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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

NJ.?3  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

r-2 r-2 . . . * c J/y. a5 NJ.?3 ti I "( -r par 7 This docam& consists of 3tiHpages, ~$0. .F of 2' topics, Series A WY/~ F/yS. 5 2 --s.d %6/e /. Prospectus On Uranium Center Operation Speciri! Rcreview FInsI Dctei mmaiion February 1, 1951 # A. L. Baker President THE KELLEX CORPORATION 233 BROADWAY NEW YORK 7, N.Y. "CAUTION" This document contains information affecting the National Defense of the Ulliterl :JI.F~*?s. ~. _________-.-.. ___-.-~~ -- . CONTENTS " ' -' P F. Brown INTRODUCTION ............................................ Page 5 PROPOSED PROGRAM ...................................... 7 Contract Scope ....................................... 7 Corporate Mechanism ................................. 8 Contract Terms ...................................... 9

2

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Middlesex North NJ Site - NJ 05  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Middlesex North NJ Site - NJ 05 Middlesex North NJ Site - NJ 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Middlesex North, NJ Alternate Name(s): Middlesex Landfill Middlesex Municipal Landfill NJ.05-2 NJ.05-4 Location: Mountain Avenue to Bound Brook, Middlesex, New Jersey NJ.05-2 Historical Operations: Served as a disposal site for low-level radioactive pitchblende ore generated from activites at the Middlesex Sampling Plant. NJ.05-2 NJ.05-3 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NJ.05-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys NJ.05-3 NJ.05-4 Site Status: Certification Basis and Federal Register Notice. USACE determination for additional remediation is pending. NJ.05-5 NJ.05-6 Long-term Care Requirements: Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites S07566_FUSRAP

3

Grow NJ (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grow NJ (New Jersey) Grow NJ (New Jersey) Eligibility Commercial Savings For Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization...

4

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Brunswick NJ Site - NJ 14  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Brunswick NJ Site - NJ 14 Brunswick NJ Site - NJ 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites New Brunswick, NJ Alternate Name(s): New Brunswick Laboratory NJ.14-1 Location: 986 Jersey Avenue, New Brunswick, New Jersey NJ.14-2 Historical Operations: Performed radiochemical analyses on uranium, thorium, beryllium, and zirconium metals and compounds for MED, AEC, ERDA, and DOE to support nuclear power and weapons programs. NJ.14-3 NJ.14-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NJ.14-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys, Verification Surveys NJ.14-2 NJ.14-4 NJ.14-6 Site Status: Certification Basis, Federal Register Notice Included NJ.14-5 Long-term Care Requirements: Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites S07566_FUSRAP Also see New Brunswick, New Jersey, Site

5

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maywood Site - NJ 10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Maywood Site - NJ 10 Maywood Site - NJ 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Maywood, NJ Alternate Name(s): Maywood Chemical Works Maywood Chemical Company Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS) Stepan Chemical Company NJ.10-2 NJ.10-3 NJ.10-7 NJ.10-11 Location: 100 West Hunter Avenue, Maywood/Rochelle Park, New Jersey NJ.10-4 Historical Operations: Processed monazite sands for extraction of rare earth compounds and mantle-grade thorium nitrates. NJ.10-2 NJ.10-3 NJ.10-4 NJ.10-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NJ.10-1 NJ.10-10 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys NJ.10-6 NJ.10-7 NJ.10-8 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. NJ.10-9 NJ.10-13 USACE FUSRAP Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see FUSRAP Maywood Superfund Site

6

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Jersey City NJ Site - NJ 07  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jersey City NJ Site - NJ 07 Jersey City NJ Site - NJ 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Jersey City, NJ Alternate Name(s): Kellex Laboratory Jersey City Laboratory Kellex/Pierpont Vitro Corporation of America Delco-Levco Pierpont Property M.W. Kellogg Site NJ.07-1 NJ.07-2 NJ.07-6 Location: New Jersey Route 440 and Kellogg Street, Jersey City, New Jersey NJ.07-5 Historical Operations: Conducted research and development for MED and AEC on gaseous diffusion process for uranium enrichment using uranium hexaflouride and solvent extraction process for uranium recovery from ores. Also conducted solvent extraction of uranium and other byproducts from waste. Processes resulted in contamination of uranium, radium, and thorium. NJ.07-3 NJ.07-5 Eligibility Determination: Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Survey, Verification Survey NJ.07-4

7

Palmco Power NJ, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Palmco Power NJ, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Palmco Power NJ, LLC Place New York Utility Id 56501 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Operates Generating Plant Yes References...

8

SolarWorks NJ | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey Sector Renewable Energy, Solar Product SolarWorks NJ, LLC, a provider of turnkey solar electricity installations and renewable energy solutions. References SolarWorks...

9

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Princeton University - NJ 08  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Princeton University - NJ 08 Princeton University - NJ 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PRINCETON UNIVERSITY (NJ.08) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Princeton , New Jersey NJ.08-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 NJ.08-2 Site Operations: During 1940's, performed experiments on uranium isotope separation and experiments for the development of diffusion barrier material for the gaseous diffusion enrichment process. NJ.08-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria NJ.08-1 NJ.08-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NJ.08-2 NJ.08-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes NJ.08-1 NJ.08-4 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

10

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area (Redirected from New York Area - NY NJ CT PA) Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

11

Valero Refining Company - NJ | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valero Refining Company - NJ Valero Refining Company - NJ Jump to: navigation, search Name Valero Refining Company - NJ Place New Jersey Utility Id 56325 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Industrial: $0.0652/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Valero_Refining_Company_-_NJ&oldid=411921" Categories: EIA Utility Companies and Aliases

12

Decomposition of NH3BH3 at sub-ambient pressures: A combined thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis-mass spectrometry study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report a systematic study of the isothermal decomposition of ammonia borane, NH3BH3, at 363 K as a function of argon pressure ranging between 50 and 1040 mbar using thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis coupled with mass analysis of the volatile species. During thermal aging at 363 K, evolution of hydrogen, aminoborane and borazine is monitored, with the relative mass loss strongly depending on the pressure in the reaction chamber. Furthermore, the induction period required for hydrogen release at 363 K decreases with decreasing pressure.

Palumbo, Oriele; Paolone, Annalisa; Rispoli, Pasquale; Cantelli, Rosario; Autrey, Thomas

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

14

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bloomfield Tool Co - NJ 21  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Bloomfield Tool Co - NJ 21 Bloomfield Tool Co - NJ 21 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Bloomfield Tool Co. (NJ.21 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Bloomfield , New Jersey NJ.21-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.21-2 Site Operations: During a small-scale experiment, uranium slugs were machined. NJ.21-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope and duration of the operations NJ.21-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NJ.21-2 NJ.21-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Bloomfield Tool Co. NJ.21-1 - AEC Memorandum; Reichard to Files; Visit to Bloomfield

15

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Heyden Chemical Corp - NJ 19  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Heyden Chemical Corp - NJ 19 Heyden Chemical Corp - NJ 19 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Heyden Chemical Corp. (NJ.19 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: American Cyanamid NJ.19-2 Location: Princeton , New Jersey NJ.19-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.19-1 Site Operations: Commercial chemical operation. AEC was interested in their process for keeping thorium oxide in suspension. No indication of AEC contractual relationship with Heyden. NJ.19-1 NJ.19-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication of AEC operations conducted on the site NJ.19-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium Oxide NJ.19-2 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

16

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Navy Ammunition Depot - NJ 15  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Navy Ammunition Depot - NJ 15 Navy Ammunition Depot - NJ 15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVY AMMUNITION DEPOT (NJ.15) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Earle, New Jersey NJ.15-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.15-2 Site Operations: Storage facility and disposal unit for drummed radioactive waste that was dumped at sea. NJ.15-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD NJ.15-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radioactive Waste Materials NJ.15-2 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD NJ.15-2 Also see Documents Related to NAVY AMMUNITION DEPOT NJ.15-1 - AEC Memorandum; Piccot to the Files; Subject: Visit to

17

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wayne Site - NJ 16  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Wayne Site - NJ 16 Wayne Site - NJ 16 FUSRAP Considered Sites Wayne, NJ Alternate Name(s): Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) W.R. Grace and Company W.R. Grace Site Rare Earths, Inc. Davison Chemical Division NJ.16-1 NJ.16-2 NJ.16-3 Location: 868 Black Oak Road, Wayne, New Jersey NJ.16-5 Historical Operations: Produced crude thorium hydroxide and rare earth elements from monazite sands. Site was also used for interim storage of contaminated material removed from vicinity properties under FUSRAP. NJ.16-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NJ.16-1 NJ.16-11 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys NJ.16-3 NJ.16-6 NJ.16-7 NJ.16-8 NJ.16-9 Site Status: USACE cleanup complete, not yet delisted from the National Priorities List. USACE Website EPA Website Long-term Care Requirements: Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites S07566_FUSRAP

18

Category:Atlantic City, NJ | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NJ NJ Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Atlantic City, NJ" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 63 KB SVMidriseApartment Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVMidriseApartment Atl... 62 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 64 KB SVSecondarySchool Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVSecondarySchool Atla... 62 KB SVStandAloneRetail Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVStandAloneRetail Atl... 63 KB SVHospital Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png

19

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bowen Lab - NJ 33  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bowen Lab - NJ 33 Bowen Lab - NJ 33 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Bowen Lab (NJ.33) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Bowen Engineering, Inc. NJ.33-1 Location: North Branch , New Jersey NJ.33-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1990 NJ.33-2 Site Operations: Test runs of spray calcining of boiled down pitchblende raffinates was conducted on May 15 and 16, 1951. Equipment used was decontaminated on May 17. NJ.33-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited quantities of material used and the duration of the tests, and subsequent cleanup of the site following the tests. NJ.33-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NJ.33-1

20

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bakelite Corp - NJ 35  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Bakelite Corp - NJ 35 Bakelite Corp - NJ 35 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Bakelite Corp (NJ 35) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Bound Brook , New Jersey NJ.35-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 NJ.35-1 Site Operations: Processed nickel metal and various chemicals in support of the K-25 plant. No indication that radioactive materials were handled. NJ.35-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive material was used at the site NJ.35-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Bakelite Corp NJ.35-1 - DOE Checklist/Memorandum; D.Levine to the File; Subject:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fairmont Chemical Co - NJ 25  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fairmont Chemical Co - NJ 25 Fairmont Chemical Co - NJ 25 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fairmont Chemical Co. (NJ.25 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Newark , New Jersey NJ.25-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.25-1 Site Operations: Company was a commercial chemical company identified as a rare earths processor (hafnium). NJ.25-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NJ.25-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Fairmont Chemical Co. NJ.25-1 - DOE Memorandum/Checklist; Wallo to File; Fairmont Chemical

22

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tube Reducing Co - NJ 11  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

experiments involving the sizing and reduction of rolled Uranium rod by the "Rockrite Process" for National Lead Company of Ohio. NJ.11-1 NJ.11-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated -...

23

Palmco Power NJ, LLC (New Jersey) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NJ, LLC (New Jersey) Jump to: navigation, search Name Palmco Power NJ, LLC Place New Jersey Utility Id 56501 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

24

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- E I Du Pont - NJ 06  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- NJ 06 - NJ 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites E.I. Dupont, NJ Alternate Name(s): E.I. Du Pont De Nemours and Company E.I. Du Pont Company Dupont Chambers Works Plant NJ.06-1 NJ.06-5 Location: Pennsville and Carney Townships, Southeast bank of the Delaware River, Deepwater, New Jersey NJ.06-5 Historical Operations: Development of a process for converting uranium oxide to uranium tetraflouride, production of uranium tetraflouride, research into conversion of uranium oxide to uranium metal, and production of uranium metal. NJ.06-3 NJ.06-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NJ.06-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys NJ.06-3 NJ.06-5 NJ.06-7 NJ.06-8 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. NJ.06-2 NJ.06-6 USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion.

25

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Aluminum Co of America - NJ 24  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NJ 24 NJ 24 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Aluminum Co of America (NJ.24 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: ALCOA (Garwood Plant) NJ.24-1 Location: Garwood , New Jersey NJ.24-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 NJ.24-5 Site Operations: Constructed and altered die-casting dies and conducted die casting operation on uranium slugs. NJ.24-1 NJ.24-3 NJ.24-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual contamination considered remote due to limited scope of activities performed at the site NJ.24-2 NJ.24-5 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium metal NJ.24-1 NJ.24-3 NJ.24-4 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

26

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- J T Baker Chemical Co - NJ 0-02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J T Baker Chemical Co - NJ 0-02 J T Baker Chemical Co - NJ 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: J.T. BAKER CHEMICAL CO. ( NJ.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Subsidiary of Vick Chemical Company NJ.0-02-1 Location: 600 North Broad Street , Phillipsburg , New Jersey NJ.0-02-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.0-02-3 Site Operations: Commercial operation - licensed to process and distribute refined source material. NJ.0-02-2 NJ.0-02-3 NJ.0-02-4 NJ.0-02-5 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No basis for inclusion in FUSRAP NJ.0-02-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NJ.0-02-5 NJ.0-02-6 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

27

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Vitro Corp of America - NJ 02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NJ 02 NJ 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Vitro Corp. of America (NJ.02) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Vitro Laboratories NJ.02-1 Location: West Orange , New Jersey NJ.02-2 Evaluation Year: 1985 NJ.02-3 Site Operations: Performed work that involved conversion of low enrichment uranium dioxide to uranium carbon spheres and for the separation of fission products. NJ.02-3 NJ.02-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria NJ.02-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Compounds NJ.02-2 NJ.02-4 Radiological Survey(s): Yes NJ.02-2 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Vitro Corp. of America

28

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Disintegrating Co Inc - NJ 0-03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Disintegrating Co Inc - NJ Disintegrating Co Inc - NJ 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: METALS DISINTEGRATING CO., INC. (NJ.0-03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 271 Grove Avenue , Verona or Elizabeth , New Jersey NJ.0-03-1 NJ.0-03-2 NJ.0-03-3 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.0-03-3 Site Operations: Provided nickel to Linde. NJ.0-03-3 NJ.0-03-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No radioactive materials were handled at this site. NJ.0-03-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to METALS DISINTEGRATING CO., INC. NJ.0-03-1 - Letter; Goman to Metals Disintegrating Company, Inc.

29

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Baker and Williams Co - NJ 13  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baker and Williams Co - NJ 13 Baker and Williams Co - NJ 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Baker and Williams Co (NJ 13) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Baker and Company, Inc. Engelhard Industries, Baker Platinum Division NJ.13-8 NJ.13-1 Location: 113 Astor Street , Newark , New Jersey NJ.13-1 NJ.13-8 Evaluation Year: 1990 NJ.13-2 NJ.13-7 Site Operations: From 1943 through the mid-1950s, the facility processed spent catalyst (contaminated platinum) to recovery the platinum for the AEC. From the Mid-1950s to the early-1960s the facility conducted research and development on metal fabrication processes including rolling, drawing uranium metal metals continued recovery operations (uranium from scrap under AEC source material license). NJ.13-3

30

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- United Lead Co - NJ 29  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lead Co - NJ 29 Lead Co - NJ 29 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: United Lead Co. (NJ.29 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 77 FUSRAP considered sites for which few, if any records are available in their respective site files to provide an historical account of past operations and their relationship, if any, with MED/AEC operations. Reviews of contact lists, accountable station lists, health and safety records and other documentation of the period do not provide sufficient information to warrant further search of historical records for information on these sites. These site files remain "open" to

31

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New York Shipbuilding Corp - NJ 34  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shipbuilding Corp - NJ 34 Shipbuilding Corp - NJ 34 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NEW YORK SHIPBUILDING CORP. (NJ.34) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: South Yard, New York Shipbuilding facility on the Delaware River , Camden , New Jersey NJ.34-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1990 NJ.34-2 Site Operations: NYX Project (1951 - 1954) - fabricated and assembled equipment (reactors) for the AEC Savannah River Plant under subcontract to AEC Prime. Later built the N.S. Savannah, the world's first nuclear-powered cargo-passenger ship -- a joint project of the AEC and the Maritime Administration authorized by the Congress in 1956. NJ.34-1 NJ.34-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination related to work for Savannah River Plant considered remote due to the limited quantity of radioactive material involved and duration of the activity NJ.34-2

32

NJ Regional Middle School Science Bowl | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 22, 2013, 8:00am February 22, 2013, 8:00am Science Education Lab-wide Event NJ Regional Middle School Science Bowl Teams of students are invited to participate in the Department of Energy's National Science Bowl Competition. Each year PPPL hosts the New Jersey Regional Science Bowl which decides which teams from the local area can continue onto the national competition in Washington, D.C. The Science Bowl is a double elimination contest with oral question and answer rounds in the fields of chemistry, biology, physics, astronomy and mathematics plus general and earth sciences. Questions are given in a toss-up with a bonus format. For more information, visit our Science Bowl website! Contact Information Website: NJ Regional Middle School Science Bowl Coordinator(s): Deedee Ortiz

33

New Jersey Solar Power LLC NJ Solar Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Power LLC NJ Solar Power Solar Power LLC NJ Solar Power Jump to: navigation, search Name New Jersey Solar Power LLC (NJ Solar Power) Place New Jersey Sector Solar Product A photovoltaic engineering firm which offers and installs a complete line of solar electric products for residential, commercial, and institutional customers. References New Jersey Solar Power LLC (NJ Solar Power)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. New Jersey Solar Power LLC (NJ Solar Power) is a company located in New Jersey . References ↑ "New Jersey Solar Power LLC (NJ Solar Power)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=New_Jersey_Solar_Power_LLC_NJ_Solar_Power&oldid=349171

34

Help in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Help in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs Help in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs Help in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs April 2, 2010 - 2:27pm Addthis Joshua DeLung In Newark, N.J., times are still tough for some residents. Among the rows of worn brick architecture, though, there are signs of hope, thanks to a local community action agency's weatherization assistance program and an extra boost in funding from the Recovery Act. The stories of homes in need of retrofitting in Newark are like those in many cities across America. Sammie Rutledge worked as a carpenter since he was a teenager but stopped working in 2004 when he was diagnosed with cancer. Faced without a paycheck from a full-time job and with high energy bills, as much as $600 each month, Sammie was distraught. Then, a friend

35

Help in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs Help in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs April 2, 2010 - 2:27pm Addthis Joshua DeLung In Newark, N.J., times are still tough for some residents. Among the rows of worn brick architecture, though, there are signs of hope, thanks to a local community action agency's weatherization assistance program and an extra boost in funding from the Recovery Act. The stories of homes in need of retrofitting in Newark are like those in many cities across America. Sammie Rutledge worked as a carpenter since he was a teenager but stopped working in 2004 when he was diagnosed with cancer. Faced without a paycheck from a full-time job and with high energy bills, as much as $600 each month, Sammie was distraught. Then, a friend

36

January 21, 2014 @ 5:00 PM (EST): 2014 NJ Regional Science Bowl...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 05:00 January 21, 2014 @ 5:00 PM (EST): 2014 NJ Regional Science Bowl registration closes Registration for the 2014 New Jersey Regional Science Bowl...

37

Category:Concord, NH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Go Back to PV Economics By Location Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Concord, NH" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 74 KB SVHospital Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVHospital Concord NH ... 75 KB SVLargeHotel Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVLargeHotel Concord N... 74 KB SVLargeOffice Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVLargeOffice Concord ... 76 KB SVMediumOffice Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVMediumOffice Concord... 74 KB SVMidriseApartment Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVMidriseApartment Con... 71 KB SVOutPatient Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVOutPatient Concord N... 72 KB SVPrimarySchool Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png

38

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.00-1.99 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1996 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1996 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: In 1996, consumption of natural gas for agricultural use

39

NH NH NH NH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Grand Station Foyer Continental Breakfast - Grand Station iii PoSt-CoMbuStion MeMbrane-baS Moderator - Jos Figueroa, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Techno tueSday,...

40

Updated 6/10 Volunteer NH!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant a garden 5 Hitchcock Hall Durham, NH 03824 Marianne Fortescue, Coordinator 603-862-2197 marianne.fortescue

Pohl, Karsten

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NJ1PA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NJ1PA DETERMINATION NJ1PA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Abengoa Solar Inc. Page 1 of2 STATE: CO PROJECT TITLE: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Power Plants Funding Opportunity Announcement Numbu Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Numbu ell) Number DE·PS36-08G098032 G018156 GFQ.G018156-003 G018156 Based on my review oflhe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A),1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but nollimiled to, literature surveys. inventories. audits), data analysis (indudm9 computer modeling). document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

42

**NO SCIENCE ON SATURDAY TODAY** NJ Regional High School Science Bowl |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 23, 2013, 8:00am February 23, 2013, 8:00am Science Education Lab-wide Event **NO SCIENCE ON SATURDAY TODAY** NJ Regional High School Science Bowl Teams of students are invited to participate in the Department of Energy's National Science Bowl Competition. Each year PPPL hosts the New Jersey Regional Science Bowl which decides which teams from the local area can continue onto the national competition in Washington, D.C. The Science Bowl is a double elimination contest with oral question and answer rounds in the fields of chemistry, biology, physics, astronomy and mathematics plus general and earth sciences. Questions are given in a toss-up with a bonus format. For more information, visit our Science Bowl website! Contact Information Website: NJ Regional High School Science Bowl

43

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

DAKOTA NEBRASKA KANSAS ARIZONA NEW MEXICO OKLAHOMA ARKANSAS MISSOURI IOWA MINNESOTA WISCONSIN MICH PA MD DELAWARE CONNECTICUT RHODE ISLAND MASS NH NJ ILL INDIANA OHIO VIRGINIA WV...

44

NJ,O-04 MEMOHANDUtl TO: FILE FRon: SITE NAME: CITY:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I I &-?I, I . . . ,- . . -' * 3 8OC NJ,O-04 MEMOHANDUtl TO: FILE FRon: SITE NAME: CITY: _____ -&-&~--------STATE: . . ------ .- OWNER(S) -------- P=st:~__------_-____--------- Current: ~~~~~~~-~----~-~~-~--~-~~~ Owner contacted q yes I-J no; if yes, date contacted TYPE OF OPERATION ~_--_---_-~~----- 0 Research & Develapment q Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale g Bench Scale Process ? a Theoretical Studies? $0 Sample & Analysis E Production 0. Disposal/Storage q Manufacturing 0 University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Cpansored Faci 1 i ty 0 Other ~~~-~~~-~-_~~--~--~-- TYPE OF CONTRACT ~-_-----~-~----- A Prime q Subcontractk- 0 Purchase Order 0 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price,

45

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- R Brew Co - NH 01  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R Brew Co - NH 01 R Brew Co - NH 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: R. BREW CO. (NH.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Concord , New Hampshire NH.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 NH.01-2 Site Operations: Conducted vacuum furnace tests using uranium and copper billets. NH.01-1 NH.01-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NH.01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NH.01-1 NH.01-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - radiological monitoring during operations NH.01-3 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to R. BREW CO. NH.01-1 - Memorandum/Checklist; Landis to File; Subject: R. Brew

46

US. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NJ1PA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OF ENERGY OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NJ1PA DETERMINATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:ELECTRATHERM, Inc. STATE: NV PROJECT TITLE: ·Small Scale Electrical Power Generation from Heat Co-Produced in Geothermal Fluids: MiningOperation" Funding Opportunity Announcement Number PNK:urement Instrument Number N£PA Control Number em Number OE+FOAOOOO336 DE-EEOOO4435 GF0-0004435-002 G04435 Based on my review of the information c:oncerning tbe proposed action, 85 NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA),1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Info rm ation gathering, analysis, and d issemination Information gathering (including , but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and

47

H. B. Fry, Staff Assistant NJ-, i.4 SUBJECT: DISCUSSION CCSJCERMZIQ THE M  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' : H. B. Fry, Staff Assistant NJ-, i.4 SUBJECT: DISCUSSION CCSJCERMZIQ THE M E W BRUNSWICK UBORAIORY; MONDAY, EOVEKBER 1, '1948 REFER TO SYb5BOLt SA:HBF tu 14-7 2 Those presentr M r. Rodden, Dr. Donovan, Hr. K&lay, Dr. Chadwell, Messrs. Fry, Bslmore and Hill, The purpose of the meeting was to disouss the program and working relationships of the New York Offioe and the laboratory at New Brunswick. There is attached an agenda for the meeting. There was no disagreement on the functiona of the laboratory described by Mr. Belmore as followat 1. To assist the Produotion Division in oontrolling wality of uranium, thori=, beryllium, zirconium metals and oompounds, (or any material assigned to NYOO). (a) By analyzing various raw materials, intermediater and

48

DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED MATERIAL FROM PORT OF NY/NJ DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED MATERIAL FROM THE PORT OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Liters Transported (Source: New Jersey Petroleum Council) Rank Port Liters 1 New York Harbor, NY/NJ 106 Jersey ranks first in the United States in volume of petroleum products handled each year. In addition to the discharge of significant amounts of petroleum hydrocarbons into the waters of the New York/New Jersey region

Brookhaven National Laboratory

49

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY...

50

Photolysis of solid NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O mixtures at 193 nm  

SciTech Connect

We have studied UV photolysis of solid ammonia and ammonia-dihydrate samples at 40 K, using infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and microgravimetry. We have shown that in the pure NH{sub 3} sample, the main species ejected are NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}, where the hydrogen and nitrogen increase with laser fluence. This increase in N{sub 2} ejection with laser fluence explains the increase in mass loss rate detected by a microbalance. In contrast, for the ammonia-water mixture, we see very weak signals of H{sub 2} and N{sub 2} in the mass spectrometer, consistent with the very small mass loss during the experiment and with a <5% decrease in the NH{sub 3} infrared absorption bands spectroscopy after a fluence of {approx}3 x 10{sup 19} photons/cm{sup 2}. The results imply that ammonia-ice mixtures in the outer solar system are relatively stable under solar irradiation.

Loeffler, M. J. [Astrochemistry Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Baragiola, R. A. [Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

NH House Committee_April27 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Control Mercury Control Technology R&D Program for Coal-Fired Boilers Working Session of the New Hampshire House Science, Technology, & Energy Committee April 26, 2005 Concord, New Hampshire Thomas J. Feeley, III thomas.feeley@netl.doe.gov National Energy Technology Laboratory NH House Committee_April 2005 Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program Performance/Cost Objectives * Have technologies ready for commercial demonstration by 2007 for all coals * Reduce "uncontrolled" Hg emissions by 50-70% * Reduce cost by 25-50% compared to baseline cost estimates Baseline Costs: $50,000 - $70,000 / lb Hg Removed 2000 Year Cost NH House Committee_April 2005 Stages of Mercury Control Technology Development DOE RD&D Model Lab/Bench/Pilot-Scale Testing Field Testing

52

,"Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","172014" ,"Next...

53

NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NH Department of Environmental Services The Act calls for annual reductions of multiple pollutants, including SO2, Nox, CO2, and mercury. The Act calls for an 87% reduction in SO2 emissions and a 70% reduction in Nox emissions from 1999 levels. CO2 emissions are to be reduced to 1990 levels by the end of 2006. Act is implemented under NH Rules Env-A 2900. This act applies specifically to three existing fossil

54

u.s. DI!PARThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NJ!PA DETEJU,llNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MANAGEMENT CENTER MANAGEMENT CENTER NJ!PA DETEJU,llNATION RECIPIENT :Ocean Renewable Power Company, LlC Page I of2 STATE: AK PROJECf TITLE: Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions withCook Inlet Tidal Energy Project Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA-OOOOO69 DE-EE0002657 GFO-O002657-002 G02657 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.3 Research related to Field and laboratory research, inventory, and information collection activities that are directly conservation of fish, wildlife, related to the conservation of fish and wildlife resources or to the protection of cultural

55

2nd Int. Symp. on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices, April 27-29, 2011, Princeton, NJ Program for the 2nd International Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2nd Int. Symp. on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices, April 27-29, 2011, Princeton, NJ Program for the 2nd International Symposium on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices April 27-29, 2011:40 Welcome, S. Prager, Director, PPPL 8:45 Announcement: Local organizer Session I-A. Lithium in Magnetic

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

56

Molecular Biology of the Brain, edited by S.J. Higgins. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1999. 196 pp. $32.50.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Biology of the Brain, edited by S.J. Higgins. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press level is one of the great- est and most important questions facing science. The Molecular Biology of the Brain reviews the state of current knowledge about the molecular foundations of brain function and gives

Schoenemann, P. Thomas

57

Public Service Co of NH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NH NH (Redirected from PSNH) Jump to: navigation, search Name Public Service Co of NH Place New Hampshire Service Territory New Hampshire Website www.psnh.com Green Button Landing Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Reference Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 15472 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections

58

A WATER MASER AND NH{sub 3} SURVEY OF GLIMPSE EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a Nobeyama 45 m H{sub 2}O maser and NH{sub 3} survey of all 94 northern GLIMPSE extended green objects (EGOs), a sample of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) identified based on their extended 4.5 {mu}m emission. We observed the NH{sub 3}(1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) inversion lines, and detected emission toward 97%, 63%, and 46% of our sample, respectively (median rms {approx} 50 mK). The H{sub 2}O maser detection rate is 68% (median rms {approx} 0.11 Jy). The derived H{sub 2}O maser and clump-scale gas properties are consistent with the identification of EGOs as young MYSOs. To explore the degree of variation among EGOs, we analyze subsamples defined based on mid-infrared (MIR) properties or maser associations. H{sub 2}O masers and warm dense gas, as indicated by emission in the higher-excitation NH{sub 3} transitions, are most frequently detected toward EGOs also associated with both Class I and II CH{sub 3}OH masers. Ninety-five percent (81%) of such EGOs are detected in H{sub 2}O (NH{sub 3}(3,3)), compared to only 33% (7%) of EGOs without either CH{sub 3}OH maser type. As populations, EGOs associated with Class I and/or II CH{sub 3}OH masers have significantly higher NH{sub 3} line widths, column densities, and kinetic temperatures than EGOs undetected in CH{sub 3}OH maser surveys. However, we find no evidence for statistically significant differences in H{sub 2}O maser properties (such as maser luminosity) among any EGO subsamples. Combining our data with the 1.1 mm continuum Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey, we find no correlation between isotropic H{sub 2}O maser luminosity and clump number density. H{sub 2}O maser luminosity is weakly correlated with clump (gas) temperature and clump mass.

Cyganowski, C. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Koda, J.; Towers, S.; Meyer, J. Donovan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Rosolowsky, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Okanagan, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Okanagan, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Egusa, F. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)] [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Momose, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Robitaille, T. P., E-mail: ccyganowski@cfa.harvard.edu [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

59

Public Service Co of NH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Public Service Co of NH Name Public Service Co of NH Place New Hampshire Service Territory New Hampshire Website www.psnh.com Green Button Landing Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Reference Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 15472 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now!

60

Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Grant Program MN MSEO Solar Electric Rebate Program NH NHPUC Renewable Energy Rebate Program NJ

Darghouth, Naim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Characterization of the selective reduction of NO by NH/sub 3/  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selective reduction of NO by NH/sub 3/ addition has been studied in a lean-burning oil-fired laboratory combustion tunnel as a function of equivalence ratio, NH/sub 3/ injection temperature, concentration of NH/sub 3/ added, and the source of NO. Ammonia breakthrough was found to depend strongly on the NH/sub 3/ addition temperature. The total concentration of nitrogen containing species other N/sub 2/, NO, and NH/sub 3/ was measured with a variety of techniques and was found to be less than 5 ppM over the range of conditions studied.

Lucas, D.; Brown, N.J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

RECIPIENT:Princeton Power Systems STATE: NJ PROJECT Marine High-Voltage Power Conditioning and Transmission System with Integrated Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Princeton Power Systems Princeton Power Systems STATE: NJ PROJECT Marine High-Voltage Power Conditioning and Transmission System with Integrated Energy Storage TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number DE-FOA-0000293 DE-EE0003640 GFO-000364~001 GOO Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the foUowing determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, ~terature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

63

Page 1 of 7 2013 NH 4-H HORSE QUIZ BOWL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at http://extension.unh.edu/4H/NH4-HHorseProject.htm or by sending an Excel document to Rhiannon.Beauregard

New Hampshire, University of

64

CHARACTERIZATION STUDIES OF THE SELECTIVE REDUCTION OF NO by NH3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Maloney, K.L. , "NOx Reduction with Ammonia: Laboratoryand Hashizawa, K. , "Reduction of NOx in Combustion ExhaustSelective Noncatalytic Reduction of NOx with NH3," EPRI NOx

Brown, N.J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Negative mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some physical aspects of negative mass are examined. Several unusual properties, such as the ability of negative mass to penetrate any armor, are analyzed. Other surprising effects include the bizarre system of negative mass chasing positive pass, naked singularities and the violation of cosmic censorship, wormholes, and quantum mechanical results as well. In addition, a brief look into the implications for strings is given.

Richard T Hammond

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

66

Export.gov - NJ Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerospace Agribusiness ArchitectureConstruction AutomotiveTransportation Education Energy Environmental Technology Franchising HotelRestaurant Information & Communication...

67

Thermal Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Multiple catalytic functions (NOx conversion, NO and NH3 oxidation, NH3 storage) of a commercial Cu-zeolite urea/NH3-SCR catalyst were assessed in a laboratory fixed-bed flow reactor system after differing degrees of hydrothermal aging. Catalysts were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), 27Al solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) / energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy to develop an understanding of the degradation mechanisms during catalyst aging. The catalytic reaction measurements of laboratory-aged catalysts were performed, which allows us to obtain a universal curve for predicting the degree of catalyst performance deterioration as a function of time at each aging temperature. Results show that as the aging temperature becomes higher, the zeolite structure collapses in a shorter period of time after an induction period. The decrease in SCR performance was explained by zeolite structure destruction and/or Cu agglomeration, as detected by XRD/27Al NMR and by TEM/EDX, respectively. Destruction of the zeolite structure and agglomeration of the active phase also results in a decrease in the NO/NH3 oxidation activity and the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst. Selected laboratory aging conditions (16 h at 800oC) compare well with a 135,000 mile vehicle-aged catalyst for both performance and characterization criteria.

Schmieg, Steven J.; Oh, Se H.; Kim, Chang H.; Brown, David B.; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all while conserving energy. In all, the state has received $17.3 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Of that, $9.6 million has been sent to the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning (NHOEP) to launch several energy saving projects. NHOEP established a subgrant program to award $6.6 million of the EECBG grant funding to local municipalities and counties. New Hampshire municipalities and counties submitted over 270 applications, totaling over $21 million in grant requests. "Substantial energy efficiency improvements will be made throughout the

69

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all while conserving energy. In all, the state has received $17.3 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Of that, $9.6 million has been sent to the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning (NHOEP) to launch several energy saving projects. NHOEP established a subgrant program to award $6.6 million of the EECBG grant funding to local municipalities and counties. New Hampshire municipalities and counties submitted over 270 applications, totaling over $21 million in grant requests. "Substantial energy efficiency improvements will be made throughout the

70

Mass Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST maintains the national standard for mass in the form of the prototype kilogram (K20) and provides services to support the parts of the national ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

fehlende Masse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

beim radioaktiven Zerfall mit der fehlenden Masse?" Zur Erinnerung: wenn Uran in Thorium und ein alpha Teilchen zerfllt, dann gehen 0.0046 u (Masseneinheiten) der...

72

Synthesis and Characterization of Th2N2(NH) Isomorphous to Th2N3  

SciTech Connect

Using a new, low-temperature, fluoride-based process, thorium nitride imide of the chemical formula Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) was synthesized from thorium dioxide via an ammonium thorium fluoride intermediate. The resulting product phase was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and was found to be crystallographically similar to Th{sub 2}N{sub 3}. Its unit cell was hexagonal with a space group of P3m{bar 1} and lattice parameters of a = b = 3.886(1) and c = 6.185(2) {angstrom}. The presence of -NH in the nitride phase was verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Total energy calculations performed using all-electron scalar relativistic density functional theory (DFT) showed that the hydrogen atom in the Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) prefers to bond with nitrogen atoms occupying 1a Wyckoff positions of the unit cell. Lattice fringe disruptions observed in nanoparticle areas of the nitride species by high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) images also displayed some evidence for the presence of -NH group. As ThO{sub 2} was identified as an impurity, possible reaction mechanisms involving its formation are discussed.

Silva, G W Chinthaka M [ORNL; Yeamans, Charles B. [University of California, Berkeley; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Sattelberger, Alfred P [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Czerwinski, Ken R. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Weck, Dr. Phil F [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Page 1 of 16 2013 NH 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM Location: Belmont Middle School, 38 School Street, Belmont NH 03220 Deadline Quiz Bowl is an event where youth demonstrate their knowledge of equine science in a contest similar to high school quiz bowls. Teams of four race to hit their buzzers and answer equine-related questions

New Hampshire, University of

74

Page 1 of 16 2014 NH 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their knowledge of equine science in a contest similar to high school quiz bowls. Teams of four race to hitPage 1 of 16 2014 NH 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl Date: Saturday January 25, 2014 Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM the day of the contest. The New Hampshire 4-H Quiz Bowl is an event where youth demonstrate

New Hampshire, University of

75

Theoretical Investigations on the Formation and Dehydrogenation Reaction Pathways of H(NH2BH2)nH (n=1-4) Oligomers: Importance of Dihydrogen Interactions (DHI)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The H(NH2BH2)nH oligomers are possible products from dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (NH3BH3) and ammonium borohydride (NH4BH4), which belong to a class of boron-nitrogen-hydrogen (BNHx) compounds that are promising materials for chemical hydrogen storage. Understanding the kinetics and reaction pathways of formation of these oligomers and their further dehydrogenation is essential for developing BNHx-based hydrogen storage materials. We have performed computational modeling using density functional theory (DFT), ab initio wavefunction theory, and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations on the energetics and formation pathways for the H(NH2BH2)nH (n=1-4) oligomers, polyaminoborane (PAB), from NH3BH3 monomers and the subsequent dehydrogenation steps to form polyiminoborane (PIB). Through transition state searches and evaluation of the intrinsic reaction coordinates, we have investigated the B-N bond cleavage, the reactions of NH3BH3 molecule with intermediates, dihydrogen release through intra- and intermolecular hydrogen transfer, dehydrocoupling/cyclization of the oligomers, and the dimerization of NH3BH3 molecules. We discovered the formation mechanism of H(NH2BH2)n+1H oligomers through reactions of the H(NH2BH2)nH oligomers first with BH3 followed by reactions with NH3 and the release of H2, where the BH3 and NH3 intermediates are formed through dissociation of NH3BH3. We also found that the dimerization of the NH3BH3 molecules to form c-(NH2BH2)2 is slightly exothermic, with an unexpected transition state that leads to the simultaneous release of two H2 molecules. The dehydrogenations of the oligomers are also exothermic, typically by less than 10 kcal/(mol of H2), with the largest exothermicity for n=3. The transition state search shows that the one-step direct dehydrocoupling cyclization of the oligomers is not a favored pathway because of high activation barriers. The dihydrogen bonding, in which protic (HN) hydrogens interact with hydridic (HB) hydrogens, plays a vital role in stabilizing different structures of the reactants, transition states, and products. The dihydrogen interaction (DHI) within the -BH2(?2-H2) moiety accounts for both the formation mechanisms of the oligomers and for the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane. Support was provided from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division and from the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Li, Jun; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Hu, Han-Shi; Schenter, Gregory K.; Autrey, Thomas; Gutowski, Maciej S.

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

76

Mass Finishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8 Operating conditions for mass finishing...Brass screw-machine parts Aluminum oxide or granite 6.4-19 0.25-0.75 [MathExpression] -6 Light matte or bright Light cutting (a) Brass stampings or screws (b) Limestone 3.2-13 0.13-0.50 2-6 Bright (a) Submerged tumbling is used for fragile and precision parts. (b) Screw-machine parts...

77

[(CH3)4N][(C5H5NH)0.8((CH3)3NH)0.2]U2Si9O23F4 (USH-8): An Organically Templated Open-Framework Uranium Silicate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Framework Uranium Silicate Xiqu Wang, Jin Huang, and Allan J. Jacobson* Department of Chemistry, Uni pyramids we obtained also a number of open-framework uranium silicates.18,19 These new compounds were-framework uranium fluorosilicate [(CH3)4N][(C5H5NH)0.8((CH3)3NH)0.2]U2Si9O23F4 (USH- 8) that has been synthesized

Wang, Xiqu

78

Ammonia as a hydrogen energy-storage medium. [LH/sub 2/, MeOH, and NH/sub 3/  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Liquid Hydrogen (LH/sub 2/), Methanol (MeOH), and Ammonia (NH/sub 3/) are compared as hydrogen energy-storage media on the basis of reforming the MeOH to produce H/sub 2/ and dissociating (cracking) the NH/sub 3/ to release H/sub 2/. The factors important in this storage concept are briefly discussed. Results of the comparison show that, in terms of energy input for media manufacture from natural gas, hydrogen energy content of the medium, and energy cost ($/10/sup 6/ Btu), NH/sub 3/ has a wide advantage and comes the closest to matching gasoline. The tasks required in developing a safe and practicial hydrogen energy-storage system based on the storage and cracking of NH/sub 3/ are listed. Results of the technical and economic evaluation of this concept will provide the basis for continued development.

Strickland, G

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Metallicity of InN and GaN surfaces exposed to NH{sub 3}.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic study of energies and structures of InN and GaN (0001) surfaces exposed to NH{sub 3} and its decomposition products was performed with first-principles methods. A phenomenological model including electron counting contributions is developed based on calculated DFT energies and is used to identify low-energy structures. These predictions are checked with additional DFT calculations. The equilibrium phase diagrams are found to contain structures that violate the electron counting rule. Densities of states for these structures indicate n-type conductivity, consistent with available experimental results.

Walkosz, W.; Zapol, P.; Stephenson, G. B. (Materials Science Division)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Quasielastic neutron scattering of -NH3 and -BH3 rotational dynamics in orthorhombic ammonia borane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutrons scattering techniques are ideally suited to directly probe H in materials due to the large incoherent scattering cross-section of hydrogen atom, and have been invaluable in providing direct insight into the local fluctuations and large amplitude motions in AB. Dihydrogen bonding may have a significant affect on materials to be used to store hydrogen for fuel-cell powered applications. We have noticed a trend of low temperature release of H2 in materials composed of hydridic and protonic hydrogen. This phenomenon has caught our attention and motivated our interest to gain more insight into dihydrogen bonding interactions in AB. We present results from a thorough Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) investigation of diffusive hydrogen motion in NH311BH3 and ND311BH3 to obtain (1) a direct measure of the rotational energy barriers the protonated species and (2) a confirmation of the 3-site jump model for rotational motion. The amplitude of the energy barrier of rotation of BH3 and NH3 determined by QENS are compared to those determined for BD3 and ND3 determined by 2H NMR studies.

Hess, Nancy J.; Hartman, Michael R.; Brown, Craig; Mamontov, Eugene; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Heldebrant, David J.; Daemen, Luke L.; Autrey, Thomas

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Herschel / HIFI observations of CO, H2O and NH3 in Mon R2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. Mon R2 is the only ultracompact HII region (UCHII) where the associated photon-dominated region (PDR) can be resolved with Herschel. Due to its brightness and proximity, it is the best source to investigate the chemistry and physics of highly UV-irradiated PDRs. Aims. Our goal is to estimate the abundance of H2O and NH3 in this region and investigate their origin. Methods. We present new observations obtained with HIFI and the IRAM-30m telescope. Using a large velocity gradient approach, we model the line intensities and derive an average abundance of H2O and NH3 across the region. Finally, we model the line profiles with a non-local radiative transfer model and compare these results with the abundance predicted by the Meudon PDR code. Results. The variations of the line profiles and intensities indicate complex geometrical and kinematical patterns. The H2O lines present a strong absorption at the ambient velocity and emission in high velocity wings towards the HII region. The spatial distribution of...

Pilleri, P; Cernicharo, J; Ossenkopf, V; Bern, O; Gerin, M; Pety, J; Goicoechea, J R; Rizzo, J R; Montillaud, J; Gonzlez-Garca, M; Joblin, C; Bourlot, J Le; Petit, F Le; Kramer, C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Growth kinetics and micromorphology of NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} crystals formed in the NH{sub 4}Cl-MnCl{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CONH{sub 3} system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth kinetics and elementary growth processes on the surface of NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} heterogeneous crystals formed in the NH{sub 4}Cl-MnCl{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CONH{sub 3} system are experimentally studied. It is found that a change in the composition of complexes in an NH{sub 4}Cl crystal from Mn(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O to MnCl{sub 2} {center_dot} 2CONH{sub 3} leads to the occurrence of a local maximum in the kinetic curve and a change in the shape of dislocation growth centers from flat to conical. The growth kinetics of {l_brace}100{r_brace} faces of heterogeneous NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} crystals is described within the Bliznakov model using the Fowler-Guggenheim adsorption isotherm, which takes into account the lateral interaction of adsorbed particles.

Pyankova, L. A., E-mail: lyuba_pyan@mail.ru; Punin, Yu. O.; Bocharov, S. N.; Shtukenberg, A. G. [Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

High mass resolution time of flight mass spectrometer for measuring products in heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate a combined microreactor and time of flight system for testing and characterization of heterogeneous catalysts with high resolution mass spectrometry and high sensitivity. Catalyst testing is performed in silicon-based microreactors which have high sensitivity and fast thermal response. Gas analysis is performed with a time of flight mass spectrometer with a modified nude Bayard-Alpert ionization gauge as gas ionization source. The mass resolution of the time of flight mass spectrometer using the ion gauge as ionization source is estimated to m/{Delta}m > 2500. The system design is superior to conventional batch and flow reactors with accompanying product detection by quadrupole mass spectrometry or gas chromatography not only due to the high sensitivity, fast temperature response, high mass resolution, and fast acquisition time of mass spectra but it also allows wide mass range (0-5000 amu in the current configuration). As a demonstration of the system performance we present data from ammonia oxidation on a Pt thin film showing resolved spectra of OH and NH{sub 3}.

Andersen, T.; Jensen, R.; Christensen, M. K.; Chorkendorff, I. [Department of Physics, Danish National Research Foundation's Center for Individual Nanoparticle Functionality (CINF), Technical University of Denmark, Building 312, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Pedersen, T.; Hansen, O. [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech Building 345 East, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Effect of sulfated CaO on NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess oxygen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of sulfated CaO on NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess oxygen was investigated to evaluate the potential of simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NO removal at the temperature range of 700-850{sup o}C. The physical and chemical properties of the CaO sulfation products were analyzed to investigate the NO reduction mechanism. Experimental results showed that sulfated CaO had a catalytic effect on NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess O{sub 2} after the sulfation reaction entered the transition control stage. With the increase of CaO sulfation extent in this stage, the activity for NO reduction first increased and then decreased, and the selectivity of NH{sub 3} for NO reduction to N{sub 2} increased. The byproduct (NO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O) formation during NO reduction experiments was negligible. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that neither CaSO{sub 3} nor CaS was detected, indicating that the catalytic activity of NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess O{sub 2} over sulfated CaO was originated from the CaSO{sub 4} product. These results revealed that simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NOx control by injecting NH{sub 3} into the dry flue gas desulfurization process for NO reduction might be achieved. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Tianjin Li; Yuqun Zhuo; Yufeng Zhao; Changhe Chen; Xuchang Xu [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Plasma-sprayed semiconductor electrodes: Photoelectrochemical characterization and NH sub 3 photoproduction by substoichiometric tungsten oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two substoichiometric tungsten oxide coatings have been obtained by plasma spray of WO{sub 3} powder on Ti substrates. The films are 40 {plus minus} 20 {mu}m thick and are yellow (WO{sub 2.99}) or dark blue (WO{sub 2.97}). WO{sub 2.99} coatings show a highly textured surface with a specific area 27.9 times the geometrical one. X-ray diffraction pattern reveals that their structure is a mixture of monoclinic and triclinic phases. The yellow films have been characterized photoelectrochemically in regenerative cells by using O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O redox at pH 2.0. Under anodic polarization of 1.5 V (SCE) their quantum yield is between 10% and 20% in the wavelength range comprised between 270 and 430 nm with an indirect bandgap of 2.55 eV and a flatband potential of {minus}0.1 V. WO{sub 2.99} films have been tested for NH{sub 3} photoproduction.

Ladouceur, M.; Dodelet, J.P. (INRS-Energie, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)); Tourillon, G. (Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)); Parent, L.; Dallaire, S. (IGM, Boucherville, Quebec (Canada))

1990-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Wayne NJ.rtf  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) Wayne, New Jersey FACT SHEET January 2004 DESCRIPTION: The Wayne site is located in a highly developed area of northern New Jersey, approximately 20 miles north-northwest of Newark, New Jersey. The site was formerly owned and operated by Rare Earths, Inc. and W.R. Grace & Co. Contamination at the property resulted from rare earths and thorium processing activities conducted at the facility during the period of 1948 to 1971. The property is now owned by the U.S. government and is designated as the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS). The site is located at the intersection of Black Oak Ridge Road and Pompton Plains Cross Road in Wayne Township, Passaic County, New Jersey. The WISS consists of approximately 6.5 acres of fenced property, roughly

88

Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Maywood NJ.rtf  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Maywood, New Jersey Maywood, New Jersey FACT SHEET January 2004 DESCRIPTION: The Maywood site is located in a highly developed area of northeastern New Jersey, in the boroughs of Maywood and Lodi and the township of Rochelle Park. It is located approximately 13 miles northeast of Newark, New Jersey. Contamination at the properties resulted from rare earths and thorium processing activities conducted at the Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) from the early 1900 through 1959. MCW stopped extracting thorium in 1959. The property was subsequently sold to the Stepan Company (Stepan), a pharmaceutical manufacturer, in 1959. The Maywood site is composed of the Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS) and various nearby properties, including the Stepan property and numerous residential, commercial, and

89

US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in New Jersey homes is for space heating. Air conditioning accounts for a larger share of household consumption than other Northeast states, but still only accounts for 3% of the...

90

The January Thaw at New Brunswick, NJ  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation of the January thaw phenomenon, a period of unseasonable warmth, was conducted using daily maximum temperatures recorded at New Brunswick, New Jersey, from 18581981. Student's t-tests, comparing long-term means of daily maximum ...

John R. Lanzante; Robert P. Harnack

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Middlesex NJ.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

were traces of radioactive materials that had been carried offsite over the years by wind and rain to yards of neighboring homes. Also, records later revealed that in 1948, some...

92

US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

than the average U.S. household. * New Jersey homes are 20% larger than the average U.S. home. CONSUMPTION BY END USE Nearly half the energy consumed in New Jersey homes is for...

93

Mercury's Protoplanetary Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major element fractionation among chondrites has been discussed for decades as ratios relative to Si or Mg. Recently, by expressing ratios relative to Fe, I discovered a new relationship admitting the possibility that ordinary chondrite meteorites are derived from two components, a relatively oxidized and undifferentiated, primitive component and a somewhat differentiated, planetary component, with oxidation state like the highly reduced enstatite chondrites, which I suggested was identical to Mercury's complement of lost elements. Here, on the basis of that relationship, I derive expressions, as a function of the mass of planet Mercury and the mass of its core, to estimate the mass of Mercury's lost elements, the mass of Mercury's alloy and rock protoplanetary core, and the mass of Mercury's gaseous protoplanet. Although Mercury's mass is well known, its core mass is not, being widely believed to be in the range of 70-80 percent of the planet mass. For a core mass of 75 percent, the mass of Mercury's lost elements is about 1.32 times the mass of Mercury, the mass of the alloy and rock protoplanetary core is about 2.32 times the mass of Mercury, and the mass of the gaseous protoplanet of Mercury is about 700 times the mass of Mercury. Circumstantial evidence is presented in support of the supposition that Mercury's lost elements is identical to the planetary component of ordinary chondrite formation.

J. Marvin Herndon

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Capacitive deionization of NH{sub 4}CIO{sub 4} solutions with carbon aerogel electrodes. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for capacitive deionization of water with a stack of carbon aerogel electrodes was developed. Unlike ion exchange, one of the more conventional deionization processes, no chemicals are required for regeneration of the system; electricity is used instead. An aqueous solution of NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4} is pumped through the electrochemical cell. After polarization, NH{sub 4}{sup +} and ClO{sub 4}{sup -} ions are removed from the water by the imposed electric field and trapped in the extensive cathodic and anodic double layers. Thsi process produces one stream of purified water and a second stream of concentrate. Effects of cell voltage, salt concentration, and cycling on electrosorption capacity were studied and results reported.

Farmer, J.C.; Fix, D.V.; Mack, G.V.; Pekala, R.W.; Poco, J.F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A reaction mechanism for titanium nitride CVD from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gas-phase and surface reaction mechanism for the CVD of TiN from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} is proposed. The only gas-phase process is complex formation, which can compete with deposition. The surface mechanism postulates the stepwise elimination of Cl and H atoms from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}, respectively, to form solid TiN and gaseous HCl. The mechanism also accounts for the change in oxidation state of Ti by allowing for liberation of N{sub 2}. Provided that the surface composition is at steady state, the stoichiometry of the overall reaction is reproduced exactly. In addition, the global kinetic law predicted by the mechanism is successfully fit to new deposition data from a rotating disk reactor and is shown to be consistent with literature results.

Larson, R.S.; Allendorf, M.D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Theoretical Mass Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mass spectrometry is an important technique in analytical chemistry, essential in areas including drug development, criminal ... Facilities/Tools Used: ...

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

97

Elbow mass flow meter  

SciTech Connect

Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

UNH Cooperative Extension is an equal opportunity educator and employer, UNH, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture and NH counties cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-up of what you did to Rhiannon Beauregard, 4-H State Program Coordinator. Signature of Applicant Date: Rhiannon Beauregard, 4-H State Program Coordinator Moiles House, 180 Main Street, Durham, NH 03824 Rhiannon.beauregard

New Hampshire, University of

99

Does Information Have Mass?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does information have mass? This question has been asked many times and there are many answers even on the Internet, including on Yahoo Answers. Usually the answer is "no". Attempts have been made to assess the physical mass of information by estimating the mass of electrons feeding the power-guzzling computers and devices making up the Internet, the result being around 50 gram. Other efforts to calculate the mass of information have assumed that each electron involved in signal transfer carries one bit of information, which makes the corresponding mass to be about 10^-5 gram. We address the fundamental question of minimum mass related to a bit of information from the angles of quantum physics and special relativity. Our results indicate that there are different answers depending on the physical situation, and sometimes the mass can even be negative. We tend to be skeptical about the earlier mass estimations, mentioned above, because our results indicate that the electron's mass does not play a role in any on...

Kish, Laszlo B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Nuclear Masses in Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of N and Z and the data obtained apply to a variety of physics topics. One of the most crucial questions to be addressed in mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides is the one of understanding the processes of element formation in the Universe. To this end, accurate atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations. In this paper, a review on the latest achievements in mass spectrometry for nuclear astrophysics is given.

Christine Weber; Klaus Blaum; Hendrik Schatz

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Mass-Loaded Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A key process within astronomy is the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between diffuse plasmas in many types of astronomical sources (including planetary nebulae, wind-blown bubbles, supernova remnants, starburst superwinds, and the intracluster medium) and dense, embedded clouds or clumps. This transfer affects the large scale flows of the diffuse plasmas as well as the evolution of the clumps. I review our current understanding of mass-injection processes, and examine intermediate-scale structure and the global effect of mass-loading on a flow. I then discuss mass-loading in a variety of diffuse sources.

J. M. Pittard

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

102

Precios de Gasolina  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precios de Gasolina para Ciudades en EEUU Pulse en el mapa para ver los precios de la gasolina en diferentes ciudades de su estado. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV...

103

DENSE GAS TRACERS IN PERSEUS: RELATING THE N{sub 2}H{sup +}, NH{sub 3}, AND DUST CONTINUUM PROPERTIES OF PRE- AND PROTOSTELLAR CORES  

SciTech Connect

We investigate 35 prestellar cores and 36 protostellar cores in the Perseus molecular cloud. We find a very tight correlation between the physical parameters describing the N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} gas. Both the velocity centroids and the line widths of N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} correlate much better than either species correlates with CO, as expected if the nitrogen-bearing species are probing primarily the dense core gas where the CO has been depleted. We also find a tight correlation in the inferred abundance ratio between N{sub 2}H{sup +} and para-NH{sub 3} across all cores, with N(p-NH{sub 3})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}) = 22 +- 10. We find a mild correlation between NH{sub 3} (and N{sub 2}H{sup +}) column density and the (sub)millimeter dust continuum derived H{sub 2} column density for prestellar cores, N(p-NH{sub 3})/N(H{sub 2}) {approx}10{sup -8}, but do not find a fixed ratio for protostellar cores. The observations suggest that in the Perseus molecular cloud the formation and destruction mechanisms for the two nitrogen-bearing species are similar, regardless of the physical conditions in the dense core gas. While the equivalence of N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} as powerful tracers of dense gas is validated, the lack of correspondence between these species and the (sub)millimeter dust continuum observations for protostellar cores is disconcerting and presently unexplained.

Johnstone, Doug; Kirk, Helen [National Research Council Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Rosolowsky, Erik [University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Tafalla, Mario, E-mail: doug.johnstone@nrc-cnrc.gc.c [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional (IGN), Alfonso XII 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain)

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

On the Photon Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the case for the photon having a tiny mass compatible with the experimental limits. We go over some possible experimental tests for such a photon mass including the violation of Lorentz symmetry. We point out that such violations may already have been witnessed in tests involving high energy gamma rays from outer space as also ultra high energy cosmic rays.

Burra G. Sidharth

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

105

Thermal masses in leptogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the validity of using thermal masses in the kinematics of final states in the decay rate of heavy neutrinos in leptogenesis calculations. We find that using thermal masses this way is a reasonable approximation, but corrections arise through quantum statistical distribution functions and leptonic quasiparticles.

Kiessig, Clemens P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Elbow mass flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

107

The origin of mass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The origin of mass is one of the deepest mysteries in science. Neutrons and protons, which account for almost all visible mass in the Universe, emerged from a primordial plasma through a cataclysmic phase transition microseconds after the Big Bang. However, ... Keywords: Gordon Bell Prize categories: scalability and time to solution, SC13 proceedings

Peter Boyle, Michael I. Buchoff, Norman Christ, Taku Izubuchi, Chulwoo Jung, Thomas C. Luu, Robert Mawhinney, Chris Schroeder, Ron Soltz, Pavlos Vranas, Joseph Wasem

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

W Transverse Mass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Some Data Analysis Some Data Analysis The Tevatron produces millions of collisions each second in CDF and DZero. The detectors have hardware triggers to decide if a collision is "interesting," that is it contains a candidate event for any one of a number studies. Our dataset contains 48,844 candidate events for a W mass study. There are other datasets to study Z mass, top and b quarks, QCD, etc. Why don't all the W decays give exactly the same mass? Are all these candidates really Ws? What if we chose only some of these data. How would our choice effect the value of the transverse mass? Work with your classmates. Test the data to see what you can learn. Help with data analysis. Record the best estimate of the W transverse mass from your data analysis. Explain which data you used and why. Check with your classmates and explain any differences between your estimate and theirs.

109

MassMass transfer andtransfer and arationstearationste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, temperature, T, and energy, E, are scalars and their gradient is a vector dc/dx or arationste scalars diffusion coefficient D; for species A in medium B : D = DAB 4 erföringo dx dc D dt.A dm m Massöve c cSepa dx dc )DD(m th Irreversible Thermodynamics considers Thermo-diffusion 4 erföringo T T Thermo

Zevenhoven, Ron

110

NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 ACTO3NH  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 ACTO3NH 0661 This publication may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone, or telecommunications device for the hearing impaired. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows: National Energy Information Center Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 Telecommunications Device for the Hearing Impaired Only: (202) 586-1181 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., eastern time, M-F

111

A model of the gas-phase chemistry of boron nitride CVC from BCl{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The kinetics of gas-phase reactions occurring during the CVD of boron nitride (BN) from BCl{sub 3} and NH{sub 3} are investigated using an elementary reaction mechanism whose rate constants were obtained from theoretical predictions and literature sources. Plug-flow calculations using this mechanism predict that unimolecular decomposition of BCl{sub 3} is not significant under typical CVD conditions, but that some NH{sub 3} decomposition may occur, especially for deposition occurring at atmospheric pressure. Reaction of BCl{sub 3} with NH{sub 3} is rapid under CVD conditions and yields species containing both boron and nitrogen. One of these compounds, Cl{sub 2}BNH{sub 2}, is predicted to be a key gas-phase precursor to BN.

Allendorf, M.D.; Melius, C.F.; Osterheld, T.H.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

FLUORESCENCE EXCITATION MODELS OF AMMONIA AND AMIDOGEN RADICAL (NH{sub 2}) IN COMETS: APPLICATION TO COMET C/2004 Q2 (MACHHOLZ)  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia is a major reservoir of nitrogen atoms in cometary materials. However, detections of ammonia in comets are rare, with several achieved at radio wavelengths. A few more detections were obtained through near-infrared observations (around the 3 {mu}m wavelength region), but moderate relative velocity shifts are required to separate emission lines of cometary ammonia from telluric absorption lines in the 3 {mu}m wavelength region. On the other hand, the amidogen radical (NH{sub 2}-a photodissociation product of ammonia in the coma) also shows rovibrational emission lines in the 3 {mu}m wavelength region. Thus, gas production rates for ammonia can be determined from the rovibrational emission lines of ammonia (directly) and amidogen radical (indirectly) simultaneously in the near-infrared. In this article, we present new fluorescence excitation models for cometary ammonia and amidogen radical in the near-infrared, and we apply these models to the near-infrared high-dispersion spectra of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) to determine the mixing ratio of ammonia to water in the comet. Based on direct detection of NH{sub 3} lines, the mixing ratio of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O is 0.46% {+-} 0.03% in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), in agreement with other results. The mixing ratio of ammonia determined from the NH{sub 2} observations (0.31%-0.79%) is consistent but has relatively larger error, owing to uncertainty in the photodissociation rates of ammonia. At the present level of accuracy, we confirm that NH{sub 3} could be the sole parent of NH{sub 2} in this comet.

Kawakita, Hideyo [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Mumma, Michael J., E-mail: kawakthd@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Solar System Exploration Division, Mailstop 690.3, NASA Godard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Higgs Mass Calculations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

this sheet now. Help with data analysis Higgs Mass Plot Project Contact: Thomas Jordan - jordant@fnal.gov Web Maintainer: qnet-webmaster@fnal.gov Last Update: August 22,...

114

Solids mass flow determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

Macko, Joseph E. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Short-term recovery of NH4-15N applied to a temperate forest inceptisol and ultisol in east Tennessee USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The short-term fate and retention of ammonium (NH4)-{sup 15}nitrogen (N) applied to two types of forest soils in east Tennessee was investigated. Four ridgetop forests, predominantly oak (Quercus spp.), were studied. Five applications of NH{sub 4}-{sup 15}N tracer were made to the forest floor at 2- to 4-week intervals over a 14-week period in 2004. Nitrogen-15 recovery in the forest floor, fine roots (100 weeks) indicated the forest floor is an effective filter for atmospheric N inputs.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Brice, Deanne Jane [ORNL; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

W Transverse Mass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transverse Mass Histogram Transverse Mass Histogram Data for 49,844 candidate W events are in an Excel spreadsheet with the following data as shown in the table below: A B C D 1 Run No Event No W TMass GeV/c2 Bins 2 55237 19588 68.71732 3 55237 30799 72.19464 Get the data. Sort the data by ascending mass. Be sure to sort all the data in the first three columns! Make a histogram of the data. Rather than graphing the data as individual points, physicists group the data by mass. They consider the full range of the data and divide it into "bins" of equal range size. A histogram is a graph of the number of events in each bin vs. the bin range. They are looking for a peak in the data where most of the masses fall. This will be the value of the mass as detemined by that dataset, and the width of the distribution is a reflection of the errors in the measurements.

117

Giga-Dalton Mass Spectrometry  

Current techniques to study large bio?molecules using mass spectrometer require fragmentation for the mass?to?charge ratios to be within the working range of the mass spectrometer. Analysis of the data is complex and often requires simulation ...

118

EMSL: Capabilities: Mass Spectrometry Experts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related EMSL User Projects Mass Spectrometry Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Research Resource for Integrative Biology...

119

Photon: history, mass, charge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The talk consists of three parts. ``History'' briefly describes the emergence and evolution of the concept of photon during the first two decades of the 20th century. ``Mass'' gives a short review of the literature on the upper limit of the photon's mass. ``Charge'' is a critical discussion of the existing interpretation of searches for photon charge. Schemes, in which all photons are charged, are grossly inconsistent. A model with three kinds of photons (positive, negative and neutral) seems at first sight to be more consistent, but turns out to have its own serious problems.

L. B. Okun

2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

120

Mass and Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last few years heat recovery was under spot and in air conditioning fields usually we use heat recovery by different types of heat exchangers. The heat exchanging between the exhaust air from the building with the fresh air to the building (air to air heat exchanger). In my papers I use (water to air heat exchanger) as a heat recovery and I use the water as a mass recovery. The source of mass and heat recovery is the condensate water which we were dispose and connect it to the drain lines.

Hindawai, S. M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Warm Water Mass Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poleward heat transport by the own implies warm Water mass formation, i.e., the retention by the tropical and subtropical ocean of some of its net radiant heat gain. Under what condition net heat retention becomes comparable to latent heat ...

G. T. Csanady

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Method for calibrating mass spectrometers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method whereby a mass spectra generated by a mass spectrometer is calibrated by shifting the parameters used by the spectrometer to assign masses to the spectra in a manner which reconciles the signal of ions within the spectra having equal mass but differing charge states, or by reconciling ions having known differences in mass to relative values consistent with those known differences. In this manner, the mass spectrometer is calibrated without the need for standards while allowing the generation of a highly accurate mass spectra by the instrument.

Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Brands, Michael D [Richland, WA; Bruce, James E [Schwenksville, PA; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

2002-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

123

Twisted mass finite volume effects  

SciTech Connect

We calculate finite-volume effects on the pion masses and decay constant in twisted mass lattice QCD at finite lattice spacing. We show that the lighter neutral pion in twisted mass lattice QCD gives rise to finite-volume effects that are exponentially enhanced when compared to those arising from the heavier charged pions. We demonstrate that the recent two flavor twisted mass lattice data can be better fitted when twisted mass effects in finite-volume corrections are taken into account.

Colangelo, Gilberto; Wenger, Urs; Wu, Jackson M. S. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

125

Single event mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

Conzemius, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

1990-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

126

Strange and charm meson masses from twisted mass lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present first results of a 2+1+1 flavor twisted mass lattice QCD computation of strange and charm meson masses. We focus on D and D_s mesons with spin J = 0,1 and parity P = -,+.

Martin Kalinowski; Marc Wagner

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

127

EMSL: Capabilities: Mass Spectrometry: Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Additional Information Meet the Mass Spectrometry Experts Related EMSL User Projects Mass Spectrometry Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Research Resource for Integrative Biology Biological and Environmental Research - PNNL Proteomics PNNL's Biological MS Data and Software Distribution Center Mass Spectrometry brochure EMSL is committed to offering state-of-the-art instruments to its users. At a workshop in January of 2008, EMSL mass spectrometry experts joined experts from many universities, private companies, and government institutions and laboratories at a conference held at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee Florida. Workshop participants reviewed the state of the art of high-performance mass spectrometers,

128

MassMass transfer andtransfer and separation technologyseparation technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Driving force Apparatus Heat exchange Energy T Heat exchanger Gas absorption Mass G L c y-y* Packed towerGas absorption Mass G L c, y-y* Packed tower, or tray column Gas desorption Mass L G c, y*-y Packed tower tower, or tray column and B from a mix Vaporisation cooling Energy, water h (enthalpy) Spray tower

Zevenhoven, Ron

129

"Gravitational mass" of information?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We hypothesize possible new types of forces that would be the result of new types of interactions, static and a slow transient, between objects with related information contents (pattern). Such mechanism could make material composition dependence claimed by Fishbach, et al in Eotvos type experiments plausible. We carried out experiments by using a high-resolution scale with the following memories: USB-2 flash drives (1-16GB), DVD and CD disks to determine if such an interaction exist/detectable with a scale resolution of 10 microgram with these test objects. We applied zero information, white noise and 1/f noise type data. Writing or deleting the information in any of these devices causes peculiar negative weight transients, up to milligrams (mass fraction around 10^-5), which is followed by various types of relaxation processes. These relaxations have significantly different dynamics compared to transients observed during cooling after stationary external heating. Interestingly, a USB-1 MP3 player has also developed comparable transient mass loss during playing music. A classical interpretation of the negative weight transients could be absorbed water in hygroscopic components however comparison of relaxation time constants with air humidity data does not support an obvious explanation. Another classical interpretation with certain contribution is the lifting Bernoulli force caused by the circulation due to convection of the warm air. However, in this case all observed time constants with a device should have been the same unless some hidden parameter causes the observed variations. Further studies are warranted to clarify if there is indeed a new force, which is showing up as negative mass at weight measurement when high-density structural information is changed or read out (measured).

Laszlo B. Kish

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

130

MASS SPECTROMETER LEAK  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved valve is described for precisely regulating the flow of a sample fluid to be analyzed, such as in a mass spectrometer, where a gas sample is allowed to "leak" into an evacuated region at a very low, controlled rate. The flow regulating valve controls minute flow of gases by allowing the gas to diffuse between two mating surfaces. The structure of the valve is such as to prevent the corrosive feed gas from contacting the bellows which is employed in the operation of the valve, thus preventing deterioration of the bellows.

Shields, W.R.

1960-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

131

HIGEE Mass Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distillation, absorption, and gas stripping have traditionally been performed in tall columns utilizing trays or packing. Columns perform satisfactorily, but have characteristics which may be disadvantages in some applications: Large size, particularly height; high weight; high cost of installation; difficulty in modularization; foaming for certain systems; must be vertical, especially for trayed towers; large liquid inventory; difficulty in modifying column internals once installed; start up time to reach steady state conditions in excessive. Many of these disadvantages can be overcome by use of HIGEE, an innovative vapor-liquid mass transfer system which utilizes a rotating bed of packing to achieve high efficiency separations, and consequent reduction in size and weight.

Mohr, R. J.; Fowler, R.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Heat and mass exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

133

Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this proceedings I review the physics that future experiments will use to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Linear electric field mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Nordholt, Jane E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Linear electric field mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Mass Transport within Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

McKone, Thomas E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Baryon Mass Extrapolation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consideration of the analytical properties of pion-induced baryon self-energies leads to new functional forms for the extrapolation of light baryon masses. These functional forms reproduce the leading non-analytic behavior of chiral perturbation theory, the correct heavy-quark limit and have the advantage of containing information on the extended structure of hadrons. The forms involve only three unknown parameters which may be optimized by fitting to present lattice data. Recent dynamical fermion results from CP-PACS and UK-QCD are extrapolated using these new functional forms. We also use these functions to probe the limit of the chiral perturbative regime and shed light on the applicability of chiral perturbation theory to the extrapolation of present lattice QCD results.

Derek B. Leinweber; Anthony W. Thomas; Kazuo Tsushima; Stewart V. Wright

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

ON THE MASS DISTRIBUTION AND BIRTH MASSES OF NEUTRON STARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the distribution of neutron star masses in different populations of binaries, employing Bayesian statistical techniques. In particular, we explore the differences in neutron star masses between sources that have experienced distinct evolutionary paths and accretion episodes. We find that the distribution of neutron star masses in non-recycled eclipsing high-mass binaries as well as of slow pulsars, which are all believed to be near their birth masses, has a mean of 1.28 M{sub Sun} and a dispersion of 0.24 M{sub Sun }. These values are consistent with expectations for neutron star formation in core-collapse supernovae. On the other hand, double neutron stars, which are also believed to be near their birth masses, have a much narrower mass distribution, peaking at 1.33 M{sub Sun }, but with a dispersion of only 0.05 M{sub Sun }. Such a small dispersion cannot easily be understood and perhaps points to a particular and rare formation channel. The mass distribution of neutron stars that have been recycled has a mean of 1.48 M{sub Sun} and a dispersion of 0.2 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the expectation that they have experienced extended mass accretion episodes. The fact that only a very small fraction of recycled neutron stars in the inferred distribution have masses that exceed {approx}2 M{sub Sun} suggests that only a few of these neutron stars cross the mass threshold to form low-mass black holes.

Oezel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Santos Villarreal, Antonio [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Narayan, Ramesh [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138,USA (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

William J. ODonnell; Donald S. Griffin

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Energy Functional for Nuclear Masses.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An energy functional is formulated for mass calculations of nuclei across the nuclear chart with major-shell occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom. The functional (more)

Bertolli, Michael Giovanni

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Effects of gaseous NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on the concentration profiles of PCDD/F in flyash under post-combustion zone conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on 2378-PCDD/F in flyash and flue gases was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 21-40% from the flue gases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 99% PCDD and 93% PCDF reductions in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 89% PCDD and 76% PCDF reductions in the flue gases. - Abstract: The influence of gaseous ammonia and sulphur dioxide on the formation of 2378-substituted PCDD/F on a reference flyash from a municipal waste incinerator has been investigated using a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor. The reference flyash samples (BCR-490) was reacted under a simulated flue gas stream at temperatures of 225 and 375 Degree-Sign C for 96 h. The experiments were carried out in two series: first with simulated flue gas alone, and then with injection of NH{sub 3} or SO{sub 2} gas into the flue gas just before the reactor inlet. It was found that the injection of gaseous ammonia into the flue gas could decrease the concentration of both PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% from the solid phase and by 21-40% from the gas phase. Converting the results to I-TEQ values, it could reduce the total I-TEQ values of PCDD and PCDF in the sum of the flyash and exhaust flue gas by 42-75% and 24-57% respectively. The application of SO{sub 2} led to 99% and 93% reductions in the PCDD and PCDF average congener concentrations, respectively in the solid phase. In the gas phase, the total reductions were 89% and 76% for PCDD and PCDF, respectively. Moreover, addition of SO{sub 2} reduced the total I-TEQ value of PCDD and PCDF in the flyash and exhaust flue gas together by 60-86% and 72-82% respectively. Sulphur dioxide was more effective than ammonia in suppressing PCDD/F formation in flyash under the conditions investigated.

Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A. [Energy Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Williams, Paul T., E-mail: p.t.williams@leeds.ac.uk [Energy Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Static-light meson masses from twisted mass lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the static-light meson spectrum using two-flavor Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD. We have considered five different values for the light quark mass corresponding to 300 MeV < m_PS < 600 MeV. We have extrapolated our results, to make predictions regarding the spectrum of B and B_s mesons.

ETM Collaboration; Karl Jansen; Chris Michael; Andrea Shindler; Marc Wagner

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Neutrino mass, a status report  

SciTech Connect

Experimental approaches to neutrino mass include kinematic mass measurements, neutrino oscillation searches at rectors and accelerators, solar neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and single and double beta decay. The solar neutrino results yield fairly strong and consistent indications that neutrino oscillations are occurring. Other evidence for new physics is less consistent and convincing.

Robertson, R.G.H.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Gravity and the Fermion Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that gravity generates mass for the fermion. It does so by coupling directly with the spinor field. The coupling term is invariant with respect to the electroweak gauge group $ U(1) \\otimes SU(2)_L. $ It replaces the fermion mass term $ m\\bar{\\psi} \\psi $.

Kenneth Dalton

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

145

Linear electric field mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer is described having a low weight and low power requirement, for use in space. It can be used to analyze the ionized particles in the region of the spacecraft on which it is mounted. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically sysmetric linear electric field.

McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

146

Quantum wells on 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunctions. Calculation of spontaneous polarization and electric field strength in experiments  

SciTech Connect

The results of experiments with quantum wells on 3C-SiC/4H-SiC and 3C-SiC/6H-SiC heterojunctions obtained by various methods are reconsidered. Spontaneous polarizations, field strengths, and energies of local levels in quantum wells on 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunctions were calculated within a unified model. The values obtained are in agreement with the results of all considered experiments. Heterojunction types are determined. Approximations for valence band offsets on heterojunctions between silicon carbide polytypes and the expression for calculating local levels in quantum wells on the 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunction are presented. The spontaneous polarizations and field strengths induced by spontaneous polarization on 3C-SiC/4H-SiC and 3C-SiC/6H-SiC heterojunctions were calculated as 0.71 and 0.47 C/m{sup 2} and 0.825 and 0.55 MV/cm, respectively.

Sbruev, I. S.; Sbruev, S. B., E-mail: science@yandex.ru [Moscow Aviation Institute (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

HfO2 Gate Dielectric on (NH4)2S Passivated (100) GaAs Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interface between hafnium oxide grown by atomic layer deposition and (100) GaAs treated with HCl cleaning and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S passivation has been characterized. Synchrotron radiation photoemission core level spectra indicated successful removal of the native oxides and formation of passivating sulfides on the GaAs surface. Layer-by-layer removal of the hafnia film revealed a small amount of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed at the interface during the dielectric deposition. Traces of arsenic and sulfur out-diffusion into the hafnia film were observed after a 450 C post-deposition anneal, and may be the origins for the electrically active defects. Transmission electron microscopy cross section images showed thicker HfO{sub 2} films for a given precursor exposure on S-treated GaAs versus the non-treated sample. In addition, the valence-band and the conduction-band offsets at the HfO{sub 2}/GaAs interface were deduced to be 3.18 eV and a range of 0.87-0.97 eV, respectively. It appears that HCl+(NH{sub 4})2{sub S} treatments provide a superior chemical passivation for GaAs and initial surface for ALD deposition.

Chen, P.T.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Y.; /SLAC, SSRL; Kim, E.; McIntyre, P.C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Tsai, W.; Garner, M.; /Intel, Santa Clara; Pianetta, P.; /SLAC, SSRL; Nishi, Y.; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept.; Chui, C.O.; /UCLA

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

148

AFFECTS OF MECHANICAL MILLING AND METAL OXIDE ADDITIVES ON SORPTION KINETICS OF 1:1 LiNH2/MgH2 MIXTURE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The destabilized complex hydride system composed of LiNH{sub 2}:MgH{sub 2} (1:1 molar ratio) is one of the leading candidates of hydrogen storage with a reversible hydrogen storage capacity of 8.1 wt%. A low sorption enthalpy of {approx}32 kJ/mole H{sub 2} was first predicted by Alapati et al. utilizing first principle density function theory (DFT) calculations and has been subsequently confirmed empirically by Lu et al. through differential thermal analysis (DTA). This enthalpy suggests that favorable sorption kinetics should be obtainable at temperatures in the range of 160 C to 200 C. Preliminary experiments reported in the literature indicate that sorption kinetics are substantially lower than expected in this temperature range despite favorable thermodynamics. Systematic isothermal and isobaric sorption experiments were performed using a Sievert's apparatus to form a baseline data set by which to compare kinetic results over the pressure and temperature range anticipated for use of this material as a hydrogen storage media. Various material preparation methods and compositional modifications were performed in attempts to increase the kinetics while lowering the sorption temperatures. This paper outlines the results of these systematic tests and describes a number of beneficial additions which influence kinetics as well as NH{sub 3} formation.

Erdy, C.; Anton, D.; Gray, J.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

149

To cities, with nothing : prisoner resettlement in Newark, NJ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis considers how cities can improve employment outcomes of recently released, formerly incarcerated people. The Newark Prisoner Reentry Initiative (NPRI) is a unique case where the city directly managed six ...

Feeney, Kevin Joseph

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maywood Site - NJ 10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

151

RECIPIENT:Princeton Power Systems STATE: NJ PROJECT Marine High...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This is a fully licensed facility with established safety and chemical handling protocols . All activities meet OSHA standards and the site is monitored and audited by OSHA,...

152

DOE's NJ HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE BOWL | Princeton Plasma Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

153

Chip-Scale Quadrupole Mass Filters for Portable Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new class of chip-scale quadrupole mass filter (QMF). The devices are completely batch fabricated using a wafer-scale process that integrates the quadrupole ...

Cheung, Kerry

154

High-throughput and in situ EDXRD investigation on the formation of two new metal aminoethylphosphonates - Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) and Ca(OH)(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O  

SciTech Connect

The system Ca{sup 2+}/2-aminoethylphosphonic acid/H{sub 2}O/NaOH was systematically investigated using high-throughput methods. The experiments led to one new compound Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2} H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) (1) and the crystal structure was determined using in house X-ray powder diffraction data (monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/c, a=9.7753(3), b=6.4931(2), c=8.4473(2) A, {beta}=106.46(2) Degree-Sign , V=514.20(2) A{sup 3}, Z=4). The formation of 1 was investigated by in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction measurements (EDXRD) at beamline F3 at HASYLAB (light source DORIS III), DESY, Hamburg. An intermediate, Ca(OH)(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2), was observed and could be isolated from the reaction mixture at ambient temperatures by quenching the reaction. The crystal structure of 2 was determined from XRPD data using synchrotron radiation (monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/m, a=11.2193(7), b=7.1488(3), c=5.0635(2) A, {beta}=100.13(4) Degree-Sign , V=399.78(3) A{sup 3}, Z=2). - Graphical abstarct: The detailed in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) investigation on the formation of the new inorganic-organic hybrid compound Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) leads to the discovery of a new crystalline intermediate phase. Both crystal structures were elucidated using X-ray powder diffraction data. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-throughput investigation led to new metal aminoethylphosphonate Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) was followed by in situ EDXRD measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystalline intermediate Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3})(OH){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O was discovered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolation of Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3})(OH){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O was accomplished by quenching experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures were determined using X-ray powder diffraction data.

Schmidt, Corinna; Feyand, Mark [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Max-Eyth Strasse 2, D 24118 Kiel (Germany); Rothkirch, Andre [HASYLAB, DESY Hamburg, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Stock, Norbert, E-mail: stock@ac.uni-kiel.de [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Max-Eyth Strasse 2, D 24118 Kiel (Germany)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfabricated mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator actively measures the mass of a sample on an acoustic microbalance during the collection process. The microbalance comprises a chemically sensitive interface for collecting the sample thereon and an acoustic-based physical transducer that provides an electrical output that is proportional to the mass of the collected sample. The acoustic microbalance preferably comprises a pivot plate resonator. A resistive heating element can be disposed on the chemically sensitive interface to rapidly heat and release the collected sample for further analysis. Therefore, the mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

Neutrino Mass and Grand Unification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seesaw mechanism appears to be the simplest and most appealing way to understand small neutrino masses observed in recent experiments. It introduces three right handed neutrinos with heavy masses to the standard model, with at least one mass required by data to be close to the scale of conventional grand unified theories. This may be a hint that the new physics scale implied by neutrino masses and grand unification of forces are one and the same. Taking this point of view seriously, I explore different ways to resolve the puzzle of large neutrino mixings in grand unified theories such as SO(10) and models based on its subgroup $SU(2)_L\\times SU(2)_R\\times SU(4)_c$.

R. N. Mohapatra

2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

157

Thermal Mass and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Mass and Demand Response Speaker(s): Gregor Henze Phil C. Bomrad Date: November 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Janie Page The topic of...

158

Figure 23. Average price of natural gas delivered to U.S. commercial...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI DE DC NC SC GA FL NJ AL...

159

Microsoft Word - figure_22.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI DE DC NC SC GA FL NJ AL...

160

Neutrino Mass and Flavour Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We survey some of the recent promising developments in the search for the theory behind neutrino mass and tri-bimaximal mixing, and indeed all fermion masses and mixing. We focus in particular on models with discrete family symmetry and unification, and show how such models can also solve the SUSY flavour and CP problems. We also discuss the theoretical implications of the measurement of a non-zero reactor angle, as hinted at by recent experimental measurements.

King, Stephen F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Neutrino Mass and Flavour Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We survey some of the recent promising developments in the search for the theory behind neutrino mass and tri-bimaximal mixing, and indeed all fermion masses and mixing. We focus in particular on models with discrete family symmetry and unification, and show how such models can also solve the SUSY flavour and CP problems. We also discuss the theoretical implications of the measurement of a non-zero reactor angle, as hinted at by recent experimental measurements.

Stephen F King

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Light and Heavy Mass Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effort to understand pre-cooling thermal mass as a Demandof Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEKey words: Pre-cooling, demand response, thermal mass

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

High external quantum efficiency and fill-factor InGaN/GaN heterojunction solar cells grown by NH{sub 3}-based molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

High external quantum efficiency (EQE) p-i-n heterojunction solar cells grown by NH{sub 3}-based molecular beam epitaxy are presented. EQE values including optical losses are greater than 50% with fill-factors over 72% when illuminated with a 1 sun AM0 spectrum. Optical absorption measurements in conjunction with EQE measurements indicate an internal quantum efficiency greater than 90% for the InGaN absorbing layer. By adjusting the thickness of the top p-type GaN window contact layer, it is shown that the short-wavelength (<365 nm) quantum efficiency is limited by the minority carrier diffusion length in highly Mg-doped p-GaN.

Lang, J. R.; Hurni, C. A.; Cruz, S. C.; Matioli, E.; Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Neufeld, C. J.; Mishra, U. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

164

QM/MM Lineshape Simulation of the Hydrogen-bonded Uracil NH Stretching Vibration of the Adenine:Uracil Base Pair in CDCl$_3$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hybrid Car-Parrinello QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out for the Watson-Crick base pair of 9-ethyl-8-phenyladenine and 1-cyclohexyluracil in deuterochloroform solution at room temperature. The resulting trajectory is analyzed putting emphasis on the N-H$...$N Hydrogen bond geometry. Using an empirical correlation between the $\\NN$-distance and the fundamental NH-stretching frequency, the time-dependence of this energy gap along the trajectory is obtained. From the gap-correlation function we determine the infrared absorption spectrum using lineshape theory in combination with a multimode oscillator model. The obtained average transition frequency and the width of the spectrum is in reasonable agreement with recent experimental data.

Yan, Yun-an; Khn, Oliver

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

QLC relation and neutrino mass hierarchy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

neutrino mass matrix is generated at high energies, s 12 = cneutrino mass matrix is generated at low energy scales. Ontrino mass matrix is generated at some high energy scale. We

Ferrandis, Javier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia using Cu-ZSM-5 and Va-based honeycomb monolith catalysts: effect of H2 pretreatment, NH3-to-NO ratio, O2, and space velocity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, the steady-state performance of zeolite-based (Cu-ZSM-5) and vanadium-based honeycomb monolith catalysts was investigated in the selective catalytic reduction process (SCR) for NO removal using NH3. The aim was to delineate the effect of various parameters including pretreatment of the catalyst sample with H2, NH3-to-NO ratio, inlet oxygen concentration, and space velocity. The concentrations of the species (e.g. NO, NH3, and others) were determined using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The temperature was varied from ambient (25 C) to 500 C. The investigation showed that all of the above parameters (except pre-treatment with H2) significantly affected the peak NO reduction, the temperature at which peak NO reduction occurred, and residual ammonia left at higher temperatures (also known as 'NH3 slip'). Depending upon the particular values of the parameters, a peak NO reduction of around 90% was obtained for both the catalysts. However, an accompanied generation of N2O and NO2 species was observed as well, being much higher for the vanadium-based catalyst than for the Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst. For both catalysts, the peak NO reduction decreased with an increase in space velocity, and did not change significantly with an increase in oxygen concentration. The temperatures at which peak NO reduction and complete NH3 removal occurred increased with an increase in space velocity but decreased with an increase in oxygen concentration. The presence of more ammonia at the inlet (i.e. higher NH3-to-NO ratio) improved the peak NO reduction but simultaneously resulted in an increase in residual ammonia. Pretreatment of the catalyst sample with H2 (performed only for the Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst) did not produce any perceivable difference in any of the results for the conditions of these experiments.

Gupta, Saurabh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy or Mass and Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A review. Problems: 1-Many empirical parameters and large dimension number; 2-Gravitation and Electrodynamics are challenged by dark matter and energy. Energy and nonlinear electrodynamics are fundamental in a unified nonlinear interaction. Nuclear energy appears as nonlinear SU(2) magnetic energy. Gravitation and electromagnetism are unified giving Einstein's equation and a geometric energy momentum tensor. A solution energy in the newtonian limit gives the gravitational constant G. Outside of this limit G is variable. May be interpreted as dark matter or energy. In vacuum, known gravitational solutions are obtained. Electromagnetism is an SU(2) subgroup. A U(1) limit gives Maxwell's equations. Geometric fields determine a generalized Dirac equation and are the germ of quantum physics. Planck's h and of Einstein's c are given by the potential and the metric. Excitations have quanta of charge, flux and spin determining the FQHE. There are only three stable 1/2 spin fermions. Mass is a form of energy. The rest energies of the fermions give the proton/electron mass ratio. Potential excitations have energies equal to the weak boson masses allowing a geometric interpretation of Weinberg's angle. SU(2) gives the anomalous magnetic moments of proton, electron, neutron and generates nuclear range attractive potentials strong enough to produce the binding energies of the deuteron and other nuclides. Lepton and meson masses are due to topological excitations. The geometric mass spectrum is satisfactory. The proton has a triple structure. The alpha constant is a geometric number.

Gustavo R Gonzalez-Martin

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

168

Photon and graviton mass limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review past and current studies of possible long-distance, low-frequency deviations from Maxwell electrodynamics and Einstein gravity. Both have passed through three phases: (1) Testing the inverse-square laws of Newton and Coulomb, (2) Seeking a nonzero value for the rest mass of photon or graviton, and (3) Considering more degrees of freedom, allowing mass while preserving gauge or general-coordinate invariance. For electrodynamics there continues to be no sign of any deviation. Since our previous review the lower limit on the photon Compton wavelength (associated with weakening of electromagnetic fields in vacuum over large distance scale) has improved by four orders of magnitude, to about one astronomical unit. Rapid current progress in astronomical observations makes it likely that there will be further advances. These ultimately could yield a bound exceeding galactic dimensions, as has long been contemplated. Meanwhile, for gravity there have been strong arguments about even the concept of a graviton rest mass. At the same time there are striking observations, commonly labeled 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' that some argue imply modified gravity. This makes the questions for gravity much more interesting. For dark matter, which involves increased attraction at large distances, any explanation by modified gravity would be qualitatively different from graviton mass. Because dark energy is associated with reduced attraction at large distances, it might be explained by a graviton-mass-like effect.

Nieto, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goldhaber Scharff, Alfred [SUNY

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Cranking mass parameters for fission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A formalism for semi-adiabatic cranking mass parameters is presented. For the fission process of 234U, the time-dependent pairing equations of motion were used to calculate the excitation energy and to extract values of the cranking inertia. A fission barrier is determined by minimizing the action trajectory in a five dimensional configuration space spanned by elongation, necking, deformations of fragments and mass-asymmetry. The deformation energy is computed in the the frame of the microscopic-macroscopic model. The two center shell model with Woods-Saxon potentials is used in this context. Values of the inertia for excited fissioning systems are reported. A dependence between the cranking mass parameters and the intrinsic excitation energy is evidenced.

M. Mirea; R. C. Bobulescu

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

170

Mass transport through polycrystalline microstructures  

SciTech Connect

Mass transport properties are important in polycrystalline materials used as protective films. Traditionally, such properties have been studied by examining model polycrystalline structures, such as a regular array of straight grain boundaries. However, these models do not account for a number of features of real grain ensembles, including the grain size distribution and variations in grain shape. In this study, a finite difference scheme is developed to study transient and steady-state mass transport through realistic two dimensional polycrystalline microstructures. Comparisons with the transport properties of traditional model microstructures provide regimes of applicability of such models. The effects of microstructural parameters such as average grain size are examined.

Swiler, T.P.; Holm, E.A.; Young, M.F.; Wright, S.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mass Transit to Mass Transit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Ridesharing Mass Transit Active Transit Multi-Modal Transportation Telework Mass Transit Passenger-Miles per Gallon Passenger-miles per gallon (pmpg) is a metric for comparing mass transit and rideshare with typical passenger vehicle travel. Transportation system

172

CORONAL MASS EJECTION MASS, ENERGY, AND FORCE ESTIMATES USING STEREO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding coronal mass ejection (CME) energetics and dynamics has been a long-standing problem, and although previous observational estimates have been made, such studies have been hindered by large uncertainties in CME mass. Here, the two vantage points of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) COR1 and COR2 coronagraphs were used to accurately estimate the mass of the 2008 December 12 CME. Acceleration estimates derived from the position of the CME front in three dimensions were combined with the mass estimates to calculate the magnitude of the kinetic energy and driving force at different stages of the CME evolution. The CME asymptotically approaches a mass of 3.4 {+-} 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} g beyond {approx}10 R{sub Sun }. The kinetic energy shows an initial rise toward 6.3 {+-} 3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 29} erg at {approx}3 R{sub Sun }, beyond which it rises steadily to 4.2 {+-} 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg at {approx}18 R{sub Sun }. The dynamics are described by an early phase of strong acceleration, dominated by a force of peak magnitude of 3.4 {+-} 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} N at {approx}3 R{sub Sun }, after which a force of 3.8 {+-} 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} N takes effect between {approx}7 and 18 R{sub Sun }. These results are consistent with magnetic (Lorentz) forces acting at heliocentric distances of {approx}Sun }, while solar wind drag forces dominate at larger distances ({approx}>7 R{sub Sun }).

Carley, Eoin P.; Gallagher, Peter T. [Astrophysics Research Group, School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); McAteer, R. T. James [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

173

Time of flight mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

Ulbricht, Jr., William H. (Arvada, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Mass modification experiment definition study  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes an attempt to find an experiment that would test the Haisch, Rueda, and Puthoff (HRP) conjecture that the mass and inertia of a body are induced effects brought about by changes in the quantum-fluctuation energy of the vacuum. It was not possible, however, to identify a definitive experiment. But, it was possible to identify an experiment that might be able to prove or disprove that the inertial mass of a body can be altered by making changes in the vacuum surrounding the body. Other experiments, which do not involve mass modification, but which teach something about the vacuum, were also defined and included in a ranked list of experiments. This report also contains an annotated bibliography. An interesting point raised by this paper is this: We can estimate the `vacuum energy density` to be 10{sup 108} J/cc, and the vacuum mass density to be 10{sup 94} g/cc, much higher numbers than those associated with nuclear energy. Although the field of `electromagnetic fluctuation energy of the vacuum` is admittedly an esoteric, little-understood field, it does seem to have definite potential as an energy source. 47 refs.

Forward, R.L. [Forward Unlimited, Malibu, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Comments on the mass of the Photon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

De Broglie believed that the photon has a mass, a view shared by a few others. Quite recently, the author has argued that the photon has a mass which is consistent with the latest experimental limits. In the present paper we point out that there is experimental evidence for this mass and also give a theoretical demonstration of the photon mass.

Burra G. Sidharth

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

176

MassMass transfer andtransfer and separation technologyseparation technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) i fl id t b Massöve small units are needed (H 1 m); 2) corrosive fluids must be handledRaschig ringring packingpacking For Raschig rings with a 1" (inch) di t d h i ht l l t th Picture: WK92 diameter Laboratory tel. 3223 ; ron.zevenhoven@abo.fi RoNz eknikarationste 24302 ochSepa 13.1 Principle of operation

Zevenhoven, Ron

177

MassMass transfer andtransfer and separation technologyseparation technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, spray columns (a) ­ Columns with mechanical agitators or centrifugal effects, for example see section 9.2 24302 ochSepa g g , f p rotating disc contactors (RDC) (b), Kühni columns (c) a b c 4 erföringo a b c-thermal, continuous, steady-state) can be presented as a series of N equilibrium stage contactors Massöve N

Zevenhoven, Ron

178

Exposing the dressed quark's mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This snapshot of recent progress in hadron physics made in connection with QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations includes: a perspective on confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB); a pre'cis on the physics of in-hadron condensates; results on the hadron spectrum, including dressed-quark-core masses for the nucleon and Delta, their first radial excitations, and the parity-partners of these states; an illustration of the impact of DCSB on the electromagnetic pion form factor, thereby exemplifying how data can be used to chart the momentum-dependence of the dressed-quark mass function; and a prediction that F_1^{p,d}/F_1^{p,u} passes through zero at Q^2\\approx 5m_N^2 owing to the presence of nonpointlike scalar and axial-vector diquark correlations in the nucleon.

Roberts, H L L; Cloet, I C; Roberts, C D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Development of a variable-temperature ion mobility/ time-of-flight mass spectrometer for separation of electronic isomers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The construction of a liquid nitrogen-cooled ion mobility spectrometer coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry was implemented to demonstrate the ability to discriminate between electronic isomers. Ion mobility allows for the separation of ions based on differing cross-sections-to-charge ratio. This allows for the possible discrimination of species with same mass if the ions differ by cross-section. Time-offlight mass spectrometry was added to mass identify the separated peak for proper identification. A liquid nitrogen-cooled mobility cell was employed for a two-fold purpose. First, the low temperatures increase the peak resolution to aid in resolving the separated ions. This is necessary when isomers may have similar cross-sections. Second, low temperature shortens the mean free path and decreases the neutral buffer gas speeds allowing for more interactions between the ions and the drift gas. Kr2+ study was performed to verify instrument performance. The variable-temperature ion mobility spectrometer was utilized to separate the distonic and conventional ion forms of CH3OH, CH3F, and CH3NH2 and to discriminate between the keto and enol forms of the acetone radical cation. Density functional theory and ab initio calculations were employed to aid in proper identification of separating isomers. Monte Carlo integration tools were also developed to predict ion cross-section and resolution within a buffer gas.

Verbeck, Guido Fridolin

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

LOW-TEMPERATURE ION TRAP STUDIES OF N{sup +}({sup 3} P{sub ja} ) + H{sub 2}(j) {yields} NH{sup +} + H  

SciTech Connect

Using a low-temperature 22-pole ion trap apparatus, detailed measurements for the title reaction have been performed between 10 K and 100 K in order to get some state specific information about this fundamental hydrogen abstraction process. The relative population of the two lowest H{sub 2} rotational states, j = 0 and 1, has been varied systematically. NH{sup +} formation is nearly thermo-neutral; however, to date, the energetics are not known with the accuracy required for low-temperature astrochemistry. Additional complications arise from the fact that, so far, there is no reliable theoretical or experimental information on how the reactivity of the N{sup +} ion depends on its fine-structure (FS) state {sup 3} P{sub ja} . Since in the present trapping experiment, thermalization of the initially hot FS population competes with hydrogen abstraction, the evaluation of the decay of N{sup +} ions over long storage times and at various He and H{sub 2} gas densities provides information on these processes. First assuming strict adiabatic behavior, a set of state specific rate coefficients is derived from the measured thermal rate coefficients. In addition, by recording the disappearance of the N{sup +} ions over several orders of magnitude, information on nonadiabatic transitions is extracted including FS-changing collisions.

Zymak, I.; Hejduk, M.; Mulin, D.; Plasil, R.; Glosik, J.; Gerlich, D. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Imaging ion-molecule reactions: Charge transfer and C-N bond formation in the C{sup +}+ NH{sub 3} system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The velocity mapping ion imaging method is applied to the ion-molecule reactions occurring between C{sup +} and NH{sub 3}. The velocity space images are collected over the relative collision energy range from 1.5 to 3.3 eV, allowing both product kinetic energy distributions and angular distributions to be obtained from the data. The charge transfer process appears to be direct, dominated by long-range electron transfer that results in minimal deflection of the products. The product kinetic energy distributions are consistent with a process dominated by energy resonance. The kinetic energy distributions for C-N bond formation appear to scale with the total available energy, providing strong evidence that energy in the [CNH{sub 3}]{sup +} precursor to products is distributed statistically. The angular distributions for C-N bond formation show pronounced forward-backward symmetry, as expected for a complex that resembles a prolate symmetric top decaying along its symmetry axis.

Pei, Linsen; Farrar, James M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

Detailed modeling and laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH(i)-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we study the formation of NO in laminar, nitrogen diluted methane diffusion flames that are seeded with ammonia in the fuel stream. We have performed numerical simulations with detailed chemistry as well as laser-induced fluorescence imaging measurements for a range of ammonia injection rates. For comparison with the experimental data, synthetic LIF images are calculated based on the numerical data accounting for temperature and fluorescence quenching effects. We demonstrate good agreement between measurements and computations. The LIF corrections inferred from the simulation are then used to calculate absolute NO mole fractions from the measured signal.The NO formation in both doped and undoped flames occurs in the flame sheet. In the undoped flame, four different mechanisms including thermal and prompt NO appear to contribute to NO formation. As the NH3 seeding level increases, fuel-NO becomes the dominant mechanism and N2 shifts from being a net reactant to being a net product. Nitric oxide in the undoped flame as well as in the core region of the doped flames are underpredicted by the model; we attribute this mainly to inaccuracies in the NO recycling chemistry on the fuel-rich side of the flame sheet.

Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Bessler, Wolfgang G.; Schulz, Christof; Glarborg, Peter; Jensen, Anker D.

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

183

Graphene, neutrino mass and oscillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A resolution of the Abraham-Minkowski dilemma is presented that other constant velocities can play the role of c in the theory of relativity. For example, in 2005 electrons of graphene were discovered to behave as if the coefficient is a Fermi velocity. Then we propose a conjecture for neutrinos to avoid the contradiction among two-component theory, negative rest mass-square and oscillation.

Z. Y. Wang

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

Make Checks Payable to the 4-H Foundation of New Hampshire. For more information contact Rhiannon Beauregard at Rhiannon.Beauergard@unh.edu or (603) 862-2188. All of this information can be found at the NH 4-H State Horse Show Website  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beauregard at Rhiannon.Beauergard@unh.edu or (603) 862-2188. All of this information can be found at the NH 4 Foundation of New Hampshire. For more information contact Rhiannon Beauregard at Rhiannon Exposition. Please notify Rhiannon Beauregard, NH 4-H Animal and Agricultural Science Education Coordinator

New Hampshire, University of

185

Hadron Mass Extraction from Lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extraction of quantities from lattice QCD calculations at realistic quark masses is of considerable importance. Whilst physical quark masses are some way off, the recent advances in the calculation of hadron masses within full QCD now invite improved extrapolation methods. We show that, provided the correct chiral behaviour of QCD is respected in the extrapolation to realistic quark masses, one can indeed obtain a fairly reliable determination of masses, the sigma commutator and the J parameter. We summarise these findings by presenting the nonanalytic behaviour of nucleon and rho masses in the standard Edinburgh plot.

S. V. Wright; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; K. Tsushima

2001-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

186

NH_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UnitedStatesWindHighResolutionNewHampshireWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of New...

187

Discrete symmetries and neutrino masses  

SciTech Connect

We constructed a model of neutrino masses using Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism with U(1)xZ{sub 3}xZ{sub 2} flavor symmetry. The model predicts that (2/3)m{sub 2}/m{sub 3}{approx}{radical}(2)sin{theta}{sub 13} at lepton number violating scale M{sub 1}. It is shown that the small values for m{sub 2}/m{sub 3} and sin{theta}{sub 13} are consequences of breaking discrete symmetries.

Siyeon, Kim [Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Quark masses : an environmental impact statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how the requirement that organic chemistry be possible constrains the values of the quark masses. Specifically, we choose a slice through the parameter space of the Standard Model in which quark masses vary ...

Kimchi, Itamar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Global Diagnostic of Interocean Mass Transfers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective and quantitative estimate of all mean annual interocean mass transfers together with a picture of the associated mean pathways is presented. The global ocean circulation transfers mass, heat, and salinity between the various ocean ...

B. Blanke; S. Speich; G. Madec; K. Ds

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

What are the exact relative masses of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to one another, it doesn't tell you what the actual masses of these particles are. In kilograms, the masses are: Neutron 1.6749286*10-27 kg Proton 1.6726231*10-27 kg Electron ...

191

W Boson Mass Working Group Report  

SciTech Connect

The W boson mass working group discussed the current status of the W boson mass measurement and the prospects for improving on LEP and Tevatron measurements at the LHC.

Kilgore, W.; Kilgore, W.

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

192

Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: Extreme Sensitivity in Biological ...  

THE LLNL TECHNOLOGY COMPANY PRODUCT 24 Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: Extreme Sensitivity in Biological Research

193

The conservation of mass-moment parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study a concept of mass-moment parameter which is the generalization of the mass and the moments of inertia of a continuous media. We shall present some interesting kinematical results in the hypothesis that a set of mass-moment parameters are conserved in a motion of a continuous media.

Dan Comanescu

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

194

Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

Chastagner, P.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e Nice - Sophia Antipolis & Institut Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M be a smooth connected compact surface in Rn of the lengths of the curves (drawn on M) joining x to y. Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12

Rifford, Ludovic

196

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M be a smooth connected compact surface), as the minimum of the lengths of the curves (drawn on M) joining x to y. Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation

Rifford, Ludovic

197

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis & Institut Universitaire de France UPV/EHU Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;Transport maps Let µ0 and µ1 be probability measures on M. We

Rifford, Ludovic

198

Eliminating the low-mass axigluon window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using recent collider data, especially on the hadronic width the Z0, we exclude axigluons in the currently allowed low-mass window, namely axigluons in the mass range 50 GeV < M_A < 120 GeV. Combined with hadron collider data from di-jet production, axigluons with masses below roughly 1 TeV are now completely excluded.

M. A. Doncheski; R. W. Robinett

1998-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

199

Mass terms in the Skyrme Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider various forms of the mass term that can be used in the Skyrme model and their implications on the properties of baryonic states. We show that, with an appropriate choice for the mass term, without changing the asymptotic behaviour of the profile functions at large $r$, we can considerably reduce or increase the mass term's contribution to the classical mass of the solitons. We find that multibaryon configurations can be classically bound at large baryon numbers for some choices of this mass term.

V. B. Kopeliovich; B. Piette; W. J. Zakrzewski

2005-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

200

Majorana Neutrino Masses from Flavor Symmetries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk we discuss the implications of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model augmented by a single U(1) anomalous family symmetry for neutrino masses and mixing angles. The left-handed neutrino states are provided with Majorana masses through a dimension-five operator in the absence of right handed neutrino components. Assuming symmetric lepton mass matrices, the model predicts inverse hierarchical neutrino mass spectrum, theta_13=0 and large mixing while at the same time it provides acceptable mass matrices for the charged fermions.

A. Psallidas

2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Higgs Particle Mass in Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A version of the Standard Model is considered, where the electroweak symmetry breaking is provided by cosmological initial data given for the zeroth Fourier harmonic of the Higgs field $$. The initial data symmetry breaking mechanism removes the Higgs field contribution to the vacuum energy density, possible creation of monopoles, and tachion behavior at high energies, if one imposes an ``inertial'' condition on the Higgs potential $\\textsf{V}_{\\rm Higgs}()=0$. The requirement of zero radiative corrections to this {\\em inertial} condition coincides with the limiting point of the vacuum stability in the Standard Model. The latter together with the direct experimental limit gives the prediction for the mass of the Higgs boson to be in the range $114 < m_h \\lsim 134$ GeV.

A. B. Arbuzov; L. A. Glinka; V. N. Pervushin

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

203

Compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a time-of-flight mass spectrometer developed for measuring the parameters of a pulsed hydrogen beam. The duration of an electron-beam current pulse in the ionizer of the mass spectrometer can be varied within 2-20 usec, the pulse electron current is 0.6 mA, and the electron energy is 250 eV. The time resolution of the mass spectrometer is determined by the repetition period of the electron-beam current pulses and is 40 usec. The mass spectrometer has 100% transmission in the direction of motion of molecular-beam particles. The dimension of the mass spectrometer is 7 cm in this direction. The mass resolution is sufficient for determination of the composition of the hydrogen beam.

Belov, A.S.; Kubalov, S.A.; Kuzik, V.F.; Yakushev, V.P.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Higher-Order Mass Defect Analysis for Mass Spectra of Complex Organic Mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Higher-order mass defect analysis is introduced as a unique formula assignment and visualization method for the analysis of complex mass spectra. This approach is an extension of the concepts of Kendrick mass transformation widely used for identification of homologous compounds differing only by a number of base units (e.g., CH2, H2, O, CH2O, etc.) in complex mixtures. We present an iterative renormalization routine for defining higher order homologous series and multidimensional clustering of mass spectral features. This approach greatly simplifies visualization of complex mass spectra and increases the number of chemical formulae that can be confidently assigned for given mass accuracy. The potential for using higher-order mass defects for data reduction and visualization is shown. Higher-order mass defect analysis is described and demonstrated through third-order analysis of a de-isotoped high-resolution mass spectrum of crude oil containing nearly 13,000 peaks.

Roach, Patrick J.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

The Substellar Mass Function: A Bayesian Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report our efforts to constrain the form of the low-mass star and brown dwarf mass function via Bayesian inference. Recent surveys of M, L, and T dwarfs in the local solar neighborhood are an essential component of our study. Uncertainties in the age distribution of local field stars make reliable inference complicated. We adopt a wide range of plausible assumptions about the rate of galactic star formation and show that their deviations from a uniform rate produce little effect on the resulting luminosity function for a given mass function. We use a Bayesian statistical formalism to evaluate the probability of commonly used mass functions in light of recent discoveries. We consider three functional forms of the mass function, include a two-segment power law, a single power law with a low-mass cutoff, and a log-normal distribution. Our results show that, at a 60% confidence level, the power-law index, $\\alpha$, for the low-mass arm of a two-segment power law has a value between -0.5 and 0.5 for objects with masses between $0.04 M_{\\odot}$ and $0.10 M_{\\odot}$. The best-fit index is $\\alpha = 0.3\\pm0.6$ at the 60% confidence level for a single-segment mass function. Current data require this function extend to at least $0.05 M_{\\odot}$ with no restrictions placed on a lower mass cutoff. Inferences of the parameter values for a log-normal mass function are virtually unaffected by recent estimates of the local space density of L and T dwarfs. We find no preference among these three forms using this method. We discuss current and future capabilities that may eventually discriminate between mass-function models and refine estimates of their associated parameter values.

P. R. Allen; D. W. Koerner; I. N. Reid; D. E. Trilling

2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

206

NIST: X-Ray Mass Attenuation Coefficients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST reserves the right to charge for these data in the ... ?/? and the mass energy-absorption coefficient ... The tables cover energies of the photon (x-ray ...

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

207

Miniaturized Mass Spectrometer - Energy Innovation Portal  

Technology Marketing Summary Sandia's invention relates to a miniaturized mass spectrometer using a silicon chip field emitter array as the source of ...

208

Top Quark Mass Measurements at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

We report the latest results on the top-quark mass and on the top-antitop mass difference from the CDF and D0 collaborations using data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We discuss general issues in top-quark mass measurements and present new results from direct measurements and from top-pair production cross-section. We also report new results on the top-antitop mass difference.

Ye, Zhenyu; /Fermilab

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Available Technologies: Nanostructure Initiator Mass Spectrometry ...  

Using time dependent isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry imaging, researchers at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley have developed a ...

210

Mass Hierarchy via Mossbauer and Reactor Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how one could determine the neutrino mass hierarchy with Mossbauer neutrinos and also revisit the question of whether the hierarchy can be determined with reactor neutrinos.

Stephen Parke; Hisakazu Minakata; Hiroshi Nunokawa; Renata Zukanovich Funchal

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

211

Press Pass - Press Release - Higgs mass constraints  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

imagesHiggs-mass-constraints-Aug2008.html Tevatron Experiments Double-Team Higgs Boson Joint CDF, DZero effort lands Fermilab in Higgs territory Batavia, Ill.--Scientists...

212

Press Pass - Press Release - Higgs mass constraints  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-constraints-20100726-images.html Fermilab experiments narrow allowed mass range for Higgs boson Batavia, Ill.New constraints on the elusive Higgs particle are more stringent...

213

Early Days of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Alvarez reviews his role in the development of the tandem Van de Graaff accelerator and the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry as a technique for isotope dating. (GHT)

Alvarez, L. W.

1981-05-00T23:59:59.000Z

214

Automated Surface Sampling Probe for Mass Spectrometry  

Dr. Gary Van Berkel and colleagues have developed a liquid microjunction surface sampling probe (LMJ?SSP). The LMJ?SSP provides mass spectrometry with ...

215

Tropospheric Aerosol Chemistry via Aerosol Mass Spectrometry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chemical information needed to interpret mass spectra. The challenge is to separate primary and secondary; anthropogenic, biogenic and biomass burning sources - and...

216

MASS SPECTROMETRY WITH A VERY SMALL CYCLOTRON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF CALIFORNIA mm Presented at the Argonne Symposium onHigh Energy Spectrometry, Argonne NationalLaboratory, Argonne, IL, May 11-13, 1981 MASS SPECTROMETRY

Muller, R.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Seismic Behaviour of Vertical Mass Isolated Structures  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the seismic behaviour of vertical mass isolated structures against the earthquake is studied. These structures are assumed to be consisted of two subsystems. Mass subsystem possesses low lateral stiffness but carries the major part of mass of the system. Stiffness subsystem, however, controls the deformation of the mass subsystem and attributes with much higher stiffness. The isolator layer is, therefore, located in between the mass and the stiffness subsystems and assumed to be a viscous damper layer. The analytical model used for this investigation is a dual mass-spring model which is an extended form of the three element Maxwell model. In this study, the ability of mass isolation techniques in reducing earthquake effects on buildings with two approaches, parametric and numerical approaches, is shown. In the parametric approach, by definition an isolation factor for structure and determination the dynamic characteristics of system, the relative optimum value of the isolator damping coefficient is obtained. The results provide an insight on role of relative stiffness and mass ratio of the two subsystems. Finally, in the numerical approach, the spectral responses of these structures due to the earthquake are investigated. The results show a noticeable decrease in earthquake input force to vertical mass isolated structures in comparison with non-isolated structures.

Nekooei, M.; Ziyaeifar, M. [Structural Engineering Research Centre, International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (IIEES), P.O. Box 19395-3913, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

218

New Enhancements Upgrade NIST Mass Spectra Library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... peaks representing a unique distribution of masses due to isotopes with varying ... with Version 2.0d of the NIST MS Search Program for Windows ...

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

219

Multidetector calibration for mass spectrometers  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency`s Safeguards Analytical Laboratory has performed calibration experiments to measure the different efficiencies among multi-Faraday detectors for a Finnigan-MAT 261 mass spectrometer. Two types of calibration experiments were performed: (1) peak-shift experiments and (2) peak-jump experiments. For peak-shift experiments, the ion intensities were measured for all isotopes of an element in different Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by shifting the isotopes to various Faraday detectors. Two different peak-shifting schemes were used to measure plutonium (UK Pu5/92138) samples. For peak-jump experiments, ion intensities were measured in a reference Faraday detector for a single isotope and compared with those measured in the other Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by switching back-and-forth between the reference Faraday detector and a selected Faraday detector. This switching procedure is repeated for all Faraday detectors. Peak-jump experiments were performed with replicate measurements of {sup 239}Pu, {sup 187}Re, and {sup 238}U. Detector efficiency factors were estimated for both peak-jump and peak-shift experiments using a flexible calibration model to statistically analyze both types of multidetector calibration experiments. Calculated detector efficiency factors were shown to depend on both the material analyzed and the experimental conditions. A single detector efficiency factor is not recommended for each detector that would be used to correct routine sample analyses. An alternative three-run peak-shift sample analysis should be considered. A statistical analysis of the data from this peak-shift experiment can adjust the isotopic ratio estimates for detector differences due to each sample analysis.

Bayne, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Donohue, D.L.; Fiedler, R. [IAEA, Seibersdorf (Austria). Safeguards Analytical Lab.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Emergence String and Mass Formulas of Hadrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assume that hadrons are formed from the emergence string. Usual string should possess two moving states: oscillation and rotation, so we propose corresponding potential and the equation of the emergence string, whose energy spectrum is namely the GMO mass formula and its modified accurate mass formula. These are some relations between the string and observable experimental data.

Yi-Fang Chang

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Mass Transportation on surfaces Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass Transportation on surfaces Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on surfaces #12;Monge quadratic transport in Rn Let µ0 and µ1 be probability measures with compact support in Rn . We call transport map from µ0 to µ1 any measurable map T : Rn Rn

Rifford, Ludovic

222

The mass distribution of quark matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze lattice QCD results on the equation of state in terms of infinitely many non-interacting massive ideal gas components. We find that the entire pressure-temperature curve can be described by a temperature independent mass distribution at vanishing chemical potential. We collect strong indications for a mass gap in this distribution, conjectured to be related confinement.

Biro, T S; Van, P; Zimnyi, J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Skyrme Model with Different Mass Terms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a one parameter family of mass terms for the Skyrme model that disfavours shell-like configurations for multi-baryon classical solutions. We argue that a model with such mass terms can provide a better description of nuclei as shell like configurations are now less stable than in the traditional massive Skyrme model

Bernard Piette; Wojtek J. Zakrzewski

2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

224

A "Muon Mass Tree" with alpha-quantized Lepton, Quark and Hadron Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A "muon mass tree" is displayed that contains the excitation systematics for accurately reproducing the masses of the six Standard Model quarks (u,d,s,c,b,t); the heavy leptons; the proton; the phi, J/Psi and Upsilon vector meson thrshold states; the Bc meson; and the mass-averaged W and Z gauge bosons, using a unified mass formalism based on the electron ground state. Multiples of an alpha-quantized 105.04 MeV fermion mass quantum reproduce the states below 12 GeV, and multiples of a doubly-alpha-quantized 14,394 Mev fermion mass quantum reproduce the W-Z and t states above 12 GeV, where alpha ~ 1/137 is the fine structure constant. Masses are additive, and the overall mass accuracy for these states is in the 1% range. A similar "pion mass tree" based on an alpha-quantized 70.03 MeV boson mass quantum accurately reproduces the pseudoscalar meson masses. The mass alpha-quantization follows from a corresponding experimental alpha-spacing of the long-lived particle lifetimes, which occur in well-defined lifetime groups that are each determined by a dominant Standard Model quark substate.

Malcolm H. Mac Gregor

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

225

Higgs boson masses in supersymmetric models  

SciTech Connect

Imposing supersymmetry on a Higgs potential constrains the parameters that define the potential. In supersymmetric extensions to the stranded model containing only Higgs SU(2){sub L} doublets there exist Higgs boson mass sum rules and bounds on the Higgs masses at tree level. The prescription for renormalizing these sum rules is derived. An explicit calculation is performed in the minimal supersymmetric extension to the standard model (MSSM). In this model at tree level the mass sum rule is M{sub H}{sup 2} + M{sub h}{sup 2} = M{sub A}{sup 2} + M{sub Z}{sup 2}. The results indicate that large corrections to the sum rules may arise from heavy matter fields, e.g. a heavy top quark. Squarks significantly heavier than their fermionic partners contribute large contributions when mixing occurs in the squark sector. These large corrections result from squark-Higgs couplings that become large in this limit. Contributions to individual Higgs boson masses that are quadratic in the squark masses cancel in the sum rule. Thus the naturalness constraint on Higgs boson masses is hidden in the combination of Higgs boson masses that comprise the sum rule. 39 refs., 13 figs.

Berger, M.S.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Closing the Low-mass Axigluon Window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this report, I will present the current status of the low-mass axigluon. The axigluon is a massive, color octet, axial vector boson, predicted in, e.g., chiral color models and some technicolor models, with a mass of order the electroweak scale. Axigluons with a mass larger than about 125 GeV to nearly 1 TeV can be eliminated by di-jet production at hadron colliders like the TEVATRON, but a low-mass window exists that the di-jet search can not probe. Upsilon decays can rule out axigluons with a mass up to 25 GeV, and low energy e^+ e^- (PEP and PETRA) can rule out axigluons with a mass up to 50 GeV using a measurement of R. Top production at the TEVATRON disfavors a light axigluon. A measurement of R at LEP strongly disfavors a light axigluon, and rules out an axigluon with mass < 365 GeV.

Michael A. Doncheski

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Initial-Final Mass Relation: First Constraints at the Low Mass End  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The initial-final mass relation represents a mapping between the mass of a white dwarf remnant and the mass that the hydrogen burning main-sequence star that created it once had. The relation thus far has been constrained using a sample of ~40 stars in young open clusters, ranging in initial mass from ~2.75 -- 7 Msun, and shows a general trend that connects larger mass main-sequence stars with larger mass white dwarfs. In this paper, we present CFHT/CFH12K photometric and Keck/LRIS multiobject spectroscopic observations of a sample of 22 white dwarfs in two old open clusters, NGC 7789 (t = 1.4 Gyr) and NGC 6819 (t = 2.5 Gyr). We measure masses for the highest signal-to-noise spectra by fitting the Balmer lines to atmosphere models and place the first constraints on the low mass end of the initial-final mass relation. Our results indicate that the observed trend at higher masses continues down to very low masses, with M_initial = 1.6 Msun main-sequence stars forming M_final = 0.54 Msun white dwarfs. When added...

Kalirai, Jasonjot S; Kelson, Daniel D; Reitzel, David B; Rich, R Michael; Richer, Harvey B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Gas sampling system for a mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to a gas sampling system, and specifically to a gas sampling system for transporting a hazardous process gas to a remotely located mass spectrometer. The gas sampling system includes a capillary tube having a predetermined capillary length and capillary diameter in communication with the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a flexible tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube intermediate the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a heat transfer tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube, and a heating device in communication the heat transfer tube for substantially preventing condensation of the process gas within the capillary tube.

Taylor, Charles E; Ladner, Edward P

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Top quark mass measurement at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on the latest experimental measurements of the top quark mass by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron. They present a new top mass measurement using the t{bar t} events collected by the D0 Collaboration in Run I between 1994 and 1996. This result is combined with previous measurements to yield a new world top mass average. They also describe several preliminary results using up to 193 pb{sup -1} of t{bar t} events produced in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV during the Run II of the Tevatron.

Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; /Harvard U.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Implementation of supersymmetric processes in the HERWIG event generator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. [4, 5, 6], the mass and decay spectra are fed in from a data file. In particular, we have provided a separate code (ISAWIG) for the conversion of data from ISAJET [9]. This way, the masses of the sparticles and their R-parity conserving decay rates... ), and the following coefficients C?? : CLL = Lq sin 2?W Ni4Nj4 ?Ni3Nj3 s?M2Z + iMZ?Z + LqiLqj u?M2qL ; (3.30) 15 CLR = Lq sin 2?W Ni3Nj3 ?Ni4Nj4 s?M2Z + iMZ?Z ? LqiLqjt?M2qL ; (3.31) CRL = Rq sin 2?W Ni4Nj4 ?Ni3Nj3 s?M2Z + iMZ?Z ? RqiRqjt?M2qR ; (3...

Moretti, Stefano; Odagiri, Kosuke; Richardson, P; Seymour, Michael H; Webber, Bryan R

231

Top Mass Measurements at the Tevatron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First observed in 1995, the top quark is the third-generation up-type quark of the standard model of particle physics (SM). The CDF and D0 collaborations have analyzed many t{bar t} events produced by the Tevatron collider, studying many properties of the top quark. Among these, the mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the SM, since its value constrains the mass of the yet to be observed Higgs boson. The analyzed events were used to measure the mass of the top quark m{sub t} {approx_equal} 173.2 GeV/c{sup 2} with an uncertainty of less than 1 GeV/c{sup 2}. We report on the latest top mass measurements at the Tevatron, using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of data for each experiment.

Potamianos, Karolos; /Purdue U.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Nuclear mass systematics using neural networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New global statistical models of nuclidic (atomic) masses based on multilayered feedforward networks are developed. One goal of such studies is to determine how well the existing data, and only the data, determines the mapping from the proton and neutron numbers to the mass of the nuclear ground state. Another is to provide reliable predictive models that can be used to forecast mass values away from the valley of stability. Our study focuses mainly on the former goal and achieves substantial improvement over previous neural-network models of the mass table by using improved schemes for coding and training. The results suggest that with further development this approach may provide a valuable alternative to conventional global models.

Athanassopoulos, S; Gernoth, K A; Clark, J W

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Nuclear mass systematics using neural networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New global statistical models of nuclidic (atomic) masses based on multilayered feedforward networks are developed. One goal of such studies is to determine how well the existing data, and only the data, determines the mapping from the proton and neutron numbers to the mass of the nuclear ground state. Another is to provide reliable predictive models that can be used to forecast mass values away from the valley of stability. Our study focuses mainly on the former goal and achieves substantial improvement over previous neural-network models of the mass table by using improved schemes for coding and training. The results suggest that with further development this approach may provide a valuable complement to conventional global models.

S. Athanassopoulos; E. Mavrommatis; K. A. Gernoth; J. W. Clark

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Scime, Earl E. (Morgantown, WV)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Plasma Mass Filters For Nuclear Waste Reprocessing  

SciTech Connect

Practical disposal of nuclear waste requires high-throughput separation techniques. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which contains the most active and mobile radioisotopes and produces most of the heat. We suggest that the fission products could be separated as a group from nuclear waste using plasma mass filters. Plasmabased processes are well suited to separating nuclear waste, because mass rather than chemical properties are used for separation. A single plasma stage can replace several stages of chemical separation, producing separate streams of bulk elements, fission products, and actinoids. The plasma mass filters may have lower cost and produce less auxiliary waste than chemical processing plants. Three rotating plasma configurations are considered that act as mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, the Ohkawa filter, and the asymmetric centrifugal trap.

Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

236

MACRAD: A mass analysis code for radiators  

SciTech Connect

A computer code to estimate and optimize the mass of heat pipe radiators (MACRAD) is currently under development. A parametric approach is used in MACRAD, which allows the user to optimize radiator mass based on heat pipe length, length to diameter ratio, vapor to wick radius, radiator redundancy, etc. Full consideration of the heat pipe operating parameters, material properties, and shielding requirements is included in the code. Preliminary results obtained with MACRAD are discussed.

Gallup, D.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Mass-loss from Red Giants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although much is known about the nature of winds from hot stars and giants and supergiants with spectral types earlier than K, there is still much to be learned regarding the mass-loss process in cool, late-type stars. We will review the current state of research, with particular reference to observations and modelling of mass-loss from giant stars in symbiotic systems.

Brian Espey; Cian Crowley

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

238

Mass Wasting in the Western Galapagos Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oceanic island volcanoes such as those in the Hawaiian, Canary and Galapagos Islands are known to become unstable, causing failures of the subaerial and submarine slopes of the volcanic edifices. These mass wasting events appear to be the primary source of destruction and loss of volume of many oceanic islands, but our knowledge of mass wasting is still rudimentary in many seamount and island chains. To better understand mass wasting in the western Galapagos Islands, multi-beam bathymetry and backscatter sidescan sonar images were used to examine topography and acoustic backscatter signatures that are characteristic of mass wasting. Observations show that mass wasting plays an important role in the development of Galapagos volcanoes. While volcanic activity continues to conceal the submarine terrain, the data show that four forms of mass wasting are identified including debris flows, slumps sheets, chaotic slumps, and detached blocks. A total of 23 mass wasting features were found to exist in the western Galapagos Islands, including fourteen debris flows with one that incorporated a set of detached blocks, seven slump sheets, and one chaotic slump. Some of the indentified features have obvious origination zones while the sources of others are not clearly identifiable. Approximately 73 percent of the surveyed coastlines are affected by slumping on the steep upper slopes and ~64 percent are affected by debris flows on the lower slopes. Unlike the giant landslides documented by GLORIA imagery around the Hawaiian Islands, the western Galapagos Islands appear to be characterized by small slump sheets existing along the steep shallow submarine flanks of the island and by debris flows that are flanked by rift zones and extend off the platform. This study indicates that submarine mass wasting is widespread in the western Galapagos, suggesting that the production of small-scale downslope movement is part of the erosive nature of these oceanic volcanic islands.

Hall, Hillary

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Mass and fans in attached sunspaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of thermal storage mass on the performance of an attached sunspace is investigated for a particular design in Boston. Mass in the sunspace and in the adjoining building are compared. Performance is evaluated in terms of temperature conditions in the sunspace and delivery of useful solar heat to the adjoining building. The dependence of the results on the manner of heat delivery is studied. Both natural convection and fan-forced air flow are included.

Jones, R.W.; McFarland, R.D.; Lazarus, G.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Calorimetry of low mass Pu239 items  

SciTech Connect

Calorimetric assay has the reputation of providing the highest precision and accuracy of all nondestructive assay measurements. Unfortunately, non-destructive assay practitioners and measurement consumers often extend, inappropriately, the high precision and accuracy of calorimetric assay to very low mass items. One purpose of this document is to present more realistic expectations for the random uncertainties associated with calorimetric assay for weapons grade plutonium items with masses of 200 grams or less.

Cremers, Teresa L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sampson, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Impact of temperature increments on tunneling barrier height and effective electron mass for plasma nitrided thin SiO{sub 2} layer on a large wafer area  

SciTech Connect

Thermally grown SiO{sub 2} layers were treated by a plasma nitridation process realized in a vertical furnace. The combination of a pulsed-low frequency plasma and a microwave remote plasma with N{sub 2}/NH{sub 3}/He feed gas mixture was used to nitride the thermally grown SiO{sub 2} gate dielectrics of MIS structures. Temperature dependency of effective masses and the barrier heights for electrons in pure thermally grown SiO{sub 2} as well as plasma nitrided SiO{sub 2} in high electric field by means of Fowler-Nordheim regime was determined. It is frequently seen from the literature that either effective electron mass or barrier height (generally effective electron mass) is assumed to be a constant and, as a result, the second parameter is calculated under the chosen assumption. However, in contrast to general attitude of previous studies, this work does not make any such assumptions for the calculation of neither of these two important parameters of an oxide at temperature ranges from 23 to 110 deg. C for SiO{sub 2}, and 23 to 130 deg. C for nitrided oxide. It is also shown here that both parameters are affected from the temperature changes; respectively, the barrier height decreases while the effective mass increases as a result of elevated temperature in both pure SiO{sub 2} and plasma nitrided SiO{sub 2}. Therefore, one parameter could be miscalculated if the other parameter, i.e., effective mass of electron, was assumed to be a constant with respect to variable physical conditions like changing temperature. Additionally, the barrier heights were calculated just by taking constant effective masses for both types of oxides to be able to compare our results to common literature values.

Aygun, G. [Fraunhofer IISB, Schottkystrasse 10, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Department of Physics, Izmir Institute of Technology, TR-35430 Urla, Izmir (Turkey); Roeder, G.; Erlbacher, T.; Wolf, M.; Schellenberger, M.; Pfitzner, L. [Fraunhofer IISB, Schottkystrasse 10, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Triangular mass matrices for quarks and leptons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We assume that all quark and lepton $3 \\times 3$ mass matrices which appear in the standard model lagrangian (after spontaneous symmetry breaking) with neutrinos treated as Dirac patricles have the triangular form. Such matrices have not only less non-zero elements (three of them are equal to zero) but also lead to very asymmetrical decomposition into one diagonal and two unitary matrices for quarks and leptons. We also assume that unitary matrices which transform flavor into definite mass states for right handed components (weakly non-interacting) in the same weak isodoublet are equal. Using all available experimental data on quark and lepton masses and mixing angles, treating in the universal way quarks and leptons, we determine the triangular mass matrices for up and down type quarks, neutrinos and charged leptons and as a consequence mixing matrices for left-handed and right handed components. As the result of the fit we get predictions for the neutrino masses including smallest neutrino mass. The calculations without CP violation and with inclusion of this effect in quark sector are also presented.

S. Tatur; J. Bartelski

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

243

On the Origin of Elementary Particle Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The oldest enigma in fundamental particle physics is: Where do the observed masses of elementary particles come from? Inspired by observation of the empirical particle mass spectrum we propose that the masses of elementary particles arise solely due to the self-interaction of the fields associated with a particle. We thus assume that the mass is proportional to the strength of the interaction of the field with itself. A simple application of this idea to the fermions is seen to yield a mass for the neutrino in line with constraints from direct experimental upper limits and correct order of magnitude predictions of mass separations between neutrinos, charged leptons and quarks. The neutrino interacts only through the weak force, hence becomes light. The electron interacts also via electromagnetism and accordingly becomes heavier. The quarks also have strong interactions and become heavy. The photon is the only fundamental particle to remain massless, as it is chargeless. Gluons gain mass comparable to quarks, or slightly larger due to a somewhat larger color charge. Including particles outside the standard model proper, gravitons are not exactly massless, but very light due to their very weak self-interaction. Some immediate and physically interesting consequences arise: i) Gluons have an effective range $\\sim 1$fm, physically explaining why QCD has finite reach ii) Gravity has an effective range $\\sim 100$ Mpc coinciding with the largest known structures; the cosmic voids iii) Gravitational waves undergo dispersion even in vacuum, and have all five polarizations (not just the two of $m=0$), which might explain why they have not yet been detected.

Johan Hansson

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

244

Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, 10-Earth Mass Planet and Its Host Star  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, made with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of m_p = 10.4 +- 1.7 Earth masses and orbits a star of mass M_* = 0.56 +- 0.09 Solar masses at a semi-major axis of a = 3.2 (+1.9 -0.5) AU and an orbital period of P = 7.6 (+7.7 -1.5} yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are enabled by the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect, which is seen primarily in the light curve distortion due to the orbital motion of the Earth. But, the analysis also demonstrates the capability to measure microlensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a "failed" gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the preval...

Muraki, Y; Bennett, D P; Suzuki, D; Monard, L A G; Street, R; Jorgensen, U G; Kundurthy, P; Skowron, J; Becker, A C; Albrow, M D; Fouque, P; Heyrovsky, D; Barry, R K; Beaulieu, J -P; Wellnitz, D D; Bond, I A; Sumi, T; Dong, S; Gaudi, B S; Bramich, D M; Dominik, M; Abe, F; Botzler, C S; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Hayashi, F; Hearnshaw, J B; Hosaka, S; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A V; Kilmartin, P M; Lin, W; Ling, C H; Makita, S; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Nishimoto, K; Ohnishi, K; Perrott, Y C; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D J; Sweatman, W L; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Christie, G W; DePoy, D L; Gorbikov, E; Gould, A; Kaspi, S; Lee, C -U; Mallia, F; Maoz, D; McCormick, J; Moorhouse, D; Natusch, T; Park, B -G; Pogge, R W; Polishook, D; Shporer, A; Thornley, G; Yee, J C; Allan, A; Browne, P; Horne, K; Kains, N; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Batista, V; Bennett, C S; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cassan, A; Cole, A; Corrales, R; Coutures, Ch; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Greenhill, J; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Martin, R; Menzies, J; Sahu, K C; Waldman, I; Zub, A Williams M; Bourhrous, H; Matsuoka, Y; Nagayama, T; Oi, N; Randriamanakoto, Z; Bozza, V; Burgdorf, M J; Novati, S Calchi; Dreizler, S; Finet, F; Glitrup, M; Harpsoe, K; Hinse, T C; Hundertmark, M; Liebig, C; Maier, G; Mancini, L; Mathiasen, M; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Surdej, J; Southworth, J; Wambsganss, J; Zimmer, F; Udalski, A; Poleski, R; Wyrzykowski, L; Ulaczyk, K; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The kaon mass in 2+1+1 flavor twisted mass Wilson ChPT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct the chiral low-energy effective theory for 2+1+1 flavor lattice QCD with twisted mass Wilson fermions. In contrast to existing results we assume a heavy charm quark mass such that the D mesons are too heavy to appear as degrees of freedom in the effective theory. As an application we compute the kaon mass to 1-loop order in the LCE regime. The result contains a chiral logarithm involving the neutral pion mass which has no analogue in continuum ChPT.

Bar, Oliver

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift...

247

Property:Dry Mass(kg) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mass(kg) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Dry Mass(kg) Property Type String Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:DryMass(kg)&oldid623736"...

248

Property:Dry Mass (kg) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mass (kg) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Dry Mass (kg) Property Type String Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:DryMass(kg)&oldid642179"...

249

Development and performance of a miniature, low cost mass spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A miniature, low cost mass spectrometer has been developed that is capable of unit resolution over a mass range of 10 to 50 AMU. The design of the mass spectrometer incorporates several new features that enhance the ...

Hemond, Brian D. (Brian David Thomson)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Cumulative mass approach for column testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cumulative mass approach for laboratory column testing using an analytical solution for miscible transport through soil is presented. The cumulative mass approach differs from the more traditional approach for column testing in that the analysis of the measured data is in terms of mass of solute instead of solute concentration. The potential advantages of the cumulative mass approach are: (1) The influence of increment in effluent sample volume on the measured concentrations is removed from consideration; (2) the effluent sampling procedure is less labor-intensive, and therefore potentially more cost-effective; and (3) the retardation factor and effective porosity can be evaluated directly from plots of the test results. A comparison of analyses of measured data based on the cumulative mass approach with the more traditional concentration-based approach indicates slight differences (less than 3%) in the regressed values of the dispersion coefficient and retardation factor. These differences are attributed to greater scatter in the data for the more traditional approach and to slight errors involved in the traditional approach due to plotting the average, incremental concentrations at the pore volumes of flow corresponding to the middle of the sampling interval.

Shackelford, C.D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)] [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Probing the Absolute Mass Scale of Neutrinos  

SciTech Connect

The experimental efforts of the Neutrino Physics Group at MIT center primarily around the exploration of neutrino mass and its significance within the context of nuclear physics, particle physics, and cosmology. The group has played a prominent role in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, a neutrino experiment dedicated to measure neutrino oscillations from 8B neutrinos created in the sun. The group is now focusing its efforts in the measurement of the neutrino mass directly via the use of tritium beta decay. The MIT group has primary responsibilities in the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino mass experiment, expected to begin data taking by 2013. Specifically, the MIT group is responsible for the design and development of the global Monte Carlo framework to be used by the KATRIN collaboration, as well as responsibilities directly associated with the construction of the focal plane detector. In addition, the MIT group is sponsoring a new research endeavor for neutrino mass measurements, known as Project 8, to push beyond the limitations of current neutrino mass experiments.

Prof. Joseph A. Formaggio

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

252

Gas mass transfer for stratified flows  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrum integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi}) Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geophysical and chemical engineering literature.

Duffey, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hughes, E.D. [CSA Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Gas mass transfer for stratified flows  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrium integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi})Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geo-physical and chemical engineering literature.

Duffey, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hughes, E.D. [CSA, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

NIST X-Ray Mass Attenuation Coefficients - Version History  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... year, month day with database access date.) Hubbell, JH and Seltzer, SM (2004), Tables of X-Ray Mass Attenuation Coefficients and Mass Energy- ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

255

From Mass Higher Education to Universal Access: The American Advantage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transition from Elite to Mass Higher Education, op. cit.impact of mass on elite higher education, see Trow, M. , Elite Higher Education: An Endangered Species? , Minerva,

Trow, Martin A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Global Electroweak Fits and the Higgs Boson Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current electroweak data and the constraints on the Higgs mass are discussed. Within the context of the Standard Model the data prefer a relatively light Higgs mass.

Peter Renton

2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

Computer Experiments for an Alternative Approach to Mass ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In anticipation of the redefinition of the kilogram and to avoid a parallel non-SI dissemination system for mass, an alternative approach to mass ...

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

258

edited1_TopQuarkMass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CALCULATE THE TOP QUARK MASS CALCULATE THE TOP QUARK MASS TEACHER NOTES DESCRIPTION Students use momentum conservation, energy conservation and two-dimensional vector addition to calculate the mass of the heaviest of the six known quarks. They gather data from data plots from the DØ experiment at Fermilab. The events were chosen carefully; all of the decay products moved in a plane perpendicular to the beam. This makes the vector addition much simpler. STANDARDS National Science Education Standards (U.S. National Research Council) * Physical Science Content Standard B: As a result of this activity . . . students should develop an understanding of: o Conservation of energy and increase in disorder. o Interactions in energy and matter. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Students will know and be able to:

259

MassBioFuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MassBioFuel MassBioFuel Jump to: navigation, search Name MassBioFuel Address 271 Milton Street Place Dedham, Massachusetts Zip 02026 Sector Biofuels Product Biodiesel producer Website http://www.massbiofuel.com/ Coordinates 42.241122°, -71.145311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.241122,"lon":-71.145311,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

260

Mass and Lifetime Measurements in Storage Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Masses of nuclides covering a large area of the chart of nuclides can be measured in storage rings where many ions circulate at the same time. In this paper the recent progress in the analysis of Schottky mass spectrometry data is presented as well as the technical improvements leading to higher accuracy for isochronous mass measurements with a time-of-flight detector. The high sensitivity of the Schottky method down to single ions allows to measure lifetimes of nuclides by observing mother and daughter nucleus simultaneously. In this way we investigated the decay of bare and H-like 140Pr. As we could show the lifetime can be even shortened compared to those of atomic nuclei despite of a lower number of electrons available for internal conversion or electron capture.All these techniques will be implemented with further improvements at the storage rings of the new FAIR facility at GSI in the future.

Weick, H.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Winkler, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Scheidenberger, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); II. Phys. Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, 35392 Giessen (Germany)] (and others)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Towards Scalable Benchmarks for Mass Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While mass storage systems have been used for several decades to store large quantities of scientific data, there has been little work on devising standard ways of measuring them. Each system is hand-tuned using parameters that seem to work best, but it is difficult to gauge the potential effect of similar changes on other systems. The proliferation of storage management software and policies has made it difficult for users to make the best choices for their own systems. The introduction of benchmarks will make it possible to gather standard performance measurements across disparate systems, allowing users to make intelligent choices of hardware, software, and algorithms for their mass storage system. This paper presents guidelines for the design of a mass storage system benchmark suite, along with preliminary suggestions for programs to be included. The benchmarks will measure both peak and sustained performance of the system as well as predicting both short-term and long-term behav...

Ethan L. Miller

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Percent Yield and Mass of Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Percent Yield and Mass of Water Percent Yield and Mass of Water Name: Lisa Status: educator Grade: 9-12 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: When doing a percent yield activity in lab, we use MgCl hexahydrate and CaSO4. How do we factor the mass of the water that is released during the reaction? Replies: Lisa, Based on your question, I am not quite sure what the experiment is. Are you heating the hydrates and looking at the percent-yield of water removed during the heating? If so, then you would calculate the theoretical yield (using stoichiometry and the balanced chemical equation: MgCl2.6H2O --> MgCl2 + 6H2O) of water released, and compare it to the actual yield of water released in the experiment to get percent yield. Greg (Roberto Gregorius) Canisius College

263

Instrument Series: Mass Spectrometry SPLAT II  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Spectrometry Mass Spectrometry SPLAT II SPLAT II is a one-of-a-kind single particle mass spectrometer that was designed, constructed, and deployed at EMSL to allow users to precisely characterize the physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles. SPLAT II yields quantitative information on particle physical and chemical properties in the laboratory or in the field-even aboard an aircraft. In the context of EMSL's integrated problem-solving environment, the unique capabilities of SPLAT II enable vital research across a range of scientific fields. Research Applications Fundamental science - characterizing the properties and behavior of matter on the nanoscale Atmospheric chemistry - understanding the processes that control atmospheric aerosol life cycle Climate change - uncovering and helping

264

High-Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HPMSF Overview HPMSF Overview Section 2-4-1 High-Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility The High-Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility (HPMSF) provides state-of-the-art mass spectrometry (MS) and separations instrumentation that has been refined for leading-edge analysis of biological problems with a primary emphasis on proteomics. Challenging research in proteomics, cell signaling, cellular molecular machines, and high-molecular weight systems receive the highest priority for access to the facility. Current research activities in the HPMSF include proteomic analyses of whole cell lysates, analyses of organic macro-molecules and protein complexes, quantification using isotopically labeled growth media, targeted proteomics analyses of subcellular fractions, and nucleic acid analysis of

265

Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmins, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Chiral Analysis of Quenched Baryon Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend to quenched QCD an earlier investigation of the chiral structure of the masses of the nucleon and the delta in lattice simulations of full QCD. Even after including the meson-loop self-energies which give rise to the leading and next-to-leading non-analytic behaviour (and hence the most rapid variation in the region of light quark mass), we find surprisingly little curvature in the quenched case. Replacing these meson-loop self-energies by the corresponding terms in full QCD yields a remarkable level of agreement with the results of the full QCD simulations. This comparison leads to a very good understanding of the origins of the mass splitting between these baryons.

R. D. Young; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; S. V. Wright

2002-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

267

Cluster mass function in mixed models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the cluster mass function in mixed dark matter (MDM) models, using two COBE normalized simulations with Omega_h = 0.26 and n=1.2, and Omega_h = 0.14 and n = 1.05, both with 2 massive nu's (MDM1 and MDM2, respectively). For the sake of comparison, we also simulate a CDM model with spectral index n=0.8 (TCDM), also COBE normalized. We argue that, in our non--hydro simulations, where CDM particles describe both actual CDM and baryons, the galaxy distribution traces CDM particles. Therefore, we use them to define clusters and their velocities to work out cluster masses. As CDM particles are more clustered than HDM and therefore have, in average, greater velocities, this leads to significant differences from PS predictions. Such predictions agree with simulations if both HDM and CDM are used to define clusters. Clusters defined through CDM in MDM models, instead, are less numerous than PS estimates, by a factor ~0.3, at the low mass end; the factor becomes \\~0.6-0.8, depending on the mix, on intermediate mass scales (~4-5, h^-1 10^14 Msun) and almost vanishes on the high mass end. Therefore: (i) MDM models expected to overproduce clusters over intermediate scales are viable; (ii) the greater reduction factor at small scales agrees with the observational data dependence on the cluster mass M (which, however, may be partially due to sample incompleteness); (iii) the higher spectral normalization is felt at large scales, where MDM models produce more objects (hence, large clusters) than CDM. MDM1 even exceeds Donahue et al. (1998) findings, while MDM2 is consistent with them. (abridged)

A. Gardini; S. A. Bonometto; G. Murante

1999-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

Hydrogen storage in a combined M.sub.xAlH.sub.6/M'.sub.y(NH.sub.2).sub.z system and methods of making and using the same  

SciTech Connect

As a promising clean fuel for vehicles, hydrogen can be used for propulsion, either directly or in fuel cells. Hydrogen storage compositions having high storage capacity, good dehydrogenation kinetics, and hydrogen release and uptake reactions which are reversible are disclosed and described. Generally a hydrogen storage composition of a metal aluminum hexahydride and a metal amide can be used. A combined system (Li.sub.3AIH.sub.6/3LiNH.sub.2) with a very high inherent hydrogen capacity (7.3 wt %) can be carried out at moderate temperatures, and with approximately 95% of that inherent hydrogen storage capacity (7.0%) is reversible over repeated cycling of release and uptake.

Lu, Jun (Salt Lake City, UT); Fang, Zhigang Zak (Salt Lake City, UT); Sohn, Hong Yong (Salt Lake City, UT)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

269

Hydrogen storage in a combined M.sub.xAlH.sub.6/M'.sub.y(NH.sub.2).sub.z system and methods of making and using the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

As a promising clean fuel for vehicles, hydrogen can be used for propulsion, either directly or in fuel cells. Hydrogen storage compositions having high storage capacity, good dehydrogenation kinetics, and hydrogen release and uptake reactions which are reversible are disclosed and described. Generally a hydrogen storage composition of a metal aluminum hexahydride and a metal amide can be used. A combined system (Li.sub.3AIH.sub.6/3LiNH.sub.2) with a very high inherent hydrogen capacity (7.3 wt %) can be carried out at moderate temperatures, and with approximately 95% of that inherent hydrogen storage capacity (7.0%) is reversible over repeated cycling of release and uptake.

Lu, Jun (Salt Lake City, UT); Fang, Zhigang Zak (Salt Lake City, UT); Sohn, Hong Yong (Salt Lake City, UT)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

270

Mechanochemical transformation of mixtures of Ca(OH){sub 2} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} or P{sub 2}O{sub 5}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed comparative study of the mechanochemical transformation of two mixtures: Ca(OH){sub 2}-(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} and Ca(OH){sub 2}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, milled in a mortar dry grinder for different periods of time was carried out. The phase transformations obtained at each milling stage were studied by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The transformations taking place during the first periods of milling are very different for both mixtures. However, prolonged milling, over nearly the same period, causes amorphization of both mixtures. DSC analysis of the milled powders showed the temperature of crystallization of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP). Calcinations of all the different milled powders at 800 deg. C for 2 h, results in the formation of hydroxyapatite and {beta}-TCP.

Gonzalez, G. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro Tecnologico, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas. Aptdo. 21827 Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela)]. E-mail: gemagonz@ivic.ve; Sagarzazu, A. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro Tecnologico, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas. Aptdo. 21827 Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Villalba, R. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro Tecnologico, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas. Aptdo. 21827 Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela)

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

271

Chapter 2 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key Atomic mass: mass of an individual atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 2 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key 2.1 Atomic mass: mass of an individual atom Atomic;Chapter 3 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key 3.1 Atomic Structure: relates the # of protons and neutrons of intercepts 2 2 1 Reduction not necessary Enclosure (221) #12;Chapter 12 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key

Grunlan, Melissa A.

272

Dirac Neutrino Masses from Generalized Supersymmetry Breaking  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate that Dirac neutrino masses in the experimentally preferred range are generated within supersymmetric gauge extensions of the standard model with a generalized supersymmetry breaking sector. If the superpotential neutrino Yukawa terms are forbidden by the gauge symmetry [such as a U(1){sup '}], sub-eV scale effective Dirac mass terms can arise at tree level from hard supersymmetry breaking Yukawa couplings, or at one loop due to nonanalytic soft supersymmetry breaking trilinear scalar couplings. The radiative neutrino magnetic and electric dipole moments vanish at one-loop order.

Demir, Durmus A.; Everett, Lisa L.; Langacker, Paul [Department of Physics, Izmir Institute of Technology, IZTECH, TR35430 Izmir (Turkey); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

A mass-dependent beta-function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Threshold effects related to fermion masses are considered for an all-order beta-function based on a background field momentum subtraction scheme. Far away from all thresholds, the suggested beta-function reduces to the conjectured all-order form inspired by the Novikov-Shifman-Vainshtein-Zakharov beta-function of N=1 supersymmetric gauge theories with a fixed integer number of fermion flavours. At (formally) infinite masses the corresponding pure Yang--Mills beta-function is recovered. We discuss applications to the phase diagram of non-Abelian field theories.

Dietrich, Dennis D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Higgs Mass in the Substandard Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Substandard theory deals with the standard model of leptons, electro-weak gauge bosons and Higgs, excluding the chromodynamics of quarks. The theory gives a geometric and algebraic interpretation of its U(2) symmetry based on the Eguchi-Hanson metric and predicts a Higgs mass $ m(H) = m(W) / \\sqrt{sin \\theta_{W}} = 115.3 GeV $. Here $ m(W) $ is the mass of the charged gauge boson and $ \\theta_{W} $ is the Weinberg angle.

E. L. Schucking

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

275

Neutrinoless double beta decay and neutrino masses  

SciTech Connect

Neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) is a promising test for lepton number violating physics beyond the standard model (SM) of particle physics. There is a deep connection between this decay and the phenomenon of neutrino masses. In particular, we will discuss the relation between 0{nu}{beta}{beta} and Majorana neutrino masses provided by the so-called Schechter-Valle theorem in a quantitative way. Furthermore, we will present an experimental cross check to discriminate 0{nu}{beta}{beta} from unknown nuclear background using only one isotope, i.e., within one experiment.

Duerr, Michael [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

276

Vector Boson Scattering at High Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the absence of a light Higgs boson, the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking will be best studied in processes of vector boson scattering at high mass. Various models predict resonances in this channel. Here, we investigate W W scalar and vector resonances, W Z vector resonances and a Z Z scalar resonance over a range of diboson centre-of-mass energies. Particular attention is paid to the application reconstruction of dijet pairs with low opening angle resulting from the decay of highly boosted vector bosons.

Sherwood, P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Solar mass-varying neutrino oscillations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose that the solar neutrino deficit may be due to oscillations of mass-varying neutrinos (MaVaNs). This scenario elucidates solar neutrino data beautifully while remaining comfortably compatible with atmospheric neutrino and K2K data and with reactor antineutrino data at short and long baselines (from CHOOZ and KamLAND). We find that the survival probability of solar MaVaNs is independent of how the suppression of neutrino mass caused by the acceleron-matter couplings varies with density. Measurements of MeV and lower energy solar neutrinos will provide a rigorous test of the idea.

V. Barger; Patrick Huber; Danny Marfatia

2005-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

278

SiO{sub 2} nanospheres with tailorable interiors by directly controlling Zn{sup 2+} and NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O species in an emulsion process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SiO{sub 2} nanospheres with tailorable interiors were synthesized by a facile one-spot microemulsion process using TEOS as silica source, wherein cyclohexane including triton X-100 and n-octanol as oil phase and Zn{sup 2+} or NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O aqueous solution as dispersive phase, respectively. The products were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Powder Diffraction. It was suggested that the as-synthesized silica nanospheres possessed grape-stone-like porous or single hollow interior, and also found that the ammonia dosage and aging time played key roles in controlling the size and structure of silica nanospheres. Furthermore, the comparative results confirmed that in-situ zinc species [ZnO/Zn(OH){sub 2}] acted as the temporary templates to construct grape-stone-like interior, and a simultaneously competing etching process occurred owing to the soluble Zn(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 2+} complex formation while the additional excessive ammonia was introduced. With the aging time being extended, the in-situ nanocrystals tended to grow into bigger ones by Ostwald Ripening, producing single hollow interior. - Graphical Abstract: Formation process of SiO{sub 2} nanospheres with porous and single hollow interior. Highlights: > ZnO/Zn(OH){sub 2} nanocrystals as the temporary templates shape the interior structures of SiO{sub 2} nanospheres. > Fabrication of porous and single hollow interiors needs no additional processes such as roasting or dissolving. > Tailorable interiors can be easily obtained through adjusting the aging time of temporary templates.

Liao Yuchao [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wu Xiaofeng [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang Zhen [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen Yunfa, E-mail: yfchen@home.ipe.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

The History of Nuclidic Masses and of their Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is centered on some historical aspects of nuclear masses, and their relations to major discoveries. Besides nuclear reactions and decays, the heart of mass measurements lies in mass spectrometry, the early history of which will be reviewed first. I shall then give a short history of the mass unit which has not always been defined as one twelfth of the carbon-12 mass. When combining inertial masses from mass spectrometry with energy differences obtained in reactions and decays, the conversion factor between the two is essential. The history of the evaluation of the nuclear masses (actually atomic masses) is only slightly younger than that of the mass measurements themselves. In their modern form, mass evaluations can be traced back to 1955. Prior to 1955, several tables were established, the oldest one in 1935.

G. Audi

2006-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

280

World average top-quark mass  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes a talk given at the Top2008 Workshop at La Biodola, Isola d Elba, Italy. The status of the world average top-quark mass is discussed. Some comments about the challanges facing the experiments in order to further improve the precision are offered.

Glenzinski, D.; /Fermilab

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Mass and temperature limits for blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A spherically symmetric distribution of classical blackbody radiation is considered, at conditions in which gravitational self-interaction effects become not negligible. Static solutions to Einstein field equations are searched for, for each choice of the assumed central energy density. Spherical cavities at thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e. filled with blackbody radiation, are then studied, in particular for what concerns the relation among the mass M of the ball of radiation contained in them and their temperature at center and at the boundary. For these cavities it is shown, in particular, that: i) there is no absolute limit to M as well to their central and boundary temperatures; ii) when radius R is fixed, however, limits exist both for mass and for boundary energy density rho_B: M <= K M_S(R) and rho_B <= Q/R^2, with K = 0.493 and Q = 0.02718, dimensionless, and M_S(R) the Schwarzschild mass for that radius. Some implications of the existence and the magnitude of these limits are considered. Finally the radial profiles for entropy for these systems are studied, in their dependence on the mass (or central temperature) of the ball of radiation.

Alessandro Pesci

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

282

Definition of the {delta} mass and width  

SciTech Connect

In the framework of effective field theory we show that, at two-loop order, the mass and width of the {delta} resonance defined via the (relativistic) Breit-Wigner parametrization both depend on the choice of field variables. In contrast, the complex-valued position of the pole of the propagator is independent of this choice.

Djukanovic, D.; Scherer, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Gegelia, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi (Georgia)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

John Day Tailrace MASS2 Hydraulic Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent biological results for the Juvenile Bypass System at John Jay Lock and Dam have raised concerns about the hydraulic conditions that are created in the tailrace under different project operations. This Memorandum for Record discusses the development and application of a truncated MASS2 model in the John Day tailrace.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

284

Light Hadron Masses and Decay Constants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extraction of the light hadron spectrum from a first-principle Quantum Chromodynamics approach is a profound application for lattice simulations of Quantum Chromodynamics. This review will cover recent lattice results for the masses and decay constants of the light hadrons. In particular, the applicability of different approaches for the extrapolation towards the physical point will be discussed.

Enno E. Scholz

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

285

Sirius A: turbulence or mass loss?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. Abundance anomalies observed in a fraction of A and B stars of both Pop I and II are apparently related to internal particle transport. Aims. Using available constraints from Sirius A, we wish to determine how well evolutionary models including atomic diffusion can explain observed abundance anomalies when either turbulence or mass loss is used as the main competitor to atomic diffusion. Methods. Complete stellar evolution models, including the effects of atomic diffusion and radiative accelerations, have been computed from the zero age main-sequence of 2.1M\\odot stars for metallicities of Z0 = 0.01 \\pm 0.001 and shown to agree with the observed parameters of Sirius A. Surface abundances were predicted for three values of the mass loss rate and for four values of the mixed surface zone. Results. A mixed mass of ~ 10^-6 M\\odot or a mass loss rate of 10^-13 M\\odot/yr were determined through comparison with observations. Of the 17 abundances determined observationally which are included in our calculati...

Michaud, G; Vick, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Heat and mass transfer in porous media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field test data on the OOSI MR3 experiments are used as a basis for exhibiting the computational capabilities of the WAFE computer code, which is a generalized tool for the analysis of heat and mass transfer in multi-dimensional domains of porous geothermal materials.

Cook, T.L.; Harlow, F.H.; Travis, B.J.; Bartel, T.J.; Tyner, C.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Problems in electromagnetic mass-difference calculations  

SciTech Connect

A brief discussion is given on the progress made thus far in calculating the electromagnetic mass differences of elementary particles. Some of the methods discussed include Feynman's method, Cottinghams method, the methods involving Bjorken scaling iunctions, and the formalism of Dashen and Frautschi. (LBS)

Majumdar, D.P.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Anisotropic mass ejection in binary mergers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the mass loss from a rotationally distorted envelope following the early, rapid in-spiral of a companion star inside a common envelope. For initially wide, massive binaries (M_1+M_2=20M_{\\odot}, P\\sim 10 yr), the primary has a convective envelope at the onset of mass transfer and is able to store much of the available orbital angular momentum in its expanded envelope. Three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics calculations show that mass loss is enhanced at mid-latitudes due to shock reflection from a torus-shaped outer envelope. Mass ejection in the equatorial plane is completely suppressed if the shock wave is too weak to penetrate the outer envelope in the equatorial direction (typically when the energy deposited in the star is less than about one-third of the binding energy of the envelope). We present a parameter study to show how the geometry of the ejecta depends on the angular momentum and the energy deposited in the envelope during a merging event. Applications to the nearly axisymmetric, but very non-spherical nebulae around SN1987A and Sheridan 25 are discussed, as well as possible links to RY Scuti and the Small Magellanic Cloud object R4.

T. Morris; Ph. Podsiadlowski

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Brachistochrone of a Spherical Uniform Mass Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We solve the brachistochrone problem for a particle travelling through a spherical mass distribution of uniform density. We examine the connection between this problem and the popular "gravity elevator" result. The solution is compared to the well known brachistochrone problem of a particle in a uniform gravitational field.

David R. Mitchell

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

290

Quark masses from lattice QCD and the study of textures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I review how the determination of quark masses from lattice QCD can be used to study textures in quark mass matrices. This type of theory relates quark masses to CKM matrix elements. I demonstrate how the recent precision results from the HPQCD and MILC collaborations for quark masses can be used to test some of these ideas.

Craig McNeile

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

291

Higgs boson mass and new physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the lower Higgs boson mass bounds which come from the absolute stability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum and from the Higgs inflation, as well as the prediction of the Higgs boson mass coming from asymptotic safety of the SM. We account for the 3-loop renormalization group evolution of the couplings of the Standard Model and for a part of two-loop corrections that involve the QCD coupling alpha_s to initial conditions for their running. This is one step above the current state of the art procedure ("one-loop matching--two-loop running"). This results in reduction of the theoretical uncertainties in the Higgs boson mass bounds and predictions, associated with the Standard Model physics, to 1-2 GeV. We find that with the account of existing experimental uncertainties in the mass of the top quark and alpha_s (taken at 2sigma level) the bound reads M_H>=M_min (equality corresponds to the asymptotic safety prediction), where M_min=129+-6 GeV. We argue that the discovery of the SM Higgs boson in this range would be in agreement with the hypothesis of the absence of new energy scales between the Fermi and Planck scales, whereas the coincidence of M_H with M_min would suggest that the electroweak scale is determined by Planck physics. In order to clarify the relation between the Fermi and Planck scale a construction of an electron-positron or muon collider with a center of mass energy ~200+200 GeV (Higgs and t-quark factory) would be needed.

Fedor Bezrukov; Mikhail Yu. Kalmykov; Bernd A. Kniehl; Mikhail Shaposhnikov

2012-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

292

Nuclear Mass Visualization and Analysis at nuclearmasses.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear masses play an important role in a wide variety of studies, motivating a tremendous surge in new precision mass measurements and global mass models. To handle this information, and to address inadequacies of existing text-based disseminations of nuclear masses, we have built a suite of codes--online at nuclearmasses.org--to manage, visualize, access, manipulate, share, compare, and analyze nuclear mass datasets. The services at this site are described, along with plans for future development.

Smith, Michael S.; Nesaraja, Caroline D. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Lingerfelt, Eric J. [Computational Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Koura, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan); Kondev, Filip G. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States)

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

Improved Wilson QCD simulations with light quark masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from simulations using 2 flavours of O(a)-improved Wilson quarks whose masses are about 1/3 of the physical strange quark mass. We present new data on the mass of the singlet pseudoscalar meson and evidence of the onset of chiral logarithms in the pion decay constant. The previously observed suppression of the topological susceptibility at lighter quark masses is confirmed. We report on the performance of the hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm at light quark masses.

CR Allton; A Hart; D Hepburn; AC Irving; B Joo; C McNeile; C Michael; SV Wright

2004-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

294

A Novel 9.4 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer with Improved Sensitivity, Mass Resolution, and Mass Range, for Petroleum Heavy Crude Oil Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Novel 9.4 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer with Improved Sensitivity, Mass Resolution, and Mass advances in instrument speed and sensitivity. We have redesigned our custom built 9 4 tesla FT ICR New 9 = 800 000 [C32H55S1+H]+ [C35H51+H]+ We have redesigned our custom-built 9.4 tesla FT-ICR mass

Weston, Ken

295

Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Balance Reconstruction. Part II: Surface Mass Balance (18402010)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological station records, ice cores, and regional climate model output are combined to develop a continuous 171-yr (18402010) reconstruction of Greenland ice sheet climatic surface mass balance (Bclim) and its subcomponents including near-...

Jason E. Box

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Greenland ice sheet mass balance reconstruction. Part II: surface mass balance (1840-2010)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological station records, ice cores, and regional climate model output are combined to develop a continuous 171-year (1840-2010) reconstruction of Greenland ice sheet climatic surface mass balance (Bclim) and its sub-components including ...

Jason E. Box

297

Automated mass spectrum generation for new physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe an extension of the FeynRules package dedicated to the automatic generation of the mass spectrum associated with any Lagrangian-based quantum field theory. After introducing a simplified way to implement particle mixings, we present a new class of FeynRules functions allowing both for the analytical computation of all the model mass matrices and for the generation of a C++ package, dubbed ASperGe. This program can then be further employed for a numerical evaluation of the rotation matrices necessary to diagonalize the field basis. We illustrate these features in the context of the Two-Higgs-Doublet Model, the Minimal Left-Right Symmetric Standard Model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model.

Adam Alloul; Jorgen D'Hondt; Karen De Causmaecker; Benjamin Fuks; Michel Rausch de Traubenberg

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

298

Higgs mass determined by cosmological parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Postulating that all massless elementary fields have conformal scaling symmetry removes a conflict between gravitational theory and the standard model of elementary quantum fields. If the scalar field essential to SU(2) symmetry breaking has conformal symmetry, it must depend explicitly on the Ricci curvature scalar of gravitational theory. This has profound consequences for both cosmology and elementary particle physics, since cosmological data determine scalar field parameters. A modified Friedmann equation is derived and solved numerically. The theory is consistent with all relevant data for supernovae redshifts below $z=1$. The implied value of the cosmological constant implies extremely small Higgs mass, far below current empirical lower bounds. Detection of a Higgs boson with large mass would falsify this argument.

R. K. Nesbet

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

299

Emerging Technologies in Mass Spectrometry Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) as an analytical tool for bio-molecular and bio-medical research targets, accurate compound localization and identification. In terms of dedicated instrumentation, this translates into the demand for more detail in the image dimension (spatial resolution) and in the spectral dimension (mass resolution and accuracy), preferably combined in one instrument. At the same time, large area biological tissue samples require fast acquisition schemes, instrument automation and a robust data infrastructure. This review discusses the analytical capabilities of an "ideal" MSI instrument for bio-molecular and bio-medical molecular imaging. The analytical attributes of such an ideal system are contrasted with technological and methodological challenges in MSI. In particular, innovative instrumentation for high spatial resolution imaging in combination with high sample throughput is discussed. Detector technology that targets various shortcomings of conventional imaging detector systems is hig...

Jungmann, Julia H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The Formation of Pluto's Low Mass Satellites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the New Horizons mission, we consider how Pluto's small satellites -- currently P5, Nix, P4, and Hydra -- grow in debris from the giant impact that forms the Pluto-Charon binary or in solid material captured from the protoplanetary debris disk. If the satellites have masses close to their minimum masses, our analysis suggests that capture of material into a circumplanetary or circumbinary debris disk is a viable mechanism for satellite formation. If the satellites are more massive, they probably form in debris from the giant impact. After the impact, Pluto and Charon accrete some of the debris and eject the rest from the binary orbit. During the ejection, high velocity collisions among debris particles produce a collisional cascade, leading to the ejection of some debris from the system and enabling the remaining debris particles to find stable orbits around the binary. Our numerical simulations of viscous diffusion, coagulation, and migration show that collisional evolution within a ring or disk...

Kenyon, Scott J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

Wang, Daojing (Daly City, CA); Yang, Peidong (Kensington, CA); Kim, Woong (Seoul, KR); Fan, Rong (Pasadena, CA)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

302

Neutrino Masses and Oscillations: Triumphs and Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent progress in establishing the existence of finite neutrino masses and mixing between generations of neutrinos has been remarkable, if not astounding. The combined results from studies of atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, and reactor antineutrinos paint an intriguing picture for theorists and provide clear motivation for future experimental studies. In this review, we summarize the status of experimental and theoretical work in this field and explore the future opportunities that emerge in light of recent discoveries.

R. D. McKeown; P. Vogel

2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

303

What kind of energy is the mass?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1905, Einstein discovered the famous equation: E=mc^2, which means that the rest mass of a particle is some kind of energy. This energy is generally referred to as "rest energy", since the particle is believed to be at rest. This paper proposes a new interpretation to the term mc^2. Observing the similarity between the term mc^2 and the kinetic energy term mv^2/2, we propose to interpret mc^2 as being one term of kinetic energy. In other words we propose that, in the called "rest frame", the massive particles are not really at rest, but they are doing a special kind of motion at the light speed c. In this interpretation the "mass" is not an intrinsic property of the particle. The "mass" is simply the kinetic energy associated with this special kind of motion. The more important consequence of this hypothesis is that the term mc^2, present in the relativistic Hamiltonian, must be rewritten as: mc^2 => p_0 c, where p_0 = mc is the modulus of the instantaneous linear moment \\vec{p}_0 associated with the special motion. We analyse a physical scenario in which this special motion is a Microscopic Orbital Circular Motion (MOCM). The characteristic length scale of the MOCM is of the order of the Compton wavelength of the particle.

E. R. Cazaroto

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

SUBSTELLAR-MASS CONDENSATIONS IN PRESTELLAR CORES  

SciTech Connect

We present combined Submillimeter Array and single-dish images of the (sub)millimeter dust continuum emission toward two prestellar cores, SM1 and B2-N5, in the nearest star-cluster-forming region, {rho} Ophiuchus. Our combined images indicate that SM1 and B2-N5 consist of three and four condensations, respectively, with masses of 10{sup -2}-10{sup -1} M{sub Sun} and sizes of a few hundred AU. The individual condensations have mean densities of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} cm{sup -3} and the masses are comparable to or larger than the critical Bonner-Ebert mass, indicating that self-gravity plays an important role in the dynamical evolution of the condensations. The coalescence timescale of these condensations is estimated to be about 10{sup 4} yr, which is comparable to the local gravitational collapse timescale, suggesting that merging of the condensations, instead of accretion, plays an essential role in the star formation process. These results challenge the standard theory of star formation, where a single, rather featureless, prestellar core collapses to form at most a couple of condensations, each of which potentially evolves into a protostar that is surrounded by a rotating disk where planets are created.

Nakamura, Fumitaka; Kawabe, Ryohei [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Takakuwa, Shigehisa, E-mail: fumitaka.nakamura@nao.ac.jp [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

305

Expert overseer for mass spectrometer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An expert overseer for the operation and real-time management of a mass spectrometer and associated laboratory equipment. The overseer is a computer-based expert diagnostic system implemented on a computer separate from the dedicated computer used to control the mass spectrometer and produce the analysis results. An interface links the overseer to components of the mass spectrometer, components of the laboratory support system, and the dedicated control computer. Periodically, the overseer polls these devices and as well as itself. These data are fed into an expert portion of the system for real-time evaluation. A knowledge base used for the evaluation includes both heuristic rules and precise operation parameters. The overseer also compares current readings to a long-term database to detect any developing trends using a combination of statistical and heuristic rules to evaluate the results. The overseer has the capability to alert lab personnel whenever questionable readings or trends are observed and provide a background review of the problem and suggest root causes and potential solutions, or appropriate additional tests that could be performed. The overseer can change the sequence or frequency of the polling to respond to an observation in the current data.

Filby, Evan E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Expert overseer for mass spectrometer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An expert overseer for the operation and real-time management of a mass spectrometer and associated laboratory equipment. The overseer is a computer-based expert diagnostic system implemented on a computer separate from the dedicated computer used to control the mass spectrometer and produce the analysis results. An interface links the overseer to components of the mass spectrometer, components of the laboratory support system, and the dedicated control computer. Periodically, the overseer polls these devices and as well as itself. These data are fed into an expert portion of the system for real-time evaluation. A knowledge base used for the evaluation includes both heuristic rules and precise operation parameters. The overseer also compares current readings to a long-term database to detect any developing trends using a combination of statistical and heuristic rules to evaluate the results. The overseer has the capability to alert lab personnel whenever questionable readings or trends are observed and provide a background review of the problem and suggest root causes and potential solutions, or appropriate additional tests that could be performed. The overseer can change the sequence or frequency of the polling to respond to an observation in the current data.

Filby, E.E.; Rankin, R.A.

1989-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

307

Comparison of nuclear mass models at nuclearmasses.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear masses are crucial in many astrophysics studies, as well as other areas of basic and applied nuclear science. There are now many different global theoretical models of nuclear masses - but choosing the best model for a given application can be challenging. The suite of codes online at nuclearmasses.org greatly facilitates the comparison of nuclear models with evaluated masses as well as the intercomparison of theoretical models. We demonstrate the utility of this suite by comparing the RMS deviations of 13 different theoretical mass models from the AME2003 evaluated masses over mass ranges appropriate for astrophysics.

Smith, Michael S.; Nesaraja, Caroline D.; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Koura, Hiroyuki; Kondev, Filip G. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States) and Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan); Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

308

Precise measurements of the $W$ mass at the Tevatron and indirect constraints on the Higgs mass  

SciTech Connect

I describe the latest D0 and CDF W boson mass measurements. The D0 measurement is performed with 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity in the electron decay channel with a data set of 1.68 x 10{sup 8} W candidates. The value of the W boson mass measured by D0 is M{sub W} = 80.375 {+-} 0.023 GeV when combined with the previously analyzed 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The CDF measurement uses 2.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity in both electron and muon decay channels with a total of 1.1 x 10{sup 8} W candidates. The value of the W boson mass measured by CDF is M{sub W} = 80.387 {+-} 0.019 GeV. I report the combination of these two measurements with previous Tevatron measurements and with the LEP measurements of the W boson mass. The new world average is M{sub W} = 80.385 {+-} 0.015GeV. I discuss the implications of the new measurement to the indirect measurement of the Standard Model Higgs boson mass.

Lopes de Sa, Rafael

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Mass gap in quantum energy-mass spectrum of relativistic Yang-Mills fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A relativistic quantum Yang-Mills theory with a simple compact gauge Lie group on the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime is set up in a framework of infinite-dimensional pseudodifferential operators in a nuclear Kree-Gelfand triple. The linear quantum Yang-Mills energy-mass operator is defined as the anti-normal quantization of the non-linear Yang-Mills energy-mass functional of consrained Cauchy data supported by an euclidean ball of a radius R. It is shown that expectation functional of the Yang-Mills energy-mass operator majorises the expectation functional of a scaled occupation number operator so that, by variational spectral principles, the quantum Yang-Mills spectral mass gap is positive. The mass gap is proportional to 1/R. The running coupling constant is proportional to the square root of R, leading to an asymptotic freedom for quantum Yang-Mills theory at short distances. This mathematically rigorous theory is non-perturbative and provides a solution for the 7th Clay Institute Millennium problem.

Alexander Dynin

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

310

Some approaches to rock mass hydrofracture theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new engineering method has been developed at the Leningrad Mining Institute for defining hot dry rock hydrofracturing parameters. It reflects the structural features of a real jointed rock mass, its gravity-tectonic components of the stress tensor and volume character of deformations, taking into account the inertial effects of hydrodynamics in the non-Darcy zone of radial fluid flow near the injection well, and conversion of the heat energy extracted from hot rock by circulating water partly into filtration-flow additional pressure. Results of calculations are compared to field experiments at Fenton Hill, NM, and are used for the first HDR circulation systems in the USSR.

Dyadkin, Yuri, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

White Paper: Measuring the Neutrino Mass Hierarchy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This white paper is a condensation of a report by a committee appointed jointly by the Nuclear Science and Physics Divisions at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The goal of this study was to identify the most promising technique(s) for resolving the neutrino mass hierarchy. For the most part, we have relied on calculations and simulations presented by the proponents of the various experiments. We have included evaluations of the opportunities and challenges for these experiments based on what is available already in the literature.

Cahn, R N; Freedman, S J; Haxton, W C; Kadel, R W; Kolomensky, Yu G; Luk, K B; McDonald, P; Gann, G D Orebi; Poon, A W P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

White Paper: Measuring the Neutrino Mass Hierarchy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This white paper is a condensation of a report by a committee appointed jointly by the Nuclear Science and Physics Divisions at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The goal of this study was to identify the most promising technique(s) for resolving the neutrino mass hierarchy. For the most part, we have relied on calculations and simulations presented by the proponents of the various experiments. We have included evaluations of the opportunities and challenges for these experiments based on what is available already in the literature.

R. N. Cahn; D. A. Dwyer; S. J. Freedman; W. C. Haxton; R. W. Kadel; Yu. G. Kolomensky; K. B. Luk; P. McDonald; G. D. Orebi Gann; A. W. P. Poon

2013-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

313

Quantization of Atomic and Nuclear Rest Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We were able to quantize phenomenologically the first time the atomic and nuclear rest masses. Note that this quantization rule is justified for atoms and nuclei with different A, N and Z and the nuclei and atoms represent a coherent synchronized systems - a complex of coupled oscillators (resonators). The cooperative resonance synchronization mechanisms are responsible for explanation of how the electron volt world can influence the nuclear mega electron volt world. It means that we created new possibilities for inducing and controlling nuclear reactions by atomic processes.

F. A. Gareev; G. F. Gareeva; I. E. Zhidkova

2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

314

Quark mass thresholds in QCD thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss radiative corrections to how quark mass thresholds are crossed, as a function of the temperature, in basic thermodynamic observables such as the pressure, the energy and entropy densities, and the heat capacity of high temperature QCD. The indication from leading order that the charm quark plays a visible role at surprisingly low temperatures, is confirmed. We also sketch a way to obtain phenomenological estimates relevant for generic expansion rate computations at temperatures between the QCD and electroweak scales, pointing out where improvements over the current knowledge are particularly welcome.

M. Laine; Y. Schroder

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

315

Correlations Tests in Nuclear Mass Model Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correlation testing provides a quick method of discriminating amongst potential terms to include in a nuclear mass formula or functional; however a firm mathematical foundation of the method has not been previously set forth. Here, the necessary justification for correlation testing is developed and more detail of the motivation behind its use is given. We provide a quantitative demonstration of the method's performance and short-comings, highlighting also potential issues a user may encounter. In concluding we suggestion some possible future developments to improve the limitations of the method.

Bertolli, M G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as measured by mass spectrometry provides an important method for the identification of proteins, which are usually identified by matching the measured and calculated m/z values of the proteolytic peptides. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as measured by mass spectrometry provides an important method for the identification of proteins, which are usually identified by matching the measured and calculated m/z values of the proteolytic peptides. A unique identification is, however, heavily

317

Twisted mass QCD and the FNAL heavy quark formalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At tree level, I discuss modifying the FNAL heavy quark formalism to include a twisted mass term. I find that at maximal twist the so called KLM factor is independent of the heavy mass.

Craig McNeile

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

Ranges of Atmospheric Mass and Composition of Super Earth Exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Terrestrial-like exoplanets may obtain atmospheres from three primary sources: Capture of nebular gases, degassing during accretion, and degassing from subsequent tectonic activity. Here we model degassing during accretion to estimate the range of atmospheric mass and composition on exoplanets ranging from 1 to 30 Earth masses. We use bulk compositions drawn from primitive and differentiated meteorite compositions. Degassing alone can create a wide range of masses of planetary atmospheres, ranging from less than a percent of the planet's total mass up to ~6 mass% of hydrogen, ~20 mass% of water, and/or ~5 mass% of carbon compounds. Hydrogen-rich atmospheres can be outgassed as a result of oxidizing metallic iron with water, and excess water and carbon can produce atmospheres through simple degassing. As a byproduct of our atmospheric outgassing models we find that modest initial water contents (10 mass% of the planet and above) create planets with deep surface liquid water oceans soon after accretion is complete.

L. Elkins-Tanton; S. Seager

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

319

A Novel and Low Cost Sea Ice Mass Balance Buoy.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The understanding of sea ice mass balance processes requires continuous monitoring of the seasonal evolution of the ice thickness. While autonomous ice mass balance buoys (IMB buoys) deployed over the past two decades have contributed to our ...

Keith Jackson; Jeremy Wilkinson; Ted Maksym; Justin Beckers; Christian Haas; David Meldrum; David Mackenzie

320

Press Pass - Press Release - W mass precisions measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the W boson mass will lead to stricter bounds on the mass of the elusive Higgs boson. The W boson is a carrier of the weak nuclear force and a key element of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

FEHM (Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEHM (Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code) FEHM (Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code) FEHM is used to simulate groundwater and contaminant flow and transport in deep...

322

Reassessment of Net Surface Mass Balance in Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent in situ measurements of surface mass balance and improved calculation techniques are used to produce an updated assessment of net surface mass balance over Antarctica. A new elevation model of Antarctica derived from ERS-1 satellite ...

David G. Vaughan; Jonathan L. Bamber; Mario Giovinetto; Jonathan Russell; A. Paul R. Cooper

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Extension of the Focusable Mass Range in Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with Multiple Detectors  

SciTech Connect

Since the underlying theory of Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (DOFMS) was reported in 2007,[1] laboratory results[2, 3] have proven its practical viability. However, these previous implementations of DOFMS considered ion detection only over narrow DOF-detection windows, with 25-mm being the greatest detection length explored. These small mass windows cannot be used to evaluate how DOFMS focusing performs over greater DOF detection lengths and mass ranges. In the present study, we expand on previous studies by placing two spatially selective ion detectors along the detection plane of the DOFMS instrument. Ion signals are simultaneously collected from both DOF detectors in order to simulate DOFMS performance with a longer spatially selective ion detector.

Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W.; Dennis, Elise; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Carado, Anthony J.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Measurements of the tau Mass and Mass Difference of the tau^+ and tau^- at BABAR  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the result of a precision measurement of the mass of the {tau} lepton, M{sub {tau}}, based on 423 fb{sup -1} of data recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, they determine the mass to be 1776.68 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.41(syst) MeV. They also measure the mass difference between the {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -}, and obtain (M{sub {tau}{sup +}} - M{sub {tau}{sup -}})/M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} = (-3.4 {+-} 1.3(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, where M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} is the average value of M{sub {tau}{sup +}} and M{sub {tau}{sup -}}.

Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Handbook of heat and mass transfer. Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume series presents advanced topics in industrial heat and mass transfer operations for reactor design technology.

Cheremisinoff, N.P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

LCPHSM2001054 Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LC­PHSM­2001­054 Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass and Cross Section with a Linear e + e \\Gamma for the measurement of the Higgs boson mass and produc­ tion cross section. An integrated luminosity of 500 fb \\Gamma1 is assumed. For Higgs boson masses of 120, 150 and 180 GeV the uncertainty on the Higgs boson mass

327

Nuclear Mass Datasets and Models at nuclearmasses.org  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This online repository for nuclear mass information allows nuclear researchers to upload their own mass values, store then, share them with colleagues, and, in turn, visualize and analyze the work of others. The Resources link provides access to published information or tools on other websites. The Contributions page is where users will find software, documents, experimental mass data sets, and theoretical mass models that have been uploaded for sharing with the scientific community.

328

Confronting mass-varying neutrinos with MiniBooNE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the proposal that mass-varying neutrinos could provide an explanation for the LSND signal for \\bar\

V. Barger; D. Marfatia; K. Whisnant

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

329

Calculating the nuclear mass at finite angular momenta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mean field methods to calculate the nuclear mass are extended into the high spin regime to calculate the nuclear binding energy as a function of proton number, neutron number and angular momentum. Comparing the trend as a function of mass number for a selection of high-spin states, a similar agreement between theory and experiment is obtained as for ground state masses.

B. G. Carlsson; I. Ragnarsson

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

Mass inflation in (1+1)-dimensional Dilaton Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the phenomenon of mass inflation in two-dimensional dilaton theories of gravity. We consider two distinct black hole spacetimes and construct the mass-inflation solution for each. Our analysis is extended to include multi-horizon spacetimes. We find that the mass function diverges in a manner quantitatively similar to its four-dimensional counterpart.

J. S. F. Chan; R. B. Mann

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

331

Development of a portable grain mass flow sensor test rig  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable grain mass flow sensor test rig was built to measure the accuracy of a mass flow sensor with dual use in the field as well as in the lab. Concurrently, a synchronization method was developed that employs GPS timing data to synchronize the ... Keywords: Mass flow sensor, Test rig, Yield monitor accuracy, Yield monitor error

M. Loghavi; R. Ehsani; R. Reeder

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Handbook of heat and mass transfer. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume series, the work of more than 100 contributors, presents advanced topics in industrial heat and mass transfer operations and reactor design technology. Volume 2 emphasizes mass transfer and reactor design. Some of the contents discussed are: MASS TRANSFER PRINCIPLES - Effect of turbulence promoters on mass transfer. Mass transfer principles with homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. Convective diffusion with reactions in a tube. Transient mass transfer onto small particles and drops. Modeling heat and mass transport in falling liquid films. Heat and mass transfer in film absorption. Multicomponent mass transfer: theory and applications. Diffusion limitation for reaction in porous catalysts. Kinetics and mechanisms of catalytic deactivation. DISTILLATION AND EXTRACTION - Generalized equations of state for process design. Mixture boiling. Estimating vapor pressure from normal boiling points of hydrocarbons. Estimating liquid and vapor molar fractions in distillation columns. Principles of multicomponent distillation. Generalized design methods for multicomponent distillation. Interfacial films in inorganic substances extraction. Liquid-liquid extraction in suspended slugs. MULTIPHASE REACTOR SYSTEMS - Reaction and mass transport in two-phase reactors. Mass transfer and kinetics in three-phase reactors. Estimating liquid film mass transfer coefficients in randomly packed columns. Designing packed tower wet scrubbers - emphasis on nitrogen oxides. Gas absorption in aerated mixers. Axial dispersion and heat transfer in gas-liquid bubble columns. Operation and design of trickle-bed reactors.

Cheremisinoff, N.P.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Nucleon Mass Splitting at Finite Isospin Chemical Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate nucleon mass splitting at finite isospin chemical potential in the frame of two flavor Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. It is analytically proved that, in the phase with explicit isospin symmetry breaking the proton mass decreases and the neutron mass increases linearly in the isospin chemical potential.

Sheng Chang; Jifeng Liu; Pengfei Zhuang

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

334

BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT A.RASPEREZA DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D­22607#erential luminosity spectrum measurements and beam energy spread on the precision of the Higgs boson mass measurement possible impact of the beam related systematic errors on the Higgs boson mass measurement is discussed

335

Mass Energy Consumers Alliance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alliance Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mass Energy Consumers Alliance Name Mass Energy Consumers Alliance Address 670 Centre St Place Boston, Massachusetts Zip 02130 Region Greater Boston Area Website http://www.massenergy.com/inde Notes Non-profit organization advocating and acting in the marketplace on behalf of consumers and the environment Coordinates 42.3123967°, -71.1141461° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3123967,"lon":-71.1141461,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

336

Neutrino Mass and Mixing with Discrete Symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a review article about neutrino mass and mixing and flavour model building strategies based on discrete family symmetry. After a pedagogical introduction and overview of the whole of neutrino physics, we focus on the PMNS mixing matrix and the latest global fits following the Daya Bay and RENO experiments which measure the reactor angle. We then describe the simple bimaximal, tri-bimaximal and golden ratio patterns of lepton mixing and the deviations required for a non-zero reactor angle, with solar or atmospheric mixing sum rules resulting from charged lepton corrections or residual trimaximal mixing. The different types of see-saw mechanism are then reviewed as well as the sequential dominance mechanism. We then give a mini-review of finite group theory, which may be used as a discrete family symmetry broken by flavons either completely, or with different subgroups preserved in the neutrino and charged lepton sectors. These two approaches are then reviewed in detail in separate chapters including mechanisms for flavon vacuum alignment and different model building strategies that have been proposed to generate the reactor angle. We then briefly review grand unified theories (GUTs) and how they may be combined with discrete family symmetry to describe all quark and lepton masses and mixing. Finally we discuss three model examples which combine an SU(5) GUT with the discrete family symmetries A4, S4 and Delta(96).

Stephen F. King; Christoph Luhn

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Environmental Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric particles influence many aspects of climate, air quality and human health. Understanding the composition, chemistry and behavior of atmospheric aerosols is a key remaining challenge in improving climate models. Furthermore, particles may be traced back to a particular source based on composition, stable isotope ratios, or the presence of particular surface chemistries. Finally, the characterization of atmospheric particles in the workplace plays an important role in understanding the potential for exposure and environmental and human health effects to engineered and natural nanoscale particles. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a useful tool in determining any of several aspects of the structure, composition and chemistry of these particles. Often used in conjunction with other surface analysis and electron microscopy methods, SIMS has been used to determine or confirm reactions on and in particles, the presence of particular organic species on the surface of atmospheric aerosols and several other interesting and relevant findings. Various versions of SIMS instruments dynamic SIMS, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry or TOF-SIMS, nanoSIMS have been used to determine specific aspects of aerosol structure and chemistry. This article describes the strengths of each type of SIMS instrument in the characterization of aerosols, along with guidance on sample preparation, specific characterization specific to the particular information sought in the analysis. Examples and guidance are given for each type of SIMS analysis.

Gaspar, Daniel J.; Cliff, John B.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

u.s. DEPARTIllENT OF I!NJ1RG EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

or industrial practices, and smallscale conservation and renewable energy research and development and pilot projects. The actions could involve building renovations or...

339

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Grand Street Mercury Site, Hoboken, NJ, September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This Record of Decision presents the selected remedial action for the Grand Street Mercury Site. The major components of the selected remedy include: permanent relocation of the former residents of the Site; continuation of temporary relocation of the former residents until permanent relocation has been implemented; historic preservation mitigation measures for the buildings at the Site, as appropriate; gross mercury decontamination of the buildings at the Site including recovery of available mercury, whenever possible; identification and abatement of asbestos in the buildings at the Site; removal and recovery of reusable fixtures, appliances, and recyclable scrap metal and other building components; demolition of the two buildings at the Site using measures to minimize releases of mercury into the environment; removal and off-site disposal of all demolition debris at EPA-approved facilities; sampling of soils at the Site; excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soils at EPA-approved facilities; sampling of soils at off-site adjacent locations; sampling of groundwater at the Site; and assessment of off-site soil and groundwater data to evaluate the need for future remedial action.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering 623 Bowser Rd. Piscataway NJ 08854-8014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

medical Home Project 150,462 08-104 Allouche, Erez Applications of Inorganic Polymer Concrete (Geopolymer Prostate Cancer Detection System ULM 2,000 Erez Allouche Applications of Inorganic Polymer Concrete (Geopolymer') in Transportation Structures Located in Harsh Environments LTRC 30,000 Kody Varah- ramyan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering 623 Bowser Rd. Piscataway NJ 08854-8014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Concrete · Corrosion/Fire-Resistant Structural Concretes · Geopolymer Structural Concrete DR. CHRISTINA · Infrastructure Deterioration · Cathodic Protection · Concrete #12;45 DR. TSUNG-CHOW "JOE" SU Professor Eng Concrete Presuel-Moreno, Francisco, Ph.D. .....44 Concurrency Shankar, Ravi, Ph

342

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Radium Corp - NJ 09  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Corp Historical documents may contain links which are no longer valid or to outside sources. LM can not attest to the accuracy of information provided by these links. Please see...

343

NJ,O-04 MEMOHANDUtl TO: FILE FRon: SITE NAME: CITY:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

if yes, date contacted TYPE OF OPERATION ----------- 0 Research & Develapment q Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale g Bench Scale Process ? a Theoretical...

344

N.J. DEP recognizes PPPL as state's top environmental steward...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

use and carbon emissions, convert our vehicles to more environmentally friendly fuels, compost our waste, and in general, implement a broad-based sustainability program, Dr. Cohen...

345

NH Acid Rain Control Act (New Hampshire)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Act is implemented under New Hampshire's acid deposition control program established under the Rules to Control Air Pollution in Chapter Env-A 400. The goal of the Act is to reduce emissions...

346

Export.gov - NH Our Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identify potential partners. Market your firm directly to local companies. Partner Search Identify potential partners and get detailed company reports. Determine the...

347

Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Exports to Canada  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

56,879 39,438 26,767 18,297 19,826 47,451 1998-2012 Pipeline Prices 7.52 9.72 5.04 5.48 5.45 4.08 1998...

348

Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Exports to Canada  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Pipeline Volumes 0 64 0 0 336 199 2007-2012 Pipeline Prices -- 7.61 -- -- 7.54 2.62 2007-2012...

349

Thermal conductivity of mass-graded graphene flakes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter we investigate thermal conductions in mass-graded graphene flakes by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It shows mass-graded graphene flakes reveal no thermal rectification effect in thermal conduction process. Dependences of thermal conductivity upon the heat fluxes and the mass gradients are studied. It is found that thermal conductivity would be dramatically decreased by increasing the mass gradients. We also discuss the influence of thermal curvatures and thermal expansions upon the thermal conduction process in mass-graded graphene flakes.

Cheh, Jigger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A search for close-mass lepton doublet  

SciTech Connect

Described is a search for a heavy charged lepton with an associated neutrino of nearly the same mass, together known as a close-mass lepton doublet. The search is conducted in e/sup +/e/sup/minus// annihilation data taken with the Mark II detector at a center-of-mass energy of 29 GeV. In order to suppress contamination from conventional two-photon reactions, the search applies a novel, radiative-tagging technique. Requiring the presence of an isolated, energetic photon allows exploration for lepton doublets with a mass splitting smaller than that previously accessible to experiment. No evidence for such a new lepton has been found, enabling limits to be placed on allowed mass combinations. Mass differences as low as 250-300 MeV are excluded for charged lepton masses up to 10 GeV. 78 refs., 64 figs., 8 tabs.

Riles, J.K.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Mass gap in quantum energy-mass spectrum of relativistic Yang-Mills fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A non-perturbative relativistic quantum Yang-Mills theory with a semisimple compact gauge Lie group on the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime is set up in a Schroedinger representation with infinite-dimensional differential operators in the framework of sesqui-holomorphic nuclear Kree-Gelfand triples. The \\emph{linear} quantum Yang-Mills energy-mass operator $\\mathbf{H}$ is defined as the anti-normal quantization of the \\emph{non-linear} Yang-Mills energy-mass functional of Cauchy data supported by a ball $\\mathbb{B}(R)$ with the center at the origin of $\\mathbb{R}^3$ and the variable radius R>0. The general global solution of the non-linear Yang-Mills system of partial differential equations (with no restrictions at infinity) is reduced to the solution of the initial value problems in the temporal gauge with the Cauchy data supported by the balls $\\mathbb{B}(R)$. It is shown that $\\mathbf{H}$ dominates the number operator $\\mathbf{N}$. Since 0 is the spectral infimum of $\\mathbf{H}$ and, simultaneously, the simple fundamental eigenvalue of $N$, variational spectral principles imply that 0 is the simple fundamental eigenvalue of $N$ as well. Thus $\\mathbf{H}$ has a positive mass gap. The domination proof depends crucially on the magic of the Killing quadratic form that reveals a mass quadratic form in the Weyl symbol of $\\mathbf{H}$. With a dimensional transmutation of the coupling constant, the mass gap is proportional to 1/R and the running coupling constant is proportional to $\\sqrt{R}$. The inverse dependence demonstrates an asymptotic freedom for quantum Yang-Mills self-interaction at short distances. The mathematically rigorous theory is non-perturbative and provides a solution for the 7th Clay Institute Millennium problem.

Alexander Dynin

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

352

Dynamic effective mass of granular media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop the concept of frequency dependent effective mass, M(omega), of jammed granular materials which occupy a rigid cavity to a filling fraction of 48%, the remaining volume being air of normal room condition or controlled humidity. The dominant features of M(omega) provide signatures of the dissipation of acoustic modes, elasticity and aging effects in the granular medium. We perform humidity controlled experiments and interpret the data in terms of a continuum model and a "trap" model of thermally activated capillary bridges at the contact points. The results suggest that attenuation in the granular materials is influenced significantly by the kinetics of capillary condensation between the asperities at the contacts.

Chaur-Jian Hsu; David L. Johnson; Rohit A. Ingale; John J. Valenza; Nicolas Gland; Hernan A. Makse

2006-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

353

Micro cogeneration: roadblocks to mass markets  

SciTech Connect

The market for micro cogeneration using units of 30 kW or less is in its infancy, and is currently limited to health care, recreation, lodging, and multi-unit residential facilities. There have been some inroads into the restaurant and fast food outlets, light industry, and some supermarkets. A mass market potential will require the industry to produce a module that is as generic as a home air conditioner or heat pump. In order for modular cogenerators to be look upon as appliances, they must be assembled as a package at the factory for easy installation and maintenance. Some utilities can create barriers to interconnections, which would have a negative effect on the market.

Ross, J.D.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Chemistry of Low Mass Substellar Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Brown dwarfs" is the collective name for objects more massive than giant planets such as Jupiter but less massive than M dwarf stars. This review gives a brief description of the classification and chemistry of low mass dwarfs. The current spectral classification of stars includes L and T dwarfs that encompass the coolest known stars and substellar objects. The relatively low atmospheric temperatures and high total pressures in substellar dwarfs lead to molecular gas and condensate chemistry. The chemistry of elements such as C, N, O, Ti, V, Fe, Cr, and the alkali elements play a dominant role in shaping the optical and infrared spectra of the "failed" stars. Chemical diagnostics for the subclassifications are described.

Katharina Lodders; Bruce Fegley, Jr

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

355

Dynamic effective mass of granular media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report an experimental and theoretical investigation of the frequency-dependent effective mass, $\\tilde{M}(\\omega)$, of loose granular particles which occupy a rigid cavity to a given filling fraction, the remaining volume being air of differing humidities. This allow us to study the mechanisms of elastic response and attenuation of acoustic modes in granular media. We demonstrate that this is a sensitive and direct way to measure those properties of the granular medium that are the cause of the changes in acoustic properties of structures containing grain-filled cavities. Specifically, we apply this understanding to the case of the flexural resonances of a rectangular bar with a grain-filled cavity within it. The dominant features of $\\tilde{M}(\\omega)$ are a sharp resonance and a broad background, which we analyze within the context of simple models. We find that: a) These systems may be understood in terms of a height-dependent and diameter-dependent effective sound speed ($\\sim 100-300$ m/s) and an effective viscosity ($\\sim 5\\times 10^4$ Poise). b) There is a dynamic Janssen effect in the sense that, at any frequency, and depending on the method of sample preparation, approximately one-half of the effective mass is borne by the side walls of the cavity and one-half by the bottom. c) By performing experiments under varying humidity conditions we conclude that, on a fundamental level, damping of acoustic modes is dominated by adsorbed films of water at grain-grain contacts in our experiments, not by global viscous dampening. d) There is a monotonically increasing effect of humidity on the dampening of the fundamental resonance within the granular medium which translates to a non-monotonic, but predictable, variation of dampening within the grain-loaded bar.

John Valenza; Chaur-Jian Hsu; Rohit Ingale; Nicolas Gland; Hernn A. Makse; David Linton Johnson

2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

356

Variability in properties of Salado Mass Concrete  

SciTech Connect

Salado Mass Concrete (SMC) has been developed for use as a seal component in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This concrete is intended to be mixed from pre-bagged materials, have an initial slump of 10 in., and remain pumpable and placeable for two hours after mixing. It is a mass concrete because it will be placed in monoliths large enough that the heat generated during cement hydration has the potential to cause thermal expansion and subsequent cracking, a phenomenon to avoid in the seal system. This report describes effects on concrete properties of changes in ratio of water to cement, batch size, and variations in characteristics of different lots of individual components of the concrete. The research demonstrates that the concrete can be prepared from laboratory-batched or pre-bagged dry materials in batches from 1.5 ft{sup 3} to 5.0 yd{sup 3}, with no chemical admixtures other than the sodium chloride added to improve bonding with the host rock, at a water-to-cement ratio ranging from 0.36 to 0.42. All batches prepared according to established procedures had adequate workability for at least 1.5 hours, and achieved or exceeded the target compressive strength of 4500 psi at 180 days after casting. Portland cement and fly ash from different lots or sources did not have a measurable effect on concrete properties, but variations in a shrinkage-compensating cement used as a component of the concrete did appear to affect workability. A low initial temperature and the water-reducing and set-retarding functions of the salt are critical to meeting target properties.

Wakeley, L.D.; Harrington, P.T. [US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Hansen, F.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY U.S. Number of states in which marketer is licensed ... Service Tech & Research Corp

358

C:\\ANNUAL\\VENTCHAP.V8\\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99...

359

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK DE 0 2 4 6 8 10 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998...

360

C:\\ANNUAL\\VENTCHAP.V8\\NewNGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK 15. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in the United States, 2001...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

C:\\ANNUAL\\VENTCHAP.V8\\NGAla1109.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Sources: Energy...

362

NGA98fin5.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99...

363

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI MT NE...

364

Computer processing of mass-spectral data. Part V. Assignment of formulas to experimental masses. Representative databases for program FZM  

SciTech Connect

Program FZM assigns formulas to masses using databases generated with respect to the /sup 14/CH/sub 2/, /sup 50/CF/sub 2/, /sup 82/CCl/sub 2/, and /sup 170/Cbr/sub 2/ homologous-unit (Dendrick) mass Scales by program DBG. Each database consists of formula codes and fractional Kendrick masses grouped into 14 nominal-mass Z series tables. The formula codes in each table are arranged in order of decreasing fractional mass. In order to verify correct implementation of programs DBG and FZM and to allow manual application of the formula-assignment process, a database is reproduced for each homologous unit. The input parameters to program DBG required to generate each database are listed. The process of determining the formulas whose masses lie within a region 2 delta about the experimental mass is illustrated for each database.

Chung, K.C.; Hwang, C.S.; Scheppele, S.E.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Universality of the subsolar mass distribution from critical gravitational collapse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-similarity induced by critical gravitational collapse is used as a paradigm to probe the mass distribution of subsolar objects. At large mass (solar mass and above) there is widespread agreement as to both the form and parameter values arising in the mass distribution of stellar objects. At subsolar mass there is still considerable disagreement as to the qualitative form of the mass distribution, let alone the specific parameter values characterizing that distribution. For the first time, the paradigm of critical gravitational collapse is applied to several concrete astrophysical scenarios to derive robust qualitative features of the subsolar mass distribution. We further contrast these theoretically derived ideas with the observational situation. In particular, we demonstrate that at very low mass the distribution is given by a power law, with an exponent opposite in sign to that observed in the high-mass regime. The value of this low-mass exponent is in principle calculable via dynamical systems theory applied to gravitational collapse. Qualitative agreement between theory, numerical experiments, and observational data is good, though quantitative issues remain troublesome.

Matt Visser; Nicolas Yunes

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Evaluation of Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Two Large Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilizing building thermal mass for cooling load shiftingUse of Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEpeak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Dynamical mass generation by source inversion: Calculating the mass gap of the Gross-Neveu model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We probe the U(N) Gross-Neveu model with a source-term $J\\bar{\\Psi}\\Psi$. We find an expression for the renormalization scheme and scale invariant source $\\hat{J}$, as a function of the generated mass gap. The expansion of this function is organized in such a way that all scheme and scale dependence is reduced to one single parameter d. We get a non-perturbative mass gap as the solution of $\\hat{J}=0$. In one loop we find that any physical choice for d gives good results for high values of N. In two loops we can determine d self-consistently by the principle of minimal sensitivity and find remarkably accurate results for N>2.

K. Van Acoleyen; H. Verschelde

2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

368

Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift region and a second drift region enclosed within an evacuation chamber. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift region and a second drift region enclosed within an evacuation chamber; a means of introducing an analyte of interest into the first drift region; a pulsed ionization source which produces molecular ions from said analyte of interest; a first foil positioned between the first drift region and the second drift region, which dissociates said molecular ions into constituent

369

Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Diaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endroczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. A. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzalez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska

2012-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

370

Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

371

Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Baragoya, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Diaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endroczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gaspar, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzalez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Krolak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods are disclosed for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector. 7 figs.

Tuszewski, M.G.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

373

Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector.

Tuszewski, Michel G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Testing Mass Varying Neutrino With Short Gamma Ray Burst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the possibility of probing for the absolute neutrino mass and its variation with short Gamma Ray Burst (GRB). We have calculated the flight time difference between a massive neutrino and a photon in two different approaches to mass varying neutrinos. Firstly we parametrize the neutrino mass as a function of redshift in a model independent way, then we consider two specific models where the neutrino mass varies during the evolution of the Quintessence fields. Our calculations show in general the value of the time delay is changed substantially relative to a constant neutrino mass. Furthermore our numerical results show that the flight time delay in these models is expected to be larger than the duration time of the short GRB, which opens a possibility of testing the scenario of mass varying neutrino with the short GRB.

Hong Li; Zigao Dai; Xinmin Zhang

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

375

A Way to Understand the Mass Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explain how the "maximally broken" family gauge theory may work; that is, the family gauge symmetry is respected at the Lagrangian level but broken spontaneously - also as a way to understand the mass-generation mechanism. We use the language of Hwang and Yan to write down an extended Standard Model - using renormalizable quantum field theory as the framework; to start with certain basic units together with a certain gauge group. Specifically we use the left-handed and right-handed spinors to form the basic units together with SUc(3) x SUL(2) x U(1) x SUf(3) as the gauge group. As shown in this paper, the scalar fields phi(1,2)(the standard Higgs), phi(3,1), and phi(3,2) (mainly the "project-out" neutral sector, as seen in the U-gauge), with the first family index and the second SUL(2) index, would do the job - that is, to make certain that all family particles are (very) massive and the phenomena of three generations, including neutrino oscillations, are there, and nothing more

W-Y. Pauchy Hwang

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and .sup.3 He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

Roberts, Mark L. (Livermore, CA); Davis, Jay C. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and [sup 3]He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

Mensky's path integral and photon mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is commonly assumed that zero and non-zero photon mass would lead to qualitatively different physics. For example, massless photon has two polarization degrees of freedom, while massive photon at least three. This feature seems counter-intuitive. In this paper we will show that if we change propagator by setting $i \\epsilon$ (needed to avoid poles) to a finite value, and also introduce it in a way that breaks Lawrentz symmetry, then we would obtain the continuous transition we desire once the speed of the photons is "large enough" with respect to "preferred" frame. The two transverse polarization degrees of freedom will be long lived, while longitudinal will be short lived. Their lifetime will be near-zero if $m \\ll \\sqrt{\\epsilon}$, which is where the properties of two circular polarizations arize. The $i \\epsilon$ corresponds to the intensity of Mensky's "continuous measurement" and the short lifetime of the longitudinal photons can be understood as the "conversion" of quantum degrees of freedom (photons) into "classical" ones by the measurement device (thus getting rid of the former). While the "classical" trajectory of the longitudinal photons does arize, it plays no physical role due to quantum Zeno effect: intuitively, it is similar to an electron being kept at a ground state due to continuous measurement.

Roman Sverdlov

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

379

Neutrino Mass and Mixing with Discrete Symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a review article about neutrino mass and mixing and flavour model building strategies based on discrete family symmetry. After a pedagogical introduction and overview of the whole of neutrino physics, we focus on the PMNS mixing matrix and the latest global fits following the Daya Bay and RENO experiments which measure the reactor angle. We then describe the simple bimaximal, tri-bimaximal and golden ratio patterns of lepton mixing and the deviations required for a non-zero reactor angle, with solar or atmospheric mixing sum rules resulting from charged lepton corrections or residual trimaximal mixing. The different types of seesaw mechanism are then reviewed as well as the sequential dominance mechanism. We then give a mini-review of finite group theory, which may be used as a discrete family symmetry broken by flavons either completely, or with different subgroups preserved in the neutrino and charged lepton sectors. These two approaches are then reviewed in detail in separate chapters including mec...

King, Stephen F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and {sup 3}He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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381

A New Mass Formula for NG Bosons in QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An often used mass formula for Nambu-Goldstone (NG) bosons in QCD, such as the pions, involves the condensate $$, $f_{\\pi}$ and the quark current masses. We argue, within the context of the Global Colour Model to QCD, that this expression is wrong. Analysis of the interplay between the Dyson-Schwinger equation for the constituent quark effect and the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the NG boson results in a new mass formula.

Reginald T. Cahill; Susan M. Gunner

1995-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Lightest Higgs Boson Mass in Pure Gravity Mediation Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the lightest Higgs boson mass in the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model with "pure gravity mediation". By requiring that the model provides the observed dark matter density, we find that the lightest Higgs boson is predicted to be below 132GeV. We also find that the upper limit on the lightest Higgs boson mass becomes 128GeV, if we further assume thermal leptogenesis mechanism as the origin of baryon asymmetry of universe. The interrelations between the Higgs boson mass and the gaugino masses are also discussed.

Ibe, Masahiro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

In-Situ Mass, Temperature, and Resistance Measurements during ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a simple household microwave, several materials properties (resistance, mass, and ... Numeric Simulation of the Cooling Process of the Iron Ore Sinter.

384

Implement Robotic Mass Measurements in SP250 Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... services will dramatically reduce the turnaround time for mass measurement services by a predicted factor of four, eliminate human errors and other ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Enthalpy and mass flowrate measurements for two-phase geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conference Proceedings: Enthalpy and mass flowrate measurements for two-phase geothermal production by Tracer dilution techniques edit Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions...

386

Mass transport characterization of a novel gas sparged ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

nitrogen gas through the reactor increased the mass transfer coefficient by an ... demonstrated that the gasliquid transfer coefficient was greater than that for the

387

HIggs Boson Mass in the Minimal Unified Subquark Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the original paper entitled, "Masses of Fundamental Particles", not only the masses of fundamental particles including the weak bosons, Higgs scalar, quarks, and leptons, but also the mixing angles of quarks and those of neutrinos are all explained and/or predicted in the unified composite model of quarks and leptons successfully. In this addendum entitled, "Higgs Boson Mass in the Minimal Unified Subquark Model", it is emphasized that the Higgs boson mass is predicted to be about 130Gev in the minimal unified subquark model, which agrees well with the experimental values of 125-126GeV recently found by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at the LHC.

Hidezumi Terazawa

2011-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

Massive gravity with mass term in three dimensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the effect of the Pauli-Fierz mass term on a recently established, new massive gravity theory in three space-time dimensions. We show that the Pauli-Fierz mass term makes the new massive gravity theory nonunitary. Moreover, although we add the gravitational Chern-Simons term to this model, the situation remains unchanged and the theory stays nonunitary despite that the structure of the graviton propagator is greatly changed. Thus, the Pauli-Fierz mass term is not allowed to coexist with mass-generating higher-derivative terms in the new massive gravity.

Nakasone, Masashi; Oda, Ichiro [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Observational Tests Of Intermediate Mass Star Yields Using Planetary Nebulae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes a project designed to study abundances in a sample of planetary nebulae representing a broad range in progenitor mass and metallicity. We collect abundances of C, N, and O determined for the entire sample and compare them with theoretical predictions of planetary nebula abundances from a grid of intermediate-mass star models. We find very good agreement between observations and theory, lending strong support to our current understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars with progenitor masses below 8 solar masses. This agreement between observation and theory also supports the validity of published stellar yields of C and N in the study of the abundance evolution of these two elements.

K. B. Kwitter; R. B. C. Henry

2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

390

Observational Tests Of Intermediate Mass Star Yields Using Planetary Nebulae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes a project designed to study abundances in a sample of planetary nebulae representing a broad range in progenitor mass and metallicity. We collect abundances of C, N, and O determined for the entire sample and compare them with theoretical predictions of planetary nebula abundances from a grid of intermediate-mass star models. We find very good agreement between observations and theory, lending strong support to our current understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars with progenitor masses below 8 solar masses. This agreement between observation and theory also supports the validity of published stellar yields of C and N in the study of the abundance evolution of these two elements.

Kwitter, K B

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

First Gogny-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov Nuclear Mass Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the first Gogny-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) model which reproduces nuclear masses with an accuracy comparable with the best mass formulas. In contrast with the Skyrme-HFB nuclear-mass models, an explicit and self-consistent account of all the quadrupole correlation energies are included within the 5D collective Hamiltonian approach. The final rms deviation with respect to the 2149 measured masses is 798 keV. In addition, the new Gogny force is shown to predict nuclear and neutron matter properties in agreement with microscopic calculations based on realistic two- and three-body forces.

Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Girod, M.; Peru, S. [Institut d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique, CP-226, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297, Arpajon (France)

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

392

Type-II seesaw mass models and baryon asymmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute and also compare the contributions of canonical and noncanonical mass terms towards baryon asymmetry by considering type-II seesaw mass models of neutrinos: Degenerare(3 varieties), Normal hierarchical and Inverted hierarchical(2 varieties). We have shown that for particular choices of parameter '$\\gamma$'(the so-called discriminator) for different neutrino mass models, the baryon asymmetry is largely dominated by canonical term. Within such type-II seesaw scenario, we find normal hierarchical mass model as the most favourable choice of nature.

Amal Kr. Sarma; H. Zeen Devi; N. Nimai Singh

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

rock and fluids, and mass balances calculations involving Cl in the glass phase, produced comparable water-rock ratios of unity, confirming the importance of irreversible...

394

Absence of Embedded Mass Shells: Cerenkov Radiation and Quantum Friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that, in a model where a non-relativistic particle is coupled to a quantized relativistic scalar Bose field, the embedded mass shell of the particle dissolves in the continuum when the interaction is turned on, provided the coupling constant is sufficiently small. More precisely, under the assumption that the fiber eigenvectors corresponding to the putative mass shell are differentiable as functions of the total momentum of the system, we show that a mass shell could exist only at a strictly positive distance from the unperturbed embedded mass shell near the boundary of the energy-momentum spectrum.

W. De Roeck; J. Froehlich; A. Pizzo

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

395

Long-term Atomistic Simulation of Heat Conduction and Mass ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This non-equilibrium thermodynamics model is then coupled with discrete kinetic models of Onsager type which governs heat conduction and mass transport at...

396

Expert Meeting Report: Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assembliesessment of risk factors for premature building deterioration due to interior insulation retrofits, and methods to reduce such...

397

The Kilogram and Measurements of Mass and Force  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... that the mass of the check standard does not change from ... of the density of moist air (1981/91), Metrologia ... [12] RD Deslattes, Proceedings of course ...

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Mass of the Compact Object in the Low-Mass X-ray Binary 2S 0921-630  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We interpret the observed radial-velocity curve of the optical star in the low-mass X-ray binary 2S 0921-630 using a Roche model, taking into account the X-ray heating of the optical star and screening of X-rays coming from the relativistic object by the accretion disk. Consequences of possible anisotropy of the X-ray radiation are considered.We obtain relations between the masses of the optical and compact (X-ray) components, mv and mx, for orbital inclinations i=60, 75, 90 degrees. Including X-ray heating enabled us to reduce the compact object's mass by near 0.5-1Msun, compared to the case with no heating. Based on the K0III spectral type of the optical component (with a probable mass of mv=2.9Msun, we concluded that mx=2.45-2.55Msun (for i=75-90 degrees). If the K0III star has lost a substantial part of its mass as a result of mass exchange, as in the V404 Cyg and GRS 1905+105 systems, and its mass is $m_v=0.65-0.75Msun, the compact object's mass is close to the standard mass of a neutron star, mx=1.4Msun...

Abubekerov, M K; Cherepashchuk, A M; Shimanskii, V V

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Modeling heavy metal mass releases from urban battery litter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consumer batteries littered on urban pavements release metals of environmental significance (Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Li, Mn, Ni, Pd, Ti, Zn) to stormwater runoff. Predicting the mass loading of any one metal is difficult because of the random composition ... Keywords: Heavy metals, filtered Poisson process, Mass loading, zinc, Stormwater contamination, Urban battery litter

Caleb Krouse; Aaron A. Jennings; Dario Gasparini

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Diagnosis of the Net Cloud Mass Flux in Gate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagnostic analysis of the net cloud mass flux for the mean state of Phase III is presented. In the upper troposphere, the environmental mass flux is shown to be slightly larger than the adiabatic sinking motion required by radiative cooling. ...

Yi-Leng Chen

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A comment on positive mass for scalar field sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a transformation due to Bekenstein to relate the ADM and Bondi masses of asymptotically-flat solutions of the Einstein equations with, respectively, scalar sources and conformal-scalar sources. Although the conformal-scalar energy-momentum tensor does not satisfy the Dominant Energy Condition one may, by this means, still conclude that the ADM mass is positive.

Paul Tod

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Mass Tracking System Software [Nuclear Waste Management using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Tracking System Mass Tracking System Software Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Modeling and analysis Unit Process Modeling Mass Tracking System Software Waste Form Performance Modeling Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Development, Design, Operation Overview Systems and Components Development Expertise System Engineering Design Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Waste Management using Electrometallurgical Technology Mass Tracking System Software Bookmark and Share The NE Division has developed a computer-based Mass Tracking (MTG) system, which is used at the Idaho National Laboratory Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) to maintain a real-time accounting of the inventory of containers and

403

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass Property Type Quantity Description The potential mass of gaseous biopower material for a place. Use this type to express a quantity of magnitude, or an object's resistance to acceleration. The default unit is the kilogram (kg). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilogram Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Kilograms - 1 kg, kilo, kilogram, kilograms, Kilogram, kilogramme, kilos Grams - 1000 g, gram, gramme, grams Tonnes - 0.001 tonnes, metric tons, Tonnes, Metric Tonnes Pounds - 2.205 lbs, pounds, pound, Pounds, Lbs Stone - 0.1575 stones, st, stone Ounces - 35.27 ounces, oz, Ounces, ounce BDT - 0.001 BDT, Bone Dry Tonnes, bdt Pages using the property "PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass"

404

Minimal Neutrino Texture with Neutrino Mass Ratio and Cabibbo Angle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present neutrino mass matrix textures in a minimal framework of the type-I seesaw mechanism where two right-handed Majorana neutrinos are introduced in order to reproduce experimental results of neutrino oscillations. The textures can lead to experimentally favored leptonic mixing angles described by the tri-bimaximal mixing with one additional rotation. We present minimal and next to minimal textures for the normal mass hierarchy case in a context of the texture zero. A minimal texture in the inverted hierarchy case is also constructed, which does not have any vanishing entries in a Dirac neutrino mass matrix. We also discuss some cases that model parameters in the textures are supposed to be a neutrino mass ratio and/or the Cabibbo angle. Predicted regions of mixing angles, a leptonic CP-violation parameter, and an effective mass for the neutrino-less double beta decay are presented in all textures.

Yusuke Shimizu; Ryo Takahashi; Morimitsu Tanimoto

2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

405

OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE DEGENERATE MASS-RADIUS RELATION  

SciTech Connect

The white dwarf mass-radius relationship is fundamental to modern astrophysics. It is central to routine estimation of DA white dwarf masses derived from spectroscopic temperatures and gravities. It is also the basis for observational determinations of the white dwarf initial-final-mass relation. Nevertheless, definitive and detailed observational confirmations of the mass-radius relation (MRR) remain elusive owing to a lack of sufficiently accurate white dwarf masses and radii. Current best estimates of masses and radii allow only broad conclusions about the expected inverse relation between masses and radii in degenerate stars. In this paper, we examine a restricted set of 12 DA white dwarf binary systems for which accurate (1) trigonometric parallaxes, (2) spectroscopic effective temperatures and gravities, and (3) gravitational redshifts are available. We consider these three independent constraints on mass and radius in comparison with an appropriate evolved MRR for each star. For the best-determined systems it is found that the DA white dwarfs conform to evolve theoretical MRRs at the 1{sigma} to 2{sigma} level. For the white dwarf 40 Eri B (WD 0413-077) we find strong evidence for the existence of a 'thin' hydrogen envelope. For other stars improved parallaxes will be necessary before meaningful comparisons are possible. For several systems current parallaxes approach the precision required for the state-of-the-art mass and radius determinations that will be obtained routinely from the Gaia mission. It is demonstrated here how these anticipated results can be used to firmly constrain details of theoretical mass-radius determinations.

Holberg, J. B. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, 1541 East University Boulevard, Sonett Space Sciences Building, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Oswalt, T. D. [Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Barstow, M. A., E-mail: holberg@argus.lpl.arizona.edu, E-mail: toswalt@fit.edu, E-mail: mab@le.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Time-of-Flight Mass Measurements of Exotic Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic masses play an important role in nuclear physics and astrophysics. The need of experimental mass values for unstable nuclides has triggered the development of a wide range of mass measurement techniques, with devices installed at many laboratories around the world. We have implemented a time-of-flight magnetic-rigidity (TOF-B ) technique at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) that includes a position measurement for magnetic rigidity corrections and uses the A1900 separator and the S800 spectrograph. We performed a successful first experiment measuring masses of neutron-rich isotopes in the region of Z 20 30, important for calculations of processes occurring in the crust of accreting neutron stars. The masses of 16 nuclei were determined, for 61V, 63Cr, 66Mn, and 74Ni for the first time, with atomic mass excesses of 30.510(890) MeV, 35.280(650) MeV, 36.900(790) MeV, and 49.210(990) MeV, respectively. The mass resolution achieved was 1.8 10 4.

Matos, M. [Michigan State Univ./JINA/Louisiana State University; Estrade, A. [Michigan State Univ./JINA/LSU/Saint Mary's Univ./GSI Darmstadt, GE; Schatz, H. [Michigan State Univ./JINA; Bazin, D. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Famiano, M. [Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo; Gade, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; George, S. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing; Lynch, W. G. [NSCL, Michigan State Univ./JINA; Meisel, Z. [NSCL, Michigan State Univ./JINA; Portillo, M. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing; Rogers, A. [NSCL, Michigan State Univ./JINA; Shapira, Dan [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Wallace, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Yurkon, J. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Geometric gravitational origin of neutrino oscillations and mass-energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mass-energy scale for neutrinos was calculated from the null cone curvature using geometric concepts. The scale is variable depending on the gravitational potential and the trajectory inclination with respect to the field direction. The mass-energy at the Earth surface varies from a horizontal value 0.402 eV to a vertical value 0.569 eV. Earth spinor waves with winding numbers n show squared energy differences within ranges from 2.05 x 10*(-3) to 4.10 x 10*(-3) eV*2 for n=0,1 neutrinos and from 3.89 x 10*(-5) to 7.79 x 10*(-5) eV*2 for n=1,2 neutrinos. These waves interfere and the different phase velocities produce neutrino-like oscillations. The experimental results for atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation mass parameters respectivelly fall within these theoretical ranges. Neutrinos in outer space, where interactions may be neglected, appear as particles travelling with zero mass on null geodesics. These gravitational curvature energies are consistent with neutrino oscillations, zero neutrino rest masses and Einstein's General Relativity and energy mass equivalence principle. When analyzing or averaging experimental neutrino mass-energy results of different experiments on the Earth it is of interest to consider the possible influence of the trajectory inclination angle.

Gustavo R. Gonzalez-Martin

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

Jet Mass Spectra in Higgs + One Jet at NNLL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The invariant mass of a jet is a benchmark variable describing the structure of jets at the LHC. We calculate the jet mass spectrum for Higgs plus one jet at the LHC at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) order using a factorization formula. At this order, the cross section becomes sensitive to perturbation theory at the soft m_jet^2/p_T^jet scale. Our calculation is exclusive and uses the 1-jettiness global event shape to implement a veto on additional jets. The dominant dependence on the jet veto is removed by normalizing the spectrum, leaving residual dependence from non-global logarithms depending on the ratio of the jet mass and jet veto variables. For our exclusive jet cross section these non-global logarithms are parametrically smaller than in the inclusive case, allowing us to obtain a complete NNLL result. Results for the dependence of the jet mass spectrum on the kinematics, jet algorithm, and jet size R are given. Using individual partonic channels we illustrate the difference between the jet mass spectra for quark and gluon jets. We also study the effect of hadronization and underlying event on the jet mass in PYTHIA. To highlight the similarity of inclusive and exclusive jet mass spectra, a comparison to LHC data is presented.

Teppo T. Jouttenus; Iain W. Stewart; Frank J. Tackmann; Wouter J. Waalewijn

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

409

Geometric gravitational origin of neutrino oscillations and mass-energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mass-energy scale for neutrinos was calculated from the null cone curvature using geometric concepts. The scale is variable depending on the gravitational potential and the trajectory inclination with respect to the field direction. The proposed neutrino covariant equation provides the adequate curvature. The mass-energy at the Earth surface varies from a horizontal value 0.402 eV to a vertical value 0.569 eV. Earth spinor waves with winding numbers n show squared energy differences within ranges from 2.05 x 10*(-3) to 4.10 x 10*(-3) eV*2 for n=0,1 neutrinos and from 3.89 x 10*(-5) to 7.79 x 10*(-5) eV*2 for n=1,2 neutrinos. These waves interfere and the different phase velocities produce neutrino-like oscillations. The experimental results for atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation mass parameters respectivelly fall within these theoretical ranges. Neutrinos in outer space, where interactions may be neglected, appear as particles travelling with zero mass on null geodesics. These gravitational curvature energies are consistent with neutrino oscillations, zero neutrino rest masses and Einstein's General Relativity and energy mass equivalence principle. When analyzing or averaging experimental neutrino mass-energy results of different experiments on the Earth it is of interest to consider the possible influence of the trajectory inclination angle.

Gustavo R. Gonzalez-Martin

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hybrid quadrupole mass filter/quadrupole ion trap/time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a laboratory-constructed mass spectrometer optimized for recording infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectra of mass-selected ions using a benchtop tunable infrared optical parametric oscillator/amplifier (OPO/A). The instrument is equipped with two ionization sources, an electrospray ionization source, as well as an electron ionization source for troubleshooting. This hybrid mass spectrometer is composed of a quadrupole mass filter for mass selection, a reduced pressure ({approx}10{sup -5} Torr) quadrupole ion trap (QIT) for OPO irradiation, and a reflectron time-of-flight drift tube for detecting the remaining precursor and photofragment ions. A helium gas pulse is introduced into the QIT to temporarily increase the pressure and hence enhance the trapping efficiency of axially injected ions. After a brief pump-down delay, the compact ion cloud is subjected to the focused output from the continuous wave OPO. In a recent study, we implemented this setup in the study of protonated tryptophan, TrpH{sup +}, as well as collision-induced dissociation products of this protonated amino acid [W. K. Mino, Jr., K. Gulyuz, D. Wang, C. N. Stedwell, and N. C. Polfer, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2, 299 (2011)]. Here, we give a more detailed account on the figures of merit of such IRMPD experiments. The appreciable photodissociation yields in these measurements demonstrate that IRMPD spectroscopy of covalently bound ions can be routinely carried out using benchtop OPO setups.

Gulyuz, Kerim; Stedwell, Corey N.; Wang Da; Polfer, Nick C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, P.O. Box 117200, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Weak Lensing Mass Reconstruction of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 209  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weak lensing applied to deep optical images of clusters of galaxies provides a powerful tool to reconstruct the distribution of the gravitating mass associated to these structures. We use the shear signal extracted by an analysis of deep exposures of a region centered around the galaxy cluster Abell 209, at redshift z=0.2, to derive both a map of the projected mass distribution and an estimate of the total mass within a characteristic radius. We use a series of deep archival R-band images from CFHT-12k, covering an area of 0.3 deg^2. We determine the shear of background galaxy images using a new implementation of the modified Kaiser-Squires-Broadhurst pipeline for shear determination, which we has been tested against the ``Shear TEsting Program 1 and 2'' simulations. We use mass aperture statistics to produce maps of the 2 dimensional density distribution, and parametric fits using both Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) and singular-isothermal-sphere profiles to constrain the total mass. The projected mass distribution shows a pronounced asymmetry, with an elongated structure extending from the SE to the NW. This is in general agreement with the optical distribution previously found by other authors. A similar elongation was previously detected in the X-ray emission map, and in the distribution of galaxy colours. The circular NFW mass profile fit gives a total mass of M_{200} = 7.7^{+4.3}_{-2.7} 10^{14} solar masses inside the virial radius r_{200} = 1.8\\pm 0.3 Mpc. The weak lensing profile reinforces the evidence for an elongated structure of Abell 209, as previously suggested by studies of the galaxy distribution and velocities.

S. Paulin-Henriksson; V. Antonuccio-Delogu; C. P. Haines; M. Radovich; A. Mercurio; U. Becciani

2007-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

412

Evolution of massive stars losing mass and angular momentum supergiants  

SciTech Connect

Evolutionary sequences have been computed to central helium exhaustion for massive Population I star models with initial masses of 40, 60, 80, and 100 M/sub sun/. Mass loss occurs through radiatively driven winds and through the effects of nonthermal winds generated both by rotational shear turbulence during the mainsequence (MS) phase and by the acoustic energy flux from the convective envelope during the red supergiant phase. The size of the convective envelope in the red supergiant phase is found to depend on the mass loss history of the star, through the effect of mass loss on the position of the hydrogen shell source (HSS) and on the opacity of the envelope above the HSS. Previous evolutionary calculations have shown that, for low mass loss rates, a blue loop forms when the HSS contacts the discontinuity at the base of the convective envelope. In contrast, the higher mass loss rates considered here produce a blue loop only if sufficient mass loss occurs during the red supergiant phase to eliminate the convective envelope entirely. On the other hand, sufficiently high mass loss rates during the MS phase can remove most of the hydrogen-rich envelope, and then the red supergiant phase does not occur. In these models the mass loss and evolutionary patterns for a star depend on its initial rotational speed, which in actual stars is expected to vary from star to star. The observed blue-to-red supergiant ratios are then interpreted as weighted means of different evolutionary patterns resulting from a spread of initial rotational speeds. The same interpretation may extend to Wolf-Rayet stars.

Sreenivasan, S.R.; Wilson, W.J.F.

1985-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Cosmological mass limits on neutrinos, axions, and other light particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The small-scale power spectrum of the cosmological matter distribution together with other cosmological data provides a sensitive measure of the hot dark matter fraction, leading to restrictive neutrino mass limits. We extend this argument to generic cases of low-mass thermal relics. We vary the cosmic epoch of thermal decoupling, the radiation content of the universe, and the new particle's spin degrees of freedom. Our treatment covers various scenarios of active plus sterile neutrinos or axion-like particles. For three degenerate massive neutrinos, we reproduce the well-known limit of m_nu solar eV-mass axions to be discovered by the CAST experiment.

Steen Hannestad; Georg Raffelt

2003-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

414

Guesswork for Dirac and Majorana neutrino mass matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the framework of seesaw mechanism with three neutrino flavors, we propose tentatively an efficient parametrization for the spectra of Dirac and righthanded Majorana neutrino mass matrices in terms of three free parameters. Two of them are related to (and determined by) the corresponding parameters introduced previously for the mass spectra of charged leptons and up and down quarks. The third is determined from the experimental estimate of solar $\\Delta m^2_{21}$. Then, the atmospheric $\\Delta m^2_{32}$ is {\\it predicted} close to its experimental estimation. With the use of these three parameters all light active-neutrino masses $ m_1 thermal leptogenesis might work.

W. Krolikowski

2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

Multi-Higgs Mass Spectrum in Gauge-Higgs Unification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study an SU(2) supersymmetric gauge model in a framework of gauge-Higgs unification. Multi-Higgs spectrum appears in the model at low energy. We develop a useful perturbative approximation scheme for evaluating effective potential to study the multi-Higgs mass spectrum. We find that both tree-massless and massive Higgs scalars obtain mass corrections of similar size from finite parts of the loop effects. The corrections modify multi-Higgs mass spectrum, and hence, the loop effects are significant in view of future verifications of the gauge-Higgs unification scenario in high-energy experiments.

Kojima, Kentaro; Yamashita, Toshifumi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Noise reduction in negative-ion quadrupole mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system having an ion source, quadrupole mass filter, and ion collector/recorder system. A weak, transverse magnetic field and an electron collector are disposed between the quadrupole and ion collector. When operated in negative ion mode, the ion source produces a beam of primarily negatively-charged particles from a sample, including electrons as well as ions. The beam passes through the quadrupole and enters the magnetic field, where the electrons are deflected away from the beam path to the electron collector. The negative ions pass undeflected to the ion collector where they are detected and recorded as a mass spectrum.

Chastagner, P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Visualization of High Resolution Spatial Mass Spectrometric Data during Acquisition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mass Spectrometric Imaging (IMS) allows the generation of 2D ion density maps that help visualize molecules present in sections of tissues and cells. The combination of spatial and mass resolution results in large and complex data sets that require powerful and efficient analysis and interpretation. In this paper, a graphical user interface (GUI) that can visualize the large data during data acquisition itself is presented. The program also has the ability to perform processing and analysis of the dataset. The various functions of the GUI including visualization of mass spectra, generation of 2D maps for selected species, manipulation of the heat maps, and peak identification are also presented.

Thomas, Mathew; Heath, Brandi S.; Laskin, Julia; Li, Dongsheng; Liu, Ellen C.; Hui, Katrina L.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Carson, James P.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

418

Gravitational field energy contribution to the neutron star mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron stars are discussed as laboratories of physics of strong gravitational fields. The mass of a neutron star is split into matter energy and gravitational field energy contributions. The energy of the gravitational field of neutron stars is calculated with three different approaches which give the same result. It is found that up to one half of the gravitational mass of maximum mass neutron stars is comprised by the gravitational field energy. Results are shown for a number of realistic equations of state of neutron star matter.

M. Dyrda; B. Kinasiewicz; M. Kutschera; A. Szmaglinski

2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

419

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Standard Oil Development...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Standard Oil Development Co of NJ - NJ 18 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: STANDARD OIL DEVELOPMENT CO. OF NJ (NJ.18) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not...

420

MassSAVE - HEAT Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MassSAVE - HEAT Loan Program MassSAVE - HEAT Loan Program MassSAVE - HEAT Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Solar Maximum Rebate $25,000 Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount HEAT (Micro Loan): $500 - $2,000 Heat (1-4 Unit, Owner Occupied): $2,000 - $25,000 Heat (1-4 Unit, Non-owner Occupied): $5,000 - $25,000 Provider MassSAVE Residential customers of Cape Light Compact, National Grid, NSTAR, Unitil and Western Massachusetts Electric Company may be eligible for zero-interest financing to help increase the energy efficiency of their

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Mass Correction Applied to Semi-Lagrangian Advection Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple mass correction is proposed for the semi-Lagrangian scheme using forward trajectories. The procedure includes (a) constructing the Lagrangian network induced by the motion of the fluid from the Eulerian network and finding the ...

Wen-Yih Sun; Ming-Teh Sun

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Iterative methods for overlap and twisted mass fermions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a comparison of a number of iterative solvers of linear systems of equations for obtaining the fermion propagator in lattice QCD. In particular, we consider chirally invariant overlap and chirally improved Wilson (maximally) twisted mass fermions. The comparison of both formulations of lattice QCD is performed at four fixed values of the pion mass between 230MeV and 720MeV. For overlap fermions we address adaptive precision and low mode preconditioning while for twisted mass fermions we discuss even/odd preconditioning. Taking the best available algorithms in each case we find that calculations with the overlap operator are by a factor of 30-120 more expensive than with the twisted mass operator.

T. Chiarappa; K. Jansen; K. -I. Nagai; M. Papinutto; L. Scorzato; A. Shindler; C. Urbach; U. Wenger; I. Wetzorke

2006-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

423

2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer, Fall 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis, modeling, and design of heat and mass transfer processes with application to common technologies. Unsteady heat conduction in one or more dimensions, steady conduction in multidimensional configurations, numerical ...

Lienhard, John H., 1961-

424

Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. Analyses are in progress on inclusions from the Salton Sea, Valles Caldera, Geysers, and Coso geothermal systems. Author(s): Mckibben, M. A.

425

MassSAVE - Financing for Business Program (Massachusetts) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MassSAVE - Financing for Business Program (Massachusetts) MassSAVE - Financing for Business Program (Massachusetts) MassSAVE - Financing for Business Program (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Manufacturing Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate $100,000 Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Varies Provider MassSAVE Business customers of Berkshire Gas, Cape Light Compact, Columbia Gas of Massachusetts, National Grid, New England Gas Company, NSTAR, Unitil and Western Massachusetts Electric Company may be eligible for low-interest financing to help increase the energy efficiency of their businesses and nonprofits. Customers must have a qualifying project that is pre-approved

426

Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in Japan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in Japan Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in Japan Speaker(s): Katsuhiro Miura Date: January 27, 2012 - 10:00am Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Wetter Buildings have a large thermal capacity and it affects much on building thermal load for the HVAC system. The thermal mass can be utilized also to control the thermal load by storing thermal energy before HVAC operation. There are two ways to store thermal energy. One is by operating the HVAC system and the other is by natural ventilation, mainly at night. The latter could be combined with daily HVAC operation as a hybrid ventilation. Thermal mass storage is useful to decrease the hourly peak load and the daily thermal load and can be used for both cooling and heating purpose.

427

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Studies and Tools Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: March 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The idea of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling energy in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads during the peak periods. Savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Case studies in a number of office buildings in California has found that a simple demand limiting strategy reduced the chiller power by 20-100% (0.5-2.3W/ft2) during six

428

Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Partial equilibrium conditions occur between fluids and secondary minerals in the Valles hydrothermal system, contained principally in the Tertiary rhyolitic Bandelier Tuff. The mass transfer processes are governed by reactive phase compositions, surface areas, water-rock ratios, reaction rates, and fluid residence times. Experimental dissolution of the vitric phase of the tuff was congruent with respect to Cl in the solid and

429

FEHM (Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEHM (Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code) FEHM (Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code) FEHM (Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code) FEHM is used to simulate groundwater and contaminant flow and transport in deep and shallow, fractured and un-fractured porous media throughout the US DOE complex. June 29, 2013 software FEHM is used to simulate groundwater and contaminant flow and transport in deep and shallow, fractured and un-fractured porous media throughout the US DOE complex. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email FEHM (Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code) FEHM is used to simulate groundwater and contaminant flow and transport in deep and shallow, fractured and un-fractured porous media throughout the US DOE complex. FEHM has proved to be a valuable asset on a variety of

430

Energy effectiveness of simultaneous heat and mass exchange devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simultaneous heat and mass exchange devices such as cooling towers, humidifiers and dehumidifiers are widely used in the power generation, desalination, air conditioning, and refrigeration industries. For design and rating ...

Narayan, G. Prakash

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Signal variation in single particle aerosol mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid and accurate detection of airborne micro-particles is currently an important problem in national security. One approach to such detection, bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS), is currently under development at Lawrence ...

Wissner-Gross, Zachary Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Mass Transport Velocity in Free Barotropic Poincar Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mass transport velocity induced by long surface waves in a shallow, rotating viscous ocean is studied theoretically by using a Lagrangian description of motion. The depth is constant, and the water is homogeneous. Such waves are referred to ...

Frode Hydalsvik; Jan Erik Weber

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Equatorward Pathways of Solomon Sea Water Masses and Their Modifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Solomon Sea is a key region of the southwest Pacific Ocean, connecting the thermocline subtropics to the equator via western boundary currents (WBCs). Modifications to water masses are thought to occur in this region because of the significant ...

Anglique Melet; Jacques Verron; Lionel Gourdeau; Ariane Koch-Larrouy

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Photon mass in inflation and nearly minimal magnetogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that the dynamics of photons canonically coupled to scalars in de Sitter inflation gets modified by a photon mass term. This might have lead to generation of potentially observable magnetic field correlated over cosmological scales today.

Tomislav Prokopec

2004-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

435

Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in Japan Speaker(s): Katsuhiro Miura Date: January 27, 2012 - 10:00am Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

436

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Studies and Tools Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: March 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The idea of pre-cooling...

437

Thermal Mass Correction for the Evaluation of Salinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper revisits the thermal mass inertia correction of Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc., (SBE4) conductivity probes for the calculation of salinity. In particular, it is shown that the standard parameters recommended for the correction method are ...

Vigan Mensah; Marc Le Menn; Yves Morel

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Thermally-Forced Mean Mass Circulations in the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagnostic approach to infer three-dimensional distribution of the thermally-forced, time-averaged horizontal mass and energy transport (Johnson and Townsend, 1981), which was previously applied in the Southern Hemisphere (Zillman, 1972), is ...

Bette L. Otto-Bliesner; Donald R. Johnson

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Impact of Atmospheric Forcing on Antarctic Continental Shelf Water Masses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antarctic continental shelf seas feature a bimodal distribution of water mass temperature, with the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas flooded by Circumpolar Deep Water that is several degrees Celsius warmer than the cold shelf waters prevalent ...

Alek A. Petty; Daniel L. Feltham; Paul R. Holland

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Comparison Between Polluted and Clean Air Masses over Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clean and polluted air masses, advected over Lake Michigan, were studied using instrumented aircraft during the summers of 1976 and 1978. The results show that regardless of the degree of pollution, the particle size distribution is bimodal. The ...

A. J. Alkezweeny; N. S. Laulainen

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Mass-Flux Budgets of Shallow Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical transport by shallow nonprecipitating cumulus clouds of conserved variables, such as the total specific humidity or the liquid water potential temperature, can be well modeled by the mass-flux approach, in which the cloud field is ...

Stephan R. de Roode; Christopher S. Bretherton

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Ab-initio Determination of Light Hadron Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than 99% of the mass of the visible universe is made up of protons and neutrons. Both particles are much heavier than their quark and gluon constituents, and the Standard Model of particle physics should explain this difference. We present a full ab-initio calculation of the masses of protons, neutrons and other light hadrons, using lattice quantum chromodynamics. Pion masses down to 190 mega electronvolts are used to extrapolate to the physical point with lattice sizes of approximately four times the inverse pion mass. Three lattice spacings are used for a continuum extrapolation. Our results completely agree with experimental observations and represent a quantitative confirmation of this aspect of the Standard Model with fully controlled uncertainties.

S. Durr; Z. Fodor; J. Frison; C. Hoelbling; R. Hoffmann; S. D. Katz; S. Krieg; T. Kurth; L. Lellouch; T. Lippert; K. K. Szabo; G. Vulvert

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

443

Water Mass Transformation and Formation in the Labrador Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectively analyzed surface hydrographic fields and NCEPNCAR reanalysis fluxes are used to estimate water mass transformation and formation rates in the Labrador Sea, focusing on Labrador Sea Water (LSW). The authors estimate a mean long-term ...

Paul G. Myers; Chris Donnelly

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture, Spring 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine ...

Jones, Caroline

445

Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. NREL has six MBMS systems that researchers and industry partners can use to understand thermochemical biomass conversion and biomass composition recalcitrance.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Characterization of phenolic resins with thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an advanced material research program, thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry (TG-MS) analysis of a phenolic resin was carried out recently for the study of the curing of the prepolymer, solvent extraction, and carbonization of the polymer at high temperature in inert atmosphere. These steps are critical to the quality of the produced advanced material. In addition to TG-MS, several other complementary techniques were also employed for the analysis of the phenolic resin prepolymer and its curing and thermal degradation products. These techniques include pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, direct insertion probe-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Chang, Cherng; Tackett, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

A theoretical estimate of the Higgs boson mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the invariance of the electroweak vacuum in the presence of a background Z field we estimate the mass of the Higgs boson in the standard model at m_H=125.9 GeV.

Jora, Renata

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

HIggs Boson Mass in the Minimal Unified Subquark Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the original paper entitled, "Masses of Fundamental Particles"(arXiv:1109.3705v5, 10 Feb 2012), not only the masses of fundamental particles including the weak bosons, Higgs boson, quarks, and leptons, but also the mixing angles of quarks and those of neutrinos are all explained and/or predicted in the unified composite models of quarks and leptons successfully. In this addendum entitled, "Higgs Boson Mass in the Minimal Unified Subquark Model", it is emphasized that the Higgs boson mass is predicted to be about 130Gev in the minimal unified subquark model, which agrees well with the experimental values of 125-126GeV recently found by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at the LHC.

Hidezumi Terazawa

2011-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

449

No evidence for mass segregation in young clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims. We investigate the validity of mass segregation indicators commonly used in the analysis of young stellar clusters. Methods. We simulate observations by constructing synthetic seeing limited images of a 1000 massive clusters (10^4 Msun) with a standard IMF and a King density distribution function. Results. We find that commonly used indicators are highly sensitive to sample incompleteness in observational data, and that radial completeness determinations do not provide satisfactory corrections, rendering the studies of radial properties highly uncertain. On the other hand, we find that under certain conditions, the global completeness can be estimated accurately, allowing for the correction of the global luminosity and mass functions of the cluster. Conclusions. We argue that there is currently no observational evidence for mass segregation in young compact clusters since there is not a robust way to differentiate between true mass segregation and sample incompleteness effects. Caution should then be ex...

Ascenso, J; Lago, M T V T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

The power of mass spectrometry in the detection of fraud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fraudulent products cost industry billions of dollars each year. Perfumes are a good example. The power of mass spectrometry in the detection of fraud Inform Magazine Analytical Chemistry Biochemistry Biotechnology Bert Poepping Fraudulent pro

451

Radiative inverse seesaw neutrino mass and dark matter  

SciTech Connect

Seesaw mechanism provides a natural explanation of light neutrino masses through suppression of heavy seesaw scale. In inverse seesaw models the seesaw scale can be much lower than that in the usual seesaw models. If terms inducing seesaw masses are further induced by loop corrections, the seesaw scale can be lowered to be in the range probed by experiments at the LHC without fine tuning. This talk, presented by X-G He, discuss models constructed in a recent preprint by us (arxiv:201207.6308) in which neutrino masses are generated at two loop level through inverse seesaw mechanism. These models also naturally have dark matter candidates. Although the recent data from Xenon100 put stringent constraint on the models, they can be consistent with data on neutrino masses, mixing, dark matter relic density and direct detection.

Guo Gang [INPAC, Department of Physics and Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); He Xiaogang [INPAC, Department of Physics and Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China) and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, and NCTS, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Li Guannan [INPAC, Department of Physics and Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, Taiwan (China)

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

452

Parameterized Updraft Mass Flux as a Predictor of Convective Intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parameterized updraft mass flux, available as a unique predictive field from the KainFritsch (KF) convective parameterization, is presented as a potentially valuable predictor of convective intensity. The KF scheme is described in some detail, ...

John S. Kain; Michael E. Baldwin; Steven J. Weiss

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Modeling and torque estimation of an automotive dual mass flywheel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dual Mass Flywheel (DMF) is primarily used for dampening of oscillations in automotive powertrains and to prevent gearbox rattling. This paper explains the DMF mechanics along with its application and components. Afterwards a detailed ab-inltio model ...

Ulf Schaper; Oliver Sawodny; Tobias Mahl; Uli Blessing

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The Particle Adventure | Unsolved Mysteries | What about masses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with other particles to give them mass. The Higgs field requires a particle, the Higgs boson. The Higgs boson has not been observed, but physicists are looking for it with...

455

Apparatus And Method For Hydrogen And Oxygen Mass Spectrometry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Of The Terrestrial Magnetosphere A detector element for mass spectrometry of a flux of heavy and light ions. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email...

456

Form invariance and symmetry in the neutrino mass matrix  

SciTech Connect

We present the general form of the unitary matrices keeping invariant the Majorana neutrino mass matrix of specific texture suitable for explaining oscillation data. In the case of the tri-bimaximal pattern with two degenerate masses, we give a specific realization of the underlying U(1) symmetry which can be uplifted to a symmetry in a complete theory including charged leptons. For this, we present a model with three light SM-like Higgs doublets and one heavy Higgs triplet and find that one can accommodate the hierarchy of the charged-lepton masses. The lepton mass spectrum can also be achieved in another model extending the SM with three SM-singlet scalars transforming nontrivially under the flavor symmetry. We discuss how such a model has room for generating enough baryon asymmetry through leptogenesis in the framework of type-I and -II seesaw mechanisms.

Lashin, E. I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Nasri, S.; Malkawi, E. [Department of Physics, UAE University, P.O. Box 17551, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates); Chamoun, N. [Physics Department, HIAST, P.O. Box 31983, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Structural determination of intact proteins using mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to novel methods of determining the sequence and structure of proteins. Specifically, the present invention allows for the analysis of intact proteins within a mass spectrometer. Therefore, preparatory separations need not be performed prior to introducing a protein sample into the mass spectrometer. Also disclosed herein are new instrumental developments for enhancing the signal from the desired modified proteins, methods for producing controlled protein fragments in the mass spectrometer, eliminating complex microseparations, and protein preparatory chemical steps necessary for cross-linking based protein structure determination.Additionally, the preferred method of the present invention involves the determination of protein structures utilizing a top-down analysis of protein structures to search for covalent modifications. In the preferred method, intact proteins are ionized and fragmented within the mass spectrometer.

Kruppa, Gary (San Francisco, CA); Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Oakland, CA); Young, Malin M. (Livermore, CA)

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

458

Added Masses of Ship Structures, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of added body masses that interact with fluid is necessary in various research and applied tasks of hydro- and aeromechanics: steady and unsteady motion of rigid bodies, total vibration of bodies in fluid, local vibration of the external plating ...

Alexandr I. Korotkin

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

The Mass of the Atmosphere: A Constraint on Global Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total mass of the atmosphere varies mainly from changes in water vapor loading; the former is proportional to global mean surface pressure and the water vapor component is computed directly from specific humidity and precipitable water using ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; Lesley Smith

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Molecular-Beam Mass-Spectrometric Analyses of Hydrocarbon Flames.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Laminar flat flame combustion has been studied with molecular-beam mass-spectrometry (MBMS) for a fuel-rich cyclohexane (? = 2.003) flame, a fuel-lean toluene (? = 0.895), (more)

Gon, Saugata

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass nh nj" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Conservation of Mass in Three Dimensions in Global Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a number of reasons, conservation of mass in the global analyses on pressure coordinates is violated, yet this constraint is required for budget studies of all kinds. The imbalances arise from postprocessing the variables onto pressure ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; James W. Hurrell; Amy Solomon

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Revamping luxury : mass customization applied to the luxury goods market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis seeks to understand how the crisis has impacted the definition of luxury goods in the mind of consumers and the implications this has for luxury goods companies. It also aims to present Mass Customization as ...

Edouard, Mlissa Susan Caroline Coleman

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

AN INITIAL MASS FUNCTION FOR INDIVIDUAL STARS IN GALACTIC DISKS. I. CONSTRAINING THE SHAPE OF THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We derive a semi-empirical galactic initial mass function (IMF) from observational constraints. We assume that the IMF, {psi}(m), is a smooth function of the stellar mass m. The mass dependence of the proposed IMF is determined by five parameters: the low-mass slope {gamma}, the high-mass slope -{Gamma} (taken to be -1.35), the characteristic mass m{sub ch} ({approx} the peak mass of the IMF), and the lower and upper limits on the mass, m{sub l} and m{sub u} (taken to be 0.004 and 120 M{sub sun}, respectively): {psi}(m)dln m {proportional_to} m{sup -}{Gamma}{l_brace}1 - exp [- (m/m{sub ch}){sup {gamma}}+{Gamma}]{r_brace}dln m. The values of {gamma} and m{sub ch} are derived from two integral constraints: (1) the ratio of the number density of stars in the range m = 0.1-0.6 M{sub sun} to that in the range m = 0.6-0.8 M{sub sun} as inferred from the mass distribution of field stars in the local neighborhood and (2) the ratio of the number of stars in the range m = 0.08-1 M{sub sun} to the number of brown dwarfs in the range m = 0.03-0.08 M{sub sun} in young clusters. The IMF satisfying the above constraints is characterized by the parameters {gamma} = 0.51 and m{sub ch} = 0.35 M{sub sun} (which corresponds to a peak mass of 0.27 M{sub sun} ). This IMF agrees quite well with the Chabrier IMF for the entire mass range over which we have compared with data, but predicts significantly more stars with masses <0.03 M{sub sun}; we also compare with other IMFs in current use and give a number of important parameters implied by the IMFs.

Parravano, Antonio [Universidad de Los Andes, Centro de Fisica Fundamental, Merida 5101a (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); McKee, Christopher F. [Physics Department and Astronomy Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hollenbach, David J. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

NEW ISOLATED PLANETARY-MASS OBJECTS AND THE STELLAR AND SUBSTELLAR MASS FUNCTION OF THE {sigma} ORIONIS CLUSTER  

SciTech Connect

We report on our analysis of the VISTA Orion ZY JHK{sub s} photometric data (completeness magnitudes of Z = 22.6 and J = 21.0 mag) focusing on a circular area of 2798.4 arcmin{sup 2} around the young {sigma} Orionis star cluster ({approx}3 Myr, {approx}352 pc, and solar metallicity). The combination of the VISTA photometry with optical, WISE and Spitzer data allows us to identify a total of 210 {sigma} Orionis member candidates with masses in the interval 0.25-0.004 M{sub Sun }, 23 of which are new planetary-mass object findings. These discoveries double the number of cluster planetary-mass candidates known so far. One object has colors compatible with a T spectral type. The {sigma} Orionis cluster harbors about as many brown dwarfs (69, 0.072-0.012 M{sub Sun }) and planetary-mass objects (37, 0.012-0.004 M{sub Sun }) as very low mass stars (104, 0.25-0.072 M{sub Sun }). Based on Spitzer data, we derive a disk frequency of {approx}40% for very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and planetary-mass objects in {sigma} Orionis. The radial density distributions of these three mass intervals are alike: all are spatially concentrated within an effective radius of 12' (1.2 pc) around the multiple star {sigma} Ori, and no obvious segregation between disk-bearing and diskless objects is observed. Using the VISTA data and the Mayrit catalog, we derive the cluster mass spectrum ({Delta}N/{Delta}M {approx} M{sup -{alpha}}) from {approx}19 to 0.006 M{sub Sun} (VISTA ZJ completeness), which is reasonably described by two power-law expressions with indices of {alpha} = 1.7 {+-} 0.2 for M > 0.35 M{sub Sun }, and {alpha} = 0.6 {+-} 0.2 for M < 0.35 M{sub Sun }. The {sigma} Orionis mass spectrum smoothly extends into the planetary-mass regime down to 0.004 M{sub Sun }. Our findings of T-type sources (<0.004 M{sub Sun }) in the VISTA {sigma} Orionis exploration appear to be smaller than what is predicted by the extrapolation of the cluster mass spectrum down to the survey J-band completeness.

Pena Ramirez, K.; Bejar, V. J. S. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/. Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Martin, E. L. [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Crta. Ajalvir km 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Petr-Gotzens, M. G., E-mail: karla@iac.es, E-mail: vbejar@iac.es, E-mail: mosorio@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: ege@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: mpetr@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

465

Occupation-number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to 2049 nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of =1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

Bertolli, Michael G. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Papenbrock, Thomas F [ORNL; Wild, S. M. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Correlations of experimental isotope shifts with spectroscopic and mass observables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental differential observables relating to mean square charge radii, spectroscopic, and mass observables of even-even nuclei are presented for different regions in the nuclear chart. They exhibit remarkable correlations, not heretofore recognized, that provide a new perspective on structural evolution, especially in exotic nuclei. This can also be a guide for future measurements of charge radii, spectroscopic observables, and masses, as well as for future theoretical approaches.

Cakirli, R. B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Istanbul, Istanbul (Turkey); Casten, R. F. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

Bertolli, M; Wild, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

469

Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20~250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semi-empirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

Liu, Min; Li, Zhuxia; Zhang, Fengshou

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20~250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semi-empirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Fengshou Zhang

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

471

Accelerator mass spectrometry as a bioanalytical tool for nutritional research  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is a mass spectrometric method of detecting long-lived radioisotopes without regard to their decay products or half-life. The technique is normally applied to geochronology, but recently has been developed for bioanalytical tracing. AMS detects isotope concentrations to parts per quadrillion, quantifying labeled biochemicals to attomole levels in milligram- sized samples. Its advantages over non-isotopeic and stable isotope labeling methods are reviewed and examples of analytical integrity, sensitivity, specificity, and applicability are provided.

Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

QCD Thermodynamics with an almost realistic quark mass spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We will report on the status of a new large scale calculation of thermodynamic quantities in QCD with light up and down quarks corresponding to an almost physical light quark mass value and a heavier strange quark mass. These calculations are currently being performed on the QCDOC Teraflops computers at BNL. We will present new lattice calculations of the transition temperature and various susceptibilities reflecting properties of the chiral transition. All these quantities are of immediate interest for heavy ion phenomenology.

C. Schmidt

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

473

A top quark mass measurement using a matrix element method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A measurement of the mass of the top quark is presented, using top-antitop pair (t{bar t}) candidate events for the lepton+jets decay channel. The measurement makes use of Tevatron p{bar p} collision data at centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected at the CDF detector. The top quark mass is measured by employing an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal (t{bar t}) and background (W+jets) matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterised jet-to-parton mapping functions. The likelihood function is maximised with respect to the top quark mass, the fraction of signal events, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) provides an in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using 578 lepton+jets candidate events corresponding to 3.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, the top quark mass is measured to be m{sub t} = 172.4 {+-} 1.4 (stat+{Delta}{sub JES}) {+-} 1.3 (syst) GeV=c{sup 2}, one of the most precise single measurements to date.

Linacre, Jacob Thomas; /Oxford U.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Type II Leptogenesis and the Neutrino Mass Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the effect of the neutrino mass scale on baryogenesis via the out-of-equilibrium decay of the lightest right-handed (s)neutrinos in type II see-saw models. We calculate the type II contributions to the decay asymmetries for minimal scenarios based on the Standard Model and on the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, where the additional direct mass term for the neutrinos arises from a Higgs triplet vacuum expectation value. The result in the supersymmetric case is new and we correct the previous result in the scenario based on the Standard Model. We confirm and generalize our results by calculating the decay asymmetries in an effective approach, which is independent of the realization of the type II contribution. We derive a general upper bound on the decay asymmetry in type II see-saw models and find that it increases with the neutrino mass scale, in sharp contrast to the type I case which leads to an upper bound of about 0.1 eV on the neutrino mass scale. We find a lower bound on the mass of the lightest right-handed neutrino, significantly below the corresponding type I bound for partially degenerate neutrinos. This lower bound decreases with increasing neutrino mass scale, making leptogenesis more consistent with the gravitino constraints in supersymmetric models.

Stefan Antusch; Steve F. King

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

475

Higgs boson mass bounds separate models of electroweak symmetry breaking  

SciTech Connect

Vacuum stability and metastability imply lower limits on the mass of the Higgs boson in the standard model (SM). In contrast, we present an improved calculation of the lightest Higgs boson mass in supersymmetric (SUSY) models, by summing to all orders in perturbation theory the leading and next-to-leading logarithms with a renormalization group equation technique, and by including finite two-loop QCD corrections. We believe our result to be the most accurate available in the literature. The mass calculation leads to an upper bound on the Higgs boson mass when the SUSY-breaking scale is sensibly restricted to {approx_lt}1 TeV. In particular, our improvements to the SUSY Higgs boson mass calculation lower the minimal SUSY standard model (MSSM) upper limit by about 10 GeV. We study the possibility that these SM and MSSM bounds do not overlap, in which case a single Higgs boson mass measurement will distinguish between the two models. (Abstract Truncated)

Diaz, M.A. [Physics Department, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); ter Veldhuis, T.A.; Weiler, T.J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Masses of mesons with charm valence quarks from 2+1+1 flavor twisted mass lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present preliminary results of an ongoing lattice QCD computation of the spectrum of $D$ mesons and $D_s$ mesons and of charmonium using 2+1+1 flavors of twisted mass sea and valence quarks.

Martin Kalinowski; Marc Wagner

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

477

Eddy Diffusivity/Mass Flux and Shallow Cumulus Boundary Layer: An Updraft PDF Multiple Mass Flux Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the eddy diffusivity/mass flux (EDMF) approach is used to combine parameterizations of nonprecipitating moist convection and boundary layer turbulence. The novel aspect of this EDMF version is the use of a probability density ...

Kay Suelj; Joo Teixeira; Georgios Matheou

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Balance Reconstruction. Part III: Marine Ice Loss and Total Mass Balance (18402010)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenland ice sheet mass loss to the marine environment occurs by some combination of iceberg calving and underwater melting (referred to here as marine ice loss, LM). This study quantifies the relation between LM and meltwater runoff (R) at the ...

Jason E. Box; William Colgan

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Prospects to Measure the Higgs Boson Mass and Cross Section in ee-->ZH Using the Recoil Mass Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The process ee-->ZH allows to measure the Higgs boson in the recoil mass spectrum against the Z boson without any assumptions on the Higgs boson decay. We performed a full simulation and reconstruction of ee-->ZH using the MOKKA and MARLIN packages describing the LDC detector. The Z is reconstructed from its decays into electrons and muons. The mass of the Higgs boson is set to 120 GeV. Assuming a centre-of-mass energy of 250 GeV and an integrated luminosity of 50/fb the Higgs boson mass and the Higgs-strahlung cross section can be measured with a precision of 120 MeV and 9%, respectively.

W. Lohmann; M. Ohlerich; A. Raspereza; A. Schlicke

2007-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

480

Greenland ice sheet mass balance reconstruction. Part III: marine ice loss and total mass balance (1840-2010)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenland ice sheet mass loss to the marine environment occurs by some combination of iceberg calving and underwater melting (referred to here as marine ice loss, LM). This study quantifies the relation between LM and meltwater runoff (R) at the ...

Jason E. Box; William Colgan

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481

Bulk gold catalyzed oxidation reactions of amines and isocyanides and iron porphyrin catalyzed N-H and O-H bond insertion/cyclization reactions of diamines and aminoalcohols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work involves two projects. The first project entails the study of bulk gold as a catalyst in oxidation reactions of isocyanides and amines. The main goal of this project was to study the activation and reactions of molecules at metal surfaces in order to assess how organometallic principles for homogeneous processes apply to heterogeneous catalysis. Since previous work had used oxygen as an oxidant in bulk gold catalyzed reactions, the generality of gold catalysis with other oxidants was examined. Amine N-oxides were chosen for study, due to their properties and use in the oxidation of carbonyl ligands in organometallic complexes. When amine N-oxides were used as an oxidant in the reaction of isocyanides with amines, the system was able to produce ureas from a variety of isocyanides, amines, and amine N-oxides. In addition, the rate was found to generally increase as the amine N-oxide concentration increased, and decrease with increased concentrations of the amine. Mechanistic studies revealed that the reaction likely involves transfer of an oxygen atom from the amine N-oxide to the adsorbed isocyanide to generate an isocyanate intermediate. Subsequent nucleophilic attack by the amine yields the urea. This is in contrast to the bulk gold-catalyzed reaction mechanism of isocyanides with amines and oxygen. Formation of urea in this case was proposed to proceed through a diaminocarbene intermediate. Moreover, formation of the proposed isocyanate intermediate is consistent with the reactions of metal carbonyl ligands, which are isoelectronic to isocyanides. Nucleophilic attack at coordinated CO by amine N-oxides produces CO{sub 2} and is analogous to the production of an isocyanate in this gold system. When the bulk gold-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of amines was examined with amine N-oxides, the same products were afforded as when O{sub 2} was used as the oxidant. When the two types of oxidants were directly compared using the same reaction system and conditions, it was found that the oxidative dehydrogenation of dibenzylamine to Nbenzylidenebenzylamine, with N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO), was nearly quantitative (96%) within 24 h. However, the reaction with oxygen was much slower, with only a 52% yield of imine product over the same time period. Moreover, the rate of reaction was found to be influenced by the nature of the amine N-oxide. For example, the use of the weakly basic pyridine N-oxide (PyNO) led to an imine yield of only 6% after 24 h. A comparison of amine N-oxide and O2 was also examined in the oxidation of PhCH{sub 2}OH to PhCHO catalyzed by bulk gold. In this reaction, a 52% yield of the aldehyde was achieved when NMMO was used, while only a 7% product yield was afforded when O{sub 2} was the oxidant after 48 h. The bulk gold-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclic amines generates amidines, which upon treatment with Aerosil and water were found to undergo hydrolysis to produce lactams. Moreover, 5-, 6-, and 7-membered lactams could be prepared through a one-pot reaction of cyclic amines by treatment with oxygen, water, bulk gold, and Aerosil. This method is much more atom economical than industrial processes, does not require corrosive acids, and does not generate undesired byproducts. Additionally, the gold and Aerosil catalysts can be readily separated from the reaction mixture. The second project involved studying iron(III) tetraphenylporphyrin chloride, Fe(TPP)Cl, as a homogeneous catalyst for the generation of carbenes from diazo reagents and their reaction with heteroatom compounds. Fe(TPP)Cl, efficiently catalyzed the insertion of carbenes derived from methyl 2-phenyldiazoacetates into O-H bonds of aliphatic and aromatic alcohols. Fe(TPP)Cl was also found to be an effective catalyst for tandem N-H and O-H insertion/cyclization reactions when 1,2-diamines and 1,2-alcoholamines were treated with diazo reagents. This approach provides a one-pot process for synthesizing piperazinones and morpholinones and related analogues such as quinoxalinones and benzoxazin-2-ones.

Klobukowski, Erik

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

482

THE 2MASS REDSHIFT SURVEY-DESCRIPTION AND DATA RELEASE  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS), a ten-year project to map the full three-dimensional distribution of galaxies in the nearby universe. The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) was completed in 2003 and its final data products, including an extended source catalog (XSC), are available online. The 2MASS XSC contains nearly a million galaxies with K{sub s} {<=} 13.5 mag and is essentially complete