Sample records for mass number half-life

  1. Conversion of experimental half-life to effective electron neutrino mass in 0nubetabeta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolnikov, Anatoly; Grabmayr, Peter [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia, and Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) collaboration will be searching for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. As a result it will measure the half-life T{sub 1/2} of this rare process; or at least a new value for the lower limit for T{sub 1/2} will be derived. The sensitivity of the GERDA experiment on the effective electron neutrino mass depends on the theoretical value for the nuclear matrix element M and the kinematical phase space factor G.In this Brief Report we focus on existing difficulties in applying the dimensionless values of M calculated by various theoretical groups, which use different methods and parametrizations. The implicit radius dependencies in M and G are discussed. Resulting values of the neutrino mass are tabulated for various representative half-lives T{sub 1/2} representing the sensitivity of the various phases of the GERDA experiment.

  2. Half-life of {sup 151}Sm remeasured

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Ming; Shen Hongtao; Shi Guozhu; Yin Xinyi; Tian Weizhi; Jiang Shan [Department of Nuclear Physics, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Post Office Box 275-50, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The half-life of {sup 151}Sm was redetermined and compared with literature values. A {sup 151}Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} sample was produced by exposing {sup 150}Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the high neutron flux of the heavy water research reactor at the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The number of atoms and the activity of {sup 151}Sm in the sample were measured by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and liquid scintillation counting (LSC), respectively. The half-life of {sup 151}Sm determined in this work is 96.6 yr, with a standard uncertainty of 2.4 yr based on a quadratic summation of the uncertainty components from the measurements of the number of atoms and the activity of {sup 151}Sm.

  3. Half-Life of $^{14}$O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. T. Burke; P. A. Vetter; S. J. Freedman; B. K. Fujikawa; W. T. Winter

    2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the half-life of $^{14}$O, a superallowed $(0^{+} \\to 0^{+})$ $\\beta$ decay isotope. The $^{14}$O was produced by the $^{12}$C($^{3}$He,n)$^{14}$O reaction using a carbon aerogel target. A low-energy ion beam of $^{14}$O was mass separated and implanted in a thin beryllium foil. The beta particles were counted with plastic scintillator detectors. We find $t_{1/2} = 70.696\\pm 0.052$ s. This result is $1.5\\sigma$ higher than an average value from six earlier experiments, but agrees more closely with the most recent previous measurement.

  4. Half-life Limit of 19Mg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Frank; T. Baumann; D. Bazin; R. R. C. Clement; M. W. Cooper; P. Heckman; W. A. Peters; A. Stolz; M. Thoennessen; M. S. Wallace

    2003-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for 19Mg was performed using projectile fragmentation of a 150 MeV/nucleon 36Ar beam. No events of 19Mg were observed. From the time-of-flight through the fragment separator an upper limit of 22 ns for the half-life of 19Mg was established.

  5. EFFECTIVE DOSIMETRIC HALF LIFE OF CESIUM 137 SOIL CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P; Michael Paller, M

    2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early 1960s, an area of privately-owned swamp adjacent to the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS), known as Creek Plantation, was contaminated by site operations. Studies conducted in 1974 estimated that approximately 925 GBq of {sup 137}Cs was deposited in the swamp. Subsequently, a series of surveys--composed of 52 monitoring locations--was initiated to characterize and trend the contaminated environment. The annual, potential, maximum doses to a hypothetical hunter were estimated by conservatively using the maximum {sup 137}Cs concentrations measured in the soil. The purpose of this report is to calculate an 'effective dosimetric' half-life for {sup 137}Cs in soil (based on the maximum concentrations) and compare it to the effective environmental half-life (based on the geometric mean concentrations).

  6. Can Environmental Factors Affect Half-Life in Beta-Decay? An Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodwin, John 1953-

    2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of the decaying radioactive nuclide, and even the distance between Earth and the Sun at the time of the half-life measurement. In this study we present evidence that the initial beliefs in the immutability of radioactive half-life (with the exception of a few...

  7. Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro...

  8. Measurement of the Double Beta Decay Half-life of 150-Nd and Search for Neutrinoless Decay Modes with the NEMO-3 Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The NEMO Collaboration; J. Argyriades

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The half-life for double beta decay of 150-Nd has been measured by the NEMO-3 experiment at the Modane Underground Laboratory. Using 924.7 days of data recorded with 36.55 g of 150-Nd the half-life for 2nubb decay is measured to be T_1/2^2nu = (9.11+0.25_-0.22}(stat.) +- 0.63 (syst.)) x 10^18 years. The observed limit on the half-life for neutrinoless double beta decay is found to be T_1/2^{0nu} > 1.8 x 10^22 years at 90 % Confidence Level. This translates into a limit on the effective Majorana neutrino mass of neutrino}><4.0-6.3 eV if the nuclear deformation is taken into account. We also set limits on models involving Majoron emission, right-handed currents and transitions to excited states.

  9. Measurement of the two neutrino double beta decay half-life of Zr-96 and search for associated neutrinoless processes with the NEMO-3 detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argyriades, J; Augier, C; Baker, J; Barabash, A S; Bongrand, M; Broudin-Bay, G; Brudanin, V B; Caffrey, A J; Chapon, A; Chauveau, E; Daraktchieva, Z; Durand, D; Egorov, V G; Fatemi-Ghomi, N; Flack, R; Freshville, A; Guillon, B; Hubert, Ph; Jullian, S; Kauer, M; King, S; Kochetov, O I; Konovalov, S I; Kovalenko, V E; Lalanne, D; Lang, K; Lemiere, Y; Lutter, G; Mamedov, F; Marquet, Ch; Martín-Albo, J; Mauger, F; Nachab, A; Nasteva, I; Nemchenok, I B; Nova, F; Novella, P; Ohsumi, H; Pahlka, R B; Perrot, F; Piquemal, F; Reyss, J L; Ricol, J S; Saakyan, R; Sarazin, X; Simard, L; Shitov, Yu A; Smolnikov, A A; Snow, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Stekl, I; Sutton, C S; Szklarz, G; Thomas, J; Timkin, V V; Tretyak, V I; Tretyak, Vl I; Umatov, V I; Vàla, L; Vanyushin, I A; Vasiliev, V A; Vorobel, V; Vylov, Ts

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 1221 days of data from the NEMO-3 detector, the measurement of Zr-96 2vbb decay half-life is [2.35 +/- 0.14(stat) +/- 0.19(syst)] x 10^19 yr. Different characteristics of the final state electrons have been studied, such as the energy sum, individual electron energy, and angular distribution. The 2v nuclear matrix element is extracted using the measured 2vbb half-life and is 0.049 +/- 0.003. A 90% CL limit is set on the 0vbb decay half-life of > 9.2 x 10^21 yr corresponding to a limit on the effective Majorana neutrino mass < 7.2 - 19.5 eV. Limits on other mechanisms of 0vbb decay have also been set.

  10. The 198Au beta-half-life in the metal Au revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Fortak; R. Kunz; L. Gialanella; H. -W. Becker; J. Meijer; F. Strieder

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The half-life of the beta-decay of 198Au has been measured for room temperature and 12 K. The resulting values of T(RT) = 2.684 +- 0.004 d and T(12 K) = 2.687 +- 0.005 d agree well within statistical uncertainties. An evidence for a temperature dependence of the half-life was not observed.

  11. Measurement of the {sup 44}Ti half-life and its significance for supernova.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P.; Kutschera, W.; Paul, M.

    1999-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998, we reported the three-laboratory measurement of the {sup 44}Ti half-life which was determined relative to the well known value (5.2714 {+-} 0.0005 yr) of the {sup 60}Co half-life. We have continued the measurement at Argonne and Jerusalem and inclusion of data points for additional two years does not change our published value of 59.0 {+-} 0.6 yr.

  12. Measurement of the {sup 214}Po half-life by the DEVIS track setup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belov, V. A.; Brakhman, E. V.; Zeldovich, O. Ya.; Karelin, A. K.; Kirichenko, V. V.; Kobyakin, A. S., E-mail: Alexander.Kobyakin@itep.ru; Kozodaeva, O. M.; Kuchenkov, A. V.; Tsvetkova, T. N. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of the {sup 214}Po half-life with the DEVIS track setup at the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP, Moscow) by means of a procedure based on determining lifetimes of individual nuclei is described. The value obtained for the {sup 214}Po half-life is 163.8 {+-} 3.0 Micro-Sign s. The possibility of reaching the accuracy of the measurements that is required for testing the statement that the decay of some nuclei has a nonexponential character and the source intensity necessary for this are discussed.

  13. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (26)Si

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Banu, A.; Chen, L.; Golovko, V. V.; Goodwin, J.; Horvat, V.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the half-life of the superallowed 0(+) -> 0(+) beta(+) emitter (26)Si to be 2245.3(7) ms. We used pure sources of (26)Si and employed a high-efficiency gas counter, whichwas sensitive to positrons from both this nuclide and its daughter...

  14. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (26)Si 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Banu, A.; Chen, L.; Golovko, V. V.; Goodwin, J.; Horvat, V.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the half-life of the superallowed 0(+) -> 0(+) beta(+) emitter (26)Si to be 2245.3(7) ms. We used pure sources of (26)Si and employed a high-efficiency gas counter, whichwas sensitive to positrons from both this nuclide and its daughter...

  15. Half-life and gamma abundance ratio measurements of Sm-153

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friese, Judah I.; Payne, Rosara F.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Garofoli, Stephanie J.

    2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of the decay of 153Sm was observed by gamma spectrometry, liquid scintillation counting and gas proportional counting in an attempt to confirm the half life and gamma abundance ratios for this isotope. Recent changes in the published nuclear decay data indicate that historical literature values may be biased. The 153Sm was made by the neutron activation of ultrapure isotopically enriched 152Sm to create 153Sm. The decay measurements were made over a three week period and no other isotopes were detected during this time. The gamma abundance ratio for the 103 keV gamma was measured to be (27.9%) which is 4% lower than the published data. In addition, the half life was 1.9308 days, which is 0.34% lower than the published data.

  16. Measurement of the double-{beta} decay half-life of {sup 150}Nd and search for neutrinoless decay modes with the NEMO-3 detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argyriades, J.; Augier, C.; Bongrand, M.; Jullian, S.; Lalanne, D.; Sarazin, X.; Simard, L.; Szklarz, G. [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud 11, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Arnold, R. [IPHC, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Baker, J.; Caffrey, A. J. [INL, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States); Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Umatov, V.; Vanyushin, I. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, RU-117259 Moscow (Russian Federation); Basharina-Freshville, A.; Daraktchieva, Z.; Flack, R.; Kauer, M.; King, S. [University College London, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The half-life for double-{beta} decay of {sup 150}Nd has been measured by the NEMO-3 experiment at the Modane Underground Laboratory. Using 924.7 days of data recorded with 36.55 g of {sup 150}Nd, we measured the half-life for 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay to be T{sub 1/2}{sup 2{nu}}=(9.11{sub -0.22}{sup +0.25}(stat.){+-}0.63(syst.))x10{sup 18} yr. The observed limit on the half-life for neutrinoless double-{beta} decay is found to be T{sub 1/2}{sup 0{nu}}>1.8x10{sup 22} yr at 90% confidence level. This translates into a limit on the effective Majorana neutrino mass of <4.0-6.3 eV if the nuclear deformation is taken into account. We also set limits on models involving Majoron emission, right-handed currents, and transitions to excited states.

  17. EFFECTIVE HALF-LIFE OF CESIUM-137 IN VARIOUS ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T.; Paller, M.; Baker, R.

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    During the operational history of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released from site facilities into the SRS environment. However, only a relatively small number of pathways, most importantly {sup 137}Cs in fish and deer, have contributed significantly to doses and risks to the public. The “effective” half-lives (T{sub e}) of {sup 137}Cs (which include both physical decay and environmental dispersion) in Savannah River floodplain soil and vegetation and in fish and white-tailed deer from the SRS were estimated using long-term monitoring data. For 1974–2011, the T{sub e}s of {sup 137}Cs in Savannah River floodplain soil and vegetation were 17.0 years (95% CI = 14.2–19.9) and 13.4 years (95% CI = 10.8–16.0), respectively. These T{sub e}s were greater than in a previous study that used data collected only through 2005 as a likely result of changes in the flood regime of the Savannah River. Field analyses of {sup 137}Cs concentrations in deer collected during yearly controlled hunts at the SRS indicated an overall T{sub e} of 15.9 years (95% CI = 12.3–19.6) for 1965–2011; however, the T{sub e} for 1990–2011 was significantly shorter (11.8 years, 95% CI = 4.8–18.8) due to an increase in the rate of {sup 137}Cs removal. The shortest T{sub e}s were for fish in SRS streams and the Savannah River (3.5–9.0 years), where dilution and dispersal resulted in rapid {sup 137}Cs removal. Long-term data show that T{sub e}s are significantly shorter than the physical half-life of {sup 137}Cs in the SRS environment but that they can change over time. Therefore, it is desirable have a long period of record for calculating Tes and risky to extrapolate T{sub e}s beyond this period unless the processes governing {sup 137}Cs removal are clearly understood.

  18. Precise half-life measurements for the superallowed beta(+) emitters Ar-34 and Cl-34

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Brinkley, J. F.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Mayes, V. E.; Nica, N.; Sanchez-Vega, M.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C 74, 055502 (2006) Precise half-life measurements for the superallowed ?+ emitters 34Ar and 34Cl V. E. Iacob,* J. C. Hardy, J. F. Brinkley, C. A. Gagliardi, V. E. Mayes, N. Nica, M. Sanchez-Vega, G. Tabacaru, L. Trache, and R. E... 15, 17 (2002). [5] J. C. Hardy et al., Nucl. Phys. A223, 157 (1974). 055502-7 V. E. IACOB et al. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 74, 055502 (2006) [6] V. E. Iacob, E. Mayes, J. C. Hardy, R. G. Neilson, M. Sanchez- Vega, A. Azhari, C. A. Gagliardi, L. Trache...

  19. Mass-induced transition in fermion number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aragao de Carvalho, C.; Pureza, J. M.

    1989-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that if we increase the mass of fermions in interaction with a topological (kink) scalar background in 1+1 dimensions, the fractional fermion number of the system will eventually vanish. The transition is sharp and corresponds to the disappearance of localized states from the spectrum of a Dirac operator which is exactly solvable. Possible applications to different physical systems are discussed.

  20. Precision Measurement of the 6He Half-Life and the Weak Axial Current in Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Knecht; R. Hong; D. W. Zumwalt; B. G. Delbridge; A. Garcia; P. Mueller; H. E. Swanson; I. S. Towner; S. Utsuno; W. Williams; C. Wrede

    2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of 6He beta decay along with tritium can play an important role in testing ab-initio nuclear wave-function calculations and may allow for fixing low-energy constants in effective field theories. Here, we present an improved determination of the 6He half-life to a relative precision of 3x10^(-4). Our value of 806.89 \\pm 0.11(stat)^{+0.23}_{-0.19}(syst) ms resolves a major discrepancy between previous measurements. Calculating the statistical rate function we determined the ft-value to be 803.04 ^{+0.26}_{-0.23} s. The extracted Gamow-Teller matrix element agrees within a few percent with ab-initio calculations.

  1. Measurement of the Double Beta Decay Half-life of 130Te with the NEMO-3 Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, R; Baker, J; Barabash, A S; Basharina-Freshville, A; Blondel, S; Bongrand, M; Broudin-Bay, G; Brudanin, V; Caffrey, A J; Chapon, A; Chauveau, E; Durand, D; Egorov, V; Flack, R; Garrido, X; Grozier, J; Guillon, B; Hubert, Ph; Jackson, C M; Jullian, S; Kauer, M; Klimenko, A; Kochetov, O; Konovalov, S I; Kovalenko, V; Lalanne, D; Lamhamdi, T; Lang, K; Liptak, Z; Lutter, G; Mamedov, F; Marquet, Ch; Martin-Albo, J; Mauger, F; Mott, J; Nachab, A; Nemchenok, I; Nguyen, C H; Nova, F; Novella, P; Ohsumi, H; Pahlka, R B; Perrot, F; Piquemal, F; Reyss, J L; Richards, B; Ricol, J S; Saakyan, R; Sarazin, X; Shitov, Yu; Simard, L; Šimkovic, F; Smolnikov, A; Söldner-Rembold, S; Štekl, I; Suhonen, J; Sutton, C S; Szklarz, G; Thomas, J; Timkin, V; Torre, S; Tretyak, V I; Umatov, V; Vála, L; Vanyushin, I; Vasiliev, V; Vorobel, V; Vylov, T; Zukauskas, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter reports results from the NEMO-3 experiment based on an exposure of 1275 days with 661g of 130Te in the form of enriched and natural tellurium foils. With this data set the double beta decay rate of 130Te is found to be non-zero with a significance of 7.7 standard deviations and the half-life is measured to be T1/2 = (7.0 +/- 0.9(stat) +/- 1.1(syst)) x 10^{20} yr. This represents the most precise measurement of this half-life yet published and the first real-time observation of this decay.

  2. Precise measurement of the 222Rn half-life: a probe to monitor the stability of radioactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bellotti; C. Broggini; G. Di Carlo; M. Laubenstein; R. Menegazzo

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We give the results of a study on the 222Rn decay we performed in the Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS) by detecting the gamma rays from the radon progeny. The motivation was to monitor the stability of radioactivity measuring several times per year the half-life of a short lifetime (days) source instead of measuring over a long period the activity of a long lifetime (tens or hundreds of years) source. In particular, we give the reason of the large periodical fluctuations in the count rate of the gamma rays due to radon inside a closed canister which has been described in literature and which has been attributed to a possible influence of a component in the solar irradiation affecting the nuclear decay rates. We then provide the result of four half-life measurements we performed underground at LNGS in the period from May 2014 to January 2015 with radon diffused into olive oil. Briefly, we did not measure any change of the 222Rn half-life with a 8*10^-5 precision. Finally, we provide the most precise value for the 222Rn half-life: 3.82146(16){stat}(4){syst} days.

  3. Measurement of the double beta decay half-life of Nd-150 and search for neutrinoless decay modes with the NEMO-3 detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasim Fatemi-Ghomi

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The half-life for two-neutrino double beta decay of Nd-150 has been measured with data taken by the NEMO 3 experiment at the Modane Underground Laboratory. The limits are also set on the half-life of different neutrinoless double beta decay of this isotope.

  4. Measurement of the Double-Beta Decay Half-life of {sup 136}Xe in KamLAND-Zen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KamLAND-Zen Collaboration; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hanakago, H.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kato, R.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Nakada, T.; Nakamura, K.; Obata, A.; Oki, A.; Ono, Y.; Shimizu, I.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yamada, S.; Yoshida, H.; Kozlov, A.; Yoshida, S.; Banks, T. I.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Han, K.; O'Donnell, T.; Berger, B. E.; Efremenko, Y.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M. P.

    2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from the KamLAND-Zen double-beta decay experiment based on an exposure of 77.6 days with 129 kg of {sup 136}Xe. The measured two-neutrino double-beta decay half-life of {sup 136}Xe is T{sup 2{nu}}{sub 1/2} = 2:38 {+-}#6; 0:02(stat)#6;{+-}0.14(syst)#2;x10{sup 21} yr, consistent with a recent measurement by EXO-200. We also obtain a lower limit for the neutrinoless double-beta decay half-life, T{sup 0{nu}}{sub 1/2} > 5.7 x#2; 10{sup 24} yr at 90% C.L.

  5. Precise measurement of the 222Rn half-life: a probe to monitor the stability of radioactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellotti, E; Di Carlo, G; Laubenstein, M; Menegazzo, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give the results of a study on the 222Rn decay we performed in the Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS) by detecting the gamma rays from the radon progeny. The motivation was to monitor the stability of radioactivity measuring several times per year the half-life of a short lifetime (days) source instead of measuring over a long period the activity of a long lifetime (tens or hundreds of years) source. In particular, we give the reason of the large periodical fluctuations in the count rate of the gamma rays due to radon inside a closed canister which has been described in literature and which has been attributed to a possible influence of a component in the solar irradiation affecting the nuclear decay rates. We then provide the result of four half-life measurements we performed underground at LNGS in the period from May 2014 to January 2015 with radon diffused into olive oil. Briefly, we did not measure any change of the 222Rn half-life with a 8*10^-5 precision. Finally, we provide the most precise value for the ...

  6. Half-life measurements of isomeric states populated in projectile fragmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowry, M.; Podolay, Zs. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The half-lives of excited isomeric states observed in {sup 195}Au, {sup 201}Tl and {sup 215}Rn are reported for the first time. Delayed {gamma}-rays were correlated with nuclei produced in the projectile fragmentation of relativistic {sup 238}U ions, unambiguously identified in terms of their atomic number (Z) and mass-to-charge ratio (A/Q) after traversing an in-flight separator. The observation of a long-lived isomeric state in {sup 195}Au with t{sub 1/2} = 16{sub -4}{sup +8}{mu}s is presented. Two shorter-lived isomeric states were detected in {sup 201}Tl and {sup 215}Rn with t{sub 1/2} = 95{sub -21}{sup +39} and 57{sub -12}{sup +21} ns respectively. In total 24 isomeric states were identified in different nuclei from Pt to Rn (A {approx} 200) during the current study, the majority of which were previously reported. The wealth of spectroscopic data provides the opportunity to determine the isomeric ratios over a wide range of Z, A and angular momentum (I h) of the reaction products. In particular, high-spin states with I Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 18 h provide a robust test of theoretical models of fragmentation.

  7. Measurement of the half-life of 198Au in a non-metal: High-precision measurement shows no host-material dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Goodwin; N. Nica; V. E. Iacob; A. Dibidad; J. C. Hardy

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the half-life of the beta decay of 198Au to be 2.6948(9) d, with the nuclide sited in an insulating environment. Comparing this result with the half-life we measured previously with a metallic environment, we find the half-lives in both environments to be the same within 0.04%, thus contradicting a prediction that screening from a "plasma" of quasi-free electrons in a metal increases the half-life by as much as 7%.

  8. Universal neutrino mass hierarchy and cosmological baryon number asymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing Zhizhong [CCAST (World Laboratory), P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918 (4), Beijing 100039 (China)

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We conjecture that three light Majorana neutrinos and their right-handed counterparts may have a universal geometric mass hierarchy. Incorporating this phenomenological conjecture with the Fritzsch texture of lepton mass matrices in a simple seesaw mechanism, we show that it is possible to simultaneously account for current neutrino oscillation data and the cosmological baryon number asymmetry via leptogenesis.

  9. Maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Th. Maschberger; C. J. Clarke

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have made a new compilation of observations of maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number from the literature, which we analyse for consistency with the predictions of a simple random drawing hypothesis for stellar mass selection in clusters. Previously, Weidner and Kroupa have suggested that the maximum stellar mass is lower, in low mass clusters, than would be expected on the basis of random drawing, and have pointed out that this could have important implications for steepening the integrated initial mass function of the Galaxy (the IGIMF) at high masses. Our compilation demonstrates how the observed distribution in the plane of maximum stellar mass versus membership number is affected by the method of target selection; in particular, rather low n clusters with large maximum stellar masses are abundant in observational datasets that specifically seek clusters in the environs of high mass stars. Although we do not consider our compilation to be either complete or unbiased, we discuss the method by which such data should be statistically analysed. Our very provisional conclusion is that the data is not indicating any striking deviation from the expectations of random drawing.

  10. Quark Number Susceptibility with Finite Quark Mass in Holographic QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyung-il Kim; Youngman Kim; Shingo Takeuchi; Takuya Tsukioka

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of a finite quark mass on the quark number susceptibility in the framework of holographic QCD. We work in a bottom-up model with a deformed AdS black hole and D3/D7 model to calculate the quark number susceptibility at finite temperature with/without a finite quark chemical potential. As expected the finite quark mass suppresses the quark number susceptibility. We find that at high temperatures $T\\ge 600$ MeV the quark number susceptibility of light quarks and heavy quarks are almost equal in the bottom-up model. This indicates that the heavy quark like charm contribution to thermodynamics of a QCD-like system may start to become significant at temperatures $T\\sim 600$ MeV. In D3/D7 model, we focus on the competition between the quark chemical potential, which enhances the quark number susceptibility, and the quark mass that suppresses the susceptibility. We observe that depending on the relative values of the quark mass and the quark chemical potential, the quark number susceptibility shows a diverging or converging behavior. We also calculate the chiral susceptibility in D3/D7 model to support the observation made with the quark number susceptibility.

  11. Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

    2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

  12. Determination of the half-life of the ground state of {sup 229}Th by using {sup 232}U and {sup 233}U decay series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kikunaga, H. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, T.; Nomura, M. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Mitsugashira, T. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Shinohara, A. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The half-life of the ground state of {sup 229}Th ({sup 229}Th{sup g}) has become an important factor in nuclear technology, for example, in the geological disposal of nuclear spent fuel. However, the values reported in two previous studies are not in agreement. This study reevaluates the half-life of {sup 229}Th{sup g} by using a simple and reliable method. The {sup 232}U/{sup 233}U activity ratio of a {sup 232,233}U sample was measured by high-resolution {alpha}-particle spectrometry. Next, the {sup 228}Th/{sup 229}Th{sup g} activity ratio of the Th sample, which was grown from the {sup 232,233}U sample, was also measured. The half-life of {sup 229}Th{sup g} was calculated from these activity ratios, the growth time, and the half-lives of {sup 232}U, {sup 233}U, and {sup 228}Th. From the results of these five measurements, the half-life of {sup 229}Th{sup g} is determined to be 7932 {+-} 55 yr at a confidence level of 2{sigma}.

  13. Ecological half-life of 137Cs in fish from a stream contaminated by nuclear reactor effluents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peles, J. [Pennsylvania State University, McKeesport; BryanJr, A. [Savannah River Ecology Lab; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ribble, D. [Trinity University; Smith, M. [Savannah River Ecology Lab

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiocesium ({sup 137}Cs) concentrations were determined during 1974, 1981 and 1998 for seven species of fish inhabiting a stream (Steel Creek) contaminated by effluents from a nuclear reactor to examine the decline of this radionuclide in a natural ecosystem. Median {sup 137}Cs concentrations were highest in Micropterus salmoides (largemouth bass) during each year of the investigation (1974 = 6.67 Bq g{sup -1} dry wt. of whole body; 1981 = 3.72 Bq g{sup -1}; 1998 = 0.35 Bq g{sup -1}), but no patterns of differences were observed among Aphredoderus sayanus (pirate perch), Esox americanus (redfin pickerel), Lepomis auritus (redbreast sunfish), L. gulosus (warmouth), L. punctatus (spotted sunfish), and Notropis cummingsae (dusky shiner). Results demonstrated a rapid decline in {sup 137}Cs within fish from Steel Creek during the 24-year period. For example, {sup 137}Cs concentrations in all fish species declined significantly among years, even after accounting for radioactive decay. The observed percent declines in {sup 137}Cs concentrations of individual species were 3-4 times greater between 1974 and 1981 compared to that expected by physical decay alone, and 2-3 times greater during 1981-1998. Ecological half-lives (EHLs) of {sup 137}Cs in fish ranged from 4.43 years in A. sayanus to 6.53 years in L. gulosus. The EHL for {sup 137}Cs in all fish species combined was 5.54 years. Current levels of {sup 137}Cs in fish from Steel Creek (1.16 Bq g{sup -1} dry wt. of whole body to below detection limits) indicate that the consumption of fish from this ecosystem poses little risk to humans and sensitive wildlife species. These results demonstrate the importance of incorporating the concept of ecological half-life into determinations concerning the length and severity of potential risks associated with radiocontaminants.

  14. atomic mass number: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  15. Altered solar wind -magnetosphere interaction at low Mach numbers: coronal mass ejections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Altered solar wind - magnetosphere interaction at low Mach numbers: coronal mass ejections Benoit fundamental alterations of the solar wind ­ magnetosphere interaction that occur during low Mach number solar wind. We first show that low Mach number solar wind conditions are often characteristic of coronal mass

  16. Fine scale modeling of wintertime aerosol mass, number, and size distributions in central California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    Fine scale modeling of wintertime aerosol mass, number, and size distributions in central with the observed PM number and size distributions (with an NMB of -13.9%), indicating the importance of coagulation scale modeling of wintertime aerosol mass, number, and size distributions in central California, J

  17. nature biotechnology volume 27 number 12 december 2009 1 half-life for indications when an extended residence time in the cir-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    and can complicate tight control over plasma Focus on synthetic biology This issue of Nature Biotechnology

  18. MASS TRANSFER CONTROLLED REACTIONS IN PACKED BEDS AT LOW REYNOLDS NUMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedkiw, Peter S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase Mass Transfer 'in Fixed Beds at Low Reynolds Numbers,"Systems - In Particular in· Fixed Beds, Fluidized Beds andto a Sphere in a Fixed and Fluidized Bed," AIChE I. , Neale,

  19. Mass Spectrum and Number of Light Neutrinos: An Attempt of the Gauge Explanation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyatlov, I T

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Symplectic flavour symmetry group Sp(n/2) (n is even) of n Majorana states does not allow for invariant Majorana masses. Only specific mass matrices with diagonal and nondiagonal elements are possible here. As a result of the spontaneous violation of flavour and chiral symmetries, a mass matrix could appear only for the number of flavours n = 6 and only together with R,L-symmetry violation (i.e., parity violation). The see-saw mechanism produces here three light and three heavy Dirac particles (neutrinos). The peculiarity of the observed light neutrino spectrum: two states located far from the third one, can be explained by certain simple properties of mass matrices appearing in Sp(3). The ordering of the states corresponds to normal mass hierarchy. Situation, when neutrino mass differences are significantly less than masses themselves, appears to be unrealizable here. Mixing angles for neutrinos can not be determined without understanding formation mechanisms for charged lepton spectrum and Majorana state we...

  20. Mass Spectrum and Number of Light Neutrinos: An Attempt of the Gauge Explanation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. T. Dyatlov

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Symplectic flavour symmetry group Sp(n/2) (n is even) of n Majorana states does not allow for invariant Majorana masses. Only specific mass matrices with diagonal and nondiagonal elements are possible here. As a result of the spontaneous violation of flavour and chiral symmetries, a mass matrix could appear only for the number of flavours n = 6 and only together with R,L-symmetry violation (i.e., parity violation). The see-saw mechanism produces here three light and three heavy Dirac particles (neutrinos). The peculiarity of the observed light neutrino spectrum: two states located far from the third one, can be explained by certain simple properties of mass matrices appearing in Sp(3). The ordering of the states corresponds to normal mass hierarchy. Situation, when neutrino mass differences are significantly less than masses themselves, appears to be unrealizable here. Mixing angles for neutrinos can not be determined without understanding formation mechanisms for charged lepton spectrum and Majorana state weak currents.

  1. CPT and lepton number violation in neutrino sector: Modified mass matrix and oscillation due to gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monika Sinha; Banibrata Mukhopadhyay

    2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the consequences of CPT and lepton number violation in neutrino sector. For CPT violation we take gravity with which neutrino and antineutrino couple differently. Gravity mixes neutrino and antineutrino in an unequal ratio to give two mass eigenstates. Lepton number violation interaction together with CPT violation gives rise to neutrino-antineutrino oscillation. Subsequently, we study the neutrino flavor mixing and oscillation under the influence of gravity. It is found that gravity changes flavor oscillation significantly which influences the relative abundance of different flavors in present universe. We show that the neutrinoless double beta decay rate is modified due to presence of gravity- the origin of CPT violation, as the mass of the flavor state is modified.

  2. PHYSICAL REVIEW D VOLUME 53,NUMBER 1 Measurement of the mass of the T lepton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Stephen L.

    PHYSICAL REVIEW D VOLUME 53,NUMBER 1 Measurement of the mass of the T lepton 1JANUARY 1996 J. Z,4 .I. Chen,5 S. J. Chen,l S. M. Chen,l Y. Chen,' Y. B. Chen,' Y. Q. Chen,' B. S. Cheng,' R. F. Cowan,e H. C. Cu&l X. Z. Cui,' H. L. Ding,' Z. Z. Du,' W. Dunwoodie,e X. L. Fan,' J. Fang, 1 C. S. Gao,' M

  3. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  4. Laser-Based Mass Spectrometric Determination of Aggregation Numbers for Petroleum-and Coal-Derived Asphaltenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Laser-Based Mass Spectrometric Determination of Aggregation Numbers for Petroleum- and Coal: Petroleum- and coal-derived asphaltenes have been studied with three laser-based mass spectrometric-MS), in which a single laser desorbs and ionizes solid analytes from an activated surface; and laser desorption

  5. Neutrino masses and the number of neutrino species from WMAP and 2dFGRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen Hannestad

    2003-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed a thorough analysis of the constraints which can be put on neutrino parameters from cosmological observations, most notably those from the WMAP satellite and the 2dF galaxy survey. For this data we find an upper limit on the sum of active neutrino mass eigenstates of \\sum m_nu < 1.0 eV (95% conf.), but this limit is dependent on priors. We find that the WMAP and 2dF data alone cannot rule out the evidence from neutrinoless double beta decay reported by the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment. In terms of the relativistic energy density in neutrinos or other weakly interacting species we find, in units of the equivalent number of neutrino species, N_nu, that N_nu = 4.0+3.0-2.1 (95% conf.). When BBN constraints are added, the bound on N_\

  6. The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

    1950-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

  7. Nuclear structure aspects of neutrinoless {beta}{beta} decay: limits on the electron neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Civitarese, O. [Department of Physics. University of La Plata, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Suhonen, J. [Department of Physics. University of Jyvaeskyla, (Finland)

    2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss some features of the nuclear structure elements participant in the calculation of the mass sector of the half-life of the neutrinoless double beta decay, and the consequences upon the adopted limits of the electron-neutrino mass.

  8. Aspects of Neutrino Masses and Lepton-Number Violation in the light of the Super-Kamiokande data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smaragda Lola

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss aspects of neutrino masses and lepton-number violation, in the light of the observations of Super-Kamiokande. As a first step, we use the data from various experiments, in order to obtain a phenomenological understanding of neutrino mass textures. We then investigate how the required patterns of neutrino masses and mixings are related to the flavour structure of the underlying theory. In supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, renormalisation group effects can have important implications: for small tanb, bottom-tau unification indicates the presence of significant muon-tau flavour mixing. The evolution of the neutrino mixing may be described by simple semi-analytic expressions, which confirm that, for large tanb, very small mixing at the GUT scale may be amplified to maximal mixing at low energies, and vice versa. Passing to specific models, we first discuss the predictions for neutrino masses in different GUT models (including superstring-embedded solutions). Imposing the requirement for successful leptogenesis may give additional constraints on the generic structure of the neutrino mass textures. Finally, we discuss direct ways to look for lepton-number violation in ultra-high energy neutrino interactions.

  9. Mass number dependence of the Skyrme-force-induced nuclear symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Rafalski; W. Satula; R. Wyss

    2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The global mass dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy and its two basic ingredients due to the mean-level spacing and effective strength of the isovector mean-potential is studied within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model. In particular, our study determines the ratio of the surface-to-volume contributions to the nuclear symmetry energy to be ~1.6 and reveals that contributions due to mean-level spacing and effective strength of the isovector mean-potential are almost equal after removing momentum-dependent effects by rescaling them with isoscalar and isovector effective masses, respectively.

  10. Attempt at a gauge-theory-based explanation of the mass spectrum and number of light neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyatlov, I. T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The symplectic group Sp(n/2) of invariance of flavors of n Majorana states (n is even) does not admit the existence of invariant Majorana masses. Only a specific mass matrix involving diagonal and off-diagonal elements is possible. A mass matrix as a result of spontaneous flavor- and chiral-symmetry breaking may appear here only in the case where the number of flavors is n = 6 and only together with spontaneous R- and L-symmetry violation-that is, parity violation. As a result, three light and three heavy Dirac particles (neutrinos) are present if the seesaw mechanism is operative. Special features of the observed spectrum of light neutrinos-in particular, the fact that two states are far off the third one-can be explained by simple properties of the mass matrices arising in Sp(3). The arrangement of states corresponds to an ordinary mass hierarchy. The mixing angles for physical neutrinos cannot be determined without understanding the mechanisms responsible for the formation of the charged-lepton spectrum and the weak current of Majorana states.

  11. Construction of Oscillating Chemical Register Machines on Binary Numbers using Mass-Action Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinze, Thomas

    of computation for controlling continuous species concentrations enhances the applicability of both modelling of three natural numbers illustrates the practicability of the design. 1 Introduction For more than 20 lead to error-prone computations [13]. We introduce a mod- ular design principle for pure chemical

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry as a bioanalytical tool for nutritional research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is a mass spectrometric method of detecting long-lived radioisotopes without regard to their decay products or half-life. The technique is normally applied to geochronology, but recently has been developed for bioanalytical tracing. AMS detects isotope concentrations to parts per quadrillion, quantifying labeled biochemicals to attomole levels in milligram- sized samples. Its advantages over non-isotopeic and stable isotope labeling methods are reviewed and examples of analytical integrity, sensitivity, specificity, and applicability are provided.

  13. arXiv:1109.1046v1[physics.ins-det]6Sep2011 Xenon purity analysis for EXO-200 via mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratta, Giorgio

    for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136 Xe[1]. The first such experiment, known as EXO-200, is currently double beta decay half life of 6.4 × 1025 years, equivalent to a Majorana neutrino mass of order 100 me collecting data at the WIPP facility near Carlsbad, New Mexico[2]. EXO-200 is sensitive to a neutrinoless

  14. Extracting the Mass Dependence and Quantum Numbers of Short-Range Correlated Pairs from A(e,e'p) and A(e,e'pp) Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colle, C; Cosyn, W; Korover, I; Piasetzky, E; Ryckebusch, J; Weinstein, L B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear mass dependence of the number of short-range correlated (SRC) proton-proton (pp) and proton-neutron (pn) pairs in nuclei is a sensitive probe of the dynamics of short-range pairs in the ground state of atomic nuclei. This work presents an analysis of electroinduced single-proton and two-proton knockout measurements off 12C, 27Al, 56Fe, and 208Pb in kinematics dominated by scattering off SRC pairs. The nuclear mass dependence of the observed A(e,e'pp)/12C(e,e'pp) cross-section ratios and the extracted number of pp- and pn-SRC pairs are much softer than the mass dependence of the total number of possible pairs. This is in agreement with a physical picture of SRC affecting predominantly nucleon-nucleon pairs in a nodeless relative-S state of the mean-field basis.

  15. Probing the N = 32 shell closure below the magic proton number Z = 20: Mass measurements of the exotic isotopes 52,53K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Rosenbusch; P. Ascher; D. Atanasov; C. Barbieri; D. Beck; K. Blaum; Ch. Borgmann; M. Breitenfeldt; R. B. Cakirli; A. Cipollone; S. George; F. Herfurth; M. Kowalska; S. Kreim; D. Lunney; V. Manea; P. Navrátil; D. Neidherr; L. Schweikhard; V. Somà; J. Stanja; F. Wienholtz; R. N. Wolf; K. Zuber

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently confirmed neutron-shell closure at N = 32 has been investigated for the first time below the magic proton number Z = 20 with mass measurements of the exotic isotopes 52,53K, the latter being the shortest-lived nuclide investigated at the online mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. The resulting two-neutron separation energies reveal a 3 MeV shell gap at N = 32, slightly lower than for 52Ca, highlighting the doubly-magic nature of this nuclide. Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Boguliubov and ab initio Gorkov-Green function calculations are challenged by the new measurements but reproduce qualitatively the observed shell effect.

  16. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Halo Occupation Number, Mass-to-Light Ratios and Omega(M)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; /Toronto U., Astron. Dept.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using K-band imaging for 15 of the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC1) clusters we examine the near-infrared properties of moderate-redshift (0.19 < z < 0.55) galaxy clusters. We find that the number of K-band selected cluster galaxies within R{sub 500} (the Halo Occupation Number, HON) is well-correlated with the cluster dynamical mass (M{sub 500}) and X-ray Temperature (T{sub x}); however, the intrinsic scatter in these scaling relations is 37% and 46% respectively. Comparison with clusters in the local universe shows that the HON-M{sub 500} relation does not evolve significantly between z = 0 and z {approx} 0.3. This suggests that if dark matter halos are disrupted or undergo significant tidal-stripping in high-density regions as seen in numerical simulations, the stellar mass within the halos is tightly bound, and not removed during the process. The total K-band cluster light (L{sub 200},K) and K-band selected richness (parameterized by B{sub gc,K}) are also correlated with both the cluster T{sub x} and M{sub 200}. The total (intrinsic) scatter in the L{sub 200,K}-M{sub 200} and B{sub gc,K}-M{sub 200} relations are 43%(31%) and 35%(18%) respectively and indicates that for massive clusters both L{sub 200,K} and B{sub gc,K} can predict M{sub 200} with similar accuracy as T{sub x}, L{sub x} or optical richness (B{sub gc}). Examination of the mass-to-light ratios of the clusters shows that similar to local clusters, the K-band mass-to-light ratio is an increasing function of halo mass. Using the K-band mass-to-light ratios of the clusters, we apply the Oort technique and find {Omega}{sub m,0} = 0.22 {+-} 0.02, which agrees well with recent combined concordance cosmology parameters, but, similar to previous cluster studies, is on the low-density end of preferred values.

  17. The Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay, Physics beyond the Standard Model and the Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amand Faessler

    2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutrinoless double beta Decay allows to determine the effectice Majorana electron neutrino mass. For this the following conditions have to be satisfied: (i) The neutrino must be a Majorana particle, i. e. identical to the antiparticle. (ii) The half life has to be measured. (iii)The transition matrix element must be reliably calculated. (iv) The leading mechanism must be the light Majorana neutrino exchange. The present contribution studies the accuracy with which one can calculate by different methods: (1) Quasi-Particle Random Phase Approach (QRPA), (2) the Shell Model (SM), (3) the (before the variation) angular momentum projected Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method (PHFB)and the (4) Interacting Boson Approach (IBA). In the second part we investigate how to determine experimentally the leading mechanism for the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay. Is it (a) the light Majorana neutrino exchange as one assumes to determine the effective Majorana neutrino mass, ist it the heavy left (b) or right handed (c) Majorana neutrino exchange allowed by left-right symmetric Grand Unified Theories (GUT's). Is it a mechanism due to Supersymmetry e.g. with gluino exchange and R-parity and lepton number violating terms. At the end we assume, that Klapdor et al. have indeed measured the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay(, although contested,)and that the light Majorana neutrino exchange is the leading mechanism. With our matrix elements we obtain then an effective Majorana neutrino mass of: = 0.24 [eV], exp (pm) 0.02; theor. (pm) 0.01 [eV

  18. NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number $A < 16$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi Xu; Kohji Takahashi; Stephane Goriely; Marcel Arnould; Masahisa Ohta; Hiroaki Utsunomiya

    2013-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An update of the NACRE compilation [Angulo et al., Nucl. Phys. A 656 (1999) 3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number $A<16$, of which fifteen are particle-transfer reactions and the rest radiative capture reactions. When compared with NACRE, NACRE II features in particular (1) the addition to the experimental data collected in NACRE of those reported later, preferentially in the major journals of the field by early 2013, and (2) the adoption of potential models as the primary tool for extrapolation to very low energies of astrophysical $S$-factors, with a systematic evaluation of uncertainties. As in NACRE, the rates are presented in tabular form for temperatures in the $10^{6}$ $\\simeq\\leq$ T $\\leq$ $10^{10}$ K range. Along with the 'adopted' rates, their low and high limits are provided. The new rates are available in electronic form as part of the Brussels Library (BRUSLIB) of nuclear data. The NACRE II rates also supersede the previous NACRE rates in the Nuclear Network Generator (NETGEN) for astrophysics. [http://www.astro.ulb.ac.be/databases.html.

  19. Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Weinheimer; Kai Zuber

    2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The various experiments on neutrino oscillation evidenced that neutrinos have indeed non-zero masses but cannot tell us the absolute neutrino mass scale. This scale of neutrino masses is very important for understanding the evolution and the structure formation of the universe as well as for nuclear and particle physics beyond the present Standard Model. Complementary to deducing constraints on the sum of all neutrino masses from cosmological observations two different methods to determine the neutrino mass scale in the laboratory are pursued: the search for neutrinoless double $\\beta$-decay and the direct neutrino mass search by investigating single $\\beta$-decays or electron captures. The former method is not only sensitive to neutrino masses but also probes the Majorana character of neutrinos and thus lepton number violation with high sensitivity. Currently quite a few experiments with different techniques are being constructed, commissioned or are even running, which aim for a sensitivity on the neutrino mass of {\\cal O}(100) meV. The principle methods and these experiments will be discussed in this short review.

  20. Mass, quark-number, and sqrt sNN dependence of the second andfourth flow harmonics in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleuscollisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present STAR measurements of the azimuthal anisotropyparameter v_2 for pions, kaons, protons, Lambda, bar Lambda, Xi+bar Xi,and \\Omega + bar Omega, along with v_4 for pions, kaons, protons, andLambda + bar Lambda at mid-rapidity for Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN=62.4and 200 GeV. The v_2(p_T) values for all hadron species at 62.4 GeV aresimilar to those observed in 130 and 200 GeV collisions. For observedkinematic ranges, v_2 values at 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV are as little as10 percent-15 percent larger than those in Pb+Pb collisions at sqrt s NN=17.3 GeV. At intermediate transverse momentum (p_T from 1.5-5 GeV/c),the 62.4 GeV v_2(p_T) and v_4(p_T) values are consistent with thequark-number scaling first observed at 200 GeV. A four-particle cumulantanalysis is used to assess the non-flow contributions to pions andprotons and some indications are found for a smaller non-flowcontribution to protons than pions. Baryon v_2 is larger than anti-baryonv_2 at 62.4 and 200 GeV perhaps indicating either that the initialspatial net-baryon distribution is anisotropic, that the mechanismleading to transport of baryon number from beam- to mid-rapidity enhancesv_2, or that anti-baryon and baryon annihilation is larger in thein-plane direction.

  1. Permanent Home Number: Residential Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viglas, Anastasios

    Permanent Home Number: Residential Number: Mobile: Please update my contact details. Signature nominated correspondence address as indicated below. Permanent Home Adress Residential Address Other Address (Must not be a PO Box) Residential Address (Must not be a PO Box) Other - Postal/Optional Address

  2. UNIT NUMBER:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

  3. Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bray, Lane A. (Richland, WA); Ryan, Jack L. (West Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of .sup.223 Ra and .sup.225 Ac, from a radionuclide "cow" of .sup.227 Ac or .sup.229 Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide "cow" forming an ingrown mixture; b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the "cow" from at least one radionuclide daughter; d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the "cow". In one embodiment the radionuclide "cow" is the .sup.227 Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.227 Th and the product radionuclide is the .sup.223 Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the .sup.227 Ac and retains the .sup.227 Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide "cow"is the .sup.229 Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.225 Ra and said product radionuclide is the .sup.225 Ac and the .sup.225 Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the .sup.229 Th and passes the .sup.225 Ra/Ac.

  4. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (38)K(m)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, G. C.; Boisvert, G.; Bricault, P.; Churchman, R.; Dombsky, M.; Lindner, T.; Macdonald, J. A.; Vandervoort, E.; Bishop, S.; D'Auria, J. M.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, V. E.; Leslie, J. R.; Mak, H. -B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . J. Schrewe, and K. S. Sharma, Nucl. Phys. A 405, 29 (1983). [5] A. P. Baerg, Metrologia 1, 131 (1965). [6] J. A. Cameron and B. Singh, Nucl. Data Sheets 109, 1 (2008). [7] G. T. A. Squier, W. E. Burcham, J. M. Freeman, R. J. Petty, S. D. Hoath...

  5. Method of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bray, Lane A. (Richland, WA); Ryan, Jack L. (West Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method of removing an impurity of plutonium, lead or a combination thereof from a mixture of radionuclides that contains the impurity and at least one parent radionuclide. The method has the steps of (a) insuring that the mixture is a hydrochloric acid mixture; (b) oxidizing the acidic mixture and specifically oxidizing the impurity to its highest oxidation state; and (c) passing the oxidized mixture through a chloride form anion exchange column whereupon the oxidized impurity absorbs to the chloride form anion exchange column and the 22.sup.9 Th or 2.sup.27 Ac "cow" radionuclide passes through the chloride form anion exchange column. The plutonium is removed for the purpose of obtaining other alpha emitting radionuclides in a highly purified form suitable for medical therapy. In addition to plutonium; lead, iron, cobalt, copper, uranium, and other metallic cations that form chloride anionic complexes that may be present in the mixture; are removed from the mixture on the chloride form anion exchange column.

  6. Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bray, L.A.; Ryan, J.L.

    1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of {sup 223}Ra and {sup 225}Ac, from a radionuclide ``cow`` of {sup 227}Ac or {sup 229}Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of (a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide ``cow`` forming an ingrown mixture; (b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; (c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the ``cow`` from at least one radionuclide daughter; (d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; (e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and (f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the ``cow``. In one embodiment the radionuclide ``cow`` is the {sup 227}Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a {sup 227}Th and the product radionuclide is the {sup 223}Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the {sup 227}Ac and retains the {sup 227}Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide ``cow`` is the {sup 229}Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a {sup 225}Ra and said product radionuclide is the {sup 225}Ac and the {sup 225}Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the {sup 229}Th and passes the {sup 225}Ra/Ac. 8 figs.

  7. , 227 240 . Half-life Radioactive decay Reaction with 2200 m/s neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    . 700-800 U2N3 UN2 . 1.2.5. 1.5 . , . UF4 UF6 UO2 HF . UO3 + 4HF Boils at 1 atm UF6 Black ~1427 8.95 UF4 Green 1036 1457 6.70 U4F17 Black 430 Disp. 6.94 U2F9 390 Disp. 7.06 UF5 White 348 Disp. 6.45 UF6 Colorless 64.05 56.54 5.06 UCl3 Olive green 837 1657 5.51 UCl4 Dark

  8. Global RNA Half-Life Analysis in Escherichia coli Reveals Positional Patterns of Transcript Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    Degradation Douglas W. Selinger,1,3 Rini Mukherjee Saxena,2,3 Kevin J. Cheung,1 George M. Church,1 and Carsten to study global RNA degradation in wild-type Escherichia coli MG1655. RNA chemical half-lives were measured of operons degrade, on average, more quickly than the rest of the transcript, with stability increasing

  9. Prolonged lipoprotein half-life: effect on oxidative stability and physical features of lipoprotein particles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simeral, Stephanie Bianco

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of lipoprotein density classes of VLDL, LDL, and high density lipoproteins (HDL) occur in accordance with effects observed in mammalian models of delayed LDL clearance such as the LDL-receptor knockout mouse that is also known to experience prolonged circulation...

  10. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (10)C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Golovko, V.; Goodwin, J.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and sent to a discriminator, whose output was split and processed in parallel by two separate systems, each with a different pre-set dominant nonextendable dead-time. The two data streams allowed us to test that our dead-time-corrected result... and discriminator threshold. Other special precautions were taken too. The tape- transport system is quite consistent in placing the collected source within ?3 mm of the center of the detector, but it is a mechanical device, and occasionally larger deviations...

  11. Method of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bray, L.A.; Ryan, J.L.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method of removing an impurity of plutonium, lead or a combination thereof from a mixture of radionuclides that contains the impurity and at least one parent radionuclide. The method has the steps of (a) insuring that the mixture is a hydrochloric acid mixture; (b) oxidizing the acidic mixture and specifically oxidizing the impurity to its highest oxidation state; and (c) passing the oxidized mixture through a chloride form anion exchange column whereupon the oxidized impurity absorbs to the chloride form anion exchange column and the {sup 229}Th or {sup 227}Ac ``cow`` radionuclide passes through the chloride form anion exchange column. The plutonium is removed for the purpose of obtaining other alpha emitting radionuclides in a highly purified form suitable for medical therapy. In addition to plutonium, lead, iron, cobalt, copper, uranium, and other metallic cations that form chloride anionic complexes that may be present in the mixture are removed from the mixture on the chloride form anion exchange column. 8 figs.

  12. Average and recommended half-life values for two neutrino double beta decay: Upgrade-2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barabash, A. S. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, B. Cheremushkinskaya 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    All existing positive results on two neutrino double beta decay in different nuclei were analyzed. Using the procedure recommended by the Particle Data Group, weighted average values for half-lives of {sup 48}Ca, {sup 76}Ge, {sup 82}Se, {sup 96}Zr, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 100}Mo?{sup 100}Ru (0{sub 1}{sup +}), {sup 116}Cd, {sup 130}Te, {sup 136}Xe, {sup 150}Nd, {sup 150}Nd?{sup 150}Sm (0{sub 1}{sup +}) and {sup 238}U were obtained. Existing geochemical data were analyzed and recommended values for half-lives of {sup 128}Te and {sup 130}Ba are proposed. I recommend the use of these results as the most currently reliable values for half-lives.

  13. Nuclear Masses in Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christine Weber; Klaus Blaum; Hendrik Schatz

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of N and Z and the data obtained apply to a variety of physics topics. One of the most crucial questions to be addressed in mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides is the one of understanding the processes of element formation in the Universe. To this end, accurate atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations. In this paper, a review on the latest achievements in mass spectrometry for nuclear astrophysics is given.

  14. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos LaboratoryCertified Reference6-02-01Change Number

  15. Microlens Mass Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William D. Heacox

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-parametric statistical model is constructed to directly relate The distribution of observed microlens timescales to that of the mass Function of the population from which the lenses are drawn, corrected For observational selection based on timescales and event amplifications. Explicit distributions are derived for microlensing impact parameters and maximum amplifications; both are shown to be statistically independent of all other parameters in the problem, including lens mass. The model is used to demonstrate that the narrow range of microlens timescales observed toward the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is probably not consistent with lensing by a widely distributed spheroidal population of large velocity dispersion, as expected of a dark halo; but is consistent with lensing within a rotating thick disk. Poor numerical conditioning on the statistical connection between lens masses and event timescales, and small number statistics, severely limit the mass function information obtainable from current microlensing surveys toward the LMC.

  16. CUORE and beyond: bolometric techniques to explore inverted neutrino mass hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artusa, D R; Azzolini, O; Balata, M; Banks, T I; Bari, G; Beeman, J; Bellini, F; Bersani, A; Biassoni, M; Brofferio, C; Bucci, C; Cai, X Z; Camacho, A; Canonica, L; Cao, X G; Capelli, S; Carbone, L; Cardani, L; Carrettoni, M; Casali, N; Chiesa, D; Chott, N; Clemenza, M; Copello, S; Cosmelli, C; Cremonesi, O; Creswick, R J; Dafinei, I; Dally, A; Datskov, V; De Biasi, A; Deninno, M M; Di Domizio, S; di Vacri, M L; Ejzak, L; Fang, D Q; Farach, H A; Faverzani, M; Fernandes, G; Ferri, E; Ferroni, F; Fiorini, E; Franceschi, M A; Freedman, S J; Fujikawa, B K; Giachero, A; Gironi, L; Giuliani, A; Goett, J; Gorla, P; Gotti, C; Gutierrez, T D; Haller, E E; Han, K; Heeger, K M; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Huang, H Z; Kadel, R; Kazkaz, K; Keppel, G; Kolomensky, Yu G; Li, Y L; Ligi, C; Liu, X; Ma, Y G; Maiano, C; Maino, M; Martinez, M; Maruyama, R H; Mei, Y; Moggi, N; Morganti, S; Napolitano, T; Nisi, S; Nones, C; Norman, E B; Nucciotti, A; O'Donnell, T; Orio, F; Orlandi, D; Ouellet, J L; Pallavicini, M; Palmieri, V; Pattavina, L; Pavan, M; Pedretti, M; Pessina, G; Pettinacci, V; Piperno, G; Pira, C; Pirro, S; Previtali, E; Rampazzo, V; Rosenfeld, C; Rusconi, C; Sala, E; Sangiorgio, S; Scielzo, N D; Sisti, M; Smith, A R; Taffarello, L; Tenconi, M; Terranova, F; Tian, W D; Tomei, C; Trentalange, S; Ventura, G; Vignati, M; Wang, B S; Wang, H W; Wielgus, L; Wilson, J; Winslow, L A; Wise, T; Woodcraft, A; Zanotti, L; Zarra, C; Zhu, B X; Zucchelli, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{130}$Te. With 741 kg of TeO$_2$ crystals and an excellent energy resolution of 5 keV (0.2%) at the region of interest, CUORE will be one of the most competitive neutrinoless double beta decay experiments on the horizon. With five years of live time, CUORE projected neutrinoless double beta decay half-life sensitivity is $1.6\\times 10^{26}$ y at $1\\sigma$ ($9.5\\times10^{25}$ y at the 90% confidence level), which corresponds to an upper limit on the effective Majorana mass in the range 40--100 meV (50--130 meV). Further background rejection with auxiliary light detector can significantly improve the search sensitivity and competitiveness of bolometric detectors to fully explore the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy with $^{130}$Te and possibly other double beta decay candidate nuclei.

  17. CUORE and beyond: bolometric techniques to explore inverted neutrino mass hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. R. Artusa; F. T. Avignone III; O. Azzolini; M. Balata; T. I. Banks; G. Bari; J. Beeman; F. Bellini; A. Bersani; M. Biassoni; C. Brofferio; C. Bucci; X. Z. Cai; A. Camacho; L. Canonica; X. G. Cao; S. Capelli; L. Carbone; L. Cardani; M. Carrettoni; N. Casali; D. Chiesa; N. Chott; M. Clemenza; S. Copello; C. Cosmelli; O. Cremonesi; R. J. Creswick; I. Dafinei; A. Dally; V. Datskov; A. De Biasi; M. M. Deninno; S. Di Domizio; M. L. di Vacri; L. Ejzak; D. Q. Fang; H. A. Farach; M. Faverzani; G. Fernandes; E. Ferri; F. Ferroni; E. Fiorini; M. A. Franceschi; S. J. Freedman; B. K. Fujikawa; A. Giachero; L. Gironi; A. Giuliani; J. Goett; P. Gorla; C. Gotti; T. D. Gutierrez; E. E. Haller; K. Han; K. M. Heeger; R. Hennings-Yeomans; H. Z. Huang; R. Kadel; K. Kazkaz; G. Keppel; Yu. G. Kolomensky; Y. L. Li; C. Ligi; X. Liu; Y. G. Ma; C. Maiano; M. Maino; M. Martinez; R. H. Maruyama; Y. Mei; N. Moggi; S. Morganti; T. Napolitano; S. Nisi; C. Nones; E. B. Norman; A. Nucciotti; T. O'Donnell; F. Orio; D. Orlandi; J. L. Ouellet; M. Pallavicini; V. Palmieri; L. Pattavina; M. Pavan; M. Pedretti; G. Pessina; V. Pettinacci; G. Piperno; C. Pira; S. Pirro; E. Previtali; V. Rampazzo; C. Rosenfeld; C. Rusconi; E. Sala; S. Sangiorgio; N. D. Scielzo; M. Sisti; A. R. Smith; L. Taffarello; M. Tenconi; F. Terranova; W. D. Tian; C. Tomei; S. Trentalange; G. Ventura; M. Vignati; B. S. Wang; H. W. Wang; L. Wielgus; J. Wilson; L. A. Winslow; T. Wise; A. Woodcraft; L. Zanotti; C. Zarra; B. X. Zhu; S. Zucchelli

    2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{130}$Te. With 741 kg of TeO$_2$ crystals and an excellent energy resolution of 5 keV (0.2%) at the region of interest, CUORE will be one of the most competitive neutrinoless double beta decay experiments on the horizon. With five years of live time, CUORE projected neutrinoless double beta decay half-life sensitivity is $1.6\\times 10^{26}$ y at $1\\sigma$ ($9.5\\times10^{25}$ y at the 90% confidence level), which corresponds to an upper limit on the effective Majorana mass in the range 40--100 meV (50--130 meV). Further background rejection with auxiliary light detector can significantly improve the search sensitivity and competitiveness of bolometric detectors to fully explore the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy with $^{130}$Te and possibly other double beta decay candidate nuclei.

  18. Mass of Ne-16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodward, C. J.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tanner, D. M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . E. Tribble, J. D. Cossairt, D. P. May, and R. A. Kenefick, Phys. Rev. C 16, 1835 (1977). 4E. Kashy, W. Benenson, D. Mueller, R. G. H. Robert- son, and D. R. Goosman, Phys. Rev. C 11, 1959 (1975). 5For a review of the various calculations, see Ref...PHYSICAL REVIEWER C VOLUME 27, NUMBER 1 Mass of ' Ne JANUARY 1983 C. J. Woodward, * R. E. Tribble, and D. M. Tanner Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 23 August 1982) The mass of ' Ne has been...

  19. Determination of the direct double- ? -decay Q value of Zr 96 and atomic masses of Zr 90 - 92 , 94 , 96 and Mo 92 , 94 - 98 , 100

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gulyuz, K.; Ariche, J.; Bollen, G.; Bustabad, S.; Eibach, M.; Izzo, C.; Novario, S. J.; Redshaw, M.; Ringle, R.; Sandler, R.; Schwarz, S.; Valverde, A. A.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental searches for neutrinoless double-? decay offer one of the best opportunities to look for physics beyond the standard model. Detecting this decay would confirm the Majorana nature of the neutrino, and a measurement of its half-life can be used to determine the absolute neutrino mass scale. Important to both tasks is an accurate knowledge of the Q value of the double-? decay. The LEBIT Penning trap mass spectrometer was used for the first direct experimental determination of the ??Zr double-? decay Q value: Q??=3355.85(15) keV. This value is nearly 7 keV larger than the 2012 Atomic Mass Evaluation [M. Wang et al., Chin. Phys. C 36, 1603 (2012)] value and one order of magnitude more precise. The 3-? shift is primarily due to a more accurate measurement of the ??Zr atomic mass: m(??Zr)=95.90827735(17) u. Using the new Q value, the 2???-decay matrix element, |M2?|, is calculated. Improved determinations of the atomic masses of all other zirconium (90-92,94,96Zr) and molybdenum (92,94-98,100Mo) isotopes using both ¹²C? and ??Rb as references are also reported.

  20. Mass transfer andMass transfer and Mass transfer andMass transfer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    't be determined A correlation for Sherwood number (Sh) based on di i l l i b d l i Sh diff idimensional analysis for mass transfer with convection: I l f d fl d b (l b l )­ Internal forced flow: inside a tube (laminar A in fluid medium B in a flow with characteristic velocity and size characteristic d: kA = f(d, w, (= fluid

  1. Determination of the stellar (n,gamma) cross section of 40Ca with accelerator mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillmann, I; Heil, M; Käppeler, F; Wallner, A; Forstner, O; Golser, R; Kutschera, W; Priller, A; Steier, P; Mengoni, A; Gallino, R; Paul, M; Vockenhuber, C; 10.1103/PhysRevC.79.065805

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stellar (n,gamma) cross section of 40Ca at kT=25 keV has been measured with a combination of the activation technique and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This combination is required when direct off-line counting of the produced activity is compromised by the long half-life and/or missing gamma-ray transitions. The neutron activations were performed at the Karlsruhe Van de Graaff accelerator using the quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. The subsequent AMS measurements were carried out at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) with a 3 MV tandem accelerator. The doubly magic 40Ca is a bottle-neck isotope in incomplete silicon burning, and its neutron capture cross section determines the amount of leakage, thus impacting on the eventual production of iron group elements. Because of its high abundance, 40Ca can also play a secondary role as "neutron poison" for the s-process. Previous determinations of this value at stellar energies were based o...

  2. Determination of the stellar (n,gamma) cross section of 40Ca with accelerator mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Dillmann; C. Domingo-Pardo; M. Heil; F. Käppeler; A. Wallner; O. Forstner; R. Golser; W. Kutschera; A. Priller; P. Steier; A. Mengoni; R. Gallino; M. Paul; C. Vockenhuber

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stellar (n,gamma) cross section of 40Ca at kT=25 keV has been measured with a combination of the activation technique and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This combination is required when direct off-line counting of the produced activity is compromised by the long half-life and/or missing gamma-ray transitions. The neutron activations were performed at the Karlsruhe Van de Graaff accelerator using the quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. The subsequent AMS measurements were carried out at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) with a 3 MV tandem accelerator. The doubly magic 40Ca is a bottle-neck isotope in incomplete silicon burning, and its neutron capture cross section determines the amount of leakage, thus impacting on the eventual production of iron group elements. Because of its high abundance, 40Ca can also play a secondary role as "neutron poison" for the s-process. Previous determinations of this value at stellar energies were based on time-of-flight measurements. Our method uses an independent approach, and yields for the Maxwellian-averaged cross section at kT=30 keV a value of 30 keV= 5.73+/-0.34 mb.

  3. Amorphous Silicon Thin-Film Transistors with DC Saturation Current Half-Life of More than 100 Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as the time for the TFT drain current to fall by 50% under DC voltage bias in saturation, the half with either back-channel etched (BCE) or back-channel passivated (BCP) structures (Fig. 1). The BCP structure passivates the back-side of the TFT channel "in situ" at the cost of an extra mask step. The gate nitride

  4. Measurement of the Double-Beta Decay Half-life of 136Xe in KamLAND-Zen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gando, A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by fallout from the Fukushima-I reactor accident in Marchof detector materials by Fukushima fallout, which includeCo are not detected near Fukushima or our soil samples, we

  5. Galaxy Cosmological Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amanda R. Lopes; Alvaro Iribarrem; Marcelo B. Ribeiro; William R. Stoeger

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach using observational data provided by galaxy redshift surveys. Starting from the theory of Ribeiro & Stoeger (2003, arXiv:astro-ph/0304094) between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity $L$ and the average galactic mass $\\mathcal{M}_g$ are computed in terms of the redshift. $\\mathcal{M}_g$ is also alternatively estimated by a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allows us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range $0.5 light ratio and its GSMF data. Assuming ${\\mathcal{M}_{g_0}} \\approx 10^{11} \\mathcal{M}_\\odot$ as the local value of the average galactic mass, the LF approach results in $L_{B} \\propto (1+z)^{(2.40 \\pm 0.03)}$ and $\\mathcal{M}_g \\propto (1+z)^{(1.1\\pm0.2)}$. However, using the GSMF results produces $\\mathcal{M}_g \\propto (1+z)^{(-0.58 \\pm 0.22)}$. We chose the latter result as it is less biased. We then obtained the theoretical quantities of interest, such as the differential number counts, to calculate the GCMF, which can be fitted by a Schechter function. The derived GCMF follows theoretical predictions in which the less massive objects form first, being followed later by more massive ones. In the range $0.5 < z < 2.0$ the GCMF has a strong variation that can be interpreted as a higher rate of galaxy mergers or as a strong evolution in the star formation history of these galaxies.

  6. Higher-Order Mass Defect Analysis for Mass Spectra of Complex Organic Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Patrick J.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher-order mass defect analysis is introduced as a unique formula assignment and visualization method for the analysis of complex mass spectra. This approach is an extension of the concepts of Kendrick mass transformation widely used for identification of homologous compounds differing only by a number of base units (e.g., CH2, H2, O, CH2O, etc.) in complex mixtures. We present an iterative renormalization routine for defining higher order homologous series and multidimensional clustering of mass spectral features. This approach greatly simplifies visualization of complex mass spectra and increases the number of chemical formulae that can be confidently assigned for given mass accuracy. The potential for using higher-order mass defects for data reduction and visualization is shown. Higher-order mass defect analysis is described and demonstrated through third-order analysis of a de-isotoped high-resolution mass spectrum of crude oil containing nearly 13,000 peaks.

  7. Neutrino mass, lepton number, and the origin of matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    antiparticles? And many other things% Do neutrinos violate CP? #12;Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay W. Rodejohann? #12;Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay 1 sigma W. Rodejohann, 1206.2560 #12;14 F. Iachello #12;15 Regions

  8. Hyper Space Complex Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanguang Tan

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A new kind of numbers called Hyper Space Complex Numbers and its algebras are defined and proved. It is with good properties as the classic Complex Numbers, such as expressed in coordinates, triangular and exponent forms and following the associative and commutative laws of addition and multiplication. So the classic Complex Number is developed from in complex plane with two dimensions to in complex space with N dimensions and the number system is enlarged also.

  9. The neutron star mass distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiziltan, Bülent [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kottas, Athanasios; De Yoreo, Maria [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Thorsett, Stephen E., E-mail: bkiziltan@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California and UCO/Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the number of pulsars with secure mass measurements has increased to a level that allows us to probe the underlying neutron star (NS) mass distribution in detail. We critically review the radio pulsar mass measurements. For the first time, we are able to analyze a sizable population of NSs with a flexible modeling approach that can effectively accommodate a skewed underlying distribution and asymmetric measurement errors. We find that NSs that have evolved through different evolutionary paths reflect distinctive signatures through dissimilar distribution peak and mass cutoff values. NSs in double NS and NS-white dwarf (WD) systems show consistent respective peaks at 1.33 M {sub ?} and 1.55 M {sub ?}, suggesting significant mass accretion (?m ? 0.22 M {sub ?}) has occurred during the spin-up phase. The width of the mass distribution implied by double NS systems is indicative of a tight initial mass function while the inferred mass range is significantly wider for NSs that have gone through recycling. We find a mass cutoff at ?2.1 M {sub ?} for NSs with WD companions, which establishes a firm lower bound for the maximum NS mass. This rules out the majority of strange quark and soft equation of state models as viable configurations for NS matter. The lack of truncation close to the maximum mass cutoff along with the skewed nature of the inferred mass distribution both enforce the suggestion that the 2.1 M {sub ?} limit is set by evolutionary constraints rather than nuclear physics or general relativity, and the existence of rare supermassive NSs is possible.

  10. WMAPping out Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron Pierce; Hitoshi Murayama

    2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent data from from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) place important bounds on the neutrino sector. The precise determination of the baryon number in the universe puts a strong constraint on the number of relativistic species during Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis. WMAP data, when combined with the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), also directly constrain the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. These results impinge upon a neutrino oscillation interpretation of the result from the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND). We also note that the Heidelberg--Moscow evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay is only consistent with the WMAP+2dFGRS data for the largest values of the nuclear matrix element.

  11. Relativistic theory of tidal Love numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor Binnington; Eric Poisson

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In Newtonian gravitational theory, a tidal Love number relates the mass multipole moment created by tidal forces on a spherical body to the applied tidal field. The Love number is dimensionless, and it encodes information about the body's internal structure. We present a relativistic theory of Love numbers, which applies to compact bodies with strong internal gravities; the theory extends and completes a recent work by Flanagan and Hinderer, which revealed that the tidal Love number of a neutron star can be measured by Earth-based gravitational-wave detectors. We consider a spherical body deformed by an external tidal field, and provide precise and meaningful definitions for electric-type and magnetic-type Love numbers; and these are computed for polytropic equations of state. The theory applies to black holes as well, and we find that the relativistic Love numbers of a nonrotating black hole are all zero.

  12. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF SUBGIANT PLANET HOSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, James P. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High mass stars are hostile to Doppler measurements due to rotation and activity on the main-sequence, so RV searches for planets around massive stars have relied on evolved stars. A large number of planets have been found around evolved stars with M > 1.5 M{sub Sun }. To test the robustness of mass determinations, Lloyd compared mass distributions of planet hosting subgiants with distributions from integrating isochrones and concluded that it is unlikely the subgiant planet hosts are this massive, but rather that the mass inferences are systematically in error. The conclusions of Lloyd have been called in to question by Johnson et al., who show TRILEGAL-based mass distributions that disagree with the mass distributions in Lloyd, which they attribute to Malmquist bias. Johnson et al. argue that the very small spectroscopic observational uncertainties favor high masses, and there are a large number of high mass sub giants in RV surveys. However, in this Letter, it is shown that Malmquist bias does not impact the mass distributions, but the mass distribution is sensitive to Galaxy model. The relationship needed to reconcile the subgiant planet host masses with any model of the Galactic stellar population is implausible, and the conclusion of Lloyd that spectroscopic mass determinations of subgiants are likely to have been overestimated is robust.

  13. Hybrid textures in minimal seesaw mass matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srubabati Goswami; Subrata Khan; Atsushi Watanabe

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of minimal seesaw framework, we study the implications of Dirac and Majorana mass matrices in which two rigid properties coexist, namely, equalities among mass matrix elements and texture zeros. In the first part of the study, we discuss general possibilities of the Dirac and Majorana mass matrices for neutrinos with such hybrid structures. We then classify the mass matrices into realistic textures which are compatible with global neutrino oscillation data and unrealistic ones which do not comply with the data. Among the large number of general possibilities, we find that only 6 patterns are consistent with the observations at the level of the most minimal number of free parameters. These solutions have only 2 adjustable parameters, so that all the mixing angles can be described in terms of the two mass differences or pure numbers. We analyze these textures in detail and discuss their impacts for future neutrino experiments and for leptogenesis.

  14. Multispecies weighted Hurwitz numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harnad, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of hypergeometric 2D Toda $\\tau$-functions as generating functions for weighted Hurwitz numbers is extended to multispecies families. Both the enumerative geometrical significance of multispecies weighted Hurwitz numbers as weighted enumerations of branched coverings of the Riemann sphere and their combinatorial significance in terms of weighted paths in the Cayley graph of $S_n$ are derived. The particular case of multispecies quantum weighted Hurwitz numbers is studied in detail.

  15. Curvature and Tachibana numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanov, Sergey E [Finance Academy under the Government of the Russian Federation, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to define the rth Tachibana number t{sub r} of an n-dimensional compact oriented Riemannian manifold as the dimension of the space of conformally Killing r-forms, for r=1,2,...,n-1. We also describe properties of these numbers, by analogy with properties of the Betti numbers b{sub r} of a compact oriented Riemannian manifold. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  16. Energy or Mass and Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo R Gonzalez-Martin

    2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A review. Problems: 1-Many empirical parameters and large dimension number; 2-Gravitation and Electrodynamics are challenged by dark matter and energy. Energy and nonlinear electrodynamics are fundamental in a unified nonlinear interaction. Nuclear energy appears as nonlinear SU(2) magnetic energy. Gravitation and electromagnetism are unified giving Einstein's equation and a geometric energy momentum tensor. A solution energy in the newtonian limit gives the gravitational constant G. Outside of this limit G is variable. May be interpreted as dark matter or energy. In vacuum, known gravitational solutions are obtained. Electromagnetism is an SU(2) subgroup. A U(1) limit gives Maxwell's equations. Geometric fields determine a generalized Dirac equation and are the germ of quantum physics. Planck's h and of Einstein's c are given by the potential and the metric. Excitations have quanta of charge, flux and spin determining the FQHE. There are only three stable 1/2 spin fermions. Mass is a form of energy. The rest energies of the fermions give the proton/electron mass ratio. Potential excitations have energies equal to the weak boson masses allowing a geometric interpretation of Weinberg's angle. SU(2) gives the anomalous magnetic moments of proton, electron, neutron and generates nuclear range attractive potentials strong enough to produce the binding energies of the deuteron and other nuclides. Lepton and meson masses are due to topological excitations. The geometric mass spectrum is satisfactory. The proton has a triple structure. The alpha constant is a geometric number.

  17. Definitions Numbered Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    Definitions · Numbered Space ­ a single space marked with a number and reserved for a single permit 24/7 · Unnumbered Space ­ a space which can be used by any customer allowed to park in that lot. High Low Average Question 4: If I buy a staff permit for an UNNUMBERED* space in a non-gated surface

  18. Halo occupation numbers and galaxy bias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Peacock; R. E. Smith

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a heuristic model that displays the main features of realistic theories for galaxy bias. We show that the low-order clustering statistics of the dark-matter distribution depend almost entirely on the locations and density profiles of dark-matter haloes. A hypothetical galaxy catalogue depends on (i) the efficiency of galaxy formation, as manifested by the halo occupation number -- the number of galaxies brighter than some sample limit contained in a halo of a given mass; (ii) the location of these galaxies within their halo. The first factor is constrained by the empirical luminosity function of groups. For the second factor, we assume that one galaxy marks the halo centre, with any remaining galaxies acting as satellites that trace the halo mass. These simple assumptions amount to a recipe for non-local bias, in which the probability of finding a galaxy is not a simple function of its local mass density. We have applied this prescription to some CDM models of current interest, and find that the predictions are close to the observed galaxy correlations for a flat $\\Omega=0.3$ model ($\\Lambda$CDM), but not for an $\\Omega=1$ model with the same power spectrum ($\\tau$CDM). This is an inevitable consequence of cluster normalization for the power spectra: cluster-scale haloes of given mass have smaller core radii for high $\\Omega$, and hence display enhanced small-scale clustering. Finally, the pairwise velocity dispersion of galaxies in the $\\Lambda$CDM model is lower than that of the mass, allowing cluster-normalized models to yield a realistic Mach number for the peculiar velocity field. This is largely due to the strong variation of galaxy-formation efficiency with halo mass that is required in this model.

  19. Metrics For Comparing Plasma Mass Filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter. __________________________________________________

  20. Metrics for comparing plasma mass filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter.

  1. Spectroscopic Binary Mass Determination using Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zucker, S; Zucker, Shay; Alexander, Tal

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-precision radial-velocity techniques, which enabled the detection of extrasolar planets are now sensitive to relativistic effects in the data of spectroscopic binary stars (SBs). We show how these effects can be used to derive the absolute masses of the components of eclipsing single-lined SBs and double-lined SBs from Doppler measurements alone. High-precision stellar spectroscopy can thus substantially increase the number of measured sellar masses, thereby improving the mass-radius and mass-magnitude calibrations.

  2. Spectroscopic Binary Mass Determination using Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shay Zucker; Tal Alexander

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    High-precision radial-velocity techniques, which enabled the detection of extrasolar planets are now sensitive to relativistic effects in the data of spectroscopic binary stars (SBs). We show how these effects can be used to derive the absolute masses of the components of eclipsing single-lined SBs and double-lined SBs from Doppler measurements alone. High-precision stellar spectroscopy can thus substantially increase the number of measured stellar masses, thereby improving the mass-radius and mass-luminosity calibrations.

  3. Neutrino mass matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strobel, E.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the many conflicting experimental results, examination is made of the neutrino mass matrix in order to determine possible masses and mixings. It is assumed that the Dirac mass matrix for the electron, muon, and tau neutrinos is similar in form to those of the quarks and charged leptons, and that the smallness of the observed neutrino masses results from the Gell-Mann-Ramond-Slansky mechanism. Analysis of masses and mixings for the neutrinos is performed using general structures for the Majorana mass matrix. It is shown that if certain tentative experimental results concerning the neutrino masses and mixing angles are confirmed, significant limitations may be placed on the Majorana mass matrix. The most satisfactory simple assumption concerning the Majorana mass matrix is that it is approximately proportional to the Dirac mass matrix. A very recent experimental neutrino mass result and its implications are discussed. Some general properties of matrices with structure similar to the Dirac mass matrices are discussed.

  4. Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

  5. Effective Mass and Energy-Mass Relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viktor Ariel

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The particle effective mass is often a challenging concept in solid state physics due to the many different definitions of the effective mass that are routinely used. Also, the most commonly used theoretical definition of the effective mass was derived from the assumption of a parabolic energy-momentum relationship, E(p), and therefore should not be applied to non-parabolic materials. In this paper, we use wave-particle duality to derive a definition of the effective mass and the energy-mass approximation suitable for non-parabolic materials. The new energy-mass relationship can be considered a generalization of Einstein's E=mc^2 suitable for arbitrary E(p) and therefore applicable to solid state materials and devices. We show that the resulting definition of the effective mass seems suitable for non-paraboic solid state materials such as HgCdTe, GaAs, and graphene.

  6. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  7. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Randall W; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  8. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Randall W (Phoenix, AZ); Williams, Peter (Phoenix, AZ); Krone, Jennifer Reeve (Granbury, TX)

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  9. A number of organizations,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    installed solar electric systems on a number of the city's buildings, including the Chicago Center for Green Technology shown here. CityofChicago Aggregated Purchasing--A Clean Energy Strategy SOLAR TODAY Aggregated Purchasing--A Clean Energy Strategy by Lori A. Bird and Edward A. Holt #12;November/December 2002 35 Power

  10. ALARA notes, Number 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C. [eds.] [eds.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the `tyranny` of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment.

  11. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  12. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  13. Neutrinoless double beta decay constrained by the existence of large extra dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Gó?d?; W. A. Kami?ski

    2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the possible influence on the half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay coming from the existence of $n$ extra spatial dimensions. The half-life in question depends on the mass of the electron neutrino. We base our analysis on the Majorana neutrino mass mechanism in Arkani-Hamed--Dimopoulos--Dvali model.

  14. Neutrino mass matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capps, R.H.; Strobel, E.L.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is assumed that the Dirac mass matrix for the neutrinos (..nu../sub e/,..nu../sub ..mu../,..nu../sub tau/) is similar in form to those for the quarks and charged leptons, and that the smallness of the observed ..nu.. masses results from the Gell-Mann--Ramond--Slansky mechanism. It is shown that if certain tentative experimental results concerning the ..nu.. masses and mixing angles are confirmed, significant limitations may be placed on the Majorana mass matrix. The most satisfactory simple assumption concerning the Majorana mass matrix is that it is approximately proportional to the Dirac mass matrix. Some general properties of the Dirac matrices are discussed.

  15. NSR Key Number Retrieval

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota PriusNSR Key Number Retrieval Pease

  16. EMSL - Mass Spectrometry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mass-spectrometry Proteomics Capabilities High resolution and mass accuracy Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) spectrometers, from 6 Tesla (T) to 15T and 21T in...

  17. Grant Application Package CFDA Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Grant Application Package CFDA Number: Opportunity Title: Offering Agency: Agency Contact: Opportunity Open Date: Opportunity Close Date: CFDA Description: Opportunity Number: Competition ID

  18. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

  19. Grant Title: KNOWLEDGE DISSEMINATION CONFERENCE GRANTS PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENT Funding Opportunity Number: CFDA Number(s) -93.243; Funding Opportunity Number -OA-08-002.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Number: CFDA Number(s) - 93.243; Funding Opportunity Number - OA-08-002. Agency/Department: Department

  20. Small numbers in supersymmetric theories of nature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graesser, Michael L.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Model of particle interactions is a successful theory for describing the interactions of quarks, leptons and gauge bosons at microscopic distance scales. Despite these successes, the theory contains many unsatisfactory features. The origin of particle masses is a central mystery that has eluded experimental elucidation. In the Standard Model the known particles obtain their mass from the condensate of the so-called Higgs particle. Quantum corrections to the Higgs mass require an unnatural fine tuning in the Higgs mass of one part in 10{sup {minus}32} to obtain the correct mass scale of electroweak physics. In addition, the origin of the vast hierarchy between the mass scales of the electroweak and quantum gravity physics is not explained in the current theory. Supersymmetric extensions to the Standard Model are not plagued by this fine tuning issue and may therefore be relevant in Nature. In the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model there is also a natural explanation for electroweak symmetry breaking. Supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories also correctly predict a parameter of the Standard Model. This provides non-trivial indirect evidence for these theories. The most general supersymmetric extension to the Standard Model however, is excluded by many physical processes, such as rare flavor changing processes, and the non-observation of the instability of the proton. These processes provide important information about the possible structure such a theory. In particular, certain parameters in this theory must be rather small. A physics explanation for why this is the case would be desirable. It is striking that the gauge couplings of the Standard Model unify if there is supersymmetry close to the weak scale. This suggests that at high energies Nature is described by a supersymmetric Grand Unified Theory. But the mass scale of unification must be introduced into the theory since it does not coincide with the probable mass scale of strong quantum gravity. The subject of this dissertation is both the phenomenology and model-building opportunities that may lie behind the small numbers that appear in supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model.

  1. The concrete theory of numbers: initial numbers and wonderful properties of numbers repunit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris V. Tarasov

    2007-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work initial numbers and repunit numbers have been studied. All numbers have been considered in a decimal notation. The problem of simplicity of initial numbers has been studied. Interesting properties of numbers repunit are proved: $gcd(R_a, R_b) = R_{gcd(a,b)}$; $R_{ab}/(R_aR_b)$ is an integer only if $gcd(a,b) = 1$, where $a\\geq1$, $b\\geq1$ are integers. Dividers of numbers repunit, are researched by a degree of prime number.

  2. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Christopher S.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The top quark, with its extraordinarily large mass (nearly that of a gold atom), plays a significant role in the phenomenology of EWSB in the Standard Model. In particular, the top quark mass when combined with the W mass constrains the mass of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. Thus, a precise determination of the mass of the top quark is a principal goal of the CDF and D0 experiments. With the data collected thus far in Runs 1 and 2 of the Tevatron, CDF and D0 have measured the top quark mass in both the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels using a variety of complementary experimental techniques. The author presents an overview of the most recent of the measurements.

  3. MassMass transfer andtransfer and MassMass transfer andtransfer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Heat conductivity T'1 Heat flux h" (W/m2), local and overall heat transfer coeffients h1 Heat transfer coefficientcoefficient /1/1 Mass flow species A:interface a p A = A mol/s M f1 (L) 2 (G) Mass transfer rate per area: A = A/a = "A mol/(m2·s) 1 (L) 2 (G) xi C1.i M t f ffi i t k x C y 1.i AA !!! Mass transfer coefficients

  4. Mass and Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hindawai, S. M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - 1 - MASS AND HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM SALAH MAHMOUD HINDAWI DIRECTOR HINDAWI FOR ENGINEERING SERVICES & CONTRACTING NEW DAMIETTA , EGYPT ABSTRACT : In the last few years heat recovery was under spot . and in air conditioning fields... ) as a heat recovery . and I use the water as a mass recovery . The source of mass and heat recovery is the condensate water which we were dispose and connect it to the drain lines . THE BENEFIT OF THIS SYSTEM ARE : 1) Using the heat energy from...

  5. Multiple mass solvers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Jegerlehner

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general method to construct multiple mass solvers from standard algorithms. As an example, the BiCGstab-M algorithm is derived.

  6. EMSL - Mass Spectrometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MS) with high mass resolution (m&61636;m100,000). Solvent mixtures of acetonitrilewater and acetonitriletoluene were used to extract and ionize polar and non-polar...

  7. Double beta decay and neutrino mass models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helo, J C; Ota, T; Santos, F A Pereira dos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay allows to constrain lepton number violating extensions of the standard model. If neutrinos are Majorana particles, the mass mechanism will always contribute to the decay rate, however, it is not a priori guaranteed to be the dominant contribution in all models. Here, we discuss whether the mass mechanism dominates or not from the theory point of view. We classify all possible (scalar-mediated) short-range contributions to the decay rate according to the loop level, at which the corresponding models will generate Majorana neutrino masses, and discuss the expected relative size of the different contributions to the decay rate in each class. We also work out the phenomenology of one concrete 2-loop model in which both, mass mechanism and short-range diagram, might lead to competitive contributions, in some detail.

  8. Volume 54, Number 10, 2000 APPLIED SPECTROSCOPY 14430003-7028 / 00 / 5410-1443$2.00 / 0 q 2000 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    , from a - counting and from the more recent g -spectrometry method, has been made for marine sediment and investigation of the harbor dynamics and history of pollution. Index Headings: Analytical methods; Gamma-ray spectrometry; Al- pha spectrometry; Marine sediment pollution. INTRODUCTION Pb-210 (half-life 22.3 years) has

  9. Data Compression with Prime Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A compression algorithm is presented that uses the set of prime numbers. Sequences of numbers are correlated with the prime numbers, and labeled with the integers. The algorithm can be iterated on data sets, generating factors of doubles on the compression.

  10. mass communication advertising &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finzi, Adrien

    mass communication advertising & public relations introduction. Graduate programs in the Department of Mass Communication, Advertising, and Public Relations provide an entry to a wide spectrum of careers in the communication industry. Classes, internships, site visits, and presentations by top professionals offer students

  11. The Origins of Mass

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

  12. The Origins of Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

  13. Measurement of the half-life of (198)Au in a nonmetal: High-precision measurement shows no host-material dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodwin, J. R.; Nica, N.; Iacob, V. E.; Dibidad, A.; Hardy, John C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ] F. Raiola et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 19, 283 (2004). [2] B. Limata et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 28, 251 (2006). [3] T. Spillane et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 31, 203 (2007). [4] J. R. Goodwin, V. V. Golovko, V. E. Iacob, and J. C. Hardy, Eur. Phys. J. A 34... (2008); 78, 039901(E) (2008). [13] B. Wang et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 28, 375 (2006). [14] J. C. Hardy and I. S. Towner, Phys. Rev. C 79, 055502 (2009). 044320-3 ...

  14. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Joachim [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), IEKP, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  15. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Duerr

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a promising test for lepton number violating physics beyond the standard model of particle physics. There is a deep connection between this decay and the phenomenon of neutrino masses. In particular, we will discuss the relation between neutrinoless double beta decay and Majorana neutrino masses provided by the so-called Schechter--Valle theorem in a quantitative way. Furthermore, we will present an experimental cross check to discriminate neutrinoless double beta decay from unknown nuclear background using only one isotope, i.e., within one experiment.

  16. Neutrinoless double beta decay and neutrino masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duerr, Michael [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) is a promising test for lepton number violating physics beyond the standard model (SM) of particle physics. There is a deep connection between this decay and the phenomenon of neutrino masses. In particular, we will discuss the relation between 0{nu}{beta}{beta} and Majorana neutrino masses provided by the so-called Schechter-Valle theorem in a quantitative way. Furthermore, we will present an experimental cross check to discriminate 0{nu}{beta}{beta} from unknown nuclear background using only one isotope, i.e., within one experiment.

  17. Mass transfer effects in a gasification riser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breault, Ronald W [U.S. DOE; Li, Tingwen [URS; Nicoletti, Phillip [URS

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the development of multiphase reacting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, a number of simplifications were incorporated into the codes and models. One of these simplifications was the use of a simplistic mass transfer correlation for the faster reactions and omission of mass transfer effects completely on the moderate speed and slow speed reactions such as those in a fluidized bed gasifier. Another problem that has propagated is that the mass transfer correlation used in the codes is not universal and is being used far from its developed bubbling fluidized bed regime when applied to circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser reactors. These problems are true for the major CFD codes. To alleviate this problem, a mechanistic based mass transfer coefficient algorithm has been developed based upon an earlier work by Breault et al. This fundamental approach uses the local hydrodynamics to predict a local, time varying mass transfer coefficient. The predicted mass transfer coefficients and the corresponding Sherwood numbers agree well with literature data and are typically about an order of magnitude lower than the correlation noted above. The incorporation of the new mass transfer model gives the expected behavior for all the gasification reactions evaluated in the paper. At the expected and typical design values for the solid flow rate in a CFB riser gasifier an ANOVA analysis has shown the predictions from the new code to be significantly different from the original code predictions. The new algorithm should be used such that the conversions are not over predicted. Additionally, its behaviors with changes in solid flow rate are consistent with the changes in the hydrodynamics.

  18. Masses of Fundamental Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidezumi Terazawa

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In the original paper entitled, "Masses of Fundamental Particles"(arXiv:1109.3705v5, 10 Feb 2012), not only the masses of fundamental particles including the weak bosons, Higgs boson, quarks, and leptons, but also the mixing angles of quarks and those of neutrinos are all explained and/or predicted in the unified composite models of quarks and leptons successfully. In this addendum entitled, "Higgs Boson Mass in the Minimal Unified Subquark Model", it is emphasized that the Higgs boson mass is predicted to be about 130Gev in the minimal unified subquark model, which agrees well with the experimental values of 125-126GeV recently found by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at the LHC.

  19. HIGEE Mass Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, R. J.; Fowler, R.

    HIGEE MASS TRANSFER R.J. Mohr and R. Fowler GLITSCH, INC. Dallas, Texas ABSTRACT Distillation, absorption, and gas stripping have traditionally been performed in tall columns utilizing trays or packing. Columns perform satisfactorily... transfer system which utilizes a rotating bed of packing to achieve high efficiency separations, and consequent reduction in size and weight. INTRODUCTION HIGEE is probably one of the most interesting developments in mass transfer equipment made...

  20. Mass of Cu-57

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagliardi, Carl A.; Semon, D. R.; Tribble, Robert E.; Vanausdeln, L. A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the experimental and theoretical Coulomb displacement energies for similar cases in A =17 and 41 has been attributed~ to ground state correlations in the nuclear wave functions. It is in- teresting to examine the mass 57 mirror nuclei to investi- gate... indicated. Reference 9. 'Reference 7. Reference 6. 'This work. 34 MASS OF Cu 1665 the 3=57 Coulomb displacement energy, using radial wave functions obtained in a spherical Hartree-Fock cal- culation, assuming a closed Ni core, and including...

  1. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

  2. Number

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 +New York, New

  3. Brookhaven National Laboratory Number: Revision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Brookhaven National Laboratory Number: Revision: PS-ESH-0057 01 Effective: Page 1 of 9 06 Chris Weilandics Signature on file Department ES&H Approval printed name Signature Date Lori Stiegler Signature on file #12;Number: PS-ESH-0057 Revision: 01 Effective: 06/08/12 Page 2 of 9 The only official

  4. Neutrino Majorana Mass from Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yosuke Uehara

    2002-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new mechanism to generate the neutrino Majorana mass in TeV-scale gravity models. The black hole violates all non-gauged symmetries and can become the origin of lepton number violating processes. The fluctuation of higher-dimensional spacetime can result in the production of a black hole, which emits 2 neutrinos. If neutrinos are Majorana particles, this process is equivalent to the free propagation of a neutrino with the insertion of the black hole. From this fact, we derive the neutrino Majorana mass. The result is completely consistent with the recently observed evidence of neutrinoless double beta decay. And the obtained neutrino Majorana mass satisfies the constraint from the density of the neutrino dark matter, which affects the cosmic structure formation. Furthermore, we can explain the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays by the Z-burst scenario with it.

  5. Atomic mass compilation 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeiffer, B., E-mail: bpfeiffe@uni-mainz.de [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Venkataramaniah, K. [Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam (India)] [Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam (India); Czok, U. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany)] [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany); Scheidenberger, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic mass reflects the total binding energy of all nucleons in an atomic nucleus. Compilations and evaluations of atomic masses and derived quantities, such as neutron or proton separation energies, are indispensable tools for research and applications. In the last decade, the field has evolved rapidly after the advent of new production and measuring techniques for stable and unstable nuclei resulting in substantial ameliorations concerning the body of data and their precision. Here, we present a compilation of atomic masses comprising the data from the evaluation of 2003 as well as the results of new measurements performed. The relevant literature in refereed journals and reports as far as available, was scanned for the period beginning 2003 up to and including April 2012. Overall, 5750 new data points have been collected. Recommended values for the relative atomic masses have been derived and a comparison with the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation has been performed. This work has been carried out in collaboration with and as a contribution to the European Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network of Evaluations.

  6. Mass and Weak Field Limit of Boson Stars in Brans Dicke Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. Whinnett

    1999-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study boson stars in Brans Dicke gravity and use them to illustrate some of the properties of three different mass definitions: the Schwarzschild mass, the Keplerian mass and the Tensor mass. We analyse the weak field limit of the solutions and show that only the Tensor mass leads to a physically reasonable definition of the binding energy. We examine numerically strong field $\\omega=-1$ solutions and show how, in this extreme case, the three mass values and the conserved particle number behave as a function of the central boson field amplitude. The numerical studies imply that for $\\omega=-1$, solutions with extremal Tensor mass also have extremal particle number. This is a property that a physically reasonable definition of the mass of a boson star must have, and we prove analytically that this is true for all values of $\\omega$. The analysis supports the conjecture that the Tensor mass uniquely describes the total energy of an asymptotically flat solution in BD gravity.

  7. Survey of lepton number violation via effective operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouvea, Andre de; Jenkins, James [Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We survey 129 lepton number violating effective operators, consistent with the minimal standard model gauge group and particle content, of mass dimension up to and including 11. Upon requiring that each one radiatively generates the observed neutrino masses, we extract an associated characteristic cutoff energy scale which we use to calculate other observable manifestations of these operators for a number of current and future experimental probes, concentrating on lepton number violating phenomena. These include searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay and rare meson, lepton, and gauge boson decays. We also consider searches at hadron/lepton collider facilities in anticipation of the CERN LHC and the future ILC. We find that some operators are already disfavored by current data, while more are ripe to be probed by next-generation experiments. We also find that our current understanding of lepton mixing disfavors a subset of higher dimensional operators. While neutrinoless double-beta decay is the most promising signature of lepton number violation for the majority of operators, a handful is best probed by other means. We argue that a combination of constraints from various independent experimental sources will help to pinpoint the ''correct'' model of neutrino mass, or at least aid in narrowing down the set of possibilities.

  8. A Survey of Lepton Number Violation Via Effective Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre de Gouvea; James Jenkins

    2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We survey 129 lepton number violating effective operators, consistent with the minimal Standard Model gauge group and particle content, of mass dimension up to and including eleven. Upon requiring that each one radiatively generates the observed neutrino masses, we extract an associated characteristic cutoff energy scale which we use to calculate other observable manifestations of these operators for a number of current and future experimental probes, concentrating on lepton number violating phenomena. These include searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay and rare meson, lepton, and gauge boson decays. We also consider searches at hadron/lepton collider facilities in anticipation of the LHC and the future ILC. We find that some operators are already disfavored by current data, while more are ripe to be probed by next-generation experiments. We also find that our current understanding of lepton mixing disfavors a subset of higher dimensional operators. While neutrinoless double-beta decay is the most promising signature of lepton number violation for the majority of operators, a handful is best probed by other means. We argue that a combination of constraints from various independent experimental sources will help to pinpoint the ``correct'' model of neutrino mass, or at least aid in narrowing down the set of possibilities.

  9. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    To prescribe procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, business instruments. Cancels DOE 1331.2B. Canceled by DOE O 540.1A.

  10. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order prescribes the procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) business instruments. Cancels DOE O 540.1. Canceled by DOE O 540.1B.

  11. The Jacobi-Stirling Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, George E; Gawronski, Wolfgang; Littlejohn, Lance L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jacobi-Stirling numbers were discovered as a result of a problem involving the spectral theory of powers of the classical second-order Jacobi differential expression. Specifically, these numbers are the coefficients of integral composite powers of the Jacobi expression in Lagrangian symmetric form. Quite remarkably, they share many properties with the classical Stirling numbers of the second kind which, as shown in LW, are the coefficients of integral powers of the Laguerre differential expression. In this paper, we establish several properties of the Jacobi-Stirling numbers and its companions including combinatorial interpretations thereby extending and supplementing known contributions to the literature of Andrews-Littlejohn, Andrews-Gawronski-Littlejohn, Egge, Gelineau-Zeng, and Mongelli.

  12. 2n-Dimensional Models with Topological Mass Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinichi Deguchi; Satoshi Hayakawa

    2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The 4-dimensional model with topological mass generation that has recently been presented by Dvali, Jackiw and Pi [G. Dvali, R. Jackiw, and S.-Y. Pi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 081602 (2006), hep-th/0610228] is generalized to any even number of dimensions. As in the 4-dimensional model, the 2n-dimensional model describes a mass-generation phenomenon due to the presence of the chiral anomaly. In addition to this model, new 2n-dimensional models with topological mass generation are proposed, in which a Stueckelberg-type mass term plays a crucial role in the mass generation. The mass generation of a pseudoscalar field such as the eta-prime meson is discussed within this framework.

  13. ALUMNI NEWSLETTER Number 5 (2002)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Geochemical Research. As I write, we are in the process of taking delivery and installing 5 new mass spectrometers that will make EOS a world leader in the application of stable and radiogenic isotopes undergraduate (Kurt Grimm) and graduate teaching (Lori Kennedy). Curriculum reform is ongoing and this year

  14. ALUMNI NEWSLETTER Number 7 (2004)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    five mass spectrometers. As you may recall from the last Newsletter, we officially opened the Pacific Samarasekera), and the B.C. Minister of Energy and Mines (Richard Neufeld). Our undergraduate courses. If, like me, your undergraduate days ended many decades ago, it is difficult to appreciate

  15. Residential Thermal Mass Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thieken, J. S.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The southwest has long known the value of building homes with high mass materials. The ancient Pueblo Indians found that by using "adobe" they could capture the energy necessary to survive the harsh desert climate. Our ancestors knew that a heavy...

  16. Riddle of the Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smirnov, A Yu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss some known approaches and results as well as few new ideas concerning origins and nature of neutrino mass. The key issues include (i) connections of neutrino and charged fermions masses, relation between masses and mixing, energy scale of new physics behind neutrino mass where possibilities spread from the Planck and GUT masses down to a sub-eV scale. The data hint two different new physics involved in generation of neutrino mass. Determination of the CP phase as well as mass hierarchy can play important role in identification of new physics. It may happen that sterile neutrinos provide the key to resolve the riddle.

  17. AGN Jet Mass Loading and Truncation by Stellar Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Hubbard; Eric G. Blackman

    2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Active Galactic Nuclei can produce extremely powerful jets. While tightly collimated, the scale of these jets and the stellar density at galactic centers implies that there will be many jet/star interactions, which can mass-load the jet through stellar winds. Previous work employed modest wind mass outflow rates, but this does not apply when mass loading is provided by a small number of high mass-loss stars. We construct a framework for jet mass-loading by stellar winds for a broader spectrum of wind mass-loss rates than has been previously considered. Given the observed stellar mass distributions in galactic centers, we find that even highly efficient (0.1 Eddington luminosity) jets from supermassive black holes of masses $M_{BH} \\la 10^4M_{\\odot}$ are rapidly mass loaded and quenched by stellar winds. For $10^4 M_{\\odot}jets is independent of the jet's mechanical luminosity. Stellar wind mass-loading is unable to quench efficient jets from more massive engines, but can account for the observed truncation of the inefficient M87 jet, and implies a baryon dominated composition on scales $\\ga 2$ kpc therein even if the jet is initially pair plasma dominated.

  18. Lepton Number Violation within the Conformal Inverse Seesaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Pascal; Patra, Sudhanwa; Smirnov, Juri

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel framework within the conformal inverse seesaw scheme allowing large lepton number violation while the neutrino mass formula is still governed by the low-scale inverse seesaw mechanism. This model includes new contributions to rare low-energy lepton number violating processes like neutrinoless double beta decay. We find that the lifetime for this rare process due to heavy sterile neutrinos can saturate current experimental limits. The characteristic collider signature of the present conformal inverse seesaw scheme includes, same-sign dilepton plus two jets and same-sign dilepton plus four jets. Finally, we comment on the testability of the model at the Large Hadron Collider since there are new scalars, new fermions and an extra neutral gauge boson with masses around few 100 GeV to few TeV.

  19. Nanoscale mass conveyors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Regan, Brian C. (Oakland, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA)

    2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass transport method and device for individually delivering chargeable atoms or molecules from source particles is disclosed. It comprises a channel; at least one source particle of chargeable material fixed to the surface of the channel at a position along its length; a means of heating the channel; and a means for applying an controllable electric field along the channel, whereby the device transports the atoms or molecules along the channel in response to applied electric field. In a preferred embodiment, the mass transport device will comprise a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT), although other one dimensional structures may also be used. The MWNT or other structure acts as a channel for individual or small collections of atoms due to the atomic smoothness of the material. Also preferred is a source particle of a metal such as indium. The particles move by dissociation into small units, in some cases, individual atoms. The particles are preferably less than 100 nm in size.

  20. Report/Product Number(s) DOE/ER/64701 DOE Award/Contract Number(s)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Foundenhancer activity than FINAL Report/Product Number(s)

  1. Mass of Si-24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tribble, Robert E.; Tanner, D. M.; Zeller, A. F.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the role of a nuclear cdi than to accur- ately account for the trivial Coulomb contribution to the IMME coefficients. In addition to testing the IMME, mass measurements in isobaric quar- tets and quintets determine Coulomb energies rather far from... stability. Comparisons between these Coulomb energies and those obtained closer to stability may provide one such alternate method for determining the role of a nuclear cdi. The Coulomb energies determined for the A = 36 iso- baric quintet already point...

  2. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  3. Top Mass and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen-Chu Chen

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The top quark was discovered in 1995. The top quark mass is now well measured at the Tevatron, with uncertainty getting below 1% of the top mass. The world average from last year was 170.9 $\\pm$ 1.8 GeV/$c^2$. The new CDF measurement is 172 $\\pm$ 1.2 (stat) $\\pm$ 1.5 (sys) GeV/$c^2$, and D0 will soon present a new measurement. The top quark mass is an important parameter in the Standard Model, and should be measured as precisely as possible. To learn more about the top quark observed and study possible new physics, other properties also should be measured. At the Tevatron, the charge of the top quark can be measured directly. Examples of other properties studied and reported in this presentation are W helicity, top decay branching ratio to b ($R_b$), searches for $t \\to H b$ and for flavor changing neutral current (FCNC). The results are all consistent with the Standard Model within current statistics. With significantly more data being collected at the Tevatron, precision measurements of the top properties are just starting.

  4. Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Fengshou Zhang

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20~250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semi-empirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

  5. On Normal Numbers Veronica Becher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figueira, Santiago

    ends with all zeros; hence, q is not simply normal to base b. 3/23 #12;The problem is still open Theorem (Borel 1909) Almost all real numbers are absolutely normal. Problem (Borel 1909) Give an example transducers. Huffman 1959 calls them lossless compressors. A direct proof of the above theorem Becher

  6. Brookhaven National Laboratory Number: Revision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    NATIONAL LABORATORY LASER CONTROLLED AREA STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE (SOP) This document defines OPERATIONS Operation Maintenance Service Specific Operation (specify) #12;Number: PS-ESH-0083 Revision: 01 the safety management program for the laser system(s) listed below. All American National Standard Institute

  7. Macro-microscopic mass formulae and nuclear mass predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Macro-microscopic mass formulae and nuclear mass predictions G. Royer, M. Guilbaud, A. Onillon manuscript, published in "Nuclear Physics A 847 (2010) 24-41" DOI : 10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2010.06.014 #12 including the pairing ef- fects have been firstly developed to reproduce the experimental nuclear masses [2

  8. Heat and mass exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

    2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  9. Heat and mass exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  10. MASS 2-pager Andrei Tokovinin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    . After each 1-min. accumulation time, the MASS software, Turbina, calculates 10 scintillation indices ­ 4 functions centered on the respective layers. The altitude resolution of MASS is h/h 0.5. Turbina

  11. The Jeans mass and the origin of the knee in the IMF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Bonnell; C. J. Clarke; M. R. Bate

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We use numerical simulations of the fragmentation of a 1000 solar mass molecular cloud and the formation of a stellar cluster to study how the initial conditions for star formation affect the resulting initial mass function (IMF). In particular, we are interested in the relation between the thermal Jeans mass in a cloud and the knee of the initial mass function, i.e. the mass separating the region with a flat IMF slope from that typified by a steeper, Salpeter-like, slope. In three isothermal simulations with M_J=1 solar mass, M_J=2 solar masses and M_J=5 solar masses, the number of stars formed, at comparable dynamical times, scales roughly with the number of initial Jeans masses in the cloud. The mean stellar mass also increases (though less than linearly) with the initial Jeans mass in the cloud. It is found that the IMF in each case displays a prominent knee, located roughly at the mass scale of the initial Jeans mass. Thus clouds with higher initial Jeans masses produce IMFs which are shallow to higher masses. This implies that a universal IMF requires a physical mechanism that sets the Jeans mass to be near 1 solar mass. Simulations including a barotropic equation of state as suggested by Larson, with cooling at low densities followed by gentle heating at higher densities, are able to produce realistic IMFs with the knee located at approximately 1 solar mass, even with an initial M_J=5 solar masses. We therefore suggest that the observed universality of the IMF in the local Universe does not require any fine tuning of the initial conditions in star forming clouds but is instead imprinted by details of the cooling physics of the collapsing gas.

  12. Lattice QCD Thermodynamics with Physical Quark Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Soltz; C. DeTar; F. Karsch; Swagato Mukherjee; P. Vranas

    2015-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past few years new physics methods and algorithms as well as the latest supercomputers have enabled the study of the QCD thermodynamic phase transition using lattice gauge theory numerical simulations with unprecedented control over systematic errors. This is largely a consequence of the ability to perform continuum extrapolations with physical quark masses. Here we review recent progress in lattice QCD thermodynamics, focussing mainly on results that benefit from the use of physical quark masses: the crossover temperature, the equation of state, and fluctuations of the quark number susceptibilities. In addition, we place a special emphasis on calculations that are directly relevant to the study of relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC and the LHC.

  13. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay within QRPA with Proton-Neutron Pairing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Pantis; F. Simkovic; J. D. Vergados; Amand Faessler

    1996-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the role of proton-neutron pairing in the context of the Quasiparticle Random Phase approximation formalism. This way the neutrinoless double beta decay matrix elements of the experimentally interesting A= 48, 76, 82, 96, 100, 116, 128, 130 and 136 systems have been calculated. We have found that the inclusion of proton-neutron pairing influences the neutrinoless double beta decay rates significantly, in all cases allowing for larger values of the expectation value of light neutrino masses. Using the best presently available experimental limits on the half life-time of neutrinoless double beta decay we have extracted the limits on lepton number violating parameters.

  14. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this proceedings I review the physics that future experiments will use to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  15. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  16. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Cerrito

    2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results on the measurement of the top quark mass at the Tevatron Collider are presented. In the dilepton decay channel, the CDF Collaboration measures m{sub t} = 175.0{sub -16.9}{sup +17.4}(stat.){+-}8.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 126 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV (Run II). In the lepton plus jets channel, the CDF Collaboration measures 177.5{sub -9.4}{sup +12.7}(stat.) {+-} 7.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 102 pb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The D0 Collaboration has newly applied a likelihood technique to improve the analysis of {approx} 125 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV (Run I), with the result: m{sub t} = 180.1 {+-} 3.6(stat.) {+-}3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The latter is combined with all the measurements based on the data collected in Run I to yield the most recent and comprehensive experimental determination of the top quark mass: m{sub t} = 178.0 {+-} 2.7(stat.) {+-} 3.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  17. Maine Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 07,755,432Commercial Consumers (Number

  18. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

  19. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)Commercial Consumers (Number of

  20. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessAprilResidential Consumers (Number of

  1. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade217523,552.1Residential Consumers (Number

  2. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel5,266 6,090Industrial Consumers (Number

  3. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

  4. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercial Consumers (Number of

  5. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear JanPriceIndustrial Consumers (Number of

  6. MASS TRANSFER CONTROLLED REACTIONS IN PACKED BEDS AT LOW REYNOLDS NUMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedkiw, Peter S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in electro- j . The kinetic expression chemical reactionreaction only in the kinetic expression. Gould (36) haveIn this case, the kinetic expression is no longer necessary,

  7. International Conference on Computational Heat and Mass Transfer Paper Number 135

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandekar, Sameer

    of heat transfer enhancement in sodium heat exchangers used in the fast breeder nuclear reactor [6 and liquid metals (Sodium, Potassium and Mercury) are utilized in the simulation. The critical sizes

  8. MASS TRANSFER CONTROLLED REACTIONS IN PACKED BEDS AT LOW REYNOLDS NUMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedkiw, Peter S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 FORM A T( I ? I DO 9C:S NP=I,NPM RSAD 1 0 ,RA,ARA,NCP,NFTmodified BAND routine is NPM, the established in the axialfORMAT( 151 au 999 NP=l,NPM READ 7, NJ f-OI\\MHlI51 KEto

  9. Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI'

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1 Termoelectrica U.SPRESSHeavy-duty Engine using the PMP

  10. Precision measurements constraints on the number of Higgs doublets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernández, A E Cárcamo; Schmidt, Iván

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider an extension of the Standard Model (SM) with arbitrary number $N$ of Higgs doublets (NHDM), and calculate their contribution to the oblique parameters $S$ and $T$. We examine possible limitations on $N$ from precision measurements of these parameters. In view of complexity of the general case of NHDM, we analyze several benchmark scenarios for the Higgs mass spectrum, identifying the lightest CP-even Higgs with the Higgs-like particle recently observed at the LHC with the mass of $\\sim 125$ GeV. The rest of the Higgses are put above the mass scale of $\\sim 400$ GeV, below which the LHC experiments do not detect any Higgs-like signals except for the former famous one. We show that in a scenario, with all the heavy Higgses degenerate at any scale, there are no limitations on the number $N$ of the Higgs doublets. However, upper limits appear for certain not completely degenerate configurations of the heavy Higgses.

  11. Neutrino masses and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay: Status and expectations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliviero Cremonesi

    2010-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Two most outstanding questions are puzzling the world of neutrino Physics: the possible Majorana nature of neutrinos and their absolute mass scale. Direct neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double beta decay (0nuDBD) are the present strategy to solve the puzzle. Neutrinoless double beta decay violates lepton number by two units and can occurr only if neutrinos are massive Majorana particles. A positive observation would therefore necessarily imply a new regime of physics beyond the standard model, providing fundamental information on the nature of the neutrinos and on their absolute mass scale. After the observation of neutrino oscillations and given the present knowledge of neutrino masses and mixing parameters, a possibility to observe 0nuDBDD at a neutrino mass scale in the range 10-50 meV could actually exist. This is a real challenge faced by a number of new proposed projects. Present status and future perpectives of neutrinoless double-beta decay experimental searches is reviewed. The most important parameters contributing to the experimental sensitivity are outlined. A short discussion on nuclear matrix element calculations is also given. Complementary measurements to assess the absolute neutrino mass scale (cosmology and single beta decays) are also discussed.

  12. Random number stride in Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo radiation transport codes use a sequence of pseudorandom numbers to sample from probability distributions. A common practice is to start each source particle a predetermined number of random numbers up the pseudorandom number sequence. This number of random numbers skipped between each source particles the random number stride, S. Consequently, the jth source particle always starts with the j{center dot}Sth random number providing correlated sampling'' between similar calculations. A new machine-portable random number generator has been written for the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP providing user's control of the random number stride. First the new MCNP random number generator algorithm will be described and then the effects of varying the stride will be presented. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Device Independent Random Number Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mataj Pivoluska; Martin Plesch

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Randomness is an invaluable resource in today's life with a broad use reaching from numerical simulations through randomized algorithms to cryptography. However, on the classical level no true randomness is available and even the use of simple quantum devices in a prepare-measure setting suffers from lack of stability and controllability. This gave rise to a group of quantum protocols that provide randomness certified by classical statistical tests -- Device Independent Quantum Random Number Generators. In this paper we review the most relevant results in this field, which allow the production of almost perfect randomness with help of quantum devices, supplemented with an arbitrary weak source of additional randomness. This is in fact the best one could hope for to achieve, as with no starting randomness (corresponding to no free will in a different concept) even a quantum world would have a fully deterministic description.

  14. Intermediate mass fragment emission in heavy-ion collisions: Energy and system mass dependence O. Bjarki,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Wolfgang

    . The number of IMFs emitted at the peak also increased with the system mass. Percolation calculations showed, the system can develop from evaporation to multifragmentation to vaporization, signifying the liquid-gas of the liquid-gas phase tran- sition and critical phenomena of nuclear matter have been carried out 9

  15. Electron Effective Mass in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viktor Ariel; Amir Natan

    2012-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The particle effective mass in graphene is a challenging concept because the commonly used theoretical expression is mathematically divergent. In this paper, we use basic principles to present a simple theoretical expression for the effective mass that is suitable for both parabolic and non-parabolic isotropic materials. We demonstrate that this definition is consistent with the definition of the cyclotron effective mass, which is one of the common methods for effective mass measurement in solid state materials. We apply the proposed theoretical definition to graphene and demonstrate linear dependence of the effective mass on momentum, as confirmed by experimental cyclotron resonance measurements. Therefore, the proposed definition of the effective mass can be used for non-parabolic materials such as graphene.

  16. The Cluster SZ -- Mass Correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher A. Metzler

    1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    N-body + hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters are used to demonstrate a correlation between galaxy cluster mass and the strength of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect induced by the cluster. The intrinsic scatter in the correlaton is larger than seen in the cluster mass -- X-ray temperature correlation, but smaller than seen in the correlation between mass (or temperature) and X-ray luminosity, as expected. Using the convergence to self-similarity of cluster structure at larger radii, a simple area-averaged SZ value derived from mock SZ maps also correlates well with mass; the intrinsic scatter in this correlation is comparable to that seen in simulations for the mass -- temperature correlation. Such a relation may prove a powerful tool for estimating cluster masses at higher redshifts.

  17. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Daniel D. (Livermore, CA); Keville, Robert F. (Valley Springs, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  18. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  19. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritzsch, Harald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the neutrino oscillations, using texture zero mass matrices for the leptons. The reactor mixing angle $\\theta^{}_{l}$ is calculated. The ratio of the masses of two neutrinos is determined by the solar mixing angle. We can calculate the masses of the three neutrinos: $m_1$ $\\approx$ 0.003 eV - $m_2$ $\\approx$ 0.012 eV - $m_3$ $\\approx$ 0.048 eV.

  20. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harald Fritzsch

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the neutrino oscillations, using texture zero mass matrices for the leptons. The reactor mixing angle $\\theta^{}_{l}$ is calculated. The ratio of the masses of two neutrinos is determined by the solar mixing angle. We can calculate the masses of the three neutrinos: $m_1$ $\\approx$ 0.003 eV - $m_2$ $\\approx$ 0.012 eV - $m_3$ $\\approx$ 0.048 eV.

  1. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics.

  2. Tribimaximal mixing in neutrino mass matrices with texture zeros or vanishing minors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dev, S; Gautam, Radha Raman

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the existence of one/two texture zeros or one/two vanishing minors in the neutrino mass matrix with $\\mu\\tau$ symmetry. In the basis where the charged lepton mass matrix and the Dirac neutrino mass matrix are diagonal, the one/two zeros or one/two vanishing minors in the right-handed Majorana mass matrix having $\\mu\\tau$ symmetry will propagate via seesaw mechanism as one/two vanishing minors or one/two texture zeros in the neutrino mass matrix with $\\mu\\tau$ symmetry respectively. It is found that only five such texture structures of the neutrino mass matrix are phenomenologically viable. For tribimaximal mixing, these texture structures reduce the number of free parameters to one. Interesting predictions are obtained for the effective Majorana mass $M_{ee}$, the absolute mass scale and the Majorana-type CP violating phases.

  3. Tribimaximal mixing in neutrino mass matrices with texture zeros or vanishing minors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dev; Shivani Gupta; Radha Raman Gautam

    2010-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the existence of one/two texture zeros or one/two vanishing minors in the neutrino mass matrix with $\\mu\\tau$ symmetry. In the basis where the charged lepton mass matrix and the Dirac neutrino mass matrix are diagonal, the one/two zeros or one/two vanishing minors in the right-handed Majorana mass matrix having $\\mu\\tau$ symmetry will propagate via seesaw mechanism as one/two vanishing minors or one/two texture zeros in the neutrino mass matrix with $\\mu\\tau$ symmetry respectively. It is found that only five such texture structures of the neutrino mass matrix are phenomenologically viable. For tribimaximal mixing, these texture structures reduce the number of free parameters to one. Interesting predictions are obtained for the effective Majorana mass $M_{ee}$, the absolute mass scale and the Majorana-type CP violating phases.

  4. MassMass transfer andtransfer and separation technologyseparation technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    tower, or tray column and B from a mix Vaporisation cooling Energy, water h (enthalpy) Spray tower Driving force Apparatus Heat exchange Energy T Heat exchanger Gas absorption Mass G L c y-y* Packed tower, or tray columnor tray column Distillation Mass, two components A and B from a mix y*A-yA, yB-yB* Packed

  5. Generalized lepton number and dark left-right gauge model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Shaaban [Center for Theoretical Physics, British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No. 11837, P.O. Box 43 (Egypt); Department of Mathematics, Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Lee, Hye-Sung; Ma, Ernest [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a left-right gauge model of particle interactions, the left-handed fermion doublet ({nu},e){sub L} is connected to its right-handed counterpart (n,e){sub R} through a scalar bidoublet so that e{sub L} pairs with e{sub R}, and {nu}{sub L} with n{sub R} to form mass terms. Suppose the latter link is severed without affecting the former, then n{sub R} is not the mass partner of {nu}{sub L}, and as we show in this paper, becomes a candidate for dark matter which is relevant for the recent PAMELA and ATIC observations. We accomplish this in a specific nonsupersymmetric model, where a generalized lepton number can be defined, so that n{sub R} and W{sub R}{sup {+-}} are odd under R{identical_to}(-1){sup 3B+L+2j}. Fermionic leptoquarks are also predicted.

  6. On the Mass-Period Correlation of the Extrasolar Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shay Zucker; Tsevi Mazeh

    2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a possible correlation between the masses and periods of the extrasolar planets, manifested as a paucity of massive planets with short orbital periods. Monte-Carlo simulations show the effect is significant, and is not solely due to an observational selection effect. We also show the effect is stronger than the one already implied by published models that assumed independent power-law distributions for the masses and periods of the extrasolar planets. Planets found in binary stellar systems may have an opposite correlation. The difference is highly significant despite the small number of planets in binary systems. We discuss the paucity of short-period massive planets in terms of some theories for the close-in giant planets. Almost all models can account for the deficit of massive planets with short periods, in particular the model that assumes migration driven by a planet-disk interaction, if the planet masses do not scale with their disk masses.

  7. On the robustness of cosmological axion mass limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Giusarma, Elena; Mena, Olga

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present cosmological bounds on the thermal axion mass in an extended cosmological scenario in which the primordial power spectrum of scalar perturbations differs from the usual power-law shape predicted by the simplest inflationary models. The power spectrum is instead modeled by means of a "piecewise cubic Hermite interpolating polynomial" (PCHIP). When using Cosmic Microwave Background measurements combined with other cosmological data sets, the thermal axion mass constraints are degraded only slightly. The addition of the measurements of $\\sigma_8$ and $\\Omega_m$ from the 2013 Planck cluster catalogue on galaxy number counts relaxes the bounds on the thermal axion mass, mildly favouring a $\\sim 1$~eV axion mass, regardless of the model adopted for the primordial power spectrum.

  8. Mass dependence of short-range correlations in nuclei and the EMC effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanhalst, Maarten; Cosyn, Wim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An approximate method to quantify the mass dependence of the number of two-nucleon (2N) short-range correlations (SRC) in nuclei is suggested. The proposed method relies on the concept of the "local nuclear character" of the SRC. We quantify the SRC and its mass dependence by computing the number of independent-particle model (IPM) nucleon pairs in a zero relative orbital momentum state. We find that the relative probability per nucleon for 2N SRC follows a power law as a function of the mass number $A$. The predictions are connected to measurements which provide access to the mass dependence of SRC. First, the ratio of the inclusive inelastic electron scattering cross sections of nuclei to $^{2}$H at large values of the Bjorken variable. Second, the EMC effect, for which we find a linear relationship between its magnitude and the predicted number of SRC-prone pairs.

  9. Mass dependence of short-range correlations in nuclei and the EMC effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maarten Vanhalst; Jan Ryckebusch; Wim Cosyn

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An approximate method to quantify the mass dependence of the number of two-nucleon (2N) short-range correlations (SRC) in nuclei is suggested. The proposed method relies on the concept of the "local nuclear character" of the SRC. We quantify the SRC and its mass dependence by computing the number of independent-particle model (IPM) nucleon pairs in a zero relative orbital momentum state. We find that the relative probability per nucleon for 2N SRC follows a power law as a function of the mass number $A$. The predictions are connected to measurements which provide access to the mass dependence of SRC. First, the ratio of the inclusive inelastic electron scattering cross sections of nuclei to $^{2}$H at large values of the Bjorken variable. Second, the EMC effect, for which we find a linear relationship between its magnitude and the predicted number of SRC-prone pairs.

  10. On q-deformed Stirling numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yilmaz Simsek

    2007-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this article is to introduce q-deformed Stirling numbers of the first and second kinds. Relations between these numbers, Riemann zeta function and q-Bernoulli numbers of higher order are given. Some relations related to the classical Stirling numbers and Bernoulli numbers of higher order are found. By using derivative operator to the generating function of the q-deformed Stirling numbers of the second kinds, a new function is defined which interpolates the q-deformed Stirling numbers of the second kinds at negative integers. The recurrence relations of the Stirling numbers of the first and second kind are given. In addition, relation between q-deformed Stirling numbers and q-Bell numbers is obtained.

  11. MASS SPECTROMETRIC APPROACHES FOR CHEMICAL CHARACTERISATION OF...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MASS SPECTROMETRIC APPROACHES FOR CHEMICAL CHARACTERISATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS: CRITICAL REVIEW OF MOST RECENT ADVANCES. MASS SPECTROMETRIC APPROACHES FOR CHEMICAL...

  12. THE EARLY DAYS OF ACCELERATOR MASS SPECTROMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, L.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reported work in high energy mass spectrometry-two in 1938,importance of high energy mass spectrometry was demonstrated

  13. Polaris: Mass and Multiplicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nancy Remage Evans; Gail Schaefer; Howard E. Bond; Edmund Nelan; Giuseppe Bono; Margarita Karovska; Scott Wolk; Dimitar Sasselov; Edward Guinan; Scott Engle; Eric Schlegel; Brian Mason

    2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Polaris, the nearest and brightest classical Cepheid, is a member of at least a triple system. It has a wide ($18''$) physical companion, the F-type dwarf Polaris B. Polaris itself is a single-lined spectroscopic binary with an orbital period of 30 years (Kamper, 1996, JRASC, 90, 140). By combining {\\it Hipparcos} measurements of the instantaneous proper motion with long-term measurements and the Kamper radial-velocity orbit, Wielen et al. (2000, A&A, 360, 399) have predicted the astrometric orbit of the close companion. Using the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} and the Advanced Camera for Surveys' High-Resolution Channel with an ultraviolet (F220W) filter, we have now directly detected the close companion. Based on the Wielen et al. orbit, the {\\it Hipparcos} parallax, and our measurement of the separation ($0.176''$ $\\pm$ $0.002''$), we find a preliminary mass of 5.0 $\\pm$ 1.5 M$_{\\odot}$ for the Cepheid and 1.38 $\\pm$ 0.61 M$_{\\odot}$ for the close companion. These values will be refined by additional {\\it HST} observations scheduled for the next 3 years. We have also obtained a {\\it Chandra} ACIS-I image of the Polaris field. Two distant companions C and D are not X-rays sources and hence are not young enough to be physical companions of the Cepheid. There is one additional stellar X-ray source in the field, located $253''$ from Polaris A, which is a possible companion. Further investigation of such a distant companion is valuable to confirm the full extent of the system.

  14. A PRECISE MASS MEASUREMENT OF THE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BINARY PULSAR PSR J1802 - 2124

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferdman, R. D.; Cognard, I.; Desvignes, G.; Theureau, G. [Station de Radioastronomie de Nancay, Observatoire de Paris, 18330 Nancay (France); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121, Bonn (Germany); McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Nice, D. J. [Physics Department, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010 (United States); Manchester, R. N.; Hobbs, G. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Lyne, A. G.; Faulkner, A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Possenti, A. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Loc. Poggio dei Pini, 09012 Capoterra (Italy); Demorest, P. B. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Backer, D. C., E-mail: robert.ferdman@obs-nancay.f [Department of Astronomy and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    PSR J1802 - 2124 is a 12.6 ms pulsar in a 16.8 hr binary orbit with a relatively massive white dwarf (WD) companion. These properties make it a member of the intermediate-mass class of binary pulsar (IMBP) systems. We have been timing this pulsar since its discovery in 2002. Concentrated observations at the Green Bank Telescope, augmented with data from the Parkes and Nancay observatories, have allowed us to determine the general relativistic Shapiro delay. This has yielded pulsar and WD mass measurements of 1.24 +- 0.11 M{sub sun} and 0.78 +- 0.04 M{sub sun} (68% confidence), respectively. The low mass of the pulsar, the high mass of the WD companion, the short orbital period, and the pulsar spin period may be explained by the system having gone through a common-envelope phase in its evolution. We argue that selection effects may contribute to the relatively small number of known IMBPs.

  15. Verification Challenges at Low Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benz, Jacob M.; Booker, Paul M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many papers have dealt with the political difficulties and ramifications of deep nuclear arms reductions, and the issues of “Going to Zero”. Political issues include extended deterrence, conventional weapons, ballistic missile defense, and regional and geo-political security issues. At each step on the road to low numbers, the verification required to ensure compliance of all parties will increase significantly. Looking post New START, the next step will likely include warhead limits in the neighborhood of 1000 . Further reductions will include stepping stones at1000 warheads, 100’s of warheads, and then 10’s of warheads before final elimination could be considered of the last few remaining warheads and weapons. This paper will focus on these three threshold reduction levels, 1000, 100’s, 10’s. For each, the issues and challenges will be discussed, potential solutions will be identified, and the verification technologies and chain of custody measures that address these solutions will be surveyed. It is important to note that many of the issues that need to be addressed have no current solution. In these cases, the paper will explore new or novel technologies that could be applied. These technologies will draw from the research and development that is ongoing throughout the national laboratory complex, and will look at technologies utilized in other areas of industry for their application to arms control verification.

  16. Mass Media Minor Requirements (total 20 credits) Prerequisites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Rebecca A.

    in Mass Media · MASS 334 (04) Writing and Speaking For Broadcast · MASS 351 (04) Digital Imaging For Mass Media · MASS 360 (04) Digital Design For Mass Media · MASS 412 (04) Mass Media History · MASS 431 (04Mass Media Minor Requirements (total 20 credits) Prerequisites: · MASS 110 Introduction to Mass

  17. High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Biological Tissue Imaging. High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR...

  18. Geometric gravitational origin of neutrino oscillations and mass-energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo R. Gonzalez-Martin

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass-energy scale for neutrinos was calculated from the null cone curvature using geometric concepts. The scale is variable depending on the gravitational potential and the trajectory inclination with respect to the field direction. The proposed neutrino covariant equation provides the adequate curvature. The mass-energy at the Earth surface varies from a horizontal value 0.402 eV to a vertical value 0.569 eV. Earth spinor waves with winding numbers n show squared energy differences within ranges from 2.05 x 10*(-3) to 4.10 x 10*(-3) eV*2 for n=0,1 neutrinos and from 3.89 x 10*(-5) to 7.79 x 10*(-5) eV*2 for n=1,2 neutrinos. These waves interfere and the different phase velocities produce neutrino-like oscillations. The experimental results for atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation mass parameters respectivelly fall within these theoretical ranges. Neutrinos in outer space, where interactions may be neglected, appear as particles travelling with zero mass on null geodesics. These gravitational curvature energies are consistent with neutrino oscillations, zero neutrino rest masses and Einstein's General Relativity and energy mass equivalence principle. When analyzing or averaging experimental neutrino mass-energy results of different experiments on the Earth it is of interest to consider the possible influence of the trajectory inclination angle.

  19. US LHC Accelerator Project Baseline Change Request BCR Number 59

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Large Hadron Collider Program

    .5.1 US PM, 1.5.3 FNAL PM Title FNAL-LHC Rebaseline Change Control Level 2 Originator Jim Kerby Date 18 Request BCR Number 59 WBS 1.1.1 IR Quads, 1.1.3 DFBX, 1.5.1 US PM, 1.5.3 FNAL PM Title FNAL-LHC Rebaseline,447,621 ($938,509) 1.1.1.1 Tooling $2,328,448 $2,180,725 ($147,723) 1.1.1.2 Cold Mass $5,401,839 $5

  20. Neutrino Masses in Astroparticle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Raffelt

    2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The case for small neutrino mass differences from atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation experiments has become compelling, but leaves the overall neutrino mass scale m_nu undetermined. The most restrictive limit of m_nu neutrinos. If solar neutrino oscillations indeed correspond to the favored large mixing angle MSW solution, then big-bang nucleosynthesis gives us a restrictive limit on all neutrino chemical potentials, removing the previous uncertainty of n_nu. Therefore, a possible future measurement of m_nu will directly establish the cosmic neutrino mass fraction Omega_nu. Cosmological neutrinos with sub-eV masses can play an interesting role for producing the highest-energy cosmic rays (Z-burst scenario). Sub-eV masses also relate naturally to leptogenesis scenarios of the cosmic baryon asymmetry. Unfortunately, the time-of-flight dispersion of a galactic or local-group supernova neutrino burst is not sensitive in the sub-eV range.

  1. Mass Resolving Power Requirement for Molecular Formula Determination of Fossil Oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Mass Resolving Power Requirement for Molecular Formula Determination of Fossil Oils Chang Samuel numbers based on the molecular formulas determined from accurate mass measurement.1 We have reported of molecular formulas of the components is reviewed. The resolving power required for overlapping compound

  2. Assigning mass values to in-house standard UF/sub 6/ cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, A.; McGuire, D.; Croarkin, C.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A statistical experimental design called the Fast 4-1 Series is used to assign mass values to in-house standard UF/sub 6/ cylinders. This design is intended to minimize the number of weighings of large cylinders yet provide acceptable estimates of mass values and their precision. 5 refs.

  3. Grant Title: INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EXPERIENCES FOR STUDENTS AND TEACHERS (ITEST) Funding Opportunity Number: NSF 12-597. CFDA Number(s): 47.076.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: NSF 12-597. CFDA Number(s): 47.076. Agency/Department: National Science Foundation

  4. Net quark number probability distribution near the chiral crossover transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Morita; Bengt Friman; Krzysztof Redlich; Vladimir Skokov

    2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate properties of the probability distribution of the net quark number near the chiral crossover transition in the quark-meson model. The calculations are performed within the functional renormalization group approach, as well as in the mean-field approximation. We find, that there is a substantial influence of the underlying chiral phase transition on the properties of the probability distribution. In particular, for a physical pion mass, the distribution which includes the effect of mesonic fluctuations, differs considerably from both, the mean-field and Skellam distributions. The latter is considered as a reference for a non-critical behavior. A characteristic feature of the net quark number probability distribution is that, in the vicinity of the chiral crossover transition in the O(4) universality class, it is narrower than the corresponding mean-field and Skellam function. We study the volume dependence of the probability distribution, as well as the resulting cumulants, and discuss their approximate scaling properties.

  5. Prime number generation and factor elimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vineet Kumar

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have presented a multivariate polynomial function termed as factor elimination function,by which, we can generate prime numbers. This function's mapping behavior can explain the irregularities in the occurrence of prime numbers on the number line. Generally the different categories of prime numbers found till date, satisfy the form of this function. We present some absolute and probabilistic conditions for the primality of the number generated by this method. This function is capable of leading to highly efficient algorithms for generating prime numbers.

  6. Mass Transfer from Giant Donors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlovskii, K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of mass transfer in binaries with convective giant donors remains an open question in modern astrophysics. There is a significant discrepancy between what the existing methods predict for a response to mass loss of the giant itself, as well as for the mass transfer rate during the Roche lobe overflow. Here we show that the recombination energy in the superadiabatic layer plays an important and hitherto unaccounted-for role in he donor's response to mass loss, in particular on its luminosity and effective temperature. Our improved optically thick nozzle method to calculate the mass transfer rate via $L_1$ allows us to evolve binary systems for a substantial Roche lobe overflow. We propose a new, strengthened criterion for the mass transfer instability, basing it on whether the donor experiences overflow through its outer Lagrangian point. We find that with the new criterion, if the donor has a well-developed outer convective envelope, the critical initial mass ratio for which a binary would evolv...

  7. Chip-Scale Quadrupole Mass Filters for Portable Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Kerry

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new class of chip-scale quadrupole mass filter (QMF). The devices are completely batch fabricated using a wafer-scale process that integrates the quadrupole ...

  8. Star Formation and the Growth of Stellar Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric F. Bell; Xian Zhong Zheng; Casey Papovich; Andrea Borch; Christian Wolf; Klaus Meisenheimer

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations have demonstrated a significant growth in the integrated stellar mass of the red sequence since z=1, dominated by a steadily increasing number of galaxies with stellar masses M* 3x10^10 M_sun blue galaxies would also be overproduced; i.e., most of the new stars formed in blue cloud galaxies are in the massive galaxies. We explore a simple truncation scenario in which these `extra' blue galaxies have their star formation suppressed by an unspecified mechanism or mechanisms; simple cessation of star formation in these extra blue galaxies is approximately sufficient to build up the red sequence at M*<10^11 M_sun.

  9. Turing's normal numbers: towards randomness Veronica Becher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    presumably in 1938 Alan Turing gave an algorithm that produces real numbers normal to every integer base- putable normal numbers, and this result should be attributed to Alan Turing. His manuscript entitled "A

  10. Mass independent textures and symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, C. S. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2T8 and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass-independent texture is a set of linear relations of the fermion mass-matrix elements which imposes no constraint on the fermionic masses nor the Majorana phases. Magic and 2-3 symmetries are examples. We discuss the general construction and the properties of these textures, as well as their relation to the quark and neutrino mixing matrices. Such a texture may be regarded as a symmetry, whose unitary generators of the symmetry group can be explicitly constructed. In particular, the symmetries connected with the tribimaximal neutrino mixing matrix are discussed, together with the physical consequence of breaking one symmetry but preserving another.

  11. Negative mass solitons in gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cebeci, Hakan; Sarioglu, Oezguer; Tekin, Bayram [Anadolu University, Department of Physics, Yunus Emre Campus, 26470, Eskisehir (Turkey); Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Middle East Technical University, 06531, Ankara (Turkey)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We first reconstruct the conserved (Abbott-Deser) charges in the spin-connection formalism of gravity for asymptotically (Anti)-de Sitter spaces, and then compute the masses of the AdS soliton and the recently found Eguchi-Hanson solitons in generic odd dimensions, unlike the previous result obtained for only five dimensions. These solutions have negative masses compared to the global AdS or AdS/Z{sub p} spacetimes. As a separate note, we also compute the masses of the recent even dimensional Taub-NUT-Reissner-Nordstroem metrics.

  12. High speed optical quantum random number generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinfurter, Harald

    .3351 (2009). 6. I. Reidler, Y. Aviad, M. Rosenbluh, and I. Kanter, "Ultrahigh-speed random number generation

  13. Clar number of catacondensed benzenoid hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klavzar, Sandi

    Clar number of catacondensed benzenoid hydrocarbons Sandi KlavŸzar a,# , Petra Ÿ Zigert a , Ivan hydrocarbon: CL is equal to the minimum number of straight lines required to intersect all hexagons theory; Clar formula; Clar number; Resonance graph; Benzenoid hydrocarbons 1. Introduction Within

  14. THE EFFECT OF MAGNETIC FIELDS AND AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION ON CORE MASS FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Nicole D.; Basu, Shantanu, E-mail: nwityk@uwo.ca, E-mail: basu@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear analysis of the formation of protostellar cores in planar magnetic interstellar clouds yields information about length scales involved in star formation. Combining these length scales with various distributions of other environmental variables (i.e., column density and mass-to-flux ratio) and applying Monte Carlo methods allow us to produce synthetic core mass functions (CMFs) for different environmental conditions. Our analysis shows that the shape of the CMF is directly dependent on the physical conditions of the cloud. Specifically, magnetic fields act to broaden the mass function and develop a high-mass tail while ambipolar diffusion will truncate this high-mass tail. In addition, we analyze the effect of small number statistics on the shape and high-mass slope of the synthetic CMFs. We find that observed CMFs are severely statistically limited, which has a profound effect on the derived slope for the high-mass tail.

  15. New precision mass measurements of neutron-rich calcium and potassium isotopes and three-nucleon forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. T. Gallant; J. C. Bale; T. Brunner; U. Chowdhury; S. Ettenauer; A. Lennarz; D. Robertson; V. V. Simon; A. Chaudhuri; J. D. Holt; A. A. Kwiatkowski; E. Mané; J. Menéndez; B. E. Schultz; M. C. Simon; C. Andreoiu; P. Delheij; M. R. Pearson; H. Savajols; A. Schwenk; J. Dilling

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present precision Penning-trap mass measurements of neutron-rich calcium and potassium isotopes in the vicinity of neutron number N=32. Using the TITAN system the mass of $^{51}$K was measured for the first time, and the precision of the $^{51,52}$Ca mass values were improved significantly. The new mass values show a dramatic increase of the binding energy compared to those reported in the atomic mass evaluation. In particular, $^{52}$Ca is more bound by 1.74 MeV, and the behavior with neutron number deviates substantially from the tabulated values. An increased binding was predicted recently based on calculations that include three-nucleon (3N) forces. We present a comparison to improved calculations, which agree remarkably with the evolution of masses with neutron number, making neutron-rich calcium isotopes an exciting region to probe 3N forces at neutron-rich extremes.

  16. LHC Higgs boson mass combination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adye, Tim; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the Higgs boson mass is presented based on the combined data samples of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN LHC in the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ and $H \\rightarrow ZZ\\rightarrow 4\\ell$ decay channels. The results are obtained from a simultaneous fit to the reconstructed invariant mass peaks in the two channels and for the two experiments. The measured masses from the individual channels and the two experiments are found to be consistent among themselves. The combined measured mass of the Higgs boson is $m_{H} = 125.09\\pm0.21\\,\\mathrm{(stat.)}\\pm0.11\\,\\mathrm{(syst.)}~\\mathrm{GeV}$.

  17. Mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator actively measures the mass of a sample on an acoustic microbalance during the collection process. The microbalance comprises a chemically sensitive interface for collecting the sample thereon and an acoustic-based physical transducer that provides an electrical output that is proportional to the mass of the collected sample. The acoustic microbalance preferably comprises a pivot plate resonator. A resistive heating element can be disposed on the chemically sensitive interface to rapidly heat and release the collected sample for further analysis. Therefore, the mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  18. Mass matrices and their renormalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, S.-H.; Kuo, T. K.; Lee, T.-H.; Xiong Chi [Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan TAIWAN (China); Purdue University, Department of Physics, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States); Purdue University, Department of Physics, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States); University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4714 (United States)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain explicitly the renormalization group equations for the quark mass matrices in terms of a set of rephasing invariant parameters. For a range of assumed high energy values for the mass ratios and mixing parameters, they are found to evolve rapidly and develop hierarchies as the energy scale decreases. To achieve the experimentally observed high degree of hierarchy, however, the introduction of new models with specific properties becomes necessary.

  19. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yifang Wang; Zhi-zhong Xing

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This essay is intended to provide a brief description of the peculiar properties of neutrinos within and beyond the standard theory of weak interactions. The focus is on the flavor oscillations of massive neutrinos, from which one has achieved some striking knowledge about their mass spectrum and flavor mixing pattern. The experimental prospects towards probing the absolute neutrino mass scale, possible Majorana nature and CP-violating effects will also be addressed.

  20. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yifang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This essay is intended to provide a brief description of the peculiar properties of neutrinos within and beyond the standard theory of weak interactions. The focus is on the flavor oscillations of massive neutrinos, from which one has achieved some striking knowledge about their mass spectrum and flavor mixing pattern. The experimental prospects towards probing the absolute neutrino mass scale, possible Majorana nature and CP-violating effects will also be addressed.

  1. Methods for recalibration of mass spectrometry data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are methods for recalibrating mass spectrometry data that provide improvement in both mass accuracy and precision by adjusting for experimental variance in parameters that have a substantial impact on mass measurement accuracy. Optimal coefficients are determined using correlated pairs of mass values compiled by matching sets of measured and putative mass values that minimize overall effective mass error and mass error spread. Coefficients are subsequently used to correct mass values for peaks detected in the measured dataset, providing recalibration thereof. Sub-ppm mass measurement accuracy has been demonstrated on a complex fungal proteome after recalibration, providing improved confidence for peptide identifications.

  2. Mass Segregation in Young LMC Clusters I. NGC 2157

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Fischer; Carlton Pryor; Stephen Murray; Mario Mateo; Tom Richtler

    1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out WFPC2 V- and I-band imaging of the young LMC cluster NGC 2157. Construction of a color-magnitude diagram and isochrone fitting yields an age of tau = 100 000 000 yrs, a reddening E(B-V) = 0.1 and a distance modulus of 18.4 mag. Our data covers the mass range 0.75 < m < 5.1 solar masses. We find that the cluster mass function changes significantly from the inner regions to the outer regions, becoming steeper (larger number of low mass stars relative to high mass stars) at larger radii. The age of NGC 2157 is comparable to its two-body relaxation timescale only in the cluster core. The observed steepening of the mass function at larger radii is therefore most likely an initial condition of the cluster stars. Such initial conditions are predicted in models of cluster star formation in which dissipative processes act more strongly upon more massive stars.

  3. Small Neutrino Masses from Supersymmetry Breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutrino mass matrices. The above Majorana and Dirac casesMajorana mass for N of the order F/M ? 100GeV, yielding a LR neutrino mass matrixMajorana masses M and couplings to the lepton doublets: L = M NN + ?LNH where M and ? are mass matrices.

  4. Mapping the core mass function to the initial mass function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guszejnov, David

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown that fragmentation within self-gravitating, turbulent molecular clouds ("turbulent fragmentation") can naturally explain the observed properties of protostellar cores, including the core mass function (CMF). Here, we extend recently-developed analytic models for turbulent fragmentation to follow the time-dependent hierarchical fragmentation of self-gravitating cores, until they reach effectively infinite density (and form stars). We show that turbulent fragmentation robustly predicts two key features of the IMF. First, a high-mass power-law scaling very close to the Salpeter slope, which is a generic consequence of the scale-free nature of turbulence and self-gravity. We predict the IMF slope (-2.3) is slightly steeper then the CMF slope (-2.1), owing to the slower collapse and easier fragmentation of large cores. Second, a turnover mass, which is set by a combination of the CMF turnover mass (a couple solar masses, determined by the `sonic scale' of galactic turbulence, and so weakly depend...

  5. Tip sheet: Expanded Library of Congress Call Number Classification system Call Number Subject Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Patanjali

    Tip sheet: Expanded Library of Congress Call Number Classification system Call Number Subject R: Medicine T: Technology U: Military Science Z: Bibliography. Library Science. Information

  6. Mass Parameterizations and Predictions of Isotopic Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Souza; P. Danielewicz; S. Das Gupta; R. Donangelo; W. A. Friedman; W. G. Lynch; W. P. Tan; M. B. Tsang

    2003-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the accuracy of mass models for extrapolating to very asymmetric nuclei and the impact of such extrapolations on the predictions of isotopic observables in multifragmentation. We obtain improved mass predictions by incorporating measured masses and extrapolating to unmeasured masses with a mass formula that includes surface symmetry and Coulomb terms. We find that using accurate masses has a significant impact on the predicted isotopic observables.

  7. Photon and graviton mass limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieto, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goldhaber Scharff, Alfred [SUNY

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review past and current studies of possible long-distance, low-frequency deviations from Maxwell electrodynamics and Einstein gravity. Both have passed through three phases: (1) Testing the inverse-square laws of Newton and Coulomb, (2) Seeking a nonzero value for the rest mass of photon or graviton, and (3) Considering more degrees of freedom, allowing mass while preserving gauge or general-coordinate invariance. For electrodynamics there continues to be no sign of any deviation. Since our previous review the lower limit on the photon Compton wavelength (associated with weakening of electromagnetic fields in vacuum over large distance scale) has improved by four orders of magnitude, to about one astronomical unit. Rapid current progress in astronomical observations makes it likely that there will be further advances. These ultimately could yield a bound exceeding galactic dimensions, as has long been contemplated. Meanwhile, for gravity there have been strong arguments about even the concept of a graviton rest mass. At the same time there are striking observations, commonly labeled 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' that some argue imply modified gravity. This makes the questions for gravity much more interesting. For dark matter, which involves increased attraction at large distances, any explanation by modified gravity would be qualitatively different from graviton mass. Because dark energy is associated with reduced attraction at large distances, it might be explained by a graviton-mass-like effect.

  8. Predicting landfalling hurricane numbers from basin hurricane numbers: basic statistical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laepple, T; Penzer, J; Bellone, E; Nzerem, K; Laepple, Thomas; Jewson, Stephen; Penzer, Jeremy; Bellone, Enrica; Nzerem, Kechi

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One possible method for predicting landfalling hurricane numbers is to first predict the number of hurricanes in the basin and then convert that prediction to a prediction of landfalling hurricane numbers using an estimated proportion. Should this work better than just predicting landfalling hurricane numbers directly? We perform a basic statistical analysis of this question in the context of a simple abstract model.

  9. REFINED BOUNDS ON THE NUMBER OF CONNECTED ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 6, 2011 ... Smith inequality (see Theorem 2.5) a bound on the number of semi- ... then using Smith inequality, have been used before in several different ...

  10. Harmonic resolution as a holographic quantum number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bousso, Raphael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL- 57239 Harmonic resolution as a holographic quantumhep-th/0310223 UCB-PTH-03/26 Harmonic resolution as aquantum number, the harmonic resolution K. The Bekenstein

  11. On Conformal Field Theory and Number Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, An

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Frontiers in Number Theory, Physics, and Ge- ometry II. (Witten, Quantum Field Theory, Crassmannians, and AlgebraicJ. Polchinski, String Theory, Vol. 1, Cambridge Univ.

  12. Big Mysteries: The Higgs Mass

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    With the discovery of what looks to be the Higgs boson, LHC researchers are turning their attention to the next big question, which is the predicted mass of the newly discovered particles. When the effects of quantum mechanics is taken into account, the mass of the Higgs boson should be incredibly high...perhaps upwards of a quadrillion times higher than what was observed. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln explains how it is that the theory predicts that the mass is so large and gives at least one possible theoretical idea that might solve the problem. Whether the proposed idea is the answer or not, this question must be answered by experiments at the LHC or today's entire theoretical paradigm could be in jeopardy.

  13. Slowly rotating homogeneous masses revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reina, Borja

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hartle's model for slowly rotating stars has been extensively used to compute equilibrium configurations of slowly rotating stars to second order in perturbation theory in General Relativity, given a barotropic equation of state (EOS). A recent study based on the modern theory of perturbed matchings show that the model must be amended to accommodate EOS's in which the energy density does not vanish at the surface of the non rotating star. In particular, the expression for the change in mass given in the original model, i.e. a contribution to the mass that arises when the perturbations are chosen so that the pressure of the rotating and non rotating configurations agree, must be modified with an additional term. In this paper, the amended change in mass is calculated for the case of constant density stars.

  14. Gauge Trimming of Neutrino Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; /Fermilab /UC, Irvine; de Gouvea, Andre; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that under a new U(1) gauge symmetry, which is non-anomalous in the presence of one ''right-handed neutrino'' per generation and consistent with the standard model Yukawa couplings, the most general fermion charges are determined in terms of four rational parameters. This generalization of the B-L symmetry with generation-dependent lepton charges leads to neutrino masses induced by operators of high dimensionality. Neutrino masses are thus naturally small without invoking physics at energies above the TeV scale, whether neutrinos are Majorana or Dirac fermions. This ''Leptocratic'' Model predicts the existence of light quasi-sterile neutrinos with consequences for cosmology, and implies that collider experiments may reveal the origin of neutrino masses.

  15. Big Mysteries: The Higgs Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    With the discovery of what looks to be the Higgs boson, LHC researchers are turning their attention to the next big question, which is the predicted mass of the newly discovered particles. When the effects of quantum mechanics is taken into account, the mass of the Higgs boson should be incredibly high...perhaps upwards of a quadrillion times higher than what was observed. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln explains how it is that the theory predicts that the mass is so large and gives at least one possible theoretical idea that might solve the problem. Whether the proposed idea is the answer or not, this question must be answered by experiments at the LHC or today's entire theoretical paradigm could be in jeopardy.

  16. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  17. Textures for neutrino mass matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leontaris, G.K.; Lola, S.; Scheich, C.; Vergados, J.D. [Theoretical Physics Division, Ioannina University, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece)] [Theoretical Physics Division, Ioannina University, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Univerisitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049, Madrid (Spain); [Department of Natural Sciences, University of Cyprus, Nicosia (Cyprus)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a classification of heavy Majorana neutrino mass matrices with up to three texture zeros, assuming the Dirac masses of the neutrinos to be of the same form as the ones of the up quarks in the five texture zero solutions for the quark matrices. This is the case for many unified and partially unified models. We find that it is possible to have solutions which account for the solar and atmospheric neutrino problems as well as the COBE observations simultaneously, and we motivate the existence of such solutions from symmetries. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. CORONAL MASS EJECTION MASS, ENERGY, AND FORCE ESTIMATES USING STEREO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carley, Eoin P.; Gallagher, Peter T. [Astrophysics Research Group, School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); McAteer, R. T. James [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States)

    2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding coronal mass ejection (CME) energetics and dynamics has been a long-standing problem, and although previous observational estimates have been made, such studies have been hindered by large uncertainties in CME mass. Here, the two vantage points of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) COR1 and COR2 coronagraphs were used to accurately estimate the mass of the 2008 December 12 CME. Acceleration estimates derived from the position of the CME front in three dimensions were combined with the mass estimates to calculate the magnitude of the kinetic energy and driving force at different stages of the CME evolution. The CME asymptotically approaches a mass of 3.4 {+-} 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} g beyond {approx}10 R{sub Sun }. The kinetic energy shows an initial rise toward 6.3 {+-} 3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 29} erg at {approx}3 R{sub Sun }, beyond which it rises steadily to 4.2 {+-} 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg at {approx}18 R{sub Sun }. The dynamics are described by an early phase of strong acceleration, dominated by a force of peak magnitude of 3.4 {+-} 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} N at {approx}3 R{sub Sun }, after which a force of 3.8 {+-} 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} N takes effect between {approx}7 and 18 R{sub Sun }. These results are consistent with magnetic (Lorentz) forces acting at heliocentric distances of {approx}<7 R{sub Sun }, while solar wind drag forces dominate at larger distances ({approx}>7 R{sub Sun }).

  19. Grant Title: NIDCD PHASE I/II PRELIMINARY CLINICAL TRIALS IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-12-123. CFDA Number(s): 93.173.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: PAR-12-123. CFDA Number(s): 93.173. Agency/Department: National Institutes of Health (NIH

  20. Grant Title: AHRQ HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH DEMONSTRATION AND DISSEMINATION GRANTS Funding Opportunity Number: PA-13-046. CFDA Number(s): 93.226.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: PA-13-046. CFDA Number(s): 93.226. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human

  1. Grant Title: INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES RESEARCH CENTERS (P30) Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-HD-13-002. CFDA Number(s): 93.865.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Number: RFA-HD-13-002. CFDA Number(s): 93.865. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services

  2. Grant Title: RESEARCH ON PSYCHOPATHOLOGY IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES (R01) Funding Opportunity Number: PA-12-219. CFDA Number(s): 93.242.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Number: PA-12-219. CFDA Number(s): 93.242. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services

  3. Grant Title: MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH DISSERTATION GRANT TO INCREASE DIVERSITY (R36) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-12-103. CFDA Number(s): 93.242.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: PAR-12-103. CFDA Number(s): 93.242. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human

  4. Grant Title: RESEARCH GRANTS FOR PREVENTING VIOLENCE AND VIOLENCE-RELATED INJURY Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-CE-14-006. CFDA Number(s): 93.136.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: RFA-CE-14-006. CFDA Number(s): 93.136. Agency/Department: Centers for Disease Control

  5. Grant Title: BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE TRACK AWARD FOR RAPID TRANSITION (B/START) (R03) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-12-251. CFDA Number(s): 93.279.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: PAR-12-251. CFDA Number(s): 93.279. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human

  6. Grant Title: ARTS IN EDUCATION MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND DISSEMINATION PROGRAM Funding Opportunity Number: ED-GRANTS-022013-001. CFDA Number(s): 84.351D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Number: ED-GRANTS-022013-001. CFDA Number(s): 84.351D. Agency/Department: Department of Education, Office

  7. 2001 TRAFFIC ZONE BOUNDARIES Zone Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    2001 TRAFFIC ZONE BOUNDARIES Zone Numbers & Detailed Definitions #12;2001 TRAFFIC ZONE BOUNDARIES of Toronto Joint Program in Transportation January 2003 #12;PREFACE This report presents the 2001 traffic zone numbers by local municipalities in the 2001 TTS survey area. The second part presents detailed

  8. Geometrical accumulations and computably enumerable real numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand-Lose, Jérôme

    Geometrical accumulations and computably enumerable real numbers (extended abstract) J and space are continuous and accumulations can be devised to unlimitedly accelerate a computation with rational numbers for coordinates and speeds, the time of any accumulation is a c.e. (compu- tably

  9. SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER AND NAME VERIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER AND NAME VERIFICATION Academic Year 2014­2015 *FA552-A* Please recycle. DIRECTIONS--You must verify your name and Social Security number for processing of your 2014­2015 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to continue. Please attach a legible copy of your Social Security

  10. SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER AND NAME VERIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER AND NAME VERIFICATION Academic Year 2013­2014 *FA552-A* Please recycle. DIRECTIONS--You must verify your name and Social Security number for processing of your 2013­2014 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to continue. Please attach a legible copy of your Social Security

  11. Search for lepton-family-number nonconservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, C.M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the status of lepton-family-number nonconservation is given. After a brief historical and theoretical discussion, a description of how experimental searches for lepton-family-number nonconservation are performed is presented. Finally, a summary of the results from past experiments and prospects for future experiments is given.

  12. Protocol Number: (IBC office use only)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asaithambi, Asai

    Protocol Number: (IBC office use only) 1 UNF Registration of Biosafety Level 2 (BSL-2) A-2 Form", describe the methods of inactivation. #12;Protocol Number: (IBC office use only) 2 10. Describe the mechanism for decontaminating lab waste prior to disposal. Yes No If "Yes", describe the methods

  13. A Thermodynamic Classification of Real Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Garrity

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new classification scheme for real numbers is given, motivated by ideas from statistical mechanics in general and work of Knauf and of Fiala and Kleban in particular. Critical for this classification of a real number will be the Diophantine properties of its continued fraction expansion.

  14. enter part number BNC / RP-BNC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    enter part number Products 7/16 1.0/2.3 1.6/5.6 AFI AMC BNC / RP-BNC C FAKRA SMB FME HN MCX Mini ------- Product Search ------- Inventory Search Search Results for: 31-10152-RFX Results: 1 - 1 of 1 Part Number. All rights reserved. Copyright | Terms & Conditions | RF E-Mail Client | Contact Us | Amphenol

  15. Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2012 #12;Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Contents Page Directors Trust Finance plc Directors' Report for the year ended 30 September 2012 Report of the Directors

  16. Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2013 #12;Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Contents Page Directors Trust Finance plc Directors' Report For the year ended 30 September 2013 Report of the Directors

  17. Experimental Number Theory Part I : Tower Arithmetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeilberger, Doron

    Experimental Number Theory Part I : Tower Arithmetic by Edinah K. Gnang January 15, 2011 1 rooted trees, which we shall here refer to as towers. The bijection between numbers and towers provides by XXX = (xk)1kn , (1) a tower expansion ( or simply a tower ) over XXX is a finite product of iterated

  18. EXTENDING THE USEFUL LIFE OF OLDER MASS SPECTROMETERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, S.; Cordaro, J.; Holland, M.; Jones, V.

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal ionization and gas mass spectrometers are widely used across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and contractor laboratories. These instruments support critical missions, where high reliability and low measurement uncertainty are essential. A growing number of these mass spectrometers are significantly older than their original design life. The reality is that manufacturers have declared many of the instrument models obsolete, with direct replacement parts and service no longer available. Some of these obsolete models do not have a next generation, commercially available replacement. Today's budget conscious economy demands for the use of creative funds management. Therefore, the ability to refurbish (or upgrade) these valuable analytical tools and extending their useful life is a cost effective option. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has the proven expertise to breathe new life into older mass spectrometers, at a significant cost savings compared to the purchase and installation of new instruments. A twenty-seven year old Finnigan MAT-261{trademark} Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS), located at the SRS F/H Area Production Support Laboratory, has been successfully refurbished. Engineers from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) fabricated and installed the new electronics. These engineers also provide continued instrument maintenance services. With electronic component drawings being DOE Property, other DOE Complex laboratories have the option to extend the life of their aged Mass Spectrometers.

  19. S3 x Z2 model for neutrino mass matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Grimus; L. Lavoura

    2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a model for lepton mass matrices based on the seesaw mechanism, a complex scalar gauge singlet and a horizontal symmetry $S_3 \\times \\mathbbm{Z}_2$. In a suitable weak basis, the charged-lepton mass matrix and the neutrino Dirac mass matrix are diagonal, but the vacuum expectation value of the scalar gauge singlet renders the Majorana mass matrix of the right-handed neutrinos non-diagonal, thereby generating lepton mixing. When the symmetry $S_3$ is not broken in the scalar potential, the effective light-neutrino Majorana mass matrix enjoys $\\mu$--$\\tau$ interchange symmetry, thus predicting maximal atmospheric neutrino mixing together with $U_{e3} = 0$. A partial and less predictive form of $\\mu$--$\\tau$ interchange symmetry is obtained when the symmetry $S_3$ is softly broken in the scalar potential. Enlarging the symmetry group $S_3 \\times \\mathbbm{Z}_2$ by an additional discrete electron-number symmetry $\\mathbbm{Z}_2^{(e)}$, a more predicitive model is obtained, which is in practice indistinguishable from a previous one based on the group $D_4$.

  20. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, M. J.; Taylor, J. D.; McCormick, R. L.

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we present a compilation of reported cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. The compiled database contains cetane values for 299 pure compounds, including 156 hydrocarbons and 143 oxygenates. Cetane number is a relative ranking of fuels based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition. The cetane number is typically measured either in a combustion bomb or in a single-cylinder research engine. This report includes cetane values from several different measurement techniques - each of which has associated uncertainties. Additionally, many of the reported values are determined by measuring blending cetane numbers, which introduces significant error. In many cases, the measurement technique is not reported nor is there any discussion about the purity of the compounds. Nonetheless, the data in this report represent the best pure compound cetane number values available from the literature as of August 2004.

  1. Time of flight mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulbricht, Jr., William H. (Arvada, CO)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

  2. Charmonium mass in nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, S. H.; Ko, Che Ming.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mass shift of charmonium states in nuclear matter is studied in the perturbative QCD approach. The leading-order effect due to the change of gluon condensate in nuclear matter is evaluated using the leading-order QCD formula, while the higher...

  3. Mass Generation and Noncommutative Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we show how it is possible to obtain mass generation in the context of non Abelian gauge field theory, using a non commutative spacetime. This is further confirmed by the modified dispersion relation that results from such a geometry.

  4. Black Holes of Negative Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I demonstrate that, under certain circumstances, regions of negative energy density can undergo gravitational collapse into a black hole. The resultant exterior black hole spacetimes necessarily have negative mass and non-trivial topology. A full theory of quantum gravity, in which topology-changing processes take place, could give rise to such spacetimes.

  5. CURRICULUM VITAE CLIFFORD F. MASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mass, Clifford F.

    ., S. Joslyn, J. Pyle, P. Tewson, T. Gneiting, A. Raftery, J. Baars, J. M. Sloughter, D. Jones and C a major orographic precipitation event. J. Atmos. Sci, 64, 711-737 Maurer, E. P, and C. F. Mass, 2006 Disturbances." J. R. Holton, adviser. Professional Experience Mid 1981 to Assistant, Associate Professor

  6. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita. 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) faces enormous scientific and engineering challenges associated with the remediation of legacy contamination at former nuclear weapons production facilities. Selection, design and optimization of appropriate site remedies (e.g., pump-and-treat, biostimulation, or monitored natural attenuation) requires reliable predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport; however, our current modeling capabilities are limited by an incomplete understanding of multi-scale mass transfer—its rates, scales, and the heterogeneity of controlling parameters. At many DOE sites, long “tailing” behavior, concentration rebound, and slower-than-expected cleanup are observed; these observations are all consistent with multi-scale mass transfer [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995; Haggerty et al., 2000; 2004], which renders pump-and-treat remediation and biotransformation inefficient and slow [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1994; Harvey et al., 1994; Wilson, 1997]. Despite the importance of mass transfer, there are significant uncertainties associated with controlling parameters, and the prevalence of mass transfer remains a point of debate [e.g., Hill et al., 2006; Molz et al., 2006] for lack of experimental methods to verify and measure it in situ or independently of tracer breakthrough. There is a critical need for new field-experimental techniques to measure mass transfer in-situ and estimate multi-scale and spatially variable mass-transfer parame

  7. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Abstract: Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving...

  8. MassMass transfer andtransfer and separation technologyseparation technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    ; for example L/L, L/S, S/S, G/L, G/L/Sexample L/L, L/S, S/S, G/L, G/L/S ­ Improved heat transfer to walls or heat exchange surfaces ­ Improved mass transfer, especially for immiscible liquids, G/L and L h t d f ti d Most mixtures will show tendency for segregation and an energy input is needed

  9. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick David [U.S. Geological Survey; Singha, Kamini [Colorado School of Mines; Johnson, Timothy C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Haggerty, Roy [Oregon State; Binley, Andrew [Lancaster University; Lane, John W. [US Geological Survey

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita.

  10. Electron-capture delayed fission properties of {sup 242}Es

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaughnessy, D. A. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemistry Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Adams, J. L. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Gregorich, K. E. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lane, M. R. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Laue, C. A. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lee, D. M. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); McGrath, C. A. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Patin, J. B. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Strellis, D. A. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Sylwester, E. R. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 70-319, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemistry Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] (and others)

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron-capture delayed fission of {sup 242}Es produced via the {sup 233}U({sup 14}N,5n){sup 242}Es reaction at 87 MeV (on target) was observed to decay with a half-life of 11{+-}3 s, consistent with the reported {alpha}-decay half-life of {sup 242}Es of 16{sub -4}{sup +6} s. The mass-yield distribution of the fission fragments is highly asymmetric. The average pre-neutron emission total kinetic energy of the fragments was measured to be 183{+-}18 MeV. Based on the ratio of the measured number of fission events to the measured number of {alpha} decays from the electron-capture daughter {sup 242}Cf (100% {alpha} branch), the probability of delayed fission was determined to be 0.006{+-}0.002. This value for the delayed fission probability fits the experimental trend of increasing delayed fission probability with increasing Q value for electron capture. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Mass Insertions vs. Mass Eigenstates calculations in Flavour Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dedes, A; Rosiek, J; Suxho, K; Tamvakis, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and prove a theorem of matrix analysis, the Flavour Expansion Theorem (or FET), according to which, an analytic function of a Hermitian matrix can be expanded polynomially in terms of its off-diagonal elements with coefficients being the divided differences of the analytic function and arguments the diagonal elements of the Hermitian matrix. The theorem is applicable in case of flavour changing amplitudes. At one-loop level this procedure is particularly natural due to the observation that every loop function in the Passarino-Veltman basis can be recursively expressed in terms of divided differences. FET helps to algebraically translate an amplitude written in mass eigenbasis into flavour mass insertions, without performing diagrammatic calculations in flavour basis. As a non-trivial application of FET up to a third order, we demonstrate its use in calculating strong bounds on the real parts of flavour changing mass insertions in the up- squark sector of the MSSM from neutron Electric Dipole Moment...

  12. Grant Title: DECISION, RISK AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES (DRMS) Funding Opportunity Number: PD-98-1321. CFDA Number(s): 47.075.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -1321. CFDA Number(s): 47.075. Agency/Department: National Science Foundation. Area of Research: Research

  13. Grant Title: NIH DIRECTOR'S EARLY INDEPENDENCE AWARDS (DP5) Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-RM-12-018. CFDA Number(s): 93.310.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -018. CFDA Number(s): 93.310. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Strategic

  14. Grant Title: NIDCD CLINICAL RESEARCH CENTER GRANT (P50) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-13-277. CFDA Number(s): 93.173.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -277. CFDA Number(s): 93.173. Agency/Department: National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute

  15. Grant Title: ACADEMIC-COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP CONFERENCE SERIES (R13) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-12-102. CFDA Number(s): 93.865.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -12-102. CFDA Number(s): 93.865. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services, National

  16. Grant Title: ALCOHOL RESEARCH EDUCATION PROJECT GRANTS (R25) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR -11-205. CFDA Number(s) 93.273.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -205. CFDA Number(s) 93.273. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), National

  17. Grant Title: NIDA CORE CENTER OF EXCELLENCE GRANT PROGRAM (P30) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-10-220. CFDA Number(s): 93.279.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -220. CFDA Number(s): 93.279. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes

  18. Grant Title: INITIATIVE FOR MAXIMIZING STUDENT DEVELOPMENT (IMSD) (R25) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-13-082. CFDA Number(s): 93.859.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    : PAR-13-082. CFDA Number(s): 93.859. Agency/Department: National Institutes of Health (NIH), National

  19. ON THE PROBLEM OF UNIQUENESS FOR THE MAXIMUM STIRLING NUMBER(S) OF THE SECOND KIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomerance, Carl

    ON THE PROBLEM OF UNIQUENESS FOR THE MAXIMUM STIRLING NUMBER(S) OF THE SECOND KIND E. Rodney Say that an integer n is exceptional if the maximum Stirling number of the second kind S(n, k) occurs or equal to x is O(x3/5+ ), for any > 0. 1. Introduction Let S(n, k) be the Stirling number of the second

  20. The International Mass Loading Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrov, Leonid

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Mass Loading Service computes four loadings: a) atmospheric pressure loading; b) land water storage loading; c) oceanic tidal loading; and d) non-tidal oceanic loading. The service provides to users the mass loading time series in three forms: 1) pre-computed time series for a list of 849 space geodesy stations; 2) pre-computed time series on the global 1deg x 1deg grid; and 3) on-demand Internet service for a list of stations and a time range specified by the user. The loading displacements are provided for the time period from 1979.01.01 through present, updated on an hourly basis, and have latencies 8-20 hours.

  1. Black Hole Interior Mass Formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthapratim Pradhan

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue by explicit computations that, although the area product, horizon radii product, entropy product and \\emph {irreducible mass product} of the event horizon and Cauchy horizon are universal, the \\emph{surface gravity product}, \\emph{surface temperature product} and \\emph{Komar energy product} of the said horizons do not seem to be universal for Kerr-Newman (KN) black hole space-time. We show the black hole mass formula on the \\emph{Cauchy horizon} following the seminal work by Smarr\\cite{smarr} for the outer horizon. We also prescribed the \\emph{four} laws of black hole mechanics for the \\emph{inner horizon}. New definition of the extremal limit of a black hole is discussed.

  2. OMB Control Number: 1910-5165

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OMB Control Number: 1910-5165 Expires: xxxx201x SEMI-ANNUAL DAVIS-BACON ENFORCEMENT REPORT Please submit this Semi-Annual Davis-Bacon Enforcement Report to your site DOENNSA...

  3. Estimating visitor and visit numbers to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................ 24 4.5 Monitoring and Evaluating Quality of Life for CRS'07 .......................................25 4.6 Quality of experience visitor, visit and total numbers of visits to woodlands. This document builds on guidance on visitor

  4. REFINED BOUNDS ON THE NUMBER OF CONNECTED ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 6, 2011 ... closure imply using the well-known Smith inequality (see Theorem 2.4) a bound on the number of semi-algebraically connected components of ...

  5. Libraries Reference Document Number: 253262-002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, James P.

    Intel® Fortran Libraries Reference Document Number: 253262-002 World Wide Web: http PROPERTY RIGHT. Intel products are not intended for use in medical, life saving, or life sustain- ing.................................................................................... xxiv Chapter 1 Overview of the Libraries Portability Routines

  6. THE NEW ELEMENT BERKELIUM (ATOMIC NUMBER 97)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, S.G.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUMBER 97) Stanley G. Thompson, Albert Ghiorso, and Glenn T.Rev Eventually 5 S • G. Thompson, Physo Revo 76, 319 (1949)0~'Street, Ghiorso, and Thompson, unpublished work. UCRL-669

  7. CORAL Name: STS 1 Model Number: ICP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    CORAL Name: STS 1 Model Number: ICP Location: TRL What it does: Deep Silicon Etch Introduction prior to use and to ENGAGE MACHINE prior to starting your process in CORAL. Venting and Loading a Wafer

  8. Contributions to Metric Number Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dent, Alexander W.

    Contributions to Metric Number Theory Paul Rowe Technical Report RHUL­MA­2002­2 5 December 2002, Professor Glyn Harman, for sug- gestions of problems to attempt, helpful advice on methods and help

  9. Elastic tail propulsion at low Reynolds number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Tony S. (Tony Sheung)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple way to generate propulsion at low Reynolds number is to periodically oscillate a passive flexible filament. Here we present a macroscopic experimental investigation of such a propulsive mechanism. A robotic swimmer ...

  10. ARE Update Volume 6, Number 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Just, David; Zilberman, David; Karp, Larry

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in California, the major GM crop is cotton. However, biotechor impossible if the GM crop is highly pro- internationala small number of authorized GM crops in the EU. Partly in

  11. Graphene, neutrino mass and oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Y. Wang

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A resolution of the Abraham-Minkowski dilemma is presented that other constant velocities can play the role of c in the theory of relativity. For example, in 2005 electrons of graphene were discovered to behave as if the coefficient is a Fermi velocity. Then we propose a conjecture for neutrinos to avoid the contradiction among two-component theory, negative rest mass-square and oscillation.

  12. Correlations of chiral condensates and quark number densities with static quark sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay Huebner

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate correlation functions of the Polyakov loop and static meson/diquark systems with the chiral condensate and the quark number density at finite temperature. In particular the latter observable can give insight in the mechanism of screening and string breaking at finite temperature. We use for our analysis gauge field configurations generated in 2+1 flavor QCD with an improved staggered fermion action with almost physical light quark masses and a physical value of the strange quark mass on lattices with temporal extent Nt=4 and 6.

  13. The concrete theory of numbers : Problem of simplicity of Fermat number-twins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris V. Tarasov

    2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of simplicity of Fermat number-twins $f_{n}^{\\pm}=2^{2^n}\\pm3$ is studied. The question for what $n$ numbers $f_{n}^{\\pm}$ are composite is investigated. The factor-identities for numbers of a kind $x^2 \\pm k $ are found.

  14. Sequence and Series of Real Numbers 1.1 Sequence of Real Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, M.Thamban

    1 Sequence and Series of Real Numbers 1.1 Sequence of Real Numbers Suppose for each positive a sequence, and this ordered list is usually written as (a1, a2, . . . , . . .) or (an) or {an}. More precisely, we define a sequence as follows: Definition 1.1 A sequence of real numbers is a function from

  15. SESAME equation of state number 7740: Polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boettger, J.C.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An equation of state (EOS) for polycarbonate (a widely used polymer) has been generated with the computer code GRIZZLY and will be added to the SESAME library as material number 7740. Although a number of the input parameter used in the calculations are based on rough estimates. 7740 provides a good match to experimental Hugoniot data and should be reliable on or near the principal Hugoniot. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Dynamical real numbers and living systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhurjati Prasad Datta

    2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently uncovered second derivative discontinuous solutions of the simplest linear ordinary differential equation define not only an nonstandard extension of the framework of the ordinary calculus, but also provide a dynamical representation of the ordinary real number system. Every real number can be visualized as a living cell -like structure, endowed with a definite evolutionary arrow. We discuss the relevance of this extended calculus in the study of living systems. We also present an intelligent version of the Newton's first law of motion.

  17. March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 1 Mass-Storage Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, Salah

    March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 1 Mass-Storage Structure Chapter 12 #12;March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 2 Objectives Describe the physical structure of secondary and tertiary storage of mass-storage devices Discuss operating-system services provided for mass storage, including RAID

  18. Energy Band Model Based on Effective Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viktor Ariel

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we demonstrate an alternative method of deriving an isotropic energy band model using a one-dimensional definition of the effective mass and experimentally observed dependence of mass on energy. We extend the effective mass definition to anti-particles and particles with zero rest mass. We assume an often observed linear dependence of mass on energy and derive a generalized non-parabolic energy-momentum relation. The resulting non-parabolicity leads to velocity saturation at high particle energies. We apply the energy band model to free relativistic particles and carriers in solid state materials and obtain commonly used dispersion relations and experimentally confirmed effective masses. We apply the model to zero rest mass particles in graphene and propose using the effective mass for photons. Therefore, it appears that the new energy band model based on the effective mass can be applied to relativistic particles and carriers in solid state materials.

  19. Mass and charge identification of fragments detected with the Chimera Silicon-CsI(Tl) telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Le Neindre; for REVERSE collaboration

    2001-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass and charge identification of charged products detected with Silicon-CsI(Tl) telescopes of the Chimera apparatus is presented. An identification function, based on the Bethe-Bloch formula, is used to fit empirical correlation between Delta E and E ADC readings, in order to determine, event by event, the atomic and mass numbers of the detected charged reaction products prior to energy calibration.

  20. Mass Splitting of Staggered Fermion and $SO(2D)$ Clifford Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Hatakeyama; H. Sawanaka; H. So

    2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new method to introduce rotationally invariant terms in staggered fermions which is based on an $SO(2D)$ Clifford algebra formulation, where $D$ means the number of space-time dimensions. We have four candidates for improved mass terms that can split the degenerate mass of staggered fermions. Among them, we analyze three types of combinations and find only one case that can identify with the light single Dirac mode.

  1. MassMass transfer andtransfer and separation technologyseparation technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Differential distillationdistillation /3/3 M l i b tt till = W = W(t) l f ti f Moles in bottom still = W = W(t), mol fraction of volatile component A = x in liquid, y in vapour Mass balance for A for vaporisation of dW: y· dW = d(W· x) = W· dx + x· dW ( = yD· D)y dW d(W x) W dx x dW ( yD D) integrates to xxW xy dx xy dx W dW W W ln

  2. New textures for the lepton mass matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Ferreira; L. Lavoura

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study predictive textures for the lepton mass matrices in which the charged-lepton mass matrix has either four or five zero matrix elements while the neutrino Majorana mass matrix has, respectively, either four or three zero matrix elements. We find that all the viable textures of these two kinds share many predictions: the neutrino mass spectrum is inverted, the sum of the light-neutrino masses is close to 0.1 eV, the Dirac phase $\\delta$ in the lepton mixing matrix is close to either $0$ or $\\pi$, and the mass term responsible for neutrinoless double-beta decay lies in between 12 and 22 meV.

  3. Measuring the neutrino mass from future wide galaxy cluster catalogues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbone, Carmelita; Moscardini, Lauro; Cimatti, Andrea [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Alma Mater Studiorum-Università di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Fedeli, Cosimo, E-mail: carmelita.carbone@unibo.it, E-mail: cosimo.fedeli@astro.ufl.edu, E-mail: lauro.moscardini@unibo.it, E-mail: a.cimatti@unibo.it [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present forecast errors on a wide range of cosmological parameters obtained from a photometric cluster catalogue of a future wide-field Euclid-like survey. We focus in particular on the total neutrino mass as constrained by a combination of the galaxy cluster number counts and correlation function. For the latter we consider only the shape information and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO), while marginalising over the spectral amplitude and the redshift space distortions. In addition to the cosmological parameters of the standard ?CDM+? model we also consider a non-vanishing curvature, and two parameters describing a redshift evolution for the dark energy equation of state. For completeness, we also marginalise over a set of ''nuisance'' parameters, representing the uncertainties on the cluster mass determination. We find that combining cluster counts with power spectrum information greatly improves the constraining power of each probe taken individually, with errors on cosmological parameters being reduced by up to an order of magnitude. In particular, the best improvements are for the parameters defining the dynamical evolution of dark energy, where cluster counts break degeneracies. Moreover, the resulting error on neutrino mass is at the level of ?(M{sub ?}) ? 0.9 eV, comparable with that derived from present Ly? forest measurements and Cosmic Microwave background (CMB) data in the framework of a non-flat Universe. Further adopting Planck priors and reducing the number of free parameters to a ?CDM+? cosmology allows to place constraints on the total neutrino mass of ?(M{sub ?}) ? 0.08 eV, close to the lower bound enforced by neutrino oscillation experiments. Finally, in the optimistic case where uncertainties in the calibration of the mass-observable relation were so small to be neglected, the combination of Planck priors with cluster counts and power spectrum would constrain the total neutrino mass down to ?(M{sub ?}) ? 0.034 eV, i.e. the minimum neutrino mass predicted by oscillation experiments would be detected in a ?CDM framework. We thus show that galaxy clusters from future wide galaxy surveys will be an excellent tool for studying cosmology and fundamental physics.

  4. Higher-Order Mass Defect Analysis for Mass Spectra of Complex...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high-resolution mass spectrum of crude oil containing nearly 13,000 peaks. Citation: Roach PJ, J Laskin, and A Laskin.2011."Higher-Order Mass Defect Analysis for Mass Spectra of...

  5. 5. DYNAMICS OF COUPLED MASSES 19 5 Dynamics of coupled masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    k1 We assume that there is no influence by gravitational or frictional forces. The two masses position of the masses. Tasks 1. Using Newton's second law, that is the sum of the forces = mass

  6. 1 Dynamics of coupled masses 1 1 Dynamics of coupled masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    w1 We assume that there is no influence by gravitational or frictional forces. The two masses position of the masses. Tasks 1. Using Newton's second law, that is the sum of the forces = mass

  7. 1 Dynamics of coupled masses 1 1 Dynamics of coupled masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    k 1 w 1 We assume that there is no in uence by gravitational or frictional forces. The two masses position of the masses. Tasks 1. Using Newton's second law, that is the sum of the forces = mass #2

  8. 5. DYNAMICS OF COUPLED MASSES 19 5 Dynamics of coupled masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    w 2 k 1 We assume that there is no influence by gravitational or frictional forces. The two masses position of the masses. Tasks 1. Using Newton's second law, that is the sum of the forces = mass

  9. Statistical Methods for the Analysis of Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xuan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    . This research is supported by the. This work was sponsored by a subcontract from PNNL and by the NIH R25-CA-90301 training grant at TAMU. Additional support was provided by KAUST-IAMCS Innovation grant, by NIH grant DK070146 and by the National Institute...-MS Liquid chromatographyCMass spectrometry M/Z Mass over charge ratio NET Normalized elution time NMC Number of missed cleavage sites NTE Number of tryptic ends PEP Posterior error probability PM Potential matches PMF Probability mass function PNNL...

  10. Testing Radiative Neutrino Mass Models at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi Cai; Jackson D. Clarke; Michael A. Schmidt; Raymond R. Volkas

    2015-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider provides us new opportunities to search for the origin of neutrino mass. Beyond the minimal see-saw models a plethora of models exist which realise neutrino mass at tree- or loop-level, and it is important to be sure that these possibilities are satisfactorily covered by searches. The purpose of this paper is to advance a systematic approach to this problem. Majorana neutrino mass models can be organised by SM-gauge-invariant operators which violate lepton number by two units. In this paper we write down the minimal ultraviolet completions for all of the mass-dimension 7 operators. We predict vector-like quarks, vector-like leptons, scalar leptoquarks, a charged scalar, and a scalar doublet, whose properties are constrained by neutrino oscillation data. A detailed collider study is presented for $O_3=LLQ\\bar dH$ and $O_8 = L\\bar d\\bar e^\\dagger \\bar u^\\dagger H$ completions with a vector-like quark $\\chi\\sim(3, 2, -\\frac{5}{6})$ and a leptoquark $\\phi\\sim(\\bar 3,1,\\frac{1}{3})$. The existing LHC limits extracted from searches for vector-like fermions and sbottoms/stops are $m_\\chi \\gtrsim 620$ GeV and $m_\\phi\\gtrsim 600$ GeV.

  11. eta Chameleontis: abnormal initial mass function or dynamical evolution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Moraux; W. Lawson; C. Clarke

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Eta Chamaeleontis is a unique young (~9 Myr) association with 18 systems concentrated in a radius of ~35 arcmin, i.e. 1pc at the cluster distance of 97pc. No other members have been found up to 1.5 degrees from the cluster centre. The cluster mass function is consistent with the IMF of other rich young open clusters in the higher mass range but shows a clear deficit of low mass stars and brown dwarfs with no objects below 0.1Msun. The aim of this paper is to test whether this peculiar mass function could result from dynamical evolution despite the young age of the cluster. We performed N-body numerical calculations starting with a log-normal IMF and different initial conditions in terms of number of systems and cluster radius using the code NBODY3. We simulated the cluster dynamical evolution over 10 Myr and compared the results to the observations. We found that it is possible to reproduce eta Cha when starting with a very compact configuration (with Ninit=40 and R0=0.005pc) which suggests that the IMF of the association might not be abnormal. The high initial density might also explain the deficit of wide binaries that is observed in the cluster.

  12. True random numbers from amplified quantum vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Jofre; M. Curty; F. Steinlechner; G. Anzolin; J. P. Torres; M. W. Mitchell; V. Pruneri

    2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Random numbers are essential for applications ranging from secure communications to numerical simulation and quantitative finance. Algorithms can rapidly produce pseudo-random outcomes, series of numbers that mimic most properties of true random numbers while quantum random number generators (QRNGs) exploit intrinsic quantum randomness to produce true random numbers. Single-photon QRNGs are conceptually simple but produce few random bits per detection. In contrast, vacuum fluctuations are a vast resource for QRNGs: they are broad-band and thus can encode many random bits per second. Direct recording of vacuum fluctuations is possible, but requires shot-noise-limited detectors, at the cost of bandwidth. We demonstrate efficient conversion of vacuum fluctuations to true random bits using optical amplification of vacuum and interferometry. Using commercially-available optical components we demonstrate a QRNG at a bit rate of 1.11 Gbps. The proposed scheme has the potential to be extended to 10 Gbps and even up to 100 Gbps by taking advantage of high speed modulation sources and detectors for optical fiber telecommunication devices.

  13. High energy neutrino telescopes as a probe of the neutrino mass mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kfir Blum; Anson Hook; Kohta Murase

    2014-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that measurements of the spectral shape and flavor ratios of high energy astrophysical neutrinos at neutrino telescopes can be sensitive to the details of the neutrino mass mechanism. We propose a simple model for Majorana neutrino mass generation that realizes the relevant parameter space, in which small explicit lepton number violation is mediated to the Standard Model through the interactions of a light scalar. IceCube, with about ten years of exposure time, could reveal the presence of anomalous neutrino self-interactions. Precision electroweak and lepton flavor laboratory experiments and a determination of the total neutrino mass from cosmology would provide consistency checks on the interpretation of a signal.

  14. Advanced Mass Calibration and Visualization for FT-ICR Mass Spectromet...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Abstract: Mass spectrometry imaging by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) yields hundreds of unique peaks, many of...

  15. On the efficiency of stochastic volume sources for the determination of light meson masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Endress; A. Jüttner; H. Wittig

    2011-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the efficiency of single timeslice stochastic sources for the calculation of light meson masses on the lattice as one varies the quark mass. Simulations are carried out with Nf = 2 flavours of non-perturbatively O(a) improved Wilson fermions for pion masses in the range of 450 - 760 MeV. Results for pseudoscalar and vector meson two-point correlation functions computed using stochastic as well as point sources are presented and compared. At fixed computational cost the stochastic approach reduces the variance considerably in the pseudoscalar channel for all simulated quark masses. The vector channel is more affected by the intrinsic stochastic noise. In order to obtain stable estimates of the statistical errors and a more pronounced plateau for the effective vector meson mass, a relatively large number of stochastic sources must be used.

  16. Grant Title: CHILDHOOD OBESITY PREVENTION Funding Opportunity Number: USDA-NIFA-AFRI-004156. CFDA Number(s): 10.310.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Grant Title: CHILDHOOD OBESITY PREVENTION Funding Opportunity Number: USDA-NIFA-AFRI-004156. CFDA, including food environment, that influence childhood obesity and use this information to develop and obesity and promoting healthy behaviors in children and adolescents. Release and Expiration: Release Date

  17. Low floor mass transit vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emmons, J. Bruce (Beverly Hills, MI); Blessing, Leonard J. (Rochester, MI)

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass transit vehicle includes a frame structure that provides an efficient and economical approach to providing a low floor bus. The inventive frame includes a stiff roof panel and a stiff floor panel. A plurality of generally vertical pillars extend between the roof and floor panels. A unique bracket arrangement is disclosed for connecting the pillars to the panels. Side panels are secured to the pillars and carry the shear stresses on the frame. A unique seating assembly that can be advantageously incorporated into the vehicle taking advantage of the load distributing features of the inventive frame is also disclosed.

  18. Automated mass spectrometer grows up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McInteer, B.B.; Montoya, J.G.; Stark, E.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980 we reported the development of an automated mass spectrometer for large scale batches of samples enriched in nitrogen-15 as ammonium salts. Since that time significant technical progress has been made in the instrument. Perhaps more significantly, administrative and institutional changes have permitted the entire effort to be transferred to the private sector from its original base at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This has ensured the continuance of a needed service to the international scientific community as revealed by a development project at a national laboratory, and is an excellent example of beneficial technology transfer to private industry.

  19. Quark masses: An environmental impact statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimchi, Itamar

    We investigate worlds that lie on a slice through the parameter space of the standard model over which quark masses vary. We allow as many as three quarks to participate in nuclei, while fixing the mass of the electron and ...

  20. Ultra-low Q values for neutrino mass measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachim Kopp; Alexander Merle

    2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate weak nuclear decays with extremely small kinetic energy release (Q value) and thus extremely good sensitivity to the absolute neutrino mass scale. In particular, we consider decays into excited daughter states, and we show that partial ionization of the parent atom can help to tune Q values to low-Q decays might only be feasible if no ionization is required, and if future improvements in isotope production technology, nuclear mass spectroscopy, and atomic structure calculations are possible. Experiments using ions, however, are extremely challenging due to the large number of ions that must be stored. New precision data on nuclear excitation levels could help to identify further isotopes with low-Q decay modes and possibly less challenging requirements.

  1. Bottom and Charm Mass Determinations with a Convergence Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dehnadi, Bahman; Mateu, Vicent

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new determinations of the MS-bar charm quark mass using relativistic QCD sum rules at O(alpha_s^3) from the moments of the vector and the pseudoscalar current correlators. We use available experimental measurements from e+e- collisions and lattice simulation results, respectively. Our analysis of the theoretical uncertainties is based on different implementations of the perturbative series and on independent variations of the renormalization scales for the mass and the strong coupling. Taking into account the resulting set of series to estimate perturbative uncertainties is crucial, since some ways to treat the perturbative expansion can exhibit extraordinarily small scale dependence when the two scales are set equal. As an additional refinement, we address the issue that double scale variation could overestimate the perturbative uncertainties. We supplement the analysis with a test that quantifies the convergence rate of each perturbative series by a single number. We find that this convergence te...

  2. Practical considerations in realizing a magnetic centrifugal mass filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gueroult, Renaud; Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic centrifugal mass filter concept represents a variation on the plasma centrifuge, with applications that are particularly promising for high-throughput separation of ions with large mass differences. A number of considerations, however, constrain the parameter space in which this device operates best. The rotation speed, magnetic field intensity, and ion temperature are constrained by the ion confinement requirements. Collisions must also be large enough to eject ions, but small enough not to eject them too quickly. The existence of favorable regimes meeting these constraints is demonstrated by a single-particle orbit code. As an example of interest, it is shown that separation factors of about 2.3 are achievable in a single pass when separating Aluminum from Strontium ions.

  3. Practical Considerations in Realizing a Magnetic C entrifugal Mass Filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renaud Gueroult and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Magnetic Centrifugal Mass Filter concept represents a variation on the plasma centrifuge, with applications that are particularly promising for high-throughput separation of ions with large mass differences. A number of considerations, however, constrain the parameter space in which this device operates best. The rotation speed, magnetic field intensity and ion temperature are constrained by the ion confinement requirements. Collisions must also be large enough to eject ions, but small enough not to eject them too quickly. The existence of favorable regimes meeting these constraints is demonstrated by a single-particle orbit code. As an example of interest, it is shown that separation factors of about 2:3 are achievable in a single pass when separating Aluminum from Strontium ions

  4. Evolution of deformations in medium-mass nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Sagawa; X. R. Zhou; X. Z. Zhang

    2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Evolution of quadrupole deformations in $sd$ and $pf$ shell nuclei with mass A= 18$\\sim$56 is studied by using deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock (HF) model with pairing correlations. We point out that the quadrupole deformations of the nuclei with the isospin T=0 and T=1 show strong mass number dependence as a clear manifestation of dynamical evolution of deformation in nuclear many-body systems. The competition between the deformation driving particle-vibration coupling and the closed shell structure is shown in a systematic study of the ratios between the proton and neutron deformations in nuclei with T=$|$T$_z|$=1. Calculated quadrupole and hexadecapole deformations are compared with shell model results and available experimental data. A relation between the skin thickness and the intrinsic Q$_2$ moments is also discussed.

  5. Neutrino mass limit from tritium beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. W. Otten; C. Weinheimer

    2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews recent experiments on tritium beta spectroscopy searching for the absolute value of the electron neutrino mass $m(\

  6. Probing lepton number violation on three frontiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay constitutes the main probe for lepton number violation at low energies, motivated by the expected Majorana nature of the light but massive neutrinos. On the other hand, the theoretical interpretation of the (non-)observation of this process is not straightforward as the Majorana neutrinos can destructively interfere in their contribution and many other New Physics mechanisms can additionally mediate the process. We here highlight the potential of combining neutrinoless double beta decay with searches for Tritium decay, cosmological observations and LHC physics to improve the quantitative insight into the neutrino properties and to unravel potential sources of lepton number violation.

  7. Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chastagner, P.

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

  8. Bioheat and Mass Transfer Educational Initiatives for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    fluid and molecular transport Cornell Datta Ugrad heat and mass fundamentals Datta fluid mechBioheat and Mass Transfer Educational Initiatives for ASME K-17 Committee Ken Diller University of Texas #12;Outline of Presentation · Summary of submitted bioheat and mass transfer syllabi from K-17

  9. Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rifford, Ludovic

    Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M be a smooth connected compact surface), as the minimum of the lengths of the curves (drawn on M) joining x to y. Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation

  10. Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rifford, Ludovic

    Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e Nice - Sophia Antipolis & Institut Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M be a smooth connected compact surface in Rn of the lengths of the curves (drawn on M) joining x to y. Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12

  11. Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rifford, Ludovic

    Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis & Institut Universitaire de France UPV/EHU Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;Transport maps Let µ0 and µ1 be probability measures on M. We

  12. Ramanujan's Harmonic Number Expansion into Negative Powers of a Triangular Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark B. Villarino

    2007-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An algebraic transformation of the DeTemple-Wang half-integer approximation to the harmonic series produces the general formula and error estimate for the Ramanujan expansion for the nth harmonic number into negative powers of the nth triangular number. We also discuss the history of the Ramanujan expansion for the nth harmonic number as well as sharp estimates of its accuracy, with complete proofs, and we compare it with other approximative formulas.

  13. Evolution of globular cluster systems in elliptical galaxies. I. Log-normal initial mass function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Vesperini

    2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the evolution of globular cluster systems (GCS) in elliptical galaxies and explore the dependence of their main properties on the mass and the size of the host galaxy.The dependence of the evolution of the GCS mass function (GCMF), of the fraction of surviving clusters and of the ratio of the final to initial mass in clusters on the structure of the host galaxy as well as their variation with the galactocentric distance inside individual host galaxies has been thoroughly investigated.After a survey over a large number of different host galaxies we have restricted our attention to a sample of galaxies with effective masses and radii equal to those observed for dwarf,normal and giant ellipticals. We show that, in spite of large differences in the fraction of surviving clusters, the final mean masses of the GCMF in massive galaxies are very similar to each other with a small galaxy-to-galaxy dispersion;low-mass compact galaxies tend to have smaller values of the final mean mass and a larger galaxy-to-galaxy dispersion. These findings are in agreement with those of recent observational analyses. The fraction of surviving clusters increases with the mass of the host galaxy. We show that a small difference between the initial and the final mean mass and dispersion of the GCMF and the lack of a significant radial dependence of the mean mass inside individual galaxies do not necessarily imply that evolutionary processes have been unimportant in the evolution of the initial population of clusters. For giant galaxies most disruption occurs within the effective radius while for low-mass galaxies a significant disruption of clusters takes place also at larger galactocentric distances. The dependence of the results obtained on the initial mean mass of the GCMF is investigated. (abridged)

  14. Neutrino properties deduced from the study of lepton number violating processes at low and high energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoica, Sabin [Horia Hulubei Foundation, P.O. Box MG-12, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania) and Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Magurele-Bucharest 077125 (Romania)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    There is nowadays a significant progress in understanding the neutrino properties. The results of the neutrino oscillation experiments have convincingly showed that neutrinos have mass and oscillate, in contradiction with the Standard Model (SM) assumptions, and these are the first evidences of beyond SM physics. However, fundamental properties of the neutrinos like their absolute mass, their character (are they Dirac or Majorana particles?), their mass hierarchy, the number of neutrino flavors, etc., still remain unknown. In this context there is an increased interest in the study of the lepton number violating (LNV) processes, since they could complete our understanding on the neutrino properties. Since recently, the neutrinoless double beta decay was considered the only process able to distinguish between Dirac or Majorana neutrinos and to give a hint on the absolute mass of the electron neutrino. At present, the increased luminosity of the LHC experiments makes feasible the search of LNV processes at high energy as well. In this lecture I will make a brief review on our present knowledge of the neutrino properties, on the present status of the double-beta decay studies and on the first attempts to search LNV processes at LHC.

  15. Probing the Neutrino Mass Hierarchy with Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a superbeam with an average neutrino energy of ~ 5 GeV, such as those being proposed at CERN, if pointing to Super-Kamiokande (L \\simeq 8770 km), could reveal the neutrino mass hierarchy at 5 sigma in less than two years irrespective of the true hierarchy and CP phase. The measurement relies on the near resonant matter effect in the numu \\rightarrow nue oscillation channel, and can be done counting the total number of appearance events with just a neutrino beam.

  16. Customer Service Specialist Job Number: 54844874

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Customer Service Specialist Job Number: 54844874 Company Name: Baxter International, Inc Job to the customer and/or the sales team including any corrective actions needed to prevent the failure in the future: Medical Information, Distribution Centers, Planning and Deployment, Credit and Collections, Customer

  17. Clar number of catacondensed benzenoid hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klavzar, Sandi

    Clar number of catacondensed benzenoid hydrocarbons Sandi Klavzara, , Petra Zigerta , Ivan Gutmanb sextets in any of the Clar formulae) of a catacondensed benzenoid hydrocarbon: CL is equal to the minimum; Resonance graph; Benzenoid hydrocarbons 1. Introduction Within the theory that was formulated [1, 2

  18. Preferential Path Profiling: Compactly Numbering Interesting Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chilimbi, Trishul

    preferential path profiling (PPP), that reduces the overhead of path profiling. PPP leverages the observation that most consumers of path profiles are only inter- ested in a subset of all program paths. PPP achieves produced by PPP. This compact path numbering enables our PPP implementation to record path information

  19. Building Grassmann Numbers from PI-Algebras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo M. Bentin; Sergio Mota

    2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This works deals with the formal mathematical structure of so called Grassmann Numbers applied to Theoretical Physics, which is a basic concept on Berezin integration. To achieve this purpose we make use of some constructions from relative modern Polynomial Identity Algebras (PI-Algebras) applied to the special case of the Grassmann algebra.

  20. Volume 89 number 44 28 october 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Volume 89 number 44 28 october 2008 pages 433­444 Eos, Vol. 89, No. 44, 28 October 2008 EOS, Tran.Mahoney Geoneutrino Measurements and Models Investigate Deep Earth PAGES 433­434 #12;Eos, Vol. 89, No. 44, 28 October 2008 uranium-238, thorium-232, and potassium- 40. Neutrinos and their antiparticles, anti- neutrinos

  1. Policy Title: Policy Number: Facilities and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papautsky, Ian

    been supported by the federal government since that time. Indirect costs are also called "Facilities and Administrative" or F&A costs. These costs include facilities costs such as electricity, heating and airPolicy Title: Policy Number: Facilities and Administrative Distribution 2.1.11 Category: Financial

  2. Master Project Assessment Form Student: ID number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    Master Project Assessment Form Student: ID number: Master Program: Graduation supervisor Graduation presentation Defense Execution of the project Grade Signature of supervisor Date * Hand in at the student administration (MF 3.068) together with an official result form (uitslagbon) #12;"Master Project

  3. March 2005 Number 238 CARBON CAPTURE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Tamsin A.

    March 2005 Number 238 CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE (CCS) As part of the government's global strategy. This POSTnote discusses the potential of carbon capture and storage (CCS), a method of carbon sequestration2 and will be included in the forthcoming Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) Carbon Abatement Technology Strategy

  4. The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

    1948-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

    Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

  5. Fast K System Generators of Pseudorandom Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akopov, N Z; Nersessian, A B; Savvidy, G K; Greiner, W

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest fast algorithm for the matrix generator of pseudorandom numbers based on Kolmogorov-Anosov K systems which has been earliar proposed in \\cite{savvidy1,akopov1}. This algorithm reduces $N^{2}$ operation of the matrix generator to $NlnN$ and essentially reduces the generation time. It also clarifies the algebraic structure of this type of K system generators.

  6. Fast K System Generators of Pseudorandom Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Z. Akopov; E. M. Madounts; A. B. Nersesian; G. K. Savvidy; W. Greiner

    1993-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest fast algorithm for the matrix generator of pseudorandom numbers based on Kolmogorov-Anosov K systems which has been earliar proposed in \\cite{savvidy1,akopov1}. This algorithm reduces $N^{2}$ operation of the matrix generator to $NlnN$ and essentially reduces the generation time. It also clarifies the algebraic structure of this type of K system generators.

  7. Write your extension number on this card.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and slide it down. Press here to remove the stand. 1 Use the key hole slots on the stand to mark Press here jack. illustrations. for a secure fit. T7100 Telephone User Card 1-800-4 NORTEL www of your display. 1. Press ·. 2. Press / to · to select a contrast level. The higher the number the higher

  8. Policy Title: Policy Number: Federal Student Aid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franco, John

    . All such officials shall further distribute the Code to their direct and indirect reports who havePolicy Title: Policy Number: Federal Student Aid Code of Conduct 1.3.3 Category: Administrative Office of the Bursar University of Cincinnati Federal Student Aid Code of Conduct, page 1 of 5 Background

  9. NUMBER: 1530 TITLE: Code of Student Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . For the purposes of this Code, the term "University Official" is inclusive of "Faculty Member" as defined in IV 1530 1 NUMBER: 1530 TITLE: Code of Student Conduct APPROVED: August 27, 1970; Revised June 14, 2012 I. BASIS AND RATIONALE FOR A CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT Old Dominion University

  10. CORAL Name: STS 2 Model Number: ICP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    CORAL Name: STS 2 Model Number: ICP Location: TRL Introduction: The ST Systems Multiplex ICP tool prior to starting your process in CORAL. Loading a Wafer: The wafer is loaded into the system using of the tool. #12;If there are any issues with the tool post a comment in CORAL and contact Donal 2-2983. #12;

  11. NUMBER: 1626 TITLE: Information Technology Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cost of more than $100,000 but less than $1 million. E. University Advisory Council on Technology (UACT technology project estimated to cost $1 million or more or deemed to be mission-critical. VI. Designated1626 - 1 NUMBER: 1626 TITLE: Information Technology Management APPROVED: September 9, 2005 I

  12. Project Name Project Number Tagging Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project Name Project Number Primary Tagging Type Secondary Tagging Type Fish Species Tagging/ Secondary Legal Driver (BiOp, MOA, Accord, etc.) Tagging Purpose Funded Entity Tagging Location Retrieval CWT Recovery Project 2010-036-00 CWT PIT Chinook, coho retrieval, analysis, address PSMFC sampling

  13. Reference number ISO 8601:2004(E)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shiliang

    Reference number ISO 8601:2004(E) © ISO 2004 INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO 8601 Third edition 2004'heure #12;ISO 8601:2004(E) PDF disclaimer This PDF file may contain embedded typefaces. In accordance. The ISO Central Secretariat accepts no liability in this area. Adobe is a trademark of Adobe Systems

  14. Paper Number: 023084 An ASAE Meeting Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    applications. In these terms, quality comprehends all factors influencing the system like accuracy, speedPaper Number: 023084 An ASAE Meeting Presentation Spatio-Temporal Quality of Precision Farming and Land Management, Chair of Geodesy, Arcisstrasse 21, D ­ 80290 Munich Written for presentation

  15. Neutrino mass matrices with a democratic texture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleppe, A. [Dep. of Mathematical Physics, LTH, Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden)

    1997-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of the neutrino mass matrices is investigated, in a scheme where the minimal three-family Standard Model is extended by including right-handed neutrinos. No assumption is made about the presence of a large mass scale, like in the see-saw scheme. Certain peculiar features of the usual democratic mass matrix are investigated, and used to define matrices with a 'democratic texture'. By demanding that the neutrino mass matrices have a specific form with such a democratic texture, Majorana mass spectra with three massless (light) neutrinos and either two or three massive neutrinos, are obtained.

  16. Possible textures of the fermion mass matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Manmohan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texture specific fermion mass matrices have played an important role in understanding several features of fermion masses and mixings. In the present work, we have given an overview of all possible cases of Fritzsch-like as well as non Fritzsch-like texture 6 and 5 zero fermion mass matrices. Further, for the case of texture 4 zero Fritzsch-like quark mass matrices, the issue of the hierarchy of the elements of the mass matrices and the role of their phases have been discussed. Furthermore, the case of texture 4 zero Fritzsch-like lepton mass matrices has also been discussed with an emphasis on the hierarchy of neutrino masses for both Majorana and Dirac neutrinos.

  17. Possible textures of the fermion mass matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manmohan Gupta; Gulsheen Ahuja

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Texture specific fermion mass matrices have played an important role in understanding several features of fermion masses and mixings. In the present work, we have given an overview of all possible cases of Fritzsch-like as well as non Fritzsch-like texture 6 and 5 zero fermion mass matrices. Further, for the case of texture 4 zero Fritzsch-like quark mass matrices, the issue of the hierarchy of the elements of the mass matrices and the role of their phases have been discussed. Furthermore, the case of texture 4 zero Fritzsch-like lepton mass matrices has also been discussed with an emphasis on the hierarchy of neutrino masses for both Majorana and Dirac neutrinos.

  18. Particle mass generation from physical vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Quimbay; J. Morales

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach for particle mass generation in which the physical vacuum is assumed as a medium at zero temperature and where the dynamics of the vacuum is described by the Standard Model without the Higgs sector. In this approach fermions acquire masses from interactions with vacuum and gauge bosons from charge fluctuations of vacuum. The obtained results are consistent with the physical mass spectrum, in such a manner that left-handed neutrinos are massive. Masses of electroweak gauge bosons are properly predicted in terms of experimental fermion masses and running coupling constants of strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions. An existing empirical relation between the top quark mass and the electroweak gauge boson masses is explained by means of this approach.

  19. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Witten, William B. (Lancing, TN); Kornienko, Oleg (Lansdale, PA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  20. Call Numbers Explained 1 8/23/2012 Call Numbers Explained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    . The second method is the Library of Congress Classification system, which is used to identify university. In the library, books are organized by call number. 3. A call number classifies a book by its subject and tells in the library. 6. The King Library is unusual because it is both a public library and a university library

  1. Number Plastic Type Common Items Number of Items (tally) 1 polyethylene terephthalate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    End Time: Number Plastic Type Common Items Number of Items (tally) 1 polyethylene terephthalate Soft drink, water and beer bottles; mouthwash bottles; peanut butter containers; salad dressing and vegetable oil containers; ovenable food trays. 2 high density polyethylene Milk jugs, juice bottles; bleach

  2. Finite-particle-number approach to physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from a discrete, self-generating and self-organizing, recursive model and self-consistent interpretive rules we construct: the scale constants of physics (3,10,137,1.7x10/sup 38/); 3+1 Minkowski space with a discrete metric and the algebraic bound ..delta.. is an element of ..delta.. tau is greater than or equal to 1; the Einstein-deBroglie relation; algebraic double slit interference; a single-time momentum-space scattering theory connected to laboratory experience; an approximation to wave functions; local phase severance and hence both distant correlations and separability; baryon number, lepton number, charge and helicity; m/sub p//m/sub e/; a cosmology not in disagreement with current observations.

  3. Sensitivity in risk analyses with uncertain numbers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, W. Troy; Ferson, Scott

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensitivity analysis is a study of how changes in the inputs to a model influence the results of the model. Many techniques have recently been proposed for use when the model is probabilistic. This report considers the related problem of sensitivity analysis when the model includes uncertain numbers that can involve both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty and the method of calculation is Dempster-Shafer evidence theory or probability bounds analysis. Some traditional methods for sensitivity analysis generalize directly for use with uncertain numbers, but, in some respects, sensitivity analysis for these analyses differs from traditional deterministic or probabilistic sensitivity analyses. A case study of a dike reliability assessment illustrates several methods of sensitivity analysis, including traditional probabilistic assessment, local derivatives, and a ''pinching'' strategy that hypothetically reduces the epistemic uncertainty or aleatory uncertainty, or both, in an input variable to estimate the reduction of uncertainty in the outputs. The prospects for applying the methods to black box models are also considered.

  4. The Total Number of Giant Planets in Debris Disks with Central Clearings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Faber; Alice C. Quillen

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrared spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope (SSC) of many debris disks are well fit with a single black body temperature which suggest clearings within the disk. We assume that inside the clearing orbital instability due to planets removes dust generating planetesimal belts and dust generated by the outer disk that is scattered or drifts into the clearing. From numerical integrations we estimate a minimum planet spacing required for orbital instability (and so planetesimal and dust removal) as a function of system age and planet mass. We estimate that a 10^8 year old debris disk with a dust disk edge at a radius of 50 AU hosted by an A star must contain approximately 5 Neptune mass planets between the clearing radius and the iceline in order to remove all primordial objects within it. We infer that known debris disk systems contain at least a fifth of a Jupiter mass in massive planets. The number of planets and spacing required is insensitive to the assumed planet mass. However an order of magnitude higher total mass in planets could reside in these systems if the planets are more massive.

  5. Small Ramsey Numbers Stanislaw P. Radziszowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radziszowski, Stanislaw P.

    , March 25 ElJC revision #3 1997, July 11 ElJC revision #4 1998, July 9 ElJC revision #5 1999, July 5 El of Technology Rochester, NY 14623, spr@cs.rit.edu http://www.cs.rit.edu/~spr Submitted: June 11, 1994; Revision Subject Number 05C55 Revisions 1993, February preliminary version, RIT-TR-93-009 [Ra2] 1994, July 3 first

  6. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a large number of questions from the audience. The biofuels topic is so critical to Texas agriculture that it is likely that I will be discussing it from time to time during the next several issues. In many states, the biofuels boat is rapidly... gaining speed. Some states are providing monetary incentives for businesses to establish production plants. Some states see tremendous value in biofuels research, and are providing broad-based funding to foster research focusing on increasing ethanol...

  7. Texas Rice, Volume 1, Number 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas October 2001 Volume I Number 8 Texas Rice Combine Harvester Efficiency: Material Other Than Grain Or Money On The Ground? continued on page 6 From... such observations it is easy to conclude that rice combines are extremely efficient. But this might be misleading, given that the choppers and spreaders do a good job of cutting plant material, including grains, into small pieces. How much rice does a combine leave...

  8. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas August 2004 Volume IV Number 6 Texas Rice Bacterial and Fungal Endophytes in Rice Endophytes are plant-associ- ated organisms that often form... plant/endophyte associations, may infer resistance to insects such as aphids and armyworms. The following is a layman’s review of research conducted by scientists worldwide on endophytic continued on page 4 associations that pertain to rice pro- duction...

  9. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications vehicles offer an environmentally clean and energy-secure transportation pathway. Fuel cell systems number of vehicles it represents, DOE has established detailed cost targets for automotive fuel cell

  10. Continuum limit for three-dimensional mass-spring networks and discrete Korn's inequality.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlyand, Leonid

    ) and the domain sizes (large scale)), which represents local energy in the neighborhood of a point. For periodic a discrete network of a large number of concen- trated masses (particles) connected by elastic springs. We. For generic non-periodic arrays of particles we describe continuum limit in terms of local energy

  11. Field-Deployable, High-Resolution, Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    as a powerful tool to characterize aerosols. A number of laser ablation instruments have been developed and trigger a laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer, which determines the composition of the sized surface rather than by ablation lasers.8-10 At present, the most commonly used instrument of this type

  12. MEASURING THE MASS DISTRIBUTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, Margaret J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Diaferio, Antonaldo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Rines, Kenneth J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States); Serra, Ana Laura, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it, E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu, E-mail: serra@to.infn.it [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, via Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Cluster mass profiles are tests of models of structure formation. Only two current observational methods of determining the mass profile, gravitational lensing, and the caustic technique are independent of the assumption of dynamical equilibrium. Both techniques enable the determination of the extended mass profile at radii beyond the virial radius. For 19 clusters, we compare the mass profile based on the caustic technique with weak lensing measurements taken from the literature. This comparison offers a test of systematic issues in both techniques. Around the virial radius, the two methods of mass estimation agree to within {approx}30%, consistent with the expected errors in the individual techniques. At small radii, the caustic technique overestimates the mass as expected from numerical simulations. The ratio between the lensing profile and the caustic mass profile at these radii suggests that the weak lensing profiles are a good representation of the true mass profile. At radii larger than the virial radius, the extrapolated Navarro, Frenk and White fit to the lensing mass profile exceeds the caustic mass profile. Contamination of the lensing profile by unrelated structures within the lensing kernel may be an issue in some cases; we highlight the clusters MS0906+11 and A750, superposed along the line of sight, to illustrate the potential seriousness of contamination of the weak lensing signal by these unrelated structures.

  13. accuracy mass spectrometry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Milos 2 High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Biological Tissue Imaging CERN Preprints Summary: Biological tissue imaging by...

  14. About the logic of the prime number distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry K. Hahn

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two basic number sequences which play a major role in the prime number distribution. The first Number Sequence SQ1 contains all prime numbers of the form 6n+5 and the second Number Sequence SQ2 contains all prime numbers of the form 6n+1. All existing prime numbers seem to be contained in these two number sequences, except of the prime numbers 2 and 3. Riemanns Zeta Function also seems to indicate, that there is a logical connection between the mentioned number sequences and the distribution of prime numbers. This connection is indicated by lines in the diagram of the Zeta Function, which are formed by the points s where the Zeta Function is real. Another key role in the distribution of the prime numbers plays the number 5 and its periodic occurrence in the two number sequences SQ1 and SQ2. All non-prime numbers in SQ1 and SQ2 are caused by recurrences of these two number sequences with increasing wave-lengths in themselves, in a similar fashion as Overtones (harmonics) or Undertones derive from a fundamental frequency. On the contrary prime numbers represent spots in these two basic Number Sequences SQ1 and SQ2 where there is no interference caused by these recurring number sequences. The distribution of the non-prime numbers and prime numbers can be described in a graphical way with a -Wave Model- (or Interference Model) -- see Table 2.

  15. RETIRED A STARS: THE EFFECT OF STELLAR EVOLUTION ON THE MASS ESTIMATES OF SUBGIANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, John Asher; Morton, Timothy D. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wright, Jason T., E-mail: johnjohn@astro.caltech.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16803 (United States)

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Doppler surveys have shown that the occurrence rate of Jupiter-mass planets appears to increase as a function of stellar mass. However, this result depends on the ability to accurately measure the masses of evolved stars. Recently, Lloyd called into question the masses of subgiant stars targeted by Doppler surveys. Lloyd argues that very few observable subgiants have masses greater than 1.5 M {sub Sun }, and that most of them have masses in the range 1.0-1.2 M {sub Sun }. To investigate this claim, we use Galactic stellar population models to generate an all-sky distribution of stars. We incorporate the effects that make massive subgiants less numerous, such as the initial mass function and differences in stellar evolution timescales. We find that these effects lead to negligibly small systematic errors in stellar mass estimates, in contrast to the Almost-Equal-To 50% errors predicted by Lloyd. Additionally, our simulated target sample does in fact include a significant fraction of stars with masses greater than 1.5 M {sub Sun }, primarily because the inclusion of an apparent magnitude limit results in a Malmquist-like bias toward more massive stars, in contrast to the volume-limited simulations of Lloyd. The magnitude limit shifts the mean of our simulated distribution toward higher masses and results in a relatively smaller number of evolved stars with masses in the range 1.0-1.2 M {sub Sun }. We conclude that, within the context of our present-day understanding of stellar structure and evolution, many of the subgiants observed in Doppler surveys are indeed as massive as main-sequence A stars.

  16. Direct Gravitational Imaging of Intermediate Mass Black Holes in Extragalactic Halos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiki Taro Inoue; Valery Rashkov; Joseph Silk; Piero Madau

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A galaxy halo may contain a large number of intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs) with masses in the range of 10^{2-6} solar mass. We propose to directly detect these IMBHs by observing multiply imaged QSO-galaxy or galaxy-galaxy strong lens systems in the submillimeter bands with high angular resolution. The silhouette of an IMBH in the lensing galaxy halo would appear as either a monopole-like or a dipole-like variation at the scale of the Einstein radius against the Einstein ring of the dust-emitting region surrounding the QSO. We use a particle tagging technique to dynamically populate a Milky Way-sized dark matter halo with black holes, and show that the surface mass density and number density of IMBHs have power-law dependences on the distance from the center of the host halo if smoothed on a scale of ~ 1 kpc. Most of the black holes orbiting close to the center are freely roaming as they have lost their dark matter hosts during infall due to tidal stripping. Next generation submillimeter telescopes with high angular resolution (solar mass in a lensing galaxy that harbours a O(10^9) solar mass supermassive black hole in its nucleus.

  17. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. IV. A PROBABILISTIC APPROACH TO INFERRING THE HIGH-MASS STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND OTHER POWER-LAW FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Clifton Johnson, L.; Beerman, Lori C.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hogg, David W.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel T. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States)] [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Rix, Hans-Walter; Gouliermis, Dimitrios [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States)] [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Lang, Dustin [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)] [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Gordon, Karl D.; Kalirai, Jason S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Skillman, Evan D., E-mail: dweisz@astro.washington.edu [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a probabilistic approach for inferring the parameters of the present-day power-law stellar mass function (MF) of a resolved young star cluster. This technique (1) fully exploits the information content of a given data set; (2) can account for observational uncertainties in a straightforward way; (3) assigns meaningful uncertainties to the inferred parameters; (4) avoids the pitfalls associated with binning data; and (5) can be applied to virtually any resolved young cluster, laying the groundwork for a systematic study of the high-mass stellar MF (M {approx}> 1 M {sub Sun }). Using simulated clusters and Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the probability distribution functions, we show that estimates of the MF slope, {alpha}, are unbiased and that the uncertainty, {Delta}{alpha}, depends primarily on the number of observed stars and on the range of stellar masses they span, assuming that the uncertainties on individual masses and the completeness are both well characterized. Using idealized mock data, we compute the theoretical precision, i.e., lower limits, on {alpha}, and provide an analytic approximation for {Delta}{alpha} as a function of the observed number of stars and mass range. Comparison with literature studies shows that {approx}3/4 of quoted uncertainties are smaller than the theoretical lower limit. By correcting these uncertainties to the theoretical lower limits, we find that the literature studies yield ({alpha}) = 2.46, with a 1{sigma} dispersion of 0.35 dex. We verify that it is impossible for a power-law MF to obtain meaningful constraints on the upper mass limit of the initial mass function, beyond the lower bound of the most massive star actually observed. We show that avoiding substantial biases in the MF slope requires (1) including the MF as a prior when deriving individual stellar mass estimates, (2) modeling the uncertainties in the individual stellar masses, and (3) fully characterizing and then explicitly modeling the completeness for stars of a given mass. The precision on MF slope recovery in this paper are lower limits, as we do not explicitly consider all possible sources of uncertainty, including dynamical effects (e.g., mass segregation), unresolved binaries, and non-coeval populations. We briefly discuss how each of these effects can be incorporated into extensions of the present framework. Finally, we emphasize that the technique and lessons learned are applicable to more general problems involving power-law fitting.

  18. Understanding the Stellar Initial Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard B. Larson

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The essential features of the stellar Initial Mass Function are, rather generally, (1) a peak at a mass of a few tenths of a solar mass, and (2) a power-law tail toward higher masses that is similar to the original Salpeter function. Recent work suggests that the IMF peak reflects a preferred scale of fragmentation associated with the transition from a cooling phase of collapse at low densities to a nearly isothermal phase at higher densities, where the gas becomes thermally coupled to the dust. The Salpeter power law is plausibly produced, at least in part, by scale-free accretion processes that build up massive stars in dense environments. The young stars at the Galactic Center appear to have unusually high masses, possibly because of a high minimum mass resulting from the high opacity of the dense star-forming gas.

  19. Bare Higgs mass at Planck scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuta Hamada; Hikaru Kawai; Kin-ya Oda

    2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute one- and two-loop quadratic divergent contributions to the bare Higgs mass in terms of the bare couplings in the Standard Model. We approximate the bare couplings, defined at the ultraviolet cutoff scale, by the MS-bar ones at the same scale, which are evaluated by the two-loop renormalization group equations for the Higgs mass around 126GeV in the Standard Model. We obtain the cutoff scale dependence of the bare Higgs mass, and examine where it becomes zero. We find that when we take the current central value for the top quark pole mass, 173GeV, the bare Higgs mass vanishes if the cutoff is about 10^{23}GeV. With a 1.3 sigma smaller mass, 170GeV, the scale can be of the order of the Planck scale.

  20. Tidal Streams and Low Mass Companions of M31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Braun; David Thilker

    2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have imaged the extended HI environment of M31 with an unprecedented combination of high resolution and sensitivity. We detect a number of distinct High Velocity Cloud components associated with M31. A sub-set of the features within 30 kpc appear to be tidal in origin. A filamentary ``halo'' component is concentrated at the M31 systemic velocity and appears to extend into a ``bridge'' connecting M31 and M33. This may represent condensation in coronal gas. A population of discrete clouds is detected out to radii of about 150 kpc. Discrete cloud line-widths are correlated with HI mass and are consistent with a 100:1 ratio of dark to HI mass. These may be the gaseous counterparts of low-mass dark-matter satellites. The combined distribution of M31's HVC components can be characterized by a spatial Gaussian of 55 kpc dispersion and yields an N_HI distribution function which agrees well with that of low red-shift QSOs.

  1. Particle physics implications of the WMAP neutrino mass bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bhattacharyya; H. Päs; L. Song; T. J. Weiler

    2003-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently published cosmological bound on the absolute neutrino masses obtained from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data has important consequences for neutrino experiments and models. Taken at face value, the new bound excludes the determination of the absolute neutrino mass in the KATRIN experiment and disfavors a neutrino oscillation interpretation of the LSND experiment. Combined with the KamLAND and Super-K data, the WMAP bound defines an accessible range for the neutrinoless double beta decay amplitude. The bound also impacts the Z-burst annihilation mechanism for resonant generation of extreme-energy cosmic rays on the cosmic neutrino background in two ways: it constrains the local overdensity of neutrino dark matter which is not helpful, but it also limits the resonant energy to a favorable range. In R-parity violating SUSY models neutrino masses are generated by trilinear and bilinear lepton number violating couplings. The WMAP result improves the constraints on these couplings over their existing values by an order of magnitude.

  2. Gravitational `Convergence' and Cluster Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two colour photometry of the cluster A1689 reveals a `relative magnification-bias' between lensed blue and red background galaxies, arising from a dependence of the faint galaxy count-slope on colour. The colour distribution is skewed blueward of the far field, allowing us to measure the cluster magnification and to understand the notorious blueness of large arcs. We show that the magnification information can be combined with the usual image distortion measurements to isolate the local `convergence' component of lensing and hence derive the projected mass. This is achieved through a simple local relation between the convergence and the observables, which can be applied generally over the surface a cluster. In the weak lensing limit, the convergence reduces to a dependence on the magnification alone, so that in the outskirts of clusters the surface-density of matter is obtained directly from the surface-density of background galaxies. Hence, useful lensing work requires colour information but not necessarily good seeing. Interestingly, convergence varies slowly at high redshift, saturating at a level depending on the Horizon distance, allowing a useful model-independent measurement of the Global Geometry.

  3. Quark Masses: An Environmental Impact Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert L. Jaffe; Alejandro Jenkins; Itamar Kimchi

    2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate worlds that lie on a slice through the parameter space of the Standard Model over which quark masses vary. We allow as many as three quarks to participate in nuclei, while fixing the mass of the electron and the average mass of the lightest baryon flavor multiplet. We classify as "congenial" worlds that satisfy the environmental constraint that the quark masses allow for stable nuclei with charges one, six, and eight, making organic chemistry possible. Whether a congenial world actually produces observers depends on a multitude of historical contingencies, beginning with primordial nucleosynthesis, which we do not explore. Such constraints may be independently superimposed on our results. Environmental constraints such as the ones we study may be combined with information about the a priori distribution of quark masses over the landscape of possible universes to determine whether the measured values of the quark masses are determined environmentally, but our analysis is independent of such an anthropic approach. We estimate baryon masses as functions of quark masses and nuclear masses as functions of baryon masses. We check for the stability of nuclei against fission, strong particle emission, and weak nucleon emission. For two light quarks with charges 2/3 and -1/3, we find a band of congeniality roughly 29 MeV wide in their mass difference. We also find another, less robust region of congeniality with one light, charge -1/3 quark, and two heavier, approximately degenerate charge -1/3 and 2/3 quarks. No other assignment of light quark charges yields congenial worlds with two baryons participating in nuclei. We identify and discuss the region in quark-mass space where nuclei would be made from three or more baryon species.

  4. Mass hierarchies and the seesaw neutrino mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, T. K. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Wu, Guo-Hong [Institute of Theoretical Science, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States)] [Institute of Theoretical Science, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States); Mansour, Sadek W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a general analysis of neutrino mixing in the seesaw mechanism with three flavors. Assuming that the Dirac and u-quark mass matrices are similar, we establish simple relations between the neutrino parameters and individual Majorana masses. They are shown to depend rather strongly on the physical neutrino mixing angles. We calculate explicitly the implied Majorana mass hierarchies for parameter sets corresponding to different solutions to the solar neutrino problem. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  5. Protostar mass functions in young clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Philip C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an improved model of protostar mass functions (PMFs), protostars gain mass from isothermal cores in turbulent clumps. Their mass accretion rate is similar to Shu accretion at low mass, and to reduced Bondi accretion at high mass. Accretion durations follow a simple expression in which higher-mass protostars accrete for longer times. These times are set by ejections, stellar feedback, and gravitational competition, which terminate accretion and reduce its efficiency. The mass scale is the mass of a critically stable isothermal core. In steady state, the PMF approaches a power law at high mass due to competition between clump accretion and accretion stopping. The power law exponent is the ratio of the time scales of accretion and accretion stopping. The luminosity function (PLF) peaks near 1 L_Sun, due to inefficient accretion of core gas. Models fit observed PLFs in four large embedded clusters. These indicate that their underlying PMFs may be top-heavy compared to the IMF, depending on the model of protost...

  6. Mass Hierarchy via Mossbauer and Reactor Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen Parke; Hisakazu Minakata; Hiroshi Nunokawa; Renata Zukanovich Funchal

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how one could determine the neutrino mass hierarchy with Mossbauer neutrinos and also revisit the question of whether the hierarchy can be determined with reactor neutrinos.

  7. Mass Hierarchy via Mossbauer and Reactor Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parke, Stephen; Nunokawa, Hiroshi; Funchal, Renata Zukanovich

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how one could determine the neutrino mass hierarchy with Mossbauer neutrinos and also revisit the question of whether the hierarchy can be determined with reactor neutrinos.

  8. Pulsar Braking Index and Mass Accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. D. Morley

    1993-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I show that the braking index, $N$, a fundamental pulsar experimental quantity, naturally differs from the canonical value of 3 by terms which involve mass accretion. Using the measured values of $N$ for PSR1509-58 and PSR0531+21, I determine that for constant density neutron stars their present mass accretion rates are $(3.10\\pm.51)\\times10^{-5}$ M year$^{-1}$ and $(9.946\\pm.089)\\times10^{-5}$ M year$^{-1}$ respectively, where M is the mass of each pulsar. Finally, I demonstrate that mass accretion removes the outstanding problem of the origin of the big glitches of the Vela Pulsar.

  9. Top Quark Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhenyu Ye; for CDF; D0 collaborations

    2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the latest results on the top-quark mass and on the top-antitop mass difference from the CDF and D0 collaborations using data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collider at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV. We discuss general issues in top-quark mass measurements and present new results from direct measurements and from top-pair production cross-section. We also report new results on the top-antitop mass difference.

  10. Top Quark Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Zhenyu; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the latest results on the top-quark mass and on the top-antitop mass difference from the CDF and D0 collaborations using data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We discuss general issues in top-quark mass measurements and present new results from direct measurements and from top-pair production cross-section. We also report new results on the top-antitop mass difference.

  11. CP violation in neutrino mass matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utpal Sarkar; Santosh K. Singh

    2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We constructed rephasing invariant measures of CP violation with elements of the neutrino mass matrix, in the basis in which the charged lepton mass matrix is diagonal. We discuss some examples of neutrino mass matrices with texture zeroes, where the present approach is applicable and demonstrate how it simplifies an analysis of CP violation. We applied our approach to study CP violation in all the phenomenologically acceptable 3-generation two-zero texture neutrino mass matrices and shown that in any of these cases there is only one CP phase which contributes to the neutrino oscillation experiment and there are no Majorana phases.

  12. Non-Oscillation Probes of Neutrino Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster Institut fuer Kernphysik, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 9, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The absolute scale of neutrino masses is very important for understanding the evolution and the structure formation of the universe as well as for nuclear and particle physics beyond the present Standard Model. Complementary to deducing statements on the neutrino mass from cosmological observations, two different methods to determine the neutrino mass scale in the laboratory are pursued: the search for neutrinoless double beta decay and the direct neutrino mass search. For both methods currently experiments with a sensitivity of O(100) meV are being set up or commissioned.

  13. Summative Mass Closure: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the appropriate combinations of LAPs allows for the summative mass closure of biomass feedstocks and process intermediates. By combining the appropriate LAPs, the goal is to...

  14. MassSAVE (Electric)- Residential Retrofit Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MassSAVE organizes residential conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts electric companies, gas companies and municipal aggregators. These utilities include Columbia Gas of...

  15. MassSAVE (Gas)- Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MassSAVE, through Gas Networks, organizes residential conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts electric companies, gas companies and municipal aggregators. These utilities...

  16. MassSAVE (Gas)- Commercial Retrofit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MassSAVE organizes commercial, industrial, and institutional conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts electric companies, gas companies and municipal aggregators. These...

  17. MassSAVE (Electric)- Commercial Retrofit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MassSAVE organizes commercial, industrial, and institutional conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts electric companies, gas companies and municipal aggregators. These...

  18. Masses of Fe-61 and Fe-62

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cossairt, J. D.; Tribble, Robert E.; Kenefick, R. A.

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL RKVIK% C VO LUMK 15, N UMBKB, 5 Masses of 'Fe and Fef MA Y 1977 J. D. Cossairt, R. E. Tribble, * and R. A. Kenefick Cyclotron Institute, Texas A AM University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 4 October 1976) The mass excesses... of 'Fe and Fe have been measured using the Ni(a, Be) 'Fe and Ni("B,"N) Fe reactions. The mass excesses obtained are M( 'Fe) = ?58.92 ~ 0.02 MeV and M("Fe) = ?58.85 + 0.07 MeV. The results are consistent with recent predictions from two different mass...

  19. Health Code Number (HCN) Development Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrocchi, Rocky; Craig, Douglas K.; Bond, Jayne-Anne; Trott, Donna M.; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the detailed description of health code numbers (HCNs) and the procedure of how each HCN is assigned. It contains many guidelines and rationales of HCNs. HCNs are used in the chemical mixture methodology (CMM), a method recommended by the department of energy (DOE) for assessing health effects as a result of exposures to airborne aerosols in an emergency. The procedure is a useful tool for proficient HCN code developers. Intense training and quality assurance with qualified HCN developers are required before an individual comprehends the procedure to develop HCNs for DOE.

  20. Texas Rice, Volume V, Number 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . If it remains unused for extended periods of time, like 3 years, the land be- comes useless for rice farming. Moreover, industry representatives are dwindling. Farm machines, the John Deere stores, they are disap- pearing. Each year, older farmers quit or retire...Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas May 2005 Volume V Number 3 Texas Rice The following is an excerpt of a speech delivered to the U.S. House of Representatives, April 28, 2005...

  1. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    have from 1-8 markers multiplexed. Last year they produced 1.3 million data points using 3 machines, about 25,000 data points a week – or about 8,333 data points per machine per week. RiceTec continued... continued on next page seed from parent lines...Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas September 2004 Volume IV Number 7 Texas Rice Hybrid Rice: Another Tool in Varietal Improvement The breeding method in which crosses are made between...

  2. Texas Rice, Volume VII, Number 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    population of hemp sesbania. What was learned? Castillo said zero grade is critical to establishing an even and early flood. Also, the seeding rate in organic systems should be higher to ensure a thick stand, which would in turn help with weed... 41 acres, due to hemp sesbania, and the portion that was harvested had high numbers of the weed seeds in the final product. This, and a significant amount of brokens, drastically reduced the price received for the crop, resulting in a net loss...

  3. Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluor FederalEnergyContractor: Contract Number:

  4. Number of Natural Gas Commercial Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0 1 2 3 4 5 Number of3

  5. Number of Natural Gas Industrial Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0 1 2 3 4 5 Number

  6. Compare Activities by Number of Buildings

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain,606,602and Tables and99EnergyNumber

  7. Compare Activities by Number of Employees

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain,606,602and TablesNumber of Employees

  8. Property:PhoneNumber | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter iconNumOfPlants JumpPhoneNumber Jump to:

  9. New Mexico Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New MexicoFeet) WorkingFeet)

  10. Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly Volume 1, Number 4

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 | NUMBER 1 | MARCH 201533,1,

  11. Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly, Volume 2, Number 1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 | NUMBER 1 | MARCH 201533,1,1

  12. Climate Zone Number 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER esDatasetCityFund Jump to: navigation, searchNumber

  13. Oregon Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) DecadeYear JanYear Jan Feb

  14. Pennsylvania Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand CubicFuelDecade Year-0

  15. Quark number density at imaginary chemical potential and its extrapolation to large real chemical potential by the effective model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junichi Takahashi; Junpei Sugano; Masahiro Ishii; Hiroaki Kouno; Masanobu Yahiro

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate quark number densities at imaginary chemical potential by lattice QCD with clover-improved two-flavor Wilson fermion. The quark number densities are extrapolated to the small real chemical potential region by assuming some function forms. The extrapolated quark number densities are consistent with those calculated at real chemical potential with the Taylor expansion method for the reweighting factors. In order to study the large real chemical potential region, we use the two-phase model consisting of the quantum hadrodynamics model for the hadron phase and the entanglement-PNJL model for the quark phase. The quantum hadrodynamics model is constructed to reproduce nuclear saturation properties, while the entanglement-PNJL model reproduces well lattice QCD data for the order parameters such as the Polyakov loop, the thermodynamic quantities and the screening masses. Then, we calculate the mass-radius relation of neutron stars and explore the hadron-quark phase transition with the two-phase model.

  16. Off-resonance energy absorption in a linear Paul trap due to mass selective resonant quenching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivarajah, I.; Goodman, D. S.; Wells, J. E.; Smith, W. W. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Narducci, F. A. [Naval Air Systems Command, EO Sensors Division, Bldg 2187, Suite 3190 Patuxent River, Maryland 20670 (United States)] [Naval Air Systems Command, EO Sensors Division, Bldg 2187, Suite 3190 Patuxent River, Maryland 20670 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear Paul traps (LPT) are used in many experimental studies such as mass spectrometry, atom-ion collisions, and ion-molecule reactions. Mass selective resonant quenching (MSRQ) is implemented in LPT either to identify a charged particle's mass or to remove unwanted ions from a controlled experimental environment. In the latter case, MSRQ can introduce undesired heating to co-trapped ions of different mass, whose secular motion is off resonance with the quenching ac field, which we call off-resonance energy absorption (OREA). We present simulations and experimental evidence that show that the OREA increases exponentially with the number of ions loaded into the trap and with the amplitude of the off-resonance external ac field.

  17. Collective Property of Numbers and Its Mathematical Refutation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guang-Liang Li; Victor O. K. Li

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A number has the "collective" property if the number is the greatest lower bound of a bounded, strictly decreasing sequence on the real line. We prove that numbers with the collective property constitute an empty set.

  18. ON STIRLING NUMBERS FOR COMPLEX ARGUMENTS AND HANKEL CONTOURS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodinger, Helmut

    ON STIRLING NUMBERS FOR COMPLEX ARGUMENTS AND HANKEL CONTOURS provide a natural generalization of Stirling numbers for unrestricted complex values. Introduction Richmond and Merlini have introduced in [5] an extension of Stirling's subset numbers xy

  19. On the Identification of High Mass Star Forming Regions using IRAS: Contamination by Low-Mass Protostars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler L. Bourke; A. R. Hyland; Garry Robinson

    2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a survey of a small sample (14) of low-mass protostars (L_IR < 10^3 Lsun) for 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission performed using the ATNF Parkes radio telescope. No new masers were discovered. We find that the lower luminosity limit for maser emission is near 10^3 Lsun, by comparison of the sources in our sample with previously detected methanol maser sources. We examine the IRAS properties of our sample and compare them with sources previously observed for methanol maser emission, almost all of which satisfy the Wood & Churchwell criterion for selecting candidate UCHII regions. We find that about half of our sample satisfy this criterion, and in addition almost all of this subgroup have integrated fluxes between 25 and 60 microns that are similar to sources with detectable methanol maser emission. By identifying a number of low-mass protostars in this work and from the literature that satisfy the Wood & Churchwell criterion for candidate UCHII regions, we show conclusively for the first time that the fainter flux end of their sample is contaminated by lower-mass non-ionizing sources, confirming the suggestion by van der Walt and Ramesh & Sridharan.

  20. Natural occupation numbers: When do they vanish?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesbertz, K J H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-vanishing of the natural orbital occupation numbers of the one-particle density matrix of many-body systems has important consequences for the existence of a density matrix-potential mapping for nonlocal potentials in reduced density matrix functional theory and for the validity of the extended Koopmans' Theorem. On the basis of Weyl's theorem we give a connection between the differentiability properties of the ground state wave function and the rate at which the natural occupations approach zero when ordered as a descending series. We show, in particular, that the presence of a Coulomb cusp in the wave function leads, in general, to a power law decay of the natural occupations, whereas infinitely differentiable wave-functions typically have natural occupations that decay exponentially. We analyze for a number of explicit examples of two-particle systems that in case the wave function is non-analytic at its spatial diagonal (for instance, due to the presence of a Coulomb cusp) the natural orbital occu...

  1. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lim, Hyunkyung [STONY BROOK UNIV; Li, Xiao - Lin [STONY BROOK UNIV; Gilmm, James G [STONY BROOK UNIV

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are concerned with the chaotic flow fields of turbulent mixing. Chaotic flow is found in an extreme form in multiply shocked Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows. The goal of a converged simulation for this problem is twofold: to obtain converged solutions for macro solution features, such as the trajectories of the principal shock waves, mixing zone edges, and mean densities and velocities within each phase, and also for such micro solution features as the joint probability distributions of the temperature and species concentration. We introduce parameterized subgrid models of mass and thermal diffusion, to define large eddy simulations (LES) that replicate the micro features observed in the direct numerical simulation (DNS). The Schmidt numbers and Prandtl numbers are chosen to represent typical liquid, gas and plasma parameter values. Our main result is to explore the variation of the Schmidt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers by three orders of magnitude, and the mesh by a factor of 8 per linear dimension (up to 3200 cells per dimension), to allow exploration of both DNS and LES regimes and verification of the simulations for both macro and micro observables. We find mesh convergence for key properties describing the molecular level of mixing, including chemical reaction rates between the distinct fluid species. We find results nearly independent of Reynolds number for Re 300, 6000, 600K . Methodologically, the results are also new. In common with the shock capturing community, we allow and maintain sharp solution gradients, and we enhance these gradients through use of front tracking. In common with the turbulence modeling community, we include subgrid scale models with no adjustable parameters for LES. To the authors' knowledge, these two methodologies have not been previously combined. In contrast to both of these methodologies, our use of Front Tracking, with DNS or LES resolution of the momentum equation at or near the Kolmogorov scale, but without resolving the Batchelor scale, allows a feasible approach to the modeling of high Schmidt number flows.

  2. RETENTION OF STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morscher, Meagan; Umbreit, Stefan; Farr, Will M.; Rasio, Frederic A., E-mail: m.morscher@u.northwestern.edu, E-mail: s-umbreit@northwestern.edu, E-mail: w-farr@northwestern.edu, E-mail: rasio@northwestern.edu [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Globular clusters should be born with significant numbers of stellar-mass black holes (BHs). It has been thought for two decades that very few of these BHs could be retained through the cluster lifetime. With masses {approx}10 M{sub Sun }, BHs are {approx}20 times more massive than an average cluster star. They segregate into the cluster core, where they may eventually decouple from the remainder of the cluster. The small-N core then evaporates on a short timescale. This is the so-called Spitzer instability. Here we present the results of a full dynamical simulation of a globular cluster containing many stellar-mass BHs with a realistic mass spectrum. Our Monte Carlo simulation code includes detailed treatments of all relevant stellar evolution and dynamical processes. Our main finding is that old globular clusters could still contain many BHs at present. In our simulation, we find no evidence for the Spitzer instability. Instead, most of the BHs remain well mixed with the rest of the cluster, with only the innermost few tens of BHs segregating significantly. Over the 12 Gyr evolution, fewer than half of the BHs are dynamically ejected through strong binary interactions in the cluster core. The presence of BHs leads to long-term heating of the cluster, ultimately producing a core radius on the high end of the distribution for Milky Way globular clusters (and those of other galaxies). A crude extrapolation from our model suggests that the BH-BH merger rate from globular clusters could be comparable to the rate in the field.

  3. Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate Policy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and...

  4. T-705: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates Packet Injection Attacks T-705: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates Packet Injection...

  5. atomic number: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  6. atomic number electron: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  7. atomic number range: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  8. MODEL-FREE MULTI-PROBE LENSING RECONSTRUCTION OF CLUSTER MASS PROFILES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umetsu, Keiichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Lens magnification by galaxy clusters induces characteristic spatial variations in the number counts of background sources, amplifying their observed fluxes and expanding the area of sky, the net effect of which, known as magnification bias, depends on the intrinsic faint-end slope of the source luminosity function. The bias is strongly negative for red galaxies, dominated by the geometric area distortion, whereas it is mildly positive for blue galaxies, enhancing the blue counts toward the cluster center. We generalize the Bayesian approach of Umetsu et al. for reconstructing projected cluster mass profiles, by incorporating multiple populations of background sources for magnification-bias measurements and combining them with complementary lens-distortion measurements, effectively breaking the mass-sheet degeneracy and improving the statistical precision of cluster mass measurements. The approach can be further extended to include strong-lensing projected mass estimates, thus allowing for non-parametric absolute mass determinations in both the weak and strong regimes. We apply this method to our recent CLASH lensing measurements of MACS J1206.2-0847, and demonstrate how combining multi-probe lensing constraints can improve the reconstruction of cluster mass profiles. This method will also be useful for a stacked lensing analysis, combining all lensing-related effects in the cluster regime, for a definitive determination of the averaged mass profile.

  9. Educational Developmentalism In Nigeria: Education For The Masses Or Just Mass -Education?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobern, William W.

    Educational Developmentalism In Nigeria: Education For The Masses Or Just Mass -Education? William of education in general is not lost oil the leaders of Nigeria and the rest of the developing world

  10. Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Light and Heavy Mass Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Peng

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as a Demand Response (DR) strategy for commercial buildings.demand response program because the added demand reduction from different buildingsdemand response, thermal mass INTRODUCTION The structural mass within existing commercial buildings

  11. Top Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. H. L. S. Wang

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the latest measurements of the top quark mass from the Tevatron. The different top decay channels and measurement techniques used for these results are also described. The world average of the top quark mass based on some of these new results combined with previous results is mtop=172.6+-1.4 GeV.

  12. Small entries of neutrino mass matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kh. Akhmedov

    1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider phenomenologically allowed structures of the neutrino mass matrix in the case of three light neutrino species. Constraints from the solar, atmospheric and reactor neutrino experiments as well as those from the neutrinoless double beta decay are taken into account. Both hierarchical and quasi-degenerate neutrino mass cases are studied. Assuming maximal $\

  13. White dwarf masses in cataclysmic variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijnen, T P G; Schreiber, M R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The white dwarf (WD) mass distribution of cataclysmic variables (CVs) has recently been found to dramatically disagree with the predictions of the standard CV formation model. The high mean WD mass among CVs is not imprinted in the currently observed sample of CV progenitors and cannot be attributed to selection effects. Two possibilities have been put forward: either the WD grows in mass during CV evolution, or in a significant fraction of cases, CV formation is preceded by a (short) phase of thermal time-scale mass transfer (TTMT) in which the WD gains a sufficient amount of mass. We investigate if either of these two scenarios can bring theoretical predictions and observations into agreement. We employed binary population synthesis models to simulate the present intrinsic CV population. We incorporated aspects specific to CV evolution such as an appropriate mass-radius relation of the donor star and a more detailed prescription for the critical mass ratio for dynamically unstable mass transfer. We also imp...

  14. Mass Transportation on surfaces Ludovic Rifford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rifford, Ludovic

    Mass Transportation on surfaces Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on surfaces #12;Monge quadratic transport in Rn Let µ0 and µ1 be probability measures with compact support in Rn . We call transport map from µ0 to µ1 any measurable map T : Rn Rn

  15. 6, 1120911246, 2006 Relation of air mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    are formed via gas phase condensation, and 11210 #12;ACPD 6, 11209­11246, 2006 Relation of air mass history to nucleation events in Po Valley, Italy, using back trajectories analysis L. Sogacheva 1 , A. Hamed 2 , M. C of air mass to San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) in Po Valley, Italy, by means of back trajectory analysis. Our

  16. CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS REQUIRE ENHANCED MASS LOSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Langer, Norbert; Izzard, Robert [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, University of Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, Ed, E-mail: neilsonh@etsu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Ave. Villanova, PA 19085 (United States)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of rates of period change of Classical Cepheids probe stellar physics and evolution. Additionally, better understanding of Cepheid structure and evolution provides greater insight into their use as standard candles and tools for measuring the Hubble constant. Our recent study of the period change of the nearest Cepheid, Polaris, suggested that it is undergoing enhanced mass loss when compared to canonical stellar evolution model predictions. In this work, we expand the analysis to rates of period change measured for about 200 Galactic Cepheids and compare them to population synthesis models of Cepheids including convective core overshooting and enhanced mass loss. Rates of period change predicted from stellar evolution models without mass loss do not agree with observed rates, whereas including enhanced mass loss yields predicted rates in better agreement with observations. This is the first evidence that enhanced mass loss as suggested previously for Polaris and {delta} Cephei must be a ubiquitous property of Classical Cepheids.

  17. The Maximum Mass of a Neutron Star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassiliki Kalogera; Gordon Baym

    1996-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational identification of black holes as members of binary systems requires the knowledge of the upper limit on the gravitational mass of a neutron star. We use modern equations of state for neutron star matter, fitted to experimental nucleon-nucleon scattering data and the properties of light nuclei, to calculate, within the framework of Rhoades & Ruffini (1974), the minimum upper limit on a neutron star mass. Regarding the equation of state as valid up to twice nuclear matter saturation density, rho_{nm}, we obtain a secure upper bound on the neutron star mass equal to 2.9 solar masses. We also find that in order to reach the lowest possible upper bound of 2.2 solar masses, we need understand the physical properties of neutron matter up to a density of about 4 times rho_{nm}.

  18. RAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005; 19: 32483252

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    to be that photofragment ions generated at this wavelength are similar to those from low- and high-energy CAD, and are thusRAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005; 19: 3248 of singly protonated peptides at 193 nm investigated with tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry Jeong Hee

  19. RAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005; 19: 24812487

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    chromophore dissociated efficiently when a suf- ficiently high laser pulse energy was used. Also, the pulseRAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005; 19: 2481 time-of- flight (TOF) mass spectrometry of ions generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption

  20. RAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2004; 18: 27062712

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    mass spectrometry.7,8 The internal energy that ions acquire in the MALDI process or via colli- sional of high quality. Tandem mass spectrometry utilizing photodissociation (PD) with ultraviolet (UV) radiation be a viable alternative to CAD for tandem mass spectrometry of large molecules because the energy requirement

  1. Lina Galtieri: Top Mass Measurements. Aspen2010, January 17-23 1 Precision Top Mass Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galtieri, Lina

    Lina Galtieri: Top Mass Measurements. Aspen2010, January 17-23 1 Precision Top Mass Measurement Measurements. Aspen2010, January 17-23 2 Motivation Mw~ Mt 2 Mw~ log(MH) ­ Quantum loop the combination of many EWK observable #12;Lina Galtieri: Top Mass Measurements. Aspen2010, January 17-23 3 Top

  2. Copy number: Efficient algorithms for single- and multi-track copy number segmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Gro; Liestøl, Knut; Loo, Peter Van; Moen Vollan, Hans Kristian; Eide, Marianne B; Rueda, Oscar M; Chin, Suet-Feung; Russell, Roslin; Baumbusch, Lars O; Caldas, Carlos; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Lingjærde, Ole Christian

    2012-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    C, Shah SP, Chin SF et al. The genomic and transcriptomic architecture of 2,000 breast tumours reveals novel subgroups. Nature 2012. doi:10.1038/nature10983. Mathiesen RR, Fjelldal R, Liestøl K et al. High resolution analysis of copy number... C, Shah SP, Chin SF et al. The genomic and transcriptomic architecture of 2,000 breast tumours reveals novel subgroups. Nature 2012. doi:10.1038/nature10983. Mathiesen RR, Fjelldal R, Liestøl K et al. High resolution analysis of copy number...

  3. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of

  4. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number ofIndustrial

  5. AERODYNAMICS AND DESIGN FOR ULTRA-LOW REYNOLDS NUMBER FLIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    AERODYNAMICS AND DESIGN FOR ULTRA-LOW REYNOLDS NUMBER FLIGHT A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED at Reynolds numbers below 10,000, here termed ultra-low Reynolds numbers. The effects of airfoil geometry at ultra-low Reynolds numbers. To further explore this design space, the flow solver has been coupled

  6. Stirling numbers of forests and cycles David Galvin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galvin, David

    Stirling numbers of forests and cycles David Galvin Do Trong Thanh June 15, 2012 Abstract For a graph G and a positive integer k, the graphical Stirling number S(G, k) is the number of partitions. If G is the empty graph on n vertices then S(G, k) reduces to S(n, k), the familiar Stirling number

  7. On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamchik, Victor

    On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik Wolfram Research Inc., 100 Trade Center Dr of Stirling numbers of the first kind for non­integer values of their arguments. We discuss the analytic representations of Stirling numbers through harmonic numbers, the generalized hy­ pergeometric function

  8. A Short Note on Unsigned Stirling Numbers Dennis Walsh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Dennis P.

    A Short Note on Unsigned Stirling Numbers Dennis Walsh Middle Tennessee State University The unsigned Stirling numbers | , the absolute values of Stirling numbers of the=Ð8� 5�l first kind, are well Stirling number Thel=Ð8� 5�l� following theorem formalizes this result. Theorem. For let denote an unsigned

  9. On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamchik, Victor

    On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik Wolfram Research Inc., 100 Trade Center Dr of Stirling numbers of the rst kind for non-integer values of their arguments. We discuss the analytic representations of Stirling numbers through harmonic numbers, the generalized hy- pergeometric function

  10. A holographic bound on the total number of computations in the visible Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurice H. P. M. van Putten

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Information and encoding are central to holographic imaging of matter and fields within a two-surface. We consider the probability of detection of particles inside star-like holographic screens defined by their propagators. Imaging a point particle of mass m hereby requires I = 2 pi mr in log2 bits on a spherical screen or radius r. Encoding the three hairs of mass, charge, angular momentum and radiation requires a minimum of four bits. This formulation leads directly to Reissner-Nordstrom black holes and extremal Kerr black holes for minimal screens, that envelope event horizons. Applied to the cosmological event horizon, the total number of computations in the visible Universe is found to be bounded by 10e121.

  11. Ratio method of measuring $w$ boson mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Feng; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes an alternative method of measuring the W boson mass in D0 experiment. Instead of extracting M{sub W} from the fitting of W {yields} e{nu} fast Monte Carlo simulations to W {yields} e{nu} data as in the standard method, we make the direct fit of transverse mass between W {yields} e{nu} data and Z {yields} ee data. One of the two electrons from Z boson is treated as a neutrino in the calculation of transverse mass. In ratio method, the best fitted scale factor corresponds to the ratio of W and Z boson mass (M{sub W}/M{sub Z}). Given the precisely measured Z boson mass, W mass is directly fitted from W {yields} e{nu} and Z {yields} ee data. This dissertation demonstrates that ratio method is a plausible method of measuring the W boson mass. With the 1 fb{sup -1} D0 Run IIa dataset, ratio method gives M{sub W} = 80435 {+-} 43(stat) {+-} 26(sys) MeV.

  12. Contribution of White Dwarfs to Cluster Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ted von Hippel

    1998-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    I present a literature search through 31 July 1997 of white dwarfs (WDs) in open and globular clusters. There are 36 single WDs and 5 WDs in binaries known among 13 open clusters, and 340 single WDs and 11 WDs in binaries known among 11 globular clusters. From these data I have calculated WD mass fractions for four open clusters (the Pleiades, NGC 2168, NGC 3532, and the Hyades) and one globular cluster (NGC 6121). I develop a simple model of cluster evolution that incorporates stellar evolution but not dynamical evolution to interpret the WD mass fractions. I augment the results of my simple model with N-body simulations incorporating stellar evolution (Terlevich 1987; de la Feunte Marcos 1996; Vesperini & Heggie 1997). I find that even though these clusters undergo moderate to strong kinematical evolution the WD mass fraction is relatively insensitive to kinematical evolution. By comparing the cluster mass functions to that of the Galactic disk, and incorporating plausibility arguments for the mass function of the Galactic halo, I estimate the WD mass fraction in these two populations. I assume the Galactic disk is ~10 Gyrs old (Winget et al. 1987; Liebert, Dahn, & Monet 1988; Oswalt et al. 1996) and that the Galactic halo is ~12 Gyrs old (Reid 1997b; Gratton et al. 1997; Chaboyer et al. 1998), although the WD mass fraction is insensitive to age in this range. I find that the Galactic halo should contain 8 to 9% (alpha = -2.35) or perhaps as much as 15 to 17% (alpha = -2.0) of its stellar mass in the form of WDs. The Galactic disk WD mass fraction should be 6 to 7% (alpha = -2.35), consistent with the empirical estimates of 3 to 7% (Liebert, Dahn, & Monet 1988; Oswalt et al. 1996). (abridged)

  13. Evolution of Mass Functions of Coeval Stars through Wind Mass Loss and Binary Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, F R N; Langer, N; de Mink, S E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate determinations of stellar mass functions and ages of stellar populations are crucial to much of astrophysics. We analyse the evolution of stellar mass functions of coeval main sequence stars including all relevant aspects of single- and binary-star evolution. We show that the slope of the upper part of the mass function in a stellar cluster can be quite different to the slope of the initial mass function. Wind mass loss from massive stars leads to an accumulation of stars which is visible as a peak at the high mass end of mass functions, thereby flattening the mass function slope. Mass accretion and mergers in close binary systems create a tail of rejuvenated binary products. These blue straggler stars extend the single star mass function by up to a factor of two in mass and can appear up to ten times younger than their parent stellar cluster. Cluster ages derived from their most massive stars that are close to the turn-off may thus be significantly biased. To overcome such difficulties, we propose t...

  14. Compositional Analysis of the High Molecular Weight Ethylene Oxide Propylene Oxide Copolymer by MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houshia, Orwa Jaber

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The composition of narrow distribution poly ethylene oxide-propylene oxide copolymer (Mw ~ 8700 Da) was studied using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The ethylene oxide-propylene oxide copolymer produced oligomers separated by 14 Da. The average resolving power over the entire spectrum was 28,000. Approximately 448 isotopically resolved peaks representing about 56 oligomers are identified. Although agreement between experimental and calculated isotopic distributions was strong, the compositional assignment was difficult. This is due to the large number of possible isobaric components. The purpose of this research is to resolve and study the composition of high mass copolymer such as ethylene oxide-propylene oxide.

  15. Mass dispersion in transfer reactions with a stochastic mean-field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouhei Washiyama; Sakir Ayik; Denis Lacroix

    2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleon transfer in symmetric heavy-ion reactions at energies below the Coulomb barrier is investigated in the framework of a microscopic stochastic mean-field theory. While mean-field alone is known to significantly underpredict the dispersion of the fragment mass distribution, a considerable enhancement of the dispersion is obtained in the stochastic mean-field theory. The variance of the fragment mass distribution deduced from the stochastic theory scales with the number of exchanged nucleon. Therefore, the new approach provides the first fully microscopic theory consistent with the phenomenological analysis of the experimental data.

  16. Stellar and Intermediate-Mass Black Holes in the Milky Way and Nearby Galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, Jimmy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0324 (United States)

    2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of high resolution X-ray telescopes, the ability to identify extragalactic black holes has greatly enhanced our understanding of massive compact objects, as we are no longer limited to the rather meager Milky Way black hole population. The greatly increased numbers have opened up opportunities to find new modes of compact object accretion and potentially long-sought evidence for intermediate-mass black holes. In this lecture series, the current state of knowledge of stellar- and intermediate-mass black holes is reviewed, particularly in regards to black hole populations in external galaxies.

  17. Masses of Fe-61 and Fe-62 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cossairt, J. D.; Tribble, Robert E.; Kenefick, R. A.

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 1O) 58.5+ 0.2 (Ref. 12) -58.935 + 0.050 (Ref. 11) Q-value determination using the Ni(' 0, Ne)6 Fe reaction. MASSES OF 'Fe Ago Fe 1689 of -59.41 MeV (Ref. 2) and -58.82 MeV (Ref. 4). The weighted average of the two Q-value de- terminations...PHYSICAL RKVIK% C VO LUMK 15, N UMBKB, 5 Masses of 'Fe and Fef MA Y 1977 J. D. Cossairt, R. E. Tribble, * and R. A. Kenefick Cyclotron Institute, Texas A AM University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 4 October 1976) The mass excesses...

  18. Glycoprotein profiling by electrospray mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Hui; Desaire, Heather; Butnev, V. Y.; Bousfield, George R.

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and protease by ultrafiltration 5 using Amicon (Millipore, Bedford, MA) Centricon P-10 centrifugal ultrafiltration cartridges [18]. The filtrate was evaporated to dryness in a Savant (Thermo-Savant, Holbrook, NY) SpeedVac. It was applied to a 150 mg Altech... and neutral loss scan, collision energy was set between 20 V and 40 V. Spectra were recorded between m/z 1000 and m/z 2000, unless specified. Ion trap mass spectrometry Electrospray mass spectra were recorded on a Thermo Finnigan LCQ Advantage mass...

  19. Gas sampling system for a mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to a gas sampling system, and specifically to a gas sampling system for transporting a hazardous process gas to a remotely located mass spectrometer. The gas sampling system includes a capillary tube having a predetermined capillary length and capillary diameter in communication with the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a flexible tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube intermediate the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a heat transfer tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube, and a heating device in communication the heat transfer tube for substantially preventing condensation of the process gas within the capillary tube.

  20. Zero minors of the neutrino mass matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lashin, E. I. [Abdus Salam ICTP, P.O. Box 586, 34100 Trieste (Italy); Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Chamoun, N. [Abdus Salam ICTP, P.O. Box 586, 34100 Trieste (Italy); Physics Department, HIAST, P.O. Box 31983, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the possibility that a certain class of neutrino mass matrices, namely, those with two independent vanishing minors in the flavor basis, regardless of being invertible or not, is sufficient to describe current data. We compute generic formulas for the ratios of the neutrino masses and for the Majorana phases. We find that seven textures with two vanishing minors can accommodate the experimental data. We present an estimate of the mass matrix for these patterns. All of the possible textures can be dynamically generated through the seesaw mechanism augmented with a discrete Abelian symmetry.

  1. Mass Distributions of Clusters Using Gravitational Magnification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst

    1995-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensing in the context of rich clusters is normally quantified from small image distortions, yielding a relative mass distribution in the limit of weak lensing. Here we show the magnification effect of lensing can also be mapped over a cluster, resulting in absolute mass determinations for the weak limit. Furthermore, given both magnification and distortion measurements, the mass distribution may be constrained in the strong regime. Methods for obtaining the magnification using spectroscopic and/or photometric information are discussed, for object detection within a fixed isophote or to a given flux limit. A map of the magnification around A1689 is constructed from the observed depletion of background red galaxy counts.

  2. Search for Lepton-Flavor and Lepton-Number Violation in the Decay tau to lhh'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for lepton-flavor and lepton-number violation in the decay of the tau lepton into one charged lepton and two charged hadrons is performed using 221.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected at an e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring. In all 14 decay modes considered, the observed data are compatible with background expectations, and upper limits are set in the range {Beta}({tau} {yields} {ell}hh') < (0.7-4.8) x 10{sup -7} at 90% confidence level.

  3. Monte-Carlo simulation for fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions from neutron induced fission of 235U

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montoya, M; Rojas, J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mass and kinetic energy distribution of nuclear fragments from thermal neutron induced fission of 235U have been studied using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Besides reproducing the pronounced broadening on the standard deviation of the final fragment kinetic energy distribution $\\sigma_{e}(m)$ around the mass number m = 109, our simulation also produces a second broadening around m = 125, that is in agreement with the experimental data obtained by Belhafaf et al. These results are consequence of the characteristics of the neutron emission, the variation in the primary fragment mean kinetic energy and the yield as a function of the mass.

  4. Mass-radius relations and core-envelope decompositions of super-Earths and sub-Neptunes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, Alex R.; Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Verne, Wesley, E-mail: arhowe@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Computer Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many exoplanets have been discovered with radii of 1-4 R {sub ?}, between that of Earth and Neptune. A number of these are known to have densities consistent with solid compositions, while others are 'sub-Neptunes' likely to have significant H{sub 2}-He envelopes. Future surveys will no doubt significantly expand these populations. In order to understand how the measured masses and radii of such planets can inform their structures and compositions, we construct models both for solid layered planets and for planets with solid cores and gaseous envelopes, exploring a range of core masses, H{sub 2}-He envelope masses, and associated envelope entropies. For planets in the super-Earth/sub-Neptune regime for which both radius and mass are measured, we estimate how each is partitioned into a solid core and gaseous envelope, associating a specific core mass and envelope mass with a given exoplanet. We perform this decomposition for both ''Earth-like'' rock-iron cores and pure ice cores, and find that the necessary gaseous envelope masses for this important sub-class of exoplanets must range very widely from zero to many Earth masses, even for a given core mass. This result bears importantly on exoplanet formation and envelope evaporation processes.

  5. Solar mass-varying neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marfatia, Danny; Huber, P.; Barger, V.

    2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose that the solar neutrino deficit may be due to oscillations of mass-varying neutrinos (MaVaNs). This scenario elucidates solar neutrino data beautifully while remaining comfortably compatible with atmospheric ...

  6. Experiments for the absolute neutrino mass measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Steidl

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results and perspectives of different methods to measure the absolute mass scale of neutrinos are briefly reviewed. The mass sensitivities from cosmological observations, double beta decay searches and single beta decay spectroscopy differ in sensitivity and model dependance. Next generation experiments in the three fields reach the sensitivity for the lightest mass eigenstate of $m_1<0.2eV$, which will finally answer the question if neutrino mass eigenstates are degenerate. This sensitivity is also reached by the only model-independent approach of single beta decay (KATRIN experiment). For higher sensitivities on cost of model-dependance the neutrinoless double beta decay search and cosmological observation have to be applied. Here, in the next decade sensitivities are approached with the potential to test inverted hierarchy models.

  7. Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Scime, Earl E. (Morgantown, WV)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

  8. Plasma Mass Filters For Nuclear Waste Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Practical disposal of nuclear waste requires high-throughput separation techniques. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which contains the most active and mobile radioisotopes and produces most of the heat. We suggest that the fission products could be separated as a group from nuclear waste using plasma mass filters. Plasmabased processes are well suited to separating nuclear waste, because mass rather than chemical properties are used for separation. A single plasma stage can replace several stages of chemical separation, producing separate streams of bulk elements, fission products, and actinoids. The plasma mass filters may have lower cost and produce less auxiliary waste than chemical processing plants. Three rotating plasma configurations are considered that act as mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, the Ohkawa filter, and the asymmetric centrifugal trap.

  9. Plasma Mass Filters For Nuclear Waste Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Practical disposal of nuclear waste requires high-throughput separation techniques. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which contains the most active and mobile radioisotopes and produces most of the heat. We suggest that the fission products could be separated as a group from nuclear waste using plasma mass filters. Plasmabased processes are well suited to separating nuclear waste, because mass rather than chemical properties are used for separation. A single plasma stage can replace several stages of chemical separation, producing separate streams of bulk elements, fission products, and actinoids. The plasma mass filters may have lower cost and produce less auxiliary waste than chemical processing plants. Three rotating plasma configurations are considered that act as mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, the Ohkawa filter, and the asymmetric centrifugal trap.

  10. Precise Nucleosynthesis Limits on Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimmo Kainulainen

    1996-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A computation of nucleosynthesis bounds on the masses of long-lived Dirac and Majorana neutrinos is reviewed. In particular an explicit treatment of the ``differential heating'' of the $\

  11. Mass inequality for the quark propagator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee; Richard Thomson

    2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that for any gauge-fixing scheme with positive semi-definite functional integral measure, the inverse correlation length of the quark propagator is bounded below by one-half the pion mass.

  12. Probing the absolute mass scale of neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formaggio, Joseph A.

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment is the next generation tritium beta decay experiment with sub-eV sensitivity to make a direct, model independent measurement of the neutrino mass. The principle of the ...

  13. Constituent quark masses obtained from hadron masses with contributions of Fermi-Breit and Glozman-Riska hyperfine interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borka Jovanovic, V.; Borka, D. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Ignjatovic, S. R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Banja Luka, Mladena Stojanovica 2, 78000 Banja Luka (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Jovanovic, P. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the color-spin and flavor-spin interaction Hamiltonians with SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking to obtain meson and baryon mass formulas. Adjusting these masses with experimental masses we determine the constituent quark masses. We discuss the constituent quark masses obtained from meson and baryon mass fits. The results for constituent quark masses are very similar in the case of two different phenomenological models: Fermi-Breit and Glozman-Riska hyperfine interactions.

  14. Jet signals for low mass strings at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis A. Anchordoqui; Haim Goldberg; Satoshi Nawata; Tomasz R. Taylor

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The mass scale M_s of superstring theory is an arbitrary parameter that can be as low as few TeVs if the Universe contains large extra dimensions. We propose a search for the effects of Regge excitations of fundamental strings at LHC, in the process p p \\to \\gamma jet. The underlying parton process is dominantly the single photon production in gluon fusion, g g \\to \\gamma g, with open string states propagating in intermediate channels. If the photon mixes with the gauge boson of the baryon number, which is a common feature of D-brane quivers, the amplitude appears already at the string disk level. It is completely determined by the mixing parameter -- and it is otherwise model-(compactification-) independent. Even for relatively small mixing, 100 fb^{-1} of LHC data could probe deviations from standard model physics, at a 5\\sigma significance, for M_s as large as 3.3 TeV.

  15. Mass Chain Evaluation for A=95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, S.K.; Sonzogni, A.; Basu, Swapan Kr.; Mukherjee, Gopal; Sonzogni, A. A.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A full evaluation of the mass chain A = 95 has been done in the ENSDF format taking into account all the available data until June 2009. Excited states populated by in-beam nuclear reactions and by radioactive decay have been considered. The 'evp' editor, developed at the NNDC, has been used for the evaluation. This mass chain was last evaluated in 1993. Many new and improved data were reported since then. A total of 13 nuclei have been evaluated.

  16. Measurement of the W Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Clutter, Justace Randall; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    30Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India 31University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland 32Korea Detector Laboratory, Korea University, Seoul, Korea 33SungKyunKwan University, Suwon, Korea 34CINVESTAV, Mexico City, Mexico 35FOM... in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction: the trans- verse mass mT , the electron transverse momentum peT , and the neutrino transverse momentum p#1;T . The transverse mass is defined as m...

  17. Lepton Mass Hierarchy and Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Fritzsch; Z. Z Xing

    1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from the symmetry of lepton flavor democracy, we propose and discuss a simple pattern for the mass generation and flavor mixing of the charged leptons and neutrinos. The three neutrino masses are nearly degenerate, and the flavor mixing angles can be calculated. The observed deficit of solar and atmospheric neutrinos can be interpreted as a consequence of the near degeneracy and large oscillations of $\

  18. Mass and fans in attached sunspaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.W.; McFarland, R.D.; Lazarus, G.S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of thermal storage mass on the performance of an attached sunspace is investigated for a particular design in Boston. Mass in the sunspace and in the adjoining building are compared. Performance is evaluated in terms of temperature conditions in the sunspace and delivery of useful solar heat to the adjoining building. The dependence of the results on the manner of heat delivery is studied. Both natural convection and fan-forced air flow are included.

  19. The Top Mass: Interpretation and Theoretical Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    André H. Hoang

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently the most precise LHC measurements of the top quark mass are determinations of the top quark mass parameter of Monte-Carlo (MC) event generators reaching uncertainties of well below $1$ GeV. However, there is an additional theoretical problem when using the MC top mass $m_t^{\\rm MC}$ as an input for theoretical predictions, because a rigorous relation of $m_t^{\\rm MC}$ to a renormalized field theory mass is, at the very strict level, absent. In this talk I show how - nevertheless - some concrete statements on $m_t^{\\rm MC}$ can be deduced assuming that the MC generator behaves like a rigorous first principles QCD calculator for the observables that are used for the analyses. I give simple conceptual arguments showing that in this context $m_t^{\\rm MC}$ can be interpreted like the mass of a heavy-light top meson, and that there is a conversion relation to field theory top quark masses that requires a non-perturbative input. The situation is in analogy to B physics where a similar relation exists between experimental B meson masses and field theory bottom masses. The relation gives a prescription how to use $m_t^{\\rm MC}$ as an input for theoretical predictions in perturbative QCD. The outcome is that at this time an additional uncertainty of about $1$ GeV has to be accounted for. I discuss limitations of the arguments I give and possible ways to test them, or even to improve the current situation.

  20. Disk Accretion Onto High-Mass Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. H. Lubow; M. Seibert; P. Artymowicz

    1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the nonlinear, two-dimensional response of a gaseous, viscous protoplanetary disk to the presence of a planet of one Jupiter mass (1 M_J) and greater that orbits a 1 solar mass star by using the ZEUS hydrodynamics code with high resolution near the planet's Roche lobe. The planet is assumed to be in a circular orbit about the central star and is not allowed to migrate. A gap is formed about the orbit of the planet, but there is a nonaxisymmetric flow through the gap and onto the planet. The gap partitions the disk into an inner (outer) disk that extends inside (outside) the planet's orbit. For a 1 M_J planet and typical disk parameters, the accretion through the gap onto the planet is highly efficient. For typical disk parameters, the mass doubling time scale is less than 10^5 years, considerably shorter than the disk lifetime. Following shocks near the L1 and L2 Lagrange points, disk material enters the Roche lobe in the form of two gas streams. Shocks occur within the Roche lobe as the gas streams collide, and shocks lead to rapid inflow towards the planet within much of planet's Roche lobe. Shocks also propagate in the inner and outer disks that orbit the star. For higher mass planets (of order 6 M_J), the flow rate onto the planet is considerably reduced, which suggests an upper mass limit to planets in the range of 10 M_J. This rate reduction is related to the fact that the gap width increases relative to the Roche (Hill sphere) radius with increasing planetary mass. The flow in the gap affects planetary migration. For the 1 M_J planet case, mass can penetrate from the outer disk to the inner disk, so that the inner disk is not depleted. The results suggest that most of the mass in gas giant planets is acquired by flows through gaps.