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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Half-Life of Pa232  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The half-life of Pa232 from two methods of preparation (Pa231+n, and Th232+d) has been measured and found to be 1.32 days.

Arthur H. Jaffey and Earl K. Hyde

1950-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Collect the Data!  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

five in our experiment to measure the half-life of five in our experiment to measure the half-life of barium-137m. Choose your detector and start collecting data! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: This is data run number five in our experiment to measure the half-life of metastable barium-137. If you want to know more about the equipment and materials we're using, please see the first video in this series. Steve: Joanna and I have already measured the background rate in this room. If you're using the Geiger-Müeller tube, the average background rate is 46.1 counts per minute. If you're using the scintillator with the photomultiplier tube, the average background rate is 3,454.4 counts per

3

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Collect the Data!  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

three in our experiment to measure the half-life of three in our experiment to measure the half-life of barium-137m. Choose your detector and start collecting data! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: This is data run number three in our experiment to measure the half-life of metastable barium-137. If you want to know more about the equipment and materials we're using, please see the first video in this series. Steve: Joanna and I have already measured the background rate in this room. If you're using the Geiger-Müeller tube, the average background rate is 46.1 counts per minute. If you're using the scintillator with the photomultiplier tube, the average background rate is 3,454.4 counts per

4

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Collect the Data!  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

two in our experiment to measure the half-life of two in our experiment to measure the half-life of barium-137m. Choose your detector and start collecting data! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: This is data run number two in our experiment to measure the half-life of metastable barium-137. If you want to know more about the equipment and materials we're using, please see the first video in this series. Steve: Joanna and I have already measured the background rate in this room. If you're using the Geiger-Müeller tube, the average background rate is 46.1 counts per minute. If you're using the scintillator with the photomultiplier tube, the average background rate is 3,454.4 counts per

5

Half life for spontaneous fission of curium-245  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sample of curium-245 of extremely high enrichment was obtained with an electromagnetic separator. The half-life for spontaneous fission was determined by measuring the rate of alpha decay. (AIP)

Druzhinin, A.A.; Polynov, V.N.; Vesnovskii, S.P.; Korochkin, A.M.; Lbov, A.A.; Nikitin, E.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Determination of the half-life of /sup 243/ Cm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors determine the half life of Cm 243 (T/sub alpha 243/) relative to the half-life of Cm 244 (whose value is known with high accuracy) from the molar ratios of the mixture of the nuclide studied with Cm 244 and the nuclides of plutonium, forming as a result of the alpha decay of curium nuclides. The results of the calculations of T/sub alpha 243/ based on the formula presented are shown. The random error for the average value of T/sub alpha 243/ is presented with a confidence probability of 0.95.

Timofeev, G.A.; Kalygin, V.V.; Privalova, P.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Half-Life of 7Be in Beryllium Metal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......S., eds. Table of Isotopes (1996) John Wiley...peaks do not impair the determination of the half-life of...53.107 0.022 11) Boron nitride 53.174 0...materials (aluminum, boron nitride etc.) has...897. 5) Table of Isotopes, 8th Ed. Vol. I......

Tsutomu Ohtsuki; Hideyuki Yuki; Jirohta Kasagi; Masakatsu Muto

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Half-life for spontaneous fission of /sup 243/Cm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is proposed for measuring the half-life for spontaneous fission of curium 243. Isotope separation and purification techniques are described and the isotope ratio of the purified target is given. The efficiency of fission fragment detection for solid state mica detectors was measured with a curium 244 standard. Results for the rate of spontaneous fission are tabulated.

Polynov, V.N.; Druzhinin, A.A.; Korochkin, A.M.; Nikitin, E.A.; Bochkarev, V.A.; Vyachin, V.N.; Lapin, V.G.; Maksimov, M.Yu.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

On neutron numbers and atomic masses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On neutron numbers and atomic masses ... Assigning neutron numbers, correct neutron numbers, and atomic masses and nucleon numbers. ...

R. Heyrovsk

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro...

11

Near-optimum procedure for half-life measurement by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A near-optimum procedure for using high-resolution /gamma/-ray spectrometry to measure the half-lives of appropriate /gamma/-ray- emitting-nuclides is presented. Among the important points of the procedure are the employment of the reference source method for implicit correction of pileup and deadtime losses; the use of full-energy peak-area ratios as the fundamental measured quantities; and continuous, high-rate data acquisition to obtain good results in a fraction of a half-life if desired. Equations are given for estimating the precision of the computed half-lives in terms of total measurement time, number of spectral acquisitions, and the precision of peak-area ratios. Results of /sup 169/Yb half-life measurements are given as an example of the procedure's application. 3 refs., 2 tabs.

Parker, J.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The significance of using the Newcomb-Benford law as a test of nuclear half-life calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Half-life number sequences collected from nuclear data charts are found to obey the Newcomb-Benford law. Based on this fact, it has been suggested recently, that this law should be used to test the quality of nuclear decay models. In this paper we briefly recall how, when and why the Newcomb-Benford law can be observed in a set of numbers with a given probability distribution. We investigate the special case of nuclear half-lives, and show that the law provides no additional clue in understanding decay half-lives. Thus, it can play no significant role in testing nuclear decay theories.

Janos Farkas; Gyorgy Gyurky

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

Dependence of the half-life of {sup 221}Fr on the implantation environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possible dependence of the half-life of {sup 221}Fr on the solid-state environment has been investigated by the simultaneous measurement of implanted {sup 221}Fr ions in an insulator (Si) and a metallic substrate (Au) at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. Our results indicate that, if existing, the difference in half-life does not follow a systematic trend and it is well below 1%.

Olaizola, B. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fraile, L. M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); ISOLDE, PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Riisager, K.; Jeppesen, H.; Skovbo, K.; Thomsen, L. A. [ISOLDE, PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Institut for Fysik og Astronomi, Aarhus Universitet, Ny Munkegade 120, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Correia, J. G.; Johnston, K. [ISOLDE, PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Fynbo, H. O. U.; Kirsebom, O. [Institut for Fysik og Astronomi, Aarhus Universitet, Ny Munkegade 120, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

14

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Equipment Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Should a Person Touch 200,000 Volts? Should a Person Touch 200,000 Volts? Previous Video (Should a Person Touch 200,000 Volts?) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Collect the Data!) Collect the Data! Equipment Overview Use our equipment to measure the half-life of a radioactive isotope, barium-137m! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Today, you're going to measure the half-life of a radioactive isotope, metastable barium-137! This is an actual experiment that you're going to do using our equipment! Steve: The half-life of a radioactive substance is the amount of time it takes for half of that substance to undergo decay. Now, half-lives can range from billions of years to a tiny fraction of a second. Happily, the

15

Precise half-life measurements for the superallowed beta(+) emitters Ar-34 and Cl-34  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the half-life of the superallowed emitter Ar-34 to be 843.8(4)ms...the quoted precision, 0.05%, is a factor of five improvement on the best previous measurement and meets this demanding requirement. Our measurement employed a high-efficiency gas counter, which was sensitive to positrons from both Ar-34 and its daughter Cl-34. We achieved the required precision on Ar-34 by analyzing the parent-daughter composite decay with a new fitting technique. We also obtained an improved half-life for Cl-34 of 1.5268(5) s, which has 0.03% precision and is a factor of two improvement on previous results. As a by-product of these measurements, we determined the half-life of Ar-35 to be 1.7754(11) s....

Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Brinkley, J. F.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Mayes, V. E.; Nica, N.; Sanchez-Vega, M.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Determination of the half-life of 213Fr with high precision  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-precision measurement of half-life and Q? value of neutral and highly charged ? emitters is a major subject of investigation currently. In this framework, we recently pushed half-life measurements of neutral emitters to a precision of a few per mil. This result was achieved by using different techniques and apparatuses at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS) and GSI Darmstadt. Here we report on 213Fr half-life determination [T1/2(213Fr)?=?34.140.06 s] at INFN-LNS, detailing the measurement protocol used. Direct comparison with the accepted value in the literature shows a discrepancy of more than three sigma. We propose this new value as a reference, discussing previous experiments.

M. Fisichella; A. Musumarra; F. Farinon; C. Nociforo; A. Del Zoppo; P. Figuera; M. La Cognata; M. G. Pellegriti; V. Scuderi; D. Torresi; E. Strano

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

17

Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (26)Si  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measured the half-life of the superallowed 0(+) -> 0(+) beta(+) emitter (26)Si to be 2245.3(7) ms. We used pure sources of (26)Si and employed a high-efficiency gas counter, whichwas sensitive to positrons from both this nuclide and its daughter...

Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Banu, A.; Chen, L.; Golovko, V. V.; Goodwin, J.; Horvat, V.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Can Environmental Factors Affect Half-Life in Beta-Decay? An Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the advent of the 21st century, at which time certain results began to issue forth from certain research groups, especially the Rolfs? group in Bochum, Germany [2, 3, 4, 5], that observations were being made of half-life changes which were caused...

Goodwin, John 1953-

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

19

Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (10)C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The half-life of (10)C has been measured to be 19.310(4) s, a result with 0.02% precision, which is a factor of three improvement over the best previous result. Since (10)C is the lightest superallowed 0(+)-> 0(+) beta(+) emitter, its ft value has...

Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Golovko, V.; Goodwin, J.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

On the properties of the negatively charged lithium ions and evaluation of the half-life of the ${}^{7}$Be atom(s)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bound state properties of the ground $2^1S-$state in the four-electron lithium ion Li$^{-}$ (or ${}^{7}$Li$^{-}$ ion) are determined from the results of accurate, variational computations. We also determine such properties for the ground $2^1S-$state(s) in the ${}^{6}$Li$^{-}$ and ${}^{7}$Li$^{-}$ ions with the finite nuclear masses. Another closely related problem discussed in this study is accurate numerical evaluation of the half-life of the beryllium-7 isotope.

Frolov, Alexei M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Half-Life Measurement for the rp-Process Waiting Point Nuclide Z80r  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

X-ray bursts have been suggested as a possible site for the astrophysical rp-process. The time scale for the process is governed by ?-decay half-lives of several even-even N=Z waiting point nuclei, in particular, N=Z=40 80Zr. A 4.1({+0.8}{-0.6})-s ?+/EC half-life for 80Zr was determined by observing delayed 84-keV ? rays depopulating a T1/2=4-?s isomer at 312 keV in the daughter 80Y. As this half-life is lower than many previously predicted values, the calculated excessive production of A=80 nuclides in astrophysical x-ray burst scenarios is reduced, and less extreme conditions are necessary for the production of heavier nuclides.

J. J. Ressler; A. Piechaczek; W. B. Walters; A. Aprahamian; M. Wiescher; J. C. Batchelder; C. R. Bingham; D. S. Brenner; T. N. Ginter; C. J. Gross; R. Grzywacz; D. Kulp; B. MacDonald; W. Reviol; J. Rikovska; K. Rykaczewski; J. A. Winger; E. F. Zganjar

2000-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

22

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Calculations and Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collect the Data! Collect the Data! Previous Video (Collect the Data!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (How to Make a Cloud Chamber!) How to Make a Cloud Chamber! Calculations and Results Now that you have your data, it's time to calculate the half-life of barium-137m! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: We're finally ready to calculate the half-life of metastable barium-137 using the data that you collected earlier. If you haven't collected any data, you may want to watch the first two videos in this series. Steve: We're going to start with an equation. Don't panic. As far as equations go in physics, this one isn't too bad. Joanna: This equation tells us that the activity of a radioactive substance

23

EFFECTIVE HALF-LIFE OF CESIUM-137 IN VARIOUS ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the operational history of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released from site facilities into the SRS environment. However, only a relatively small number of pathways, most importantly {sup 137}Cs in fish and deer, have contributed significantly to doses and risks to the public. The effective half-lives (T{sub e}) of {sup 137}Cs (which include both physical decay and environmental dispersion) in Savannah River floodplain soil and vegetation and in fish and white-tailed deer from the SRS were estimated using long-term monitoring data. For 19742011, the T{sub e}s of {sup 137}Cs in Savannah River floodplain soil and vegetation were 17.0 years (95% CI = 14.219.9) and 13.4 years (95% CI = 10.816.0), respectively. These T{sub e}s were greater than in a previous study that used data collected only through 2005 as a likely result of changes in the flood regime of the Savannah River. Field analyses of {sup 137}Cs concentrations in deer collected during yearly controlled hunts at the SRS indicated an overall T{sub e} of 15.9 years (95% CI = 12.319.6) for 19652011; however, the T{sub e} for 19902011 was significantly shorter (11.8 years, 95% CI = 4.818.8) due to an increase in the rate of {sup 137}Cs removal. The shortest T{sub e}s were for fish in SRS streams and the Savannah River (3.59.0 years), where dilution and dispersal resulted in rapid {sup 137}Cs removal. Long-term data show that T{sub e}s are significantly shorter than the physical half-life of {sup 137}Cs in the SRS environment but that they can change over time. Therefore, it is desirable have a long period of record for calculating Tes and risky to extrapolate T{sub e}s beyond this period unless the processes governing {sup 137}Cs removal are clearly understood.

Jannik, T.; Paller, M.; Baker, R.

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

24

Half-life of Fr221 in Si and Au at 4 K and at millikelvin temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The half-life of the ?-decaying nucleus Fr221 was determined in different environments, that is, embedded in Si at 4 K, and embedded in Au at 4 K and about 20 mK. No differences in half-life for these different conditions were observed within 0.1%. Furthermore, we quote a value for the absolute half-life of Fr221 of t1/2=286.1(10)s that is of comparable precision to the most precise value available in the literature.

F. Wauters; B. Verstichel; M. Breitenfeldt; V. De Leebeeck; V. Yu. Kozlov; I. Kraev; S. Roccia; G. Soti; M. Tandecki; E. Traykov; S. Van Gorp; D. Zkouck; N. Severijns

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

25

Calculation of the Aluminosilicate Half-Life Formation Time in the 2H Evaporator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2H Evaporator contains large quantities of aluminosilicate solids deposited on internal fixtures. The proposed cleaning operations will dissolve the solids in nitric acid. Operations will then neutralize the waste prior to transfer to a waste tank. Combining recent calculations of heat transfer for the 2H Evaporator cleaning operations and laboratory experiments for dissolution of solid samples from the pot, the authors estimated the re-formation rate for aluminosilicates during cooling. The results indicate a half-life formation of 17 hours when evaporator solution cools from 60 degrees C and 9 hours when cooled from 90 degrees C.

Fondeur, F.F.

2000-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

26

Half Life of {sup 101}Mo and {sup 101}Tc beta{sup -}-decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the half-life of the {sup 155}Sm beta{sup -} decay was determined using enriched {sup 154}Sm samples submitted to irradiation in the IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN; the activity of the samples were followed for 4-5 consecutive half lives using a 198 cm{sup 3} HPGe detector. The data was corrected using a non paralizable dead time correction and fitted to an exponential decay function using a non linear fitting procedure developed on the MatLab platform. The resulting value--T{sub 1/2} = 22.180(26) min--was compatible to the one found in the literature, with a lower uncertainty.

Genezini, Frederico A.; Zahn, Guilherme S.; Zamboni, Cibele B. [Centro do Reator de Pesquisas (CRPq)-Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP). Av. Linneu Prestes, 2242-Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, SP, 05507-000 (Brazil)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

27

Average and recommended half-life values for two neutrino double beta decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All existing positive results on two neutrino double beta decay in different nuclei were analyzed. Using the procedure recommended by the Particle Data Group, weighted average values for half-lives of $^{48}$Ca, $^{76}$Ge, $^{82}$Se, $^{96}$Zr, $^{100}$Mo, $^{100}$Mo - $^{100}$Ru ($0^+_1$), $^{116}$Cd, $^{130}$Te, $^{136}$Xe, $^{150}$Nd, $^{150}$Nd - $^{150}$Sm ($0^+_1$) and $^{238}$U were obtained. Existing geochemical data were analyzed and recommended values for half-lives of $^{128}$Te, and $^{130}$Ba are proposed. Given the measured half-life values, nuclear matrix elements were calculated using latest (more reliable and precise) values for phase space factor. Finally, previous results (PRC 81 (2010) 035501) were up-dated and results for $^{136}$Xe were added.

A. S. Barabash

2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

28

In vivo recovery and half-life time of a steam-treated factor IX concentrate in hemophilia B patients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Factor IX (FIX) recovery and half-life was measured in ten hemophilia B patients under standardized conditions. Each patient received a steam-treated high-purity factor IX concentrate at a dose of 1939 U/kg b...

M. Khler; E. Seifried; P. Hellstern; G. Pindur; C. Miyashita; S. Mrsdorf

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Towards a precision measurement of the half life of neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Recent neutrino oscillation experiments provide proof that neutrinos are massive par- ticles, but the absolute neutrino mass scale remains unknown. Observation of neu- trinoless double (more)

Stanford University, Dept. of Physics

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have made a new compilation of observations of maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number from the literature, which we analyse for consistency with the predictions of a simple random drawing hypothesis for stellar mass selection in clusters. Previously, Weidner and Kroupa have suggested that the maximum stellar mass is lower, in low mass clusters, than would be expected on the basis of random drawing, and have pointed out that this could have important implications for steepening the integrated initial mass function of the Galaxy (the IGIMF) at high masses. Our compilation demonstrates how the observed distribution in the plane of maximum stellar mass versus membership number is affected by the method of target selection; in particular, rather low n clusters with large maximum stellar masses are abundant in observational datasets that specifically seek clusters in the environs of high mass stars. Although we do not consider our compilation to be either complete or unbiased, we discuss the method by which such data should be statistically analysed. Our very provisional conclusion is that the data is not indicating any striking deviation from the expectations of random drawing.

Th. Maschberger; C. J. Clarke

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

31

SIMPLIFIED PROCEDURE FOR CERTAIN USERS OF SEALED SOURCES, SHORT HALF-LIFE MATERIALS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

authority with a minimum of: (1) a certification that no residual radioactive contamination attributable, AND SMALL QUANTITIES A large number of users of radioactive materials may use a simplified procedure that qualify for simplified decommissioning procedures are those where radioactive materials have been used

32

Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

33

Relationship between isotope half-life and prostatic edema for optimal prostate dose coverage in permanent seed implants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The robustness of treatment planning to prostatic edema for three different isotopes ({sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs) is explored using dynamical dose calculations on 25 different clinical prostate cases. The treatment plans were made using the inverse planning by simulated annealing (IPSA) algorithm. The prescription was 144, 127, and 125 Gy for {sup 125}I, {sup 131}Cs, and {sup 103}Pd, respectively. For each isotope, three dose distribution schemes were used to impose different protection levels to the urethra: V{sub 120}=0%, V{sub 150}=0%, and V{sub 150}=30%. Eleven initial edema values were considered ranging from 1.0 (no edema) to 2.0 (100%). The edema was assumed to resolve exponentially with time. The prostate volume, seed positions, and seed activity were dynamically tracked to produce the final dose distribution. Edema decay half-lives of 10, 30, and 50 days were used. A total of 675 dynamical calculations were performed for each initial edema value. For the {sup 125}I isotope, limiting the urethra V{sub 120} to 0% leads to a prostate D{sub 90} under 140 Gy for initial edema values above 1.5. Planning with urethra V{sub 150} at 0% provides a good response to the edema; the prostate D{sub 90} remains higher than 140 Gy for edema values up to 1.8 and a half-life of 30 days or less. For {sup 103}Pd, the prostate D{sub 90} is under 97% of the prescription dose for approximately 66%, 40%, and 30% of edema values for urethra V{sub 120}=0%, V{sub 150}=0%, and V{sub 150}=30%, respectively. Similar behavior is seen for {sup 131}Cs and the center of the prostate becomes 'cold' for almost all edema scenarios. The magnitude of the edema following prostate brachytherapy, as well as the half-life of the isotope used and that of the edema resorption, all have important impacts on the dose distribution. The {sup 125}I isotope with its longer half-life is more robust to prostatic edema. Setting up good planning objectives can provide an adequate compromise between organ doses and robustness. This is even more important since seed misplacements will contribute to further degrade dose coverage.

Villeneuve, Maxime; Leclerc, Ghyslain; Lessard, Etienne; Pouliot, Jean; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Hotel-dieu de Quebec, CHUQ, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec J1H 5N4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94713-1708 (United States); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Hotel-dieu de Quebec, CHUQ, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Highly accurate measurements of the spontaneous fission half-life of 240,242Pu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fast spectrum neutron-induced fission cross-section data for transuranic isotopes are of special demand from the nuclear data community. In particular highly accurate data are needed for the new generation IV nuclear applications. The aim is to obtain precise neutron-induced fission cross sections for 240Pu and 242Pu. To do so, accurate data on spontaneous fission half-lives must be available. Also, minimizing uncertainties in the detector efficiency is a key point. We studied both isotopes by means of a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber with the goal of improving the present data on the neutron-induced fission cross section. For the two plutonium isotopes the high ?-particle decay rates pose a particular problem to experiments due to piling-up events in the counting gas. Argon methane and methane were employed as counting gases, the latter showed considerable improvement in signal generation due to its higher drift velocity. The detection efficiency for both samples was determined, and improved spontaneous fission half-lives were obtained with very low statistical uncertainty (0.13% for 240Pu and 0.04% for 242Pu): for 240Pu, T1/2,SF=1.1651011 yr (1.1%), and for 242Pu, T1/2,SF=6.741010 yr (1.3%). Systematic uncertainties are due to sample mass (0.4% for 240Pu and 0.9% for 242Pu) and efficiency (1%).

P. Salvador-Castieira; T. Bry?; R. Eykens; F.-J. Hambsch; A. Moens; S. Oberstedt; G. Sibbens; D. Vanleeuw; M. Vidali; C. Pretel

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

35

SIMULTANEOUS CONSTRAINTS ON THE NUMBER AND MASS OF RELATIVISTIC SPECIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent indications from both particle physics and cosmology suggest the possible existence of more than three neutrino species. In cosmological analyses the effects of neutrino mass and number of species can in principle be disentangled for fixed cosmological parameters. However, since we do not have perfect measurements of the standard {Lambda} cold dark matter model parameters, some correlation remains between the neutrino mass and number of species, and both parameters should be included in the analysis. Combining the newest observations of several cosmological probes (cosmic microwave background, large-scale structure, expansion rate), we obtain N {sub eff} = 3.58{sup +0.15} {sub -0.16}(68% CL){sup +0.55} {sub -0.53}(95% CL) and {Sigma}m {sub {nu}} < 0.60 eV(95% CL), which are currently the strongest constraints on N {sub eff} and {Sigma}m {sub {nu}} from an analysis including both parameters. The preference for N {sub eff} >3 is at the 2{sigma} level.

Riemer-Sorensen, Signe; Parkinson, David; Davis, Tamara M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)] [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Blake, Chris, E-mail: signe@physics.uq.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)] [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Improved half-life measurement of 224Pa and its 209Bi(18O,3n)224Pa production cross section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

224Pa was produced via the 209Bi(18O,3n) reaction at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron and the half-life was determined to be 85020 ms by measuring its alpha decay using our rotating wheel system. Our value is consistent with a previously reported half-life of 950150 ms for 224Pa produced via the 205Tl(22Ne,3n) reaction, but its much more precise. The cross section for the 209Bi(18O,3n)224Pa reaction was measured to be 0.50.1 mb for 8789 MeV 18O5+ projectiles incident on the target.

P. A. Wilk; K. E. Gregorich; M. B. Hendricks; M. R. Lane; D. M. Lee; C. A. McGrath; D. A. Shaughnessy; D. A. Strellis; E. R. Sylwester; D. C. Hoffman

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Measurement of the half-life of the T=$\\frac{1}{2}$ mirror decay of $^{19}$Ne and its implication on physics beyond the standard model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The $\\frac{1}{2}^+ \\rightarrow \\frac{1}{2}^+$ superallowed mixed mirror decay of $^{19}$Ne to $^{19}$F is excellently suited for high precision studies of the weak interaction. However, there is some disagreement on the value of the half-life. In a new measurement we have determined this quantity to be $T_{1/2}$ = $17.2832 \\pm 0.0051_{(stat)}$ $\\pm 0.0066_{(sys)}$ s, which differs from the previous world average by 3 standard deviations. The impact of this measurement on limits for physics beyond the standard model such as the presence of tensor currents is discussed.

L. J. Broussard; H. O. Back; M. S. Boswell; A. S. Crowell; P. Dendooven; G. S. Giri; C. R. Howell; M. F. Kidd; K. Jungmann; W. L. Kruithof; A. Mol; C. J. G. Onderwater; R. W. Pattie Jr.; P. D. Shidling; M. Sohani; D. J. van der Hoek; A. Rogachevskiy; E. Traykov; O. O. Versolato; L. Willmann; H. W. Wilschut; A. R. Young

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

38

Altered solar wind -magnetosphere interaction at low Mach numbers: coronal mass ejections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Altered solar wind - magnetosphere interaction at low Mach numbers: coronal mass ejections Benoit fundamental alterations of the solar wind ­ magnetosphere interaction that occur during low Mach number solar wind. We first show that low Mach number solar wind conditions are often characteristic of coronal mass

Boyer, Edmond

39

nature biotechnology volume 27 number 12 december 2009 1 half-life for indications when an extended residence time in the cir-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and can complicate tight control over plasma Focus on synthetic biology This issue of Nature Biotechnology

Cai, Long

40

Wave?number solution for a string with distributed mass properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A structure with spatially variable properties when excited at a single frequency will excite many wave numbers. In this paper the vibration of a string with a mass distribution m(x) given by a Fourier series expansion is analyzed. The equation governing the wave?number solution w(k) for the string displacement is obtained via Fourier transform. The final result is a finite?difference equation. The finite?difference equation relates all of the displacement wave numbers to each other. The solution to this equation is obtained by rewriting it as a system of simultaneous equations that are then solved by standard linear algebra techniques. Wave?number spectral solutions are obtained for different mass distribution. In one case the mass distribution is assumed to vary in a discontinuous manner between adjacent bays in another case the mass is assumed to vary in a triangular manner. The wave?number solutions are presented in 3?D graphs so that the magnitude of the displacement can be seen as a function of the wave number and either the magnitude of the additional mass the area over which the mass is distributed or the length of the bay. In the limiting case as the mass distribution becomes very concentrated the classical pass/stop band familiar with periodic structures is recovered. ?

Mauro Pierucci

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Global energy gradients and size in colonial organisms: Worker mass and worker number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global energy gradients and size in colonial organisms: Worker mass and worker number in ant size varies globally is a key challenge to ecology. Solar energy may shape gradients of body size by its effects on local temperature and net primary productivity (16­20). Rising global temperatures (21

Kaspari, Mike

42

Constraints on the dark matter particle mass from the number of Milky Way satellites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have conducted N-body simulations of the growth of Milky Way-sized halos in cold and warm dark matter cosmologies. The number of dark matter satellites in our simulated Milky Ways decreases with decreasing mass of the dark matter particle. Assuming that the number of dark matter satellites exceeds or equals the number of observed satellites of the Milky Way, we derive lower limits on the dark matter particle mass. We find with 95% confidence m{sub s}>13.3 keV for a sterile neutrino produced by the Dodelson and Widrow mechanism, m{sub s}>8.9 keV for the Shi and Fuller mechanism, m{sub s}>3.0 keV for the Higgs decay mechanism, and m{sub WDM}>2.3 keV for a thermal dark matter particle. The recent discovery of many new dark matter dominated satellites of the Milky Way in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey allows us to set lower limits comparable to constraints from the complementary methods of Lyman-{alpha} forest modeling and x-ray observations of the unresolved cosmic x-ray background and of dark matter halos from dwarf galaxy to cluster scales. Future surveys like LSST, DES, PanSTARRS, and SkyMapper have the potential to discover many more satellites and further improve constraints on the dark matter particle mass.

Polisensky, Emil [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20745 (United States); Ricotti, Massimo [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20745 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Number  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' , /v-i 2 -i 3 -A, This dow'at consists ~f--~-_,_~~~p.~,::, Number -------of.-&--copies, 1 Series.,-a-,-. ! 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER 1; r-.' L INTRAMURALCORRESPONDENCE i"ks' 3 2.. September 25, 1947 Memo.tor Dr. A. H, Dovdy . From: Dr. H. E, Stokinger Be: Trip Report - Mayvood Chemical Works A trip vas made Nednesday, August 24th vith Messrs. Robert W ilson and George Sprague to the Mayvood Chemical F!orks, Mayvood, New Jersey one of 2 plants in the U.S.A. engaged in the production of thorium compounds. The purpose of the trip vas to: l 1. Learn the type of chemical processes employed in the thorium industry (thorium nitrate). 2. Survey conditions of eeosure of personnel associated vith these chemical processes. 3. Obtain samples of atmospheric contaminants in the plant, as

44

The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

1950-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

45

The effect of particle resuspension during walking activity to PM10 mass and number concentrations in an indoor microenvironment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Mass and number concentration of particulate matter (PM10) was measured during walking experiments inside a laboratory. In total 20 walking experiments were conducted in a period of 3 months. Particle number concentration was measured in the size range of 0.021?m, while, mass concentration was measured in the range 0.110?m. The PM10 mass increased during the activity, by average 84%, whereas, the walking activity had no impact on particle number concentration. Human induced resuspension rates were examined under different dust loadings. The different dust loadings used (25, 15, 5, 1g/m2) in order to evaluate the impact of surface loading on the indoor PM10 mass concentration and on the resuspension rate. Walking style was the same in all experiments. Moreover, the experiments involved two different walking patterns inside the laboratory (rectangular and line). The impact of different speed was also examined. The average resuspension rate was calculated to be equal to 10?210?3hr?1. No impact on resuspension rate was observed for different walking patterns or walking speed. On the other hand, the measured mass concentration inside the room was increased when using higher dust loading on the floor, although the estimated resuspension rate found independent on the initially deposited surface dust loading.

Norbert Serfozo; Sofia Eirini Chatoutsidou; Mihalis Lazaridis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

The Number of Information Bits Related to the Minimum Quantum and Gravitational Masses in a Vacuum Dominated Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wesson obtained a limit on quantum and gravitational mass in the universe by combining the cosmological constant Lambda, Planck constant, the speed of light c, and also the gravitational constant G. The corresponding masses are 2.0x10E-62 kg and 2.3E+54 kg respectively, and in general can be obtained with the help of a generic dimensional analysis, or from an analysis where the cosmological constant appears in a four dimensional space-time and as a result of a higher dimensional reduction. In this paper our goal is to establish a relation for both quantum and gravitational mass as function of the information number bit N. For this reason, we first derive an expression for the cosmological constant as a function of information bit, since both masses depend on it, and then various resulting relations are explored, in relation to information number of bits N. Fractional information bits imply no information extraction is possible. We see, that the order of magnitude of the various parameters as well as their ratios involve the large number 10E+122, that is produced naturally from the fundamental parameters of modern cosmology. Finally, we propose that in a complete quantum gravity theory the idea of information the might have to be included, with the quantum bits of information (q-bits) as one of its fundamental parameters, resulting thus to a more complete understanding of the universe, its laws, and its evolution.

Ioannis Haranas; Ioannis Gkigkitzis

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

47

Mass number dependence of the Skyrme-force-induced nuclear symmetry energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The global mass dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy and its two basic ingredients due to the mean-level spacing and effective strength of the isovector mean-potential is studied within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model. In particular, our study determines the ratio of the surface-to-volume contributions to the nuclear symmetry energy to be ~1.6 and reveals that contributions due to mean-level spacing and effective strength of the isovector mean-potential are almost equal after removing momentum-dependent effects by rescaling them with isoscalar and isovector effective masses, respectively.

M. Rafalski; W. Satula; R. Wyss

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Planck Length Scale and Einstein Mass-Energy Obtained from the Sciama-Mach Large Number Relationship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If a physical significance should be attributed to the cosmological large number relationship obtained from Sciama's formulation of Mach's Principle, then a number of interesting physical conclusions may be drawn. The Planck length is naturally obtained as the amplitude of waves in a medium whose properties are implied by the relationship. The relativistic internal energy associated with a rest mass is explicitly related to the gravitational potential energy of the Universe, and consistency with the Einstein photon energy is demonstrated. Broader cosmological consequences of this formulation are addressed.

Scott Funkhouser

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

49

Measurement of number, mass and size distribution of particles in the atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...size-fractionated manner using cascade impactors, which depend...mean free path of the gas molecules o er a signi...5, tra c-related gases, particle number and...and contracts with the Natural Environment Research Council...this period, exhaust gas emissions will be rich...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Arbitrary mass Majorana neutrinos in neutrinoless double beta decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We revisit the mechanism of neutrinoless double beta (NLDBD) decay mediated by the exchange with the heavy Majorana neutrino N of arbitrary mass mN, slightly mixed with the electron neutrino. By assuming the dominance of this mechanism, we update the well-known NLDBD-decay exclusion plot in the mass-mixing angle plane taking into account recent progress in the calculation of nuclear matrix elements within quasiparticle random phase approximation and improved experimental bounds on the NLDBD-decay half-life of Ge-76 and Xe-136. We also consider the known formula approximating the mN dependence of the NLDBD-decay nuclear matrix element in a simple explicit form. We analyze its accuracy and specify the corresponding parameters, allowing one to easily calculate the NLDBD-decay half-life for arbitrary mN for all the experimentally interesting isotopes without resorting to real nuclear structure calculations.

Amand Faessler; Marcela Gonzalez; Sergey Kovalenko; Fedor Simkovic

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

51

paper-number : V11D-2318 abstract-number : 949668 Mass-conservative numerical scheme of bubble growth in incompressible viscous magmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pa(0) C : water concentration : surface tension i : Pa(0) M GT M : water molar mass G : gas constant scale decompression time scale = 2 RiPa(0) : dimensionless surface tension : porosity R S r P C(t,r) m is refined at the bubble boundary Scheme stability Constraint on the time step by physical considera- tion

d'Orléans, Université

52

arXiv:1109.1046v1[physics.ins-det]6Sep2011 Xenon purity analysis for EXO-200 via mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136 Xe[1]. The first such experiment, known as EXO-200, is currently double beta decay half life of 6.4 ? 1025 years, equivalent to a Majorana neutrino mass of order 100 me collecting data at the WIPP facility near Carlsbad, New Mexico[2]. EXO-200 is sensitive to a neutrinoless

Gratta, Giorgio

53

Arbitrary mass Majorana neutrinos in neutrinoless double beta decay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We revisit the mechanism of neutrinoless double beta (0???) decay mediated by the exchange with the heavy Majorana neutrino N of arbitrary mass mN, slightly mixed ?UeN with the electron neutrino ?e. By assuming the dominance of this mechanism, we update the well-known 0???-decay exclusion plot in the mN?UeN plane taking into account recent progress in the calculation of nuclear matrix elements within quasiparticle random phase approximation and improved experimental bounds on the 0???-decay half-life of Ge76 and Xe136. We also consider the known formula approximating the mN dependence of the 0???-decay nuclear matrix element in a simple explicit form. We analyze its accuracy and specify the corresponding parameters, allowing one to easily calculate the 0???-decay half-life for arbitrary mN for all the experimentally interesting isotopes without resorting to real nuclear structure calculations.

Amand Faessler; Marcela Gonzlez; Sergey Kovalenko; Fedor imkovic

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

54

NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number $A < 16$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An update of the NACRE compilation [Angulo et al., Nucl. Phys. A 656 (1999) 3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number $A<16$, of which fifteen are particle-transfer reactions and the rest radiative capture reactions. When compared with NACRE, NACRE II features in particular (1) the addition to the experimental data collected in NACRE of those reported later, preferentially in the major journals of the field by early 2013, and (2) the adoption of potential models as the primary tool for extrapolation to very low energies of astrophysical $S$-factors, with a systematic evaluation of uncertainties. As in NACRE, the rates are presented in tabular form for temperatures in the $10^{6}$ $\\simeq\\leq$ T $\\leq$ $10^{10}$ K range. Along with the 'adopted' rates, their low and high limits are provided. The new rates are available in electronic form as part of the Brussels Library (BRUSLIB) of nuclear data. The NACRE II rates also supersede the previous NACRE rates in the Nuclear Network Generator (NETGEN) for astrophysics. [http://www.astro.ulb.ac.be/databases.html.

Yi Xu; Kohji Takahashi; Stephane Goriely; Marcel Arnould; Masahisa Ohta; Hiroaki Utsunomiya

2013-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

55

Technetium Activities at Mass 97  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A technetium activity believed to be Tc97g has been observed to decay with molybdenum K x-rays and to possess a half-life in the range of 104 to 105 years.

G. E. Boyd

1954-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Mass, quark-number, and sqrt sNN dependence of the second andfourth flow harmonics in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleuscollisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present STAR measurements of the azimuthal anisotropyparameter v_2 for pions, kaons, protons, Lambda, bar Lambda, Xi+bar Xi,and \\Omega + bar Omega, along with v_4 for pions, kaons, protons, andLambda + bar Lambda at mid-rapidity for Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN=62.4and 200 GeV. The v_2(p_T) values for all hadron species at 62.4 GeV aresimilar to those observed in 130 and 200 GeV collisions. For observedkinematic ranges, v_2 values at 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV are as little as10 percent-15 percent larger than those in Pb+Pb collisions at sqrt s NN=17.3 GeV. At intermediate transverse momentum (p_T from 1.5-5 GeV/c),the 62.4 GeV v_2(p_T) and v_4(p_T) values are consistent with thequark-number scaling first observed at 200 GeV. A four-particle cumulantanalysis is used to assess the non-flow contributions to pions andprotons and some indications are found for a smaller non-flowcontribution to protons than pions. Baryon v_2 is larger than anti-baryonv_2 at 62.4 and 200 GeV perhaps indicating either that the initialspatial net-baryon distribution is anisotropic, that the mechanismleading to transport of baryon number from beam- to mid-rapidity enhancesv_2, or that anti-baryon and baryon annihilation is larger in thein-plane direction.

Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

57

UNIT NUMBER:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

58

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 UNIT NUMBER UNIT NAME Rubble oile 41 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Butler Lake Dam, West end of Butler Lake top 20 ft wide, 10 ft APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long, base 30...

59

Half-life calculation of one-proton emitters with a shell model potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accumulated amount of data for half-lives of proton emitters still remains a challenge to the ability of nuclear models to reproduce them consistently. These nuclei are far from beta stability line in a region where the validity of current nuclear models is not guaranteed. A nuclear shell model is introduced to the calculation of the nuclear barrier of less deformed proton emitters. The predictions using the proposed model are in good agreement with the data, with the advantage of have used only a single parameter in the model.

Rodrigues, M. M.; Duarte, S. B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCT Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Teruya, N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba - UFPB Campus de Joao Pessoa, 58051-970, Joao Pessoa - PB (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

60

Analysis of environmental influences in nuclear half-life measurements exhibiting time-dependent decay rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a recent series of papers evidence has been presented for correlations between solar activity and nuclear decay rates. This includes an apparent correlation between Earth-Sun distance and data taken at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Although these correlations could arise from a direct interaction between the decaying nuclei and some particles or fields emanating from the Sun, they could also represent an "environmental" effect arising from a seasonal variation of the sensitivities of the BNL and PTB detectors due to changes in temperature, relative humidity, background radiation, etc. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the responses of the detectors actually used in the BNL and PTB experiments, and show that sensitivities to seasonal variations in the respective detectors are likely too small to produce the observed fluctuations.

Jenkins, Jere H; Fischbach, Ephraim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (38)K(m)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada V5A 1S6 J. C. Hardy and V. E. Iacob Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA J. R. Leslie and H.-B. Mak Department of Physics, Queen?s University...

Ball, G. C.; Boisvert, G.; Bricault, P.; Churchman, R.; Dombsky, M.; Lindner, T.; Macdonald, J. A.; Vandervoort, E.; Bishop, S.; D'Auria, J. M.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, V. E.; Leslie, J. R.; Mak, H. -B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The half-life of DNA in bone: measuring decay kinetics in 158 dated fossils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Charlotte L. Oskam 1 Marie L. Hale 2 Paula F. Campos 3 5 Jose A...the activation energy and R the gas constant. On the basis of the...R. P. Scofield, M. L. Hale, and R. N. Holdaway 2010 Highly...Scofield, C. L. Oskam, M. L. Hale, R. N. Holdaway, and M...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Half-life measurements of 137,139 Cs excited nuclear states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F´isica, Comisi´on Nacional de Energ´ia At´omica, 1429 Buenos Aires, Argentina 3 Universidad Nacional de General San Mart´in, San Mart´in, Argentina 4 CONICET, 1033 Buenos Aires, Argentina 5 Centre de, France 6 Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

64

Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of .sup.223 Ra and .sup.225 Ac, from a radionuclide "cow" of .sup.227 Ac or .sup.229 Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide "cow" forming an ingrown mixture; b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the "cow" from at least one radionuclide daughter; d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the "cow". In one embodiment the radionuclide "cow" is the .sup.227 Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.227 Th and the product radionuclide is the .sup.223 Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the .sup.227 Ac and retains the .sup.227 Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide "cow"is the .sup.229 Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.225 Ra and said product radionuclide is the .sup.225 Ac and the .sup.225 Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the .sup.229 Th and passes the .sup.225 Ra/Ac.

Bray, Lane A. (Richland, WA); Ryan, Jack L. (West Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Prolonged Serum Half-Life of Antineoplastic Drugs by Incorporation into the Low Density Lipoprotein  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cells. J. Supramol. Struct., 10: 467-478, 1979. Shaw. J. M.. Shaw. K. V., Yanovich, S., Iwanik. M., Futch, W. S., Rosowsky, A., and Schook, L. B. Delivery of lipophilic drugs using lipoproteins. Ann. NY Acad. Sci...

P. Chris de Smidt and Theo J. C. van Berkel

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Prolonged lipoprotein half-life: effect on oxidative stability and physical features of lipoprotein particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is responsible for two out of the three leading causes of death in the United States. Oxidatively modified apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein (apoB-LPs) are known to contribute to atherosclerotic...

Simeral, Stephanie Bianco

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Case Number:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Name of Petitioner: Name of Petitioner: Date of Filing: Case Number: Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 JUL 2 2 2009 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Appeal Dean P. Dennis March 2, 2009 TBA-0072 Dean D. Dennis filed a complaint of retaliation under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Dennis alleged that he engaged in protected activity and that his employer, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec ), subsequently terminated him. An Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Hearing Officer denied relief in Dean P. Dennis, Case No. TBH-0072, 1 and Mr. Dennis filed the instant appeal. As discussed below, the appeal is denied. I. Background The DOE established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to "safeguard public

68

JOB NUMBER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

. . . . . . . . . .: LEAVE BLANK (NARA use only) JOB NUMBER N/-&*W- 9d - 3 DATE RECEIVED " -1s - 9 J - NOTIFICATION TOAGENCY , In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C. 3303a the disposition request. including amendments, is ap roved except , . l for items that may be marke,, ,"dis osition not approved" or "withdrawn in c o i m n 10. 4. NAME OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER 5 TELEPHONE Jannie Kindred (202) 5&-333 5 - 2 -96 6 AGENCYCERTIFICATION -. ~ - I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposition of its records and that the records roposed for disposal are not now needed for the business of this agency or wiRnot be needed after t G t r & s s d ; and that written concurrence from

69

KPA Number  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Mapping of the DOE Information Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM-SW) level 3. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Number KPA Activity SEM Section SEM Work Product SQSE Web site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse ORGANIZATION PROCESS FOCUS OPF-1 The software process is assessed periodically, and action plans are developed to address the assessment findings. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement Action Plan * Methodologies ! DOE Methodologies ! SEM OPF-2 The organization develops and maintains a plan for its software process development and improvement activities. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement

70

Nuclear Masses in Astrophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of N and Z and the data obtained apply to a variety of physics topics. One of the most crucial questions to be addressed in mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides is the one of understanding the processes of element formation in the Universe. To this end, accurate atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations. In this paper, a review on the latest achievements in mass spectrometry for nuclear astrophysics is given.

Christine Weber; Klaus Blaum; Hendrik Schatz

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

71

W Transverse Mass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Some Data Analysis Some Data Analysis The Tevatron produces millions of collisions each second in CDF and DZero. The detectors have hardware triggers to decide if a collision is "interesting," that is it contains a candidate event for any one of a number studies. Our dataset contains 48,844 candidate events for a W mass study. There are other datasets to study Z mass, top and b quarks, QCD, etc. Why don't all the W decays give exactly the same mass? Are all these candidates really Ws? What if we chose only some of these data. How would our choice effect the value of the transverse mass? Work with your classmates. Test the data to see what you can learn. Help with data analysis. Record the best estimate of the W transverse mass from your data analysis. Explain which data you used and why. Check with your classmates and explain any differences between your estimate and theirs.

72

Heat and Mass Transfer Wrme-und Stoffbertragung  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 23 Heat and Mass Transfer Wärme- und Stoffübertragung ISSN 0947-7411 Volume 49 Number 3 Heat Mass

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

73

The mass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mass of the charged Higgs boson at the 1-loop level is investigated, assuming the CP symmetry to be violated explicitly in the Higgs sector of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). It is found that there is a parameter region of the MSSM where the presence of explicit CP violation in the Higgs sector yields negative radiative corrections to the charged Higgs boson mass. Thus, the charged Higgs boson in the MSSM may have as low a mass as 60GeV at the 1-loop level, if the CP symmetry is violated. This lower bound may be improved by the Higgs search at LEP2, which imposes experimental constraints on the charged Higgs mass, as well as on the masses of the neutral Higgs bosons. Hence, LEP2 can constrain experimentally the charged Higgs mass to be not smaller than 109GeV under our assumption. In addition, it sets 75GeV as the lower bound on the mass of the lightest neutral Higgs boson, and 84GeV for that of the next-to-lightest neutral Higgs boson.

Seung Woo Ham; Sun Kun Oh; Eun Jong Yoo; Hyun Kyu Lee

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

CUORE and beyond: bolometric techniques to explore inverted neutrino mass hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{130}$Te. With 741 kg of TeO$_2$ crystals and an excellent energy resolution of 5 keV (0.2%) at the region of interest, CUORE will be one of the most competitive neutrinoless double beta decay experiments on the horizon. With five years of live time, CUORE projected neutrinoless double beta decay half-life sensitivity is $1.6\\times 10^{26}$ y at $1\\sigma$ ($9.5\\times10^{25}$ y at the 90% confidence level), which corresponds to an upper limit on the effective Majorana mass in the range 40--100 meV (50--130 meV). Further background rejection with auxiliary light detector can significantly improve the search sensitivity and competitiveness of bolometric detectors to fully explore the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy with $^{130}$Te and possibly other double beta decay candidate nuclei.

D. R. Artusa; F. T. Avignone III; O. Azzolini; M. Balata; T. I. Banks; G. Bari; J. Beeman; F. Bellini; A. Bersani; M. Biassoni; C. Brofferio; C. Bucci; X. Z. Cai; A. Camacho; L. Canonica; X. G. Cao; S. Capelli; L. Carbone; L. Cardani; M. Carrettoni; N. Casali; D. Chiesa; N. Chott; M. Clemenza; S. Copello; C. Cosmelli; O. Cremonesi; R. J. Creswick; I. Dafinei; A. Dally; V. Datskov; A. De Biasi; M. M. Deninno; S. Di Domizio; M. L. di Vacri; L. Ejzak; D. Q. Fang; H. A. Farach; M. Faverzani; G. Fernandes; E. Ferri; F. Ferroni; E. Fiorini; M. A. Franceschi; S. J. Freedman; B. K. Fujikawa; A. Giachero; L. Gironi; A. Giuliani; J. Goett; P. Gorla; C. Gotti; T. D. Gutierrez; E. E. Haller; K. Han; K. M. Heeger; R. Hennings-Yeomans; H. Z. Huang; R. Kadel; K. Kazkaz; G. Keppel; Yu. G. Kolomensky; Y. L. Li; C. Ligi; X. Liu; Y. G. Ma; C. Maiano; M. Maino; M. Martinez; R. H. Maruyama; Y. Mei; N. Moggi; S. Morganti; T. Napolitano; S. Nisi; C. Nones; E. B. Norman; A. Nucciotti; T. O'Donnell; F. Orio; D. Orlandi; J. L. Ouellet; M. Pallavicini; V. Palmieri; L. Pattavina; M. Pavan; M. Pedretti; G. Pessina; V. Pettinacci; G. Piperno; C. Pira; S. Pirro; E. Previtali; V. Rampazzo; C. Rosenfeld; C. Rusconi; E. Sala; S. Sangiorgio; N. D. Scielzo; M. Sisti; A. R. Smith; L. Taffarello; M. Tenconi; F. Terranova; W. D. Tian; C. Tomei; S. Trentalange; G. Ventura; M. Vignati; B. S. Wang; H. W. Wang; L. Wielgus; J. Wilson; L. A. Winslow; T. Wise; A. Woodcraft; L. Zanotti; C. Zarra; B. X. Zhu; S. Zucchelli

2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

75

CUORE and beyond: bolometric techniques to explore inverted neutrino mass hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{130}$Te. With 741 kg of TeO$_2$ crystals and an excellent energy resolution of 5 keV (0.2%) at the region of interest, CUORE will be one of the most competitive neutrinoless double beta decay experiments on the horizon. With five years of live time, CUORE projected neutrinoless double beta decay half-life sensitivity is $1.6\\times 10^{26}$ y at $1\\sigma$ ($9.5\\times10^{25}$ y at the 90% confidence level), which corresponds to an upper limit on the effective Majorana mass in the range 40--100 meV (50--130 meV). Further background rejection with auxiliary light detector can significantly improve the search sensitivity and competitiveness of bolometric detectors to fully explore the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy with $^{130}$Te and possibly other double beta decay candidate nuclei.

Artusa, D R; Azzolini, O; Balata, M; Banks, T I; Bari, G; Beeman, J; Bellini, F; Bersani, A; Biassoni, M; Brofferio, C; Bucci, C; Cai, X Z; Camacho, A; Canonica, L; Cao, X G; Capelli, S; Carbone, L; Cardani, L; Carrettoni, M; Casali, N; Chiesa, D; Chott, N; Clemenza, M; Copello, S; Cosmelli, C; Cremonesi, O; Creswick, R J; Dafinei, I; Dally, A; Datskov, V; De Biasi, A; Deninno, M M; Di Domizio, S; di Vacri, M L; Ejzak, L; Fang, D Q; Farach, H A; Faverzani, M; Fernandes, G; Ferri, E; Ferroni, F; Fiorini, E; Franceschi, M A; Freedman, S J; Fujikawa, B K; Giachero, A; Gironi, L; Giuliani, A; Goett, J; Gorla, P; Gotti, C; Gutierrez, T D; Haller, E E; Han, K; Heeger, K M; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Huang, H Z; Kadel, R; Kazkaz, K; Keppel, G; Kolomensky, Yu G; Li, Y L; Ligi, C; Liu, X; Ma, Y G; Maiano, C; Maino, M; Martinez, M; Maruyama, R H; Mei, Y; Moggi, N; Morganti, S; Napolitano, T; Nisi, S; Nones, C; Norman, E B; Nucciotti, A; O'Donnell, T; Orio, F; Orlandi, D; Ouellet, J L; Pallavicini, M; Palmieri, V; Pattavina, L; Pavan, M; Pedretti, M; Pessina, G; Pettinacci, V; Piperno, G; Pira, C; Pirro, S; Previtali, E; Rampazzo, V; Rosenfeld, C; Rusconi, C; Sala, E; Sangiorgio, S; Scielzo, N D; Sisti, M; Smith, A R; Taffarello, L; Tenconi, M; Terranova, F; Tian, W D; Tomei, C; Trentalange, S; Ventura, G; Vignati, M; Wang, B S; Wang, H W; Wielgus, L; Wilson, J; Winslow, L A; Wise, T; Woodcraft, A; Zanotti, L; Zarra, C; Zhu, B X; Zucchelli, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

W Transverse Mass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transverse Mass Histogram Transverse Mass Histogram Data for 49,844 candidate W events are in an Excel spreadsheet with the following data as shown in the table below: A B C D 1 Run No Event No W TMass GeV/c2 Bins 2 55237 19588 68.71732 3 55237 30799 72.19464 Get the data. Sort the data by ascending mass. Be sure to sort all the data in the first three columns! Make a histogram of the data. Rather than graphing the data as individual points, physicists group the data by mass. They consider the full range of the data and divide it into "bins" of equal range size. A histogram is a graph of the number of events in each bin vs. the bin range. They are looking for a peak in the data where most of the masses fall. This will be the value of the mass as detemined by that dataset, and the width of the distribution is a reflection of the errors in the measurements.

77

Rapid scanning mass spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass spectrometers and residual gas analyzers (RGA) are used in a variety of applications for analysis of volatile and semi-volatile materials. Analysis is performed by detecting fragments of gas molecules, based on their mass to charge ratio, which are generated in the mass spectrometer. When used as a detector for a gas chromatograph, they function as a means to quantitatively identify isolated volatile species which have been separated from other species via the gas chromatograph. Vacuum Technology, Inc., (VTI) produces a magnetic sector mass spectrometer/RGA which is used in many industrial and laboratory environments. In order to increase the utility of this instrument, it is desirable to increase the mass scanning speed, thereby increasing the number of applications for which it is suited. This project performed the following three upgrades on the computer interface. (1) A new electrometer was designed and built to process the signal from the detector. This new electrometer is more sensitive, over 10 times faster, and over 100 times more stable than the electrometer it will replace. (2) The controller EPROM was reprogrammed with new firmware. This firmware acts as an operating system for the interface and is used to shuttle communications between the PC and the AEROVAC mass spectrometer. (3) The voltage regulator which causes the ion selector voltage to ramp to allow ions of selected mass to be sequentially detected was redesigned and prototyped. The redesigned voltage regulator can be ramped up or down more than 100 times faster than the existing regulator. These changes were incorporated into a prototype unit and preliminary performance testing conducted. Results indicated that scanning speed was significantly increased over the unmodified version.

Leckey, J.H. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boeckmann, M.D. [Vacuum Technology, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1996-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

78

Neutrino mass, lepton number, and the origin of matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

antiparticles? And many other things% Do neutrinos violate CP? #12;Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay W. Rodejohann? #12;Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay 1 sigma W. Rodejohann, 1206.2560 #12;14 F. Iachello #12;15 Regions

79

Half-life of the electron-capture decay of (97)Ru: Precision measurement shows no temperature dependence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Gedcke, Quantitative X-ray Spectrometry (Marcel Dekker, New York, 1981), p. 266. [19] D. Radford, http://radware.phy.ornl.gov/main.html; private communication. [20] R. Brun and F. Rademakers, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 389, 81 (1997). [21.... Gedcke, Quantitative X-ray Spectrometry (Marcel Dekker, New York, 1981), p. 266. [19] D. Radford, http://radware.phy.ornl.gov/main.html; private communication. [20] R. Brun and F. Rademakers, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 389, 81 (1997). [21...

Goodwin, J. R.; Golovko, V. V.; Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Measurement of the Double-Beta Decay Half-life of 136Xe in KamLAND-Zen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by fallout from the Fukushima-I reactor accident in Marchof detector materials by Fukushima fallout, which includeCo are not detected near Fukushima or our soil samples, we

Gando, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Elements of number theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dissertation argues for the necessity of a morphosemantic theory of number, that is, a theory of number serviceable both to semantics and morphology. The basis for this position, and the empirical core of the dissertation, ...

Harbour, Daniel, 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Mass of Si-24  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 22, NUMBER 1 JULY 1980 Mass of Si R. E. Tribble, D. M. Tanner, and A. F. Zeller* Cyclotron Institute and Physics Department, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 11 January 1980) The Si( He, 'He... quintet. The theoretical predictions are from Ref. 14. Nuclides +Si- 4AI Al Mg +Mg 24Na +Na- 4Ne Experimental 4&, 5661(24) 5179(9) 4735(2) 42840. 0) Predicted &&, 5646 5184 4722 4260 15 -5 12 24 +37 +12 -12 -37 ay g@eXQ ~~ thearC C...

Tribble, Robert E.; Tanner, D. M.; Zeller, A. F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF SUBGIANT PLANET HOSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High mass stars are hostile to Doppler measurements due to rotation and activity on the main-sequence, so RV searches for planets around massive stars have relied on evolved stars. A large number of planets have been found around evolved stars with M > 1.5 M{sub Sun }. To test the robustness of mass determinations, Lloyd compared mass distributions of planet hosting subgiants with distributions from integrating isochrones and concluded that it is unlikely the subgiant planet hosts are this massive, but rather that the mass inferences are systematically in error. The conclusions of Lloyd have been called in to question by Johnson et al., who show TRILEGAL-based mass distributions that disagree with the mass distributions in Lloyd, which they attribute to Malmquist bias. Johnson et al. argue that the very small spectroscopic observational uncertainties favor high masses, and there are a large number of high mass sub giants in RV surveys. However, in this Letter, it is shown that Malmquist bias does not impact the mass distributions, but the mass distribution is sensitive to Galaxy model. The relationship needed to reconcile the subgiant planet host masses with any model of the Galactic stellar population is implausible, and the conclusion of Lloyd that spectroscopic mass determinations of subgiants are likely to have been overestimated is robust.

Lloyd, James P. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Number Counts and Dynamical Vacuum Cosmologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study non-linear structure formation in an interacting model of the dark sector of the Universe in which the dark energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, $\\rho_{\\Lambda} \\propto H$, leading to a constant-rate creation of cold dark matter. We derive all relevant expressions to calculate the mass function and the cluster number density using the Sheth-Torman formalism and show that the effect of the interaction process is to increase the number of bound structures of large masses ($M \\gtrsim 10^{14} M_{\\odot}h^{-1}$) when compared to the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model. Since these models are not reducible to each other, this number counts signature can in principle be tested in future surveys.

N. Chandrachani Devi; H. A. Borges; S. Carneiro; J. S. Alcaniz

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Number Counts and Dynamical Vacuum Cosmologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study non-linear structure formation in an interacting model of the dark sector of the Universe in which the dark energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, $\\rho_{\\Lambda} \\propto H$, leading to a constant-rate creation of cold dark matter. We derive all relevant expressions to calculate the mass function and the cluster number density using the Sheth-Torman formalism and show that the effect of the interaction process is to increase the number of bound structures of large masses ($M \\gtrsim 10^{14} M_{\\odot}h^{-1}$) when compared to the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model. Since these models are not reducible to each other, this number counts signature can in principle be tested in future surveys.

Devi, N Chandrachani; Carneiro, S; Alcaniz, J S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Coronal structure of low-mass stars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......structure of low-mass stars Pauline Lang...loss in the stellar wind and X-ray emission...use reconstructed maps of the radial magnetic...strong as the stellar mass decreases, while...magnitude of the open (wind-bearing) magnetic...either rotational velocity or Rossby number......

Pauline Lang; Moira Jardine; Jean-Franois Donati; Julien Morin; Aline Vidotto

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Energy or Mass and Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A review. Problems: 1-Many empirical parameters and large dimension number; 2-Gravitation and Electrodynamics are challenged by dark matter and energy. Energy and nonlinear electrodynamics are fundamental in a unified nonlinear interaction. Nuclear energy appears as nonlinear SU(2) magnetic energy. Gravitation and electromagnetism are unified giving Einstein's equation and a geometric energy momentum tensor. A solution energy in the newtonian limit gives the gravitational constant G. Outside of this limit G is variable. May be interpreted as dark matter or energy. In vacuum, known gravitational solutions are obtained. Electromagnetism is an SU(2) subgroup. A U(1) limit gives Maxwell's equations. Geometric fields determine a generalized Dirac equation and are the germ of quantum physics. Planck's h and of Einstein's c are given by the potential and the metric. Excitations have quanta of charge, flux and spin determining the FQHE. There are only three stable 1/2 spin fermions. Mass is a form of energy. The rest energies of the fermions give the proton/electron mass ratio. Potential excitations have energies equal to the weak boson masses allowing a geometric interpretation of Weinberg's angle. SU(2) gives the anomalous magnetic moments of proton, electron, neutron and generates nuclear range attractive potentials strong enough to produce the binding energies of the deuteron and other nuclides. Lepton and meson masses are due to topological excitations. The geometric mass spectrum is satisfactory. The proton has a triple structure. The alpha constant is a geometric number.

Gustavo R Gonzalez-Martin

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

88

Improving aerosol distributions below clouds by assimilating satellite-retrieved cloud droplet number  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...remainder of the map to the...distributions for mass, number, composition...such as vertical velocity and aerosol composition...updated aerosol mass for each compound...aerosols in trade wind cumulus observed by...spectrum of updraft velocities and the internally...Starting from aerosol mass (M) and number...

Pablo E. Saide; Gregory R. Carmichael; Scott N. Spak; Patrick Minnis; J. Kirk Ayers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number Number Jump to: navigation, search Properties of type "Number" Showing 200 properties using this type. (previous 200) (next 200) A Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Property:AvgTempGeoFluidIntoPlant Property:AvgWellDepth B Property:Building/FloorAreaChurchesChapels Property:Building/FloorAreaGroceryShops Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare Property:Building/FloorAreaShops Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters

90

ALARA notes, Number 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the `tyranny` of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment.

Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C. [eds.] [eds.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

CHROMOSOME NUMBERS IN MAMMALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...variables for which the double inte-gral does not exist: R. L. JEFFERY. On the number of elements in a group which have a power in...society will meet at Columbia University, MA ay 2, 1925. W. BENJAMIN FITE Acting Secretary 424 SCIENCE

Theophilus S. Painter

1925-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

92

Baryon Number Violation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report, prepared for the Community Planning Study - Snowmass 2013 - summarizes the theoretical motivations and the experimental efforts to search for baryon number violation, focussing on nucleon decay and neutron-antineutron oscillations. Present and future nucleon decay search experiments using large underground detectors, as well as planned neutron-antineutron oscillation search experiments with free neutron beams are highlighted.

K. S. Babu; E. Kearns; U. Al-Binni; S. Banerjee; D. V. Baxter; Z. Berezhiani; M. Bergevin; S. Bhattacharya; S. Brice; R. Brock; T. W. Burgess; L. Castellanos; S. Chattopadhyay; M-C. Chen; E. Church; C. E. Coppola; D. F. Cowen; R. Cowsik; J. A. Crabtree; H. Davoudiasl; R. Dermisek; A. Dolgov; B. Dutta; G. Dvali; P. Ferguson; P. Fileviez Perez; T. Gabriel; A. Gal; F. Gallmeier; K. S. Ganezer; I. Gogoladze; E. S. Golubeva; V. B. Graves; G. Greene; T. Handler; B. Hartfiel; A. Hawari; L. Heilbronn; J. Hill; D. Jaffe; C. Johnson; C. K. Jung; Y. Kamyshkov; B. Kerbikov; B. Z. Kopeliovich; V. B. Kopeliovich; W. Korsch; T. Lachenmaier; P. Langacker; C-Y. Liu; W. J. Marciano; M. Mocko; R. N. Mohapatra; N. Mokhov; G. Muhrer; P. Mumm; P. Nath; Y. Obayashi; L. Okun; J. C. Pati; R. W. Pattie Jr.; D. G. Phillips II; C. Quigg; J. L. Raaf; S. Raby; E. Ramberg; A. Ray; A. Roy; A. Ruggles; U. Sarkar; A. Saunders; A. Serebrov; Q. Shafi; H. Shimizu; M. Shiozawa; R. Shrock; A. K. Sikdar; W. M. Snow; A. Soha; S. Spanier; G. C. Stavenga; S. Striganov; R. Svoboda; Z. Tang; Z. Tavartkiladze; L. Townsend; S. Tulin; A. Vainshtein; R. Van Kooten; C. E. M. Wagner; Z. Wang; B. Wehring; R. J. Wilson; M. Wise; M. Yokoyama; A. R. Young

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

93

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 Risk and Safety Manager 5535 Security 7058 #12;- 3 - FOREWORD This reference manual outlines the safe

Bolch, Tobias

94

FAQ 5-Is uranium radioactive?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? All isotopes of uranium are radioactive, with most having extremely long half-lives. Half-life is a measure of the time it takes for one half of the atoms of a particular radionuclide to disintegrate (or decay) into another nuclear form. Each radionuclide has a characteristic half-life. Half-lives vary from millionths of a second to billions of years. Because radioactivity is a measure of the rate at which a radionuclide decays (for example, decays per second), the longer the half-life of a radionuclide, the less radioactive it is for a given mass. The half-life of uranium-238 is about 4.5 billion years, uranium-235 about 700 million years, and uranium-234 about 25 thousand years. Uranium atoms decay into other atoms, or radionuclides, that are also radioactive and commonly called "decay products." Uranium and its decay products primarily emit alpha radiation, however, lower levels of both beta and gamma radiation are also emitted. The total activity level of uranium depends on the isotopic composition and processing history. A sample of natural uranium (as mined) is composed of 99.3% uranium-238, 0.7% uranium-235, and a negligible amount of uranium-234 (by weight), as well as a number of radioactive decay products.

95

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Magnesium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sodium Sodium Previous Element (Sodium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Aluminum) Aluminum Isotopes of the Element Magnesium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 24 78.99% STABLE 25 10.00% STABLE 26 11.01% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 19 4.0 picoseconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 20 90.8 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission ~ 27.00% 21 122 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 32.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay < 0.50%

96

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Chlorine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sulfur Sulfur Previous Element (Sulfur) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Argon) Argon Isotopes of the Element Chlorine [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 35 75.76% STABLE 37 24.24% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 28 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 29 < 20 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 30 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 31 150 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.70% 32 298 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

97

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Potassium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Argon Argon Previous Element (Argon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Calcium) Calcium Isotopes of the Element Potassium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 39 93.2581% STABLE 40 0.0117% 1.248×10+9 years 41 6.7302% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 32 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 33 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 34 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 35 178 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.37% 36 342 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

98

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Silicon Silicon Previous Element (Silicon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sulfur) Sulfur Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 31 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 24 No Data Available Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 25 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission 100.00% 26 43.7 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission No Data Available 27 260 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with

99

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Oxygen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Previous Element (Nitrogen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Fluorine) Fluorine Isotopes of the Element Oxygen [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 16 99.757% STABLE 17 0.038% STABLE 18 0.205% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 12 1.139×10-21 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available 13 8.58 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 100.00% 14 70.620 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 15 122.24 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 16 STABLE - - 17 STABLE - - 18 STABLE - - 19 26.88 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

100

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Gallium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Zinc Zinc Previous Element (Zinc) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Germanium) Germanium Isotopes of the Element Gallium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 69 60.108% STABLE 71 39.892% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 56 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 57 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 58 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 59 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 60 70 milliseconds Electron Capture 98.40%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Sodium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium Isotopes of the Element Sodium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 23 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 18 1.3×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 19 < 40 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 20 447.9 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 20.05% Electron Capture 100.00% 21 22.49 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 22 2.6027 years Electron Capture 100.00% 23 STABLE - - 24 14.997 hours Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

102

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Neon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fluorine Fluorine Previous Element (Fluorine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sodium) Sodium Isotopes of the Element Neon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 20 90.48% STABLE 21 0.27% STABLE 22 9.25% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 16 9×10-21 seconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 17 109.2 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay No Data Available Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 100.00% 18 1.6670 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 19 17.22 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 20 STABLE - -

103

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Copper  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nickel Nickel Previous Element (Nickel) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Zinc) Zinc Isotopes of the Element Copper [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 63 69.15% STABLE 65 30.85% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 52 No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 53 < 300 nanoseconds Electron Capture No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 54 < 75 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 55 27 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 15.0% 56 93 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

104

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Boron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beryllium Beryllium Previous Element (Beryllium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Carbon) Carbon Isotopes of the Element Boron [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 10 19.9% STABLE 11 80.1% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 6 No Data Available Double Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 7 3.255×10-22 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 8 770 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 100.00% 9 8.439×10-19 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% Double Alpha Decay 100.00%

105

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Tungsten  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tantalum Tantalum Previous Element (Tantalum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Rhenium) Rhenium Isotopes of the Element Tungsten [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 180 0.12% >= 6.6×10+17 years 182 26.50% STABLE 183 14.31% > 1.3×10+19 years 184 30.64% STABLE 186 28.43% > 2.3×10+19 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 157 275 milliseconds Electron Capture No Data Available 158 1.25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 158m 0.143 milliseconds Isomeric Transition No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 159 7.3 milliseconds Alpha Decay ~ 99.90%

106

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Boron Boron Previous Element (Boron) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Nitrogen) Nitrogen Isotopes of the Element Carbon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 12 98.93% STABLE 13 1.07% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 8 1.981×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay No Data Available 9 126.5 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 61.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 38.40% 10 19.308 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 11 20.334 minutes Electron Capture 100.00% 12 STABLE - -

107

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Rhenium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tungsten Tungsten Previous Element (Tungsten) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Osmium) Osmium Isotopes of the Element Rhenium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 185 37.40% STABLE 187 62.60% 4.33×10+10 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 159 No Data Available No Data Available No Data Available 160 0.82 milliseconds Proton Emission 91.00% Alpha Decay 9.00% 161 0.44 milliseconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay <= 1.40% 161m 14.7 milliseconds Alpha Decay 93.00% Proton Emission 7.00% 162 107 milliseconds Alpha Decay 94.00% Electron Capture 6.00%

108

Metrics For Comparing Plasma Mass Filters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter. __________________________________________________

Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT Board of Directors Reply to: Ronald Rayner C. W. Adams James D. Downing, P.E. Chairman Billy Hickman 66768 Hwy 60 Brian Turner Marvin John P.O. Box 99 Vice-Chairman Jason Pierce Salome, AZ 85348 Denton Ross Jerry Rovey Secretary James N. Warkomski ED8@HARCUVARCO.COM John Utz Gary Wood PHONE:(928) 859-3647 Treasurer FAX: (928) 859-3145 Sent via e-mail Mr. Darrick Moe, Regional Manager Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region P. O. Box 6457 Phoenix, AZ 85005-6457 moe@wapa.gov; dswpwrmrk@wapa.gov Re: ED5-Palo Verde Hub Project Dear Mr. Moe, In response to the request for comments issued at the October 6 Parker-Davis Project customer th meeting, and in conjunction with comments previously submitted by the Southwest Public Power

110

Preventive Action Number:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-018 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-018 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 09_0924 Worksheet modified to reflect External Audit recommendation for identification of "Cause for Potential Nonconformance". Minor editing changes. 11_0414 Added Preventive Action Number block to match Q-Pulse

111

Preventive Action Number:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-017 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 11_0414 Added problem statement to first block. F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 3 of 3 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Corrective Action Number: Source: Details/Problem Statement: Raised By: Raised Date: Target Date:

112

Mass Spectrometer: Orbitrap | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Software (ISIS): A Machine Learning Approach to Tandem Mass Spectral Identification of Lipids. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics has gained importance...

113

Mass Spectrometry | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Microfabrication Mass Spectrometry Microscopy Molecular Science Computing NMR and EPR Spectroscopy and Diffraction Subsurface Flow and Transport Mass Spectrometry Systems...

114

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

115

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

116

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

117

NAME: STUDENT NUMBER (PID): CITY, STATE ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAME: STUDENT NUMBER (PID): ADDRESS: CITY, STATE ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER: CELL PHONE NUMBER of financial institution. 14 Cell Phone Expenses 15 Other ordinary and necessary living expenses. 16 TOTAL (add

118

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

119

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

120

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Mass spectrometric immunoassay  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

Nelson, Randall W; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

122

Mass spectrometric immunoassay  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

Nelson, Randall W (Phoenix, AZ); Williams, Peter (Phoenix, AZ); Krone, Jennifer Reeve (Granbury, TX)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

123

Gauge Fields, Sources, and Electromagnetic Masses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hypothesis of strong-interaction gauge fields, with non-Abelian gauge invariance broken only by the 1- particle mass terms, gives a natural source theory setting for the introduction of electromagnetic effects. The electromagnetic potential vector appears as a compensating field in the mass terms of the neutral 1- particles. The resulting electromagnetic self-action is used to discuss mass displacements. The pion electro-magnetic mass is computed in a number of waysby direct calculation of various processes and by chiral methods, in two variants. The relationship of these approaches is established. A phenomenological modification of the chiral evaluation gives perfect agreement with the observed value. It is found, however, that the (m?m?)2 terms, which are neglected in this method, are not very small. Baryon electromagnetic mass splittings are described by a simple adaptation of gross mass-spectrum empirics. Agreement with the data is excellent.

Julian Schwinger

1968-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

124

Construction Project Number  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

North Execution - (2009 - 2011) North Execution - (2009 - 2011) Construction Project Number 2009 2010 2011 Project Description ANMLPL 0001C 76,675.32 - - Animas-Laplata circuit breaker and power rights CRGRFL 0001C - - 7,177.09 Craig Rifle Bay and transfer bay upgrade to 2000 amps; / Convert CRG RFL to 345 kV out of Bears Ear Sub FGE 0019C - - 39,207.86 Replace 69/25kV transformer KX2A at Flaming Gorge FGE 0020C - - 52,097.12 Flaming Gorge: Replace failed KW2A transformer HDN 0069C 16,638.52 208,893.46 3,704,578.33 Replace failed transformer with KZ1A 250 MVA 230/138kv

125

KPA Activity Number  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

supports CMM-SW Level 2 supports CMM-SW Level 2 Mapping of the DOE Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM- SW) level 2. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Activity Number KPA Activity SEM Section SME Work Product SQSE Web Site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse REQUIREMENTS MANAGEMENT RM-1 The software engineering group reviews the allocated requirements before they are incorporated in the software project. Chapter 3.0 * Develop High-Level Project Requirements Chapter 4.0 * Establish Functional Baseline * Project Plan * Requirements Specification Document * Requirements Management awareness * Defining Project Requirements RM-2 The software engineering group uses the allocated requirements as the basis for

126

EMSL - Mass Spectrometry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mass-spectrometry Proteomics Capabilities High resolution and mass accuracy Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) spectrometers, from 6 Tesla (T) to 15T and 21T in...

127

mass communication advertising &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mass communication advertising & public relations introduction. Graduate programs in the Department of Mass Communication, Advertising, and Public Relations provide an entry to a wide spectrum of careers the opportunity to create content, campaigns, strategy, and research in public relations, advertising

Finzi, Adrien

128

Elbow mass flow meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Transcendental L2 -Betti numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transcendental L2 -Betti numbers Atiyah's question Thomas Schick G¨ottingen OA Chennai 2010 Thomas Schick (G¨ottingen) Transcendental L2 -Betti numbers Atiyah's question OA Chennai 2010 1 / 24 #12 = ~M/) with fundamental domain F. L2-Betti numbers:= normalized dimension( space of L2-harmonic forms

Sunder, V S

130

Data Compression with Prime Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A compression algorithm is presented that uses the set of prime numbers. Sequences of numbers are correlated with the prime numbers, and labeled with the integers. The algorithm can be iterated on data sets, generating factors of doubles on the compression.

Gordon Chalmers

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

131

USING CUMULATIVE NUMBER DENSITIES TO COMPARE GALAXIES ACROSS COSMIC TIME  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comparing galaxies across redshifts at fixed cumulative number density is a popular way to estimate the evolution of specific galaxy populations. This method ignores scatter in mass accretion histories and galaxy-galaxy mergers, which can lead to errors when comparing galaxies over large redshift ranges (?z > 1). We use abundance matching in the ?CDM paradigm to estimate the median change in cumulative number density with redshift and provide a simple fit (+0.16 dex per unit ?z) for progenitors of z = 0 galaxies. We find that galaxy descendants do not evolve in the same way as galaxy progenitors, largely due to scatter in mass accretion histories. We also provide estimates for the 1? range of cumulative number densities corresponding to galaxy progenitors and descendants. Finally, we discuss some limits on cumulative number density comparisons, which arise due to difficulties measuring physical quantities (e.g., stellar mass) consistently across redshifts. A public tool to calculate cumulative number density evolution for galaxies, as well as approximate halo masses, is available online.

Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)] [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Marchesini, Danilo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Muzzin, Adam [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)] [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Papovich, Casey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Stefanon, Mauro [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)] [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

EMSL - Mass Spectrometer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mass-spectrometer en Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsphysical-properties-ambient-and...

133

Number  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY STATUS REPORT on Implementation of NEP Recommendations January, 2005 1 NEP RECOMMENDATIONS: STATUS OF IMPLEMENTATION Chapter 1 1. That the President issue an Executive Order to direct all federal agencies to include in any regulatory action that could significantly and adversely affect energy supplies, distribution, or use, a detailed statement of energy effects and alternatives in submissions to the Office of Management and Budget of proposed regulations covered and all notices of proposed regulations published in the Federal Register. STATUS: IMPLEMENTED. In May 2001, President Bush issued Executive Order 13211 requiring federal agencies to include, in any regulatory action that could significantly and

134

NUMBER:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SWMU 161 C-743 Trainina Trailer Comolex- Soil Backfill UNIT NAME: . REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southwest of C-743 building APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 feet wide by 200 feet...

135

Elbow mass flow meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

136

The Origins of Mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

Lincoln, Don

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

Nizkorodov, Sergey

138

Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Iodine molecule for neutrino mass spectroscopy: ab initio calculation of spectral rate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......such as tritium for the measurement of an averaged absolute neutrino mass value, and (2) the search of neutrinoless double beta decay for verification of lepton number violation related to a finite Majorana type of masses. So far negative......

Motomichi Tashiro; Masahiro Ehara; Susumu Kuma; Yuki Miyamoto; Noboru Sasao; Satoshi Uetake; Motohiko Yoshimura

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Reynolds number effects on RayleighTaylor instability with possible  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­Taylor-driven turbulence as the dominant acceleration mechanism for thermonuclear flames in type-Ia supernovae7.4 solar masses, ignition occurs near the centre, thus generating a thermonuclear flame front with high Reynolds number turbulence. The thermonuclear flame varies in thickness, from 10-4 to 1 cm (ref. 8

Loss, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Formulation of functional theory for pairing with particle number restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The restoration of particle number within energy density functional theory is analyzed. It is shown that the standard method based on configuration mixing leads to a functional of both the projected and nonprojected densities. As an alternative that might be advantageous for mass models, nuclear dynamics, and thermodynamics, we propose to formulate the functional in terms directly of the one-body and two-body density matrices of the state with good particle number. Our approach does not contain the pathologies recently observed when restoring the particle number in an energy density functional framework based on transition density matrices and can eventually be applied with functionals having arbitrary density dependencies.

Hupin, Guillaume; Lacroix, Denis [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, F-14076 Caen (France); Bender, Michael [Universite Bordeaux, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR5797, F-33175 Gradignan (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR5797, F-33175 Gradignan (France)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Nucleon generalized form factors with twisted mass fermions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results on the nucleon form factors, momentum fraction and helicity moment for $N_f=2$ and $N_f=2+1+1$ twisted mass fermions for a number of lattice volumes and lattice spacings. First results for a new $N_f=2$ ensemble at the physical pion mass are also included. The implications of these results on the spin content of the nucleon are discussed taking into account the disconnected contributions at one pion mass.

C. Alexandrou; M. Constantinou; V. Drach; K. Jansen; Ch. Kallidonis; G. Koutsou

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

143

A Novel Form of the Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Created by Cysteine Mutations Extends Its Half-Life: Relevance to Cancer and Angiogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4. Molecular Modeling of Cys PAI-1 Mutants...SWISS-MODEL (Automated Protein Model Server...analysis revealed a rapid conformational change...bonds, as molecular simulations and three-dimensional structural modeling suggest. After...

Joanna Chorostowska-Wynimko; Rafal Swiercz; Ewa Skrzypczak-Jankun; Adam Wojtowicz; Steven H. Selman; and Jerzy Jankun

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Measurement of the half-life of (198)Au in a nonmetal: High-precision measurement shows no host-material dependence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.ortec-online.com/Solutions/multichannel-analyzers. aspx]. [8] R. Jenkins, R. W. Gould, and D. Gedcke, Quantitative X-ray Spectrometry (Dekker, New York, 1981), p. 266. [9] D. Radford (private communication) [http://radware.phy. ornl.gov/main.html]. [10] R. Brun and F. Rademakers, Nucl. Instrum...

Goodwin, J. R.; Nica, N.; Iacob, V. E.; Dibidad, A.; Hardy, John C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

AID Associates with Single-Stranded DNA with High Affinity and a Long Complex Half-Life in a Sequence-Independent Manner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...indicating that AID binds these bubble substrates with very high affinities...binding affinities of AID to bubble substrates suggests that AID...of relatively high complex stability. AID complex formation on...single-stranded region of the bubble, it remained plausible that...

Mani Larijani; Alexander P. Petrov; Oxana Kolenchenko; Maribel Berru; Sergey N. Krylov; Alberto Martin

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

146

THE FIRST ISOLATION OF AMERICIUM IN THE FORM OF PURE COMPOUNDS - THE SPECIFIC ALPHA-ACTIVITY AND HALF-LIFE OF Am241  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eng-48 THE FIRST ISOLATION QF AMERICIUM IN THE FORM OF PURECalifornia July 20, 1950 l Americium was discovered inof the chemistry of americium were carried out by its

Cunningham, B.B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Mass of Ca-36  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PH YS ICA 1. RE VIK W C VO I. UMK 15, 5 UMBER 6 Mass of ~Cat R. E. Tribble, ~ J. D. Cossairt, and R. A. Kenefick Cyclotron Institute and Physics Department, Texas AChM University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 14 October 1976) The ' Ca...('He, He)' Ca reaction has been used to provide the first observation of the nuclide ' Ca. The Q value and mass excess were found to be ?57.58~0.04 and ?6.44+0.04 MeV, respectively. The new mass completes four members of the A = 36 isobaric quintet...

Tribble, Robert E.; Cossairt, J. D.; Kenefick, R. A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

New Paradigm for Baryon and Lepton Number Violation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possible discovery of proton decay, neutron-antineutron oscillation, neutrinoless beta decay in low energy experiments, and exotic signals related to the violation of the baryon and lepton numbers at collider experiments will change our understanding of the conservation of fundamental symmetries in nature. In this review we discuss the rare processes due to the existence of baryon and lepton number violating interactions. The simplest grand unified theories and the neutrino mass generation mechanisms are discussed. The theories where the baryon and lepton numbers are defined as local gauge symmetries spontaneously broken at the low scale are discussed in detail. The simplest supersymmetric gauge theory which predicts the existence of lepton number violating processes at the low scale is investigated. The main goal of this review is to discuss the main implications of baryon and lepton number violation in physics beyond the Standard Model.

Perez, Pavel Fileviez

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

An avalanche-photodiode-based photon-number-resolving detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Avalanche photodiodes are widely used as practical detectors of single photons.1 Although conventional devices respond to one or more photons, they cannot resolve the number in the incident pulse or short time interval. However, such photon number resolving detectors are urgently needed for applications in quantum computing,2-4 communications5 and interferometry,6 as well as for extending the applicability of quantum detection generally. Here we show that, contrary to current belief,3,4 avalanche photodiodes are capable of detecting photon number, using a technique to measure very weak avalanches at the early stage of their development. Under such conditions the output signal from the avalanche photodiode is proportional to the number of photons in the incident pulse. As a compact, mass-manufactured device, operating without cryogens and at telecom wavelengths, it offers a practical solution for photon number detection.

B. E. Kardynal; Z. L. Yuan; A. J. Shields

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

150

E-Print Network 3.0 - accreting small mass Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

momentum Omega Mach number 12;Mass accretion... of low-power radio galaxies accreting small fraction of Bondi estimates. http... Is perfectly spherical Bondi accretion generic...

151

Masses of Kr-77 and Kr-75  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 35, NUMBER 4 Masses of Kr and Kr APRIL 1987 D. M. Moltz Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 A. C. Betker, J. P. Sullivan, R. H. Burch, C. A... determinations of neutron deficient nu- clei between the 1f7/2 and lg9/2 shells are hampered by low production cross sections and complex decay schemes. The direct mass measurements' of the rubidium isotopes have provided a substantial base for other...

Moltz, D. M.; Betker, A. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Burch, R. H.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Tribble, Robert E.; Toth, K. S.; Avignone, F. T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Neutrinoless double beta decay and neutrino masses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neutrinoless double beta decay (0???) is a promising test for lepton number violating physics beyond the standard model (SM) of particle physics. There is a deep connection between this decay and the phenomenon of neutrino masses. In particular we will discuss the relation between 0??? and Majorana neutrino masses provided by the so-called Schechter-Valle theorem in a quantitative way. Furthermore we will present an experimental cross check to discriminate 0??? from unknown nuclear background using only one isotope i.e. within one experiment.

Michael Duerr

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A question of mass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a pedagogical discussion of spontaneous symmetry breaking the Goldstone theorem and the Higgs mechanism. If the Higgs boson is found it might provide an explanation of the origin of mass.

Jeremy Bernstein

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Heavy Hybrid mesons Masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We estimate the ground state masses of the heavy hybrid mesons using a phenomenological QCD-type potential. 0^{- -},1^{- -},0^{- +},1^{- +} and 0^{+ -} J^{PC} states are considered.

F. Iddir; L. Semlala

2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

155

MASS POLITICAL MOBILIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................................................................... MASS POLITICAL MOBILIZATION ................................................................................................................................................... Boix & Stokes: The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics Boixandstokes-chap21 Revise Proof page 497 20.4.2007 12:41pm #12;Boix & Stokes: The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics Boixandstokes-chap21

156

Masses of Fundamental Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the original paper entitled, "Masses of Fundamental Particles"(arXiv:1109.3705v5, 10 Feb 2012), not only the masses of fundamental particles including the weak bosons, Higgs boson, quarks, and leptons, but also the mixing angles of quarks and those of neutrinos are all explained and/or predicted in the unified composite models of quarks and leptons successfully. In this addendum entitled, "Higgs Boson Mass in the Minimal Unified Subquark Model", it is emphasized that the Higgs boson mass is predicted to be about 130Gev in the minimal unified subquark model, which agrees well with the experimental values of 125-126GeV recently found by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at the LHC.

Hidezumi Terazawa

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

157

Mass transfer effects in a gasification riser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the development of multiphase reacting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, a number of simplifications were incorporated into the codes and models. One of these simplifications was the use of a simplistic mass transfer correlation for the faster reactions and omission of mass transfer effects completely on the moderate speed and slow speed reactions such as those in a fluidized bed gasifier. Another problem that has propagated is that the mass transfer correlation used in the codes is not universal and is being used far from its developed bubbling fluidized bed regime when applied to circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser reactors. These problems are true for the major CFD codes. To alleviate this problem, a mechanistic based mass transfer coefficient algorithm has been developed based upon an earlier work by Breault et al. This fundamental approach uses the local hydrodynamics to predict a local, time varying mass transfer coefficient. The predicted mass transfer coefficients and the corresponding Sherwood numbers agree well with literature data and are typically about an order of magnitude lower than the correlation noted above. The incorporation of the new mass transfer model gives the expected behavior for all the gasification reactions evaluated in the paper. At the expected and typical design values for the solid flow rate in a CFB riser gasifier an ANOVA analysis has shown the predictions from the new code to be significantly different from the original code predictions. The new algorithm should be used such that the conversions are not over predicted. Additionally, its behaviors with changes in solid flow rate are consistent with the changes in the hydrodynamics.

Breault, Ronald W [U.S. DOE; Li, Tingwen [URS; Nicoletti, Phillip [URS

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

RNG: A Practitioner's Overview Random Number Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RNG: A Practitioner's Overview Random Number Generation A Practitioner's Overview Prof. Michael and Monte Carlo Methods Pseudorandom number generation Types of pseudorandom numbers Properties of these pseudorandom numbers Parallelization of pseudorandom number generators New directions for SPRNG Quasirandom

Mascagni, Michael

159

Mass of Cd104  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A quadrupole-dipole-dipole-dipole spectrograph has been used with a 34.6 MeV proton beam to observe the Cd106(p,t)Cd104 reaction. The Q value is measured and a mass excess of -83 963(14) keV is inferred for Cd104.NUCLEAR REACTIONS Cd106(p,t)Cd104, E=34.6 MeV; Q value measured; mass excess inferred.

R. A. Dewberry; R. T. Kouzes; R. A. Naumann

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Motion at low Reynolds number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The work described in this thesis centers on inertialess motion at low Reynolds numbers at the crossroad between biofluids and microfluids. Here we address questions regarding locomotion of micro-swimmers, transport of ...

Tam, Daniel See Wai, 1980-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To prescribe procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, business instruments. Cancels DOE 1331.2B. Canceled by DOE O 540.1A.

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

162

Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order prescribes the procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) business instruments. Cancels DOE O 540.1. Canceled by DOE O 540.1B.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

163

California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,626 7,904,858 8,113,034 8,313,776 1990's 8,497,848 8,634,774 8,680,613 8,726,187 8,790,733 8,865,541 8,969,308 9,060,473 9,181,928 9,331,206 2000's 9,370,797 9,603,122 9,726,642 9,803,311 9,957,412 10,124,433 10,329,224 10,439,220 10,515,162 10,510,950 2010's 10,542,584 10,625,190 10,681,916 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Residential

164

Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results for several light hadronic quantities ($f_\\pi$, $f_K$, $B_K$, $m_{ud}$, $m_s$, $t_0^{1/2}$, $w_0$) obtained from simulations of 2+1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly-physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O(3)%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum `global fit' with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of $m_\\pi$, $m_K$ and $m_\\Omega$ to determine the two quark masses and the scale - all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with sub-percent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including: $f_\\pi$ = 130.2(9) MeV; $f_K$ = 155.5(8) MeV; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the $\\overline {\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, $B_K$, in the RGI scheme, 0.750(15) and the $\\overline{\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 0.530(11).

RBC; UKQCD collaborations; :; T. Blum; P. A. Boyle; N. H. Christ; J. Frison; N. Garron; R. J. Hudspith; T. Izubuchi; T. Janowski; C. Jung; A. Juettner; C. Kelly; R. D. Kenway; C. Lehner; M. Marinkovic; R. D. Mawhinney; G. McGlynn; D. J. Murphy; S. Ohta; A. Portelli; C. T. Sachrajda; A. Soni

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

165

Effect of bubble interactions on mass transfer in bubbly flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effect of bubble interactions on mass transfer in a multi-bubble system is examined by numerical simulations. Since mass transfer in the liquid phase of gasliquid multiphase flows usually takes place at a considerably slower rate than the transfer of momentum, the mass flux boundary layers are much thinner than the momentum boundary layers. In direct numerical simulations the resolution requirements for flows with mass transfer are therefore considerably higher than for flows without mass transfer. Here, we use a multiscale approach for the computations of the mass transfer near the bubble surface, in order to reduce the cost, and examine the effect of void fraction and bubble Reynolds number on the mass transfer from bubbles in periodic domains. Specifically, we compare results for a single bubble in a periodic domain with results for several bubbles in a larger domain with the same void fraction. It is shown that even though the average Reynolds number of freely moving bubbles drops after a while, in most cases the mass transfer from the bubbles increases slightly. When the bubbles start to wobble, in most cases the increase in bubblebubble interactions compensate for the reduction in Reynolds number.

B. Aboulhasanzadeh; G. Tryggvason

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Atomic mass compilation 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic mass reflects the total binding energy of all nucleons in an atomic nucleus. Compilations and evaluations of atomic masses and derived quantities, such as neutron or proton separation energies, are indispensable tools for research and applications. In the last decade, the field has evolved rapidly after the advent of new production and measuring techniques for stable and unstable nuclei resulting in substantial ameliorations concerning the body of data and their precision. Here, we present a compilation of atomic masses comprising the data from the evaluation of 2003 as well as the results of new measurements performed. The relevant literature in refereed journals and reports as far as available, was scanned for the period beginning 2003 up to and including April 2012. Overall, 5750 new data points have been collected. Recommended values for the relative atomic masses have been derived and a comparison with the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation has been performed. This work has been carried out in collaboration with and as a contribution to the European Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network of Evaluations.

Pfeiffer, B., E-mail: bpfeiffe@uni-mainz.de [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitt Gieen, Gieen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Venkataramaniah, K. [Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam (India)] [Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam (India); Czok, U. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitt Gieen, Gieen (Germany)] [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitt Gieen, Gieen (Germany); Scheidenberger, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitt Gieen, Gieen (Germany)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Mass and Lifetime Measurements in Storage Rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Masses of nuclides covering a large area of the chart of nuclides can be measured in storage rings where many ions circulate at the same time. In this paper the recent progress in the analysis of Schottky mass spectrometry data is presented as well as the technical improvements leading to higher accuracy for isochronous mass measurements with a time-of-flight detector. The high sensitivity of the Schottky method down to single ions allows to measure lifetimes of nuclides by observing mother and daughter nucleus simultaneously. In this way we investigated the decay of bare and H-like 140Pr. As we could show the lifetime can be even shortened compared to those of atomic nuclei despite of a lower number of electrons available for internal conversion or electron capture.All these techniques will be implemented with further improvements at the storage rings of the new FAIR facility at GSI in the future.

Weick, H.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Winkler, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Scheidenberger, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); II. Phys. Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, 35392 Giessen (Germany)] (and others)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

168

Document ID Number: RL-721  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: RL-721 REV 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00066 I. Project Title: Nesting Bird Deterrent Study at the 241-C Tank Farm CX B3.8, "Outdoor Terrestrial Ecological and Environmental Research" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions - e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) will perform an outdoor, terrestrial ecological research study to attempt to control and deter nesting birds at the 241-C Tank Farm. This will be a preventative study to test possible methods for controlling &/or minimizing the presence and impacts of nesting birds inside the tank farm. A nesting bird

169

On rings of structural numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structural numbers over the set X, and let B(X) have the operations defined above with equality also as before. Theorem I. l. If X is any set, then B(X) is a commutative ring with identity. Proof. The structural number 0 is the additive identity element... with identity g. Definition I. 7. If A, B e S(X) then A'B = (P U q ( p e A, q e B, p Il q = &f and p U q can be formed in an odd number of ways). ~E1 t. 4. L t A = (( . b), (bj. 7 )) 4 B = ((b, c), (b), (a)) be in S(X) for some X. Then AD B = {{b, a), {a...

Powell, Wayne Bruce

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

Mass transfer experiments on single irregular-shaped particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass transfer from irregular-shaped naphthalene particles (100-200 {mu}m in size) was studied in an electrodynamic balance. Charged particles were suspended in an electrostatic field directly in line with a calibrated air jet. Mass and size change histories were obtained under ambient conditions, and under steady- and pulsed-flow conditions. For natural convection, the time-averaged Sherwood number was similar to that for spheres. Forced-convection Sherwood number under steady-flow conditions was strongly dependent on particle shape and particle Reynolds number, and was consistently higher than values predicted for spheres at comparable Reynolds numbers. This paper validates the technique and indicates the shape effect on mass transfer from single particles.

Ramezan, M. (Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (US)); Kale, S.R. (Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (US)); Anderson, R.J. (Dept. of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Origin of the narrow, single peak in the fission-fragment mass distribution for 258Fm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the origin of the narrowness of the single peak at mass-symmetric division in the fragment mass-yield curve for spontaneous fission of {sup 258}Fm. For this purpose, we employ the macroscopic-microscopic model and calculate a potential-energy curve at the mass-symmetric compact scission configuration, as a function of the fragment mass number, which is obtained from the single-particle wave-function densities. In the calculations, we minimize total energies by varying the deformations of the two fragments, with constraints on the mass quadrupole moment, and by keeping the neck radius zero. The energies thus become functions of mass asymmetry. Using the obtained potential, we solve the one-dimensional Schroedinger equation with a microscopic coordinate-dependent inertial mass to calculate the fragment mass-yield curve. The calculated mass yield, expressed in terms of the microscopic mass density, is consistent with the extremely narrow experimental mass distribution.

Moller, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ickhikawa, Takatoshi [RIKEN; Iwamoto, Akira [JAEA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Response: Issue Numbers and Librarianship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...some time. Put back the issue number. ALISON BAKER Librawy Jackson Laboratot), Bar...passage in which he supposes some unusually wise ape-like animal to have first thought...the approving nods and kindly grunts ofmy wise and most respected chief. And now I feel...

DANIEL E. KOSHLAND; JR.

1986-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

173

The Mass Spectroscope  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE handbook, prepared by M. G. Inghram of JL the University of Chicago, and R ... Committee on Nuclear Science of the National Research Council*, presents in some detail the fundamental design and operational techniques pertinent to the efficient utilization of the mass spectroscope. Attention ...

S. WEINTROUB

1955-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

174

Mass Media Science Fellows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...alternative energy sources, including solar, bio-mass, and geothermal. The changing...assistant secretary for con-servation and solar applications, U.S. Department of Energy...representative of the United Re-public of Tanzania to the United Na-tions, the resolution...

1979-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Residential Thermal Mass Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The southwest has long known the value of building homes with high mass materials. The ancient Pueblo Indians found that by using "adobe" they could capture the energy necessary to survive the harsh desert climate. Our ancestors knew that a heavy...

Thieken, J. S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Top Quark Mass Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

First observed in 1995 the top quark is one of a pair of third?generation quarks in the Standard Model of particle physics. It has charge +2/3e and a mass of 171.4 GeV about 40 times heavier than its partner the bottom quark. The CDF and D collaborations have identified several hundred events containing the decays of top?antitop pairs in the large dataset collected at the Tevatron proton?antiproton collider over the last four years. They have used these events to measure the top quarks mass to nearly 1% precision and to study other top quark properties. The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model and knowledge of its value with small uncertainty allows us to predict properties of the as?yet?unobserved Higgs boson. This paper presents the status of the measurements of the top quark mass. It is based on a talk I gave at the Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics in Puerto Rico May 2006 which also included discussion of measurements of other top quark properties.

A. P. Heinson; CDF Collaboration; D Collaboration

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Mass Extinctions Geology 331  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into shallow water and released to atmosphere. · Oxidation of coal and hydrocarbons by extensive erosion of sedimentary rocks, and/or massive volcanic eruptions in Siberia? CH2O + O2 CO2 +H2O · Release of methane by rapid influx of C12 caused by methane release and mass dying at the end of the Permian. Organisms

Kammer, Thomas

178

Gauge Invariance and Mass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is argued that the gauge invariance of a vector field does not necessarily imply zero mass for an associated particle if the current vector coupling is sufficiently strong. This situation may permit a deeper understanding of nucleonic charge conservation as a manifestation of a gauge invariance, without the obvious conflict with experience that a massless particle entails.

Julian Schwinger

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A quantum statistical model of nuclear fragmentation reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are tallied from left to right. The numbering system is illustrated in Figure 1. This scheme was also very useful to the storage and referencing of nuclidic information such as mass and half-life data within the computer programs that were used... computer memory, given the proton and neutron numbers of each product. Using a special refer- 14 encing system , a minimal amount of core storage space for this data is needed. When the channel phase space is found for each incident energy...

Gruben, James Henry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

180

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Laplacians  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Laplacians method to compute Betti numbers of sim- plicial complexes. This has a number of advantages over are the Betti numbers, the i-th Betti number, bi= bi(X), being the rank of Hi(X). The Betti numbers often have

Friedman, Joel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A Comparison of Intermediate Mass Black Hole Candidate ULXs and Stellar-Mass Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cool thermal emission components have recently been revealed in the X-ray spectra of a small number of ultra-luminous X-ray (ULX) sources with L_X > 1 E+40 erg/s in nearby galaxies. These components can be well fitted with accretion disk models, with temperatures approximately 5-10 times lower than disk temperatures measured in stellar-mass Galactic black holes when observed in their brightest states. Because disk temperature is expected to fall with increasing black hole mass, and because the X-ray luminosity of these sources exceeds the Eddington limit for 10 Msun black holes (L_Edd = 1.3 E+39 erg/s), these sources are extremely promising intermediate-mass black hole candidates (IMBHCs). In this Letter, we directly compare the inferred disk temperatures and luminosities of these ULXs, with the disk temperatures and luminosities of a number of Galactic black holes. The sample of stellar-mass black holes was selected to include different orbital periods, companion types, inclinations, and column densities. These ULXs and stellar-mass black holes occupy distinct regions of a L_X -- kT diagram, suggesting these ULXs may harbor IMBHs. We briefly discuss the important strengths and weaknesses of this interpretation.

J. M. Miller; A. C. Fabian; M. C. Miller

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

182

RIN Number 1904-AB68  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RIN NUMBER: 1904-AB68 CLOSING DATE: August 20, 2007 COMMENT NUMBER DATE RECEIVED/ DATE OF LETTER NAME & TITLE OF COMMENTATOR AFFILIATION & ADDRESS OF COMMENTATOR 1 ? 7/31/07 Edwin Pinero Federal Environmental Executive Office of the Federal Environmental Executive 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Mail Code 1600J Washington, DC 20460 2 8/8/07 (e-mail) Bob Null President Arkansas Lamp Manufacturing bnull@arkansaslamp.com 3 8/10/07 (e-mail) Dawn Gunning Environmental Program Manager Department of Justice Dawn.M.Gunning@usdoj.gov 4 8/14/07 8/14/07 Kyle Pitsor Vice President, Government Relations National Electrical Manufacturers Association 1300 North 17th Street, Suite 1752 Rosslyn, VA 22209

183

RIN Number 1904-AB68  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RULEMAKING TITLE: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RULEMAKING TITLE: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RIN NUMBER: 1904-AB68 CLOSING DATE: August 20, 2007 COMMENT NUMBER DATE RECEIVED/ DATE OF LETTER NAME & TITLE OF COMMENTATOR AFFILIATION & ADDRESS OF COMMENTATOR 1 ? 7/31/07 Edwin Pinero Federal Environmental Executive Office of the Federal Environmental Executive 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Mail Code 1600J Washington, DC 20460 2 8/8/07 (e-mail) Bob Null President Arkansas Lamp Manufacturing bnull@arkansaslamp.com 3 8/10/07 (e-mail) Dawn Gunning Environmental Program Manager Department of Justice Dawn.M.Gunning@usdoj.gov 4 8/14/07 8/14/07 Kyle Pitsor Vice President, Government Relations National Electrical Manufacturers Association 1300 North 17th Street, Suite 1752

184

RL·721 Document ID Number:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: REV 3 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00045 . J.proj(;l~t Titl~: - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- --------- ------_. . _ - - - - - - - - - - - - - . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - LIMITED FIREBREAK MAINTENANCE ON THE HANFORD SITE DURING CALENDAR YEAR 2012 II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions· e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, etc.): The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to perform firebreak maintenance in selected areas of the Hanford Site during calendar year 2012 with limited use of physical, chemical, and prescribed burning methods. Prescribed burning will be performed by the Hanford Fire Department under approved burn plans and permits; and only in previously disturbed

185

Mass Market Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

186

Nanoscale mass conveyors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mass transport method and device for individually delivering chargeable atoms or molecules from source particles is disclosed. It comprises a channel; at least one source particle of chargeable material fixed to the surface of the channel at a position along its length; a means of heating the channel; and a means for applying an controllable electric field along the channel, whereby the device transports the atoms or molecules along the channel in response to applied electric field. In a preferred embodiment, the mass transport device will comprise a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT), although other one dimensional structures may also be used. The MWNT or other structure acts as a channel for individual or small collections of atoms due to the atomic smoothness of the material. Also preferred is a source particle of a metal such as indium. The particles move by dissociation into small units, in some cases, individual atoms. The particles are preferably less than 100 nm in size.

Regan, Brian C. (Oakland, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA)

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

187

Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

188

Top Mass and Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The top quark was discovered in 1995. The top quark mass is now well measured at the Tevatron, with uncertainty getting below 1% of the top mass. The world average from last year was 170.9 $\\pm$ 1.8 GeV/$c^2$. The new CDF measurement is 172 $\\pm$ 1.2 (stat) $\\pm$ 1.5 (sys) GeV/$c^2$, and D0 will soon present a new measurement. The top quark mass is an important parameter in the Standard Model, and should be measured as precisely as possible. To learn more about the top quark observed and study possible new physics, other properties also should be measured. At the Tevatron, the charge of the top quark can be measured directly. Examples of other properties studied and reported in this presentation are W helicity, top decay branching ratio to b ($R_b$), searches for $t \\to H b$ and for flavor changing neutral current (FCNC). The results are all consistent with the Standard Model within current statistics. With significantly more data being collected at the Tevatron, precision measurements of the top properties are just starting.

Yen-Chu Chen

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Studies and Tools Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: March 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The idea of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling energy in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads during the peak periods. Savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Case studies in a number of office buildings in California has found that a simple demand limiting strategy reduced the chiller power by 20-100% (0.5-2.3W/ft2) during six

190

EMSL: Capabilities: Mass Spectrometry: Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Additional Information Meet the Mass Spectrometry Experts Related EMSL User Projects Mass Spectrometry Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Research Resource for Integrative Biology Biological and Environmental Research - PNNL Proteomics PNNL's Biological MS Data and Software Distribution Center Mass Spectrometry brochure EMSL is committed to offering state-of-the-art instruments to its users. At a workshop in January of 2008, EMSL mass spectrometry experts joined experts from many universities, private companies, and government institutions and laboratories at a conference held at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee Florida. Workshop participants reviewed the state of the art of high-performance mass spectrometers,

191

Mass spectrometry of proteins of known mass Andrew D. Miranker*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deter- mination has two significant advantages. First, the mass accuracy under these conditions to the orifice of the mass analyzer. As a result, there is a local separation of charges at the tip

Miranker, Andrew

192

Neutrino mass measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...swimming-pool-type nuclear reactors). This light is detected...side- branch in the nuclear reactions that power...which led to the next generation of experiments: Super-Kamiokande...are a large number of nuclear power reactors that sit in di erent...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Joel Friedman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Laplacians Joel Friedman Department of Mathematics 1984 Abstract We use the Laplacian and power method to compute Betti numbers of sim­ plicial complexes. This has are the Betti numbers, the i­th Betti number, b i = b i (X), being the rank of H i (X). The Betti numbers often

Friedman, Joel

194

Effective Neutrino Mass Operators: A Guide to Model Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective operators relevant for generating small Majorana masses for the neutrinos in the Standard Model will be considered. These operators serve as a useful guide for building models of neutrino mass. Some of these operators are represented by familiar models in the literature, and others lead to interesting new models. The number of relevant operators will be drastically reduced if neutrinoless double beta decays are observed in current experiments.

C. N. Leung

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Structure in the ??? System at the A2 Mass Region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence is presented for an enhancement in the ??? mass spectrum at the A2 mass region in ?+p interactions at 5 GeV/c. Assuming this effect to be the A2, we calculate the decay rate relative to the ?? decay mode and obtain the results 0.29 0.08 and 0.10 0.04 for the two final states A20?++ and A2+p, respectively. Possible explanations of the discrepancy between these numbers are suggested.

U. Karshon; G. Mikenberg; S. Pitluck; Y. Eisenberg; E. E. Ronat; A. Shapira; G. Yekutieli

1974-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semiempirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of the symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhu-Xia Li; Feng-Shou Zhang

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

197

Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20~250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semi-empirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Fengshou Zhang

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

199

"Gravitational mass" of information?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We hypothesize possible new types of forces that would be the result of new types of interactions, static and a slow transient, between objects with related information contents (pattern). Such mechanism could make material composition dependence claimed by Fishbach, et al in Eotvos type experiments plausible. We carried out experiments by using a high-resolution scale with the following memories: USB-2 flash drives (1-16GB), DVD and CD disks to determine if such an interaction exist/detectable with a scale resolution of 10 microgram with these test objects. We applied zero information, white noise and 1/f noise type data. Writing or deleting the information in any of these devices causes peculiar negative weight transients, up to milligrams (mass fraction around 10^-5), which is followed by various types of relaxation processes. These relaxations have significantly different dynamics compared to transients observed during cooling after stationary external heating. Interestingly, a USB-1 MP3 player has also developed comparable transient mass loss during playing music. A classical interpretation of the negative weight transients could be absorbed water in hygroscopic components however comparison of relaxation time constants with air humidity data does not support an obvious explanation. Another classical interpretation with certain contribution is the lifting Bernoulli force caused by the circulation due to convection of the warm air. However, in this case all observed time constants with a device should have been the same unless some hidden parameter causes the observed variations. Further studies are warranted to clarify if there is indeed a new force, which is showing up as negative mass at weight measurement when high-density structural information is changed or read out (measured).

Laszlo B. Kish

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

200

Neutron Majorana mass from exotic instantons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show how a Majorana mass for the Neutron could result from non-perturbative quantum gravity effects peculiar to string theory. In particular, "exotic instantons" in un-oriented string compactifications with D-branes extending the (supersymmetric) standard model could indirectly produce an effective operator delta{m} n^t n+h.c. In a specific model with an extra vector-like pair of `quarks', acquiring a large mass proportional to the string mass scale (exponentially suppressed by a function of the string moduli fields), delta{m} can turn out to be as low as 10^{-24}-10^{-25} eV. The induced neutron-antineutron oscillations could take place with a time scale tau_{n\\bar{n}} > 10^8 s, that could be tested by the next generation of experiments. On the other hand, proton decay and FCNC's are automatically strongly suppressed and are compatible with the current experimental limits. Depending on the number of brane intersections, the model may also lead to the generation of Majorana masses for R-handed neutrini. Our proposal could also suggest neutron-neutralino or neutron-axino oscillations, with implications in UCN, Dark Matter Direct Detection, UHECR and Neutron-Antineutron oscillations. This suggests to improve the limits on neutron-antineutron oscillations, as a possible test of string theory and quantum gravity.

Andrea Addazi; Massimo Bianchi

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Gaugino and Scalar Masses in the Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this letter we demonstrate the genericity of suppressed gaugino masses M_a \\sim m_{3/2}/ln(M_P/m_{3/2}) in the IIB string landscape, by showing that this relation holds for D7-brane gauginos whenever the associated modulus is stabilised by nonperturbative effects. Although m_{3/2} and M_a take many different values across the landscape, the above small mass hierarchy is maintained. We show that it is valid for models with an arbitrary number of moduli and applies to both the KKLT and exponentially large volume approaches to Kahler moduli stabilisation. In the latter case we explicitly calculate gaugino and moduli masses for compactifications on the two-modulus Calabi-Yau P^4_[1,1,1,6,9]. In the large-volume scenario we also show that soft scalar masses are approximately universal with m_i^2 \\sim m_{3/2}^2 (1 + \\epsilon_i), with the non-universality parametrised by \\epsilon_i \\sim 1/ln (M_P/m_{3/2})^2 \\sim 1/1000. We briefly discuss possible phenomenological implications of our results.

Joseph P. Conlon; Fernando Quevedo

2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

202

Neutron Majorana mass from exotic instantons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show how a Majorana mass for the Neutron could result from non-perturbative quantum gravity effects peculiar to string theory. In particular, "exotic instantons" in un-oriented string compactifications with D-branes extending the (supersymmetric) standard model could indirectly produce an effective operator delta{m} n^t n+h.c. In a specific model with an extra vector-like pair of `quarks', acquiring a large mass proportional to the string mass scale (exponentially suppressed by a function of the string moduli fields), delta{m} can turn out to be as low as 10^{-24}-10^{-25} eV. The induced neutron-antineutron oscillations could take place with a time scale tau_{n\\bar{n}} > 10^8 s, that could be tested by the next generation of experiments. On the other hand, proton decay and FCNC's are automatically strongly suppressed and are compatible with the current experimental limits. Depending on the number of brane intersections, the model may also lead to the generation of Majorana masses for R-handed neutrini. Ou...

Addazi, Andrea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

204

The Neutron-Hydrogen Mass Difference and the Neutron Mass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data in the literature leading to the neutron-hydrogen mass difference and the neutron mass are summarized. The disintegration energy of the deuteron together with the HH-D mass spectroscopic doublet separation apparently yields the best value of n-H=0.7550.016 Mev and a neutron mass of 1.008,9410.000,02 mass units. Other transmutation-radioactivity cycles check this value. Several inconsistencies in these data and their possible explanation are pointed out. Experiments of interest for improvement in accuracy and reliability of these values are noted.

W. E. Stephens

1947-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Primordial black hole minimum mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we revisit thermodynamic constraints on primordial black hole (PBH) formation in the early universe. Under the assumption that PBH mass is equal to the cosmological horizon mass, one can use the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics to put a lower limit on the PBH mass. In models of PBH formation, however, PBHs are created at some fraction of the horizon mass. We show that this thermodynamic constraint still holds for subhorizon PBH formation.

Chisholm, James R. [Institute for Fundamental Theory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8440 (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

RL-721 Document ID Number:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00075 I. Project Title: Project 1-718, Electrical Utili ties Transformer Management Support Facility II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions -e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): The proposed action includes design, procurement, and construction of a pre-engineered metal building for transformer management; including inspections, routine maintenance, testing, refurbishing, and disposition of excess transformers. The building will be constructed in the previously disturbed, gravel-covered electrical utilities lay-down yard west of the 2101-M Building in 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The building footprint

207

International Conference on Computational Heat and Mass Transfer Paper Number 135  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONDENSATION OF LIQUID METAL VAPOUR UNDERNEATH A FLAT INCLINED SUBSTRATE Basant Singh Sikarwar, Sameer@iitk.ac.in ABSTRACT Although dropwise condensation of metallic vapor underneath a cold substrate is an efficient route on common engineering substrates is a challenging task. Quantification of the substrate leaching rate

Khandekar, Sameer

208

Statistical Analysis of Diesel Fuel Effects on Particle Number and Mass Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, they received a higher recognition during the 1990s as clean air additives in the frame of the Oxyfuel program (25). ...

Leonidas Ntziachristos; Zissis Samaras; Panayotis Pistikopoulos; Nikolas Kyriakis

2000-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

209

Measurement of number, mass and size distribution of particles in the atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...combustion in energy production 10% commercial and residential combustion 7% industrial combustion 6% non-combustion processes 13% road transport 60% Figure 2. Pie chart illustrating the sources of PM0 :1 emissions in the UK in 1996...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Renewable Renewable Identification Numbers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Identification Numbers RIN Format EPA uses the following format to determine RINs for each physical gallon of

211

Mass Transport within Soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

McKone, Thomas E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Mass of Cu-57  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the extension of these systematics to higher Z. If the 3 =57 nuclei have true single particle low-lying states, the Cu beta decay rates determine the 2p3/2 +2p3/2 and 2p 3/2 ~2p ~ &2 Gamow-Teller matrix elements, providing a measure of Gamow... with A ~ 56 (Ref. 3) and possibly for the time evolu- tion of cosmic x-ray bursts. Cu has been observed in the Cu~ Ni+e++v, and Ni( Li, He} Cu reactions. The former study found the Cu mass excess to be ?47.34(13) MeV and deter- mined its beta decay...

Gagliardi, Carl A.; Semon, D. R.; Tribble, Robert E.; Vanausdeln, L. A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Verification Challenges at Low Numbers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many papers have dealt with the political difficulties and ramifications of deep nuclear arms reductions, and the issues of Going to Zero. Political issues include extended deterrence, conventional weapons, ballistic missile defense, and regional and geo-political security issues. At each step on the road to low numbers, the verification required to ensure compliance of all parties will increase significantly. Looking post New START, the next step will likely include warhead limits in the neighborhood of 1000 . Further reductions will include stepping stones at1000 warheads, 100s of warheads, and then 10s of warheads before final elimination could be considered of the last few remaining warheads and weapons. This paper will focus on these three threshold reduction levels, 1000, 100s, 10s. For each, the issues and challenges will be discussed, potential solutions will be identified, and the verification technologies and chain of custody measures that address these solutions will be surveyed. It is important to note that many of the issues that need to be addressed have no current solution. In these cases, the paper will explore new or novel technologies that could be applied. These technologies will draw from the research and development that is ongoing throughout the national laboratory complex, and will look at technologies utilized in other areas of industry for their application to arms control verification.

Benz, Jacob M.; Booker, Paul M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Betti numbers, Morse theory, and homology Perturbations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Betti numbers, Morse theory, and homology Perturbations Cascades Multicomplexes Morse and Morse Hurtubise Morse and Morse-Bott Homology #12;Betti numbers, Morse theory, and homology Perturbations Cascades Multicomplexes Betti numbers, Morse theory, and homology Betti numbers Morse inequalities Transversality Morse

Hurtubise, David E.

215

Segmented \\{HPGe\\} detectors for the search of neutrinoless double beta-decay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neutrinoless double beta-decay (0vbb-decay) is the most promising approach to distinguish between the possibilities of a Dirac or a Majorana nature of neutrinos. Additionally, a measurement of the half-life of 0vbb-decay can give information on the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. At the moment \\{HPGe\\} detectors yield the most sensitive limits on this Lepton-number violating process. The segmentation of \\{HPGe\\} detectors increases the experimental sensitivity by allowing the reconstruction of event topologies. The successful operation of prototype detectors submerged in cryoliquid demonstrates the viability of this experimental approach.

B. Majorovits

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay within QRPA with Proton-Neutron Pairing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have investigated the role of proton-neutron pairing in the context of the Quasiparticle Random Phase approximation formalism. This way the neutrinoless double beta decay matrix elements of the experimentally interesting A= 48, 76, 82, 96, 100, 116, 128, 130 and 136 systems have been calculated. We have found that the inclusion of proton-neutron pairing influences the neutrinoless double beta decay rates significantly, in all cases allowing for larger values of the expectation value of light neutrino masses. Using the best presently available experimental limits on the half life-time of neutrinoless double beta decay we have extracted the limits on lepton number violating parameters.

G. Pantis; F. Simkovic; J. D. Vergados; Amand Faessler

1996-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

Self-calibration of cluster dark energy studies: Observable-mass distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The exponential sensitivity of cluster number counts to the properties of the dark energy implies a comparable sensitivity to not only the mean but also the actual distribution of an observable-mass proxy given the true cluster mass. For example a 25% scatter in mass can provide a ?50% change in the number counts at z?2 for the upcoming SPT survey. Uncertainty in the scatter of this amount would degrade dark energy constraints to uninteresting levels. Given the shape of the actual mass function, the properties of the distribution may be internally monitored by the shape of the observable mass function. As a proof of principle, for a simple mass-independent Gaussian distribution the scatter may be self-calibrated to allow a measurement of the dark energy equation of state of ?(w)?0.1. External constraints on the mass variance of the distribution that are more accurate than ??ln?M2dark energy constraints.

Marcos Lima and Wayne Hu

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

218

h-analogue of Fibonacci Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we introduce the h-analogue of Fibonacci numbers for non-commutative h-plane. For h h'= 1 and h = 0, these are just the usual Fibonacci numbers as it should be. We also derive a collection of identities for these numbers. Furthermore, h-Binet's formula for the h-Fibonacci numbers is found and the generating function that generates these numbers is obtained.

H. B. Benaoum

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Galactic Chemical Evolution Redux: Atomic Numbers 6 < Z < 15  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the inability of Galactic chemical evolution models to reproduce some of the observed solar neighbourhood distribution of elements (and isotopes) with atomic numbers 6 < Z < 15, we have revisited the relevant stellar and Galactic models as part of an ambitious new program aimed at resolving these long-standing discrepancies. Avoiding the use of (traditional) parametric models for low- and intermediate-mass stellar evolution, we have generated a new, physically self-consistent, suite of stellar models and integrated the nucleosynthetic outputs into GEtool, our semi-analytical galactic chemical evolution software package. The predicted temporal evolution of several light- and intermediate-mass elements (and their isotopes) in the solar neighbourhood - from carbon to phosphorus - demonstrate the efficacy of the new yields in reconciling theory and observation.

B. K. Gibson; Y. Fenner; A. Kiessling

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Department for Analysis and Computational Number Theory Additive functions and number systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department for Analysis and Computational Number Theory Additive functions and number systems systems April 7, 2010 1 / 35 #12;Department for Analysis and Computational Number Theory Outline Number #12;Department for Analysis and Computational Number Theory Examples for number systems b Z, b -2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

National Centre for Biological Sciences Mass Spectrometry Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Sample Information Number of samples: Sample ID: Concentration: Solubility: Expected mass (Da): Molecular: Protein Peptide Lipid Nucleic acid Others (specify) Analysis Requirement ESI MS, low resolution ESI MS, high resolution LC-ESI MS LC-ESI MS/MS Others (specify) Signature of research supervisor: Signature

Bhalla, Upinder S.

222

Mini ion trap mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

223

Mini ion trap mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

Dietrich, Daniel D. (Livermore, CA); Keville, Robert F. (Valley Springs, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Electron Effective Mass in Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The particle effective mass in graphene is a challenging concept because the commonly used theoretical expression is mathematically divergent. In this paper, we use basic principles to present a simple theoretical expression for the effective mass that is suitable for both parabolic and non-parabolic isotropic materials. We demonstrate that this definition is consistent with the definition of the cyclotron effective mass, which is one of the common methods for effective mass measurement in solid state materials. We apply the proposed theoretical definition to graphene and demonstrate linear dependence of the effective mass on momentum, as confirmed by experimental cyclotron resonance measurements. Therefore, the proposed definition of the effective mass can be used for non-parabolic materials such as graphene.

Viktor Ariel; Amir Natan

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

The Magnetic Centrifugal Mass Filter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass filters using rotating plasmas have been considered for separating nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel. We propose a new mass filter that utilizes centrifugal and magnetic confinement of ions in a way similar to the asymmetric centrifugal trap. This magnetic centrifugal mass filter is shown to be more proliferation resistant than present technology. This filter is collisional and produces well confined output streams, among other advantages. __________________________________________________

Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

226

Prime number generation and factor elimination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have presented a multivariate polynomial function termed as factor elimination function,by which, we can generate prime numbers. This function's mapping behavior can explain the irregularities in the occurrence of prime numbers on the number line. Generally the different categories of prime numbers found till date, satisfy the form of this function. We present some absolute and probabilistic conditions for the primality of the number generated by this method. This function is capable of leading to highly efficient algorithms for generating prime numbers.

Vineet Kumar

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

227

Relativistic mass and modern physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At first sight, arguments for and against the notion of relativistic mass look like a notorious intra-Lilliputian quarrel between Big-Endians (those who broke their eggs at the larger end) and Little-Endians. However, upon closer inspection we discover that the relativistic mass notion is alien to the spirit of modern physics to a much greater extent than it seems. To demonstrate an abyss between the modern approach and archaic notions, in this paper we explore how the concept of mass is introduced in modern physics. This modern approach reveals a deep cohomological origin of mass.

Z. K. Silagadze

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Phenomenology of Absolute Neutrino Masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The phenomenology of absolute neutrino masses is reviewed, focusing on tritium beta decay, cosmological measurements and neutrinoless double-beta decay.

Carlo Giunti

2004-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

Energy Functional for Nuclear Masses.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An energy functional is formulated for mass calculations of nuclei across the nuclear chart with major-shell occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom. The functional (more)

Bertolli, Michael Giovanni

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Gauge Invariance and Mass. II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility that a vector gauge field can imply a nonzero mass particle is illustrated by the exact solution of a one-dimensional model.

Julian Schwinger

1962-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Spin Singularities: Clifford Kaleidoscopes and Particle Masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are particles singularities- vortex lines, tubes, or sheets in some global ocean of dark energy? We visit the zoo of Lagrangian singularities, or caustics in a spin(4,C) phase flow over compactifed Minkowsky space, and find that their varieties and energies parallel the families and masses of the elementary particles. Singularities are classified by tensor products of J Coxeter groups s generated by reflections. The multiplicity, s, is the number reflections needed to close a cycle of null zigzags: nonlinear resonances of J chiral pairs of lightlike matter spinors with (4-J) Clifford mirrors: dyads in the remaining unperturbed vacuum pairs. Using singular perturbations to "peel" phase-space singularities by orders in the vacuum intensity, we find that singular varieties with quantized mass, charge, and spin parallel the families of leptons (J=1), mesons (J=2), and hadrons (J=3). Taking the symplectic 4 form - the volume element in the 8- spinor phase space- as a natural Lagrangian, these singularities turn out to have rest energies within a few percent of the observed particle masses.

Marcus S. Cohen

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

232

,"New York Number of Natural Gas Consumers"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Residential" "Sourcekey","NA1501SNY8","NA1508SNY8","NA1509SNY8" "Date","New York Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Count)","New York Natural Gas Number...

233

Global phenomenological descriptions of nuclear odd-even mass staggering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the general nature of nuclear odd-even mass differences by employing neutron and proton mass relations that emphasize these effects. The most recent mass tables are used. The possibility of a neutron excess dependence of the staggering is examined in detail in separate regions defined by the main nuclear shells, and a clear change in this dependency is found at $Z=50$ for both neutrons and protons. A further separation into odd and even neutron (proton) number produces very accurate local descriptions of the mass differences for each type of nucleons. These odd-even effects are combined into a global phenomenological expression, ready to use in a binding energy formula. The results deviate from previous parametrizations, and in particular found to be significantly superior to a recent two term, $A^{-1}$ dependence.

D. Hove; A. S. Jensen; K. Riisager

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

234

Analysis of Random Number Generators Parijat Naik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Analysis of Random Number Generators Parijat Naik Department of Computer Science Oregon State generation used in practice and a comparison of their efficiency. The paper focuses on the techniques used Random number generators are used for generating an array of numbers that have a random distribution

235

Growth of Betti Numbers Bryan Clair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth of Betti Numbers Bryan Clair _____________________________________________________________________________ Introduction Let X = fX= be a finite simplicial complex. We study the growth rate of the Betti numbers of X. It is easy to see that the sequence of Betti numbers {bq(Xi)} can grow at most linearly

Clair, Bryan

236

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Joel Friedman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Laplacians Joel Friedman Department of Mathematics 1984 Abstract We use the Laplacian and power method to compute Betti numbers of sim- plicial complexes. This has, involving higher dimensional spaces (see [Cha95]). 1 #12;A part of the homology groups are the Betti numbers

Friedman, Joel

237

Betti Numbers of Graph Sean Jacques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ii Betti Numbers of Graph Ideals Sean Jacques Thesis submitted to the University of She but there are formulae for finding the Betti numbers (part of the information which comprises a minimal free resolution especially explicit or useful descriptions of the Betti numbers. However we restrict our attention to those

Katzman, Moty

238

Mass Transfer between Double White Dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three periodically variable stars have recently been discovered (V407 Vul, P=9.5 min; ES Cet, P=10.3 min; RX J0806.3+1527, P=5.3 min) with properties that suggest that their photometric periods are also their orbital periods, making them the most compact binary stars known. If true, this might indicate that close, detached, double white dwarfs are able to survive the onset of mass transfer caused by gravitational wave radiation and emerge as the semi-detached, hydrogen-deficient stars known as the AM CVn stars. The accreting white dwarfs in such systems are large compared to the orbital separations. This has two effects: first it makes it likely that the mass transfer stream can hit the accretor directly, and second it causes a loss of angular momentum from the orbit which can destabilise the mass transfer unless the angular momentum lost to the accretor can be transferred back to the orbit. The effect of the destabilisation is to reduce the number of systems which survive mass transfer by as much as one hundred-fold. In this paper we analyse this destabilisation and the stabilising effect of a dissipative torque between the accretor and the binary orbit. We obtain analytic criteria for the stability of both disc-fed and direct impact accretion, and carry out numerical integrations to assess the importance of secondary effects, the chief one being that otherwise stable systems can exceed the Eddington accretion rate. We show that to have any effect upon survival rates, the synchronising torque must act on a timescale of order 1000 years or less. If synchronisation torques are this strong, then they will play a significant role in the spin rates of white dwarfs in cataclysmic variable stars as well.

T. R. Marsh; G. Nelemans; D. Steeghs

2003-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

239

What are the Neutrino Masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possible source of the production of neutrino with large masses is considered. For this purpose the reaction nu+n to e+p+gamma, in which the electron in neW+ vertex is produced off-mass-shell, is studied.

V. P. Efrosinin

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

240

Geometric gravitational origin of neutrino oscillations and mass-energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mass-energy scale for neutrinos was calculated from the null cone curvature using geometric concepts. The scale is variable depending on the gravitational potential and the trajectory inclination with respect to the field direction. The proposed neutrino covariant equation provides the adequate curvature. The mass-energy at the Earth surface varies from a horizontal value 0.402 eV to a vertical value 0.569 eV. Earth spinor waves with winding numbers n show squared energy differences within ranges from 2.05 x 10*(-3) to 4.10 x 10*(-3) eV*2 for n=0,1 neutrinos and from 3.89 x 10*(-5) to 7.79 x 10*(-5) eV*2 for n=1,2 neutrinos. These waves interfere and the different phase velocities produce neutrino-like oscillations. The experimental results for atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation mass parameters respectivelly fall within these theoretical ranges. Neutrinos in outer space, where interactions may be neglected, appear as particles travelling with zero mass on null geodesics. These gravitational curvature energies are consistent with neutrino oscillations, zero neutrino rest masses and Einstein's General Relativity and energy mass equivalence principle. When analyzing or averaging experimental neutrino mass-energy results of different experiments on the Earth it is of interest to consider the possible influence of the trajectory inclination angle.

Gustavo R. Gonzalez-Martin

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Biases on cosmological parameter estimators from galaxy cluster number counts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys are promising probes of cosmology - in particular for Dark Energy (DE) -, given their ability to find distant clusters and provide estimates for their mass. However, current SZ catalogs contain tens to hundreds of objects and maximum likelihood estimators may present biases for such sample sizes. In this work we use the Monte Carlo approach to determine the presence of bias on cosmological parameter estimators from cluster abundance as a function of the area and depth of the survey, and the number of cosmological parameters fitted. Assuming perfect knowledge of mass and redshift some estimators have non-negligible biases. For example, the bias of $\\sigma_8$ corresponds to about $40%$ of its statistical error bar when fitted together with $\\Omega_c$ and $w_0$. Including a SZ mass-observable relation decreases the relevance of the bias, for the typical sizes of current surveys. The biases become negligible when combining the SZ data with other cosmological probes. However, we show that the biases from SZ estimators do not go away with increasing sample sizes and they may become the dominant source of error for an all sky survey at the South Pole Telescope (SPT) sensitivity. The results of this work validate the use of the current maximum likelihood methods for present SZ surveys, but highlight the need for further studies for upcoming experiments. [abridged

M. Penna-Lima; M. Makler; C. A. Wuensche

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

242

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

243

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

244

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

245

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

246

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

247

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

248

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

249

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

250

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

251

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

252

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

253

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

254

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

255

Assigning mass values to in-house standard UF/sub 6/ cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A statistical experimental design called the Fast 4-1 Series is used to assign mass values to in-house standard UF/sub 6/ cylinders. This design is intended to minimize the number of weighings of large cylinders yet provide acceptable estimates of mass values and their precision. 5 refs.

Goldman, A.; McGuire, D.; Croarkin, C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A near-infrared relationship for estimating black hole masses in active galactic nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......a continuum spectral energy distribution (SED...nearby (in position and air mass) A0-V star with...circles). Therefore, improving the number statistics...and where M BH is in solar masses, FWHM and sigmaline...reverberation-mapped AGN with high-quality near-IR spectroscopy......

Hermine Landt; Martin J. Ward; Bradley M. Peterson; Misty C. Bentz; Martin Elvis; Kirk T. Korista; Margarita Karovska

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

257

Chip-Scale Quadrupole Mass Filters for Portable Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new class of chip-scale quadrupole mass filter (QMF). The devices are completely batch fabricated using a wafer-scale process that integrates the quadrupole ...

Cheung, Kerry

258

Spontaneous fission properties of Rf104262  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have measured the mass and kinetic-energy distributions of fragments from the spontaneous fission (SF) of Rf104262. The Rf104262 was produced via the Pu244(22Ne,4n) reaction with a production cross section of ?0.7 nb using 114.4-MeV projectiles. The kinetic energies and times of the coincident fission fragments were measured using our rotating wheel system. From these data the half-life, mass, and kinetic-energy distributions were derived. The total kinetic-energy (TKE) distribution appears to consist of a single component with a most probable pre-neutron-emission TKE of 2152 MeV. The mass distribution is symmetric with a full width at half maximum of about 22 mass numbers. These results are consistent with trends observed for other trans-berkelium spontaneously fissioning isotopes. We determined the half-life to be 2.10.2 s by measuring its spontaneous fission decay. We also attempted to observe the alpha decay of Rf104262 by searching for alpha decay correlated in time with SF from the alpha daughter, 1.2-ms No258. We observed no such decays and have set an upper limit of 0.8% (68% confidence level) on the alpha decay branch of Rf104262. 1996 The American Physical Society.

M. R. Lane; K. E. Gregorich; D. M. Lee; M. F. Mohar; M. Hsu; C. D. Kacher; B. Kadkhodayan; M. P. Neu; N. J. Stoyer; E. R. Sylwester; J. C. Yang; D. C. Hoffman

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Computer processing of mass-spectral data. Part III. Assignment of formulas to experimental masses. Algorithms and structures of programs DBG, FZM, and FZMIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer method for the assignment of formulas to experimental masses has been developed. Programs FZM, DBG and FZMIN are the main programs controlling the procedures for processing the exprerimental masses. The main purpose of this document is to describe the development of these programs and the associated alborithms. Program FZM assigns formulas to the experimental masses using a pregenerated database. A database is generated by program DBG with respect to one of the homologous units CH/sub 2/, CF/sub 2/, CCl/sub 2/, or CBr/sub 2/ using a formula-acceptability-criterion-based bound and branched combinatorial algorithm as part of the formula-assignment process. Program FZM calculates the correct mass number of a species from its experimental mass on the appropriate Kendrick-mass scale and the truncating factor calculated by program DBG for the current database in order to locate the correct database table. The homologous-unit-mass-scale fractional masses in this table which lie within the user-specified region about the experimental Kendrick fractional mass are retrieved using a binary and linear search algorithm. The formula codes associated with these fractional masses are decoded. Program FZMIN admits on-line acquired mass spectral data to program FZM or remote execution.

Chung, K.C.; Barker, G.A.; Hedrick, G.E.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

ACCURATE MASS ESTIMATORS FOR NAVARRO-FRENK-WHITE HALOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the problem of estimating the virial mass of a dark halo from the positions and velocities of a tracer population. Although a number of general tools are available, more progress can be made if we are able to specify the functional form of the halo potential (although not its normalization). Here, we consider the Navarro-Frenk-White halo and develop two simple estimators. We demonstrate their effectiveness against numerical simulations and use them to provide new mass estimates of Carina, Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

Evans, N. W.; Deason, A. J. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); An, J., E-mail: nwe@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: ajd75@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: jinan@nao.cas.cn [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, A20 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

IRAQ'S WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DESPITE SEVEN YEARS OF INtrusive United Nations inspections and decimation of Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, Iraq was able to sequester sizable stocks of chemical and biological weapons, some missiles to deliver them, and the scientific and technical ...

LOIS EMBER

2002-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

262

Computing the Betti Numbers of Arrangements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Computing the Betti Numbers of Arrangements Saugata Basu School of Mathematics & College complexity of a set S are the Betti numbers. i(S). · i(S) is the rank of the Hi (S) (the i-th co. · An important measure of the topological complexity of a set S are the Betti numbers. i(S). · i(S) is the rank

Basu, Saugata

263

BETTI NUMBERS OF HYPERSURFACE COMPLEMENTS LAURENTIU MAXIM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L2 ­BETTI NUMBERS OF HYPERSURFACE COMPLEMENTS LAURENTIU MAXIM Abstract. In [DJL07] it was shown that if A is an affine hyperplane arrange- ment in Cn, then at most one of the L2­Betti numbers b (2) i (Cn \\ A, id of [FLM09, LM06] about L2­Betti numbers of plane curve complements. 1. Introduction Let M be any

Maxim, Laurentiu-George

264

Coulomb Resummation and Monopole Masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relativistic Coulomb resummation factor suggested by I.L. Solovtsov is used to reanalyze the mass limits obtained for magnetic monopoles which might have been produced at the Fermilab Tevatron. The limits given by the Oklahoma experiment (Fermilab E882) are pushed close to the unitary bounds, so that the lower limits on monopole masses are increased from around 250 GeV to about 400 GeV.

K. A. Milton

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

265

Mass Quantization and Lepton Theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article discusses some features of mass quantization obtained by the introduction of a continuous inner degree of freedom into a free field. The usual particle interpretation, with discrete mass values, is applicable, as shown in the case of a second-quantized scalar field. A simple class of fermion field equations with unexpected lepton-like properties is also presented and studied in some detail.

Marcel Wellner

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

REFINED BOUNDS ON THE NUMBER OF CONNECTED ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apr 6, 2011 ... Smith inequality (see Theorem 2.5) a bound on the number of semi- ... then using Smith inequality, have been used before in several different...

2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

267

Battling bird flu by the numbers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bird flu by the numbers Lab theorists have developed a mathematical tool that could help health experts and crisis managers determine in real time whether an emerging...

268

Appendix MASS: Performance Assessment Modeling Assumptions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rock Units MASS-12.2 Historical Context of the Salado Conceptual Model MASS-12.3 The Fracture Model MASS-12.4 Flow in the DRZ MASS-12.5 Actinide Transport in the Salado MASS-13.0...

269

New Candidate Massive Clusters from 2MASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massive stars are important for the evolution of the interstellar medium. The detailed study of their properties (such as mass loss, rotation, magnetic fields) is enormously facilitated by samples of these objects in young massive galactic star clusters. Using 2MASS we have searched for so far unknown candidates of red supergiant clusters along the Galactic Plane. Utilising deep high resolution UKIDSS GPS and VISTA VVV data to study colour-magnitude diagrams, we uncover six new massive cluster candidates in the inner Galaxy. If spectroscopically confirmed as real clusters, two of them could be part of the Scutum-Complex. One cluster candidate has a number of potential red supergiant members comparable to RSGC1 and 3. Our investigation of UKIDSS data reveals for the first time the main sequence of the massive cluster RSGC2. The stars of the sequence show an increased projected density at the same position as the known red supergiants in the cluster and have E(J-K)=1.6mag. This either indicates an unusual extin...

Froebrich, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Spin Singularities: Clifford Kaleidoscopes and Particle Masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are particles singularities- vortex lines, tubes, or sheets in some global ocean of dark energy? We visit the zoo of Lagrangian singularities, or caustics in a spin(4,C) phase flow over compactifed Minkowsky space, and find that their varieties and energies parallel the families and masses of the elementary particles. Singularities are classified by tensor products of J Coxeter groups s generated by reflections. The multiplicity, s, is the number reflections needed to close a cycle of null zigzags: nonlinear resonances of J chiral pairs of lightlike matter spinors with (4-J) Clifford mirrors: dyads in the remaining unperturbed vacuum pairs. Using singular perturbations to "peel" phase-space singularities by orders in the vacuum intensity, we find that singular varieties with quantized mass, charge, and spin parallel the families of leptons (J=1), mesons (J=2), and hadrons (J=3). Taking the symplectic 4 form - the volume element in the 8- spinor phase space- as a natural Lagrangian, these singularities turn ou...

Cohen, Marcus S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2013 #12;Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Contents Page Directors Trust Finance plc Directors' Report For the year ended 30 September 2013 Report of the Directors

Rambaut, Andrew

272

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2012 #12;Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Contents Page Directors Trust Finance plc Directors' Report for the year ended 30 September 2012 Report of the Directors

Rambaut, Andrew

273

GENERAL CHEMISTRY TEXTBOOK LIST ISBN Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FALL 2013 GENERAL CHEMISTRY TEXTBOOK LIST Course Number ISBN Number Title of Text and/or Material Edition Author Publishers 11100 978-1-2591-9687-4 Introduction to Chemistry, 3rd ed. (packaged w 978-1-2591-6192-6 Chemistry, The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 6e (packaged w

Jiang, Wen

274

High speed optical quantum random number generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High speed optical quantum random number generation Martin F¨urst1,2,, Henning Weier1,2, Sebastian, ready-for-use quantum random number generator (QRNG) whose stochastic model is based on the ran- domness directly delivered to a PC, generated at a rate of up to 50 Mbit/s, clearly pass all tests relevant

Weinfurter, Harald

275

Compare Activities by Number of Computers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Computers Number of Computers Compare Activities by ... Number of Computers Office buildings contained the most computers per square foot, followed by education and outpatient health care buildings. Education buildings were the only type with more than one computer per employee. Religious worship and food sales buildings had the fewest computers per square foot. Percent of All Computers by Building Type Figure showing percent of all computers by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Computer Data by Building Type Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Employees (thousand) Total Computers (thousand) Computers per Million Square Feet Computers per Thousand Employees All Buildings 4,657

276

Mass Issues in the Standard Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In these lectures I discuss mass issues both In QCD and in the standard electroweak theory. Among the topics treated are masses In the Goldstone sector of QCD, electromagnetic mass shifts and the values of qua...

R. D. Peccei

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Nitrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen Isotopes of the Element Nitrogen [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 14 99.636% STABLE 15 0.364% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 10 No Data Available Proton Emission 100.00% 11 5.49×10-22 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 12 11.000 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% 13 9.965 minutes Electron Capture 100.00% 14 STABLE - - 15 STABLE - - 16 7.13 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00% Beta-minus Decay with delayed Alpha Decay 1.2×10-3 % 17 4.173 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

278

Current Direct Neutrino Mass Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this contribution we review the status and perspectives of direct neutrino mass experiments. These experiments investigate the kinematics of $\\beta$-decays of specific isotopes ($^3$H, $^{187}$Re, $^{163}$Ho) to derive model-independent information on the averaged electron (anti-) neutrino mass, which is formed by the incoherent sum of the neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. We first review the kinematics of $\\beta$-decay and the determination of the neutrino mass, before giving a brief overview of past neutrino mass measurements (SN1987a-ToF studies, Mainz and Troitsk experiments for $^3$H, cryo-bolometers for $^{187}$Re). We then describe the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment which is currently under construction at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The large-scale setup will use the MAC-E-Filter principle pioneered earlier to push the sensitivity down to a value of 200 meV(90% C.L.). KATRIN faces many technological challenges that have to be resolved with regar...

Drexlin, G; Mertens, S; Weinheimer, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Photon and graviton mass limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review past and current studies of possible long-distance, low-frequency deviations from Maxwell electrodynamics and Einstein gravity. Both have passed through three phases: (1) Testing the inverse-square laws of Newton and Coulomb, (2) Seeking a nonzero value for the rest mass of photon or graviton, and (3) Considering more degrees of freedom, allowing mass while preserving gauge or general-coordinate invariance. For electrodynamics there continues to be no sign of any deviation. Since our previous review the lower limit on the photon Compton wavelength (associated with weakening of electromagnetic fields in vacuum over large distance scale) has improved by four orders of magnitude, to about one astronomical unit. Rapid current progress in astronomical observations makes it likely that there will be further advances. These ultimately could yield a bound exceeding galactic dimensions, as has long been contemplated. Meanwhile, for gravity there have been strong arguments about even the concept of a graviton rest mass. At the same time there are striking observations, commonly labeled 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' that some argue imply modified gravity. This makes the questions for gravity much more interesting. For dark matter, which involves increased attraction at large distances, any explanation by modified gravity would be qualitatively different from graviton mass. Because dark energy is associated with reduced attraction at large distances, it might be explained by a graviton-mass-like effect.

Nieto, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goldhaber Scharff, Alfred [SUNY

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Ultra-low Q values for neutrino mass measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate weak nuclear decays with extremely small kinetic energy release (Q value) and thus extremely good sensitivity to the absolute neutrino mass scale. In particular, we consider decays into excited daughter states, and we show that partial ionization of the parent atom can help to tune Q values to << 1 keV. We discuss several candidate isotopes undergoing {beta}{sup {+-}}, bound state {beta}, or electron capture decay, and come to the conclusion that a neutrino mass measurement using low-Q decays might only be feasible if no ionization is required, and if future improvements in isotope production technology, nuclear mass spectroscopy, and atomic structure calculations are possible. Experiments using ions, however, are extremely challenging due to the large number of ions that must be stored. New precision data on nuclear excitation levels could help to identify further isotopes with low-Q decay modes and possibly less challenging requirements.

Kopp, Joachim; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Fermilab; Merle, Alexander; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Big Mysteries: The Higgs Mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the discovery of what looks to be the Higgs boson, LHC researchers are turning their attention to the next big question, which is the predicted mass of the newly discovered particles. When the effects of quantum mechanics is taken into account, the mass of the Higgs boson should be incredibly high...perhaps upwards of a quadrillion times higher than what was observed. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln explains how it is that the theory predicts that the mass is so large and gives at least one possible theoretical idea that might solve the problem. Whether the proposed idea is the answer or not, this question must be answered by experiments at the LHC or today's entire theoretical paradigm could be in jeopardy.

Lincoln, Don

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

283

Mass Spectroscopy and Reaction Studies of Laser-Vaporized Clusters from Metal-Doped Carbon Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C50 + LaC60 + (40) 30 40 50 60 70 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arb.units) (a) Positive La Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) C43 ­ C44 ­ Mass (amu) LaC32 ­ (a) (b) Fig. 2 Even distribution. 440 460 480 500 36 38 40 42 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) (a) as injected (b

Maruyama, Shigeo

284

Engineering superpositions of displaced number states of a trapped ion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a protocol that permits the generation of a subtle with superposition with 2^(l+1) displaced number states on a circle in phase space as target state for the center-of-mass motion of a trapped ion. Through a sequence of 'l' cycles involving the application of laser pulses and no-fluorescence measurements, explicit expressions for the total duration of laser pulses employed in the sequence and probability of getting the ion in the upper electronic state during the 'l' cycles are obtained and analyzed in detail. Furthermore, assuming that the effective relaxation process of a trapped ion can be described in the framework of the standard master equation for the damped harmonic oscillator, we investigate the degradation of the quantum interference effects inherent to superpositions via Wigner function.

Marcelo A. Marchiolli; Wagner D. Jose

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

285

Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly Volume 1, Number 4  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1, Number 4 * February 2012 1, Number 4 * February 2012 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 1, Number 4 Inside this Issue 2 Applying Advanced Simulation Models to Neutron Tube Ion Extraction 3 Advanced Optical Cavities for Subcritical and Hydrodynamic Experiments 5 Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility 7 Commissioning URSA Minor: The First LTD-Based Accelerator for Radiography 8 Publication Highlights 9 2011 NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship Class S tockpile Stewardship Science is not for wimps, and

286

JOURNAL OF MASS SPECTROMETRY J. Mass Spectrom. 2003; 38: 277282  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tandem mass spectrom- etry even isomerizations such as isoaspartate formation are detectable.3 Low-energy, nuclear and endosomal morphology, a defect in fluid-phase uptake and an impairment in normal cytokinesis.1.02 derived from acrylamide-modified peptides.8 These fragmentation reactions can be utilized for the spe-

Manstein, Dietmar J.

287

Mass-Independent Isotope Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scientific interests: ESR and NMR spectroscopies, molecular magnets, mechanisms of chemical and biochemical reactions, spin physics and chemistry, isotopes and isotope effects in chemistry and biochemistry. ... Another mass-independent isotope effect was detected in 1983 as a deviation of isotopic distribution in reaction products from that which would be expected from the mass-dependent isotope effect. ... Later, Nomura et al.(92) have found isotopic 233U anomaly in the U4+U6+ exchange reaction; they noted that the isotope effect was correlated with isotope shifts in the atomic spectra of uranium isotopes. ...

Anatoly L. Buchachenko

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

288

CORONAL MASS EJECTION MASS, ENERGY, AND FORCE ESTIMATES USING STEREO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding coronal mass ejection (CME) energetics and dynamics has been a long-standing problem, and although previous observational estimates have been made, such studies have been hindered by large uncertainties in CME mass. Here, the two vantage points of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) COR1 and COR2 coronagraphs were used to accurately estimate the mass of the 2008 December 12 CME. Acceleration estimates derived from the position of the CME front in three dimensions were combined with the mass estimates to calculate the magnitude of the kinetic energy and driving force at different stages of the CME evolution. The CME asymptotically approaches a mass of 3.4 {+-} 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} g beyond {approx}10 R{sub Sun }. The kinetic energy shows an initial rise toward 6.3 {+-} 3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 29} erg at {approx}3 R{sub Sun }, beyond which it rises steadily to 4.2 {+-} 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg at {approx}18 R{sub Sun }. The dynamics are described by an early phase of strong acceleration, dominated by a force of peak magnitude of 3.4 {+-} 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} N at {approx}3 R{sub Sun }, after which a force of 3.8 {+-} 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} N takes effect between {approx}7 and 18 R{sub Sun }. These results are consistent with magnetic (Lorentz) forces acting at heliocentric distances of {approx}<7 R{sub Sun }, while solar wind drag forces dominate at larger distances ({approx}>7 R{sub Sun }).

Carley, Eoin P.; Gallagher, Peter T. [Astrophysics Research Group, School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); McAteer, R. T. James [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

289

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Mass Transit to Mass Transit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Ridesharing Mass Transit Active Transit Multi-Modal Transportation Telework Mass Transit Passenger-Miles per Gallon Passenger-miles per gallon (pmpg) is a metric for comparing mass transit and rideshare with typical passenger vehicle travel. Transportation system

290

Climate Zone Number 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Number 1 Climate Zone Number 1 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 1 is defined as Very Hot - Humid(1A) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50ºF and SI Units 5000 < CDD10ºC Dry(1B) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50ºF and SI Units 5000 < CDD10ºC . The following places are categorized as class 1 climate zones: Broward County, Florida Hawaii County, Hawaii Honolulu County, Hawaii Kalawao County, Hawaii Kauai County, Hawaii Maui County, Hawaii Miami-Dade County, Florida Monroe County, Florida Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate_Zone_Number_1&oldid=21604" Category: ASHRAE Climate Zones What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

291

What's Behind the Numbers? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

What's Behind the Numbers? What's Behind the Numbers? What's Behind the Numbers? June 24, 2011 - 3:39pm Addthis What's Behind the Numbers? Dr. Richard Newell Dr. Richard Newell What does this mean for me? New website shows data on the why's, when's and how's of crude oil prices. Among the most visible prices that consumers may see on a daily basis are the ones found on the large signs at the gasoline stations alongside our streets and highways. The biggest single factor affecting gasoline prices is the cost of crude oil, the main raw material for gasoline production, which accounts for well over half the price of gasoline at the pump. But what is behind the price of crude oil? This week the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) launched a new web-based assessment highlighting key factors that can affect crude oil

292

REFINED BOUNDS ON THE NUMBER OF CONNECTED ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 6, 2011 ... closure imply using the well-known Smith inequality (see Theorem 2.4) a bound on the number of semi-algebraically connected components of...

2011-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

293

Analytical number-projected BCS nuclear model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transforming both the overlap energy kernel and overlap functionals into polynomial forms, the well-known integral of the number-projected BCS theory is performed analytically. We then obtain the projected ground state BCS energy in the closed form.

Mauro Kyotoku

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Regulation of Numbers of Intracellular Algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Regulation of Numbers of Intracellular Algae L. Muscatine R. R. Pool Members of three classes of unicellular algae have exploited an intracellular habitat...is poorly understood. Steady-state algae:host cell ratios might be achieved by...

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Elastic tail propulsion at low Reynolds number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple way to generate propulsion at low Reynolds number is to periodically oscillate a passive flexible filament. Here we present a macroscopic experimental investigation of such a propulsive mechanism. A robotic swimmer ...

Yu, Tony S. (Tony Sheung)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Utility Priority Number Evaluation for FMEA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditionally, decisions on how to improve an operation are based on risk priority number (RPN) in the failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA). Many scholars questioned the RPN method ... make a decision on impr...

Jih Kuang Chen

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Baryon number violation in particle decays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been argued in the past that in baryogenesis via out-of-equilibrium decays one must consider loop diagrams that contain more than one baryon number violating coupling. In this paper we argue that the requirement with regard to baryon number violating couplings in loop diagrams is that the interaction between the intermediate on-shell particles and the final particles should correspond to a net change in baryon number and that this can be satisfied even if the loop diagram contains only one baryon number violating coupling. Put simply, we show that to create a baryon asymmetry there should be net B violation to the right of the cut in the loop diagram. This is of relevance to some works involving the out-of-equilibrium decay scenario.

Rathin Adhikari and Raghavan Rangarajan

2002-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

298

Implementation of a Distributed Pseudorandom Number Generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In parallel Monte Carlo simulations, it is highly desirable to have a system of pseudo-random number generators that has good statistical properties and allows ... processes. In this work, we discuss a distributed

Jian Chen; Paula Whitlock

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Entropy of pseudo-random-number generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the work of Ferrenberg et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 3382 (1992)] some pseudo-random-number generators are known to yield wrong results in cluster Monte Carlo simulations. In this contribution the fundamental mechanism behind this failure is discussed. Almost all random-number generators calculate a new pseudo-random-number xi from preceding values, xi=f(xi?1,xi?2,,xi?q). Failure of these generators in cluster Monte Carlo simulations and related experiments can be attributed to the low entropy of the production rule f() conditioned on the statistics of the input values xi?1,,xi?q. Being a measure only of the arithmetic operations in the generator rule, the conditional entropy is independent of the lag in the recurrence or the period of the sequence. In that sense it measures a more profound quality of a random-number generator than empirical tests with their limited horizon.

Stephan Mertens and Heiko Bauke

2004-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

300

Algorithms for Algebraic Number Theory II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We now leave the realm of quadratic fields where the main computational tasks of algebraic number theory mentioned at the end of Chapter 4 were relatively simple (although as we have seen many conjectures rema...

Henri Cohen

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Bridge Numbers of Torus Knots Jennifer Schultens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contained proof of the following result of H. Schubert: If K is a (p, q)-torus knot, then the bridge number below all maxima of h|K, then we say that K is in bridge position with respect to h. The bridge number of whether or not we require K to be in bridge position. Indeed, if h|K has n maxima, then the maxima of h

Schultens, Jennifer

302

Chemical kinetics of cetane number improving agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing demand for diesel fuels has resulted in the use of greater percentage of cracked distillates having poor ignition properties. The ignition properties of diesel fuels can be rated in terms of their cetane number and diesel fuels having low cetane number may have poor ignition properties such as diesel knock, difficulties to start engines in the cold weather and so on. Such diesel fuels need cetane number improving agents. In the 1940s and 1950s alkyl nitrates, alkyl nitrites and organic peroxides were found to be effective cetane number improving additives. Our recent study suggests that free radicals produced from thermal decomposition just before ignition should have an important role to improve their ignition properties. However no studies on the reaction mechanism for improving effect of these additives have been attempted because of complex nature of spontaneous ignition reaction of hydrocarbons. In order to clarify the reaction mechanism for improving effects of cetane number improving agents. We here have attempted to simulate the spontaneous ignition of n-butane as a model compound in the presence of alkyl nitrites as cetane number improving agents.

Hashimoto, K.; Akutsu, Y.; Arai, M.; Tamura, M. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Dynamical Constraints on Disk Masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While the total interior mass of a galaxy is reasonably well determined by a good rotation curve, the relative contributions from disk, bulge and halo are only weakly constrained by one-dimensional data. Barred galaxies are intrinsically more complicated, but provide much tighter constraints on the disk masses and support the idea that most of the mass in the inner parts of bright galaxies is in their stars. There appears to be no systematic difference in dark matter content between barred and unbarred galaxies, consistent with the theoretical result that the global stability of galaxies with dense centers does not depend on their halo fraction. The rotation curve shapes of lower luminosity and low-surface-brightness galaxies, on the other hand, indicate significant mass in the DM halo even near their centers. We find that most DM halos appear to have large cores, inconsistent with the predictions from cosmological simulations. We also show that such large-core halos can result from compression by disk infall of physically reasonable initial halos. Maximum disks, while apparently required by the data, do seem to present some puzzles; most notably they re-open the old disk-halo ``conspiracy'' issue and incorrectly predict that surface brightness should be a second parameter in the Tully-Fisher relation.

J. A. Sellwood

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

304

Mass Generation and Noncommutative Spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we show how it is possible to obtain mass generation in the context of non Abelian gauge field theory, using a non commutative spacetime. This is further confirmed by the modified dispersion relation that results from such a geometry.

Burra G. Sidharth

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

305

Majorana neutrino masses in the three-flavor Pauli model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A special Majorana model for three neutrino flavors is developed on the basis of the Pauli transformation group. In this model, the neutrinos possess a partially conserved generalized lepton (Pauli) charge that makes it possible to discriminate between neutrinos of different type. It is shown that, within the model in question, a transition from the basic 'mass' representation, where the average value of this charge is zero, to the representation associated with physical neutrinos characterized by specific Pauli 'flavor' charges establishes a relation between the neutrino mixing angles {theta}{sub mix,12}, {theta}{sub mix,23}, and {theta}{sub mix,13} and an additional relation between the Majorana neutrino masses. The Lagrangian mass part, which includes a term invariant under Pauli transformations and a representation-dependent term, concurrently assumes a 'quasi-Dirac' form. With allowance for these relations, the existing set of experimental data on the features of neutrino oscillations makes it possible to obtain quantitative estimates for the absolute values of the neutrino masses and the 2{beta}-decay mass parameter m{sub {beta}{beta}} and a number of additional constraints on the neutrino mixing angles.

Gaponov, Yu. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

MassMass transfer andtransfer and separation technologyseparation technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liquid extraction involves three stages: ­ Contacting / extraction al-extraction.j ­ Separation the component of interest solute (A) will distribute over extract (E, phase II or 2) and raffinate (R, phase I with equilibrium constant K: 4 erföringo cA,II/cA,I = K´ , or Massöve xA,E/xA,R = xA,II/xA,I = xA,2/xA,1 = K K´= K

Zevenhoven, Ron

307

Fourier transform mass spectrometry of high-mass biomolecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report the authors present an overview of the use of FTMS for the analysis of large biomolecules, with emphasis on recent developments in coupling ESI and MALDI with FTMS. A simple description of the principles of FTMS operation and experimental factors that are relevant to the examination of large molecules are also presented. The examples represent state-of-the-art capabilities of FTMS. On the basis of early reports, it is apparent that the applications of FTMS for the analysis of biopolymers will expand rapidly in the near future. Although many different types of mass analyzers are compatible with FAB, ESI, and MALDI, FTMS has exhibited particular potential for high sensitivity, accurate mass measurement, high-mass resolution, and structural characterization of large biopolymers. The recent results obtained with both ESI-FTMS and MALDI-FTMS are very exciting with respect to both fundamental advances in the capabilities of FTMS and potential applications in the biochemical laboratory. 63 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Buchanan, M.V.; Hettich, R.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signaturea hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivityover a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOEs Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita. 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) faces enormous scientific and engineering challenges associated with the remediation of legacy contamination at former nuclear weapons production facilities. Selection, design and optimization of appropriate site remedies (e.g., pump-and-treat, biostimulation, or monitored natural attenuation) requires reliable predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport; however, our current modeling capabilities are limited by an incomplete understanding of multi-scale mass transferits rates, scales, and the heterogeneity of controlling parameters. At many DOE sites, long tailing behavior, concentration rebound, and slower-than-expected cleanup are observed; these observations are all consistent with multi-scale mass transfer [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995; Haggerty et al., 2000; 2004], which renders pump-and-treat remediation and biotransformation inefficient and slow [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1994; Harvey et al., 1994; Wilson, 1997]. Despite the importance of mass transfer, there are significant uncertainties associated with controlling parameters, and the prevalence of mass transfer remains a point of debate [e.g., Hill et al., 2006; Molz et al., 2006] for lack of experimental methods to verify and measure it in situ or independently of tracer breakthrough. There is a critical need for new field-experimental techniques to measure mass transfer in-situ and estimate multi-scale and spatially variable mass-transfer parame

Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

309

Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased Tracers of Star Formation?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We model the mass distribution of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies given recent results suggesting that GRBs occur in low metallicity environments. By utilizing measurements of the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relationship for galaxies, along with a sharp host metallicity cut-off suggested by Modjaz and collaborators, we estimate an upper limit on the stellar mass of a galaxy that can efficiently produce a GRB as a function of redshift. By employing consistent abundance indicators, we find that sub-solar metallicity cut-offs effectively limit GRBs to low stellar mass spirals and dwarf galaxies at low redshift. At higher redshifts, as the average metallicity of galaxies in the Universe falls, the mass range of galaxies capable of hosting a GRB broadens, with an upper bound approaching the mass of even the largest spiral galaxies. We compare these predicted limits to the growing number of published GRB host masses and find that extremely low metallicity cut-offs of 0.1 to 0.5 Z{sub {circle_dot}} are effectively ruled out by a large number of intermediate mass galaxies at low redshift. A mass function that includes a smooth decrease in the efficiency of producing GRBs in galaxies of metallicity above 12+log(O/H){sub KK04} = 8.7 can, however, accommodate a majority of the measured host galaxy masses. We find that at z {approx} 1, the peak in the observed GRB host mass distribution is inconsistent with the expected peak in the mass of galaxies harboring most of the star formation. This suggests that GRBs are metallicity biased tracers of star formation at low and intermediate redshifts, although our model predicts that this bias should disappear at higher redshifts due to the evolving metallicity content of the universe.

Kocevski, Daniel; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; West, Andrew A.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /MIT, MKI; Modjaz, Maryam; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

310

Climate Zone Number 7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Number 7 Climate Zone Number 7 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 7 is defined as Very Cold with IP Units 9000 < HDD65ºF ≤ 12600 and SI Units 5000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 7000 . The following places are categorized as class 7 climate zones: Aitkin County, Minnesota Aleutians East Borough, Alaska Aleutians West Census Area, Alaska Anchorage Borough, Alaska Aroostook County, Maine Ashland County, Wisconsin Baraga County, Michigan Barnes County, North Dakota Bayfield County, Wisconsin Becker County, Minnesota Beltrami County, Minnesota Benson County, North Dakota Bottineau County, North Dakota Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska Burke County, North Dakota Burnett County, Wisconsin Carlton County, Minnesota Cass County, Minnesota

311

SPRNG Parallel Random Number Generators at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SPRNG SPRNG SPRNG Description The SPRNG libraries of generators produce good quality random numbers, and are also fast. They have been subjected to some of the largest random number tests, with around 10^13 RNs per test. SPRNG provides both FORTRAN and C (also C++) interfaces for the use of the parallel random number generators. Access SPRNG v2.0 is available on Carver (gcc, intel and pgi) and Cray systems (pgi and cce). Use the module utility to load the software. module load sprng Using SPRNG On Cray systems: ftn sprng_test.F $SPRNG -lsprng On Carver: mpif90 sprng_test.F $SPRNG -lsprng Documentation On Carver there are various documents in $SPRNG/DOCS and various examples in $SPRNG/EXAMPLES. See the SPRNG web site at Florida State University for complete details. For help using SPRNG at NERSC contact the

312

Microsoft Word - Document Numbering Plan.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

document Number Plan 11/3/2005 document Number Plan 11/3/2005 All documents numbers start with a 9 9 _ _ ___ | | | | | Document per chart | Generation (i.e. PSS has 1,2&3, FEEPS has 1&2) Use 0 when the document doesn't apply to any of these System 0- Non system Specific (group wide) 1- PSS 2- Reserved for PSS expansion 3- FEEPS 4- Reserved for FEEPS expansion 5- BLEPS 6- Reserved for BLEPS expansion 7- DIW 8- Reserved for future use 9- Reserved for future use 000-099 Requirements 000 - Statement of work For x.1.4.1.4 - Design Statement of Work For Beamlines - Installation Statement of Work 001-009 Reserved for Statement of Works for upgrade, revisions, add-ons, etc. 010 - Cost Estimate 011-019 Additional Cost Estimates

313

Notices OMB Control Number: 1850-0803.  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

870 Federal Register 870 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 140 / Monday, July 22, 2013 / Notices OMB Control Number: 1850-0803. Type of Review: Extension without change of an existing collection of information. Respondents/Affected Public: Individuals or households. Total Estimated Number of Annual Responses: 135,000. Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 27,000. Abstract: This is a request for a 3-year renewal of the generic clearance to allow the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) to continue to develop, test, and improve its survey and assessment instruments and methodologies. The procedures utilized to this effect include but are not limited to experiments with levels of incentives for various types of survey operations, focus groups, cognitive laboratory

314

Climate Zone Number 3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number 3 Number 3 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 3 is defined as Warm - Humid(3A) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Dry(3B) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Warm - Marine(3C) with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND HDD65ºF ≤ 3600 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 2000 . The following places are categorized as class 3 climate zones: Abbeville County, South Carolina Adair County, Oklahoma Adams County, Mississippi Aiken County, South Carolina Alameda County, California Alcorn County, Mississippi Alfalfa County, Oklahoma Allendale County, South Carolina Amite County, Mississippi Anderson County, South Carolina

315

Probing lepton number violation on three frontiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutrinoless double beta decay constitutes the main probe for lepton number violation at low energies, motivated by the expected Majorana nature of the light but massive neutrinos. On the other hand, the theoretical interpretation of the (non-)observation of this process is not straightforward as the Majorana neutrinos can destructively interfere in their contribution and many other New Physics mechanisms can additionally mediate the process. We here highlight the potential of combining neutrinoless double beta decay with searches for Tritium decay, cosmological observations and LHC physics to improve the quantitative insight into the neutrino properties and to unravel potential sources of lepton number violation.

Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

On the muon neutrino mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the runs of the PS 179 experiment at LEAR of CERN, we photographed an event of antiproton-Ne absorption, with a complete pi+ -> mu+ ->e+ chain. From the vertex of the reaction a very slow energy pi+ was emitted. The pi+ decays into a mu+ and subsequently the mu+ decays into a positron. At the first decay vertex a muon neutrino was emitted and at the second decay vertex an electron neutrino and a muon antineutrino. Measuring the pion and muon tracks and applying the momentum and energy conservation and using a classical statistical interval estimator, we obtained an experimental upper limit for the muon neutrino mass: m_nu < 2.2 MeV at a 90% confidence level. A statistical analysis has been performed of the factors contributing to the square value of the neutrino mass limit.

N. Angelov; F. Balestra; Yu. Batusov; A. Bianconi; M. P. Bussa; L. Busso; L. Ferrero; R. Garfagnini; I. Gnesi; E. Lodi Rizzini; A. Maggiora; D. Panzieri; G. Piragino; G. Pontecorvo; F. Tosello; L. Venturelli

2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

317

Graphene, neutrino mass and oscillation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A resolution of the Abraham-Minkowski dilemma is presented that other constant velocities can play the role of c in the theory of relativity. For example, in 2005 electrons of graphene were discovered to behave as if the coefficient is a Fermi velocity. Then we propose a conjecture for neutrinos to avoid the contradiction among two-component theory, negative rest mass-square and oscillation.

Z. Y. Wang

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

318

Energy Band Model Based on Effective Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we demonstrate an alternative method of deriving an isotropic energy band model using a one-dimensional definition of the effective mass and experimentally observed dependence of mass on energy. We extend the effective mass definition to anti-particles and particles with zero rest mass. We assume an often observed linear dependence of mass on energy and derive a generalized non-parabolic energy-momentum relation. The resulting non-parabolicity leads to velocity saturation at high particle energies. We apply the energy band model to free relativistic particles and carriers in solid state materials and obtain commonly used dispersion relations and experimentally confirmed effective masses. We apply the model to zero rest mass particles in graphene and propose using the effective mass for photons. Therefore, it appears that the new energy band model based on the effective mass can be applied to relativistic particles and carriers in solid state materials.

Viktor Ariel

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

319

Table B14. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999" 4. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Establishments in Building" ,,"One","Two to Five","Six to Ten","Eleven to Twenty","More than Twenty","Currently Unoccupied" "All Buildings ................",4657,3528,688,114,48,27,251 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1897,272,"Q","Q","Q",164 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,802,222,17,"Q","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,506,121,51,12,"Q",17 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",257,184,33,15,15,"Q","Q"

320

Beamline Phone Numbers| Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactive Map Interactive Map Beamlines Map Beamlines Directory Techniques Directory Sectors Directory Beamline Phone Numbers Status and Schedule Beamline Phone Numbers From on-site, dial 2, then a number listed below. From off-site, dial 630-252 and a number listed below. Sector 1 1-BM-A: 1701 1-BM-C: 5468 1-ID: 1801 Sector 2 2-BM: 1702 2-ID-B: 1628 2-ID-D: 1802 2-ID-E: 3711 Sector 3 3-ID: 1803 Sector 4 4-ID-C: 1704 4-ID-D: 1804 Sector 5 5-BM: 1705 5-ID: 1805 Sector 6 6-ID-B: 1806 6-ID-C: 1406 6-ID-D: 1606 Sector 7 7-ID-B: 1607 7-ID-C: 1707 7-ID-D: 1807 7-ID-E: 1207 Sector 8 8-ID-E: 1908 8-ID-I: 1808 Sector 9 9-BM-B: 1709 9-ID-B: 0349 9-ID-C: 1809 Column 95: 4705 Sector 10 10-BM-B: 6792 10-ID-B: 1710 Sector 11 11-BM-B: 5877 11-ID-B: 1711 11-ID-C: 1711 11-ID-D: 2162 Laser lab: 0379 Sector 12 12-BM-B: 0378 12-ID-B,C: 1712

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

March 2005 Number 238 CARBON CAPTURE AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

March 2005 Number 238 CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE (CCS) As part of the government's global strategy. This POSTnote discusses the potential of carbon capture and storage (CCS), a method of carbon sequestration2 stages: CO2 capture, transport and storage. CO2 capture Carbon capture is best applied to large

Mather, Tamsin A.

322

Colorado Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

,606,602 1,622,434 1,634,587 1,645,716 1,659,808 1,672,312 1986-2013 Sales 1,634,582 1,645,711 1,659,803 1,672,307 1997-2013 Transported 5 5 5 5 1997-2013 Commercial Number of...

323

Report Number: _____________ UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report Number: _____________ UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER EMPLOYEE SAFETY HAZARD REPORT health, life or property are to be reported by phone to "7777" on campus and "911" off campus. Employees are to use this form to report other hazards. The employee is then to distribute copies of this completed

Kim, Duck O.

324

Heat Transfer at Small Grashof Numbers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...January 1957 research-article Heat Transfer at Small Grashof Numbers J. J...physical arguments suggest that the heat transfer from a body, immersed in a fluid...the problem is small. However, heat-transfer rates predicted in this fashion...

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Estimate octane numbers using an enhanced method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved model, based on the Twu-Coon method, is not only internally consistent, but also retains the same level of accuracy as the previous model in predicting octanes of gasoline blends. The enhanced model applies the same binary interaction parameters to components in each gasoline cut and their blends. Thus, the enhanced model can blend gasoline cuts in any order, in any combination or from any splitting of gasoline cuts and still yield the identical value of octane number for blending the same number of gasoline cuts. Setting binary interaction parameters to zero for identical gasoline cuts during the blending process is not required. The new model changes the old model`s methodology so that the same binary interaction parameters can be applied between components inside a gasoline cut as are applied to the same components between gasoline cuts. The enhanced model is more consistent in methodology than the original model, but it has equal accuracy for predicting octane numbers of gasoline blends, and it has the same number of binary interaction parameters. The paper discusses background, enhancement of the Twu-Coon interaction model, and three examples: blend of 2 identical gasoline cuts, blend of 3 gasoline cuts, and blend of the same 3 gasoline cuts in a different order.

Twu, C.H.; Coon, J.E. [Simulation Sciences Inc., Brea, CA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Student's Department: Course/Section Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student's Department: Course/Section Number: Course Title: Instructor: Explanation of why coursework has not yet been completed: Description of coursework remaining to be completed: Graduate Student is Requested: Arts & Sciences Students: Shriver Hall 28 (Graduate Affairs and Admissions Office) Engineering

Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

327

STUDENT HANDBOOK Table of Contents Page Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDENT HANDBOOK Campus #12;Table of Contents Page Number Welcome 1 The School 1 Mission Statement Student Resources 8 Financial Aid and Funding Sources Writing Supports 9 Special Needs Computers Libraries RefWorks 10 Student Services 11 Administrative Information 14 Student ID, and Email Accounts U of R

Saskatchewan, University of

328

Connecticut Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

487,320 489,349 490,185 494,970 504,138 513,492 1986-2013 Sales 489,380 494,065 503,241 512,110 1997-2013 Transported 805 905 897 1,382 1997-2013 Commercial Number of Consumers...

329

Volume 22, Number 2, 2014 ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-users [2,3,4,5] reduce health risks [6,7,8], and mitigate the greenhouse gas impact of lighting techVolume 22, Number 2, 2014 LIGHT & ENGINEERING Znack Publishing House, Moscow ISSN 0236-2945 #12 Advisory Board: Lou Bedocs, Thorn Lighting Limited, United Kingdom Wout van Bommel, Philips Lighting

Jacobson, Arne

330

Idaho Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

36,191 342,277 346,602 350,871 353,963 359,889 1987-2013 Sales 346,602 350,871 353,963 359,889 1997-2013 Commercial Number of Consumers 37,320 38,245 38,506 38,912 39,202 39,722...

331

Gorilla numbers doubled in the Congo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... previously thought, according to a census of the northern regions of the Republic of the Congo. Led by the New-York-based Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), the count found ... attributes the high numbers to successful management of protected areas in the Republic of the Congo, a food-rich habitat and the remoteness and inaccessibility of the region. The ...

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

332

Paper Number (Assigned by IFPE Staff)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paper Number (Assigned by IFPE Staff) Compressed Air Energy Storage for Offshore Wind Turbines pumped hydro, compressed air energy storage, a variety of battery chemistries, capacitors, flywheels of this paper, compressed air energy storage, is highly scalable, reasonably inexpensive, provides moderate ramp

Li, Perry Y.

333

The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

1948-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

334

The 1993 atomic mass evaluation: (I) Atomic mass table  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is the first of a series of four. In it, a table is given to replace the 1983 atomic mass table. The differences with the earlier table are briefly discussed and information is given of interest for the users of this table. Part II of this series gives values for several derived quantities (decay-, separation- and reaction energies), part III shows graphs of several of those quantities, and part IV gives a list of input data and full information on the used input data and on the procedures used in deriving the tables in the preceding parts.

G. Audi; A.H. Wapstra

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Quantum random-number generator based on a photon-number-resolving detector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrated a high-efficiency quantum random number generator which takes inherent advantage of the photon number distribution randomness of a coherent light source. This scheme was realized by comparing the photon flux of consecutive pulses with a photon number resolving detector. The random bit generation rate could reach 2.4 MHz with a system clock of 6.0 MHz, corresponding to a random bit generation efficiency as high as 40%. The random number files passed all the stringent statistical tests.

Min Ren; E Wu; Yan Liang; Yi Jian; Guang Wu; Heping Zeng

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

336

High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Biological Tissue Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological tissue imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry has seen rapid development with the commercial availability of polyatomic primary ion sources. Endogenous lipids and other small bio-molecules can now be routinely mapped on the micrometer scale. Such experiments are typically performed on time-of-flight mass spectrometers for high sensitivity and high repetition rate imaging. However, such mass analyzers lack the mass resolving power to ensure separation of isobaric ions and the mass accuracy for exact mass elemental formula assignment. We have recently reported a secondary ion mass spectrometer with the combination of a C60 primary ion gun with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) for high mass resolving power, high mass measurement accuracy and tandem mass spectrometry capabilities. In this work, high specificity and high sensitivity secondary ion FT-ICR MS was applied to chemical imaging of biological tissue. An entire rat brain tissue was measured with 150 ?m spatial resolution (75 ?m primary ion spot size) with mass resolving power (m/?m50%) of 67,500 (at m/z 750) and root-mean-square measurement accuracy less than two parts-per-million for intact phospholipids, small molecules and fragments. For the first time, ultra-high mass resolving power SIMS has been demonstrated, with m/?m50% > 3,000,000. Higher spatial resolution capabilities of the platform were tested at a spatial resolution of 20 ?m. The results represent order of magnitude improvements in mass resolving power and mass measurement accuracy for SIMS imaging and the promise of the platform for ultra-high mass resolving power and high spatial resolution imaging.

Smith, Donald F.; Kiss, Andras; Leach, Franklin E.; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Heeren, Ronald M.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Betti Numbers, Spectral Sequences and Algorithms for computing them  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Betti Numbers, Spectral Sequences and Algorithms for computing them Saugata Basu School on the number of connected components, Betti numbers etc. In terms of: #12;4 Complexity of Semi-algebraic Sets Uniform bounds on the number of connected components, Betti numbers etc. In terms of: The number

Basu, Saugata

338

Quantum-State Engineering of Multiple Trapped Ions for Center-of-Mass Mode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a scheme to generate a superposition with arbitrary coefficients on a line in phase space for the center-of-mass vibrational mode of N ions by means of isolating all other spectator vibrational modes from the center-of-mass mode. It can be viewed as the generation of previous methods for preparing motional states of one ion. For large number of ions, we need only one cyclic operatin to generate such a superposition of many coherent states.

Hao-Sheng Zeng; Xi-Wen Zhu; Ke-Lin Gao

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Averaged number of prompt neutrons calculus for photo-fission of actinides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The empirical calculations of the averaged number of prompt neutrons for photofission of 232Th, 233U, 234U, 235U, 236U, 238U, 237Np, 239Pu and 241Am actinides were done as a function of excitation energy, mass and charge of the nucleus, which can be used to evaluate the prompt neutrons for photofission of nuclides for which no or scarce data is available.

A. I. Lengyel; O. O. Parlag; V. T. Maslyuk; N. I. Romanyuk; O. O. Gritzay

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

340

Search for Lepton Number Violating Charged Current Processes with Neutrino Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new idea to test a class of loop-induced neutrino mass mechanisms by searching for lepton number violating charged current processes with incident of a neutrino beam. The expected rates of these processes are estimated based on some theoretical assumptions. They turn out to be sizable so that detection of such processes could be possible at near detectors in future highly intense neutrino-beam facilities.

Shinya Kanemura; Yoshitaka Kuno; Toshihiko Ota

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

THE DARK MATTER HALO CONCENTRATION AND STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION OF A CASSOWARY GROUP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We exploit the group environment of the CAmbridge Sloan Survey Of Wide ARcs in the skY z = 0.3 lens J2158+0257 to measure the group dynamical mass as a complement to the central dynamical and lensing mass constraints. Follow-up spectroscopy of candidate group members is performed using VLT/FORS2. From the resulting N = 21 confirmed members, we measure the group dynamical mass by calibrating an analytic tracer mass estimator with cosmological simulations. The luminosity-weighted line-of-sight velocity dispersion and the Einstein radius of the lens are used as mass probes in the inner regions of the galaxy. Combining these three observational probes allows us to independently constrain the mass and concentration of the dark matter halo, in addition to the total stellar mass of the central galaxy. We find a dark matter halo in remarkably good agreement with simulations (log{sub 10} M{sub 200}/M{sub Sun} = 14.2 {+-} 0.2, c{sub 200}= 4.4{sup +1.6}{sub -1.4}) and a stellar mass-to-light ratio which favors a Salpeter initial mass function ((M/L)* = 5.7 {+-} 1.2). Our measurement of a normal halo concentration suggests that there is no discrepancy between simulations and observations at the group mass scale. This is in contrast to the cluster mass scale for which a number of studies have claimed over-concentrated halos. While the halo mass is robustly determined, and the halo concentration is not significantly affected by systematics, the resulting stellar mass-to-light ratio is sensitive to the choice of stellar parameters, such as density profile and velocity anisotropy.

Deason, A. J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Auger, M. W.; Belokurov, V.; Evans, N. W., E-mail: alis@ucolick.org [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Rd, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

342

Number Plastic Type Common Items Number of Items (tally) 1 polyethylene terephthalate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

End Time: Number Plastic Type Common Items Number of Items (tally) 1 polyethylene terephthalate and vegetable oil containers; ovenable food trays. 2 high density polyethylene Milk jugs, juice bottles; bleach, piping, candy wrappers 4 low density polyethylene Squeezable bottles; bread, frozen food, dry cleaning

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

343

Responding to Mass Psychogenic Illness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...outbreaks have not been reported. In a previous era, spirits and demons oppressed us. Although they have been replaced by our contemporary concern about invisible viruses, chemicals, and toxins, the mechanisms of contagious fear remain the same. The rapid outbreak of illness described by Jones et al. the particular... In this issue of the Journal, Jones and colleagues report on an episode of mass psychogenic illness that had a devastating impact on a high school in McMinnville, Tennessee.1 They provide an elegant description of the outbreak. Such outbreaks, ...

Wessely S.

2000-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

344

Measurement of the double beta decay half-life of ^{100}Mo to the 0^{+}_{1} excited state, and ^{48}Ca to the ground state in the NEMO 3 experiment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??NEMO 3 is a double beta decay experiment situated in the Frjus tunnel which runs between France and Italy. If neutrinoless double beta decay is (more)

King, S.L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Battling bird flu by the numbers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May » May » Battling bird flu by the numbers Battling bird flu by the numbers Lab theorists have developed a mathematical tool that could help health experts and crisis managers determine in real time whether an emerging infectious disease such as avian influenza H5N1 is poised to spread globally. May 27, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

346

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Number: Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 $2,550,203 FY2009 $39,646,446 FY2010 $64,874,187 FY2011 $66,253,207 FY2012 $41,492,503 FY2013 $0 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 Cumulative Fee Earned $214,816,546 Fee Available $2,550,203 Minimum Fee $77,931,569 $69,660,249 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC $458,687,779 $0 Maximum Fee Fee Information $88,851,963 EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office, Aiken, SC Contract Name: Management & Operating Contract September 2013 DE-AC09-08SR22470

347

Entanglement Distillation Protocols and Number Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the analysis of entanglement distillation protocols for qudits of arbitrary dimension $D$ benefits from applying basic concepts from number theory, since the set $\\zdn$ associated to Bell diagonal states is a module rather than a vector space. We find that a partition of $\\zdn$ into divisor classes characterizes the invariant properties of mixed Bell diagonal states under local permutations. We construct a very general class of recursion protocols by means of unitary operations implementing these local permutations. We study these distillation protocols depending on whether we use twirling operations in the intermediate steps or not, and we study them both analitically and numerically with Monte Carlo methods. In the absence of twirling operations, we construct extensions of the quantum privacy algorithms valid for secure communications with qudits of any dimension $D$. When $D$ is a prime number, we show that distillation protocols are optimal both qualitatively and quantitatively.

H. Bombin; M. A. Martin-Delgado

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Entanglement distillation protocols and number theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that the analysis of entanglement distillation protocols for qudits of arbitrary dimension D benefits from applying basic concepts from number theory, since the set Z{sub D}{sup n} associated with Bell diagonal states is a module rather than a vector space. We find that a partition of Z{sub D}{sup n} into divisor classes characterizes the invariant properties of mixed Bell diagonal states under local permutations. We construct a very general class of recursion protocols by means of unitary operations implementing these local permutations. We study these distillation protocols depending on whether we use twirling operations in the intermediate steps or not, and we study them both analytically and numerically with Monte Carlo methods. In the absence of twirling operations, we construct extensions of the quantum privacy algorithms valid for secure communications with qudits of any dimension D. When D is a prime number, we show that distillation protocols are optimal both qualitatively and quantitatively.

Bombin, H.; Martin-Delgado, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica I, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Advanced Mass Calibration and Visualization for FT-ICR Mass Spectromet...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Abstract: Mass spectrometry imaging by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) yields hundreds of unique peaks, many of which...

350

W Boson Mass Working Group Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The W boson mass working group discussed the current status of the W boson mass measurement and the prospects for improving on LEP and Tevatron measurements at the LHC.

Kilgore, W.; Kilgore, W.

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

351

Testing Radiative Neutrino Mass Models at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Hadron Collider provides us new opportunities to search for the origin of neutrino mass. Beyond the minimal see-saw models a plethora of models exist which realise neutrino mass at tree- or loop-level, and it is important to be sure that these possibilities are satisfactorily covered by searches. The purpose of this paper is to advance a systematic approach to this problem. Majorana neutrino mass models can be organised by SM-gauge-invariant operators which violate lepton number by two units. In this paper we write down the minimal ultraviolet completions for all of the mass-dimension 7 operators. We predict vector-like quarks, vector-like leptons, scalar leptoquarks, a charged scalar, and a scalar doublet, whose properties are constrained by neutrino oscillation data. A detailed collider study is presented for $O_3=LLQ\\bar dH$ and $O_8 = L\\bar d\\bar e^\\dagger \\bar u^\\dagger H$ completions with a vector-like quark $\\chi\\sim(3, 2, -\\frac{5}{6})$ and a leptoquark $\\phi\\sim(\\bar 3,1,\\frac{1}{3})$. The existing LHC limits extracted from searches for vector-like fermions and sbottoms/stops are $m_\\chi \\gtrsim 620$ GeV and $m_\\phi\\gtrsim 600$ GeV.

Yi Cai; Jackson D. Clarke; Michael A. Schmidt; Raymond R. Volkas

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

352

Case Numbers: TBH-0063, TBZ-0063  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 21, 2008 May 21, 2008 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Motion To Dismiss Name of Case: Richard L. Urie Dates of Filing: May 15, 2007 July 19, 2007 Case Numbers: TBH-0063 TBZ-0063 This Decision concerns a Complaint filed by Richard L. Urie (hereinafter referred to as "Mr. Urie" or "the Complainant") against Los Alamos National Laboratory (hereinafter referred to as "LANL" or "the Respondent"), his former employer, under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor

353

On real number labelings and graph invertibility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For non-negative real x"0 and simple graph G, @l"x"""0","1(G) is the minimum span over all labelings that assign real numbers to the vertices of G such that adjacent vertices receive labels that differ by at least x"0 and vertices at distance two receive ... Keywords: ?-invertible, ?j,k-labeling, ?x,1-labeling, Distance-constrained labeling, Kneser graphs, Self-complementary graphs

Jeong-Ok Choi; John Georges; David Mauro; Yan Wang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Laser interrogation of latent vehicle registration number  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent investigation involved automobile registration numbers as important evidentiary specimens. In California, as in most states, small, thin metallic decals are issued to owners of vehicles each year as the registration is renewed. The decals are applied directly to the license plate of the vehicle and typically on top of the previous year`s expired decal. To afford some degree of security, the individual registration decals have been designed to tear easily; they cannot be separated from each other, but can be carefully removed intact from the metal license plate by using a razor blade. In September 1993, the City of Livermore Police Department obtained a blue 1993 California decal that had been placed over an orange 1992 decal. The two decals were being investigated as possible evidence in a case involving vehicle registration fraud. To confirm the suspicion and implicate a suspect, the department needed to known the registration number on the bottom (completely covered) 1992 decal. The authors attempted to use intense and directed light to interrogate the colored stickers. Optical illumination using a filtered white-light source partially identified the latent number. However, the most successful technique used a tunable dye laser pumped by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. By selectively tuning the wavelength and intensity of the dye laser, backlit illumination of the decals permitted visualization of the underlying registration number through the surface of the top sticker. With optimally-tuned wavelength and intensity, 100% accuracy was obtained in identifying the sequence of latent characters. The advantage of optical techniques is their completely nondestructive nature, thus preserving the evidence for further interrogation or courtroom presentation.

Russo, R.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Forensic Science Center; Pelkey, G.E. [City of Livermore Police Dept., CA (United States); Grant, P.; Whipple, R.E.; Andresen, B.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Forensic Science Center

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Texas Rice, Volume VII, Number 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas April 2007 Volume VII Number 2 Texas Rice Latest News on the Farm Bill continued on page 6 Agriculture Secretary, Mike Johanns, appears... News on the Farm Bill Welcome to the latest edition of Texas Rice. The 2007 crop season is starting off very slow. Unseasonably cool weather, combined with continuing damp conditions, has greatly delayed plantings. Many of the fields that were...

356

Winding number versus Chern--Pontryagin charge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the usual d dimensional SO(d) gauged Higgs models with $d$-component Higgs fields, the 'energies' of the topologically stable solitons are bounded from below by the Chern-Pontryagin charges. A new class of Higgs models is proposed here, whose 'energies' are stabilised instead by the winding number of the Higgs field itself, with no reference to the gauge group. Consequently, such Higgs models can be gauged by SO(N), with 2 \\le N \\le d.

Tigran Tchrakian

2002-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

357

Electroweak strings, zero modes and baryon number  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Dirac equations for leptons and quarks in the background of an electroweak Zstring have zero mode solutions. If two loops of electroweak string are linked, the zero modes on one of the loops interacts with the other loop via an Aharanov-Bohm interaction. The effects of this interaction are briefly discussed and it is shown that the fermions induce a baryon number on linked loops of Zstring.

Tanmay Vachaspati

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

MEASURING THE ULTIMATE HALO MASS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS: REDSHIFTS AND MASS PROFILES FROM THE HECTOSPEC CLUSTER SURVEY (HeCS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The infall regions of galaxy clusters represent the largest gravitationally bound structures in a {Lambda}CDM universe. Measuring cluster mass profiles into the infall regions provides an estimate of the ultimate mass of these halos. We use the caustic technique to measure cluster mass profiles from galaxy redshifts obtained with the Hectospec Cluster Survey (HeCS), an extensive spectroscopic survey of galaxy clusters with MMT/Hectospec. We survey 58 clusters selected by X-ray flux at 0.1 < z < 0.3. The survey includes 22,680 unique MMT/Hectospec redshifts for individual galaxies; 10,145 of these galaxies are cluster members. For each cluster, we acquired high signal-to-noise spectra for {approx}200 cluster members and a comparable number of foreground/background galaxies. The cluster members trace out infall patterns around the clusters. The members define a very narrow red sequence. We demonstrate that the determination of velocity dispersion is insensitive to the inclusion of bluer members (a small fraction of the cluster population). We apply the caustic technique to define membership and estimate the mass profiles to large radii. The ultimate halo mass of clusters (the mass that remains bound in the far future of a {Lambda}CDM universe) is on average (1.99 {+-} 0.11)M{sub 200}, a new observational cosmological test in essential agreement with simulations. Summed profiles binned in M{sub 200} and in L{sub X} demonstrate that the predicted Navarro-Frenk-White form of the density profile is a remarkably good representation of the data in agreement with weak lensing results extending to large radius. The concentration of these summed profiles is also consistent with theoretical predictions.

Rines, Kenneth [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States); Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Diaferio, Antonaldo, E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu, E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Torino, Torino (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Torino, Torino (Italy)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

359

THE OVERDENSITY AND MASSES OF THE FRIENDS-OF-FRIENDS HALOS AND UNIVERSALITY OF HALO MASS FUNCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The friends-of-friends algorithm (hereafter FOF) is a percolation algorithm which is routinely used to identify dark matter halos from N-body simulations. We use results from percolation theory to show that the boundary of FOF halos does not correspond to a single density threshold but to a range of densities close to a critical value that depends upon the linking length parameter, b. We show that for the commonly used choice of b = 0.2, this critical density is equal to 81.62 times the mean matter density. Consequently, halos identified by the FOF algorithm enclose an average overdensity which depends on their density profile (concentration) and therefore changes with halo mass, contrary to the popular belief that the average overdensity is {approx}180. We derive an analytical expression for the overdensity as a function of the linking length parameter b and the concentration of the halo. Results of tests carried out using simulated and actual FOF halos identified in cosmological simulations show excellent agreement with our analytical prediction. We also find that the mass of the halo that the FOF algorithm selects crucially depends upon mass resolution. We find a percolation-theory-motivated formula that is able to accurately correct for the dependence on number of particles for the mock realizations of spherical and triaxial Navarro-Frenk-White halos. However, we show that this correction breaks down when applied to the real cosmological FOF halos due to the presence of substructures. Given that abundance of substructure depends on redshift and cosmology, we expect that the resolution effects due to substructure on the FOF mass and halo mass function will also depend on redshift and cosmology and will be difficult to correct for in general. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the universality of the mass function.

More, Surhud; Kravtsov, Andrey V. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Dalal, Neal [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H8 (Canada); Gottloeber, Stefan, E-mail: surhud@kicp.uchicago.edu [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Property:PhoneNumber | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PhoneNumber PhoneNumber Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "PhoneNumber" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1st Light Energy, Inc. + 209-824-5500 + 2 21-Century Silicon, Inc. + 972-591-0713 + 3 3Degrees + 415.449.0500 + 3M + 1-888-364-3577 + 4 4C Offshore Limited + +44 (0)1502 509260 + 4th Day Energy + 877-484-3291 + @ @Ventures (California) + (650) 322-3246 + @Ventures (Massachusetts) + (978) 658-8980 + A A.J. Rose Manufacturing Company + 440-934-2859 + A.O. Smith + 414-359-4000 + A1 Sun, Inc. + (510) 526-5715 + A10 Power + 415-729-4A10 or 415-729-4210 + ABC Solar, Inc. + 1-866-40-SOLAR + ABS Alaskan Inc + (800) 235-0689 + ACME solar works + 877-226-3004 + ACORE + 202-393-0001 +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Tidal Love Numbers of Neutron Stars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a variety of fully relativistic polytropic neutron star models we calculate the star's tidal Love number k{sub 2}. Most realistic equations of state for neutron stars can be approximated as a polytrope with an effective index n {approx} 0.5-1.0. The equilibrium stellar model is obtained by numerical integration of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkhov equations. We calculate the linear l = 2 static perturbations to the Schwarzschild spacetime following the method of Thorne and Campolattaro. Combining the perturbed Einstein equations into a single second-order differential equation for the perturbation to the metric coefficient g{sub tt} and matching the exterior solution to the asymptotic expansion of the metric in the star's local asymptotic rest frame gives the Love number. Our results agree well with the Newtonian results in the weak field limit. The fully relativistic values differ from the Newtonian values by up to {approx}24%. The Love number is potentially measurable in gravitational wave signals from inspiralling binary neutron stars.

Hinderer, Tanja [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)], E-mail: tph25@cornell.edu

2008-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

362

Practical Considerations in Realizing a Magnetic C entrifugal Mass Filter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Magnetic Centrifugal Mass Filter concept represents a variation on the plasma centrifuge, with applications that are particularly promising for high-throughput separation of ions with large mass differences. A number of considerations, however, constrain the parameter space in which this device operates best. The rotation speed, magnetic field intensity and ion temperature are constrained by the ion confinement requirements. Collisions must also be large enough to eject ions, but small enough not to eject them too quickly. The existence of favorable regimes meeting these constraints is demonstrated by a single-particle orbit code. As an example of interest, it is shown that separation factors of about 2:3 are achievable in a single pass when separating Aluminum from Strontium ions

Renaud Gueroult and Nathaniel J. Fisch

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

363

Coulomb crystal mass spectrometry in a digital ion trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a mass spectrometric technique for identifying the masses and relative abundances of Coulomb-crystallized ions held in a linear Paul trap. A digital radiofrequency waveform is employed to generate the trapping potential, as this can be cleanly switched off, and static dipolar fields subsequently applied to the trap electrodes for ion ejection. Excellent detection efficiency is demonstrated for Ca+ and CaF+ ions from bi-component Ca+/CaF+ Coulomb crystals prepared by reaction of Ca+ with CH3F. A quantitative linear relationship is observed between ion number and the corresponding integrated TOF peak, independent of the ionic species. The technique is applicable to a diverse range of multi-component Coulomb crystals - demonstrated here for Ca+/NH3+/NH4+ and Ca+/CaOH+/CaOD+ crystals - and will facilitate the measurement of ion-molecule reaction rates and branching ratios in complicated reaction systems.

Deb, Nabanita; Smith, Alexander D; Keller, Matthias; Rennick, Christopher J; Heazlewood, Brianna R; Softley, Timothy P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Mass Transfer Model for a Breached Waste Package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The degradation of waste packages, which are used for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in the repository, can result in configurations that may increase the probability of criticality. A mass transfer model is developed for a breached waste package to account for the entrainment of insoluble particles. In combination with radionuclide decay, soluble advection, and colloidal transport, a complete mass balance of nuclides in the waste package becomes available. The entrainment equations are derived from dimensionless parameters such as drag coefficient and Reynolds number and based on the assumption that insoluble particles are subjected to buoyant force, gravitational force, and drag force only. Particle size distributions are utilized to calculate entrainment concentration along with geochemistry model abstraction to calculate soluble concentration, and colloid model abstraction to calculate colloid concentration and radionuclide sorption. Results are compared with base case geochemistry model, which only considers soluble advection loss.

C. Hsu; J. McClure

2004-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

365

Practical considerations in realizing a magnetic centrifugal mass filter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetic centrifugal mass filter concept represents a variation on the plasma centrifuge, with applications that are particularly promising for high-throughput separation of ions with large mass differences. A number of considerations, however, constrain the parameter space in which this device operates best. The rotation speed, magnetic field intensity, and ion temperature are constrained by the ion confinement requirements. Collisions must also be large enough to eject ions, but small enough not to eject them too quickly. The existence of favorable regimes meeting these constraints is demonstrated by a single-particle orbit code. As an example of interest, it is shown that separation factors of about 2.3 are achievable in a single pass when separating Aluminum from Strontium ions.

Gueroult, Renaud; Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Grand Unified Yukawa Matrix Ansatz: The Standard Model Fermion Mass, Quark Mixing and CP Violation Parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new mass matrix ansatz: At the grand unified (GU) scale, the standard model (SM) Yukawa coupling matrix elements are integer powers of the square root of the GU gauge coupling constant \\varepsilon \\equiv \\sqrt{\\alpha_{\\text{GU}}}, multiplied by order unity random complex numbers. It relates the hierarchy of the SM ermion masses and quark mixings to the gauge coupling constants, greatly reducing the SM parameters, and can give good fitting results of the SM fermion mass, quark mixing and CP violation parameters. This is a neat but very effective ansatz.

Yong-Chao Zhang; De-Hai Zhang

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

367

Mass spectrometry: analytical capabilities and potentials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...INSULIN AND OTHER LARGE PEPTIDES, JOURNAL...MASS-SPECTROMETRY OF LARGE, FRAGILE, AND INVOLATILE...APPLICATIONS IN THE AREA OF MOLECULAR MODIFICATIONS...I-127-LABELED PLASMA DESORPTION MASS-SPECTROMETRY...PIONEER VENUS LARGE PROBE NEUTRAL MASS-SPECTROMETER...HORNING, E.C., ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE IONIZATION...

RG Cooks; KL Busch; GL Glish

1983-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

368

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M be a smooth connected compact surface), as the minimum of the lengths of the curves (drawn on M) joining x to y. Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation

Rifford, Ludovic

369

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis & Institut Universitaire de France UPV/EHU Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;Transport maps Let µ0 and µ1 be probability measures on M. We

Rifford, Ludovic

370

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e Nice - Sophia Antipolis & Institut Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M be a smooth connected compact surface in Rn of the lengths of the curves (drawn on M) joining x to y. Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12

Rifford, Ludovic

371

What is Special About the Planck Mass?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planck introduced his famous units of mass, length and time a hundred years ago. The many interesting facets of the Planck mass and length are explored. The Planck mass ubiquitously occurs in astrophysics, cosmology, quantum gravity, string theory, etc. Current aspects of its implications for unification of fundamental interactions, energy dependence of coupling constants, dark energy, etc. are discussed.

C. Sivaram

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

Chastagner, P.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Interfacing Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......an active area of 1 to 2...of a known thermal sensitivity...interfacing is the large unbalance...pressure, an atmospheric pressure...to the ion plasma by a stream...occur in the atmospheric pres- sure...in the ion plasma and compete...doubtful that non-volatile...seldom a large number...work in this area using a variety...operated with RF only. The......

William H. McFadden

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

CHAPTER XVIII - INDEX-NUMBERS OF PRICES PRICE INDEX-NUMBERS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter provides an overview of index numbers. If a term is expressed in a statistical series comparing similar events at different times or in different places as a relative number to another term, called the base, of the same series one obtains an index number of the simplest form. If the terms of a series of prices of a given commodity are expressed as ratio to a fixed base and a number of such series are combined into a group, a frequency distribution is obtained. The first purpose of constructing price index numbers was the measurement of changes in the purchasing power of money considered as a reciprocal of the general price level. Another purpose of constructing price index numbers is the splitting of changes in aggregate values into their price and quantity components. While it is easy to split changes in aggregate values into price changes and quantity changes in the case of a single commodity, it is extremely difficult to do so in the case of a group of commodities. Theoretically, six fundamental types of price index numbers may be distinguished.

ISAAC PAENSON

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

TTRDC - Publications - Transforum Volume 11 Number 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Battery Technology Helps Power Chevy Volt Battery Technology Helps Power Chevy Volt Volt The 2011 Chevy Volt's 16 kWh battery can be recharged using a 120V or 240V outlet. Image courtesy of General Motors. View larger image. When General Motors recently introduced the Chevy Volt as the first mass-produced, plug-in hybrid electric car, it was widely viewed as a technological marvel. In addition to the car's unique engineering, it has a battery that lasts longer, runs more safely and performs better than other batteries currently on the market. This novel battery chemistry is based in part on a revolutionary breakthrough pioneered by scientists at Argonne National Laboratory. "Existing materials weren't good enough for a long-range vehicle," explained Michael Thackeray, an Argonne Distinguished Fellow who is one of

376

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

377

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

378

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

379

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

380

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

382

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

383

Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

72 Federal Register 72 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 181 / Wednesday, September 18, 2013 / Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 10,128. Abstract: Enrollment in the Federal Student Aid (FSA) Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) allows eligible entities to securely exchange Title IV, Higher Education Act (HEA) assistance programs data electronically with the Department of Education processors. Organizations establish Destination Point Administrators (DPAs) to transmit, receive, view and update student financial aid records using telecommunication software. Eligible respondents include the following, but are not limited to, institutions of higher education that participate in Title IV, HEA assistance programs, third-party servicers of eligible institutions,

384

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

385

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

386

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

387

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

388

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

389

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

390

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

391

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

392

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

393

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

394

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

395

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

396

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

397

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

398

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

399

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

400

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly, Volume 2, Number 1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 * May 2012 1 * May 2012 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 2, Number 1 Inside this Issue 2 LANL and ANL Complete Groundbreaking Shock Experiments at the Advanced Photon Source 3 Characterization of Activity-Size-Distribution of Nuclear Fallout 5 Modeling Mix in High-Energy-Density Plasma 6 Quality Input for Microscopic Fission Theory 8 Fiber Reinforced Composites Under Pressure: A Case Study in Non-hydrostatic Behavior in the Diamond Anvil Cell 8 Emission of Shocked Inhomogeneous Materials 9 2012 NNSA Stewardship Science Academic

402

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

403

Number Suppletion in North American Indian Languages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been elimina ted from consideration. A total of 32 languages from 13 distinct genetic groupings were found to have suppletive verbs marking ergative plurality, i.e. the suppletive verb form cross-references the number of the subject of an intransitive... cry, die carry, put, stand throw sit go, run handle, put down lie, sit, fall, run stand lie, sit, float/glide carry, give, stand run/fly, put swim, turn, walk/go be locat- .arrive , be little die ed, lie, return sit,stand lie, sit falloff big, long...

Booker, Karen M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Texas Rice, Volume VII, Number 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas September 2007 Volume VII Number 7 Texas Rice Nobel Peace Prize Recipient Dr. Norman Borlaug continued on page 4 September of 2003 was a time etched... Tabien, and Dr. Lee Tarpley. Four years ago this month, the Texas A&M Research and Exten- sion Center at Beaumont was hon- ored to welcome one of the most influential people in agriculture. Nobel Peace Prize recipient, Dr. Norman Borlaug, has a long...

405

The New Element Berkelium (Atomic Number 97)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

An isotope of the element with atomic number 97 has been discovered as a product of the helium-ion bombardment of americium. The name berkelium, symbol Bk, is proposed for element 97. The chemical separation of element 97 from the target material and other reaction products was made by combinations of precipitation and ion exchange adsorption methods making use of its anticipated (III) and (IV) oxidation states and its position as a member of the actinide transition series. The distinctive chemical properties made use of in its separation and the equally distinctive decay properties of the particular isotope constitute the principal evidence for the new element.

Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Ghiorso, A.

1950-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

406

Probing Dark Energy with Neutrino Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the effective number of neutrino is found to be close to the standard model value Neff = 3.046 for the \\LambdaCDM cosmology. One can obtain the same CMB angular power spectrum as that of \\LambdaCDM for the different value of Neff by using the different dark energy model (i.e. for the different value of w). This degeneracy between Neff and w in CMB can be broken from future galaxy survey using the matter power spectrum.

Seokcheon Lee

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

407

Probing Dark Energy with Neutrino Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the effective number of neutrino is found to be close to the standard model value Neff = 3.046 for the \\LambdaCDM cosmology. One can obtain the same CMB angular power spectrum as that of \\LambdaCDM for the different value of Neff by using the different dark energy model (i.e. for the different value of w). This degeneracy between Neff and w in CMB can be broken from future galaxy survey using the matter power spectrum.

Lee, Seokcheon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

409

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

410

Moving mass trim control system design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the design of a moving mass trim control system for maneuvering axisymmetric reentry vehicles. The moving mass trim controller is composed of three equal masses that are independently positioned in order to deliver a desired center of mass position. For a slowly spinning reentry vehicle, the mass offset creates a trim angle-of-attack to generate modest flight path corrections. The control system must maintain the desired position of each mass in the face of large disturbances. A novel algorithm for determining the desired mass positions is developed in conjunction with a preliminary controller design. The controller design is based on classical frequency domain techniques where a bound on the disturbance magnitude is used to formulate the disturbance rejection problem. Simulation results for the controller are presented for a typical reentry vehicle.

Byrne, R.H.; Robinett, R.D.; Sturgis, B.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

412

Determination of the effective atomic and mass numbers for mixture and compound materials in high energy photon interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In consideration the radiological properties of materials and studying the scattering processes in atomic ... have been calculated for any mixed or composite materials in interaction with high energy photons (Lin...

Mohamad Javad Tahmasebi Birgani

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Comparison of Pseudorandom Numbers Generators and Chaotic Numbers Generators used in Differential Evolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Differential evolution is one of the great family of evolutionary algorithms. As well as all evolutionary algorithms differential evolution uses pseudorandom numbers generators in many steps of algorithm. In this...

Lenka Skanderova; Adam ?eho?

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Integrality of L2-Betti numbers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Atiyah conjecture predicts that the L2-Betti numbers of a finite CW-complex with torsion-free fundamental group are integers. We show that the Atiyah conjecture holds (with an additional technical condition) for direct and inverse limits of directed systems of groups for which it is true. As a corollary it holds for residually torsion-free solvable groups, e.g. for pure braid groups or for positive 1-relator groups with torsion free abelianization. Putting everything together we establish a new class of groups for which the Atiyah conjecture holds, which contains all free groups and in particular is closed under taking subgroups, direct sums, free products, extensions with elementary amenable quotient, and under direct and inverse limits of directed systems. This is a corrected version of an older paper with the same title. The proof of Proposition 2.1 of the earlier version contains a gap, as was pointed out to me by Pere Ara. This gap could not be fixed. Consequently, in this new version everything based on this result had to be removed. Please take the errata to "L2-determinant class and approximation of L2-Betti numbers" into account, which are added, rectifying some unproved statements about "amenable extension". As a consequence, throughout, amenable extensions should be extensions with normal subgroups.

Thomas Schick (Georg-August-Universitt Gttingen).; Muenster; Preprint No. 73.; no. 4; 727--750. and Math. Ann. 322 (2002); no. 2; 421--422

415

Matter Waves and Orbital Quantum Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The atom's orbital electron structure in terms of quantum numbers (principal, azimuthal, magnetic and spin) results in space for a maximum of: 2 electrons in the n=1 orbit, 8 electrons in the n=2 orbit, 18 electrons in the n=3 orbit, and so on. Those dispositions are correct, but that is not because of quantum numbers nor angular momentum nor a "Pauli exclusion principle". Matter waves were discovered in the early 20th century from their wavelength, which was predicted by DeBroglie to be, Planck's constant divided by the particle's momentum. But, the failure to obtain a reasonable theory for the matter wave frequency resulted in loss of interest. That problem is resolved in "A Reconsideration of Matter Waves" in which a reinterpretation of Einstein's derivation of relativistic kinetic energy [which produced his famous E = mc^2] leads to a valid matter wave frequency and a new understanding of particle kinetics and the atom's stable orbits. It is analytically shown that the orbital electron arrangement is enforced by the necessity of accommodating the space that each orbiting electron's matter wave occupies.

Roger Ellman

2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

416

U.S. Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S. Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 62 63 59 63 58 61 59 63 62 65 2001 61 61 63 65 64 60 58 56 54 58 59 58 2002 54 57 54 50 51 50 52 50 56 57 50 43 2003 40 41 41 40 38 39 41 43 39 39 38 42 2004 43 45 45 45 44 49 48 49 48 48 49 50 2005 52 53 51 50 55 57 54 55 56 57 57 58 2006 55 57 59 58 58 57 66 62 63 64 65 64 2007 63 63 68 71 70 69 69 71 73 77 79 75 2008 76 77 75 72 73 73 72 72 NA 77 72 73 2009 75 76 72 70 65 60 61 60 60 63 62 63 2010 64 65 63 66 67 67 67 65 64 62 62 62

417

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

418

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

419

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

420

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

422

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

423

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

424

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

425

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

426

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

427

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

428

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

429

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

430

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

431

MEASURING THE MASS DISTRIBUTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cluster mass profiles are tests of models of structure formation. Only two current observational methods of determining the mass profile, gravitational lensing, and the caustic technique are independent of the assumption of dynamical equilibrium. Both techniques enable the determination of the extended mass profile at radii beyond the virial radius. For 19 clusters, we compare the mass profile based on the caustic technique with weak lensing measurements taken from the literature. This comparison offers a test of systematic issues in both techniques. Around the virial radius, the two methods of mass estimation agree to within {approx}30%, consistent with the expected errors in the individual techniques. At small radii, the caustic technique overestimates the mass as expected from numerical simulations. The ratio between the lensing profile and the caustic mass profile at these radii suggests that the weak lensing profiles are a good representation of the true mass profile. At radii larger than the virial radius, the extrapolated Navarro, Frenk and White fit to the lensing mass profile exceeds the caustic mass profile. Contamination of the lensing profile by unrelated structures within the lensing kernel may be an issue in some cases; we highlight the clusters MS0906+11 and A750, superposed along the line of sight, to illustrate the potential seriousness of contamination of the weak lensing signal by these unrelated structures.

Geller, Margaret J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Diaferio, Antonaldo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Rines, Kenneth J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States); Serra, Ana Laura, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it, E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu, E-mail: serra@to.infn.it [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, via Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

432

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as...

433

Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Abstract: Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power...

434

Time of Flight Secondary Ion (TOF SIMS) Mass Spectrometer | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(TOF SIMS) Mass Spectrometer Time of Flight Secondary Ion (TOF SIMS) Mass Spectrometer The Physical Electronics Instruments (PHI) Model T2100 time-of-flight secondary ion mass...

435

A Variable flavor number scheme at NNLO.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.e. second order in ?S, there is much more complication f n f +1i (Q2) = ( ?S 4pi )2 ? i j (A2,0i j +A 2,1 i j ln(Q2/m2H)+A2,2i j ln2(Q2/m2H))? f n f j (Q2), Evolution of NNLO Fc2(x,Q2) -0.2 0 0.2 0.4 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 20Q2 Fc 2 (x, Q2 ) x=0.00003 x=0.001 x... =0.012 x=0.1 Evolution of NNLO F2(x,Q2) 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 20Q2 F 2 (x, Q2 ) x=0.00003 x=0.001 x=0.012 x=0.1 FIGURE 1. NNLO Fc2 (x,Q2) and F2(x,Q2) in zero-mass VFNS where A2,0i j is generally non-zero [2]. There is no longer a...

Thorne, Robert S

436

Case Numbers: TBH-0098, TBZ-0098  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 9, 2010 November 9, 2010 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Motion to Dismiss Initial Agency Decision Names of Petitioners: Mark D. Siciliano Battelle Energy Alliance LLC Dates of Filings: March 15, 2010 August 16, 2010 Case Numbers: TBH-0098 TBZ-0098 This Decision will consider a Motion to Dismiss filed by Battelle Energy Alliance LLC (Battelle), the Management and Operating Contractor for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in connection with the pending Complaint of Retaliation filed by Mark Siciliano against Battelle under the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program and its governing regulations set forth at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The Office of Hearings and Appeals

437

Case Numbers: TBH-0073, TBH-0075  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2008 9, 2008 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Names of Petitioners: Jonathan K. Strausbaugh Richard L. Rieckenberg Date of Filing: February 1, 2008 Case Numbers: TBH-0073 TBH-0075 This Initial Agency Decision involves two whistleblower complaints, one filed by Jonathan K. Strausbaugh (Case No. TBH-0073) and the other filed by Richard L. Rieckenberg (Case No. TBH-0075) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Both complainants were employees of KSL Services, Inc. ("KSL" or "the contractor"), a contractor providing technical services on the site of the DOE Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico, where they were employed until June 14, 2007. In their respective

438

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

439

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

440

Case Numbers: TBH-0080, TBZ-0080  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7, 2009 7, 2009 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Order to Show Cause Motion for Summary Judgment Initial Agency Decision Name of Cases: Billy Joe Baptist Dates of Filing: December 19, 2008 February 18, 2009 Case Numbers: TBH-0080 TBZ-0080 This decision will consider an Order to Show Cause that I issued on February 3, 2009, regarding a March 6, 2008, whistleblower complaint filed by Billy Joe Baptist (Baptist) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708, against his employer, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI). I will also consider in this decision as a Motion for Summary Judgment that CWI filed on February 18, 2009 regarding this complaint. Pursuant to Part 708, an OHA attorney conducted an investigation of Baptist's whistleblower

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

442

Climate Zone Number 5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 5 is defined as Cool- Humid(5A) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 Dry(5B) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 Marine(5C) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 . The following places are categorized as class 5 climate zones: Ada County, Idaho Adair County, Iowa Adair County, Missouri Adams County, Colorado Adams County, Illinois Adams County, Indiana Adams County, Iowa Adams County, Nebraska Adams County, Pennsylvania Adams County, Washington Albany County, New York Allegan County, Michigan Alleghany County, North Carolina

443

Case Numbers: TBD-0073, TBD-0075  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

16, 2008 16, 2008 DECISION AND ORDER OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Motion to Compel Discovery Case Names: Jonathan K. Strausbaugh Richard L. Rieckenberg Date of Filing: April 2, 2008 Case Numbers: TBD-0073 TBD-0075 Pending before me is a consolidated Motion to Compel Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) on behalf of Jonathan K. Strausbaugh and Richard L. Rieckenberg (the complainants) by their attorney. This Motion relates to a hearing requested by the complainants under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708), in connection with the Part 708 complaints they filed against KSL Services, Inc. (KSL). The OHA has assigned Mr. Strausbaugh's and Mr. Rieckenberg's hearing

444

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

445

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

446

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

447

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

448

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

449

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

450

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

451

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

452

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

453

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

454

Title, Location, Document Number Estimated Cost Description  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moody to Lev, SUBJECT: NEPA 2012 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: JAN 25 2012 Moody to Lev, SUBJECT: NEPA 2012 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: JAN 25 2012 Title, Location, Document Number Estimated Cost Description EA Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain EA Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain Total Estimated Cost $65,000 Annual NEPA Planning Summary NEPA Reviews of Proposals to Implement Enterprise SRS Initiatives unknown The Savannah River Site Strategic Plan for 2011 - 2015 describes 12 initiatives that Enterprise SRS will pursue by applying SRS's management core competencies in nuclear materials. Implementation of new missions resulting from this effort will likely require NEPA review. However, until firm proposals are developed

455

Case Numbers: TBH-0087, TBZ-0087  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 22, 2010 January 22, 2010 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Motion to Dismiss Name of Case: David P. Sanchez Dates of Filing: October 30, 2009 December 21, 2009 Case Numbers: TBH-0087 TBZ-0087 This Decision will consider a Motion to Dismiss filed by Los Alamos National Laboratory ("LANL" or "the Respondent"). LANL seeks dismissal of a pending complaint filed by David P. Sanchez ("Mr. Sanchez" or "the Complainant") against his employer, Los Alamos National Security, L. L. C. ("LANS"), 1 on October 30, 2009, under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, set for that 10 C.F.R. Part 708. OHA has assigned Mr. Sanchez' hearing request Case No. TBH-0087, and the present Motion to Dismiss Case No.

456

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

457

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804

458

Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Version No: 2013.01 Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: http://www.eia.gov/survey/form/eia_14/instructions.pdf Mailing Address: Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/noticeoog.jsp Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Zip Code - Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov - - - - Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey Email address: U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 PADD 4 Type of Report (Check One ): (Thousands of dollars) (Thousands of barrels) PADD 2 PADD 3 PAD DISTRICT (a) Revision to Report:

459

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,178 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 244,826 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,290 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 Total................................................................... 281,117 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 Repressuring ...................................................... 563 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 Wet After Lease Separation................................

460

Pseudo winding numbers and the spherical ansatz  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The path-dependent surface/time integral contribution to the topological charge in an SO(3) Yang - Mills theory is studied for paths in field space that interpolate between a background gauge field in the remote past and a gauge transform of it in the remote future. The possibility of existence of such paths along which this integral vanishes for a given initial background gauge field is related to the action of the group of gauge transformations of real, pseudo winding numbers on the physical states of the theory in the background gauge field. The analysis takes a particularly transparent form for the spherically-symmetric fields of the spherical ansatz, leading to a simple interpretation of the results.

Ahmed Abouelsaood

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 241,776 224,560 224,112 194,121 212,276 From Oil Wells.................................................. 60,444 56,140 56,028 48,530 53,069 Total................................................................... 302,220 280,700 280,140 242,651 265,345 Repressuring ...................................................... 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 Wet After Lease Separation................................

462

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

463

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 98,551 97,272 97,154 87,993 85,018 From Oil Wells.................................................. 6,574 2,835 6,004 5,647 5,458 Total................................................................... 105,125 100,107 103,158 93,641 90,476 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 105,125 100,107 103,158

464

Fact #857 January 26, 2015 Number of Partner Workplaces Offering...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

7 January 26, 2015 Number of Partner Workplaces Offering Electric Vehicle Charging More Than Tripled Since 2011 Fact 857 January 26, 2015 Number of Partner Workplaces Offering...

465

,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other",,,"All Technologies" ,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back...

466

T-705: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates Packet Injection Attacks T-705: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates Packet Injection...

467

RETIRED A STARS: THE EFFECT OF STELLAR EVOLUTION ON THE MASS ESTIMATES OF SUBGIANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Doppler surveys have shown that the occurrence rate of Jupiter-mass planets appears to increase as a function of stellar mass. However, this result depends on the ability to accurately measure the masses of evolved stars. Recently, Lloyd called into question the masses of subgiant stars targeted by Doppler surveys. Lloyd argues that very few observable subgiants have masses greater than 1.5 M {sub Sun }, and that most of them have masses in the range 1.0-1.2 M {sub Sun }. To investigate this claim, we use Galactic stellar population models to generate an all-sky distribution of stars. We incorporate the effects that make massive subgiants less numerous, such as the initial mass function and differences in stellar evolution timescales. We find that these effects lead to negligibly small systematic errors in stellar mass estimates, in contrast to the Almost-Equal-To 50% errors predicted by Lloyd. Additionally, our simulated target sample does in fact include a significant fraction of stars with masses greater than 1.5 M {sub Sun }, primarily because the inclusion of an apparent magnitude limit results in a Malmquist-like bias toward more massive stars, in contrast to the volume-limited simulations of Lloyd. The magnitude limit shifts the mean of our simulated distribution toward higher masses and results in a relatively smaller number of evolved stars with masses in the range 1.0-1.2 M {sub Sun }. We conclude that, within the context of our present-day understanding of stellar structure and evolution, many of the subgiants observed in Doppler surveys are indeed as massive as main-sequence A stars.

Johnson, John Asher; Morton, Timothy D. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wright, Jason T., E-mail: johnjohn@astro.caltech.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16803 (United States)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

468

Daily routines of body mass gain in birds: 2. An experiment with reduced food availability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; published online 31 July 2006; MS. number: 8608R) Theoretical models predict that small birds should adjust daily patterns of body mass gain in response to environmental and internal factors. In a companion paper, we described a model on daily fattening that allows the analysis of precise changes in the shape

Carrascal, Luis M.

469

Chemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

45 48 51 54 57 60 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) (a) as injected (b) SWIFTed (c) NO 1sChemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer S. Maruyama, M- fullerene and single walled carbon nanotubes are investigated through experimental studies of interaction

Maruyama, Shigeo

470

Compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a time-of-flight mass spectrometer developed for measuring the parameters of a pulsed hydrogen beam. The duration of an electron-beam current pulse in the ionizer of the mass spectrometer can be varied within 2-20 usec, the pulse electron current is 0.6 mA, and the electron energy is 250 eV. The time resolution of the mass spectrometer is determined by the repetition period of the electron-beam current pulses and is 40 usec. The mass spectrometer has 100% transmission in the direction of motion of molecular-beam particles. The dimension of the mass spectrometer is 7 cm in this direction. The mass resolution is sufficient for determination of the composition of the hydrogen beam.

Belov, A.S.; Kubalov, S.A.; Kuzik, V.F.; Yakushev, V.P.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

High performance ?Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT . ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS . tv LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES C~R I. INTRODUCTION tx xt A. A General Overview . 1. Particle-Induced Desorption 2. The Application of Cf PDMS in Analytical Chemistry 3. Time-of-Flight Mass... INTRODUCTION The method of 'Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry (PDMS) is a mass spectrometric method pioneered in 1974 by Macfarlane and co-workers (1) at Texas A&M University. This method uses fission fragments (highly energetic atomic ions...

McIntire, Thomas Shane

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Screening masses in thermal and dense medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Screening masses of different hadronic states are studied in thermal and dense medium on lattice. It has been found that screening masses increase with the temperature. In deconfinement phase, chemical potential enhances the screening masses. We use the normalization with respect to lowest Matsubara frequency to characterize dissolving of hadronic bound states at high temperatures. It has been found that different hadronic states have different dissolving temperatures and their survivals are considerably improved at finite chemical potentials.

A. Tawfik

2006-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

473

Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number Number Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Number" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 3 + Acadia Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 2 + Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 4 + Ada County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adair County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adair County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 4 + Adair County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 3 +

474

MASS SPECTROMETRY WITH A VERY SMALL CYCLOTRON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CALIFORNIA mm Presented at the Argonne Symposium onHigh Energy Spectrometry, Argonne NationalLaboratory, Argonne, IL, May 11-13, 1981 MASS SPECTROMETRY

Muller, R.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Ultraviolet photodissociation enhances top?down mass...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ultraviolet photodissociation enhances top-down mass spectrometry as demonstrated on green fluorescent protein variants Xibei Dang 1,2 and Nicolas L. Young 1 1 Ion Cyclotron...

476

Top Quark Mass Measurements at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the latest results on the top-quark mass and on the top-antitop mass difference from the CDF and D0 collaborations using data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We discuss general issues in top-quark mass measurements and present new results from direct measurements and from top-pair production cross-section. We also report new results on the top-antitop mass difference.

Ye, Zhenyu; /Fermilab

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Early Days of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Alvarez reviews his role in the development of the tandem Van de Graaff accelerator and the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry as a technique for isotope dating. (GHT)

Alvarez, L. W.

1981-05-00T23:59:59.000Z

478

Toward laser ablation Accelerator Mass Spectrometry of actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A project to measure neutron capture cross sections of a number of actinides in a reactor environment by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the ATLAS facility of Argonne National Laboratory is underway. This project will require the precise and accurate measurement of produced actinide isotopes in many (>30) samples irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory with neutron fluxes having different energy distributions. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highlycharged positive ions in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source followed by acceleration in the ATLAS linac and mass-to-charge (m/q) measurement at the focus of the Fragment Mass Analyzer. Laser ablation was selected as the method of feeding the actinide material into the ion source because we expect it will have higher efficiency and lower chamber contamination than either the oven or sputtering techniques, because of a much narrower angular distribution of emitted material. In addition, a new multi-sample holder/changer to allow quick change between samples and a computer-controlled routine allowing fast tuning of the accelerator for different beams, are being developed. An initial test run studying backgrounds, detector response, and accelerator scaling repeatability was conducted in December 2010. The project design, schedule, and results of the initial test run to study backgrounds are discussed.

R. C. Pardo; F. G. Kondev; S. Kondrashev; C. Nair; T. Palchan; R. Scott; D. Seweryniak; R. Vondrasek; M. Paul; P. Collon; C. Deibel; M. Salvatores; G. Palmiotti; J. Berg; J. Fonnesbeck; G. Imel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Neutrino mass hierarchy determination with IceCube-PINGU  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We discuss the neutrino mass hierarchy determination with atmospheric neutrinos in Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade, based on a simulation with the GLoBES software including the full three flavor framework and parameter degeneracy, and we compare it to long-baseline experiment options. We demonstrate that the atmospheric mass hierarchy sensitivity depends on the achievable experiment properties, and we identify the main targets for optimization, whereas the impact of a large number of tested systematical errors turns out to be small. Depending on the values of ?23, ?, and the true hierarchy, a 90%C.L. to 3? discovery after three years of operation seems conceivable. We also emphasize the synergy with existing beam and reactor experiments, driven by NO?A, such as the complementary coverage of the parameter space. Finally, we point out that a low intensity neutrino beam with a relatively short decay pipe could be used to determine the mass hierarchy with a sensitivity comparable to the LBNE experiment irrespective of the directional resolution of the detector.

Walter Winter

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

480

Multidetector calibration for mass spectrometers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency`s Safeguards Analytical Laboratory has performed calibration experiments to measure the different efficiencies among multi-Faraday detectors for a Finnigan-MAT 261 mass spectrometer. Two types of calibration experiments were performed: (1) peak-shift experiments and (2) peak-jump experiments. For peak-shift experiments, the ion intensities were measured for all isotopes of an element in different Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by shifting the isotopes to various Faraday detectors. Two different peak-shifting schemes were used to measure plutonium (UK Pu5/92138) samples. For peak-jump experiments, ion intensities were measured in a reference Faraday detector for a single isotope and compared with those measured in the other Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by switching back-and-forth between the reference Faraday detector and a selected Faraday detector. This switching procedure is repeated for all Faraday detectors. Peak-jump experiments were performed with replicate measurements of {sup 239}Pu, {sup 187}Re, and {sup 238}U. Detector efficiency factors were estimated for both peak-jump and peak-shift experiments using a flexible calibration model to statistically analyze both types of multidetector calibration experiments. Calculated detector efficiency factors were shown to depend on both the material analyzed and the experimental conditions. A single detector efficiency factor is not recommended for each detector that would be used to correct routine sample analyses. An alternative three-run peak-shift sample analysis should be considered. A statistical analysis of the data from this peak-shift experiment can adjust the isotopic ratio estimates for detector differences due to each sample analysis.

Bayne, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Donohue, D.L.; Fiedler, R. [IAEA, Seibersdorf (Austria). Safeguards Analytical Lab.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

482

Riverpoint Campus Security 358-7995 (24-hour number)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Age: Number at which call received: Time: Date: CALLER'S VOICE: Calm Nasal Angry Stutter Slow Lisp

Collins, Gary S.

483

Quantifiers for randomness of chaotic pseudo-random number generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...randomness of chaotic pseudo-random number generators L. De Micco 1 H. A. Larrondo 1...connection with pseudo-random number generators (PRNGs). Workers in the field are...notion to generate pseudo-random number generators (PRNGs) because random numbers are...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

THE DERIVED SERIES AND VIRTUAL BETTI NUMBERS SIDDHARTHA GADGIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DERIVED SERIES AND VIRTUAL BETTI NUMBERS SIDDHARTHA GADGIL Abstract. The virtual Betti number conjecture states that any hyperbolic three-manifold has a finite cover with positive first Betti number. We that the virtual Betti number conjecture would follow if it were known that the derived series of the fundamental

Gadgil, Siddhartha

485

Betti numbers in multidimensional persistent homology are stable functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Betti numbers in multidimensional persistent homology are stable functions Andrea Cerri Barbara Di can be studied through their persistent Betti numbers, i.e. the dimensions of the images of persistent Betti numbers. Varying the lower level sets, we get that persistent Betti numbers can be seen

Frosini, Patrizio

486

Von Neumann Betti numbers and Novikov type inequalities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that the Novikov inequalities for critical points of closed 1-forms hold with the von Neumann Betti numbers replacing the Novikov numbers. As a corollary we obtain a vanishing theorem for $L^2$ cohomology, generalizing a theorem of W. Lueck. We also prove that von Neumann Betti numbers coincide with the Novikov numbers for free abelian coverings.

Michael Farber

1998-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

487

"L -Betti numbers of mapping tori and groups" by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 "L -Betti numbers of mapping tori and groups-Betti numbers of a manifold fibered over S1 are trivial. Secondly, the first L2-Betti number * *of aspherical manifold M be fibered over the circle S1. Then all L2-* *Betti numbers bp(M) are trivial. Let

Lück, Wolfgang

488

FAST METHODS FOR COMPUTING ISOSURFACE TOPOLOGY WITH BETTI NUMBERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FAST METHODS FOR COMPUTING ISOSURFACE TOPOLOGY WITH BETTI NUMBERS Shirley F. Konkle University, Davis joy@cs.ucdavis.edu Keywords: Betti Numbers, Isosurface topology. Abstract Betti numbers can present a fast algorithm for the calculation of Betti numbers for triangulated isosurfaces, along

Hamann, Bernd

489

Bekenstein Bound of Information Number N and its Relation to Cosmological Parameters in a Universe with and without Cosmological Constant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bekenstein has obtained is an upper limit on the entropy S, and from that, an information number bound N is deduced. In other words, this is the information contained within a given finite region of space that includes a finite amount of energy. Similarly, this can be thought as the maximum amount of information required to perfectly describe a given physical system down to its quantum level. If the energy and the region of space are finite then the number of information N required in describing the physical system is also finite. In this short letter two information number bounds are derived and compared for two types of universe. First, a universe without a cosmological constant lamda and second a universe with a cosmological constant lamda are investigated. This is achieved with the derivation of two different relations that connect the Hubble constant and cosmological constants to the number of information N. We find that the number of information N involved in a the two universes are identical or N1=N2, and that the total mass of the universe scales as the square root of the information number N, containing an information number N of the order of 10E+122. Finally, we expressed Calogero quantization action as a function of the number of information N. We also have found that in self gravitating systems the number of information N in nats is the ratio of the total kinetic to total thermal energy of the system.

Ioannis Haranas; Ioannis Gkigkitzis

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

490

CP-violating Fritzsch mass matrices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The phase-invariant measure J of CP violation defined by Jarlskog is applied to the Fritzsch mass matrices. Given the hierarchy of masses it is shown that the phases in the matrices do not maximize J. Two recent suggestions for maximal CP violation using the Fritzsch form are compared.

Lincoln Wolfenstein

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Summerschool Modelling of Mass and Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summerschool Modelling of Mass and Energy Transport #12;Black Box Analogy )(teRi dt di L i and Energy Transport Exercise Given a flux vector approaching an oblique oriented surface element (line .constc G S dsndg *)(2 . #12;Mass and Energy Balance Continued V S dsnvudV dt d V S dsnvdV t u

Kornhuber, Ralf

492

Mass Renormalization in Nonrelativistic Quantum Electrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 572­8508, Japan Abstract The e#ective mass m e# of the the Pauli­Fierz Hamiltonain with ultraviolet electron with the bare mass m interacting with a quantized radiation field carries a virtual cloud and the quantized radiation field has an infrared cuto# # and an ultraviolet cuto# #. We are interested

493

Mass Transportation on surfaces Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mass Transportation on surfaces Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on surfaces #12;Monge quadratic transport in Rn Let µ0 and µ1 be probability measures with compact support in Rn . We call transport map from µ0 to µ1 any measurable map T : Rn Rn

Rifford, Ludovic

494

Review Paper. Neutrino masses, mixing and oscillations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...experiments on the search for neutrinoless...experiments on the search for neutrinoless...If neutrino fields enter only in the SM Lagrangians...is a neutrino mass term, which does not...i) Dirac mass term LD = - R MD L + h...Sterile fields do not enter into the standard...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Emergence String and Mass Formulas of Hadrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assume that hadrons are formed from the emergence string. Usual string should possess two moving states: oscillation and rotation, so we propose corresponding potential and the equation of the emergence string, whose energy spectrum is namely the GMO mass formula and its modified accurate mass formula. These are some relations between the string and observable experimental data.

Yi-Fang Chang

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

496

Calculation of nuclear masses using image reconstruction techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods have been developed to calculate and predict nuclear masses over the last 70 years. The accuracy of the present state-of-the-art nuclear mass models is impressive, because these quantities can be calculated with an average 0.05 % precision. However this precision level is still insufficient to deal with nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest, especially r-process ones. Different approaches exist to calculate nuclear masses, ranging from the simple Bethe-Weizsaecker Liquid Drop Formula (LDM) to the sophisticated Finite Range Droplet Model calculations or the microscopic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliuvob techniques from first principles, using Skyrme or Gogny parametrizations of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Here we suggest a new method to calculate this fundamental property of the atomic nucleus, using a completely phenomenological point of view. Our method is based in the analysis of the differences between measured masses and LDM predictions, which contains information related to those ingredients not taken into account in the LDM formula, such as shell closures, nuclear deformations and residual nuclear interactions. The differences are arranged in a two dimensional plot which can be viewed as an incomplete image of the full chart of nuclides, equivalent to a product of the full image and a binary mask. In order to remove the distortions produced by this mask we employ an algorithm, well known in astronomy, used to remove artificial effects present in the astrophysical images collected through telescopes. This algorithm is called the CLEAN method. It is one of a number of methods which exists to deconvolve undesirable effects in images and to extrapolate or reconstruct missing parts in them. By using the CLEAN method we can fit measured masses with an r.m.s error of less than 100 keV. We have performed several checks and concluded that its utilization must be carried out carefully in order to obtain reliable results in the zone of unknown masses between the driplines. We also outline potential applications of the present approach.

Barea, J.; Frank, A.; Hirsch, J. G.; Lopez, J. C.; Morales, I.; Mendoza, J. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Velazquez, V. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

497

Penning trap mass measurements on nobelium isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP at GSI Darmstadt allows accurate mass measurements of radionuclides, produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and separated by the velocity filter SHIP from the primary beam. Recently, the masses of the three nobelium isotopes {sup 252-254}No were determined. These are the first direct mass measurements of transuranium elements, which provide new anchor points in this region. The heavy nuclides were produced in cold-fusion reactions by irradiating a PbS target with a {sup 48}Ca beam, resulting in production rates of the nuclei of interest of about one atom per second. In combination with data from decay spectroscopy our results are used to perform a new atomic-mass evaluation in this region.

Dworschak, M.; Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Vorobyev, G. K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Audi, G. [CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, F-91405 Orsay-Campus (France); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Droese, C.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, D-17487 Greifswald (Germany); Eliseev, S.; Ketter, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fleckenstein, T. [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, D-35390 Giessen (Germany); Haettner, E.; Plass, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, D-35390 Giessen (Germany); Ketelaer, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Kluge, H.-J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles Title Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Ban-Weiss, George, Melissa M. Lunden, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Robert A. Harley Journal Journal of Aerosol Science Keywords emission, motor vehicle, particle number, size distribution, tunnel Abstract Average particle number concentrations and size distributions from ~61 000 light-duty (LD) vehicles and ~2500 medium-duty (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) trucks were measured during the summer of 2006 in a San Francisco Bay area traffic tunnel. One of the traffic bores contained only LD vehicles, and the other contained mixed traffic, allowing pollutants to be apportioned between LD vehicles and diesel trucks. Particle number emission factors (particle diameter Dp > 3 nm) were found to be (3.9 ± 1.4) x 1014 and (3.3 ± 1.3) x 1015 # kg-1 fuel burned for LD vehicles and diesel trucks, respectively. Size distribution measurements showed that diesel trucks emitted at least an order of magnitude more particles for all measured sizes (10 < Dp < 290 nm) per unit mass of fuel burned. The relative importance of LD vehicles as a source of particles increased as Dp decreased. Comparing the results from this study to previous measurements at the same site showed that particle number emission factors have decreased for both LD vehicles and diesel trucks since 1997. Integrating size distributions with a volume weighting

499

Hanford Facility Beryllium Fact Sheet Building Number/Name:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was found to confirm this. The Critical Mass Laboratory was designated as an airborne radioactive contamination area. In February 1998, knowledgeable employees were interviewed...

500

Search for Lepton-Flavor and Lepton-Number Violation in the Decay tau to lhh'  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for lepton-flavor and lepton-number violation in the decay of the tau lepton into one charged lepton and two charged hadrons is performed using 221.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected at an e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring. In all 14 decay modes considered, the observed data are compatible with background expectations, and upper limits are set in the range {Beta}({tau} {yields} {ell}hh') < (0.7-4.8) x 10{sup -7} at 90% confidence level.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z