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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

2

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Title Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-50626 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Herter, Karen, Roger Levy, John Wilson, and Arthur H. Rosenfeld Conference Name 2002 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response, demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, rate programs & tariffs Abstract Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operator controlled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customer controlled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Any demand response program based on this system could consist of either or both of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled, providing automatic load management through customer-programmed price response, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability in California. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers to implementation of such a program in California.

3

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Title Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2011 Authors Cappers, Peter, Andrew D. Mills, Charles A. Goldman, Ryan H. Wiser, and Joseph H. Eto Pagination 76 Date Published 10/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords demand response, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, renewable generation integration, smart grid Abstract The penetration of renewable generation technology (e.g., wind, solar) is expected to dramatically increase in the United States during the coming years as many states are implementing policies to expand this sector through regulation and/or legislation. It is widely understood, though, that large scale deployment of certain renewable energy sources, namely wind and solar, poses system integration challenges because of its variable and often times unpredictable production characteristics (NERC, 2009). Strategies that rely on existing thermal generation resources and improved wind and solar energy production forecasts to manage this variability are currently employed by bulk power system operators, although a host of additional options are envisioned for the near future. Demand response (DR), when properly designed, could be a viable resource for managing many of the system balancing issues associated with integrating large-scale variable generation (VG) resources (NERC, 2009). However, demand-side options would need to compete against strategies already in use or contemplated for the future to integrate larger volumes of wind and solar generation resources. Proponents of smart grid (of which Advanced Metering Infrastructure or AMI is an integral component) assert that the technologies associated with this new investment can facilitate synergies and linkages between demand-side management and bulk power system needs. For example, smart grid proponents assert that system-wide implementation of advanced metering to mass market customers (i.e., residential and small commercial customers) as part of a smart grid deployment enables a significant increase in demand response capability.1 Specifically, the implementation of AMI allows electricity consumption information to be captured, stored and utilized at a highly granular level (e.g., 15-60 minute intervals in most cases) and provides an opportunity for utilities and public policymakers to more fully engage electricity customers in better managing their own usage through time-based rates and near-real time feedback to customers on their usage patterns while also potentially improving the management of the bulk power system. At present, development of time-based rates and demand response programs and the installation of variable generation resources are moving forward largely independent of each other in state and regional regulatory and policy forums and without much regard to the complementary nature of their operational characteristics.2 By 2020, the electric power sector is expected to add ~65 million advanced meters3 (which would reach ~47% of U.S. households) as part of smart grid and AMI4 deployments (IEE, 2010) and add ~40-80 GW of wind and solar capacity (EIA, 2010). Thus, in this scoping study, we focus on a key question posed by policymakers: what role can the smart grid (and its associated enabling technology) play over the next 5-10 years in helping to integrate greater penetration of variable generation resources by providing mass market customers with greater access to demand response opportunities? There is a well-established body of research that examines variable generation integration issues as well as demand response potential, but the nexus between the two has been somewhat neglected by the industry. The studies that have been conducted are informative concerning what could be accomplished with strong broad-based support for the expansion of demand response opportunities, but typically do not discuss the many barriers that stand in the way of reaching this potential. This study examines how demand side resources could be used to integrate wind and solar resources in the bulk power system, identifies barriers that currently limit the use of demand side strategies, and suggests several factors that should be considered in assessing alternative strategies that can be employed to integrate wind and solar resources in the bulk power system. It is difficult to properly gauge the role that DR could play in managing VG integration issues in the near future without acknowledging and understanding the entities and institutions that govern the interactions between variable generation and mass market customers (see Figure ES-1). Retail entities, like load-serving entities (LSE) and aggregators of retail customers (ARC), harness the demand response opportunities of mass market customers through tariffs (and DR programs) that are approved by state regulatory agencies or local governing entities (in the case of public power). The changes in electricity consumption induced by DR as well as the changes in electricity production due to the variable nature of wind and solar generation technologies is jointly managed by bulk power system operators. Bulk power system operators function under tariffs approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and must operate their systems in accordance with rules set by regional reliability councils. These reliability rules are derived from enforceable standards that are set by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and approved by federal regulators. Thus, the role that DR can play in managing VG integration issues is contingent on what opportunities state and local regulators are willing to approve and how customers' response to the DR opportunities can be integrated into the bulk power system both electrically (due to reliability rules) and financially (due to market rules).

4

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response and Mass Market Demand Response and Mass Market Demand Response and Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: Variable Generation Integration Issues: Variable Generation Integration Issues: Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study A Scoping Study Peter Cappers, Andrew Mills, Charles Goldman, Ryan Wiser, Joseph H. Eto Report Summary October 2011 Energy Analysis Department  Electricity Markets and Policy Group 1 1 Presentation Overview Presentation Overview  Objectives and Approach  Variable Generation Resources and the Bulk Power System  Demand Response Opportunities  Demand Response as a Strategy to Integrate p gy g Variable Generation Resources  Comparison of Various Strategies to Integrate Variable Generation  Conclusions Energy Analysis Department  Electricity Markets and Policy Group

5

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roger. 2002. Using Demand Response to Link Wholesale andfor advanced metering, demand response, and dynamic pricing.EPRI. 2001. Managing Demand-Response To Achieve Multiple

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

SciTech Connect

Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operator controlled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customer controlled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Any demand response program based on this system could consist of either or both of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled, providing automatic load management through customer-programmed price response, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability in California. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers to implementation of such a program in California.

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

7

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response programs are often quickly and poorlycrafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisissubsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared whenthe next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate theevent-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demandresponsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such,demand response can be required as a condition of service, and theoffering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities asan element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore thecosts and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response systemcapable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operatorcontrolled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customercontrolled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Anydemand response program based on this system could consist of either orboth of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled,providing automatic load management through customer-programmed priceresponse, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability inCalifornia. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers toimplementation of such a program in California.

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

8

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This scoping study focuses on the policy issues inherent in the claims made by some Smart Grid proponents that the demand response potential of mass market customers which is enabled by widespread implementation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) through the Smart Grid could be the silver bullet for mitigating variable generation integration issues. In terms of approach, we will: identify key issues associated with integrating large amounts of variable generation into the bulk power system; identify demand response opportunities made more readily available to mass market customers through widespread deployment of AMI systems and how they can affect the bulk power system; assess the extent to which these mass market Demand Response (DR) opportunities can mitigate Variable Generation (VG) integration issues in the near-term and what electricity market structures and regulatory practices could be changed to further expand the ability for DR to mitigate VG integration issues over the long term; and provide a qualitative comparison of DR and other approaches to mitigate VG integration issues.

Cappers, Peter; Mills, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Wiser, Ryan; Eto, Joseph H.

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

9

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

63E 63E Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Peter Cappers, Andrew Mills, Charles Goldman, Ryan Wiser, Joseph H. Eto Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2011 The work described in this report was funded by the Permitting, Siting and Analysis Division of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the

10

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices and quantified how system balancing costs change with high wind energywind energy when mass market customers responded on a 15-minute basis to DR price

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goldman, G. (2009) Retail demand response in Southwest PowerCoordination of retail demand response with Midwest ISO2010. 110 pages. Demand Response and Variable Generation

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

faced with high energy market prices if they do not procureIf low or negative prices in energy markets are insufficientenergy or reserves in determining schedules and market prices.

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toolkit Energy Imbalance Market (EIM): Implementing Tariff.under tariffs approved by the Federal Energy Regulatoryunder tariffs approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis. Presentation given to PJM Interconnection Markete.g. , ISO-NE, NYISO, PJM, MISO, ERCOT, and CAISO). Co-also elect to participate in PJMs day-ahead and/or real-

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Empirical Evidence. FERC (2006) Assessment of DemandRevised 2008. 240 pages. FERC. (2008) Final Rule - Docket19-000 and AD07-7-000. FERC (2009a) A National Assessment of

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Review of current Southern California edison load management programs and proposal for a new market-driven, mass-market, demand-response program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility load management programs, including direct load control and interruptible load programs, constitute a large installed base of controllable loads that are employed by utilities as system reliability resources. In response to energy supply shortfalls expected during the summer of 2001, the California Public Utilities Commission in spring 2001 authorized new utility load management programs as well as revisions to existing programs. This report provides an independent review of the designs of these new programs for a large utility (Southern California Edison) and suggests possible improvements to enhance the price responsiveness of the customer actions influenced by these programs. The report also proposes a new program to elicit a mass-market demand response to utility price signals.

Weller, G.H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies January 16, 2011 Maryanne Fuller (MF): Hi there. This is Maryanne Fuller from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory....

18

Demand response participation in PJM wholesale markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of demand response resource participation in PJM wholesale ancillary service markets which include: Day Ahead Scheduling Reserves, Synchronized Reserves and Regulation.

Peter L. Langbein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Thermal Mass and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Mass and Demand Response Speaker(s): Gregor Henze Phil C. Bomrad Date: November 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Janie Page The topic of...

20

Review of current Southern California edison load management programs and proposal for a new market-driven, mass-market, demand-response program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Once the spot market energy prices reaches $100/MWh, thehour until spot market energy prices reach $250/MWh. At thatand actual spot market energy prices. If, for example, the

Weller, G.H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Marketing and Demand Creation (1.5 hr video) - EarthAid & Efficiency 2.0 Facebook Social Plug-ins YouTube Google Tools - Adwords & Web Optimizer *...

22

Projecting market demand for residential heat pumps  

SciTech Connect

Primarily because of technological improvements and sharp increases in energy prices after the 1970s energy crises, the sale of residential electric heat pumps rose ninefold from 1970 to 1983. This report describes current and future market demand for heat pumps used for space heating and cooling. A three-step approach was followed. In the first step, the historical growth of residential electric heat pumps was analyzed, and factors that may have affected market growth were examined. Also examined were installation trends of heat pumps in new single-family and multifamily homes. A market segmentation analysis was used to estimate market size by categories. In the second step, several methods for forecasting future market demand were reviewed and evaluated to select the most suitable one for this study. The discrete-choice approach was chosen. In the third step, a market penetration model based on selected discrete-choice methods was developed to project heat pump demand in key market segments such as home type (single-family or multifamily), new or existing construction, and race-ethnic origin of household (black, Hispanic, or white).

Teotia, A.P.S.; Raju, P.S.; Karvelas, D.; Anderson, J.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Financial Market Risk and U.S. Money Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper empirically examines U.S. broad money demand, emphasizing the role of financial market risk. Broad money demand displays long-run stability after controlling for financial market factors. We show that money demand rises with the liquidity risk of stock markets or the credit risk of corporate bond markets. The financial risk model for money demand surpasses the traditional model in explaining the persistent fluctuations observed in broad money demand in the last 15 years. Also, the models estimated in an error-correction specification suggest that financial market risk affects substantially the short-term fluctuations of broad money demand since the early 1990s.

Woon Gyu Choi; David Cook

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information also suggests that many LSEs provide "price-sensitive demand bids" in MISO day-ahead energy markets

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Markets Title Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Markets Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6155E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Cappers, Peter, Jason MacDonald, and Charles A. Goldman Date Published 03/2013 Keywords advanced metering infrastructure, aggregators of retail customers, ancillary services, demand response, electric utility regulation, electricity market rules, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, institutional barriers, market and value, operating reserves, retail electricity providers, retail electricity tariffs, smart grid Attachment Size

27

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MISO Day- ahead and Real-time Price-sensitive demand: LSEse.g. high day-ahead or real-time market prices) and systemis required to pay the real-time market price for load not

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand (RT- Demand), Real-Time Price (RT-Price) and Day-to reduce load in real-time when a specific price point iscloser to real-time when energy market prices rose above a

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Two market models for demand response in power networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, we consider two abstract market models for designing demand response to match power supply and shape power demand, respectively. We characterize the resulting equilibria in competitive as well as oligopolistic markets, and propose distributed demand response algorithms to achieve the equilibria. The models serve as a starting point to include the appliance-level details and constraints for designing practical demand response schemes for smart power grids. I.

Lijun Chen; Na Li; Steven H. Low; John C. Doyle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.ieadsm.org/Files/Tasks/Task%20XIII%20-%20Demand%20Response%20Resou Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/estimating-demand-response-market-pot Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation Regulations: Resource Integration Planning This resource presents demand response (DR) potential results from top-performing programs in the United States and Canada, as well as a DR

31

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The authors are solely responsible for any omissions or errors contained herein. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence More Documents & Publications Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

32

Revealing the Value of Demand Response: Regulatory and Market Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market failures have plagued competitive electricity markets worldwide. This report explores market and regulatory options for correcting some of these failures. In doing so, it recognizes the critical role that regulation plays in assuring that the competitive process works, as it should, to the benefit of all. In particular, the report examines ways to better integrate demand response (DR) into electricity markets at both the wholesale and retail levels.

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

33

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR Title Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5557E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kim, Joyce Jihyun, and Sila Kiliccote Date Published 06/2012 Publisher LBNL/NYSERDA Keywords commercial, demand response, dynamic pricing, mandatory hourly pricing, open automated demand response, openadr, pilot studies & implementation, price responsive demand Abstract In New York State, the default electricity pricing for large customers is Mandatory Hourly Pricing (MHP), which is charged based on zonal day-ahead market price for energy. With MHP, retail customers can adjust their building load to an economically optimal level according to hourly electricity prices. Yet, many customers seek alternative pricing options such as fixed rates through retail access for their electricity supply. Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) is an XML (eXtensible Markup Language) based information exchange model that communicates price and reliability information. It allows customers to evaluate hourly prices and provide demand response in an automated fashion to minimize electricity costs. This document shows how OpenADR can support MHP and facilitate price responsive demand for large commercial customers in New York City.

34

Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006) Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006) Most electricity customers see electricity rates that are based on average electricity costs and bear little relation to the true production costs of electricity as they vary over time. Demand response is a tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use customers in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to give

35

Turkey opens electricity markets as demand grows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turkey's growing power market has attracted investors and project developers for over a decade, yet their plans have been dashed by unexpected political or financial crises or, worse, obstructed by a lengthy bureaucratic approval process. Now, with a more transparent retail electricity market, government regulators and investors are bullish on Turkey. Is Turkey ready to turn the power on? This report closely examine Turkey's plans to create a power infrastructure capable of providing the reliable electricity supplies necessary for sustained economic growth. It was compiled with on-the-ground research and extensive interview with key industrial and political figures. Today, hard coal and lignite account for 21% of Turkey's electricity generation and gas-fired plants account for 50%. The Alfin Elbistan-B lignite-fired plant has attracted criticism for its lack of desulfurization units and ash dam facilities that have tarnished the industry's image. A 1,100 MW hard-coal fired plant using supercritical technology is under construction. 9 figs., 1 tab.

McKeigue, J.; Da Cunha, A.; Severino, D. [Global Business Reports (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we find that price elasticity both increases the retailers revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite effect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we find that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we find that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we find that price elasticity both increases the retailers revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite effect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we find that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we find that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Program Participation Rates on Demand Response MarketTable 3-1. Methods of Estimating Demand Response PenetrationDemand Response

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity2006. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and2010. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Analysis of Residential Demand Response and Double-Auction Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response and dynamic pricing programs are expected to play increasing roles in the modern Smart Grid environment. While direct load control of end-use loads has existed for decades, price driven response programs are only beginning to be explored at the distribution level. These programs utilize a price signal as a means to control demand. Active markets allow customers to respond to fluctuations in wholesale electrical costs, but may not allow the utility to control demand. Transactive markets, utilizing distributed controllers and a centralized auction can be used to create an interactive system which can limit demand at key times on a distribution system, decreasing congestion. With the current proliferation of computing and communication resources, the ability now exists to create transactive demand response programs at the residential level. With the combination of automated bidding and response strategies coupled with education programs and customer response, emerging demand response programs have the ability to reduce utility demand and congestion in a more controlled manner. This paper will explore the effects of a residential double-auction market, utilizing transactive controllers, on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Chassin, David P.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?  

SciTech Connect

The restructuring of regional electricity markets in the U.S. has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created significant new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators, to control and manage the load patterns of their wholesale or retail end-users. These technologies and business approaches for manipulating end-user load shapes are known as Load Management or, more recently, Demand Responsive programs. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is conducting case studies on innovative demand responsive programs and presents preliminary results for five case studies in this paper. These case studies illustrate the diversity of market participants and range of technologies and business approaches and focus on key program elements such as target markets, market segmentation and participation results; pricing scheme; dispatch and coordination; measurement, verification, and settlement; and operational results where available.

Heffner, Grayson C. Dr.; Goldman, Charles A.

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

42

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

SciTech Connect

Empirical evidence concerning demand response (DR) resources is needed in order to establish baseline conditions, develop standardized methods to assess DR availability and performance, and to build confidence among policymakers, utilities, system operators, and stakeholders that DR resources do offer a viable, cost-effective alternative to supply-side investments. This paper summarizes the existing contribution of DR resources in U.S. electric power markets. In 2008, customers enrolled in existing wholesale and retail DR programs were capable of providing ~;;38,000 MW of potential peak load reductions in the United States. Participants in organized wholesale market DR programs, though, have historically overestimated their likely performance during declared curtailments events, but appear to be getting better as they and their agents gain experience. In places with less developed organized wholesale market DR programs, utilities are learning how to create more flexible DR resources by adapting legacy load management programs to fit into existing wholesale market constructs. Overall, the development of open and organized wholesale markets coupled with direct policy support by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has facilitated new entry by curtailment service providers, which has likely expanded the demand response industry and led to product and service innovation.

Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Kathan, David

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Light and Heavy Mass Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effort to understand pre-cooling thermal mass as a Demandof Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEKey words: Pre-cooling, demand response, thermal mass

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Analyzing strategic behaviors in electricity markets via transmission-constrained residual demand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation studies how to characterize strategic behaviors in electricity markets from a transmission-constrained residual demand perspective. This dissertation generalizes the residual demand concept, widely (more)

Xu, Lin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Studies and Tools Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: March 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The idea of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling energy in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads during the peak periods. Savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Case studies in a number of office buildings in California has found that a simple demand limiting strategy reduced the chiller power by 20-100% (0.5-2.3W/ft2) during six

46

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Electricity Market Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. The major assumptions are summarized below.

47

Re DSM: Here comes demand-side marketing  

SciTech Connect

Demand-side management (DSM) programs where utilities pay large rebates for energy efficient equipment are being declared dead. The popular view of DSM in the past was to encourage conservation of energy with significant rebates, credits and other incentives offered by electric and also natural gas utilities. After years of increase in utility DSM expenditures, the first decline took place last year of about 6% for the electric industry. Although still spending more than $2 billion in 1994, utilities have continued this year to reduce the number of DSM programs. For some utilities there has been a dramatic abandonment of energy efficiency incentive programs. Where programs remain, utilities are placing increased emphasis on the most cost-effective ones which are usually directed toward commercial and industrial facilities. At the same time utilities have been transforming their programs from demand-side management to demand-side marketing. The objectives have shifted to retaining existing customers, developing new accounts, and increasing profitable sales. Incentives are justified in this new cost-driven competitive environment when they result in decreased rates for all customers. Whereas, in the past, DSM program participants were the primary beneficiaries with reduced bills, in the new marketing environment all customers can benefit from reduced bills.

Barrett, L.B. [Barrett Consulting Associates, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Effects of Demand Response on Retail and Wholesale Power Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response has grown to be a part of the repertoire of resources used by utilities to manage the balance between generation and load. In recent years, advances in communications and control technology have enabled utilities to consider continuously controlling demand response to meet generation, rather than the other way around. This paper discusses the economic applications of a general method for load resource analysis that parallels the approach used to analyze generation resources and uses the method to examine the results of the US Department of Energys Olympic Peninsula Demonstration Testbed. A market-based closed-loop system of controllable assets is discussed with necessary and sufficient conditions on system controllability, observability and stability derived.

Chassin, David P.; Kalsi, Karanjit

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

49

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the amount of electricity demand that is settled forward.unresponsive demand side, electricity demand has to be metxed percentage of overall electricity demand. The ISO, thus,

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Modeling Structural Changes in Market Demand and Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic events may cause structural changes in markets. To know the effect of the economic event we should analyze the structural changes in the market demand and supply. The purpose of this dissertation is to analyze the effect of selected economic events on market demand and supply using econometric models. Structural changes can be modeled according to the types of changes. For an abrupt and instantaneous break, a dummy variable model can be used. For a smooth and gradual movement, proxy variables which represent the event can be applied, if we know the variables. If we don?t know the appropriate proxy variables, a smooth transition regression model can be employed. The BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy) outbreak in the U.S. in 2003 is assumed to make abrupt and instantaneous changes in Korean meat consumption. To analyze the effect on Korean meat consumption, the Korean demands of beef, pork, chicken, and U.S. beef are estimated using an LA/AIDS (Linear Approximate Almost Ideal Demand System) model with the dummy variable specifying the time before and after the BSE. From the results we can confirm that food safety concerns caused by the BSE case changed Korean meat consumption structure. Korean beef and U.S. beef became less elastic, and pork and chicken got more elastic to budget. Korean beef became less price elastic, but pork and U.S. beef got more price elastic. The changes of U.S. natural gas supply caused by technology development and depletion in reserves are analyzed using a smooth transition regression model. From the results, we can confirm that the productivity improvement by technology development is greater than the labor cost increase by depletion, but not greater than the capital cost increase by depletion in mid-2000s. The effects of posting the winning bid in a repeated Vickrey auction are examined using a proxy variable. By applying an unobserved effect Tobit model to the experimental auction done by Corrigan and Rousu (2006) for a candy bar, we can confirm that the changes of bidding behavior are significant, especially when the winning bid is high. By extracting the bid affiliation effects, we showed that true willingness to pay can be estimated.

Park, Beom Su

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Studies and Tools Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: March 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The idea of pre-cooling...

52

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robinson, Michael, 2008, "Demand Response in Midwest ISOPresentation at MISO Demand Response Working Group Meeting,Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Dynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the New England ISO Demand Response Collaborative, a NYSERDACEC Staff. Selected Demand Response Pilots in California:New Principles for Demand Response Planning, Electric Power

Borenstein, Severin; Jaske, Michael; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LBNL-2124E LBNL-2124E Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence Principal Authors Peter Cappers a , Charles Goldman a , and David Kathan b a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 b Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street, NE, Washington, DC 20426, Energy Analysis Department Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 90R4000 Berkeley CA 94720-8136 Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2009 http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/EMS_pubs.html Pre-print version of the article to be published in Energy, forthcoming 2009. The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S.

55

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concerns during system peak demand conditions, and failurerelative to national peak demand, was about 5.0% in 2006 [2]to a regions summer peak demand (see Fig. 2). Demand

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Power Industry Development Paths and Natural Gas Market Risks: Cycles of Markets, Drilling, and Demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current natural gas market is depressed by a combination of unusual factorsa great excess of supply and weak demand. Excess supply comes from the momentum of exploration and production (EP) to the new U.S. gas shale plays, a phenomenon barely 18 months old and a game-changing event in the industry. Weak demand comes from the "Great Recession." The seeds for correcting this imbalance would appear to be a dramatic cutback in drilling, which has collapsed over the past year and which is a principal focu...

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

57

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

load and customer maximum demand are most commonly used as1) minimum and maximum amounts of demand reduction; (2)

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

SciTech Connect

The Organization of Midwest ISO States (OMS) launched the Midwest Demand Resource Initiative (MWDRI) in 2007 to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) region and develop policies to overcome them. The MWDRI stakeholders decided that a useful initial activity would be to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This additional detail could then be used to assess any"seams issues" affecting coordination and integration of retail DR resources with MISO's wholesale markets. Working with state regulatory agencies, we conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs, dynamic pricing tariffs, and their features in MISO states. Utilities were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g., seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. This report describes the results of this comprehensive survey and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into organized wholesale markets. Survey responses from 37 MISO members and 4 non-members provided information on 141 DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs with a peak load reduction potential of 4,727 MW of retail DR resource. Major findings of this study area:- About 72percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;18percent. Almost 90percent of the DR resources included in this survey are provided by investor-owned utilities. - Approximately, 90percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and over 1,900 MW can be dispatched on less than thirty minutes notice. These legacy DR programs are increasingly used by utilities for economic in addition to reliability purposes, with over two-thirds (68percent) of these programs callable based on market conditions. - Approximately 60percent of DLC programs and 30percent of interruptible rate programs called ten or more DR events in 2006. Despite the high frequency of DR events, customer complaints remained low. The use of economic criteria to trigger DR events and the flexibility to trigger a large number of events suggests that DR resources can help improve the efficiency of MISO wholesale markets. - Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels averaged about $5/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $6/kW-month for DLC programs. Few programs offered incentive payments that were explicitly linked to actual load reductions during events and at least 27 DR programs do not have penalties for non-performance. - Measurement and verification (M&V) protocols to estimate load impacts vary significantly across MISO states. Almost half of the DR programs have not been evaluated in recent times and thus performance data for DR events is not available. For many DLC programs, M&V protocols may need to be enhancedin order to allow participation in MISO's proposed EDR schedule. System operators and planners will need to develop more accurate estimates of the load reduced capability and actual performance.

Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Sedano, Richard

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

59

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy commodity risk (e.g. gas markets) Attendance at training workshops Technical audits or information information and improved methods that would support more reliable demand response market assessments. Energy

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

An exploration of automotive platinum demand and its impacts on the platinum market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The platinum market is a material market of increasing interest, as platinum demand has grown faster than supply in recent years. As a result, the price of platinum has increased, causing end-user firms to experience ...

Whitfield, Christopher George

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Empirical Analysis of the Spot Market Implications of Price-Responsive Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CA, USA. Siddiqui, AS (2004), Price-Elastic Demand inand Demand Response in Electricity Markets, CSEM Working Paper CSEM-WP-105, University of California Energy Institute, Berkeley, CA, USA.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Assessing the impacts of carbohydrate information on the market demand of US meats, vegetables, and fruits.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the impacts of low carbohydrate information on the market demand of US meats, vegetables, and fruits. The study further explores the combined (more)

Paudel, Laxmi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

An Evaluation of Demand Response in New York State's Wholesale Electricity Markets .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis identifies the conditions under which and quantifies how much society gains from integrating demand response directly into wholesale electricity markets and the level (more)

Cappers, Peter Andrew

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the world's largest energy markets, and ensuring that theorganized wholesale energy markets (day-ahead and real time)through the wholesale energy market only. LSEs can offer D R

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the ISO-NEs Day-Ahead energy market. 4 PJM provides itsin the Real-Time energy market, either through direct orahead and real-time energy market with centralized economic

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will buy for a given energy markets price. Dispatchable byindexed to wholesale energy market prices (i.e. either day-real-time or day-ahead energy market price. The RTP tariffs

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exposure to high energy market prices but were reticentto real-time when energy market prices rose above a certainprices. Finally, organized wholesale markets and policy support by the Federal Energy

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Dynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Large Comm. Interval metering system with monthly dataDynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering and Demand Response inE Dynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in

Borenstein, Severin; Jaske, Michael; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

70

Gray Markets, A Product of Demand Uncertainty and Excess Inventory.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two-market stochastic inventory system, Management Science.M. , P. Kouvelis. 2007. Inventory, speculation, and sourcing2001. A two-location inventory model with transshipment and

Ahmadi, R.; Carr, S. M.; Dasu, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vs. CSP.. 24market DR program by a CSP), (3) metering and telemetryof the interval data to CSP and ISO. As new entrants, CSPs

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is unable to reduce electricity prices. The unstorability ofhourly variability in electricity prices while maintainingboth forward and spot electricity prices a ect demand. Our

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Demand Response and Storage Integration Study: Markets Report...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Background Tools and techniques have been developed to help characterize demand response (DR) resources Given diversity in types of DR programs and relative...

74

Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

difference between Strike Price & forecast wholesale priceon day-ahead forecast of demand & price Wholesale utilitiesday-of forecast, or actual hourly spot price. A quick

Heffner, Dr. Grayson C.; Goldman, Charles A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Micro cogeneration: roadblocks to mass markets  

SciTech Connect

The market for micro cogeneration using units of 30 kW or less is in its infancy, and is currently limited to health care, recreation, lodging, and multi-unit residential facilities. There have been some inroads into the restaurant and fast food outlets, light industry, and some supermarkets. A mass market potential will require the industry to produce a module that is as generic as a home air conditioner or heat pump. In order for modular cogenerators to be look upon as appliances, they must be assembled as a package at the factory for easy installation and maintenance. Some utilities can create barriers to interconnections, which would have a negative effect on the market.

Ross, J.D.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

References Bressler, Stu (PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. ).01, Effective Date: 06/01/00. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. ,Market Monitoring Unit 2000. PJM Interconnection State of

Heffner, Dr. Grayson C.; Goldman, Charles A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Market-based airport demand management : theory, model and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ever-increasing demand for access to the world's major commercial airports combined with capacity constraints at many of these airports have led to increasing air traffic congestion. In particular, the scarcity of ...

Fan, Terence P

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rates that are based on average electricity costs and bear little relation to the true production costs of electricity as they vary over time. Demand response is a tariff or...

79

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response in Electricity Markets." University ofRates and Tariffs /Schedule for Electricity Service, P.S.C.no. 10- Electricity/Rules 24 (Riders)/Leaf No. 177-327."

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Deployment of Demand Response as a Real-Time Resource in Organized Markets  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deployment of Demand Response as a Real-Time Resource in Organized Markets Deployment of Demand Response as a Real-Time Resource in Organized Markets Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Deployment of Demand Response as a Real-Time Resource in Organized Markets Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1040619008000973 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/deployment-demand-response-real-time- Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: Resource Integration Planning This article examines the use of demand response as a dispatchable resource

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Water flows, energy demand, and market analysis of the informal water sector in Kisumu, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis Water flows, energy demand, and market analysis of the informal water sector in Kisumu Available online xxxx Keywords: Informal water sector Water flows Developing countries Water market analysis to cope with popu- lation growth. Informal water businesses fulfill unmet water supply needs, yet little

Elimelech, Menachem

82

Identifying the attribute of joint demand in Chinese payment card market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Payment card market is characterised by its two-sidedness. This fact implies that the demand of the market is jointly determined by participants on both sides of the payment platform. In this article, we employ copula functions to capture the complex ...

Lianying Fu; Pinliang Luo; Ling Rong

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Comfort-Aware Home Energy Management Under Market-Based Demand-Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pricing and consumption data in South Korea. Index Terms--smart grid, demand-response, energy management I-based pricing. In peak capping, each home is allocated an energy quota. In market-based pricing, the price-term viable way of regulating energy consumptions. We work with day-ahead market pricing in this paper

Boutaba, Raouf

84

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercialand Industrial Customers:A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

Demand response is increasingly recognized as an essentialingredient to well functioning electricity markets. This growingconsensus was formalized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT), whichestablished demand response as an official policy of the U.S. government,and directed states (and their electric utilities) to considerimplementing demand response, with a particular focus on "price-based"mechanisms. The resulting deliberations, along with a variety of stateand regional demand response initiatives, are raising important policyquestions: for example, How much demand response is enough? How much isavailable? From what sources? At what cost? The purpose of this scopingstudy is to examine analytical techniques and data sources to supportdemand response market assessments that can, in turn, answer the secondand third of these questions. We focus on demand response for large(>350 kW), commercial and industrial (C&I) customers, althoughmany of the concepts could equally be applied to similar programs andtariffs for small commercial and residential customers.

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Electricity Markets Meet the Home through Demand Response Lazaros Gkatzikis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with increasing trends [9]. Dynamic pricing motivates home users to modify their electricity consumption behavior price timeslots leading to the same total energy consumption, but a significantly different demand in practice though, since home users require to know the price per unit of consumed energy in advance. Instead

Massoulié, Laurent

86

Demand Response and Storage Integration Study: Markets Report Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Andy Satchwell Andy Satchwell Scientific Engineering Associate Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, ER&E Committee Meeting, July 24, 2012 Portland, OR Tools and Methods Working Group Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Outline of Presentation  Introduction and background: DR Estimation Tools and Methods Working Group  Working group members  Work plan  Identification of estimation tools and methods needs  Preliminary gap analysis  Next steps 2 Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Introduction and Background  Tools and techniques have been developed to help characterize demand response (DR) resources  Given diversity in types of DR programs and relative

87

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone Title Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3898e Year of Publication 2009 Authors Xu, Peng, Rongxin Yin, Carrie Brown, and DongEun Kim Date Published June 2009 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords demand response, demand shifting (pre-cooling), DRQAT, hot climates, market sectors, office buildings, pre-cooling, technologies, testbed tools and guides, thermal mass Abstract The potential for using building thermal mass for load shifting and peak energy demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Previous Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory research has demonstrated that the approach is very effective in cool and moderately warm climate conditions (California Climate Zones 2-4). However, this method had not been tested in hotter climate zones.This project studied the potential of pre-cooling the building early in the morning and increasing temperature setpoints during peak hours to reduce cooling-related demand in two typical office buildings in hotter California climates - one in Visalia (CEC Climate Zone 13) and the other in San Bernardino (CEC Climate Zone 10). The conclusion of the work to date is that pre-cooling in hotter climates has similar potential to that seen previously in cool and moderate climates. All other factors being equal, results to date indicate that pre-cooling increases the depth (kW) and duration (kWh) of the possible demand shed of a given building. The effectiveness of night pre-cooling in typical office building under hot weather conditions is very limited. However, night pre-cooling is helpful for office buildings with an undersized HVAC system. Further work is required to duplicate the tests in other typical buildings and in other hot climate zones and prove that pre-cooling is truly effective.

88

Incorporating Demand Resources into ISO New Englands Forward Capacity Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Forward Capacity Market was developed by ISO New England, the six New England states, and industry stakeholders to promote investment in demand- and supply-side resources. Under the new FCM design, ISO New England will project the needs of the power system three years in advance and then hold an annual auction to purchase the power resources that will satisfy the future regional requirements. ISO New England submitted a filing with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in November of 2007 that defined 6,102 megawatts (MW) of new demand- and supply-side resources now eligible to compete in the market. Approximately 40 percentor 2,483 MWof the new, qualified projects are demand-side resources such as demand response, energy efficiency, load management, and distributed generation. Energy efficiency projects make up over 590 MW of that total.

Winkler, E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEThe Role of Thermal Mass on the Cooling Load of Buildings.Keywords: Pre-cooling, demand response, thermal mass, hot

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Controlling Market Power and Price Spikes in Electricity Networks: Demand-side Bidding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simona Lup, Jia Jing Liu and Stephen Sosnicki for help with running the experiments and testing the software. This paper has benefited from comments from Kevin McCabe, Mark Olson, Dave Porter, and Stan Reynolds, but all errors are our own. The data are available upon request from the authors. Controlling Market Power and Price Spikes in Electricity Networks: Demand-Side Bidding In this paper we report experiments that examine how two structural features of electricity networks contribute to the exercise of market power in deregulated markets. The first feature is the distribution of ownership of a given set of generating assets. In the market power treatment, two large firms are allocated baseload and intermediate cost generators such that either firm might unilaterally withhold the capacity of its intermediate cost generators from the market to benefit from the supracompetitive prices that would result from only selling its baseload units. In the converse treatment, ownership of some of the intermediate cost generators is transferred from each of these firms to two other firms, so that no one firm could unilaterally restrict output to spawn supra-competitive prices. The second feature explores how the presence of line constraints in a radial network may segment the market and promote supra-competitive pricing in the isolated market segments. We also consider the interaction effect when both of these structural features are present. Having established a wellcontrolled data set with price spikes paralleling those observed in the naturally occurring economy, we also extend the design to include demand-side bidding. We find that demand-side bidding completely neutralizes the exercise of market power and eliminates price spikes.

Stephen J. Rassenti; Vernon L. Smith; Bart J. Wilson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Empirical analysis of the spot market implications ofprice-elastic demand  

SciTech Connect

Regardless of the form of restructuring, deregulated electricity industries share one common feature: the absence of any significant, rapid demand-side response to the wholesale (or, spotmarket) price. For a variety of reasons, electricity industries continue to charge most consumers an average cost based on regulated retail tariff from the era of vertical integration, even as the retailers themselves are forced to purchase electricity at volatile wholesale prices set in open markets. This results in considerable price risk for retailers, who are sometimes forbidden by regulators from signing hedging contracts. More importantly, because end-users do not perceive real-time (or even hourly or daily) fluctuations in the wholesale price of electricity, they have no incentive to adjust their consumption in response to price signals. Consequently, demand for electricity is highly inelastic, and electricity generation resources can be stretched to the point where system stability is threatened. This, then, facilitates many other problems associated with electricity markets, such as market power and price volatility. Indeed, economic theory suggests that even modestly price-responsive demand can remove the stress on generation resources and decrease spot prices. To test this theory, we use actual generator bid data from the New York control area to construct supply stacks, and intersect them with demand curves of various slopes to approximate different levels of demand elasticity. We then estimate the potential impact of real-time pricing on the equilibrium spot price and quantity. These results indicate the immediate benefits that could be derived from a more price-elastic demand. Such analysis can provide policymakers with a measure of how effective price-elastic demand can potentially reduce prices and maintain consumption within the capability of generation resources.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

2004-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

92

Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market Potential:Integrating Price and Customer Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT=Demand response (DR) is increasingly recognized asan essential ingredient to well-functioning electricity markets. DRmarket potential studies can answer questions about the amount of DRavailable in a given area, from which market segments. Several recent DRmarket potential studies have been conducted, most adapting techniquesused to estimate energy-efficiency (EE) potential. In this scoping study,we: reviewed and categorized seven recent DR market potential studies;recommended a methodology for estimating DR market potential for large,non-residential utility customers that uses price elasticities to accountfor behavior and prices; compiled participation rates and elasticityvalues from six DR options offered to large customers in recent years,and demonstrated our recommended methodology with large customer marketpotential scenarios at an illustrative Northeastern utility. We recommendan elasticity approach for large-customer DR options that rely oncusto!

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Impact of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Programs on the U.S. Electricity Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the impact of the energy efficiency (EE) and demand response (DR) programs on the grid and the consequent level of production. Changes in demand caused by EE and DR programs affect not only the dispatch of existing plants and new generation technologies, the retirements of old plants, and the finances of the market. To find the new equilibrium in the market, we use the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch Model (ORCED) developed to simulate the operations and costs of regional power markets depending on various factors including fuel prices, initial mix of generation capacity, and customer response to electricity prices. In ORCED, over 19,000 plant units in the nation are aggregated into up to 200 plant groups per region. Then, ORCED dispatches the power plant groups in each region to meet the electricity demands for a given year up to 2035. In our analysis, we show various demand, supply, and dispatch patterns affected by EE and DR programs across regions.

Baek, Young Sun [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A Methodology for Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response MarketPotential  

SciTech Connect

Demand response (DR) is increasingly recognized as an essential ingredient to well-functioning electricity markets. DR market potential studies can answer questions about the amount of DR available in a given area and from which market segments. Several recent DR market potential studies have been conducted, most adapting techniques used to estimate energy-efficiency (EE) potential. In this scoping study, we: reviewed and categorized seven recent DR market potential studies; recommended a methodology for estimating DR market potential for large, non-residential utility customers that uses price elasticities to account for behavior and prices; compiled participation rates and elasticity values from six DR options offered to large customers in recent years, and demonstrated our recommended methodology with large customer market potential scenarios at an illustrative Northeastern utility. We observe that EE and DR have several important differences that argue for an elasticity approach for large-customer DR options that rely on customer-initiated response to prices, rather than the engineering approaches typical of EE potential studies. Base-case estimates suggest that offering DR options to large, non-residential customers results in 1-3% reductions in their class peak demand in response to prices or incentive payments of $500/MWh. Participation rates (i.e., enrollment in voluntary DR programs or acceptance of default hourly pricing) have the greatest influence on DR impacts of all factors studied, yet are the least well understood. Elasticity refinements to reflect the impact of enabling technologies and response at high prices provide more accurate market potential estimates, particularly when arc elasticities (rather than substitution elasticities) are estimated.

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Cappers,Peter

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies January 16, 2011 Maryanne Fuller (MF): Hi there. This is Maryanne Fuller from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Thank you for joining this call on the marketing and driving demand collaborative. The call today is on social media. I think everyone's phone should be unmuted through this system. Is that right? No? -Can you hear me? MF: Yep, great. So everyone's phone is unmuted. But if you can please mute your own personal phone just so we don't have any background noise. But this will allow you to speak up whenever you want to so feel free to ask questions, add your two cents, et cetera as we go through the call. So, here's the agenda for today. We're going to just briefly remind you of what the collaborative is all about. We have

96

How Increased Crude Oil Demand by China and India Affects the International Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-WTI Spot Cushing US$/BBL Brent Crude Oil-Brent Dated FOB US$/BBL Dubai Crude Oil-Arab Gulf Dubai FOB US$/BBL Tapis Crude Oil-Malaysia Tapis FOB US$/BBL Urals Crude Oil-Urals FOB US$/BBL Bonny Crude Oil-Africa FOB1 How Increased Crude Oil Demand by China and India Affects the International Market

97

Evaluation of consumer demand for selected end-use markets for cotton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. cotton industry is facing a rapidly diminishing share of the domestic and foreign textile markets. To become more competitive in these markets, the textile industry should know where consumer demand is being directed. The objectives of this study were to quantitatively examine the demand for cotton in twelve selected end-uses from 1973 to 1997. Four structural models were developed to explain demand, two of which were built using the results from directed graphs. Changes in fashion and governmental policy were also assessed during this time period. Economic theory and prior literature suggested that the following factors influence demand at the end-use level: Disposable Personal Income, the Consumer Price Index for Apparel and Upkeep, cotton fiber prices lagged one year, polyester fiber prices lagged one year, and population segmented by age and gender. Regression results indicate that the Consumer Price Index, the lagged polyester prices, and the population variables most significantly contribute to the demand for cotton. A negative polyester coefficient was associated in all cases of significance, characterizing cotton and polyester fiber as complements in end-uses. Out-of-sample forecasts were generated for the years 1993 to 1997, and then evaluated using the Theil's U statistic, the Root Mean Square Error, and the Mean Absolute Percentage Error. The forecasts from the full models, those with all variables, outperformed the directed graph models in terms of predictive power. Differences in significant variables and variability in forecasting accuracy among the different end-uses suggests that there is an inherent difficulty in modeling the demand for a fiber in its end-use. A common saying in the fashion industry is that "the only constant is change." A constantly changing industry thus presents difficulty in quantifying, modeling, and forecasting.

Viator, Catherine Longman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Program Strategies and Results for Californias Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Energy Partners provides a review of Californias strategic approach to energy efficiency and demand response implementation, with a focus on the industrial sector. The official role of the state, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), is presented along with special efforts being made in support of industrial end users. The interrelationship between the CEC and the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) with regard to advancing demand side programs is highlighted. The specific cost recovery mechanisms put in place by the CPUC is discussed, including Californias experience with revenue decoupling, public purpose funds, and avoided cost calculations. Next, the role as energy efficiency (EE) and demand response (DR) program implementer played by each of the state Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs) is outlined. Each utility is responsible for serving major end use market segments with target programs designed to provide unique value. Within the industrial sector, there is special attention paid to the needs of the various sub-markets such as oil refining, agriculture, food processing, water and wastewater, manufacturing, and others. A review is presented of how EE and DR measures are selected, how incentive values are determined, which customers are eligible for programs, and how programs are evaluated to gage effectiveness. Lastly, mechanisms used by the IOUs to deliver industrial EE and DR incentive programs are discussed. This includes a review of core programs administered by the utilities as well as subcontracted programs administered by third party implementers and local government partners. Global Energy Partners will offer specific examples of program experience in the oil & gas, agriculture, and food processing sectors, and will also highlight program success within the emerging automated demand response market.

Ehrhard, R.; Hamilton, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

On the Impact of Forward Markets on Investment in Oligopolistic Markets wtih Reference to Electricity Part 1: Deterministic Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the properties of three capacity games in an oligopolistic market with Cournot players and deterministic demand. In the first game, capacity and the operation of that capacity is determined simultaneously. This is the classic open-loop Cournot game. In the second game, capacity is decided in the first stage and the operation of that capacity is determined in the second stage. The first-stage decision of each player is contingent on the solution of the second-stage game. This is a two-stage, closed-loop game. We show that when the solution exists, it is the same as the solution in the first game. However, it does not always exist. The third game has three stages with a futures position taken between the capacity stage and the operations stage and is also a closed-loop game. As with the second game, the equilibrium is the same as the open-loop game when it exists. However, the conditions for existence are more restrictive with forward markets added. When both games have an equilibrium, the solution values are identical. The results are very different from games with no capacity stage as studied by Allaz and Vila (1993), where they concluded that forward markets

Frederic Murphy; Yves Smeers

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MARKETS REVIEW OF DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS IN THE U.S. ANDMARKETS REVIEW OF DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS IN THE U.S. ANDend-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called

Heffner, Grayson C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Proceedings of the Chinese-American symposium on energy markets and the future of energy demand  

SciTech Connect

The Symposium was organized by the Energy Research Institute of the State Economic Commission of China, and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Johns Hopkins University from the United States. It was held at the Johns Hopkins University Nanjing Center in late June 1988. It was attended by about 15 Chinese and an equal number of US experts on various topics related to energy demand and supply. Each presenter is one of the best observers of the energy situation in their field. A Chinese and US speaker presented papers on each topic. In all, about 30 papers were presented over a period of two and one half days. Each paper was translated into English and Chinese. The Chinese papers provide an excellent overview of the emerging energy demand and supply situation in China and the obstacles the Chinese planners face in managing the expected increase in demand for energy. These are matched by papers that discuss the energy situation in the US and worldwide, and the implications of the changes in the world energy situation on both countries. The papers in Part 1 provide historical background and discuss future directions. The papers in Part 2 focus on the historical development of energy planning and policy in each country and the methodologies and tools used for projecting energy demand and supply. The papers in Part 3 examine the pattern of energy demand, the forces driving demand, and opportunities for energy conservation in each of the major sectors in China and the US. The papers in Part 4 deal with the outlook for global and Pacific region energy markets and the development of the oil and natural gas sector in China.

Meyers, S. (ed.)

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Estimating the Customer-Level Demand for Electricity Under Real-Time Market Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the customer-level demand for electricity by industrial and commercial customers purchasing electricity according to the half-hourly energy prices from the England and Wales (E&W) electricity market. These customers also face the possibility of a demand charge on its electricity consumption during the three half-hour periods that are coincident with E&W system peaks. Although energy charges are largely known by 4 PM the day prior to consumption, a fraction of the energy charge and the identity of the half-hour periods when demand charges occur are only known with certainty ex post of consumption. Four years of data from a Regional Electricity Company (REC) in the United Kingdom is used to quantify the half-hourly customer-level demands under this real-time pricing program. The econometric model developed and estimated here quantifies the extent of intertemporal substitution in electricity consumption across pricing periods within the day due to changes ...

Robert H. Patrick; Frank A. Wolak

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Window Market in Texas: Opportunities for Energy Savings and Demand Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of high performance windows represents a promising opportunity to reduce energy consumption and summer electrical demand in homes and commercial buildings in Texas and neighboring states. While low-e glass coatings and other energy efficiency features have become standard features in windows in states with building energy codes, their sales in the Texas market remain limited. This paper presents findings from a pilot energy efficiency program sponsored by American Electric Power Company (AEP). The Texas Window Initiative (TWI) has conducted over 160 on-site training sessions for hardware store sales personnel and builders across the AEP service areas in Texas over the past two years. Companion promotional activities have also been completed. The past one and a half years have witnessed a very significant increase in the market penetration of energy efficient windows in the AEP service area; from about 2.5% of total window sales in early 2000 to roughly 25% (according to preliminary data) by the end of 2001.1 Some of this increase is attributable to TWI's activities, although other factors may be responsible for a portion of this increase as well. The market for windows in Texas is described. TWI's approach to promoting energy efficient windows is reviewed. Initial impact estimates from TWI's activities are presented. The technical potential for energy savings and utility peak demand reduction from the installation of energy efficient windows in Texas is presented. The paper also provides some speculation on how the window market might be impacted by the adoption of building energy codes in Texas.

Zarnikau, J.; Campbell, L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Empirical Analysis of the Spot Market Implications ofPrice-Responsive Demand  

SciTech Connect

Regardless of the form of restructuring, deregulatedelectricity industries share one common feature: the absence of anysignificant, rapid demand-side response to the wholesale (or, spotmarket) price. For a variety of reasons, most electricity consumers stillpay an average cost based regulated retail tariff held over from the eraof vertical integration, even as the retailers themselves are oftenforced to purchase electricity at volatile wholesale prices set in openmarkets. This results in considerable price risk for retailers, who aresometimes additionally forbidden by regulators from signing hedgingcontracts. More importantly, because end-users do not perceive real-time(or even hourly or daily) fluctuations in the wholesale price ofelectricity, they have no incentive to adjust their consumptionaccordingly. Consequently, demand for electricity is highly inelastic,which together with the non storability of electricity that requiresmarket clearing over very short time steps spawn many other problemsassociated with electricity markets, such as exercise of market power andprice volatility. Indeed, electricity generation resources can bestretched to the point where system adequacy is threatened. Economictheory suggests that even modest price responsiveness can relieve thestress on generation resources and decrease spot prices. To quantify thiseffect, actual generator bid data from the New York control area is usedto construct supply stacks and intersect them with demand curves ofvarious slopes to approximate the effect of different levels of demandresponse. The potential impact of real-time pricing (RTP) on theequilibrium spot price and quantity is then estimated. These resultsindicate the immediate benefits that could be derived from a moreprice-responsive demand providing policymakers with a measure of howprices can be potentially reduced and consumption maintained within thecapability of generation assets.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30percent using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Parrish, Kristen

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

106

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings:Field Tests, Simulation and Audits  

SciTech Connect

The principle of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads and reducing or shedding related electrical demand during the peak periods. Cost savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies (Braun 1990, Ruud et al. 1990, Conniff 1991, Andresen and Brandemuehl 1992, Mahajan et al. 1993, Morris et al. 1994, Keeney and Braun 1997, Becker and Paciuk 2002, Xu et al. 2003). This technology appears to have significant potential for demand reduction if applied within an overall demand response program. The primary goal associated with this research is to develop information and tools necessary to assess the viability of and, where appropriate, implement demand response programs involving building thermal mass in buildings throughout California. The project involves evaluating the technology readiness, overall demand reduction potential, and customer acceptance for different classes of buildings. This information can be used along with estimates of the impact of the strategies on energy use to design appropriate incentives for customers.

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

months when buildings' electricity demand is also high dueoptimize buildings' electricity demand according to hourlymonths when buildings' electricity demand is also high due

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential customers with peak demand greater than 350 kWs) Eligible Customers (peak demand) Optional hourly pricingis relatively small; the peak demand of its large, non-

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the wholesale market in hour h, and ,Borenstein, S. , 2008. The Market Value and Cost of SolarEto, J. , 2011. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. Price-Elastic Demand in Deregulated Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The degree to which anyderegulated market functions e ciently often depends on the ability ofmarket agents to respond quickly to uctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we nd that price elasticity bothincreases the retailer's revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite e ect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the electricity forward price is ambiguous. Indeed, each retailer's response depends on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we nd that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we nd that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

Afzal S. Siddiqui; Afzal S. Siddiqui

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

size (average maximum demand) 84 , business type (SIC code),HECO customers average maximum demands was not available.to estimate the maximum demand (kW) of each customer.

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Social Welfare implications of demand response programs in competitiv e electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Customer Electricity Demand Under Fixed Tariffs vs.to re-emphasize that these electricity demands are the onesdamage from fire. of electricity demand, it is system-wide

Boisvert, Richard N.; Neenan, Bernard F.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market Potential: Integrating Price and Customer Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reductions in their class peak demand in response to pricesresidential customers with peak demand greater than 350 kWs) Eligible Customers (peak demand) > 1,500 kW > 2000 kW >

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A Methodology for Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reductions in their class peak demand in response to pricesresidential customers with peak demand greater than 350 kWs) Eligible Customers (peak demand) > 1,500 kW > 2000 kW

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Data mining of market information to assess at-home pork demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study analyzes the economic and demographic patterns of at-home pork consumption for representative individuals over 18 years of age in the United States. Three data sets purchased by the National Pork Board (NPB) are mined for this purpose: (1) National Eating Trends (NET) data from National Panel Diary (NPD) on individuals' intake and their demographic characteristics; (2) weekly retail prices for fresh meats and fresh pork cuts from FreshLook; and (3) weekly retail prices for processed pork products from A.C. Nielsen. Heckman sample selection models are used to find demographic, health, and attitudinal/lifestyle patterns of consumption of twelve fresh and processed pork products as well as beef, chicken, and seafood. In the fall, individuals have a higher probability of eating beef, chicken, pork tenderloin, and bacon, but a lower probability of eating fresh seafood, canned ham, and smoked ham relative to the spring. The New England region has the highest likelihood of eating fresh pork, beef, chicken, seafood, pork roasts, pork tenderloin, and pork hotdogs. Blacks, on average, eat more fresh and processed pork, chicken, pork sausage, bacon, and canned ham, but less beef relative to whites. Concern about serving food with fat is negatively related with the likelihood of eating processed pork, lunchmeat, ham, and bacon, but it is positively related with the likelihood of eating pork hotdogs. A three-stage selectivity-adjusted censored LA/AIDS model is developed and estimated to find demand-price relationships for: (1) fresh meats (pork, beef, chicken, and seafood) and (2) nine fresh and processed pork cuts. However, aggregate fresh meats are substitutes for each other in at-home market, but there are substantial complementarities between pork cuts. Pork sausage is the major competitor for the processed products, pork roasts and pork tenderloin, but a major complement for pork ribs. There is relatively week substitutability between pork and beef, and relatively strong substitutability between pork and chicken and between beef and chicken. This could suggest opportunities for some joint marketing efforts between pork and beef commodity interests. This information can be used as a guide for marketing strategists for targeting and promotion as well as for category management of the disaggregated pork products.

Asatryan, Armen A.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Evaluation of Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Two Large Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Building thermal mass can be used to reduce the peak cooling load. For example, in summer, the building mass can be pre-cooled during non-peak hours in order to reduce the cooling load in the peak hours. As a result, the cooling load is shifted in time and the peak demand is reduced. The building mass can be cooled most effectively during unoccupied hours because it is possible to relax the comfort constraints. While the benefits of demand shift are certain, different thermal mass discharge strategies result in different cooling load reduction and savings. The goal of an optimized discharge strategy is to maximize the thermal mass discharge and minimize the possibility of rebounds before the shed period ends. A series of filed tests were carefully planned and conducted in two commercial buildings in Northern California to investigate the effects of various precooling and demand shed strategies. Field tests demonstrated the potential of cooling load reduction in peak hours and importance of discharge strategies to avoid rebounds. EnergyPlus simulation models were constructed and calibrated to investigate different kind of recovery strategies. The results indicate the value of pre-cooling in maximizing the electrical shed in the on-peak period. The results also indicate that the dynamics of the shed need to be managed in order to avoid discharging the thermal capacity of the building too quickly, resulting in high cooling load and electric demand before the end of the shed period. An exponential trajectory for the zone set-point during the discharge period yielded good results and is recommended for practical implementation.

Xu, Peng

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Comfort-aware home energy management under market-based demand-response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To regulate energy consumption and enable Demand-Response programs, effective demand-side management at home is key and an integral part of the future Smart Grid. In essence, the home energy management is a mix between discrete appliance scheduling problem ... Keywords: demand-response, energy management, smart grid

Jin Xiao, Jian Li, Raouf Boutaba, James Won-Ki Hong

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Social Welfare implications of demand response programs in competitive electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

The price volatility exhibited by wholesale electricity markets has stymied the movement to restructure the industry, and may derail it altogether. Market designers argue that prices are superior to regulation for directing long-term investments to the proper location and function, and that price volatility is a natural manifestation of a robustly competitive market. However, episodes of prices that soar to previously unimaginable heights try customers' patience and cause policy makers to reconsider if the prize is worth the consequences.

Boisvert, Richard N.; Neenan, Bernard F.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Empirical analysis of the spot market implications of price-elastic demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are exposed to real-time electricity prices, then they cansustained increases in the electricity price. Greater pricethe market-clearing electricity price. Indeed, the remaining

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

charges to avoid high electricity bills. Demand Responseaffect customers' electricity bills negatively. Therefore,charges to avoid high electricity bills Under ConEd's SC-9

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

response as: changes in electric usage by end-use customerselectric competition Typical rate design includes demand and/or volumetric distribution charges, with all commodity usage

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

On Coordinating Electricity Markets: Smart Power Scheduling for Demand Side Management and Economic Dispatch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-way system of communicating real-time prices and hourly de- mand between electricity producers and households a mechanism to approximate equilibrium prices and quantities for use as a real-time pricing scheme. Our goal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 3 Market Equilibrium 36 3.1 Retail Market Energy Consumption Game

Chen, Yiling

123

In situ global method for measurement of oxygen demand and mass transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two aerobic microorganisms, Saccharomycopsis lipolytica and Brevibacterium lactofermentum, have been used in a study of mass transfer and oxygen uptake from a global perspective using a closed gas system. Oxygen concentrations in the gas and liquid were followed using oxygen electrodes, and the results allowed for easy calculation of in situ oxygen transport. The cell yields on oxygen for S. lipolytica and B. lactofermentum were 1.01 and 1.53 g/g respectively. The mass transfer coefficient was estimated as 10 h{sup {minus}1} at 500 rpm for both fermentations. The advantages with this method are noticeable since the use of model systems may be avoided, and the in situ measurements of oxygen demand assure reliable data for scale-up.

Klasson, K.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Lundbaeck, K.M.O.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L. [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Social Welfare implications of demand response programs in competitiv e electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

markets such as that run by the New York ISO and PJMInterconnection (PJM), and are also consistent with theDR programs of NYISO and PJM. An alternative is a program

Boisvert, Richard N.; Neenan, Bernard F.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market Potential: Integrating Price and Customer Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 2006) ISO-NE Real-Time Price Response (RTPR) ProgramResponse to Real Time Electricity Prices, December,real-time energy market) Short-notice emergency program Price-

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

period difference in maximum demand was 166 kilowatts (kW).4 p.m. ; however, the maximum demand was not reduced as muchdata indicate that the maximum demand shed always appears

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for CommercialScenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for CommercialThe whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Field Tests, Simulation and Audits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Braun (Purdue). 2004. Peak demand reduction from pre-coolingmass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has beenpre-cooling strategies on peak demand. In addition, a set of

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. E. Braun. 2004. Peak demand reduction from pre-coolingReducing electrical peak demand has a huge economic andmass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

36E 36E Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California R. Yin, S. Kiliccote, M.A. Piette, K. Parrish Environmental Energy Technologies Division May 2010 Presented at the 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Pacific Grove, CA, August 15-20, 2010, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

131

Propane Sector Demand Shares  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... agricultural demand does not impact regional propane markets except when unusually high and late demand for propane for crop drying combines with early cold ...

132

Gas Market Transition: Buildup of Power Sector Demand: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Just how fast is natural gas demand for power generation growing in response to the many new gas-fired units being built? This simple question has a far from simple answer, due to confusing streams of data, the interplay between new efficient gas combined cycle units and existing capacity, and the surprisingly low overall levels of capacity utilization observed among the new units. This report dissects each component of gas use in the power sector and provides a novel, integrated view of near term trends...

2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

133

Testing of peak demand limiting using thermal mass at a small commercial building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IBPSA-USA Conference at MIT, Boston, MA. Demand ResponseDemand- Limiting Setpoint Trajectories in Commercial Buildings Using Short-Term Data Analysis, Proceedings of the 2006 IBPSA-USA

Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Braun, James E; Fredrickson, Steve; Konis, Kyle; Arens, Edward

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Demand Trading Toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Download report 1006017 for FREE. The global movement toward competitive markets is paving the way for a variety of market mechanisms that promise to increase market efficiency and expand customer choice options. Demand trading offers customers, energy service providers, and other participants in power markets the opportunity to buy and sell demand-response resources, just as they now buy and sell blocks of power. EPRI's Demand Trading Toolkit (DTT) describes the principles and practice of demand trading...

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

Evaluation of Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Two Large Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilizing building thermal mass for cooling load shiftingUse of Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEpeak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Demand Trading: Building Liquidity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand trading holds substantial promise as a mechanism for efficiently integrating demand-response resources into regional power markets. However, regulatory uncertainty, the lack of proper price signals, limited progress toward standardization, problems in supply-side markets, and other factors have produced illiquidity in demand-trading markets and stalled the expansion of demand-response resources. This report shows how key obstacles to demand trading can be overcome, including how to remove the unce...

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Energy Conservation Through Demand-Side Management (DSM): A Methodology to Characterize Energy Use Among commercial Market Segments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing energy demand can be beneficial for both the energy consumer and the energy supplier. By reducing energy use, the consumer reduces operating costs and improves production efficiency and competitiveness. Similarly, the supplier may reduce the need for costly capacity expansion and wholesale power purchasing, especially if energy reductions occur during peak loading conditions. Energy reductions may also lessen global climate change and reduce many other consequences of fossil-fuel energy use. The following research highlights a methodology to characterize energy use and optimize a DSM program for different types of commercial buildings. Utilizing publicly available records, such as utility billing data and property tax records, the diverse commercial building market was characterized. The commercial building types were matched to relevant submarkets of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). These sources were combined to prioritize building type submarket energy use intensity (kWh/sf/yr), load factor and many other energy use characteristics for each market segment. From this information, lower tier performers in each NAICS submarket can be identified and appropriate DSM alternatives selected specific to each.

Grosskopf, K. R.; Oppenheim, P.; Barclay, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Field Tests, Simulation and Audits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Role of Thermal Mass on the Cooling Load of Buildings.Use of Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEpeak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Market transformation lessons learned from an automated demand response test in the Summer and Fall of 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large FacilitiesLearned from an Automated Demand Response Test in the SummerLearned from an Automated Demand Response Test in the Summer

Shockman, Christine; Piette, Mary Ann; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Revamping luxury : mass customization applied to the luxury goods market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis seeks to understand how the crisis has impacted the definition of luxury goods in the mind of consumers and the implications this has for luxury goods companies. It also aims to present Mass Customization as ...

Edouard, Mlissa Susan Caroline Coleman

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies (e.g. , microgrids, plug-in electric vehicles,technologies (e.g. , microgrids, plug- in electric vehicles,

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission system to trade electricity. In regions withoutand loads to trade electricity. In organized wholesale

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system operational costs of wind energy, the low capacitybalancing costs change with high wind energy penetration.

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Pre-cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass inthe high thermal storage during the pre-cooling period. Forwith low thermal mass is limited, the pre-cooling period can

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization. Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, 127, 37-Mass. Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, 125, 292-301.

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The restructuring of regional and national electricity markets in the U.S. and around the world has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators to control and manage the load patterns of wholesale and retail end-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called Load Management, have re-emerged as an important element in the fine-tuning of newly restructured electricity markets. During the summers of 1999 and 2001 they played a vital role in stabilizing wholesale markets and providing a hedge against generation shortfalls throughout the U.S.A. Demand Response Programs include ''traditional'' capacity reservation and interruptible/curtailable rates programs as well as voluntary demand bidding programs offered by either Load Serving Entities (LSEs) or regional Independent System Operators (ISOs). The Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) has been monitoring the development of new types of Demand Response Programs both in the U.S. and around the world. This paper provides a survey and overview of the technologies and program designs that make up these emerging and important new programs.

Heffner, Grayson C.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a California Hot Climate Zone. Lawrence Berkeleythermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30%data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Propane Market Status Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Propane Market Status Report 07272000 Click here to start Table of Contents Propane Market Status Report Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil Propane Demand by Sector Demand Impacted...

149

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on utility demand-side management and conservation and renewable energy programs  

SciTech Connect

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) requires all of its long-term firm power customers to implement programs that promote the conservation of electric energy or facilitate the use of renewable energy resources. Western has also proposed that all customers develop integrated resource plans that include cost-effective demand-side management programs. As part of the preparation of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) developed estimates of the reductions in energy demand resulting from Western`s conservation and renewable energy activities in its Salt Lake City Area Office. ANL has also estimated the energy-demand reductions from cost-effective, demand-side management programs that could be included in the integrated resource plans of the customers served by Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The results of this study have been used to adjust the expected hourly demand for Western`s major systems in the Salt Lake City Area. The expected hourly demand served as the basis for capacity expansion plans develops with ANL`s Production and Capacity Expansion (PACE) model.

Cavallo, J.D.; Germer, M.F.; Tompkins, M.M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

? Market Simulation Activities ? Registration Process Overview ? Agreements ? Intro to Demand Response Provider Software ? Resource Data Template ? Pre-Market Meter Data Submission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By the end of this module, you will be able to: ? Describe the purpose of the Proxy Demand Resource project ? Identify the tabs in the Demand Response Provider software ? Identify three components of the Generator Resource Data Template and describe how they are used. ISO PUBLIC- 2010 CAISO 3

Jenny Pedersen; Senior Client Trainer; Iso Public Caiso

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the prevailing PJM energy market price. The demand in thethe prevailing national energy market price. Last, suppliersraising the national energy market price cap P up to f, in

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Market  

... and its contributions to society and the economy; The marketing group values suggestions from researchers regarding companies to approach.

153

Demand Response Program Design and Implementation Case Study...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delurey, Dan, and J. Schwartz Date Published 022013 Keywords demand response research, demand side resources: policy, electricity markets, electricity markets and policy group,...

154

Equity Capital Flows and Demand for REITs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the shape of the market demand curve for ... Our results do not support a downward demand curve for ... Charleston, IL 61920, USA e-mail:...

155

The Non-alcoholic Beverage Market in the United States: Demand Interrelationships, Dynamics, Nutrition Issues and Probability Forecast Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many different types of non-alcoholic beverages (NAB) available in the United States today compared to a decade ago. Additionally, the needs of beverage consumers have evolved over the years centering attention on functionality and health dimensions. These trends in volume of consumption are a testament to the growth in the NAB industry. Our study pertains to ten NAB categories. We developed and employed a unique cross-sectional and time-series data set based on Nielsen Homescan data associated with household purchases of NAB from 1998 through 2003. First, we considered demographic and economic profiling of the consumption of NAB in a two-stage model. Race, region, age and presence of children and gender of household head were the most important factors affecting the choice and level of consumption. Second, we used expectation-prediction success tables, calibration, resolution, the Brier score and the Yates partition of the Brier score to measure the accuracy of predictions generated from qualitative choice models used to model the purchase decision of NAB by U.S. households. The Yates partition of the Brier score outperformed all other measures. Third, we modeled demand interrelationships, dynamics and habits of NAB consumption estimating own-price, cross-price and expenditure elasticities. The Quadratic Almost Ideal Demand System, the synthetic Barten model and the State Adjustment Model were used. Soft drinks were substitutes and fruit juices were complements for most of non-alcoholic beverages. Investigation of a proposed tax on sugar-sweetened beverages revealed the importance of centering attention not only to direct effects but also to indirect effects of taxes on beverage consumption. Finally, we investigated factors affecting nutritional contributions derived from consumption of NAB. Also, we ascertained the impact of the USDA year 2000 Dietary Guidelines for Americans associated with the consumption of NAB. Significant factors affecting caloric and nutrient intake from NAB were price, employment status of household head, region, race, presence of children and the gender of household food manager. Furthermore, we found that USDA nutrition intervention program was successful in reducing caloric and caffeine intake from consumption of NAB. The away-from-home intake of beverages and potential impacts of NAB advertising are not captured in our work. In future work, we plan to address these limitations.

Dharmasena, Kalu Arachchillage Senarath

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Reliability and Competitive Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Behavior in a Competitive Electricity Market, InternationalDemand Response in Electricity Markets, Hewlett FoundationGreen, R. (1999) The Electricity Contract Market in England

Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 EMCS EPACT ERCOT FCM FERC FRCC demand side managementEnergy Regulatory Commission (FERC). EPAct began the processin wholesale markets, which FERC Order 888 furthered by

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Leslie Mancebo (7234) Transportation Demand &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Leslie Mancebo (7234) Transportation Demand & Marketing Coordinator 1 FTE, 1 HC Administrative Vice Chancellor Transportation and Parking Services Clifford A. Contreras (0245) Director 30.10 FTE Alternative Transportation & Marketing Reconciliation Lourdes Lupercio (4723) Michelle McArdle (7512) Parking

Hammock, Bruce D.

159

Demand Uncertainty and Price Dispersion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Demand uncertainty has been recognized as one factor that may cause price dispersion in perfectly competitive markets with costly and perishable capacity. With the persistence (more)

Li, Suxi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Role of Enabling Technologies in Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides a study of the technologies that are crucial to the success of demand response programs. It takes a look at the historical development of demand response programs and analyzes how new technology is needed to enable demand response to make the transition from a small scale pilot operation to a mass market means of improving grid reliability. Additionally, the report discusses the key technologies needed to enable a large scale demand response effort and evaluates current efforts to develop and integrate these technologies. Finally, the report provides profiles of leading developers of these key technologies.

NONE

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Harnessing the power of demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Response Response Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group November 18, 2008 November 18, 2008 Daniel Gore Daniel Gore Office of Energy Market Regulation Office of Energy Market Regulation Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Presentation Contents Presentation Contents Statutory Requirements Statutory Requirements National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response General Discussion on Demand Response and Energy Outlook

163

Capacity Markets and Market Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The good news is that market stability can be achieved through a combination of longer-term contracts, auctions for far enough in the future to permit new entry, a capacity management system, and a demand curve. The bad news is that if and when stable capacity markets are designed, the markets may seem to be relatively close to where we started - with integrated resource planning. Market ideologues will find this anathema. (author)

Stauffer, Hoff

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

165

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

166

Review of current Southern California edison load management programs and proposal for a new market-driven, mass-market, demand-response program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geographically defined climate zones to distinguish thesystem. If homogenous climate zones could be created, a morethat by creating these climate zones SCE could take into

Weller, G.H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Review of current Southern California edison load management programs and proposal for a new market-driven, mass-market, demand-response program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Southern California Edison company. Table of Contentsfor Southern California Edison. LBNL-52408. Appendix A.Current Southern California Edison Load Management Programs

Weller, G.H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

DE-AC03-76SF00098. CONFIGURING LOAD AS A RESOURCE FOR COMPETITIVE ELECTRICITY MARKETS REVIEW OF DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS IN THE U.S. AND AROUND THE WORLD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The restructuring of regional and national electricity markets in the U.S. and around the world has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators to control and manage the load patterns of wholesale and retail end-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called Load Management, have re-emerged as an important element in the fine-tuning of newly restructured electricity markets. During the summers of 1999 and 2001 they played a vital role in stabilizing wholesale markets and providing a hedge

Grayson C. Heffner; Grayson C. Heffner

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

170

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

171

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S. RetailNoureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandanalysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. Energy

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services A Comparison of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services A Comparison of Opportunities and Challenges in the US Wholesale Markets Title Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services A...

175

Propane Demand by Sector - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In order to understand markets you also have to look at supply and demand. First, demand or who uses propane. For the most part, the major components of propane ...

176

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

networks_in_the_home_the_new_growth_market.htm [12] NationalHome Network Technologies and Automating Demand Responsethe University of California. Home Network Technologies and

McParland, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Distillate Demand Strong in December 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total distillate demand includes both diesel and heating oil. These are similar products. Physically, diesel can be used in the heating oil market, but low sulfur ...

178

Q:\asufinal_0107_demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

00 00 (AEO2000) Assumptions to the January 2000 With Projections to 2020 DOE/EIA-0554(2000) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution

179

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity MarketsEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response?7 3.1.Demand Response in Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electricity Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Markets Electricity Markets Researchers in the electricity markets area conduct technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S. electricity sector. Current research seeks to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to energy efficiency and demand response, renewable energy, electricity resource and transmission planning, electricity reliability and distributed generation resources. Research is conducted in the following areas: Energy efficiency research focused on portfolio planning and market assessment, design and implementation of a portfolio of energy efficiency programs that achieve various policy objectives, utility sector energy efficiency business models, options for administering energy efficiency

182

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

183

Coal News and Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Metallurgical coal markets became volatile when the thriving Chinese steel industry in late 2003 and 2004 made outsized demands for coking coal and met coke, ...

184

D:\assumptions_2001\assumptions2002\currentassump\demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

185

Signposts of Change in Evolving Natural Gas Markets: Key Factors Affecting Expected Future Supply and Demand for Natural Gas in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the North American natural gas industry has undergone a major restructuring as a result of the so-called shale revolution.This is an amazing situation when one considers the magnitude of the changes the shale revolution has spurred not only in domestic natural gas markets, but across many sectors of the overall economy.In essence, the shale revolution is a black swan event that many industry observers consider to have been a once in more than ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

186

Net Demand3 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract Number: DE-FE0004002 (Subcontract: S013-JTH-PPM4002 MOD 00) Summary The US DOE has identified a number of materials that are both used by clean energy technologies and are at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Several of these materials, especially the rare earth elements (REEs) yttrium, cerium, and lanthanum were identified by DOE as critical (USDOE 2010) and are crucial to the function and performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) 1. In addition, US DOE has issued a second Request For Information regarding uses of and markets for these critical materials (RFI;(USDOE 2011)). This report examines how critical materials demand for SOFC applications could impact markets for these materials and vice versa, addressing categories 1,2,5, and 6 in the RFI. Category 1 REE Content of SOFC Yttria (yttrium oxide) is the only critical material (as defined for the timeframe of interest for SOFC) used in SOFC 2. Yttrium is used as a dopant in the SOFCs core ceramic cells.. In addition, continuing developments in SOFC technology will likely further reduce REE demand for SOFC, providing credible scope for at least an additional 50 % reduction in REE use if desirable. Category 2 Supply Chain and Market Demand SOFC developers expect to purchase

J. Thijssen Llc

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Demand Trading: Measurement, Verification, and Settlement (MVS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With this report, EPRI's trilogy of publications on demand trading is complete. The first report (1006015), the "Demand Trading Toolkit," documented how to conduct demand trading based on price. The second report (1001635), "Demand Trading: Building Liquidity," focused on the problem of liquidity in the energy industry and developed the Demand Response Resource Bank concept for governing electricity markets based on reliability. The present report focuses on the emerging price/risk partnerships in electr...

2004-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

189

SREC Market Update NREL Webinar Brad Bowery | CEO | SRECTrade...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mar SREC Supply - Sellers Go To Market SREC Demand - Buyers Must Report Compliance SREC Market Pitfalls * No solar specific carve-out (CA, TX) * Regulated markets limited...

190

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience-- Technical Appendix: Market Descriptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Denmark. Elkraft 2005a. Demand Response in Practice, Elkraftand Developing Demand Response in the Energy Markets.Demand Management Delivery. Demand Response Workshop. Slide

Grayson Heffner, Charles Goldman, Kintner-Meyer, M; Kirby, Brendan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Export markets gain strength  

SciTech Connect

The prices for internally traded coal in the USA have reached record levels and the future market fundamentals look very good. This is mainly due to Asian demand. The article discusses recent markets for US coal and summarizes findings of a recent study by Hill & Associates entitled 'International coal trade - supply, demand and prices to 2025'. 1 ref., 2 tabs.

Fiscor, S.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

Rochlin, Cliff

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Using Forward Markets to Improve Electricity Market Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forward markets, both medium term and long term, complement the spot market for wholesale electricity. The forward markets reduce risk, mitigate market power, and coordinate new investment. In the medium term, a forward energy market lets suppliers and demanders lock in energy prices and quantities for one to three years. In the long term, a forward reliability market assures adequate resources are available when they are needed most. The forward markets reduce risk for both sides of the market, since they reduce the quantity of energy that trades at the more volatile spot price. Spot market power is mitigated by putting suppliers and demanders in a more balanced position at the time of the spot market. The markets also reduce transaction costs and improve liquidity and transparency. Recent innovations to the Colombia market illustrate the basic elements of the forward markets and their beneficial role. 1

Lawrence M. Ausubel; Peter Cramton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

195

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

196

Dividends with Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

To assist facility managers in assessing whether and to what extent they should participate in demand response programs offered by ISOs, we introduce a systematic process by which a curtailment supply curve can be developed that integrates costs and other program provisions and features. This curtailment supply curve functions as bid curve, which allows the facility manager to incrementally offer load to the market under terms and conditions acceptable to the customer. We applied this load curtailment assessment process to a stylized example of an office building, using programs offered by NYISO to provide detail and realism.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Goldman, Charles; Sezgen, O.; Pratt, D.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Electric Power Market Simulations Using Individuals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439, USA guenter@anl.gov #12;2 Market Simulations Allow Us to Explore Market Market Demand agent ­ Consume electricity ­ Curtail demand when electricity becomes very expensive There Are Weather Forecast Errors Demand Forecasts Are Imperfect #12;6 Argonne Agents Submit Bid Forms to the ISO

Kemner, Ken

198

Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

199

Competition and Marketing on the Swedish Biofuel Markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bioenergy covers about 28% of Swedens energy demand and the percentage is steady increasing. The pellets and the bioethanol Swedish markets are the oldest and (more)

Folea, Ion; Nurul, Huda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Driving Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

even know they have. This section explains how you can use effective marketing to drive demand for energy upgrades in your community. Following the lead of many Better Buildings...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Demand Side Bidding. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

Spahn, Andrew

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity, Wiley-IEEE Press. CEC (in Major Drivers in U.S. Electricity Markets, NREL/CP-620-and fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Market review: Market values summary July market review/current market data  

SciTech Connect

A summary of financial data for the uranium spot market is provided. Recent transactions are tabulated, including uranium sales, natural uranium loans, conversion sales, and enrichment sales. A market values summary and long-term price indicators are also provided. The July 1996 market review data includes summaries of near-term uranium sales, near-term supply/demand, NUEXCO values, USEC prices, and calculated worth of enriched uranium. Active projects in uranium, conversion, and separative work supply and demand are listed. International market values are tabulated for 22 selected currencies.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

demand response - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA Survey Forms Facebook Twitter ... demand response June 14, 2012 California's electric power market faces challenges heading into summer. March 24, ...

205

Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products Title Field Testing of Automated...

206

Demand for Electric Vehicles in Hybrid Households: An Exploratory Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stated they wouldlikely add an electric and vehicle to theirhouseholdsand the demand electric vehicles", Transportation1983) "A Critical Reviewof Electric Vehicle MarketStudies",

Kurani, Kenneth S.; Turrentine, Tom; Sperling, Daniel

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Public transportation is not going to work : non-work travel markets for the future of mass transit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For public transportation agencies to attract new riders in an automobile-dominated environment, niche markets must be targeted. The downtown journey to work is already recognized as a successful niche for transit. This ...

Cohen, Alexander Nobler, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Demand Pricing & Resource Allocation in Market- based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... While pricing operates on a comparatively slow ... and tracking the optimal price, admission control ... the time lag in varying and disseminating prices. ...

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

209

World Petroleum Supply/Demand Forecast - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... surplus supply over demand for spring and summer quarters compared with some other forecasters such as Oil Market Intelligence, ...

210

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

211

Coal markets squeeze producers  

SciTech Connect

Supply/demand fundamentals seem poised to keep prices of competing fossil fuels high, which could cushion coal prices, but increased mining and transportation costs may squeeze producer profits. Are markets ready for more volatility?

Ryan, M.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Task 1: Market Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Report - 12501 3 ABSTRACT Building upon the 1999 AD Little Study, an expanded market analysis was performed by GE Power Systems in 2001 to quantify the potential demand...

213

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

about natural gas supply and demand. As a result, someCalibrating natural gas supply and demand conditions withelectricity and natural gas markets, demand-side management

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Scoping Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Electricity Markets Peter Cappers, Jason MacDonald, Charles Goldman April 2013 Report Summary 1 Energy Analysis Department  Electricity Markets and Policy Group Presentation Overview  Objectives and Approach  Wholesale and Retail Market Environments  Market and Policy Barrier Typology  Prototypical Regional Barrier Assessment 2 Energy Analysis Department  Electricity Markets and Policy Group A Role for Demand Response to Provide Ancillary Services  Increasing penetration of renewable energy generation in U.S. electricity markets means that bulk power system operators will need to manage the variable and uncertain nature of many renewable resources

215

H. R. 4604: a bill to promote competition in the natural gas market, to ensure open access to transportation service, to encourage production of natural gas, to provide natural gas consumers with adequate supplies at reasonable prices, to eliminate demand restraints, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 16, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Policy Act Amendments of 1986 promotes competition in the natural gas market. Title I ensures open access to transportation service by requiring that interstate pipelines not discriminate in providing transportation services. Title II encourages production of natural gas by removing wellhead price controls and repealing jurisdiction over first sales. Title III provides natural gas consumers with adequate supplies at reasonable prices and eliminates demand restraints. The bill was referred to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Computing the Electricity Market Equilibrium: Uses of market equilibrium models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. On the demand side, considerable demand is simply not exposed to wholesale price variation, which greatly complicates the spec- ification of a demand model. Furthermore, the specification of electricity markets Engineer- ing, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA (email: baldick

Baldick, Ross

217

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience-- Technical Appendix: Market Descriptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response in the Energy Markets. Copenhagen, 27 May.Demand Response in the Energy Markets Fingrid Oyj 2005a.Response in the Energy Markets: Framework and Infrastructure

Grayson Heffner, Charles Goldman, Kintner-Meyer, M; Kirby, Brendan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Principle-agent Incentives, Excess Caution, and Market Inefficiency: Evidence from Utility Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distort forward natural gas markets when demand is expecteda model of supply and demand in natural gas markets in whichof Mexico. The demand centers for natural gas, however, are

Borenstein, Severin; Busse, Meghan; Kellog, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Principal-agent incentives, excess caution, and market inefficiency: Evidence from utility regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distort forward natural gas markets when demand is expecteda model of supply and demand in natural gas markets in whichof Mexico. The demand centers for natural gas, however, are

Borenstein, Severin; Busse, Meghan; KELLOGG, RYAN M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A Proposed Framework for a Demand Response Product Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response is now widely recognized as an essential feature of well-functioning wholesale and retail electricity markets. Some utilities have had dynamic pricing plans (a form of demand response) underway for many years. All major wholesale electricity markets in the United States have demand response programs today. Despite this experience, it is difficult to learn from the programs that have been implemented due to a lack of a consistent framework for comparing their major design features (includi...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Frost & Sullivan's Study on Potential Market for Carbon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 100 CNT Demand (Tons) Growth Rate ... segment over the forecast period (through 2015). ... Segment Market Analysis and Forecasts - Nanotechnology ...

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

222

Demand Response - Policy: More Information | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response - Policy: More Information Demand Response - Policy: More Information Demand Response - Policy: More Information OE's commitment to ensuring non-wires options to modernize the nation's electricity delivery system includes ongoing support of a number of national and regional activities in support of demand response. The New England Demand Response Initiative (NEDRI), OE's initial endeavor to assist states with non-wire solutions, was created to develop a comprehensive, coordinated set of demand response programs for the New England regional power markets. NEDRI's goal was to outline workable market rules, public policies, and regulatory criteria to incorporate customer-based demand response resources into New England's electricity markets and power systems. NEDRI promoted best practices and coordinated

223

Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a Developing Country: Insights from Simulating a Market in Maharashtra State, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large Quantities of Electricity Demand for AgriculturalLarge Size of the Market Electricity demand for agriculturalconstraints, and electricity demand in MH state to simulate

Phadke, Amol

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Electricity Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Market Module Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 101 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2013, DOE/EIA-M068(2013). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

225

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

226

Demand Response Spinning Reserve  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Title Demand Response Spinning Reserve Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2007 Authors Eto, Joseph H., Janine Nelson-Hoffman, Carlos...

227

Transportation Demand This  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates...

228

Addressing Energy Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Bo Shen, Girish Ghatikar, Chun Chun Ni, and Junqiao Dudley Environmental Energy...

229

Market potential for electrolytic hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

By the year 2000, the potential market for advanced-technology electrolytic hydrogen among specialty users is projected to be about half of what the merchant hydrogen market would be in the absence of electrolytic hydrogen. This potential market, representing an annual demand of about 16 billion SCF of hydrogen, will develop from market penetrations of electrolyzers assumed to begin in the early 1980s. 6 refs.

Fein, E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Forthcoming, Utilities Policy, 2010. Using Forward Markets to Improve Electricity Market Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forward markets, both medium term and long term, complement the spot market for wholesale electricity. The forward markets reduce risk, mitigate market power, and coordinate new investment. In the medium term, a forward energy market lets suppliers and demanders lock in energy prices and quantities for one to three years. In the long term, a forward reliability market assures adequate resources are available when they are needed most. The forward markets reduce risk for both sides of the market, since they reduce the quantity of energy that trades at the more volatile spot price. Spot market power is mitigated by putting suppliers and demanders in a more balanced position at the time of the spot market. The markets also reduce transaction costs and improve liquidity and transparency. Recent innovations to the Colombia market illustrate the basic elements of the forward markets and their beneficial role. 1

Lawrence M. Ausubel; Peter Cramton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and user community data needs. The re- quirements include petroleum product price, market distribution, demand (or sales), and product supply data, which are needed for a...

232

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers...

233

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Energy Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data Figure 55 From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to 293 million Btu in 2035, as higher efficiency standards for vehicles and

235

Demand response compensation, net Benefits and cost allocation: comments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FERC's Supplemental Notice of Public Rulemaking addresses the question of proper compensation for demand response in organized wholesale electricity markets. Assuming that the Commission would proceed with the proposal ''to require tariff provisions allowing demand response resources to participate in wholesale energy markets by reducing consumption of electricity from expected levels in response to price signals, to pay those demand response resources, in all hours, the market price of energy for such reductions,'' the Commission posed questions about applying a net benefits test and rules for cost allocation. This article summarizes critical points and poses implications for the issues of net benefit tests and cost allocation. (author)

Hogan, William W.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Electricity Market Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the Electricity Market Module as it was used for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013. The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Electricity Load and Demand (ELD) Submodule.

Jeff Jones

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

237

Letters: Energy demand prediction using GMDH networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry is in transition as it moves towards a competitive and deregulated environment. In this emerging market, traditional electric utilities as well as energy traders, power pools and independent system operators (ISOs) need the ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, Energy demand, Forecasting, Group method of data handling (GMDH) networks, Self-organizing networks

Dipti Srinivasan

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

policy uncertainty in concert with continued low natural gasnatural gas prices, modest electricity demand growth, and existing state policiespolicy towards wind energy after 2012, market expectations for continued low natural gas

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Demand Impacted by Weather  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When you look at demand, its also interesting to note the weather. The weather has a big impact on the demand of heating fuels, if its cold, consumers will use ...

240

Demand-side participation in the Australian National Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand-side participation in the Australian National Electricity Market Speaker(s): Hugh Outhred Date: March 4, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

017F.PDF KEMA, Inc. 2011. PJM Empirical Analysis of DemandMethods. Prepared for the PJM Markets Implementation~/media/markets-ops/dsr/pjm-analysis-of-dr-baseline-methods-

Bode, Josh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Market power in electricity markets: Beyond concentration measures  

SciTech Connect

The wave of electricity market restructuring both within the US and abroad has brought the issue of horizontal market power to the forefront of energy policy. Traditionally, estimation and prediction of market power has relied heavily on concentration measures. In this paper, the authors discuss the weaknesses of concentration measures as a viable measure of market power in the electricity industry, and they propose an alternative method based on market simulations that take advantage of existing plant level data. The authors discuss results from previous studies they have performed, and present new results that allow for the detection of threshold demand levels where market power is likely to be a problem. In addition, the authors analyze the impact of that recent divestitures in the California electricity market will have on estimated market power. They close with a discussion of the policy implications of the results.

Borenstein, S.; Bushnell, J.; Knittel, C.R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A Multi-agent Paradigm for the Inter-domain Demand Allocation Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market liberalisation and increasing demands for the allocation of services which span several networks are pushing every network operator to evolve the way of interacting with peer operators. The Inter-domain Demand Allocation (IDA) process is a very ...

Monique Calisti; Boi Faltings

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: How do we make the most...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

benefitting the grid 3 Supply and Demand Tell the (short run) Basic Story Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets - US DOE Feb 2006 4 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000...

245

Comparing Price Forecast Accuracy of Natural Gas Models and Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information about natural gas supply and demand. As amarket Calibrating natural gas supply and demand conditionsnation-wide natural gas market, equalizing supply with

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Reliability implications of price responsive demand : a study of New England's power system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With restructuring of the traditional, vertically integrated electricity industry come new opportunities for electricity demand to actively participate in electricity markets. Traditional definitions of power system ...

Whitaker, Andrew C. (Andrew Craig)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1994) Demand for Electric Vehicles in Hybrid Households: A nand the Household Electric Vehicle Market: A Constraintsthe mar- ket for electric vehicles in California. Presented

Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

UV Curable Coatings -- Marketing Kit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultra violet (UV) curable coatings are being successfully applied to electric motors, metal shafts, cell phones, printing, plastic packaging, and wood laminates. Demand is expected to expand to an even greater number of end products as issues related to environmental well-being, finish quality, cost reductions, and manufacturing efficiencies drive this market. This UV Curable Coatings-Marketing Kit is designed to help utility sales and marketing personnel present UV curable coating opportunities to custo...

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

249

Global Natural Gas Market Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the characteristics of global gas markets. These markets have entered a period of supplier strength and high prices as global demand growth has outpaced supply growth. The report systematically evaluates developments in global liquefaction andfor the principal consuming nationsin domestic production, market growth, pipelines, and regasification. While containing a great deal of detail, the report probes myriad announcements of commercial activities to help interpret the evolving comp...

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

250

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Publication Type...

251

World uranium supply and demand: Buyer`s banquet?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This articule reviews the present (end of 1993) world-wide uranium market and attempts to focus on the 1994-2004 market. Market forces discussed include: (1) reactor uranium demand, (2) natural uranium production (3) utility inventory drawdown, (4) reprocessing products, (5) the Russian stockpile, (6) loans, and (7) inventories of HEU. The following conclusions were reached: (1) reactor demand will be satisfied during this period, (2) Russia could be the single most important influence on the world uranium market, (3) there would be no need for new mine development is the Russian material is allowed into the market, and (4) the market will be in oversupply, so price increases will be limited.

NONE

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Optimal Inventory Policies when Purchase Price and Demand Are Stochastic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the problem of a firm that faces a stochastic (Poisson) demand and must replenish from a market in which prices fluctuate, such as a commodity market. We describe the price evolution as a continuous stochastic process and we ... Keywords: production/inventory

Peter Berling; Victor Martnez-de-Albniz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Electrical Demand Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below the previous year's level and yielded $150,000 annual savings. These measures include rescheduling of selected operations and demand limiting techniques such as fuel switching to alternate power sources during periods of high peak demand. For example, by rescheduling the startup of five heat treat annealing ovens to second shift, 950 kW of load was shifted off peak. Also, retired, non-productive steam turbine chillers and a diesel air compressor have been effectively operated to displaced 1330 kW during peak periods each day. Installed metering devices have enabled the recognition of critical demand periods. The paper concludes with a brief look at future plans and long range objectives of the Demand Management Plan.

Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows...

255

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 95 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M068(2011). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

256

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page inTenTionally lefT blank 91 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M068(2012). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

257

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

services provided to the energy markets, Order 745 advancesin the wholesale energy market (both day-ahead and real-the capacity market is. The energy market does not feature

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Demand Dispatch-Intelligent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and energy efficiency throughout the value chain resulting in the most economical price for electricity. Having adequate quantities and capacities of demand resources is a...

259

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

U.S. Propane Demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand is higher in 1999 due to higher petrochemical demand and a strong economy. We are also seeing strong demand in the first quarter of 2000; however, ...

262

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xxxv Option Value of Electricity Demand Response, Osmanelasticity in aggregate electricity demand. With these newii) reduction in electricity demand during peak periods (

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Growing demand for gas spawns pipeline projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that burgeoning demand for gas is fueling pipeline construction in Eastern and Western hemispheres. In the East, the North Sea is the focal point for activity. And in the West, the U.S. gas market is the power behind construction. As predictions of U.S. gas demand increase, Canadian pipeliners adjust expansion plans to be ready to capture greater shares of markets. Canada's TransCanada Pipelines Ltd. is racing to step up its share of the U.S. market. TransCanada's Western Gas Marketing Ltd. sold 242.3 bcf of gas in the 3 months ended last June 30, a 9.8% increase from last year. TransCanada reported lower volumes sold into Canadian markets, while exports into the U.S. continued to rise. Gas Research Institute (GRI) projects Canadian gas exports to the U.S. by 2000 will reach 2 tcf/year and LNG exports 800 bcf/year. U.S. gas supplies could increase to 23.9 tcf/year by 2010, mostly from Lower 48 production. GRI says supplies from Canada will make up the balance. In the past 2 years, TransCanada has spent about $1 billion expanding its interprovincial main line system.

Not Available

1991-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

264

Market Design Test Environments  

SciTech Connect

Power industry restructuring continues to evolve at multiple levels of system operations. At the bulk electricity level, several organizations charged with regional system operation are implementing versions of a Wholesale Power Market Platform (WPMP) in response to U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission initiatives. Recently the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and several regional initiatives have been pressing the integration of demand response as a resource for system operations. These policy and regulatory pressures are driving the exploration of new market designs at the wholesale and retail levels. The complex interplay among structural conditions, market protocols, and learning behaviors in relation to short-term and longer-term market performance demand a flexible computational environment where designs can be tested and sensitivities to power system and market rule changes can be explored. This paper presents the use of agent-based computational methods in the study of electricity markets at the wholesale and retail levels, and distinctions in problem formulation between these levels.

Widergren, Steven E.; Sun, Junjie; Tesfatsion, Leigh

2006-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

265

Propane Market Model documentation report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Propane Market Model (PMM), describe its basic approach, and to provide details on model functions. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the general public. Documentation of the model is in accordance with EIA`s legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. The PMM performs a short-term (6- to 9-months) forecast of demand and price for consumer-grad propane in the national US market; it also calculates the end-of-month stock level during the term of the forecast. Another part of the model allows for short-term demand forecasts for certain individual Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) districts. The model is used to analyze market behavior assumptions or shocks and to determine the effect on market price, demand, and stock level.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Look Ahead at Demand Response in New England  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the demand response programs developed and in operation in New England, and the revised designs for participation in the forward capacity market. This description will include how energy efficiency, demand-side resources, and distributed generation are eligible to participate in this new forward capacity market. The paper will also discuss various methods that can be used to configure and communicate with demand response resources and important concerns in specifying interfaces that accommodate multiple technologies and allow technology choice and evolution.

Burke, Robert B.; Henderson, Michael I.; Widergren, Steven E.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Photovoltaic markets: a review and assessment  

SciTech Connect

Available information on potential markets for photovoltaic power systems is reviewed. A set of key parameters which affect the rate of photovoltaic market penetration is used to develop a simple anaytical structure that characterizes potential markets. Completed studies on photovoltaic markets were reviewed to describe potential markets using this structure. Selected markets were then examined in greater detail in a market demand workshop attended by potential purchasers in these markets. Available information, while sufficient to provide a rudimentary indication of how markets might develop, does not allow the construction of any single market scenario in which a high level of confidence can be placed. Major uncertainties in the available information on photovoltaic markets are highlighted.

Posner, D. M.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Auction Basics for Wholesale Power Markets:Auction Basics for Wholesale Power Markets: Objectives and Pricing RulesObjectives and Pricing Rules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" "maximum willingness to pay" is also called a "(buyer) reservation value." #12;8 Buyer 2 Demand Bid: P (Inverse) Demand Function:Total System (Inverse) Demand Function: P=D(Q)P=D(Q) P 0 90 10 30 50 70 Maximum OutlinePresentation Outline Introduction Double auction basics for power markets Supply, demand, & market

Tesfatsion, Leigh

269

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT PANEL INITIAL forecast, end-use demand modeling, econometric modeling, hybrid demand modeling, energyMahon, Carl Linvill 2012. Demand Forecast Expert Panel Initial Assessment. California Energy

270

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internal conditions. Maximum Demand Saving Intensity [W/ft2]automated electric demand sheds. The maximum electric shed

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Liquid Fuels Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquid Fuels Market Module Liquid Fuels Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 145 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Liquid Fuels Market Module The NEMS Liquid Fuels Market Module (LFMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, esters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the LFMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The LFMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. petroleum refining

272

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California Title Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-3636e Year of Publication 2010 Authors Yin, Rongxin, Sila Kiliccote, Mary Ann Piette, and Kristen Parrish Conference Name 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, demand shifting (pre-cooling), DRQAT Abstract This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30% using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

273

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

274

World Crude Production Not Keeping Pace with Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The crude market is the major factor behind today’s low stocks. This graph shows the balance between world production and demand for petroleum. Normally, production exceeds demand in the summer, building stocks, and is less than demand in the winter months, drawing the stocks back down (dark blue areas). However, production exceeded demand through most of 1997 and 1998, building world stocks to very high levels and driving prices down. But the situation reversed in 1999. Recently, there has been more petroleum demand than supply, requiring the use of stocks to meet petroleum needs. Following the extremely low crude oil prices at the beginning of 1999, OPEC agreed to remove about 6% of world production from the market in order to work off excess inventories and bring prices back up.

275

Agent-based coordination techniques for matching supply and demand in energy networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a lot of effort directed toward realizing the power network of the future. The future power network is expected to depend on a large number of renewable energy resources connected directly to the low and medium voltage power network. Demand ... Keywords: Supply and demand matching, market and non-market algorithms, multi-agent systems

Rashad Badawy; Benjamin Hirsch; Sahin Albayrak

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

277

Demand Response Database & Demo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Database & Demo Speaker(s): Mike Graveley William M. Smith Date: June 7, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Mary Ann Piette Infotility...

278

Tankless Demand Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as needed and without the use of a storage tank. They...

279

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

280

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

283

Transportation Demand This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Demand Transportation Demand This page inTenTionally lefT blank 75 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight

284

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Title Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2010 Authors Goldman, Charles A., Michael Reid, Roger Levy, and Alison Silverstein Pagination 74 Date Published 01/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025.1 Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries-which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity-is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that "the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW" by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

285

FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, October 29,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, October 29, 2010 FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, October 29, 2010 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) presentation on demand response as power system resources before the Electicity Advisory Committee, October 29, 2010 Demand Response as Power System Resources More Documents & Publications A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Cost-Effectiveness Working Group Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

286

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes assessments and test results of four end-use technologies, representing products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) standard that was introduced to the public in 2008 and currently used in two ...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

287

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, which is an update to EPRI Report 1016082, includes assessments and test results of four end-use vendor technologies. These technologies represent products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) Communicat...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

EIA - AEO2010 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Demand Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Natural Gas Demand Figure 68. Regional growth in nonhydroelectric renewable electricity capacity including end-use capacity, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 69. Annual average lower 48 wellhead and Henry Hub spot market prices for natural gas, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 70. Ratio of low-sulfur light crude oil price to Henry Hub natural gas price on an energy equivalent basis, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 71. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three technology cases, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 72. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three oil price cases, 1990-2035

289

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is on the rise, natural gas demand is expected to grow 2.4%has resulted in higher natural gas demand and volatility andelectricity and natural gas markets, demand-side management

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook. Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast . Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance

291

An Analysis of Price Volatility in Natural Gas Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Market prices respond to shifts in supply and demand, and the degree of price response relates to the price elasticity of both. Natural gas prices have been particularly

292

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... March 2003 Price Spike August 2003 Price Spike Quarterly World Oil Demand Growth from Previous Year Overview of Market Fundamentals Tight balance in global ...

293

Biofuel policy and stock price in imperfectly competitive markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The increase in demand for corn as a biofuel feedstock has had a significant impact on the agricultural markets in the United States. These include (more)

Tepe, Fatma Sine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is determined by the market energy price offered by themay be paid the spot market energy price. (e.g. PJM SRM, UKor the wholesale market price for energy. By codifying the

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Diagnosing Market Power in California's Deregulated Wholesale Electricity Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective competition in wholesale electricity markets is a necessary feature of a successful electricity supply industry restructuring. We examine the degree of competition in the California wholesale electricity market during the period June 1998 to September 1999 by comparing the market prices with estimates of the prices that would have resulted if owners of instate fossil fuel generating facilities behaved as price takers. We find that there were significant departures from competitive pricing and that these departures are most pronounced during the highest demand periods, which tend to occur during the months of July through September. Through most of the winter and spring of 1999 there was little evidence of the exercise of market power. We find a significantly lower amount of market power exercised during summer 1999 than for the same months in summer 1998. Overall, the exercise of market power raised the cost of power purchases by about 16% above the competitive level. Following the p...

Severin Borenstein; Severin Borenstein; James Bushnell; James Bushnell; Frank Wolak; Frank Wolak

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

California Independent System Operator demand response & proxy demand resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response programs are designed to allow end use customers to contribute to energy load reduction individually or through a demand response provider. One form of demand response can occur when an end use customer reduces their electrical usage ...

John Goodin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time. 4 Reducing this peak demand through DR programs meansthat a 5% reduction in peak demand would have resulted insame 5% reduction in the peak demand of the US as a whole.

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Motor Gasoline Market Model documentation report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Motor Gasoline Market Model (MGMM), describe its basic approach and to provide detail on model functions. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the general public. The MGMM performs a short-term (6- to 9-month) forecast of demand and price for motor gasoline in the US market; it also calculates end of month stock levels. The model is used to analyze certain market behavior assumptions or shocks and to determine the effect on market price, demand and stock level.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

produce a short-term energy market price reduction of $8- $and incentive payments), energy market price benefits to allweather years the energy market price benefits and the ICAP

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

302

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

303

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

304

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: February 4, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. The Demand Response Quick Assessment Tools developed at LBNL will be demonstrated. The tool is built on EnergyPlus simulation and is able to evaluate and compare different DR strategies, such as global temperature reset, chiller cycling, supply air temperature reset, etc. A separate EnergyPlus plotting tool will also be demonstrated during this seminar. Users can use the tool to test EnergyPlus models, conduct parametric analysis, or compare multiple EnergyPlus simulation

305

Abstract --Demand Response (DR) programs are not a new concept; moreover, the key technologies for their implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. III. DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS UNDER SMARTGRID PARADIGM AND MARKET INTEGRATION. The demand response as SmartGrid). While many of the DR programs under SmartGrid are directed to the distribution sector, DR

Dixon, Juan

306

Demand responsive public transportation using wireless technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution has been the bane of society for which we still have not got a satisfying solution. The air pollution due to automobiles constitutes around 60--90% of the total air pollution in the urban area. To curtail this, the mass transportation, ... Keywords: Djiktra's algorithm, on-demand public transportation, routing algorithms, wireless client-server backbone

S. Prashanth; Sp Geetha; Ga Shanmugha Sundaram

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Retail Market Based Pricing: Retail Market Based Pricing - Three Cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Customers are not provided with incentives for efficient conservation and substitution of electricity away from peak periods if they do not face prices that reflect the real-time cost of purchasing wholesale electricity that is experienced by their retail energy provider. Recent events in California's restructured electricity market underscore the importance of developing products and structures that enable demand response to changes in prices in these markets. This report assembles three studies of cust...

2001-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

308

Demand Response In California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency & Energy Efficiency & Demand Response Programs Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner California Public Utilities Commission California Public Utilities Commission FUPWG 2006 Fall Meeting November 2, 2006 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 1 Highest Priority Resource Energy Efficiency is California's highest priority resource to: Meet energy needs in a low cost manner Aggressively reduce GHG emissions November 2, 2006 2 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 3 http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUBLISHED/REPORT/51604.htm Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 4 Energy Action Plan II Loading order continued "Pursue all cost-effective energy efficiency, first." Strong demand response and advanced metering

309

Automated Demand Response Today  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) has progressed over recent years beyond manual and semi-automated DR to include growing implementation and experience with fully automated demand response (AutoDR). AutoDR has been shown to be of great value over manual and semi-automated DR because it reduces the need for human interactions and decisions, and it increases the speed and reliability of the response. AutoDR, in turn, has evolved into the specification known as OpenADR v1.0 (California Energy Commission, PIER Program, C...

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

310

Travel Demand Modeling  

SciTech Connect

This chapter describes the principal types of both passenger and freight demand models in use today, providing a brief history of model development supported by references to a number of popular texts on the subject, and directing the reader to papers covering some of the more recent technical developments in the area. Over the past half century a variety of methods have been used to estimate and forecast travel demands, drawing concepts from economic/utility maximization theory, transportation system optimization and spatial interaction theory, using and often combining solution techniques as varied as Box-Jenkins methods, non-linear multivariate regression, non-linear mathematical programming, and agent-based microsimulation.

Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Garrow, Dr. Laurie [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

United States lubricant demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines United States Lubricant Demand for Automotive and Industrial Lubricants by year from 1978 to 1992 and 1997. Projected total United States Lubricant Demand for 1988 is 2,725 million (or MM) gallons. Automotive oils are expected to account for 1,469MM gallons or (53.9%), greases 59MM gallons (or 2.2%), and Industrial oils will account for the remaining 1,197MM gallons (or 43.9%) in 1988. This proportional relationship between Automotive and Industrial is projected to remain relatively constant until 1992 and out to 1997. Projections for individual years between 1978 to 1992 and 1997 are summarized.

Solomon, L.K.; Pruitt, P.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Distillate Market Model documentation report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Distillate Market Model (DMM), describe its basic approach, and to provide details on model functions. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the general public. Documentation of the model is in accordance with EIA`s legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. The DMM performs a short-term (6- to 9-month) forecast of demand and retail price for distillate fuel oil in the national US market; it also calculates the end-of-month stock level during the term of the forecast. The model is used to analyze certain market behavior assumptions or shocks and to determine the effect on retail market price, demand, and stock level.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A. G. A. six-month gas demand forecast July-December, 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of the total gas demand for 1984 (including pipeline fuel) range from 18,226 to 19,557 trillion (TBtu). The second half of the year shows a slower recovery rate as economic recovery moderates. The forecast show both actual and projected demand by month, and compares it with 1983 demand and by market sector. 6 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Assessment of the impacts of demand curtailments in the DAMs: issues in and proposed modifications of FERC Order No. 745.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), in its initiative to incentivize demand response resources (DRRs) to participate in the day-ahead markets (DAMs), enacted Order No. (more)

Castillo, Isaac

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Transmaterialization: technology and materials demand cycles  

SciTech Connect

Recently concern has risen worldwide regarding the issue of declining materials demand which has been termed dematerialization. A summary of the issues involved appears in the proceedings of the recent conference on metals demand published in Materials and Society (1986). Dematerialization refers to the constant decline in use of materials as a percentage of total production. Dematerialization implies a structural change in an economy, indicating a reduced demand for materials and, therefore, a decline in overall industrial growth. This paper proposes that, instead of dematerialization in the US material markets, the demand change that has been occurring can be more aptly described as transmaterialization. Transmaterialization implies a recurring industrial transformation in the way that economic societies use materials, a process that has occurred regularly or cyclically throughout history. Instead of a once and for all structural change as implied by dematerialization, transmaterialization suggests that minerals demand experiences phases in which old, lower-quality materials linked to mature industries undergo replacement periodically by higher-quality or technologically-more-appropriate materials. The latter, as of recent, tend to be lighter materials with more robust technical properties than those being replaced.

Waddell, L.M.; Labys, W.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

On Demand Guarantees in Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??On Demand Guarantees in Iran This thesis examines on demand guarantees in Iran concentrating on bid bonds and performance guarantees. The main guarantee types and (more)

Ahvenainen, Laura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Transportation Demand Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Demand Management Plan FALL 2009 #12;T r a n s p o r t a t i o n D e m a n d M a n the transportation impacts the expanded enrollment will have. Purpose and Goal The primary goal of the TDM plan is to ensure that adequate measures are undertaken and maintained to minimize the transportation impacts

319

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: To understand the inventory situation, we must look the balance between demand and supply that drives inventories up or down. First consider demand. Most of the remaining charts deal with total distillate demand. Total distillate demand includes both diesel and heating oil. These are similar products physically, and prior to the low sulfur requirements for on-road diesel fuel, were used interchangeably. But even today, low sulfur diesel can be used in the heating oil market, but low sulfur requirements keep heating oil from being used in the on-road transportation sector. The seasonal increases and decreases in stocks stem from the seasonal demand in heating oil shown as the bottom red line. Heating oil demand increases by more than 50 percent from its low point to its high

323

Promoting Renewable Energy in a Market Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Promoting Renewable Energy in a Market Environment: A Community-Based Approach for Aggregating Green Demand Rudd Mayer Eric Blank Randy Udall John Nielsen Land and Water Fund of...

324

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

325

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

326

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2009 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 12. Marketed Energy Use by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

327

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2008 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 9. World Marketed EnergyConsumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

328

Predicting market power in wholesale electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in California and more recently in the EU Sector Inquiry. The paper investigates its value in identifying the ability of ?rms to raise prices in an electricity market with contracts and capacity constraints and ?nd that it is most useful for the case of a single... positive number. Estimates for the value of the short-run demand elasticity for electricity are quite low, and over periods of months possibly below 0:25 for the ?domestic and other industry? sector, judging by the response to extraordinarily sharp price...

Newbery, David

329

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region.

330

Electric demand growth: An uncertain future for uranium  

SciTech Connect

Broadly conceived, the demand for electricity depends upon three sets of variables: (i) the growths of the many individual demands for energy services; (ii) the competitiveness of electrically driven technologies in meeting these demands; and (iii) the energy-conversion efficiencies of installed electrical technologies. The first set of variables establishes the size of the potential market; the second, the market penetration of electrical equipment; and the third, the quantity of electricity required to operate the equipment. All forecasts of electricity consumption ultimately depend upon inferred or assumed relationships to describe the future behavior of these variables. In this paper, the authors review recent forecasts of electricity demand growth. They also examine, in a qualitative way, some of the causes for the systematic, downward revisions of these forecasts over recent years. Graphical presentations of data are extensively used in the discussions. In an important sense, forecasting, whatever the number of variables, remains a matter of ''curve fitting.''

Asbury, J.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Floorspace Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Service Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Equipment Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Consumption Submodule The commercial demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar thermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and distillate oil, the CDM is a "structural" model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the commercial floorspace stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. For the remaining five marketed "minor fuels," simple econometric projections are made. The commercial sector encompasses business establishments that are not

332

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 7: Determine Loan Marketing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7: 7: Determine Loan Marketing Channels to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 7: Determine Loan Marketing Channels on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 7: Determine Loan Marketing Channels on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 7: Determine Loan Marketing Channels on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 7: Determine Loan Marketing Channels on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 7: Determine Loan Marketing Channels on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 7: Determine Loan Marketing Channels on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market Define Finance Program Objectives

333

Market Transformation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its market transformation subprogram.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Paying for demand-side response at the wholesale level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent FERC Notice of Public Rulemaking regarding the payment to demand-side resources in wholesale markets has engendered a great deal of comments including FERC's obligation to ensure just and reasonable rates in the wholesale market and criteria for what FERC should do (on grounds of economic efficiency) without any real focus on what that commitment would really mean if FERC actually pursued it. (author)

Falk, Jonathan

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report to the California Energy Demand 2006-2016 Staff Energy Demand Forecast Report STAFFREPORT June 2005 CEC-400 .......................................................................................................................................1-1 ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING AT THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION: AN OVERVIEW

336

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required of any forecast of electricity demand and developing ways to reduce the risk of planning errors that could arise from this and other uncertainties in the planning process. Electricity demand is forecast

337

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

338

On Demand Paging Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The power consumption of the network interface plays a major role in determining the total operating lifetime of wireless handheld devices. On demand paging has been proposed earlier to reduce power consumption in cellular networks. In this scheme, a low power secondary radio is used to wake up the higher power radio, allowing the latter to sleep or remain off for longer periods of time. In this paper we present use of Bluetooth radios to serve as a paging channel for the 802.11 wireless LAN. We have implemented an on-demand paging scheme on a WLAN consisting of iPAQ PDAs equipped with Bluetooth radios and Cisco Aironet wireless networking cards. Our results show power saving ranging from 19% to 46% over the present 802.11b standard operating modes with negligible impact on performance.

Bluetooth Radios On; Yuvraj Agarwal; Rajesh K. Gupta

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Electricity markets in the western United States  

SciTech Connect

This article introduces the use of rigorous econometric tools to understand the geographic scope of the market for generation services. These tools are applied to data from the current wholesale electricity market in the western United States. The behavior of the current wholesale electricity market and the methods used to assess the expanse of the geographic market in the current wholesale electricity market can go a long way toward informing the discussion of pricing behavior and performance in a restructured electricity industry. First, the current wholesale electricity market is already effectively unregulated and suffers from the same technical complexities that face a retail electricity market. Consequently, understanding the supply and demand conditions that cause the extent of the geographic market for generation services to narrow in the current wholesale electricity market can shed light on which times the geographic expanse of the market may narrow in a restructures electricity market. Second, the techniques developed in this paper to assess the extent of the current wholesale electricity market can be applied readily to a restructured electricity market. Finally, because market conditions in the electricity industry are likely to change significantly in the next few years, as the structure of the electricity sector changes dramatically, this analysis of the geographic expanse of the market can provide a useful benchmark against which to compare post-restructuring wholesale price relationships.

Bailey, E.M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study Title Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6056E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, and Aimee T. McKane Date Published 12/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract This report details a study into the demand response potential of a large wastewater treatment facility in San Francisco. Previous research had identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response and automated demand response, and this study was conducted to investigate facility attributes that are conducive to demand response or which hinder its implementation. One years' worth of operational data were collected from the facility's control system, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. These data were analyzed to determine factors which affected facility power demand and demand response capabilities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information Speaker(s): Sebastien Houde Date: September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Christopher Payne The goal of this talk is to discuss two interrelated research projects that aim to assess the welfare effects of energy policies that rely on standards and information. The first project focuses on the Energy Star certification program. Using unique micro-data on the US refrigerator market, I first show that consumers respond to certification in different ways. Some consumers appear to rely heavily on Energy Star and pay little attention to electricity costs, others are the reverse, and still others appear to be insensitive to both electricity costs and Energy Star. I then develop a

342

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Demands..xi Annual natural gas demand for each alternativeused in natural gas demand projections. 34

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Analysis of recent projections of electric power demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the changes and potential changes in the outlook for electric power demand since the publication of Review and Analysis of Electricity Supply Market Projections (B. Swezey, SERI/MR-360-3322, National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Forecasts of the following organizations were reviewed: DOE/Energy Information Administration, DOE/Policy Office, DRI/McGraw-Hill, North American Electric Reliability Council, and Gas Research Institute. Supply uncertainty was briefly reviewed to place the uncertainties of the demand outlook in perspective. Also discussed were opportunities for modular technologies, such as renewable energy technologies, to fill a potential gap in energy demand and supply.

Hudson, D.V. Jr.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimum demand and Maximum demand incorporate assumptionslevels, or very minor Maximum demand household size, growthvehicles in Increasing Maximum demand 23 mpg truck share

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Emerging markets: design goes global  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China and India represent two of the most rapidly evolving markets for IC design today. According to the CMP China IC Design Survey 2002, demand for IC design services in China is growing exponentially alongside 8- and 12-inch wafer fab construction. ...

Chi-Foon Chan; Deirdre Hanford; Jian Yue Pan; Narendra Shenoy; Mahesh Mehendale; A. Vasudevan; Shaojun Wei

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Electricity Market and Policy | Electricity Markets and Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Department Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Department The Electricity Markets and Policy Group conducts technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S. electricity sector. Our current research seeks to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to energy efficiency and demand response, renewable energy, electricity resource and transmission planning, and electricity reliability. Demand Response & Smart Grid The Electricity Markets and Policy Group conducts public interest research on the smart grid and concepts, technologies and operating practices it enables from a market, policy, cost, benefit, and performance perspective. LEARN MORE... Electricity Reliability The reliability of the electric power system is critical to the economic

347

Renewable Energy Development in Regulated Markets, 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The slowdown in electricity market restructuring since 2000 has dramatically altered opportunities for marketing green energy to retail customers. Indeed, it has become less clear what role direct consumer demand for green energy may play in future renewable energy development. Currently, utilities, green energy activists, and marketers are pursuing a number of new concepts that may increase the scale of renewable energy development. This report evaluates the status and potential of these new green energ...

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

348

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995 by Tancred Lidderdale* Provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 designed to reduce ground-level ozone will increase the demand for reformulated motor gaso- line in a number of U.S. metropolitan areas. Refor- mulated motor gasoline is expected to constitute about one-third of total motor gasoline demand in 1995, and refiners will have to change plant opera- tions and modify equipment in order to meet the higher demand. The costs incurred are expected to create a wholesale price premium for reformu- lated motor gasoline of up to 4.0 cents per gallon over the price of conventional motor gasoline. This article discusses the effects of the new regulations on the motor gasoline market and the refining

349

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation By Tansa Musa zones and do not respect size limits in their quest for maximum financial returns. "I lack words economy. China's demand for hardwood drives illegal logging says "Both illegal and authorized

350

Estimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Properties of the AIDS Generalized Maximum Entropy Estimator 24 #12;Estimating a Demand SystemEstimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand Amos Golan* Jeffrey with nonnegativity constraints is presented. This approach, called generalized maximum entropy (GME), is more

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

351

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST Demand Forecast report is the product of the efforts of many current and former California Energy Commission staff. Staff contributors to the current forecast are: Project Management and Technical Direction

352

United States energy supply and demand forecasts 1979-1995  

SciTech Connect

Forecasts of U.S. energy supply and demand by fuel type and economic sector, as well as historical background information, are presented. Discussion and results pertaining to the development of current and projected marginal energy costs, and their comparison with market prices, are also presented.

Walton, H.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Price supports and demand in commodity market modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gerdner, B. L. "Futures Prices in Supply Analysis." Amer. J.Service. Spot and Futures Prices." Limited Dcpenden{avec Leuthold, R. ~1. "The Price Performance on the Futures

Riboud, Chris; Rausser, Gordon C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Mary Beth Tighe (FERC), Bruce Sailers (Duke Energy,CPP DLC DOE DR EIA EDR EEA FERC IRC ISO-NE LMP LBNL LSE MISOorganizations (RTOs) that the FERC has approved to carry out

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission (FERC) to develop a comprehensiveaccomplish this task, the FERC prepared and administered aDR Resource contribution, FERC staff drew upon FERC survey

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

by end use customers from their normal consumption patterns in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to incentive payments designed to induce lower...

357

Dynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RS) is a conventional all energy tariff with no time periodutilization of these tariffs by the energy procurementof a new tariff, with naive participants and naive energy

Borenstein, Severin; Jaske, Michael; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MISO MP MRO MWDRI M&V NYISO PJM PUC RAP RFC RTO RTP SERC AirRTOs such as New England or PJM. In 2005 MISO became theEdison is a member of PJM). Interruptible (Total = 3398, N =

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

22, 2009. Norristown, PA: PJM Interconnection, LLC, 2009.opennat.asp? fileID=11833372 PJM Interconnection, LLC.ISO New England (ISO-NE), and PJM Interconnection (PJM). The

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Power Marketing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remarketing Effort Hoover Coordinating Committee Meeting FY2011 - June 7 Mead Transformer Presentation Navajo Navajo Surplus Marketing Parker-Davis Parker-Davis Project...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Market Transformation  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This Fuel Cell Technologies Program fact sheet outlines current status and challenges in the market transformation of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

362

Power Marketing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Certificate Solicitations Benefit Review Energy Services Rates and Repayment WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Send correspondence to: Power Marketing Manager Western...

363

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power system costs in the Pacific Northwest (See Figure 7) include wholesale market prices, plant availability, load growth

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A Generic Framework for a Combined Agent-based Market and Production Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agent-based market models are in general based on a-priori defined supply and demand schemes. Likewise, production models assume that prices are known a-priori. In reality prices depend on variable demands and supplies, while demand and supply depend ... Keywords: Agent-based computational economics, Invisible hand, Markets, Price mechanism, Von Neumann technology matrices

Bas Straatman; Danielle J. Marceau; Roger White

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Capacity-constrained multiple-market price discrimination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies a multiple-market price discrimination problem with different markets' demand elasticity and supply constraints, whereas the markets share a common capacity. We model the problem as a continuous nonlinear knapsack problem, and propose ... Keywords: Knapsack problem, Nonlinear programming, Price discrimination

Bin Zhang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

McParland, Charles

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Demand Response: An UntappedDemand Response: An Untapped Resource for Western ElectricityResource for Western Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Administration, Form EIA-861 Database. #12;Energy Analysis Department Significant cost@lbl.gov FERC Western Energy Infrastructure Conference Denver, Colorado July 30, 2003 #12;Energy Analysis value of demand-side for electricity markets - Short-term Load Management - Dynamic Pricing - Energy

368

ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT STAFFREPORT June 2005 ..............................................................................3 Residential Forecast Comparison ..............................................................................................5 Nonresidential Forecast Comparisons

369

World NGL markets continue rapid expansion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The international LPG industry has expanded rapidly during the 1990s and undergone significant changes. LPG consumption has expanded at nearly twice the rate of world petroleum demand. In particular, LPG use in residential and commercial markets has more than doubled in many developing countries. Markets for LPG and other petroleum products have been opened in many countries, accelerating demand growth and creating investment opportunities in all downstream segments. This has led to an overall strengthening of global LPG pricing and the development of many new export gas-processing projects. The paper discusses world LPG demand in residential and commercial markets and in petrochemicals, world LPG supply, regional increases, international trade, the US situation in natural gas, NGL supply, and NGL demand.

Otto, K.; Gist, R.; Whitley, C. [Purvin and Gertz, Houston, TX (United States); Haun, R. [Purvin and Gertz, Dallas, TX (United States)

1998-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

370

Providing Reliability Services through Demand Response: A Prelimnary Evaluation of the Demand Response Capabilities of Alcoa Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response is the largest underutilized reliability resource in North America. Historic demand response programs have focused on reducing overall electricity consumption (increasing efficiency) and shaving peaks but have not typically been used for immediate reliability response. Many of these programs have been successful but demand response remains a limited resource. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) report, 'Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering' (FERC 2006) found that only five percent of customers are on some form of demand response program. Collectively they represent an estimated 37,000 MW of response potential. These programs reduce overall energy consumption, lower green house gas emissions by allowing fossil fuel generators to operate at increased efficiency and reduce stress on the power system during periods of peak loading. As the country continues to restructure energy markets with sophisticated marginal cost models that attempt to minimize total energy costs, the ability of demand response to create meaningful shifts in the supply and demand equations is critical to creating a sustainable and balanced economic response to energy issues. Restructured energy market prices are set by the cost of the next incremental unit of energy, so that as additional generation is brought into the market, the cost for the entire market increases. The benefit of demand response is that it reduces overall demand and shifts the entire market to a lower pricing level. This can be very effective in mitigating price volatility or scarcity pricing as the power system responds to changing demand schedules, loss of large generators, or loss of transmission. As a global producer of alumina, primary aluminum, and fabricated aluminum products, Alcoa Inc., has the capability to provide demand response services through its manufacturing facilities and uniquely through its aluminum smelting facilities. For a typical aluminum smelter, electric power accounts for 30% to 40% of the factory cost of producing primary aluminum. In the continental United States, Alcoa Inc. currently owns and/or operates ten aluminum smelters and many associated fabricating facilities with a combined average load of over 2,600 MW. This presents Alcoa Inc. with a significant opportunity to respond in areas where economic opportunities exist to help mitigate rising energy costs by supplying demand response services into the energy system. This report is organized into seven chapters. The first chapter is the introduction and discusses the intention of this report. The second chapter contains the background. In this chapter, topics include: the motivation for Alcoa to provide demand response; ancillary service definitions; the basics behind aluminum smelting; and a discussion of suggested ancillary services that would be particularly useful for Alcoa to supply. Chapter 3 is concerned with the independent system operator, the Midwest ISO. Here the discussion examines the evolving Midwest ISO market structure including specific definitions, requirements, and necessary components to provide ancillary services. This section is followed by information concerning the Midwest ISO's classifications of demand response parties. Chapter 4 investigates the available opportunities at Alcoa's Warrick facility. Chapter 5 involves an in-depth discussion of the regulation service that Alcoa's Warrick facility can provide and the current interactions with Midwest ISO. Chapter 6 reviews future plans and expectations for Alcoa providing ancillary services into the market. Last, chapter 7, details the conclusion and recommendations of this paper.

Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL; Todd, Duane [Alcoa; Caulfield, Michael [Alcoa; Helms, Brian [Alcoa

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Overview of Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 PJM 08 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Overview of Demand Response PJM ©2008 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Growth, Statistics, and Current Footprint AEP, Dayton, ComEd, & DUQ Dominion Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Current PJM RTO Statistics Current PJM RTO Statistics PJM Mid-Atlantic Integrations completed as of May 1 st , 2005 ©2008 PJM

372

Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 137 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Petroleum Market Module The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining activities in the five Petroleum Administration for

373

Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page inTenTionally lefT blank 135 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Petroleum Market Module The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, esters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining activities in the five Petroleum Administration for

374

Smart finite state devices: A modeling framework for demand response technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce and analyze Markov Decision Process (MDP) machines to model individual devices which are expected to participate in future demand-response markets on distribution grids. We differentiate devices into the ...

Turitsyn, Konstantin

375

Futures oil market outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We expect the broader expansion of global economic activity in 1995 to more than offset the anticipated slowdown in the US economic growth. This should result in worldwide oil demand growth in excess of 1 million barrels per day and firmer oil prices. This comes on the heels of nearly identical growth in 1994 and should be followed by an even larger increase in 1996. This year`s demand growth comes against a backdrop of flat OPEC production and an increase in non-OPEC supplies that will fall short of the expected increase in consumption. Some degree of political upheaval in at least a half dozen important oil exporting nations could also have implication for crude supplies. One major wildcard that remains for global oil markets is the status of the United Nations` sanctions on Iraqi exports and the timing of when these sanctions are to be eased or lifted completely.

Saucer, J. [Smith Barney, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Market theories evolve, and so do markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of Competitive Market Behavior," Journal of PoliticalContinuous Double Auction Markets. International Journal ofeds. ), The Dynamics of Market Exchange, North-Holland, 115-

Friedman, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

LNG demand, shipping will expand through 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1990s, especially the middle years, have witnessed a dramatic turnaround in the growth of liquefied-natural-gas demand which has tracked equally strong natural-gas demand growth. This trend was underscored late last year by several annual studies of world LNG demand and shipping. As 1998 began, however, economic turmoil in Asian financial markets has clouded near-term prospects for LNG in particular and all energy in general. But the extent of damage to energy markets is so far unclear. A study by US-based Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL, reveals that LNG imports worldwide have climbed nearly 8%/year since 1980 and account for 25% of all natural gas traded internationally. In the mid-1970s, the share was only 5%. In 1996, the most recent year for which complete data are available, world LNG trade rose 7.7% to a record 92 billion cu m, outpacing the overall consumption for natural gas which increased 4.7% in 1996. By 2015, says the IGT study, natural-gas use would surpass coal as the world`s second most widely used fuel, after petroleum. Much of this growth will occur in the developing countries of Asia where gas use, before the current economic crisis began, was projected to grow 8%/year through 2015. Similar trends are reflected in another study of LNG trade released at year end 1997, this from Ocean Shipping Consultants Ltd., Surrey, U.K. The study was done too early, however, to consider the effects of the financial problems roiling Asia.

True, W.R.

1998-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

379

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

380

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand Response (DR) can be defined as actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies and congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, or market conditions raise supply costs. California utilities have offered price and reliability DR based programs to customers to help reduce electric peak demand. The lack of knowledge about the DR programs and how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs, as is the lack of automation of DR systems. Most DR activities are manual and require people to first receive notifications, and then act on the information to execute DR strategies. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows. Manual Demand Response involves a labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. We refer to this as Auto-DR (Piette et. al. 2005). Auto-DR for commercial and industrial facilities can be defined as fully automated DR initiated by a signal from a utility or other appropriate entity and that provides fully-automated connectivity to customer end-use control strategies. One important concept in Auto-DR is that a homeowner or facility manager should be able to 'opt out' or 'override' a DR event if the event comes at time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. Therefore, Auto-DR is not handing over total control of the equipment or the facility to the utility but simply allowing the utility to pass on grid related information which then triggers facility defined and programmed strategies if convenient to the facility. From 2003 through 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) developed and tested a series of demand response automation communications technologies known as Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In 2007, LBNL worked with three investor-owned utilities to commercialize and implement Auto-DR programs in their territories. This paper summarizes the history of technology development for Auto-DR, and describes the DR technologies and control strategies utilized at many of the facilities. It outlines early experience in commercializing Auto-DR systems within PG&E DR programs, including the steps to configure the automation technology. The paper also describes the DR sheds derived using three different baseline methodologies. Emphasis is given to the lessons learned from installation and commissioning of Auto-DR systems, with a detailed description of the technical coordination roles and responsibilities, and costs.

Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Kiliccote, Sila; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Wikler, Greg; Prijyanonda, Joe; Chiu, Albert

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

382

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Title Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5319E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ghatikar, Girish, Aimee T. McKane, Sasank Goli, Peter L. Therkelsen, and Daniel Olsen Date Published 01/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords automated dr, controls and automation, demand response, dynamic pricing, industrial controls, market sectors, openadr Abstract California's electricity markets are moving toward dynamic pricing models, such as real-time pricing, within the next few years, which could have a significant impact on an industrial facility's cost of energy use during the times of peak use. Adequate controls and automated systems that provide industrial facility managers real-time energy use and cost information are necessary for successful implementation of a comprehensive electricity strategy; however, little is known about the current control capacity of California industries. To address this gap, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in close collaboration with California industrial trade associations, conducted a survey to determine the current state of controls technologies in California industries. This study identifies sectors that have the technical capability to implement Demand Response (DR) and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In an effort to assist policy makers and industry in meeting the challenges of real-time pricing, facility operational and organizational factors were taken into consideration to generate recommendations on which sectors Demand Response efforts should be focused. Analysis of the survey responses showed that while the vast majority of industrial facilities have semi- or fully automated control systems, participation in Demand Response programs is still low due to perceived barriers. The results also showed that the facilities that use continuous processes are good Demand Response candidates. When comparing facilities participating in Demand Response to those not participating, several similarities and differences emerged. Demand Response-participating facilities and non-participating facilities had similar timings of peak energy use, production processes, and participation in energy audits. Though the survey sample was smaller than anticipated, the results seemed to support our preliminary assumptions. Demonstrations of Auto-Demand Response in industrial facilities with good control capabilities are needed to dispel perceived barriers to participation and to investigate industrial subsectors suggested of having inherent Demand Response potential.

383

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

384

Annual World Oil Demand Growth  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.9 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.6 million barrels per day in 2001. Of this increase, about 3/5 comes from non-OECD countries, while U.S. oil demand growth represents more than half of the growth projected in OECD countries. Demand in Asia grew steadily during most of the 1990s, with 1991-1997 average growth per year at just above 0.8 million barrels per day. However, in 1998, demand dropped by 0.3 million barrels per day as a result of the Asian economic crisis that year. Since 1998, annual growth in oil demand has rebounded, but has not yet reached the average growth seen during 1991-1997. In the Former Soviet Union, oil demand plummeted during most of the

385

How different home styles are valued in the Salt Lake City market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on market valuation of attributes of single family housing in the Salt Lake City market. Using data from different sub-regions of Salt Lake County, this paper addresses the question of buyer demand with ...

Peterson, Barrett, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feature of competitive wholesale electricity markets. Ineffectively in wholesale electricity markets, we will needEfficiency in the US Electricity Futures Market, Australian

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Study on consumer demands and merchant participation motives of mobile payment services in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consumer demands and merchant participation motives are the two key factors of the mobile payment service market from the point of view of mobile payment service providers to whom both are customers. To find out the real attitudes of mobile users and ... Keywords: consumer demands, investigation, merchant participation motives, mobile payment

Zhao Xinyan; Ge Wei; Lu Tingjie

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Multi-period Optimal Procurement and Demand Responses in the Presence of Uncertain Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

additional power on the real-time market, if necessary, to balance supply and demand. We derive the optimal and variability of renewable generation on these optimal decisions and on social welfare. I. INTRODUCTION Future and solar is their uncertainty. Furthermore, there is also randomness in user demand. Despite the uncer

Low, Steven H.

389

An Open Architecture Platform for Demand Resources from AutoDR and MBCx:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Open Architecture Platform for Demand Resources from AutoDR and MBCx: An Open Architecture Platform for Demand Resources from AutoDR and MBCx: National Virtual Power Plant Speaker(s): Jung In Choi Date: December 20, 2013 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Philip Haves The presentation lays out the technology and business model for National Virtual Power Plant (NVPP). NAPP is a Korean initiative to develop a cluster of demand resources from consumers by peak reduction or energy saving. Demand resources from NVPP are collectively traded in the open architecture platform for energy market. The platform enables 3rd parties to develop new business models and applications through open API s. It will bring a long tail market for demand response and energy efficiency in small and medium size buildings as well as large ones. Automated Demand

390

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003). Balancing Natural Gas Policy - Fueling the Demands ofThis lead to the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) in 1978 whichnatural gas markets, demand-side management programs, development of renewable sources, and environmental policies.

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Commissioning Title Automated Demand Response and Commissioning Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-57384 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Piette, Mary...

392

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lvi Southern California Edison filed its SmartConnectinfrastructure (e.g. , Edison Electric Institute, DemandSouthern California Edison Standard Practice Manual

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

1995 Demand-Side Managment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels

394

Designing Rules for the Capacity Market Hlne Le Cadre Michal Soubra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, the energy market is a modeled as a Stackelberg game involving three categories of agents per unit of demand. Finally, coupling the energy and the capacity markets, we design rules for the ca the liberalization of the energy market and imposes the creation of a capacity market in 2015 which long term goal

395

North American Natural Gas Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Decision Support for Demand Response Triggers: Methodology Development and Proof of Concept Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a project conceptualized and executed to help bridge a financial disconnect between retail and wholesale electricity markets. Although wholesale electricity costs vary hourly with wholesale market and grid conditions, retail customers are predominantly disconnected from wholesale conditions by fixed retail tariffs, and generally lack incentive to respond to wholesale market changes in a timely manner. Demand response (DR) programs have been developed at the retail level by both load...

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

397

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.energy efficiency and demand response program and tariffenergy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT) The opportunities for demand reduction and cost saving with building demand responsive control vary tremendously with building type...

400

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2.0 Demand ResponseFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8.4 Demand Response Integration . . . . . . . . . . .for each day type for the demand response study - moderatefor each day type for the demand response study - moderate

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilitiesof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. Economic demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due toaddressed in this report. Maximum Demand Savings Intensity (Echelon Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due to

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Empirical Analysis of the Spot Market Implications of Price-Elastic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

absence of any significant, rapid demand-side response to the wholesale (or, spot market) price. For a variety of reasons, electricity industries continue to charge most consumers...

409

Day-Ahead/Hour-Ahead Forecasting for Demand Trading: A Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand trading can be an effective hedge against wholesale power price spikes during times of constraint. However, it also can be a high-risk venture. Profitability depends on reliable demand forecasting. Short-term load forecasting (STLF) can minimize the risks of day-ahead purchasing by providing better predictions at the system level. Additionally, STLF can reduce hour-ahead spot market risks and directly support demand trading by providing more accurate assessments of incremental load reductions from...

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

410

Day-Ahead/Hour-Ahead Forecasting for Demand Trading: A Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Download report 1006016 for FREE. Demand trading can be an effective hedge against wholesale power price spikes during times of constraint. However, it also can be a high-risk venture. Profitability depends on reliable demand forecasting. Short-term load forecasting (STLF) can minimize the risks of day-ahead purchasing by providing better predictions at the system level. Additionally, STLF can reduce hour-ahead spot market risks and directly support demand trading by providing more accurate assessments o...

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

411

Market structure and competition: a cross-market analysis of U.S. electricity deregulation, CSEM Working Paper No  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the importance of market characteristics in restructured electricity markets. We measure market performance relative to benchmarks that abstract away from market design characteristics but capture important structural elements. Specifically, we estimate market outcomes under an assumption of perfect competition and under an assumption of Cournot competition in three U.S. markets: California, New England, and PJM. These two counter-factual assumptions bound the space of possible static, non-cooperative outcomes. By establishing where actual market outcomes fall within these bounds, we can compare how markets perform relative to the extremes determined by structural factors alone. Our findings suggest that vertical arrangements between suppliers and retailers, dramatically affect estimated market outcomes. When we include vertical arrangements in firms objective functions, Cournot equilibrium prices in both PJM and New England fall dramatically. California did not have such arrangements. After accounting for vertical arrangements, performance in each market relative to Cournot is similar, particularly during hours of peak demand.

James Bushnell; Erin T. Mansur; Celeste Saravia; James Bushnell; Erin T. Mansur; Celeste Saravia; Steve Puller; Peter Schott; Frank Wolak

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Non-OPEC supply to fill global 1996 demand gain  

SciTech Connect

Excess capacity brought on by rapidly rising oil production from outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, coupled with stabilization of output from the Commonwealth of Independent States, will hamper OPEC`s efforts to balance the oil market in 1996. World demand for oil is projected to move up sharply. But non-OPEC output will increase even more, challenging OPEC to reduce production quotas. This paper reviews data on supply, demand, and production from these non-OPEC countries and the overall effects it will have on OPEC operations and costs.

Beck, R.J.

1996-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

413

MassSAVE (Gas) - Residential Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MassSAVE (Gas) - Residential Rebate Program MassSAVE (Gas) - Residential Rebate Program MassSAVE (Gas) - Residential Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Other Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Start Date 1/1/2012 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Warm Air Furnaces with Electronic Commutated Motor (ECM): $300-$450 Forced Hot Water Boilers: $1,000-$1500 Programmable/Wi-Fi Thermostats: $25-$100 Indirect Water Heater: $400 Tankless On-Demand Water Heater: $500 or $800 Indirect Water Heater: $400 Condensing Gas Water Heaters: $500 Combined Boiler/Water Heating Unit: $1,200 Storage Water Heater: $100 After-Market Boiler Reset Controls: $225

414

China, India demand cushions prices  

SciTech Connect

Despite the hopes of coal consumers, coal prices did not plummet in 2006 as demand stayed firm. China and India's growing economies, coupled with solid supply-demand fundamentals in North America and Europe, and highly volatile prices for alternatives are likely to keep physical coal prices from wide swings in the coming year.

Boyle, M.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Oil Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Markets Oil Markets International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 3: World Oil Markets In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand increases by 47 percent from 2003 to 2030. Non-OECD Asia, including China and India, accounts for 43 percent of the increase. In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand grows from 80 million barrels per day in 2003 to 98 million barrels per day in 2015 and 118 million barrels per day in 2030. Demand increases strongly despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than in last year’s outlook. Much of the growth in oil consumption is projected for the nations of non-OECD Asia, where strong economic growth is expected. Non-OECD Asia (including China and India) accounts for 43 percent of the total increase in world oil use over the projection period.

416

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

SciTech Connect

In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources among SPP members. For these entities, investment in DR is often driven by the need to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demand charges for each distribution cooperative. o About 65-70percent of the interruptible/curtailable tariffs and DLC programs are routinely triggered based on market conditions, not just for system emergencies. Approximately, 53percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and 447 MW can be dispatched with less than thirty minutes notice. o Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels ranged from $0.40 to $8.30/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $0.30 to $4.60/kW-month for DLC programs. A few interruptible programs offered incentive payments which were explicitly linkedto actual load reductions during events; payments ranged from 2 to 40 cents/kWh for load curtailed.

Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Global irrigation demand - A holistic approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To develop a research track on global irrigation demand and the use of future water resources to help feed the world, we need to adopt a holistic approach to understand inter-dependencies and the main drivers of the global water system and unravel positive (reinforcing) and negative (balancing) feedback loops that can lead to cascading consequences. Thus, there needs to be more research dedicated to 1) the modeling of the agricultural and water systems as components within an integrated assessment human-Earth modeling framework, 2) the understanding of the linkages between the physical processes and the human system, and to integrate them in an economic framework to capture the dynamics of market price, and institutional regulations. This editorial discusses the importance of tackling the global irrigation problem in an integrated assessment modeling framework.

Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

418

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy markets. References Aniti, L. , 2002, Energy InformationEnergy Information Administration Energy Management Control Systems Electricity Market

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Energy storage fundamentally decouples supply and demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... MARKET PRICE 10 50 mills Frequency Regulation average market clearing price ... 14 Wind Challenge: Persistent Cycling Intermittency ...

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

420

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

both types of programs. Xcel Energy markets both energyEnergy Efficiency Marketing Xcel Energy Paul Suskie Chairman

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Demand Response for Ancillary Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Title Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California...

423

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricity1: Average and Maximum Peak Electric Demand Savings during

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, the demand for renewable electricity has accelerated as a consequence of state and federal policies and the growth of voluntary green power purchase markets, along with the generally improving economics of renewable energy development. This paper reports on a preliminary examination of the supply and demand balance for renewable electricity in the United States, with a focus on renewable energy projects that meet the generally accepted definition of "new" for voluntary market purposes, i.e., projects installed on or after January 1, 1997. After estimating current supply and demand, this paper presents projections of the supply and demand balance out to 2010 and describe a number of key market uncertainties.

Swezey, B.; Aabakken, J.; Bird, L.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New England 13 and the PJM Interconnection 14 . According toGW. The current size of the PJM system is approximately 165markets, most notably in the PJM Interconnection and ISO-New

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NE market through the Real-Time Price Response and Day-Aheadin the prices they pay and include real-time pricing,on a day-ahead or real-time basis. Prices are higher during

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Outlook for US lube oil supply and demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the domestic demand for automotive and industrial lubricants to the year 2000 and evaluates the ability of U.S. refiners to meet the associated demand for base stocks. Changes in the supply/demand picture over the past several years are also reviewed. In the late 1970's, lube base stocks had been in short supply as healthy increases in demand pushed U.S. refiners to near maximum operating levels. Imports were increased to what were then record high levels and exports were reduced. This situation began to reverse itself in mid-1980 as marketers began to feel the impact of recession here and abroad. U.S. base stock consumption has since declined dramatically, to a level in 1982 estimated to be 17.5% below that of 1979's peak. In the meantime, refiners had added another 7.0 MB/CD to manufacturing capacity. 1982 lube plant operations are estimated to have dropped as low as 62% of nameplate capacity. The outlook for recovery is conservative. Due to continued depressed demand in certain market segments, 1983's increase in base oil demand is projected to be held to only 2%. Gains in 1984 and 1985 will be more robust, in the area of 6% per year. Thereafter, the overall rate of growth will drop to under 1% per year. The outlooks for automotive and industrial lubricants demand are summarized. Due to a forecast of greater relative growth in synthetic and water-based lubricants, base stock consumption is forecast to increase at a slower pace than that of the total finished lubricants volume.

Brecht, F.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

global gasoline and diesel price and income elasticities.shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.Habits and Uncertain Relative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con-

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Mobile Permission Marketing: Framing the Market Inquiry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emergence of a mobile data infrastructure interconnected with the Internet and television marks the advent of a new marketing channel based on mobile messaging and complementary to traditional marketing channels and the Internet. Mobile marketing ... Keywords: Case Studies, Disruptive Technologies, Emerging Technologies, Firm Competencies, Mobile Internet, New Market Entrants, Permission-Based Marketing, Public Policy

Petros Kavassalis; Ntina Spyropoulou; Dimitris Drossos; Evangelos Mitrokostas; Gregory Gikas; Antonis Hatzistamatiou

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

What's changing in East Coast fuels markets?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The U.S. East Coast petroleum product market is undergoing fundamental changes from the standpoint of supply and demand. In addition to the announced idling and potential closure of several major refineries, a number of Northeastern states plan a transition to ultra-low sulfur diesel for heating oil use beginning with New York in the summer of 2012. This article provides an overview of EIA's recent analyses related to East Coast fuels markets.

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

431

The role of public policy in emerging green power markets: An analysis of marketer preferences  

SciTech Connect

Green power marketing has been heralded by some as a means to create a private market for renewable energy that is driven by customer demand for green products. This report challenges the premise--sometimes proffered in debates over green markets--that profitable, sizable, credible markets for green products will evolve naturally without supportive public policies. Relying primarily on surveys and interviews of US green power marketers, the article examines the role of specific regulatory and legislative policies in enabling the green market, and searches for those policies that are believed by marketers to be the most conducive or detrimental to the expansion of the green market. The authors find that marketers: (1) believe that profitable green power markets will only develop if a solid foundation of supportive policies exists; (2) believe that establishing overall price competition and encouraging customer switching are the top priorities; (3) are somewhat leery of government-sponsored or mandated public information programs; and (4) oppose three specific renewable energy policies that are frequently advocated by renewable energy enthusiasts, but that may have negative impacts on the green marketers' profitability. The stated preferences of green marketers shed light on ways to foster renewables by means of the green market. Because the interests of marketers do not coincide perfectly with those of society, however, the study also recognizes other normative perspectives and highlights policy tensions at the heart of current debates related to green markets. By examining these conflicts, they identify three key policy questions that should direct future research: (1) to what extent should price competition and customer switching be encouraged at the expense of cost shifting; (2) what requirements should be imposed to ensure credibility in green products and marketing; and (3) how should the green power market and broader renewable energy policies interact?

Wiser, R.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Transportation Market Distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport Prices and Markets, Victoria Transport PolicySurvey: Survey Suggests Market-Based Vision of Smart Growth,G. 1996. Roads in a Market Economy, Avebury (Aldershot).

Litman, Todd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity. Wiley IEEE Press. [25]in the England and Wales Electricity Market, Power WorkingFelder (1996), Should Electricity Markets Have a Capacity

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Information Markets and Aggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Markets and Aggregation by Narahari Mohan PhatakSpring 2012 Information Markets and Aggregation CopyrightMohan Phatak Abstract Information Markets and Aggregation by

Phatak, Narahari Mohan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies and Demonstration in New York City Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR Title Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6470E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Kim, Joyce Jihyun, Sila Kiliccote, and Rongxin Yin Date Published 09/2013 Publisher LBNL/NYSERDA Abstract Demand response (DR) - allowing customers to respond to reliability requests and market prices by changing electricity use from their normal consumption pattern - continues to be seen as an attractive means of demand-side management and a fundamental smart-grid improvement that links supply and demand. Since October 2011, the Demand Response Research Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority have conducted a demonstration project enabling Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) in large commercial buildings located in New York City using Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) communication protocols. In particular, this project focuses on demonstrating how OpenADR can automate and simplify interactions between buildings and various stakeholders in New York State including the independent system operator, utilities, retail energy providers, and curtailment service providers. In this paper, we present methods to automate control strategies via building management systems to provide event-driven demand response, price response and demand management based on OpenADR signals. We also present cost control opportunities under day-ahead hourly pricing for large customers and Auto-DR control strategies developed for demonstration buildings. Lastly, we discuss the communication architecture and Auto-DR system designed for the demonstration project to automate price response and DR participation.

436

Market analysis for optoelectronic transceiver in short range data transmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increasing demanding of bandwidth in information technology, electronic connections meet the limitation in high speed processing in shorter and shorter reach. In the work, three markets for optical connection with ...

Luo, Jia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acknowledgments SUMMARY Electricity Demand ElectricityAdverse Impacts ELECTRICITY DEMAND . . . .Demand forElectricity Sales Electricity Demand by Major Utility

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

million Market Price Benefits $2.109 billion (PV) None $52PV of a future option to curtail a given load, constructed to reflect forward energy curves as modified by forecast price &

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marketing a utilitys air-conditioning load-cycling programof these customers air-conditioning in a manner similar tothese customers air-conditioning units 37 times during the

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12: Market Impacts of Price Responsive Load in PJM and ISO-44 Figure 15: PJM Synchronized Reserve Scheduled MW:particularly those in PJMs service territory, have begun

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Dynamic Customer Management and the Value of One-to-One Marketing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of one-to-one marketing is intuitively appealing, but there is little research that investigates the value of individual-level marketing relative to segment-level or mass marketing. In this paper, we investigate the financial benefits of ... Keywords: CRM, database marketing, dynamic programming, heterogeneity, one-to-one marketing, promotions

Romana Khan; Michael Lewis; Vishal Singh

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of their forecasted peak demand. The so- called Installedbut not enough to satisfy peak demand in the national energybe enough to satisfy peak demand in the national energy

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Demand Response Research in Spain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Research in Spain Demand Response Research in Spain Speaker(s): Iñigo Cobelo Date: August 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette The Spanish power system is becoming increasingly difficult to operate. The peak load grows every year, and the permission to build new transmission and distribution infrastructures is difficult to obtain. In this scenario Demand Response can play an important role, and become a resource that could help network operators. The present deployment of demand response measures is small, but this situation however may change in the short term. The two main Spanish utilities and the transmission network operator are designing research projects in this field. All customer segments are targeted, and the research will lead to pilot installations and tests.

444

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

445

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart...

446

Demand for money in China .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research investigates the long-run equilibrium relationship between money demand and its determinants in China over the period 1952-2004 for three definitions of money (more)

Zhang, Qing

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

building demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

448

STEO December 2012 - coal demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

coal demand seen below 1 billion tons in 2012 for fourth year in a row Coal consumption by U.S. power plants to generate electricity is expected to fall below 1 billion tons in...

449

Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Notes: Well, distillate fuel demand wasn't the reason that stocks increased in January 2001 and kept prices from going higher. As you will hear shortly, natural gas prices spiked...

450

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005 Motegi,National Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005Demand Response and Commissioning Mary Ann Piette, David S.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs Title Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2012 Authors Borgeson, Merrian Keywords demand side resources: policy, electricity markets, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, self direct programs, technical assistance Full Text LBNL recently provided technical assistance funded by DOE to the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio to inform their decision-making about changes to their existing self-direct program for commercial and industrial customers. Self-direct programs are usually targeted at large industrial customers with specialized needs or strong in-house energy engineering capacity. These programs are found in at least 24 states, and there is significant variety in how these programs are structured - with important implications for the additionality and reliability of the energy savings that result. LBNL reviewed existing programs and compared key elements of self-direct program design. For additional questions about this work, please contact Merrian Borgeson.

453

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Housing Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Appliance Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Technology Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Shell Integrity Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Fuel Consumption Submodule The residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar thermal and geothermal energy. The RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of the RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts,

454

Customer Demand Issues in SmartGrids European Platform: Relevant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Customer Demand Issues in SmartGrids European Platform: Relevant Customer Demand Issues in SmartGrids European Platform: Relevant Initiatives Speaker(s): Carlos Alvarez-Bel Date: June 26, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette SmartGrids technological platform was created by the European Commission in order to develop and identify research topics and objectives to facilitate the implementation of future electric grids. Smart grid is, by definition, user-centric, which implies that enhancing and promoting customer participation in electricity markets and systems, from efficiency to demand response, is a key goal. Efficiency targets in Europe (20% energy reduction in 2020) will probably not be met and, on the contrary, the renewable generation share target of 20% for the same year seems affordable. These

455

Miniaturized Mass Spectrometer - Energy Innovation Portal  

Technology Marketing Summary Sandia's invention relates to a miniaturized mass spectrometer using a silicon chip field emitter array as the source of ...

456

Guidebook for Farmstead Demand-Side Management (DSM) program design  

SciTech Connect

The acceptance and growth of Demand-Side Management (DSM) continues to increase in the US. According to latest estimates, total expenditures on electric utility DSM programs now exceed $1.2 billion annually, with these investments ranging from 1 to 5 percent of a utility's gross revenues. In addition, due to increasing environmental concerns and the high cost of new capacity, these expenditure levels are expected to increase. While the vast majority of these DSM programs are directed at the more traditional residential, commercial and industrial market sectors, significant opportunities still exist. One market segment that has not been the focus of attention but a critical sector from an economic development perspective for marry utilities -- is the agricultural and farmstead market. Although the total number of farms in the United States decreased by approximately 5 percent between 1985 and 1989, the land dedicated to farming still accounts for over 995 million acres. Furthermore, the total value of farm output in the United States has been steadily increasing since 1986. The limited penetration of energy efficiency measures in farmsteads provides an excellent opportunity for utilities to expand their DSM programming efforts to capture this non-traditional'' market segment, and at the same time assist farms in increasing their efficiency and competitiveness. In marry states, and, in particular New York State, agriculture plays a major economic role. The importance of farms not only from a utility perspective but also from a state and federal perspective cannot be overstated. As such, utilities are in a unique position to facilitate farmstead DSM technology investments in an effort to benefit the farmer (and his profitability), the utility, the state and the country. This guidebook is designed to provide the framework for agricultural demand planning, including market assessment, technology assessment, market penetration analysis and program design.

Rose, M.; Camera, R.K.

1992-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

457

Volume 15, number 3 april 2010 markets products analysis research forecasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand is only slowly climbing back. While there are some exceptions, it appears that "constrained capaci around the world in almost all wood products. While WOOD MARKETS' supply and demand models have been Board Foot Club global statistics 6 Global Sawnwood, USa, Canada international Wood markets Group inc

458

Propane Market Outlook Assessment of Key Market Trends, Threats, and Opportunities Facing  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

0 0 Propane Market Outlook Assessment of Key Market Trends, Threats, and Opportunities Facing the Propane Industry Through 2020 P r e s e n T e d B y : Declining Sales in the Recent Past and Near-Term Future After peaking in 2003, nationwide propane consumption fell by more than 10 percent through 2006. Although propane demand rebounded somewhat in 2007 and 2008 due to colder weather, propane demand appears to have declined again in 2009. The collapse of the new housing market, combined with decreases in fuel use per customer resulting from efficiency upgrades in homes and equipment, resulted in a decline in residential propane sales. The recession also reduced demand in the industrial and commercial sectors. Colder weather in the last half of 2009 and in January

459

Market behavior under partial price controls: the case of the retail gasoline market  

SciTech Connect

The use of firm-specific controls on the price of gasoline during 1979 and 1980, at both the wholesale and the retail level, dramatically affected the retail market for gasoline. The most visible effect was a diversity of monetary prices across service stations within particular retail market areas. Price could no longer play its usual role in clearing the retail market for gasoline. Queues and other changes in quality of service at stations arose to maintain the balance of market demand and supply. This report examines the behavior of an otherwise competitive market in the presence of such regulation-induced nonprice phenomena. In such a market, consumers consider both monetary prices and costs imposed by queues in deciding where to buy gasoline and how much to buy. Using a price-theoretic model of behavior, this paper predicts how various changes in effective price regulation affect consumers. 14 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

Camm, F.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Electricity Market Module figure 6. Electricity Market Model Supply Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2009, DOE/EIA-M068(2009). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass market demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Composition of Electricity Generation Portfolios, Pivotal Dynamics, and Market Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use simulations to study how the diversification of electricity generation portfolios influences wholesale prices. We find that the relationship between technological diversification and market prices is mediated by the supply-to-demand ratio. In ... Keywords: electricity, market power, simulations, technology diversification

Albert Banal-Estaol; Augusto Ruprez Micola

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

After record sales and production, international met markets plummet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After surging in 2007 and most of 2008, both the demand and the pricing for coal collapsed in 2008's final quarter. The article discusses last year's market and gives some predictions on 2009's production and prices. The National Mining Association predicts that production of coking coal will fall 11% due to plunging demand for steel. 4 photos.

Buchsbaum, L.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

District heating and cooling market assessment  

SciTech Connect

For more than 10 years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has supported research on and development of district steam, hot-water, and chilled-water systems in the residential and commercial sectors. In 1991, DOE sponsored a research project at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to reestimate the national market for district heating and cooling (DHC) systems to the year 2010. ANL had previously developed a DHC market-penetration model and used it to project future market penetration. The first step in the project was to conduct a literature search to identify major data sources on historical DHC markets and any past studies on the future market potential of DHC systems. On the basis of an evaluation of the available data and methodologies for estimating market penetration of new technologies, it was concluded that ANL should develop a new econometric model for forecasting DHC markets. By using the 1989 DOE/Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Surveys (CBECS) public-use-tape data, a model was estimated for steam, hot-water, and chilled-water demand in the buildings surveyed. The model provides estimates of building steam, hot-water, and chilled-water consumption and expenditures between now and the year 2010. The analysis shows that the total U.S. market for district steam, hot water, and chilled water could grow from 0.8 quadrillion British thermal units (quad) in 1989 to 1.0 quad by 2000 and 1.25 quad by 2010. The demand for chilled water could nearly double in the forecast period, and its share could approach one-third of the total DHC market. This model, and the results, should be of use to policymakers, researchers, and market participants involved in the planning and implementation of community-based, energy-conserving, and environmentally beneficial energy systems.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Karvelas, D.E.; Daniels, E.J.; Anderson, J.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Successful demand-side management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is a brief summary of a series of case studies of five publicly-owned utilities that are noted for their success with demand-side management. These utilities are: (1) city of Austin, Texas, (2) Burlington Electric Department in Vermont, (3) Sacramento Municipal Utility District in California, (4) Seattle City Light, and (5) Waverly Light and Power in Iowa. From these case studies, the authors identified a number of traits associated with a successful demand-side management program. These traits are: (1) high rates, (2) economic factors, (3) environmental awareness, (4) state emphasis on integrated resource planning/demand side management, (5) local political support, (6) large-sized utilities, and (7) presence of a champion.

Hadley, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Flanigan, T. [Results Center, Aspen, CO (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Definition: Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand The rate at which electric energy is delivered to or by a system or part of a system, generally expressed in kilowatts or megawatts, at a given instant or averaged over any designated interval of time., The rate at which energy is being used by the customer.[1] Related Terms energy, electricity generation References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Demand&oldid=480555"

468

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart indicates the extent to which the last winter exhibited below-normal heating degree-days (and thus below-normal heating demand). Temperatures were consistently warmer than normal throughout the 1999-2000 heating season. This was particularly true in November 1999, February 2001 and March 2001. For the heating season as a whole (October through March), the 1999-2000 winter yielded total HDDs 10.7% below normal. Normal temperatures this coming winter would, then, be expected to bring about 11% higher heating demand than we saw last year. Relative to normal, the 1999-2000 heating season was the warmest in

469

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight, rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

471

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

472

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

473

Data centres in the ancillary services market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ancillary services are the mechanisms power grids use to address short-term variability in supply and demand as well as the impact of power plant or transmission line failures. Organizations providing such services can earn revenue, or at least reduce ... Keywords: simulation,electrical markets,ancillary services,smart grids

David Aikema; Rob Simmonds; Hamidreza Zareipour

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

The Role of Demand Resources In Regional Transmission Expansion Planning and Reliable Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigating the role of demand resources in regional transmission planning has provided mixed results. On one hand there are only a few projects where demand response has been used as an explicit alternative to transmission enhancement. On the other hand there is a fair amount of demand response in the form of energy efficiency, peak reduction, emergency load shedding, and (recently) demand providing ancillary services. All of this demand response reduces the need for transmission enhancements. Demand response capability is typically (but not always) factored into transmission planning as a reduction in the load which must be served. In that sense demand response is utilized as an alternative to transmission expansion. Much more demand response is used (involuntarily) as load shedding under extreme conditions to prevent cascading blackouts. The amount of additional transmission and generation that would be required to provide the current level of reliability if load shedding were not available is difficult to imagine and would be impractical to build. In a very real sense demand response solutions are equitably treated in every region - when proposed, demand response projects are evaluated against existing reliability and economic criteria. The regional councils, RTOs, and ISOs identify needs. Others propose transmission, generation, or responsive load based solutions. Few demand response projects get included in transmission enhancement plans because few are proposed. But this is only part of the story. Several factors are responsible for the current very low use of demand response as a transmission enhancement alternative. First, while the generation, transmission, and load business sectors each deal with essentially the same amount of electric power, generation and transmission companies are explicitly in the electric power business but electricity is not the primary business focus of most loads. This changes the institutional focus of each sector. Second, market and reliability rules have, understandably, been written around the capabilities and limitations of generators, the historic reliability resources. Responsive load limitations and capabilities are often not accommodated in markets or reliability criteria. Third, because of the institutional structure, demand response alternatives are treated as temporary solutions that can delay but not replace transmission enhancement. Financing has to be based on a three to five year project life as opposed to the twenty to fifty year life of transmission facilities. More can be done to integrate demand response options into transmission expansion planning. Given the societal benefits it may be appropriate for independent transmission planning organizations to take a more proactive role in drawing demand response alternatives into the resource mix. Existing demand response programs provide a technical basis to build from. Regulatory and market obstacles will have to be overcome if demand response alternatives are to be routinely considered in transmission expansion planning.

Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity consumption, the flattening of the demand curves (except Maximum demand) reflects decreasing population growth ratesresidential electricity demand are described in Table 11. For simplicity, end use-specific UEC and saturation rates

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover,138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW by 2030, or 14

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential ofneed to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demandcustomers and a system peak demand of over 43,000 MW. SPPs

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with total Statewide peak demand and on peak days isto examine the electric peak demand related to lighting inDaily) - TOU Savings - Peak Demand Charges - Grid Peak -Low

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Tankless Demand Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Water Heaters Tankless Demand Water Heaters August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is...

480

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand.Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

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481

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous California Energy previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare

482

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand Robert P. Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare the industrial forecast

483

EIA projections of coal supply and demand  

SciTech Connect

Contents of this report include: EIA projections of coal supply and demand which covers forecasted coal supply and transportation, forecasted coal demand by consuming sector, and forecasted coal demand by the electric utility sector; and policy discussion.

Klein, D.E.

1989-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

484

Multiple mass-market applications as components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Truly successful models for component-based software development continue to prove elusive. One of the few is the use of operating system, database and similar programs in many systems. We address three related problems in this paper. First, we lack ... Keywords: component-based software, package-oriented programming

David Coppit; Kevin J. Sullivan

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Incorporating Demand Response into Western Interconnection Transmissio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

side resources: policy, electricity markets, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Attachment Size PDF 702.25 KB Google...

486

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

markets deregulate and energy tariffs increasingly exposereal-time energy markets either through RTP tariffs or DRtariff, the payoff is the savings for not consuming the energy

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forward price curves in electricity markets, Energyenergy markets tends to increase electricity system reliability, reduce pricemarkets deregulate and energy tariffs increasingly expose customers to commodity price

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

what if wholesale market energy prices remain low or if CPPwith high prices in the real-time energy market. Nationalmarket prices and reliability circumstances, even though energy

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Electronic OTC Trading in the German Wholesale Electricity Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Recent changes in the German energy policy initiated a deregulation process from a monopolistic to a competitive market, fundamentally changing the market structure, transaction relationships and trading processes. While the mutual exchange of electric energy has been a business activity between vertically integrated utilities for a long time, wholesale electricity trading in an open market only recently started to gain momentum. Electricity becomes a commodity traded at power exchanges and off-exchange on over the counter (OTC) markets. In Germany, the wholesale electricity market is dominated by OTC trading. Trading in OTC markets is usually performed via telephone and facsimile which leads to a limited price transparency, a limited liquidity, an ex ante restricted number of potential market partners and, last but not least, substantial transaction costs. Market participants are therefore searching for new trading mechanisms to circumvent the problems of the current trading processes. The electronization of trading activities promises to reduce the disadvantages of current OTC trading processes through the automation of tasks within the transaction chain. In this context, electronic markets for electricity trading are coordination mechanisms for the market exchange of electricity and electricity derivatives, i. e., a virtual market place where supply and demand meet and trade. An important feature of electronic markets is an automated dynamic pricing which is currently not supported by electronic markets available for electricity trading in the German wholesale market. A concept for an Electronic Electricity Trading System is therefore proposed with a main focus on automated price discovery.

Stefan Strecker; Christof Weinhardt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements Title Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2010 Authors Fuller, Merrian C., Cathy Kunkel, Mark Zimring, Ian M. Hoffman, Katie L. Soroye, and Charles A. Goldman Tertiary Authors Borgeson, Merrian Pagination 136 Date Published 09/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Policy makers and program designers in the U.S. and abroad are deeply concerned with the question of how to scale up energy efficiency to a level that is commensurate both to the energy and climate challenges we face, and to the potential for energy savings that has been touted for decades. When policy makers ask what energy efficiency can do, the answers usually revolve around the technical and economic potential of energy efficiency-they rarely hone in on the element of energy demand that matters most for changing energy usage in existing homes: the consumer. A growing literature is concerned with the behavioral underpinnings of energy consumption. We examine a narrower, related subject: How can millions of Americans be persuaded to divert valued time and resources into upgrading their homes to eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy? With hundreds of millions of public dollars1 flowing into incentives, workforce training, and other initiatives to support comprehensive home energy improvements2, it makes sense to review the history of these programs and begin gleaning best practices for encouraging comprehensive home energy improvements. Looking across 30 years of energy efficiency programs that targeted the residential market, many of the same issues that confronted past program administrators are relevant today: How do we cost-effectively motivate customers to take action? Who can we partner with to increase program participation? How do we get residential efficiency programs to scale? While there is no proven formula-and only limited success to date with reliably motivating large numbers of Americans to invest in comprehensive home energy improvements, especially if they are being asked to pay for a majority of the improvement costs-there is a rich and varied history of experiences that new programs can draw upon. Our primary audiences are policy makers and program designers-especially those that are relatively new to the field, such as the over 2,000 towns, cities, states, and regions who are recipients of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act funds for clean energy programs. This report synthesizes lessons from first generation programs, highlights emerging best practices, and suggests methods and approaches to use in designing, implementing, and evaluating these programs. We examined 14 residential energy efficiency programs, conducted an extensive literature review, interviewed industry experts, and surveyed residential contractors to draw out these lessons.

491

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings Title Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-2340e Year of Publication 2009 Authors Piette, Mary Ann, Girish Ghatikar, Sila Kiliccote, David S. Watson, Edward Koch, and Dan Hennage Journal Journal of Computing Science and Information Engineering Volume 9 Issue 2 Keywords communication and standards, market sectors, openadr Abstract This paper describes the concept for and lessons from the development and field-testing of an open, interoperable communications infrastructure to support automated demand response (auto-DR). Automating DR allows greater levels of participation, improved reliability, and repeatability of the DR in participating facilities. This paper also presents the technical and architectural issues associated with auto-DR and description of the demand response automation server (DRAS), the client/server architecture-based middle-ware used to automate the interactions between the utilities or any DR serving entity and their customers for DR programs. Use case diagrams are presented to show the role of the DRAS between utility/ISO and the clients at the facilities.

492

Forecast of California car and truck fuel demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to forecast likely future car and truck fuel demand in California in light of recent and possible additional improvements in vehicle efficiency. Forecasts of gasoline and diesel fuel demand are made based on projections of primary economic, demographic, and transportation technology variables. Projections of car and light truck stock and new sales are based on regression equations developed from historical data. Feasible future vehicle fuel economies are determined from technical improvements possible with existing technology. Several different cases of market-induced efficiency improvement are presented. Anticipated fuel economy improvements induced by federal mileage standards and rising fuel costs will cause lower future fuel demand, even though vehicle miles traveled will continue to increase both on a per capita and total basis. If only relatively low-cost fuel economy improvements are adopted after about 1985, when federal standards require no further improvements, fuel demand will decrease from the 1982 level of 11.7 billion gallons (gasoline equivalent) to 10.6 billion gallons in 2002, about a 9% reduction. Higher fuel economy levels, based on further refinements in existing technology, can produce an additional 7% reduction in fuel demand by 2002.

Stamets, L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

494

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission (FERC) 2006. Assessment of DemandRegulatory Commission (FERC) 2007. Assessment of DemandRegulatory Commission (FERC) 2008a. Wholesale Competition

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data Rate of Electricity Demand Growth Slows, Following the Historical Trend Electricity demand fluctuates in the short term in response to business cycles, weather conditions,...

496

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource Title Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Eto, Joseph H.,...

497

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in...

498

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand ResponseConference on Building Commissioning: April 22 24, 2008al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oakland CA, December. PJM Demand Side Response WorkingPrice Response Program a PJM Economic Load Response ProgramLoad Response Statistics PJM Demand Response Working Group

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z