National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for mass difference measurements

  1. Measurement of the mass difference between $t$ and $\\bar{t}$ quarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    We present a direct measurement of the mass difference between t and {bar t} quarks using t{bar t} candidate events in the lepton+jets channel, collected with the CDF II detector at Fermilab's 1.96 TeV Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. We make an event by event estimate of the mass difference to construct templates for top quark pair signal events and background events. The resulting mass difference distribution of data is compared to templates of signals and background using a maximum likelihood fit. From a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb{sup -1}, we measure a mass difference, {Delta}M{sub top} = M{sub t} - M{sub {bar t}} = -3.3 {+-} 1.4 (stat) {+-} 1.0 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}, approximately two standard deviations away from the CPT hypothesis of zero mass difference. This is the most precise measurement of a mass difference between t and its {bar t} partner to date.

  2. Precision measurement of the mass difference between light nuclei and anti-nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE collaboration

    2015-08-17

    The measurement of the mass differences for systems bound by the strong force has reached a very high precision with protons and anti-protons. The extension of such measurement from (anti-)baryons to (anti-)nuclei allows one to probe any difference in the interactions between nucleons and anti-nucleons encoded in the (anti-)nuclei masses. This force is a remnant of the underlying strong interaction among quarks and gluons and can be described by effective theories, but cannot yet be directly derived from quantum chromodynamics. Here we report a measurement of the difference between the ratios of the mass and charge of deuterons and anti-deuterons, and $^{3}{\\rm He}$ and $^3\\overline{\\rm He}$ nuclei carried out with the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) detector in Pb-Pb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 2.76 TeV. Our direct measurement of the mass-over-charge differences confirm CPT invariance to an unprecedented precision in the sector of light nuclei. This fundamental symmetry of nature, which exchanges particles with anti-particles, implies that all physics laws are the same under the simultaneous reversal of charge(s) (charge conjugation C), reflection of spatial coordinates (parity transformation P) and time inversion (T).

  3. Measurement of the Mass Difference between t and t[over-bar] Quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We present a direct measurement of the mass difference between t and t[over-bar] quarks using tt[over-bar] candidate events in the lepton+jets channel, collected with the CDF II detector at Fermilab’s 1.96 TeV Tevatron ...

  4. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Joachim [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), IEKP, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  5. Solution mass measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, W.; Marshall, R.S.; Osborn, L.C.; Picard, R.; Thomas, C.C. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    This report describes the efforts to develop and demonstrate a solution mass measurement system for use at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. Because of inaccuracy of load cell measurements, our major effort was directed towards the pneumatic bubbler tube. The differential pressure between the air inlet to the bubbler tube and the glovebox interior is measured and is proportional to the solution mass in the tank. An inexpensive, reliable pressure transducer system for measuring solution mass in vertical, cylindrical tanks was developed, tested, and evaluated in a laboratory test bed. The system can withstand the over- and underpressures resulting from solution transfer operations and can prevent solution backup into the measurement pressure transducer during transfers. Drifts, noise, quantization error, and other effects limit the accuracy to 30 g. A transportable calibration system using a precision machined tank, pneumatic bubbler tubes, and a Ruska DDR 6000 electromanometer was designed, fabricated, tested, and evaluated. Resolution of the system is +-3.5 g out of 50 kg. The calibration error is 5 g, using room-temperature water as the calibrating fluid. Future efforts will be directed towards in-plant test and evaluation of the tank measurement systems. 16 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Cerrito

    2004-07-16

    Preliminary results on the measurement of the top quark mass at the Tevatron Collider are presented. In the dilepton decay channel, the CDF Collaboration measures m{sub t} = 175.0{sub -16.9}{sup +17.4}(stat.){+-}8.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 126 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV (Run II). In the lepton plus jets channel, the CDF Collaboration measures 177.5{sub -9.4}{sup +12.7}(stat.) {+-} 7.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 102 pb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The D0 Collaboration has newly applied a likelihood technique to improve the analysis of {approx} 125 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV (Run I), with the result: m{sub t} = 180.1 {+-} 3.6(stat.) {+-}3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The latter is combined with all the measurements based on the data collected in Run I to yield the most recent and comprehensive experimental determination of the top quark mass: m{sub t} = 178.0 {+-} 2.7(stat.) {+-} 3.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  7. Measurement of the mass difference between top and anti-top quarks in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A measurement of the mass difference between top and anti-top quarks is presented. In a 4.7 fb[superscript ?1] data sample of proton–proton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, events ...

  8. Top Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. H. L. S. Wang

    2009-04-02

    We present the latest measurements of the top quark mass from the Tevatron. The different top decay channels and measurement techniques used for these results are also described. The world average of the top quark mass based on some of these new results combined with previous results is mtop=172.6+-1.4 GeV.

  9. Top Quark Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhenyu Ye; for CDF; D0 collaborations

    2011-07-22

    We report the latest results on the top-quark mass and on the top-antitop mass difference from the CDF and D0 collaborations using data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collider at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV. We discuss general issues in top-quark mass measurements and present new results from direct measurements and from top-pair production cross-section. We also report new results on the top-antitop mass difference.

  10. Electromagnetic mass difference on the lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuke Namekawa; Yoshio Kikukawa

    2005-09-24

    We calculate electromagnetic mass difference of mesons using a method proposed by Duncan {\\it et al}. The RG-improved gauge action and the non-compact Abelian gauge action are employed to generate configurations. Quark propagators in the range of $m_{PS}/m_{V}=0.76-0.51$ are obtained with the meanfield-improved clover quark action. Chiral and continuum extrapolations are performed and the results are compared with experiments. Finite size effects are also examined. Quark masses are extracted from the measured spectrum. Our preliminary values for light quark masses are $m_{u}^{\\bar{MS}}(\\mu =2 {GeV}) = 3.03(19)$ MeV, $m_{d}^{\\bar{MS}}(\\mu = 2 {GeV}) = 4.44(28)$ MeV, $m_{s}^{\\bar{MS}}(\\mu = 2 {GeV}) = 99.2(52)$ MeV.

  11. Top Mass Measurements with the D0 Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Boline

    2015-01-18

    I present recent results related to the measurement of the top quark mass, using $p\\bar{p}$ collisions recorded with the D{\\O}Detector at the Tevatron. The results are: A direct measurement of the mass difference between top and anti-top quarks, Measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets channel and in the dilepton channel.

  12. Experiments for the absolute neutrino mass measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Steidl

    2009-06-02

    Experimental results and perspectives of different methods to measure the absolute mass scale of neutrinos are briefly reviewed. The mass sensitivities from cosmological observations, double beta decay searches and single beta decay spectroscopy differ in sensitivity and model dependance. Next generation experiments in the three fields reach the sensitivity for the lightest mass eigenstate of $m_1<0.2eV$, which will finally answer the question if neutrino mass eigenstates are degenerate. This sensitivity is also reached by the only model-independent approach of single beta decay (KATRIN experiment). For higher sensitivities on cost of model-dependance the neutrinoless double beta decay search and cosmological observation have to be applied. Here, in the next decade sensitivities are approached with the potential to test inverted hierarchy models.

  13. Top quark mass measurements at the D0 experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Grohsjean

    2009-05-30

    The most recent measurements of the top quark mass at the D0 experiment are summarized. Different techniques and final states are used and the top quark mass is determined to be mtop=172.8+-1.6(stat+syst)GeV/c^2. In addition, a new, indirect measurement comparing the measured cross section to theoretical calculations is discussed. Both, the direct and the indirect measurement of the top quark mass are in good agreement.

  14. Mass measurements of rare isotopes with SHIPTRAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dworschak, M.

    2010-06-01

    The Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP was set up with the aim to perform high-precision mass measurements. Since autumn 2005, the masses of 63 neutron-deficient nuclides in the mass range from A = 80 to A = 254 have been determined with relative uncertainties of down to 10{sup -8}. Nuclides with half-lives down to 580 ms and production rates of less than one atom per minute were investigated. The results are valuable for nuclear structure investigations and nuclear astrophysics. The most remarkable successes were the first direct mass measurements beyond the proton drip line and in the region above Z = 100.

  15. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brubaker, Erik; /Chicago U., EFI

    2006-05-01

    The mass of the top quark M{sub top} is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model and as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) has a robust program of top quark mass analyses, including the most precise single measurement, M{sub top} = 173.4 {+-} 2.8 GeV/c{sup 2}, using 680 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data. A combination of current results from CDF gives M{sub top} = 172.0 {+-} 2.7 GeV/c{sup 2}, surpassing the stated goal of 3 GeV/c{sup 2} precision using 2 fb{sup -1} of data. Finally, a combination with current D0 results gives a world average top quark mass of 172.5 {+-} 2.3 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  16. Top quark mass measurement using the template method at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T

    2011-06-03

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels of t$\\bar{t}$ decays using the template method. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at Tevatron with ?s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector. The measurement is performed by constructing templates of three kinematic variables in the lepton+jets and two kinematic variables in the dilepton channel. The variables are two reconstructed top quark masses from different jets-to-quarks combinations and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton+jets channel, and amore »reconstructed top quark mass and mT2, a variable related to the transverse mass in events with two missing particles, in the dilepton channel. The simultaneous fit of the templates from signal and background events in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels to the data yields a measured top quark mass of Mtop = 172.1±1.1 (stat)±0.9 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  17. Top quark mass measurement using the template method at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T

    2011-06-03

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels of tt? decays using the template method. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb-1 of pp? collisions at Tevatron with ?s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector. The measurement is performed by constructing templates of three kinematic variables in the lepton+jets and two kinematic variables in the dilepton channel. The variables are two reconstructed top quark masses from different jets-to-quarks combinations and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton+jets channel, and a reconstructed top quark mass and mT2, a variable related to the transverse mass in events with two missing particles, in the dilepton channel. The simultaneous fit of the templates from signal and background events in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels to the data yields a measured top quark mass of Mtop = 172.1±1.1 (stat)±0.9 (syst) GeV/c2.

  18. Top quark mass measurement using the template method at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B [Oviedo U.; Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G [Fermilab; Appel, J A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A [Purdue U.; Arisawa, T [Waseda U.; Dubna, JINR

    2011-06-03

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels of tt? decays using the template method. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb-1 of pp? collisions at Tevatron with ?s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector. The measurement is performed by constructing templates of three kinematic variables in the lepton+jets and two kinematic variables in the dilepton channel. The variables are two reconstructed top quark masses from different jets-to-quarks combinations and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton+jets channel, and a reconstructed top quark mass and mT2, a variable related to the transverse mass in events with two missing particles, in the dilepton channel. The simultaneous fit of the templates from signal and background events in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels to the data yields a measured top quark mass of Mtop = 172.1±1.1 (stat)±0.9 (syst) GeV/c2.

  19. BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT A.RASPEREZA DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D­22607#erential luminosity spectrum measurements and beam energy spread on the precision of the Higgs boson mass measurement possible impact of the beam related systematic errors on the Higgs boson mass measurement is discussed

  20. Using buoyant mass to measure the growth of single cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godin, Michel

    We used a suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) combined with picoliter-scale microfluidic control to measure buoyant mass and determine the 'instantaneous' growth rates of individual cells. The SMR measures mass with ...

  1. BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT A.RASPEREZA DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 and differential luminosity spectrum measurements and beam energy spread on the precision of the Higgs boson mass such as Higgs boson mass, decay branching fractions and production rate. However, most of these studies did

  2. LCPHSM2001054 Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LC­PHSM­2001­054 Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass and Cross Section with a Linear e + e \\Gamma for the measurement of the Higgs boson mass and produc­ tion cross section. An integrated luminosity of 500 fb \\Gamma1 is assumed. For Higgs boson masses of 120, 150 and 180 GeV the uncertainty on the Higgs boson mass

  3. Direct neutrino mass measurements after PLANCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formaggio, Joseph A.

    The absolute mass scale of neutrinos remains an open question subject to experimental investigation from both particle physics and cosmology. Over the next decade, a number of experiments from both disciplines will attempt ...

  4. Enthalpy and mass flowrate measurements for two-phase geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Enthalpy and mass flowrate measurements for two-phase geothermal production by Tracer dilution techniques Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  5. High precision mass measurements of odd-odd T=1 nuclides for the study of the Isobaric Multiplet Mass Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCormick, M; Atanasov, D; Blaum, K; Boehm, Ch; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; Cocolios, T E; Eliseev, S; Eronen, T; George, S; Herfurth, F; Herlert, A; Kisler, D; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Litvinov, Yu A; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Minaya Ramirez, E; Naimi, S; Neidherr, D; Rosenbusch, M; de Roubin, A; Schweikhard, L; Welker, A; Wienholtz, F; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K; Jokinen, A; Moore, I D; CERN. Geneva. ISOLDE and neutron Time-of-Flight Experiments Committee; INTC

    2014-01-01

    High precision mass measurements of odd-odd T=1 nuclides for the study of the Isobaric Multiplet Mass Equation

  6. Effects of finite volume on the KL – KS mass difference

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Christ, N.? H.; Feng, X.; Martinelli, G.; Sachrajda, C.? T.

    2015-06-01

    Phenomena that involve two or more on-shell particles are particularly sensitive to the effects of finite volume and require special treatment when computed using lattice QCD. In this paper we generalize the results of Lüscher and Lellouch and Lüscher, which determine the leading-order effects of finite volume on the two-particle spectrum and two-particle decay amplitudes to determine the finite-volume effects in the second-order mixing of the K? and K?? states. We extend the methods of Kim, Sachrajda, and Sharpe to provide a direct, uniform treatment of these three, related, finite-volume corrections. In particular, the leading, finite-volume corrections to the KLmore »– KS mass difference ?MK and the CP-violating parameter ?K are determined, including the potentially large effects which can arise from the near degeneracy of the kaon mass and the energy of a finite-volume, two-pion state.« less

  7. Measuring the mass, density, and size of particles and cells using a suspended microchannel resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godin, Michel; Bryan, Andrea K.; Burg, Thomas P.; Babcock, Ken; Manalis, Scott R.

    2007-09-17

    We demonstrate the measurement of mass, density, and size of cells and nanoparticles using suspended microchannel resonators. The masses of individual particles are quantified as transient frequency shifts, while the particles transit a microfluidic channel embedded in the resonating cantilever. Mass histograms resulting from these data reveal the distribution of a population of heterogeneously sized particles. Particle density is inferred from measurements made in different carrier fluids since the frequency shift for a particle is proportional to the mass difference relative to the displaced solution. We have characterized the density of polystyrene particles, Escherichia coli, and human red blood cells with a resolution down to 10{sup -4} g/cm{sup 3}.

  8. Charge dependent relation between the masses of different generations and Neutrino masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branislav Sazdovic

    2015-01-29

    Despite the enormous achievements, the Standard model of Particle physics can not be consider as complete theory of fundamental interactions. Among other things, it can not describe the gravitational interaction and it depends on 19 parameters. The Standard model includes 12 fermions (matter elementary particles with spin $\\frac{1}{2}$) which are divided in three generations, groups with same interactions but different masses. Each generation can be classified into two leptons (with electric charges $Q=-1$, electron-like and $Q=0$, neutrino) and two quarks (with electric charges $Q=-\\frac{1}{3}$, down-type and $Q=\\frac{2}{3}$, up-type). However, the understanding of the relationship between generations and ratio of masses of different generations are unknown. Here we show that there exists the simple relation between masses of different generations which depend only on the electric charges for $Q=-1,\\, \\, Q=-\\frac{1}{3}$ and $Q=\\frac{2}{3}$. It is in pretty good agreement with experimental data. Assuming that the same relation valid for $Q=0$, we are able to calculate neutrino masses. Therefore, our results could pave the way for further investigations beyond Standard model.

  9. Charge dependent relation between the masses of different generations and Neutrino masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sazdovic, Branislav

    2015-01-01

    Despite the enormous achievements, the Standard model of Particle physics can not be consider as complete theory of fundamental interactions. Among other things, it can not describe the gravitational interaction and it depends on 19 parameters. The Standard model includes 12 fermions (matter elementary particles with spin $\\frac{1}{2}$) which are divided in three generations, groups with same interactions but different masses. Each generation can be classified into two leptons (with electric charges $Q=-1$, electron-like and $Q=0$, neutrino) and two quarks (with electric charges $Q=-\\frac{1}{3}$, down-type and $Q=\\frac{2}{3}$, up-type). However, the understanding of the relationship between generations and ratio of masses of different generations are unknown. Here we show that there exists the simple relation between masses of different generations which depend only on the electric charges for $Q=-1,\\, \\, Q=-\\frac{1}{3}$ and $Q=\\frac{2}{3}$. It is in pretty good agreement with experimental data. Assuming that...

  10. Precision Top-Quark Mass Measurement at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron ?s=1.96??TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ...

  11. Sensitivity bias in the mass-radius distribution from Transit Timing Variations and Radial Velocity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steffen, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent discussions, both in private and in the literature, we use a Monte Carlo simulation of planetary systems to investigate sources of bias in determining the mass-radius distribution of exoplanets for the two primary techniques used to measure planetary masses---Radial Velocities (RVs) and Transit Timing Variations (TTVs). We assert that mass measurements derived from these two methods are comparably reliable---as the physics underlying their respective signals is well understood. Nevertheless, their sensitivity to planet mass varies with the properties of the planets themselves. We find that for a given planet size, the RV method tends to find planets with higher mass while the sensitivity of TTVs is more uniform. This ``sensitivity bias'' implies that a complete census of TTV systems is likely to yield a more robust estimate of the mass-radius distribution provided there are not important physical differences between planets near and far from mean-motion resonance. We discuss differences in...

  12. A top quark mass measurement using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linacre, Jacob Thomas; /Oxford U.

    2010-02-01

    A measurement of the mass of the top quark is presented, using top-antitop pair (t{bar t}) candidate events for the lepton+jets decay channel. The measurement makes use of Tevatron p{bar p} collision data at centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected at the CDF detector. The top quark mass is measured by employing an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal (t{bar t}) and background (W+jets) matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterised jet-to-parton mapping functions. The likelihood function is maximised with respect to the top quark mass, the fraction of signal events, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) provides an in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using 578 lepton+jets candidate events corresponding to 3.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, the top quark mass is measured to be m{sub t} = 172.4 {+-} 1.4 (stat+{Delta}{sub JES}) {+-} 1.3 (syst) GeV=c{sup 2}, one of the most precise single measurements to date.

  13. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.

    1999-07-14

    radiative corrections, the value of the top quark mass affects predic- tions of the standard model for many processes. For ex- ample, the prediction for the mass of the W boson varies by approximately 7 MeV1 for every 1 GeV change in the mass of the top... subdetectors that measure the trajectories of charged par- ticles: a vertex drift chamber, a transition radiation detector, a central drift chamber, and two forward drift chambers. These chambers also measure ionization to identify tracks from single charged...

  14. Top-quark mass measurements: Alternative techniques (LHC + Tevatron)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanie Adomeit

    2014-11-28

    Measurements of the top-quark mass employing alternative techniques are presented, performed by the D0 and CDF collaborations at the Tevatron as well as the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC. The alternative methods presented include measurements using the lifetime of $B$-hadrons, the transverse momentum of charged leptons and the endpoints of kinematic distributions in top quark anti-quark pair ($t\\bar{t}$) final states. The extraction of the top-quark pole mass from the $t\\bar{t}$ production cross-section and the normalized differential $t\\bar{t}$ + 1-jet cross-section are discussed as well as the top-quark mass extraction using fixed-order QCD predictions at detector level. Finally, a measurement of the top-quark mass using events enhanced in single top t-channel production is presented.

  15. Anomaly Mediated Gaugino Mass and Path-Integral Measure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keisuke Harigaya; Masahiro Ibe

    2014-09-16

    In recent years, there have been controversy concerning the anomaly mediated gaugino mass in the superspace formalism of supergravity. In this paper, we reexamine the gaugino mass term in this formalism by paying particular attention to symmetry which controls gaugino masses in supergravity. We first discuss super-Diffeomorphism invariance of path-integral measures of charged superfields. As we will show, the super-Diffeomorphism invariant measure is not invariant under a super-Weyl transformation, which is the origin of the anomaly mediated gaugino mass. We show how the anomaly mediated gaugino mass is expressed as a local operator in a Wilsonian effective action in a super-Diffeomorphism covariant way. We also obtain a gaugino mass term independent of the gauge choice of the fictitious super-Weyl symmetry in the super-Weyl compensator formalism, which reproduces the widely accepted result. Besides, we discuss how to reconcile the gaugino mass term in the local Wilsonian effective action and the gaugino mass term appearing in a non-local 1PI quantum effective action.

  16. Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Fengshou Zhang

    2010-11-17

    The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20~250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semi-empirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

  17. Measurements of the top quark mass at the tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Brandt; for the CDF Collaboration; for the D0 Collaboration

    2012-04-04

    The mass of the top quark (\\mtop) is a fundamental parameter of the standard model (SM). Currently, its most precise measurements are performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron $p\\bar p$ collider at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt s=1.96 \\TeV$. We review the most recent of those measurements, performed on data samples of up to 8.7 \\fb\\ of integrated luminosity. The Tevatron combination using up to 5.8 fb$^{-1}$ of data results in a preliminary world average top quark mass of $m_{\\rm top} = 173.2 \\pm 0.9$ GeV. This corresponds to a relative precision of about 0.54%. We conclude with an outlook of anticipated precision the final measurement of \\mtop at the Tevatron.

  18. Measurements of the top quark mass at the tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Oleg

    2012-01-01

    The mass of the top quark (\\mtop) is a fundamental parameter of the standard model (SM). Currently, its most precise measurements are performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron $p\\bar p$ collider at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt s=1.96 \\TeV$. We review the most recent of those measurements, performed on data samples of up to 8.7 \\fb\\ of integrated luminosity. The Tevatron combination using up to 5.8 fb$^{-1}$ of data results in a preliminary world average top quark mass of $m_{\\rm top} = 173.2 \\pm 0.9$ GeV. This corresponds to a relative precision of about 0.54%. We conclude with an outlook of anticipated precision the final measurement of \\mtop at the Tevatron.

  19. Intracellular Water Exchange for Measuring the Dry Mass, Water Mass and Changes in Chemical Composition of Living Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cermak, Nathan

    We present a method for direct non-optical quantification of dry mass, dry density and water mass of single living cells in suspension. Dry mass and dry density are obtained simultaneously by measuring a cell’s buoyant ...

  20. Lina Galtieri: Top Mass Measurements. Aspen2010, January 17-23 1 Precision Top Mass Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galtieri, Lina

    for each mt value Maximize the likelihood for the entire sample. Examples of variables used: mt after measured quantities Incoming partons parton level quantities normalization acceptance Transfer functions

  1. Microwave measurement of the mass of frozen hydrogen pellets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Talanker, Vera (Golden, CO); Greenwald, Martin (Belmont, MA)

    1990-01-01

    A nondestructive apparatus and method for measuring the mass of a moving object, based on the perturbation of the dielectric character of a resonant microwave cavity caused by the object passing through the cavity. An oscillator circuit is formed with a resonant cavity in a positive feedback loop of a microwave power amplifier. The moving object perturbs the resonant characteristics of the cavity causing a shift in the operating frequency of the oscillator proportional to the ratio of the pellet volume to the volume of the cavity. Signals from the cavity oscillation are mixed with a local oscillator. Then the IF frequency from the mixer is measured thereby providing a direct measurement of pellet mass based upon known physical properties and relationships. This apparatus and method is particularly adapted for the measurement of frozen hydrogen pellets.

  2. Improvements to TITAN's Mass Measurement and Decay Spectroscopy Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Lascar; A. A. Kwiatkowski; U. Chowdhury; A. Finlay; A. T. Gallant; M. Good; R. Klawitter; B. Kootte; K. G. Leach; A. Lennarz; E. Leistenschneider; B. E. Schultz; R. Schupp; D. A. Short; C. Andreoiu; J. Dilling; G. Gwinner

    2015-08-27

    The study of nuclei farther from the valley of $\\beta$-stability goes hand-in-hand with shorter-lived nuclei produced in smaller abundances than their more stable counterparts. The measurement, to high precision, of nuclear masses therefore requires innovations in technique in order to keep up. TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN) facility deploys three ion traps, with a fourth in the commissioning phase, to perform and support Penning trap mass spectrometry and in-trap decay spectroscopy on some of the shortest-lived nuclei ever studied. We report on recent advances and updates to the TITAN facility since the 2012 EMIS Conference. TITAN's charge breeding capabilities have been improved and in-trap decay spectroscopy can be performed in TITAN's electron beam ion trap (EBIT). Higher charge states can improve the precision of mass measurements, reduce the beam-time requirements for a given measurement, improve beam purity and opens the door to access, via in-trap decay and recapture, isotopes not available from the ISOL method. This was recently demonstrated during TITAN's mass measurement of $^{30}$Al. The EBIT's decay spectroscopy setup was commissioned with a successful branching ratio and half-life measurement of $^{124}$Cs. Charge breeding in the EBIT increases the energy spread of the ion bunch sent to the Penning trap for mass measurement so a new Cooler Penning Trap (CPET), which aims to cool highly charge ions with an electron plasma, is undergoing online commissioning. Already, CPET has demonstrated the trapping and self-cooling of a room-temperature electron plasma which was stored for several minutes. A new detector has been installed inside the CPET magnetic field which will allow for in-magnet charged particle detection.

  3. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ntampaka, M; Sutherland, D J; Fromenteau, S; Poczos, B; Schneider, J

    2015-01-01

    We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers and show that a modern machine learning (ML) algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create two mock catalogs from Multidark's publicly-available N-body MDPL1 simulation, one with perfect galaxy cluster membership information and the other where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line of sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. Assuming perfect membership knowledge, this unrealistic case produces a wide fractional mass error distribution, with width = 0.87. Interlopers introduce additional scatter, significantly widening the error distribution further (width = 2.13). We employ the Support Distribution Machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to...

  4. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita. 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) faces enormous scientific and engineering challenges associated with the remediation of legacy contamination at former nuclear weapons production facilities. Selection, design and optimization of appropriate site remedies (e.g., pump-and-treat, biostimulation, or monitored natural attenuation) requires reliable predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport; however, our current modeling capabilities are limited by an incomplete understanding of multi-scale mass transfer—its rates, scales, and the heterogeneity of controlling parameters. At many DOE sites, long “tailing” behavior, concentration rebound, and slower-than-expected cleanup are observed; these observations are all consistent with multi-scale mass transfer [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995; Haggerty et al., 2000; 2004], which renders pump-and-treat remediation and biotransformation inefficient and slow [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1994; Harvey et al., 1994; Wilson, 1997]. Despite the importance of mass transfer, there are significant uncertainties associated with controlling parameters, and the prevalence of mass transfer remains a point of debate [e.g., Hill et al., 2006; Molz et al., 2006] for lack of experimental methods to verify and measure it in situ or independently of tracer breakthrough. There is a critical need for new field-experimental techniques to measure mass transfer in-situ and estimate multi-scale and spatially variable mass-transfer parame

  5. Mass measurements near the Z = N line with JYFLTRAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kankainen, Anu; Collaboration: JYFLTRAP Collaboration

    2011-11-30

    Masses of nuclides involved in astrophysical rp and {nu}p processes have to be known precisely in order to model these processes reliably. Mass excesses for 90 ground state and 8 isomeric states of neutron-deficient nuclides have been determined with a precision of better than 10 keV with the JYFLTRAP double Penning trap mass spectrometer at the Ion-Guide Isotope Separator On-Line facility in Jyvaeskylae. Highlights of the measurements related to nuclear astrophysics are given. Some of the measured isomers, such as {sup 53}Co{sup m}, {sup 90}Tc{sup m}, and {sup 95}Pd{sup m}, and implications for the excitation energy of the 21{sup +} isomer in {sup 94}Ag are briefly discussed.

  6. Fundamental Mass Flow Measurement of Solid Department of Agricultural Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA A generic mass flow measurement device formation and direct counting of individual particles is impossible. If a method could be available correspondence to Tony Grift, Department of Agricultural Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana

  7. Precision Top-Quark Mass Measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-07-01

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb{sup -1}. Using a sample of t{bar t} candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the W boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, mtop = 172.85 {+-} 0.71 (stat) {+-} 0.85 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  8. KATRIN: an experiment to measure the neutrino mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. H. Robertson; for the KATRIN Collaboration

    2007-12-23

    KATRIN is a very large scale tritium-beta-decay experiment to determine the mass of the neutrino. It is presently under construction at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, and makes use of the Tritium Laboratory built there for the ITER project. The combination of a very large retarding-potential electrostatic-magnetic spectrometer and an intense gaseous molecular tritium source makes possible a sensitivity to neutrino mass of 0.2 eV, about an order of magnitude below present laboratory limits. The measurement is kinematic and independent of whether the neutrino is Dirac or Majorana. The status of the project is summarized briefly in this report.

  9. Fission fragment mass reconstruction from Si surface barrier detector measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Velkovska; R. L. McGrath

    1999-07-12

    A method for plasma delay and pulse-height defect corrections for Si surface barrier detectors (SBD) is presented. Based on known empirical formulae, simple approximations involving the measured time-of-flight (TOF) and energy of the ions were found and a mass reconstruction procedure was developed. The procedure was applied for obtaining the fission fragment mass and angular distributions from the $^{64}$ Ni+$^{197}$Au reaction at 418 MeV and 383 MeV incident energy using an array of eight SBDs.

  10. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick David; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy C.; Haggerty, Roy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John W.

    2014-11-25

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita.

  11. Top-quark mass measurement using events with missing transverse energy and jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Anastassov, A; Amidei, D; Antos, J; Annovi, A

    2013-07-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass with tt? events using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb -1 of pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with ?s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF II Detector. We select events having no identified charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet containing a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b quark. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic tt? decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons, which are usually not included in the top-quark mass measurements. The measurement uses as kinematic variables the invariant mass of two jets consistent with the mass of the W boson, and the invariant masses of two different three-jet combinations. We fit the data to signal templates of varying top-quark masses and background templates, and measure a top-quark mass of Mtop = 172.3 ± 2.4 (stat) ± 1.0 (syst) GeV/c2.

  12. Top-quark mass measurement using events with missing transverse energy and jets at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Anastassov, A; Amidei, D; Antos, J; Annovi, A

    2013-07-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass with tt? events using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb -1 of pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with ?s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF II Detector. We select events having no identified charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet containing a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b quark. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic tt? decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons, which are usually not included in the top-quark mass measurements. The measurement uses as kinematic variables the invariant mass of two jets consistent with the mass of the W boson, and the invariant masses of two different three-jet combinations. We fit the data to signal templates of varying top-quark masses and background templates, and measure a top-quark mass of Mtop = 172.3 ± 2.4 (stat) ± 1.0 (syst) GeV/c2.

  13. Top-quark mass measurement using events with missing transverse energy and jets at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Anastassov, A; Amidei, D; Antos, J; Annovi, A

    2013-07-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass with tt? events using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb -1 of pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with ?s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF II Detector. We select events having no identified charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet containing a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b quark. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic tt? decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons, which are usually not included inmore »the top-quark mass measurements. The measurement uses as kinematic variables the invariant mass of two jets consistent with the mass of the W boson, and the invariant masses of two different three-jet combinations. We fit the data to signal templates of varying top-quark masses and background templates, and measure a top-quark mass of Mtop = 172.3 ± 2.4 (stat) ± 1.0 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  14. Top quark mass measurement from dilepton events at CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2005-12-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass using events collected by the CDF II Detector from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We calculate a likelihood function for the top mass in events that are consistent with t{bar t} {yields} {bar b}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}b{ell}{prime}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{prime} decays. The likelihood is formed as the convolution of the leading-order matrix element and detector resolution functions. The joint likelihood is the product of likelihoods for each of 33 events collected in 340 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, yielding a top quark mass M{sub t} = 165.2 {+-} 6.1(stat.) {+-} 3.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. This first application of a matrix-element technique to t{bar t} {yields} b{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{bar b}{ell}{prime}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}, decays gives the most precise single measurement of M{sub t} in dilepton events. Combined with other CDF Run II measurements using dilepton events, we measure M{sub t} = 167.9 {+-} 5.2(stat.) {+-} 3.7(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  15. Improved W boson mass measurement with the DØ detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.

    2002-07-02

    boson mass using the precision hadronic showers. The first hadronic layer is also used to capture any energy escaping the EM layers for electrons or photons. The muon detection system outside the calorimeters is not used in this measurement, except... cryostats: a central calorim- eter and two end calorimeters. Each calorimeter has an inner section for the detection of electromagnetic ~EM! particles; these consist of twenty-one uranium plates of 3 mm thick- ness for the central calorimeter or twenty 4 mm...

  16. Mass Measurements Demonstrate a Strong N =28 Shell Gap in Argon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Meisel; S. George; S. Ahn; J. Browne; D. Bazin; B. A. Brown; J. F. Carpino; H. Chung; R. H. Cyburt; A. Estradé; M. Famiano; A. Gade; C. Langer; M. Matoš; W. Mittig; F. Montes; D. J. Morrissey; J. Pereira; H. Schatz; J. Schatz; M. Scott; D. Shapira; K. Smith; J. Stevens; W. Tan; O. Tarasov; S. Towers; K. Wimmer; J. R. Winkelbauer; J. Yurkon; R. G. T. Zegers

    2015-10-06

    We present results from recent time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. We report the first mass measurements of 48Ar and 49Ar and find atomic mass excesses of -22.28(31) MeV and -17.8(1.1) MeV, respectively. These masses provide strong evidence for the closed shell nature of neutron number N=28 in argon, which is therefore the lowest even-Z element exhibiting the N=28 closed shell. The resulting trend in binding-energy differences, which probes the strength of the N=28 shell, compares favorably with shellmodel calculations in the sd-pf shell using SDPF-U and SDPF-MU Hamiltonians.

  17. Observation of the charmed baryon sigma(c)+ and measurement of the isospin mass splittings of the sigma(c)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1993-11-01

    We observe the SIGMA(c)+ baryon decaying to LAMBDA(c)+pi0 and measure the mass difference M(SIGMA(c)+) - M(LAMBDA(c)+) to be 168.5 +/- 0.4 +/- 0.2 MeV/c2. We also measure the mass differences M(SIGMA(c)++) - M(LAMBDA(c)+) and M(SIGMA(c)0) - M(LAMBDA(c...

  18. Mass Measurement Using Energy Spectra in Three-body Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Kim, Doojin; Wardlow, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    In previous works we have demonstrated how the energy distribution of massless decay products in two body decays can be used to measure the mass of decaying particles. In this work we show how such results can be generalized to the case of multi-body decays. The key ideas that allow us to deal with multi-body final states are an extension of our previous results to the case of massive decay products and the factorization of the multi-body phase space. The mass measurement strategy that we propose is distinct from alternative methods because it does not require an accurate reconstruction of the entire event, as it does not involve, for instance, the missing transverse momentum, but rather requires measuring only the visible decay products of the decay of interest. To demonstrate the general strategy, we study a supersymmetric model wherein pair-produced gluinos each decay to a stable neutralino and a bottom quark-antiquark pair via an off-shell bottom squark. The combinatorial background stemming from the indi...

  19. arXiv:hepex/0505096 Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ################ arXiv:hep­ex/0505096 v1 30 May 2005 Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass for the measurement of the Higgs boson mass. An integrated luminosity of 500 fb 1 is assumed. For Higgs boson masses of 120, 150 and 180 GeV the uncertainty on the Higgs boson mass measurement is estimated to be 40, 65

  20. A PRECISE MASS MEASUREMENT OF THE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BINARY PULSAR PSR J1802 - 2124

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferdman, R. D.; Cognard, I.; Desvignes, G.; Theureau, G. [Station de Radioastronomie de Nancay, Observatoire de Paris, 18330 Nancay (France); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121, Bonn (Germany); McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Nice, D. J. [Physics Department, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010 (United States); Manchester, R. N.; Hobbs, G. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Lyne, A. G.; Faulkner, A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Possenti, A. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Loc. Poggio dei Pini, 09012 Capoterra (Italy); Demorest, P. B. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Backer, D. C., E-mail: robert.ferdman@obs-nancay.f [Department of Astronomy and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-03-10

    PSR J1802 - 2124 is a 12.6 ms pulsar in a 16.8 hr binary orbit with a relatively massive white dwarf (WD) companion. These properties make it a member of the intermediate-mass class of binary pulsar (IMBP) systems. We have been timing this pulsar since its discovery in 2002. Concentrated observations at the Green Bank Telescope, augmented with data from the Parkes and Nancay observatories, have allowed us to determine the general relativistic Shapiro delay. This has yielded pulsar and WD mass measurements of 1.24 +- 0.11 M{sub sun} and 0.78 +- 0.04 M{sub sun} (68% confidence), respectively. The low mass of the pulsar, the high mass of the WD companion, the short orbital period, and the pulsar spin period may be explained by the system having gone through a common-envelope phase in its evolution. We argue that selection effects may contribute to the relatively small number of known IMBPs.

  1. Measuring the Density Fluctuation From the Cluster Gas Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuhiro Shimasaku

    1997-01-27

    We investigate the gas mass function of clusters of galaxies to measure the density fluctuation spectrum on cluster scales. The baryon abundance confined in rich clusters is computed from the gas mass function and compared with the mean baryon density in the universe which is predicted by the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. This baryon fraction and the slope of the gas mass function put constraints on $\\sigma_8$, the rms linear fluctuation on scales of $8h^{-1}\\Mpc$, and the slope of the fluctuation spectrum, where $h$ is the Hubble constant in units of 100 $\\kms \\oMpc$. We find $\\sigma_8 = 0.80 \\pm 0.15$ and $n \\sim -1.5$ for $0.5 \\le h \\le 0.8$, where we assume that the density spectrum is approximated by a power law on cluster scales: $\\sigma(r) \\propto r^{-{3+n\\over{2}}}$. Our value of $\\sigma_8$ is independent of the density parameter, $\\Omega_0$, and thus we can estimate $\\Omega_0$ by combining $\\sigma_8$ obtained in this study with those from $\\Omega_0$-dependent analyses to date. We find that $\\sigma_8(\\Omega_0)$ derived from the cluster abundance such as the temperature function gives $\\Omega_0 \\sim 0.5$ while $\\sigma_8(\\Omega_0)$ measured from the peculiar velocity field of galaxies gives $\\Omega_0 \\sim 0.2-1$, depending on the technique used to analyze peculiar velocity data. Constraints are also derived for open, spatially flat, and tilted Cold Dark Matter models and for Cold + Hot Dark Matter models.

  2. Pinning down the superfluid and measuring masses using pulsar glitches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Wynn C G; Antonopoulou, Danai; Andersson, Nils

    2015-01-01

    Pulsars are known for their superb timing precision, although glitches can interrupt the regular timing behavior when the stars are young. These glitches are thought to be caused by interactions between normal and superfluid matter in the crust of the star. However, glitching pulsars such as Vela have been shown to require a superfluid reservoir that greatly exceeds that available in the crust. We examine a model in which glitches tap the superfluid in the core. We test a variety of theoretical superfluid models against the most recent glitch data and find that only one model can successfully explain up to 45 years of observational data. We develop a new technique for combining radio and X-ray data to measure pulsar masses, thereby demonstrating how current and future telescopes can probe fundamental physics such as superfluidity near nuclear saturation.

  3. Pinning down the superfluid and measuring masses using pulsar glitches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wynn C. G. Ho; Cristobal M. Espinoza; Danai Antonopoulou; Nils Andersson

    2015-10-01

    Pulsars are known for their superb timing precision, although glitches can interrupt the regular timing behavior when the stars are young. These glitches are thought to be caused by interactions between normal and superfluid matter in the crust of the star. However, glitching pulsars such as Vela have been shown to require a superfluid reservoir that greatly exceeds that available in the crust. We examine a model in which glitches tap the superfluid in the core. We test a variety of theoretical superfluid models against the most recent glitch data and find that only one model can successfully explain up to 45 years of observational data. We develop a new technique for combining radio and X-ray data to measure pulsar masses, thereby demonstrating how current and future telescopes can probe fundamental physics such as superfluidity near nuclear saturation.

  4. Direct mass measurements of Cd isotopes show strong shell gap at N=82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Knöbel; M. Diwisch; F. Bosch; D. Boutin; L. Chen; C. Dimopoulou; A. Dolinskii; B. Franczak; B. Franzke; H. Geissel; M. Hausmann; C. Kozhuharov; J. Kurcewicz; S. A. Litvinova; G. Martínez-Pinedo; M. Matoš; M. Mazzocco; G. Münzenberg; S. Nakajima; C. Nociforo; F. Nolden; T. Ohtsubo; A. Ozawa; Z. Patyk; W. R. Plaß; C. Scheidenberger; J. Stadlmann; M. Steck; B. Sun; T. Suzuki; P. Walker; H. Weick; M. -R. Wu; M. Winkler; T. Yamaguchi

    2015-07-16

    A $^{238}$U projectile beam was used to create cadmium isotopes via abrasion-fission at 410 MeV/u in a beryllium target at the entrance of the in-flight separator FRS at GSI. The fission fragments were separated with the FRS and injected into the isochronous storage ring ESR for mass measurements. The Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) was performed under two different experimental conditions, with and without B$\\rho$-tagging at the dispersive central focal plane of the FRS. In the experiment with B$\\rho$-tagging the magnetic rigidity of the injected fragments was determined by an accuracy of $2\\times 10^{-4}$. A new method of data analysis, using a correlation matrix for the combined data set from both experiments, has provided mass values for 25 different isotopes for the first time. The high selectivity and sensitivity of the experiment and analysis has given access even to rare isotopes detected with a few atoms per week. In this letter we present for the $^{129,130,131}$Cd isotopes mass values directly measured for the first time. The Cd results clearly show a very pronounced shell effect at $N=82$ which is in agreement with the conclusion from $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy of $^{130}$Cd and confirms the assumptions of modern shell-model calculations.

  5. Extending Penning trap mass measurements with SHIPTRAP to the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Herfurth, F.; Hofmann, S.; Blaum, K.; Droese, C.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Eibach, M.; Eliseev, S.; Haettner, E.; Plass, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Hessberger, F. P.; Ramirez, E. Minaya; Nesterenko, D.; and others

    2013-03-19

    Penning-trap mass spectrometry of radionuclides provides accurate mass values and absolute binding energies. Such mass measurements are sensitive indicators of the nuclear structure evolution far away from stability. Recently, direct mass measurements have been extended to the heavy elements nobelium (Z=102) and lawrencium (Z=103) with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP. The results probe nuclear shell effects at N=152. New developments will pave the way to access even heavier nuclides.

  6. Press Pass - Press Release - W mass precisions measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    uncertainty of the W boson mass will lead to stricter bounds on the mass of the elusive Higgs boson. The W boson is a carrier of the weak nuclear force and a key element of the...

  7. Quantifying Particle Coatings Using High-Precision Mass Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knudsen, Scott Michael

    We present a general method to quantify coatings on microparticle surfaces based on the additional mass. Particle buoyant mass is determined in a solution with a density that is nearly equivalent to that of the core particle, ...

  8. Mass-resolved retarding field energy analyzer and its measurement of ion energy distribution in helicon plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zexian, Cao

    Mass-resolved retarding field energy analyzer and its measurement of ion energy distribution) are measured at rf power of 1000 W. The results show that the fairly broad energy distributions of different analyzer; Ion energy distribution; Helicon plasma 1. Introduction It is well recognized that ion

  9. Mass measurements of neutron rich isotopes in the Fe region and electron capture processes in neutron star crusts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estrade, Alfredo [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Matos, M. [Louisiana State University; Schatz, Hendrik [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Amthor, A. M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Beard, Mary [University of Notre Dame, IN; Brown, Edward [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Bazin, D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Becerril, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Elliot, T [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Gade, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Galaviz, D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Gupta, Sanjib [Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Lau, Rita [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Moeller, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pereira, J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Portillo, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Rogers, A. M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Shapira, Dan [ORNL; Smith, E. [Ohio State University; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Wallace, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wiescher, Michael [University of Notre Dame, IN

    2010-01-01

    Experimental knowledge of nuclear masses of exotic nuclei is important for understanding nu- clear structure far from the valley of -stability, and as a direct input into astrophysical models. Electron capture processes in the crust of accreting neutron stars have been proposed as a heat source that can affect the thermal structure of the star. Nuclear masses of very neutron-rich nu- clides are necessary inputs to model the electron capture process. The time-of-flight (TOF) mass measurement technique allows measurements on very short-lived nuclei. It has been effectively applied using the fast fragment beams produced at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab (NSCL) to reach masses very far from stability. Measurements were performed for neutron-rich isotopes in the region of the N=32 and N=40 subshells, which coincides with the mass range of carbon superburst ashes. We discuss reaction network calculations performed to investigate the impact of our new measurements and to compare the effect of using different global mass models in the calculations. It is observed that the process is sensitive to the differences in the odd-even mass staggering predicted by the mass models, and our new result for 66Mn has a significant impact on the distribution of heat sources in the crust.

  10. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hylton, J.O.; Remenyik, C.J.

    1994-08-09

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure is disclosed. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel. 5 figs.

  11. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hylton, James O. (Clinton, TN); Remenyik, Carl J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel.

  12. Measurement of the top quark mass using the invariant mass of lepton pairs in soft muon b-tagged events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We present the first measurement of the mass of the top quark in a sample of tt? ???? bb? qq? events (where ?=e,?) selected by identifying jets containing a muon candidate from the semileptonic decay of heavy-flavor hadrons ...

  13. Direct mass measurements of Cd isotopes show strong shell gap at N=82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knöbel, R; Bosch, F; Boutin, D; Chen, L; Dimopoulou, C; Dolinskii, A; Franczak, B; Franzke, B; Geissel, H; Hausmann, M; Kozhuharov, C; Kurcewicz, J; Litvinova, S A; Martínez-Pinedo, G; Matoš, M; Mazzocco, M; Münzenberg, G; Nakajima, S; Nociforo, C; Nolden, F; Ohtsubo, T; Ozawa, A; Patyk, Z; Plaß, W R; Scheidenberger, C; Stadlmann, J; Steck, M; Sun, B; Suzuki, T; Walker, P; Weick, H; Wu, M -R; Winkler, M; Yamaguchi, T

    2015-01-01

    A $^{238}$U projectile beam was used to create cadmium isotopes via abrasion-fission at 410 MeV/u in a beryllium target at the entrance of the in-flight separator FRS at GSI. The fission fragments were separated with the FRS and injected into the isochronous storage ring ESR for mass measurements. The Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) was performed under two different experimental conditions, with and without B$\\rho$-tagging at the dispersive central focal plane of the FRS. In the experiment with B$\\rho$-tagging the magnetic rigidity of the injected fragments was determined by an accuracy of $2\\times 10^{-4}$. A new method of data analysis, using a correlation matrix for the combined data set from both experiments, has provided mass values for 25 different isotopes for the first time. The high selectivity and sensitivity of the experiment and analysis has given access even to rare isotopes detected with a few atoms per week. In this letter we present for the $^{129,130,131}$Cd isotopes mass values directly ...

  14. Real-Time Particulate Mass Measurements Pre and Post Diesel Particulat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pre and Post Diesel Particulate Filters for LIght-Duty Diesel Vehicles Real-Time Particulate Mass Measurements Pre and Post Diesel Particulate Filters for LIght-Duty...

  15. Measurement of the top quark mass with dilepton events selected using neuroevolution at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen

    2009-04-14

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass $M_t$ in the dilepton decay channel $t\\bar{t}\\to b\\ell'^{+}\

  16. Mass Measurements of Proton-Rich Nuclei Fe-50 and Ni-54 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tribble, Robert E.; Cossairt, J. D.; May, D. P.; Kenefick, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    to different kinematic shifts for the 'He' s from the light (A=12) and heavy (A =54, 58) mass targets. Calibrated 'He spectra from Fe and "Ni are shown in Fig. 1. From previous ('He, 'He) measurements, the cross sections to "Fe and ' Ni were expected... are TABLE I. Properties of Fe and 5 Ni. All entries are in MeV. Nuclide Expt. Mass excess Garvey and Kelson ~ Coulomb energy ~ip ~2p Coulomb energy 50Fe -34.48 +0.06 -39.21 +0.05 -34.50 39.27 -34.472 +0.013 -39.296 +0.013 4.16 6.24 8.93 +0.06 3...

  17. Prospects to Measure the Higgs Boson Mass and Cross Section in ee-->ZH Using the Recoil Mass Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Lohmann; M. Ohlerich; A. Raspereza; A. Schälicke

    2007-10-13

    The process ee-->ZH allows to measure the Higgs boson in the recoil mass spectrum against the Z boson without any assumptions on the Higgs boson decay. We performed a full simulation and reconstruction of ee-->ZH using the MOKKA and MARLIN packages describing the LDC detector. The Z is reconstructed from its decays into electrons and muons. The mass of the Higgs boson is set to 120 GeV. Assuming a centre-of-mass energy of 250 GeV and an integrated luminosity of 50/fb the Higgs boson mass and the Higgs-strahlung cross section can be measured with a precision of 120 MeV and 9%, respectively.

  18. Isothermal stress relaxation in electroplated Cu films. I. Mass transport measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Rui

    Isothermal stress relaxation in electroplated Cu films. I. Mass transport measurements Dongwen Gan-boundary mass transport measured from isothermal stress relaxation in electroplated Cu thin films. Thermal stresses in electroplated Cu films with and without passivation, subjected to thermal cycling

  19. Ultra-low Q values for neutrino mass measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachim Kopp; Alexander Merle

    2010-04-21

    We investigate weak nuclear decays with extremely small kinetic energy release (Q value) and thus extremely good sensitivity to the absolute neutrino mass scale. In particular, we consider decays into excited daughter states, and we show that partial ionization of the parent atom can help to tune Q values to low-Q decays might only be feasible if no ionization is required, and if future improvements in isotope production technology, nuclear mass spectroscopy, and atomic structure calculations are possible. Experiments using ions, however, are extremely challenging due to the large number of ions that must be stored. New precision data on nuclear excitation levels could help to identify further isotopes with low-Q decay modes and possibly less challenging requirements.

  20. TOF-Brho Mass Measurements of Very Exotic Nuclides for Astrophysical Calculations at the NSCL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Matos; A Estrade; M Amthor; A Aprahamian; D Bazin; A Becerril; T Elliot; D Galaviz; A Gade; S Gupta; G Lorusso; F Montes; J Pereira; M Portillo; A M Rogers; H Schatz; D Shapira; E Smith; A Stolz; M Wallace

    2007-07-01

    Atomic masses play a crucial role in many nuclear astrophysics calculations. The lack of experimental values for relevant exotic nuclides triggered a rapid development of new mass measurement devices around the world. The Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass measurements offer a complementary technique to the most precise one, Penning trap measurements, the latter being limited by the rate and half-lives of the ions of interest. The NSCL facility provides a well-suited infrastructure for TOF mass measurements of very exotic nuclei. At this facility, we have recently implemented a TOF-Brho technique and performed mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclides in the Fe region, important for r-process calculations and for calculations of processes occurring in the crust of accreting neutron stars.

  1. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass Simultaneously in Dilepton and Lepton + Jets Decay Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorko, Wojciech T.; /Chicago U.

    2008-09-01

    The authors present the first measurement of the top quark mass using simultaneously data from two decay channels. They use a data sample of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collisions with integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector. They select dilepton and lepton + jets channel decays of t{bar t} pairs and reconstruct two observables in each topology. They use non-parametric techniques to derive probability density functions from simulated signal and background samples. The observables are the reconstructed top quark mass and the scalar sum of transverse energy of the event in the dilepton topology and the reconstructed top quark mass and the invariant mass of jets from the W boson decay in lepton + jets channel. They perform a simultaneous fit for the top quark mass and the jet energy scale which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson resonance from the lepton + jets channel. Using 144 dilepton candidate events and 332 lepton + jets candidate events they measure: M{sub top} = 171.9 {+-} 1.7 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.1 (other sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} = 171.9 {+-} 2.0 GeV/c{sup 2}. The measurement features a robust treatment of the systematic uncertainties, correlated between the two channels and develops techniques for a future top quark mass measurement simultaneously in all decay channels. Measurements of the W boson mass and the top quark mass provide a constraint on the mass of the yet unobserved Higgs boson. The Higgs boson mass implied by measurement presented here is higher than Higgs boson mass implied by previously published, most precise CDF measurements of the top quark mass in lepton + jets and dilepton channels separately.

  2. Atom localization and center-of-mass wave-function determination via multiple simultaneous quadrature measurements RID A-5077-2009 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evers, Joerg; Qamar, Shahid; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2007-01-01

    We discuss localization and center-of-mass wave-function measurement of a quantum particle using multiple simultaneous dispersive interactions of the particle with different standing-wave fields. In particular, we consider objects with an internal...

  3. Measurement of the lifetimes of B meson mass eigenstates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anikeev, Konstantin

    2004-01-01

    In this dissertation, we present the results of the average lifetime measurements in ..., ..., and ... decays, as well as the results of a time-dependent angular analysis of ... and ... decays. The time-dependent angular ...

  4. Nuclear Structure Revealed by High-Precision Mass Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNewsusceptometer under pressureNavy Turns 50Security

  5. Measuring nickel masses in Type Ia supernovae using cobalt emission in nebular phase spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childress, Michael J; Seitenzahl, Ivo; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Taubenberger, Stefan; Scalzo, Richard; Ruiter, Ashley; Blagorodnova, Nadejda; Camacho, Yssavo; Castillo, Jayden; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Fraser, Morgan; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Graham, Melissa; Howell, D Andrew; Inserra, Cosimo; Jha, Saurabh W; Kumar, Sahana; Mazzali, Paolo A; McCully, Curtis; Morales-Garoffolo, Antonia; Pandya, Viraj; Polshaw, Joe; Schmidt, Brian; Smartt, Stephen; Smith, Ken W; Sollerman, Jesper; Spyromilio, Jason; Tucker, Brad; Valenti, Stefano; Walton, Nicholas; Wolf, Christian; Yaron, Ofer; Young, D R; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    The light curves of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are powered by the radioactive decay of $^{56}$Ni to $^{56}$Co at early times, and the decay of $^{56}$Co to $^{56}$Fe from ~60 days after explosion. We examine the evolution of the [Co III] 5892 A emission complex during the nebular phase for SNe Ia with multiple nebular spectra and show that the line flux follows the square of the mass of $^{56}$Co as a function of time. This result indicates both efficient local energy deposition from positrons produced in $^{56}$Co decay, and long-term stability of the ionization state of the nebula. We compile 77 nebular spectra of 25 SN Ia from the literature and present 17 new nebular spectra of 7 SNe Ia, including SN2014J. From these we measure the flux in the [Co III] 5892 A line and remove its well-behaved time dependence to infer the initial mass of $^{56}$Ni ($M_{Ni}$) produced in the explosion. We then examine $^{56}$Ni yields for different SN Ia ejected masses ($M_{ej}$ - calculated using the relation between light...

  6. Atomic mass measurements of short-lived nuclides around the doubly-magic 208Pb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Weber; G. Audi; D. Beck; K. Blaum; G. Bollen; F. Herfurth; A. Kellerbauer; H. -J. Kluge; D. Lunney; S. Schwarz

    2008-01-14

    Accurate atomic mass measurements of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich nuclides around the doubly-magic 208Pb and of neutron-rich cesium isotopes were performed with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN. The masses of 145,147Cs, 181,183Tl, 186Tlm, 187Tl, 196Tlm, 205Tl, 197Pbm, 208Pb, 190 to 197Bi, 209,215,216Bi, 203,205,229Fr, and 214,229,230Ra were determined. The obtained relative mass uncertainty in the range of $2 \\cdot 10^{-7}$ to $2 \\cdot 10^{-8}$ is not only required for safe identification of isomeric states but also allows mapping the detailed structure of the mass surface. A mass adjustment procedure was carried out and the results included into the Atomic Mass Evaluation. The resulting separation energies are discussed and the mass spectrometric and laser spectroscopic data are examined for possible correlations.

  7. Measurement of Mass and Spin of Black Holes with QPOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2007-10-18

    There are now four low mass X-ray binaries with black holes which show twin resonant-like HFQPOs. Similar QPOs might have been found in Sgr A*. I review the power spectral density distributions of the three X-ray flares and the six NIR flares published for Sgr A* so far, in order to look for more similarities than just the frequencies between the microquasar black holes and Sgr A*. The three X-ray flares of Sgr A* are re-analysed in an identical way and white noise probabilities from their power density distributions are given for the periods reported around 1100 s. Progress of the resonant theory using the anomalous orbital velocity effect is summarized.

  8. Extraction of the symmetry energy coefficients from the masses differences of isobaric nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junlong Tian; Haitao Cui; Kuankuan Zheng; Ning Wang

    2014-03-28

    The nuclear symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei are extracted by using the differences between the masses of isobaric nuclei. Based on the masses of more than 2400 nuclei with $A=9-270$, we investigate the model dependence in the extraction of symmetry energy coefficient. We find that the extraction of the symmetry energy coefficients is strongly correlated with the forms of the Coulomb energy and the mass dependence of the symmetry energy coefficient adopted. The values of the extracted symmetry energy coefficients increase by about 2 MeV for heavy nuclei when the Coulomb correction term is involved. We obtain the bulk symmetry energy coefficient $S_0=28.26\\pm1.3$ MeV and the surface-to-volume ratio $\\kappa=1.26\\pm 0.25 $ MeV if assuming the mass dependence of symmetry energy coefficient $a_{\\rm sym}(A)=S_0(1-\\kappa/A^{1/3})$, and $S_0=32.80\\pm1.7$ MeV, $\\kappa=2.82\\pm0.57$ MeV when $a_{\\rm sym}(A)=S_0 (1+\\kappa/A^{1/3})^{-1}$ is adopted.

  9. Prospects for measuring neutron-star masses and radii with X-ray pulse profile modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Chakrabarty, Deepto, E-mail: dpsaltis@email.arizona.edu, E-mail: fozel@email.arizona.edu, E-mail: deepto@mit.edu [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Modeling the amplitudes and shapes of the X-ray pulsations observed from hot, rotating neutron stars provides a direct method for measuring neutron-star properties. This technique constitutes an important part of the science case for the forthcoming NICER and proposed LOFT X-ray missions. In this paper, we determine the number of distinct observables that can be derived from pulse profile modeling and show that using only bolometric pulse profiles is insufficient for breaking the degeneracy between inferred neutron-star radius and mass. However, we also show that for moderately spinning (300-800 Hz) neutron stars, analysis of pulse profiles in two different energy bands provides additional constraints that allow a unique determination of the neutron-star properties. Using the fractional amplitudes of the fundamental and the second harmonic of the pulse profile in addition to the amplitude and phase difference of the spectral color oscillations, we quantify the signal-to-noise ratio necessary to achieve a specified measurement precision for neutron star radius. We find that accumulating 10{sup 6} counts in a pulse profile is sufficient to achieve a ? 5% uncertainty in the neutron star radius, which is the level of accuracy required to determine the equation of state of neutron-star matter. Finally, we formally derive the background limits that can be tolerated in the measurements of the various pulsation amplitudes as a function of the system parameters.

  10. Measurement of the electron antineutrino mass from the beta spectrum of gaseous tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, D.A.

    1986-12-01

    A measurement has been made of the mass of the electron antineutrino using the beta spectrum from a source of gaseous molecular tritium, and an upper limit of 36 eV/c/sup 2/ has been set on this mass. This measurement is the first upper limit on neutrino mass that does not rely on assumptions about the atomic configuration after the beta decay, and it has significantly smaller systematic errors associated with it than do previous measurements. 130 refs., 83 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS MEASUREMENTS AND THEIR IMPORTANCE FOR NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matos, M.; Shapira, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Atomic masses play an important role in nuclear astrophysics. The lack of experimental values for nuclides of interest has triggered a rapid development of new mass measurement devices around the world, including Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass measurements offering an access to the most exotic nuclides. Recently, the TOF-B rho technique that includes a position measurement for magnetic rigidity correction has been implemented at the NSCL. An experiment with a similar TOF-B rho technique is approved and planned at the next generation radioactive beam facility (RIBF) at RIKEN.

  12. Neutrino Mass Differences and Nonunitarity of Neutrino Mixing Matrix from Interfering Recoil Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kleinert; P. Kienle

    2009-10-06

    We show that the recent observation of the time modulation of two-body weak decays of heavy ions reveals the mass content of the electron neutrinos via interference patterns in the recoiling ion wave function. From the modulation period we derive the difference of the square masses $ \\Delta m^2\\approx 22.5\\times 10^{-5}$ eV${}^2$, which is about 2.8 times larger than that derived from a combined analysis of KamLAND and solar neutrino oscillation experiments. It is, however, compatible with a data regime to which the KamLAND analysis attributes a smaller probability. The experimental results imply that the neutrino mixing matrix violates unitarity by about 10%.

  13. TOF-B{rho} Mass Measurement of Neutron Rich Nuclei at the NSCL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estrade, Alfredo; Amthor, Matthew A.; Becerril, Ana D.; Elliot, Thom J.; Lorusso, Giuseppe; Rogers, Andrew; Schatz, Hendrik [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University East Lansing, MI (United States); Matos, Milan; Galaviz, Daniel; Pereira, Jorge [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Bazin, Daniel; Gade, Alexandra; Portillo, Mauricio; Stolz, Andreas [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Shapira, Dan [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Smith, Edward [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Wallace, Mark S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2007-10-26

    Experimental knowledge of nuclear masses of exotic nuclei is important for understanding nuclear structure far from the valley of {beta}-stability, and as a direct input into astrophysical models. In the case of astrophysical processes involving neutron rich nuclei, such as nucleosynthesis during the r-process and the evolution of matter in the crust of an accreting neutron star, we are mostly limited to using theoretical mass models. The time of flight (TOF) mass measurement technique allows measuring very short-lived nuclei. It has been effectively applied using the fast fragment beams produced at the A1900 fragment separator at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab (NSCL) to reach masses very far from stability. We describe a recent mass measurement experiment in the neutron rich Fe region performed at the NSCL, and present preliminary results.

  14. Search for Low Mass Exotic Baryons in One Pion Electroproduction Data Measured at JLAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tatischeff; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson

    2007-02-05

    This paper aims to give further evidence for the existence of low mass exotic baryons. Narrow structures in baryonic missing mass or baryonic invariant mass were previously observed during the last ten years. Since their existence is sometimes questionable, the structure functions of one pion electroproduction cross sections, measured at JLAB, are studied to add informations on the possible existence of these narrow exotic baryonic resonances.

  15. Optimizing the Mass Flow and Temperature Difference in a Cooling System for Energy Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, M. N.; Bond, S. K.

    1980-01-01

    for specifying the mass rate and temperature difference for given heat loads to minimize energy consumption. I INTRODUCTION Conventional wisdom has suggested to most Operational parameters of heat exchangers a~e building operators that raising the chilled...-STORY OFFICE BUILDINGS 8uildi ng A 8ui1ding 8 8ullding C Lighting 28 31 33 Chiller 29 25 29 Auxill aries {fans & pumps l 37 39 34 Hi sce 11 aneous 6 5 4 rota1 square footage 104,000 95,000 91,000 Total No. of Floors 4 4 In Figure 3 the fan power...

  16. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry during the MILAGRO 2006 Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortner, E. C.

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by proton transfer reaction – mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) on a rooftop in the urban mixed residential and industrial area North Northeast of downtown Mexico City as part of ...

  17. Measurement of the ?[superscript 0 over subscript b] lifetime and mass in the ATLAS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A measurement of the ?[superscript 0 over subscript b] lifetime and mass in the decay channel ?[superscript 0 over subscript b]?J/?(?[superscript +]?[superscript -])?[superscript 0](p?[superscript -]) is presented. The ...

  18. Measurement of Mass, Density, and Volume During the Cell Cycle of Yeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Andrea Kristine

    Cell growth comprises changes in both mass and volume—two processes that are distinct, yet coordinated through the cell cycle. Understanding this relationship requires a means for measuring each of the cell’s three basic ...

  19. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A

    2011-01-01

    and S.J. Thompson,“Determining Plutonium in Spent Fuel withTobin, “Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent FuelFluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

  20. Precision measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton + jets...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Precision measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton + jets channel using a matrix element method with Quasi-Monte Carlo integration Citation Details In-Document Search...

  1. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants and mass flow measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Dennis G. (Augusta, GA); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC); Riha, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

    2003-07-15

    A system for improving the Baroball valve and a method for retrofitting an existing Baroball valve. This invention improves upon the Baroball valve by reshaping the interior chamber of the valve to form a flow meter measuring chamber. The Baroball valve sealing mechanism acts as a rotameter bob for determining mass flow rate through the Baroball valve. A method for retrofitting a Baroball valve includes providing static pressure ports and connecting a measuring device, to these ports, for measuring the pressure differential between the Baroball chamber and the well. A standard curve of nominal device measurements allows the mass flow rate to be determined through the retrofitted Baroball valve.

  2. Made-to-Measure models of the Galactic Box/Peanut bulge: stellar and total mass in the bulge region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portail, M; Gerhard, O; Martinez-Valpuesta, I

    2015-01-01

    We construct dynamical models of the Milky Way's Box/Peanut (B/P) bulge, using the recently measured 3D density of Red Clump Giants (RCGs) as well as kinematic data from the BRAVA survey. We match these data using the NMAGIC Made-to-Measure method, starting with N-body models for barred discs in different dark matter haloes. We determine the total mass in the bulge volume of the RCGs measurement (+-2.2 x +- 1.4 x +- 1.2 kpc) with unprecedented accuracy and robustness to be 1.84 +- 0.07 x10^10 Msun. The stellar mass in this volume varies between 1.25-1.6 x10^10 Msun, depending on the amount of dark matter in the bulge. We evaluate the mass-to-light and mass-to-clump ratios in the bulge and compare them to theoretical predictions from population synthesis models. We find a mass-to-light ratio in the K-band in the range 0.8-1.1. The models are consistent with a Kroupa or Chabrier IMF, but a Salpeter IMF is ruled out for stellar ages of 10 Gyr. To match predictions from the Zoccali IMF derived from the bulge stel...

  3. Method and apparatus for measuring the mass flow rate of a fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Robert P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilkins, S. Curtis (Idaho Falls, ID); Goodrich, Lorenzo D. (Shelley, ID); Blotter, Jonathan D. (Pocatello, ID)

    2002-01-01

    A non invasive method and apparatus is provided to measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid. An accelerometer is attached to a pipe carrying a multi-phase fluid. Flow related measurements in pipes are sensitive to random velocity fluctuations whose magnitude is proportional to the mean mass flow rate. An analysis of the signal produced by the accelerometer shows a relationship between the mass flow of a fluid and the noise component of the signal of an accelerometer. The noise signal, as defined by the standard deviation of the accelerometer signal allows the method and apparatus of the present invention to non-intrusively measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid.

  4. Mass-ablation-rate measurements in direct-drive cryogenic implosions using x-ray self-emission images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, A. K., E-mail: adavi@lle.rochester.edu; Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Craxton, R. S.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14636 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A technique to measure the mass ablation rate in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions using a pinhole x-ray framing camera is presented. In target designs consisting of two layers of different materials, two x-ray self-emission peaks from the coronal plasma were measured once the laser burned through the higher-Z outer layer. The location of the inner peak is related to the position of the ablation front and the location of the outer peak corresponds to the position of the interface of the two layers in the plasma. The emergence of the second peak was used to measure the burnthrough time of the outer layer, giving the average mass ablation rate of the material and instantaneous mass remaining. By varying the thickness of the outer layer, the mass ablation rate can be obtained as a function of time. Simulations were used to validate the methods and verify that the measurement techniques are not sensitive to perturbation growth at the ablation surface.

  5. Combination of CDF and D0 W-Boson mass measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We summarize and combine direct measurements of the mass of the W boson in s? = 1.96??TeV proton-antiproton collision data collected by CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Earlier measurements from ...

  6. Time-of-flight mass measurements for nuclear processes in neutron star crusts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estrade, Alfredo [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Matos, M. [Louisiana State University; Schatz, Hendrik [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Amthor, A. M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Bazin, D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Beard, Mary [University of Notre Dame, IN; Becerril, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Brown, Edward [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Elliot, T [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Gade, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Galaviz, D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); George, S. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Gupta, Sanjib [Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Lau, Rita [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Moeller, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pereira, J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Portillo, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Rogers, A. M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Shapira, Dan [ORNL; Smith, E. [Ohio State University; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Wallace, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wiescher, Michael [University of Notre Dame, IN

    2011-01-01

    The location of electron capture heat sources in the crust of accreting neutron stars depends on the masses of extremely neutron-rich nuclei. We present first results from a new implementation of the time-of-flight technique to measure nuclear masses of rare isotopes at the National Supercon- ducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The masses of 16 neutron-rich nuclei in the Sc Ni element range were determined simultaneously, improving the accuracy compared to previous data in 12 cases. The masses of 61V, 63Cr, 66Mn, and 74Ni were measured for the first time with mass excesses of 30.510(890) MeV, 35.280(650) MeV, 36.900(790) MeV, and 49.210(990) MeV, respectively. With the measurement of the 66Mn mass, the location of the two dominant heat sources in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars, which exhibit so called superbursts, is now experimentally constrained. We find that the location of the 66Fe 66Mn electron capture transition occurs sig- nificantly closer to the surface than previously assumed because our new experimental Q-value is 2.1 MeV smaller than predicted by the FRDM mass model. The results also provide new insights into the structure of neutron-rich nuclei around N = 40.

  7. A parametric modeling approach to measuring the gas masses of circumstellar disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Jonathan P.; Best, William M. J. E-mail: wbest@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-06-10

    The disks that surround young stars are mostly composed of molecular gas, which is harder to detect and interpret than the accompanying dust. Disk mass measurements have therefore relied on large and uncertain extrapolations from the dust to the gas. We have developed a grid of models to study the dependencies of isotopologue CO line strengths on disk structure and temperature parameters and find that a combination of {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O observations provides a robust measure of the gas mass. We apply this technique to Submillimeter Array observations of nine circumstellar disks and published measurements of six well studied disks. We find evidence for selective photodissociation of C{sup 18}O and determine masses to within a factor of about three. The inferred masses for the nine disks in our survey range from 0.7 to 6 M {sub Jup}, and all are well below the extrapolation from the interstellar medium gas-to-dust ratio of 100. This is consistent with the low masses of planets found around such stars, and may be due to accretion or photoevaporation of a dust-poor upper atmosphere. However, the masses may be underestimated if there are more efficient CO depletion pathways than those known in molecular clouds and cold cores.

  8. Quantization of Differences Between Atomic and Nuclear Rest Masses and Selforganization of Atoms and Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. A. Gareev; I. E. Zhidkova

    2006-11-15

    We come to the conclusion that all atomic models based on either the Newton equation and the Kepler laws, or the Maxwell equations, or the Schrodinger and Dirac equations are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. We can only suspect that these equations are grounded on the same fundamental principle(s) which is (are) not known or these equations can be transformed into each other. We proposed a new mechanism of LENR: cooperative processes in the whole system - nuclei+atoms+condensed matter - nuclear reactions in plasma - can occur at smaller threshold energies than the corresponding ones on free constituents. We were able to quantize phenomenologically the first time the differences between atomic and nuclear rest masses by the formula (in MeV/$c^{2}$) $\\Delta M=\\frac{n_{1}}{n_{2}}*0.0076294, n_{i}=1,2,3,...$ Note that this quantization rule is justified for atoms and nuclei with different $A, N$ and $Z$ and the nuclei and atoms represent a coherent synchronized systems - a complex of coupled oscillators (resonators). The cooperative resonance synchronization mechanisms are responsible for explanation of how the electron volt world can influence the nuclear mega electron volt world. It means that we created new possibilities for inducing and controlling nuclear reactions by atomic processes.

  9. Quantization of Differences Between Atomic and Nuclear Rest Masses and Selforganization of Atoms and Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gareev, F A

    2006-01-01

    We come to conclusion that the all atomic models based either on the Newton equation and the Kepler laws or on the Maxwell equations or on the Schrodinger and Dirac equations achieved reasonable agreement with experimental data. We can only suspect that these equations are grounded on the same fundamental principle(s) which is(are) not known or these equations can be transformed into each other. We proposed a new mechanism of LENR: cooperative processes in whole system - nuclei+atoms+condensed matter - nuclear reactions in plasma - can occur at smaller threshold energies then corresponding ones on free constituents.We were able to quantize phenomenologically (numerology) the first time the differences between atomic and nuclear rest masses according to the formula (in MeV/$c^{2}$) $\\Delta M=0.0076294*n_{1}*2^{n_{2}}, n_{1}=1,2,3,..., n_{2}=1,\\pm2,\\pm4,\\pm8,... $. Note that this quantization rule is justified for atoms and nuclei with different $A, N$ and $Z$ and the nuclei and atoms represent a coherent synch...

  10. Measuring the Higgs boson mass using event-by-event uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castelli, Angelantonio; van Vulpen, Ivo; Kluit, Peter

    The thesis presents a measurement of the properties of the Higgs particle, performed by using the data collected by the ATLAS experiment in 2011 and 2012. The measurement is performed by using a three-dimensional model based on analytic functions to describe the signal produced by the Higgs boson decays into four leptons. The model includes the information provided by the uncertainty measured event-by-event on the four-lepton invariant mass. A maximum likelihood fit is used to obtain an unbiased estimate of the mass, the signal strength and the decay amplitude of the Higgs particle. The best estimation of the Higgs boson mass results to be: $124.52^{+0.48}_{-0.49}(\\text{stat.})\\pm0.08(\\text{syst.})\\text{GeV}$

  11. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass from lepton+jets events at D0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich [Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim [Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath [Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond [Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd [Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D [Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D [St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K [Michigan U.; Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O [Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto [Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Ancu, Lucian Stefan [Nijmegen U.; Fermilab

    2011-08-09

    We report a measurement of the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states of pp&3772; ? tt? data corresponding to 2.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using a matrix element method, we combine an in situ jet energy calibration with the standard jet energy scale derived in studies of ? + jet and dijet events and employ a novel flavor-dependent jet response correction to measure a top-quark mass of mt = 176.01 ± 1.64 GeV. Combining this result with a previous result obtained on an independent data set, we measure a top-quark mass of mt = 174.94 ± 1.49 GeV for a total integrated luminosity of 3.6 fb-1.

  12. Precision measurement of the top-quark mass in lepton$+$jets final states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-06-04

    We measure the mass of the top quark in lepton þ jets final states using the full sample of pp¯ collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at ffiffi s p ¼ 1.96 TeV, corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. We also use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from t¯t production or background. Furthermore, the overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the W boson. We measure mt ¼ 174.98 0.76 GeV. This constitutes the most precise singlemore »measurement of the top-quark mass.« less

  13. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass from lepton+jets events at D0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-08-09

    We report a measurement of the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states of pp&3772; ? tt? data corresponding to 2.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using a matrix element method, we combine an in situ jet energy calibration with the standard jet energy scale derived in studies of ? + jet and dijet events and employ a novel flavor-dependent jet response correction to measure a top-quark mass of mt = 176.01 ± 1.64 GeV. Combining this result with a previous result obtained on an independent data set, wemore »measure a top-quark mass of mt = 174.94 ± 1.49 GeV for a total integrated luminosity of 3.6 fb-1.« less

  14. Measuring the Higgs boson mass in dileptonic W-boson decays at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Alan; Gripaios, Ben; Lester, Christopher G.

    2009-01-01

    Ju l 2 00 9 Cavendish-HEP-09/04 Measuring the Higgs boson mass in dileptonic W -boson decays at hadron colliders Alan J. Barr,1, ? Ben Gripaios,2, † and Christopher G. Lester3, ‡ 1Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH, United Kingdom 2... CERN PH-TH, Geneva 23, 1211 Switzerland 3Cavendish Laboratory, Dept of Physics, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE, United Kingdom (Dated: July 22, 2009) It is expected that hadron collider measurements of the Higgs boson mass using the decay h ? W...

  15. Elemental ratio measurements of organic compounds using aerosol mass spectrometry: characterization, improved calibration, and implications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Canagaratna, M. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kroll, J. H.; Chen, Q.; Kessler, S. H.; Massoli, P.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Fortner, E.; Williams, L. R.; Wilson, K. R.; et al

    2015-01-12

    Elemental compositions of organic aerosol (OA) particles provide useful constraints on OA sources, chemical evolution, and effects. The Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) is widely used to measure OA elemental composition. This study evaluates AMS measurements of atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O : C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H : C), and organic mass-to-organic carbon (OM : OC) ratios, and of carbon oxidation state (OS C) for a vastly expanded laboratory data set of multifunctional oxidized OA standards. For the expanded standard data set, the method introduced by Aiken et al. (2008), which uses experimentally measured ionmore »intensities at all ions to determine elemental ratios (referred to here as "Aiken-Explicit"), reproduces known O : C and H : C ratio values within 20% (average absolute value of relative errors) and 12%, respectively. The more commonly used method, which uses empirically estimated H2O+ and CO+ ion intensities to avoid gas phase air interferences at these ions (referred to here as "Aiken-Ambient"), reproduces O : C and H : C of multifunctional oxidized species within 28 and 14% of known values. The values from the latter method are systematically biased low, however, with larger biases observed for alcohols and simple diacids. A detailed examination of the H2O+, CO+, and CO2+ fragments in the high-resolution mass spectra of the standard compounds indicates that the Aiken-Ambient method underestimates the CO+ and especially H2O+ produced from many oxidized species. Combined AMS–vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization measurements indicate that these ions are produced by dehydration and decarboxylation on the AMS vaporizer (usually operated at 600 °C). Thermal decomposition is observed to be efficient at vaporizer temperatures down to 200 °C. These results are used together to develop an "Improved-Ambient" elemental analysis method for AMS spectra measured in air. The Improved-Ambient method uses specific ion fragments as markers to correct for molecular functionality-dependent systematic biases and reproduces known O : C (H : C) ratios of individual oxidized standards within 28% (13%) of the known molecular values. The error in Improved-Ambient O : C (H : C) values is smaller for theoretical standard mixtures of the oxidized organic standards, which are more representative of the complex mix of species present in ambient OA. For ambient OA, the Improved-Ambient method produces O : C (H : C) values that are 27% (11%) larger than previously published Aiken-Ambient values; a corresponding increase of 9% is observed for OM : OC values. These results imply that ambient OA has a higher relative oxygen content than previously estimated. The OS C values calculated for ambient OA by the two methods agree well, however (average relative difference of 0.06 OS C units). This indicates that OS C is a more robust metric of oxidation than O : C, likely since OS C is not affected by hydration or dehydration, either in the atmosphere or during analysis.« less

  16. Elemental ratio measurements of organic compounds using aerosol mass spectrometry: characterization, improved calibration, and implications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Canagaratna, M. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kroll, J. H.; Chen, Q.; Kessler, S. H.; Massoli, P.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Fortner, E.; Williams, L. R.; Wilson, K. R.; et al

    2014-07-31

    Elemental compositions of organic aerosol (OA) particles provide useful constraints on OA sources, chemical evolution, and effects. The Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) is widely used to measure OA elemental composition. This study evaluates AMS measurements of atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O : C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H : C), organic mass-to-organic carbon (OM : OC), and carbon oxidation state (OSC) for a vastly expanded laboratory dataset of multifunctional oxidized OA standards. For the expanded standard dataset, the "Aiken-Explicit" method (Aiken et al., 2008), which uses experimentally measured ion intensities at all ions to determine elementalmore »ratios, reproduces known molecular O : C and H : C ratio values within 20% (average absolute value of relative errors) and 12% respectively. The more commonly used "Aiken-Ambient" method, which uses empirically estimated H2O+ and CO+ ion intensities to avoid gas phase air interferences at these ions, reproduces O : C and H : C of multifunctional oxidized species within 28% and 14% of known values. These values are systematically biased low, however, with larger biases observed for alcohols and simple diacids. A detailed examination of the H2O+, CO+, and CO2+ fragments in the high-resolution mass spectra of the standard compounds indicates that the Aiken-Ambient method underestimates the CO+ and H2O+ produced from many oxidized species. Combined AMS-vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization measurements indicate that these ions are produced by dehydration and decarboxylation on the AMS vaporizer (usually operated at 600 °C). Thermal decomposition is observed to be efficient at vaporizer temperatures down to 200 °C. These results are used together to develop an "Improved-Ambient" elemental analysis method for AMS spectra measured in air. The Improved-Ambient method reduces the systematic biases and reproduces O : C (H : C) ratios of individual oxidized standards within 28% (13%) of the known molecular values. The error in Improved-Ambient O : C and H : C values is smaller (12% and 4% respectively) for synthetic mixtures of the oxidized organic standards, which are more representative of the complex mix of species present in ambient OA. For ambient OA, the Improved-Ambient method produces O : C (H : C) values that are 27% (11%) larger than previously published Aiken-Ambient values; a corresponding increase of 9% is observed for OM : OC values. These results imply that ambient OA has a higher relative oxygen content than previously estimated. The OSC values calculated for ambient OA by the two methods agree well, however (average relative difference of 0.06 OSC units). This indicates that OSC is a more robust metric of oxidation than O : C, likely since OSC is not affected by hydration or dehydration, either in the atmosphere or during analysis.« less

  17. Elemental ratio measurements of organic compounds using aerosol mass spectrometry: Characterization, improved calibration, and implications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Canagaratna, M. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kroll, J. H.; Chen, Q.; Kessler, S. H.; Massoli, P.; Ruiz, L. Hildebrandt; Fortner, E.; Williams, L. R.; Wilson, K. R.; et al

    2015-01-12

    Elemental compositions of organic aerosol (OA) particles provide useful constraints on OA sources, chemical evolution, and effects. The Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) is widely used to measure OA elemental composition. This study evaluates AMS measurements of atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O : C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H : C), and organic mass-to-organic carbon (OM : OC) ratios, and of carbon oxidation state (OS C) for a vastly expanded laboratory data set of multifunctional oxidized OA standards. For the expanded standard data set, the method introduced by Aiken et al. (2008), which uses experimentally measured ionmore »intensities at all ions to determine elemental ratios (referred to here as "Aiken-Explicit"), reproduces known O : C and H : C ratio values within 20% (average absolute value of relative errors) and 12%, respectively. The more commonly used method, which uses empirically estimated H2O+ and CO+ ion intensities to avoid gas phase air interferences at these ions (referred to here as "Aiken-Ambient"), reproduces O : C and H : C of multifunctional oxidized species within 28 and 14% of known values. The values from the latter method are systematically biased low, however, with larger biases observed for alcohols and simple diacids. A detailed examination of the H2O+, CO+, and CO2+ fragments in the high-resolution mass spectra of the standard compounds indicates that the Aiken-Ambient method underestimates the CO+ and especially H2O+ produced from many oxidized species. Combined AMS–vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization measurements indicate that these ions are produced by dehydration and decarboxylation on the AMS vaporizer (usually operated at 600 °C). Thermal decomposition is observed to be efficient at vaporizer temperatures down to 200 °C. These results are used together to develop an "Improved-Ambient" elemental analysis method for AMS spectra measured in air. The Improved-Ambient method uses specific ion fragments as markers to correct for molecular functionality-dependent systematic biases and reproduces known O : C (H : C) ratios of individual oxidized standards within 28% (13%) of the known molecular values. The error in Improved-Ambient O : C (H : C) values is smaller for theoretical standard mixtures of the oxidized organic standards, which are more representative of the complex mix of species present in ambient OA. For ambient OA, the Improved-Ambient method produces O : C (H : C) values that are 27% (11%) larger than previously published Aiken-Ambient values; a corresponding increase of 9% is observed for OM : OC values. These results imply that ambient OA has a higher relative oxygen content than previously estimated. The OS C values calculated for ambient OA by the two methods agree well, however (average relative difference of 0.06 OS C units). This indicates that OS C is a more robust metric of oxidation than O : C, likely since OS C is not affected by hydration or dehydration, either in the atmosphere or during analysis.« less

  18. Evolution, nucleosynthesis and yields of AGB stars at different metallicities (III): intermediate mass models, revised low mass models and the ph-FRUITY interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristallo, S; Piersanti, L; Gobrecht, D

    2015-01-01

    We present a new set of models for intermediate mass AGB stars (4.0, 5.0 and, 6.0 Msun) at different metallicities (-2.15database. We describe the physical and chemical evolution of the computed models from the Main Sequence up to the end of the AGB phase. Due to less efficient third dredge up episodes, models with large core masses show modest surface enhancements. The latter is due to the fact that the interpulse phases are short and, then, Thermal Pulses are weak. Moreover, the high temperature at the base of the convective envelope prevents it to deeply penetrate the radiative underlying layers. Depending on the initial stellar mass, the heavy elements nucleosynthesis is dominated by different neutron sources. In particular, the s-process distributions of the more massive models are dominated by the \

  19. Precise measurement of the $W$-boson mass with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-03-01

    We have measured the W-boson mass M{sub W} using data corresponding to 2.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Samples consisting of 470 126 W {yields} e{nu} candidates and 624 708 W {yields} {mu}{nu} candidates yield the measurement M{sub W} = 80 387 {+-} 12{sub stat} {+-} 15{sub syst} = 80 387 {+-} 19 MeV/c{sup 2}. This is the most precise measurement of the W-boson mass to date and significantly exceeds the precision of all previous measurements combined.

  20. A New Method for Indirect Mass Measurements using the Integral Charge Asymmetry at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guy Steve Muanza; Thomas Serre

    2015-06-11

    Processes producing a charged final state at the LHC have a positive integral charge asymmetry. We propose a novel method for an indirect measurement of the mass of these final states based upon the process integral charge asymmetry. First, the theoretical prediction of the integral charge asymmetry and its related uncertainties are studied through parton level cross sections calculations. Then, the experimental extraction of the integral charge asymmetry of a given signal, in the presence of some background, is performed using particle level simulations. Process dependent templates enable to convert the measured integral charge asymmetry into an estimated mass of the charged final state. Finally, a combination of the experimental and the theoretical uncertainties determines the full uncertainty of the indirect mass measurement. This new method applies to all charged current processes at the LHC. In this article, we demonstrate its effectiveness at extracting the mass of the W boson, as a first step, and the sum of the masses of a chargino and a neutralino in case these supersymmetric particles are produced by pair, as a second step.

  1. FermilabPub97/172E Measurement of the Top Quark Mass Using Dilepton Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    collaboration has performed a measurement of the top quark mass m t based on six candidate events. We obtain m t = 168:4 \\Sigma 12:3 (stat) \\Sigma 3:7 (sys) GeV/c 2 , consistent with the measurement:0 \\Sigma 7:5 GeV/c 2 . Typeset using REVT E X \\Lambda Authors listed on the following page. Submitted

  2. Prospects for improving the LHC W boson mass measurement with forward muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozzi, Giuseppe; Vesterinen, Mika; Vicini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the $W$ boson mass are planned by the ATLAS and CMS experiments, but for the time being, these may be unable to compete with the current world average precision of 15 MeV, due to uncertainties in the PDFs. We discuss the potential of a measurement by the LHCb experiment based on the charged lepton transverse momentum $p_T^{\\ell}$ spectrum in $W \\to \\mu\

  3. Low Mass Vector Meson Measurements via Di-electrons at RHIC by the PHENIX Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deepali Sharma; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2009-01-21

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured $\\omega$ and $\\phi$ mesons in $p+p$, $d+Au$ and $Au+Au$ collisions at \\sqn = 200 GeV via both hadronic and di-electron decay channels. The transverse momentum spectra as measured in different decay modes and at different centralities are shown and discussed here.

  4. Toward precision mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclei relevant to $r$-process nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. H. Sun; Yu. A. Litvinov; I. Tanihata; Y. H. Zhang

    2015-08-04

    The open question of where, when, and how the heavy elements beyond iron enrich our Universe has triggered a new era in nuclear physics studies.\\ Of all the relevant nuclear physics inputs, the mass of very neutron-rich nuclides is a key quantity for revealing the origin of heavy elements beyond iron.\\ Although the precise determination of this property is a great challenge, enormous progress has been made in recent decades, and it has contributed significantly to both nuclear structure and astrophysical nucleosynthesis studies.\\ In this review, we first survey our present knowledge of the nuclear mass surface, emphasizing the importance of nuclear mass precision in $r$-process calculations.\\ We then discuss recent progress in various methods of nuclear mass measurement with a few selected examples.\\ For each method, we focus on recent breakthroughs and discuss possible ways of improving the weighing of $r$-process nuclides.

  5. Toward precision mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclei relevant to $r$-process nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, B H; Tanihata, I; Zhang, Y H

    2015-01-01

    The open question of where, when, and how the heavy elements beyond iron enrich our Universe has triggered a new era in nuclear physics studies.\\ Of all the relevant nuclear physics inputs, the mass of very neutron-rich nuclides is a key quantity for revealing the origin of heavy elements beyond iron.\\ Although the precise determination of this property is a great challenge, enormous progress has been made in recent decades, and it has contributed significantly to both nuclear structure and astrophysical nucleosynthesis studies.\\ In this review, we first survey our present knowledge of the nuclear mass surface, emphasizing the importance of nuclear mass precision in $r$-process calculations.\\ We then discuss recent progress in various methods of nuclear mass measurement with a few selected examples.\\ For each method, we focus on recent breakthroughs and discuss possible ways of improving the weighing of $r$-process nuclides.

  6. Measuring sparticle masses in non-universal string inspired models at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. C. Allanach; C. G. Lester; M. A. Parker; B. R. Webber

    2000-09-04

    We demonstrate that some of the suggested five supergravity points for study at the LHC could be approximately derived from perturbative string theories or M-theory, but that charge and colour breaking minima would result. As a pilot study, we then analyse a perturbative string model with non-universal soft masses that are optimised in order to avoid global charge and colour breaking minima. By combining measurements of up to six kinematic edges from squark decay chains with data from a new kinematic variable, designed to improve slepton mass measurements, we demonstrate that a typical LHC experiment will be able to determine squark, slepton and neutralino masses with an accuracy sufficient to permit an optimised model to be distinguished from a similar standard SUGRA point. The technique thus generalizes SUSY searches at the LHC.

  7. Measuring sparticle masses in non-universal string inspired models at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allanach, Benjamin C; Parker, M A; Webber, Bryan R

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate that some of the suggested five supergravity points for study at the LHC could be approximately derived from perturbative string theories or M-theory, but that charge and colour breaking minima would result. As a pilot study, we then analyse a perturbative string model with non-universal soft masses that are optimised in order to avoid global charge and colour breaking minima. By combining measurements of up to six kinematic edges from squark decay chains with data from a new kinematic variable, designed to improve slepton mass measurements, we demonstrate that a typical LHC experiment will be able to determine squark, slepton and neutralino masses with an accuracy sufficient to permit an optimised model to be distinguished from a similar standard SUGRA point. The technique thus generalizes SUSY searches at the LHC.

  8. Mass dependence of balance energy for different N/Z ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aman D. Sood

    2011-09-28

    We present the study for the mass dependence of E$_{bal}$ for various N/Z ratios covering pure symmetric systems to highly neutron-rich ones.

  9. Measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in X(3872) ---> J/psi pi+ pi- decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan,

    2005-12-01

    The authors measure the dipion mass spectrum in X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays using 360 pb{sup -1} of {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. The spectrum is fit with predictions for odd C-parity ({sup 3}S{sub 1}, {sup 1}P{sub 1}, and {sup 3}D{sub J}) charmonia decaying to J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, as well as event C-parity states in which the pions are from {rho}{sup 0} decay. The latter case also encompasses exotic interpretations, such as a D{sup 0}{bar D}*{sup 0} molecule. Only the {sup 3}S{sub 1} and J/{psi} {rho} hypotheses are compatible with the data. Since {sup 3}S{sub 1} is untenable on other grounds, decay via J/{psi} {rho} is favored, which implies C = +1 for the X(3872). Models for different J/{psi}-{rho} angular momenta L are considered. Flexibility in the models, especially the introduction of {rho}-{omega} interference, enable good descriptions of the data for both L = 0 and 1.

  10. Human vitamin B12 absorption measurement by accelerator mass spectrometry using specifically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, John R.

    Human vitamin B12 absorption measurement by accelerator mass spectrometry using specifically to assimilate dietary vitamin B12. Assaying and understanding absorption and uptake of B12 is important because and showed plasma appearance and clearance curves consistent with the predicted behavior of the pure vitamin

  11. Top-Quark Mass Measurement Using Events with Missing Transverse Energy and Jets at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass using a sample of tt? events in 5.7??fb[superscript -1] of integrated luminosity from pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with ?s=1.96??TeV and collected by the CDF II ...

  12. Precise Measurement of the W-Boson Mass with the CDF II Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We have measured the W-boson mass M[superscript W] using data corresponding to 2.2??fb[superscript -1] of integrated luminosity collected in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron ...

  13. Top quark mass measurement in the lepton plus jets channel using a modified matrix element method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass, m_t, obtained from pp? collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. We analyze a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ...

  14. The Matrix Element Method and its Application to Measurements of the Top Quark Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Fiedler; Alexander Grohsjean; Petra Haefner; Philipp Schieferdecker

    2010-09-24

    The most precise measurements of the top quark mass are based on the Matrix Element method. We present a detailed description of this analysis method, taking the measurements of the top quark mass in final states with one and two charged leptons as concrete examples. In addition, we show how the Matrix Element method is suitable to reduce the dominant systematic uncertainties related to detector effects, by treating the absolute energy scales for b-quark and light-quark jets independently as free parameters in a simultaneous fit together with the top quark mass. While the determination of the light-quark jet energy scale has already been applied in several recent measurements, the separate determination of the absolute b-quark jet energy scale is a novel technique with the prospect of reducing the overall uncertainty on the top quark mass in the final measurements at the Tevatron and in analyses at the LHC experiments. The procedure is tested on Monte Carlo generated events with a realistic detector resolution.

  15. Precise measurement of the W-boson mass with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We present a measurement of the W-boson mass, MW, using data corresponding to 2.2??fb[superscript ?1] of integrated luminosity collected in p[bar over p] collisions at ?s = 1.96??TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab ...

  16. Measurement of the W boson mass and width using a novel recoil model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetstein, Matthew J.; /Maryland U.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation presents a direct measurement of the W boson mass (M{sub W}) and decay width ({Lambda}{sub W}) in 1 fb{sup -1} of W {yields} e{nu} collider data at D0 using a novel method to model the hadronic recoil. The mass is extracted from fits to the transverse mass M{sub T}, p{sub T}(e), and E{sub T} distributions. The width is extracted from fits to the tail of the M{sub T} distribution. The electron energy measurement is simulated using a parameterized model, and the recoil is modeled using a new technique by which Z recoils are chosen from a data library to match the p{sub T} and direction of each generated W boson. We measure the the W boson mass to be M{sub W} = 80.4035 {+-} 0.024(stat) {+-} 0.039(syst) from the M{sub T}, M{sub W} = 80.4165 {+-} 0.027(stat) {+-} 0.038(syst) from the pT(e), and MW = 80.4025 {+-} 0.023(stat) {+-} 0.043(syst) from the E{sub T} distributions. {Lambda}{sub W} is measured to be {Lambda}{sub W} = 2.025 {+-} 0.038(stat) {+-} 0.061(syst) GeV.

  17. SYMPOSIUM: SEX DIFFERENCES IN MUSCULOSKELETAL DISEASE AND SCIENCE b-Ecdysone Augments Peak Bone Mass in Mice of Both Sexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    SYMPOSIUM: SEX DIFFERENCES IN MUSCULOSKELETAL DISEASE AND SCIENCE b-Ecdysone Augments Peak Bone Mass in Mice of Both Sexes Weiwei Dai PhD, HongLiang Zhang MD, PhD, Zhendong A. Zhong PhD, Li Jiang MD to investigate sex differences in terms of bone development and structure after bEcd administration. Methods Two

  18. Neutron-Proton Mass Difference in Nuclear Matter and in Finite Nuclei and the Nolen-Schiffer Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulf-G. Meißner; A. M. Rakhimov; A. Wirzba; U. T. Yakhshiev

    2009-12-29

    The neutron-proton mass difference in (isospin asymmetric) nuclear matter and finite nuclei is studied in the framework of a medium-modified Skyrme model. The proposed effective Lagrangian incorporates both the medium influence of the surrounding nuclear environment on the single nucleon properties and an explicit isospin-breaking effect in the mesonic sector. Energy-dependent charged and neutral pion optical potentials in the s- and p-wave channels are included as well. The present approach predicts that the neutron-proton mass difference is mainly dictated by its strong part and that it markedly decreases in neutron matter. Furthermore, the possible interplay between the effective nucleon mass in finite nuclei and the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly is discussed. In particular, we find that a correct description of the properties of mirror nuclei leads to a stringent restriction of possible modifications of the nucleon's effective mass in nuclei.

  19. First measurement of the w boson mass with CDF in Run 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver

    2005-10-01

    This thesis describes a first measurement of the W Boson mass through the decay into a muon and a neutrino in Run 2 of the Tevatron. The W Bosons are produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data sample used for this analysis corresponds to 200 pb{sup -1} recorded by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab. The most important quantity in this measurement is the momentum of the muon measured in a magnetic spectrometer which is calibrated using the two quarkonium resonances J/{Psi} and {Upsilon}(1S). Systematic uncertainties arise from the modeling of the recoil when the W Boson is produced, the momentum calibration, the modeling of W Boson production and decay dynamics and backgrounds. The result is: M{sub W} = 80408 {+-} 50(stat.) {+-} 57(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}.

  20. Measurement of the top-quark mass from the b jet energy spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The top-quark mass is measured using the peak position of the energy distribution of b jets produced from top-quark decays. The analysis is based on a recent theoretical proposal. The measurement is carried out selecting $\\mathrm{t\\overline{t}}$ events with one electron and one muon in the final state in proton-proton collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=8~\\mathrm{TeV}$, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7$~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. The fitted peak position of the observed energy distribution is calibrated using simulated events and translated to a top-quark mass measurement using relativistic kinematics, with the result $m_{\\mathrm{t}}=172.29\\pm1.17\\,(\\mathrm{stat.})\\pm2.66\\,(\\mathrm{syst.})~\\mathrm{GeV}$.

  1. Final Report: Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haggerty, Roy; Day-Lewis, Fred; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-20

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita.

  2. Top quark mass measurement from dilepton events at CDF II with the matrix-element method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-05-01

    We describe a measurement of the top quark mass using events with two charged leptons collected by the CDF II detector from p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The likelihood in top mass is calculated for each event by convoluting the leading order matrix element describing q{bar q} {yields} t{bar t} {yields} b{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}{bar b}{ell}{prime} {nu}{sub {ell}}, with detector resolution functions. The presence of background events in the data sample is modeled using similar calculations involving the matrix elements for major background processes. In a data sample with integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1}, we observe 33 candidate events and measure M{sub top} = 165.2 {+-} 6.1(stat.) {+-} 3.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. This measurement represents the first application of this method to events with two charged leptons and is the most precise single measurement of the top quark mass in this channel.

  3. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-04-25

    In this study, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([11C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [11C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of 12C-cyanide (12CN¯). The [11C]CN¯ is produced from [11C]CO2, which is generated by the 14N(p,?)11C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [11C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to 12CN¯ mass. It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33 µA for 1 and 10 min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [11C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [11C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.

  4. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-04-25

    In this study, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([11C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [11C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of 12C-cyanide (12CN¯). The [11C]CN¯ is produced from [11C]CO2, which is generated by the 14N(p,?)11C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [11C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to 12CN¯ mass.more »It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33 µA for 1 and 10 min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [11C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [11C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.« less

  5. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg equivalents. AMS provides an sensitive, accurate and precise method of measuring drug compounds in biological matrices.

  6. Air mass flow estimation in turbocharged diesel engines from in-cylinder pressure measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desantes, J.M.; Galindo, J.; Guardiola, C.; Dolz, V.

    2010-01-15

    Air mass flow determination is needed for the control of current internal combustion engines. Current methods are based on specific sensors (as hot wire anemometers) or indirect estimation through manifold pressure. With the availability of cylinder pressure sensors for engine control, methods based on them can be used for replacing or complementing standard methods. Present paper uses in cylinder pressure increase during the intake stroke for inferring the trapped air mass. The method is validated on two different turbocharged diesel engines and compared with the standard methods. (author)

  7. DESI and other Dark Energy experiments in the era of neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; McDonald, Patrick; Mostek, Nick; Reid, Beth A.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže E-mail: PVMcDonald@lbl.gov E-mail: BAReid@lbl.gov E-mail: anze@bnl.gov

    2014-05-01

    We present Fisher matrix projections for future cosmological parameter measurements, including neutrino masses, Dark Energy, curvature, modified gravity, the inflationary perturbation spectrum, non-Gaussianity, and dark radiation. We focus on DESI and generally redshift surveys (BOSS, HETDEX, eBOSS, Euclid, and WFIRST), but also include CMB (Planck) and weak gravitational lensing (DES and LSST) constraints. The goal is to present a consistent set of projections, for concrete experiments, which are otherwise scattered throughout many papers and proposals. We include neutrino mass as a free parameter in most projections, as it will inevitably be relevant — DESI and other experiments can measure the sum of neutrino masses to ? 0.02 eV or better, while the minimum possible sum is ? 0.06 eV. We note that constraints on Dark Energy are significantly degraded by the presence of neutrino mass uncertainty, especially when using galaxy clustering only as a probe of the BAO distance scale (because this introduces additional uncertainty in the background evolution after the CMB epoch). Using broadband galaxy power becomes relatively more powerful, and bigger gains are achieved by combining lensing survey constraints with redshift survey constraints. We do not try to be especially innovative, e.g., with complex treatments of potential systematic errors — these projections are intended as a straightforward baseline for comparison to more detailed analyses.

  8. A Measurement of the Mass of the Top Quark in Lepton + Jets Events at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brubaker, Erik Matthews

    2004-12-01

    This document presents a measurement of the top quark mass using the CDF run II detector at Fermilab. Colliding beams of protons and anti-protons at Fermilab's Tevatron ({radical}s = 1.96 TeV) produce top/anti-top pairs, which decay to W{sup +}W{sup -} b{bar b}; events are selected where one W decays hadronically, and one W decays to either e or {mu} plus a neutrino. The data sample was collected between March 2002 and September 2003, and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 162 pb{sup -1}. Thirty-seven candidate t{bar t} events are found with at least one b jet identified by its displaced vertex. In each event, the best fit top quark invariant mass is determined by minimizing a {chi}{sup 2} for the overconstrained kinematic system. A likelihood fit of the reconstructed masses in the data sample to distributions from simulated signal and background events gives a top mass of 174.9{sub -7.7}{sup +7.1}(stat.) {+-} 6.5(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The dominant systematic error is due to uncertainties in the jet energy measurements.

  9. A Computational Tool to Interpret the Bulk Composition of Solid Exoplanets based on Mass and Radius Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li Zeng; Sara Seager

    2008-08-13

    The prospects for finding transiting exoplanets in the range of a few to 20 Earth masses is growing rapidly with both ground-based and spaced-based efforts. We describe a publicly available computer code to compute and quantify the compositional ambiguities for differentiated solid exoplanets with a measured mass and radius, including the mass and radius uncertainties.

  10. Measurement of positional isotope exchange rates in enzyme catalyzed reactions by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilscher, Larry Wayne

    1985-01-01

    utility in analyzing a wide array of biological compounds. Our laboratory became interested in the potential use of FAB-MS to study PIX in nucleotide . Working with Dr. David H. Russell's group (Dept. of Chemistry, Texas A A M University) we were able...MEASUREMENT OF POSITIONAL ISOTOPE EXCHANGE RATES IN ENZYME CATALYZED REACTIONS BY FAST ATOM BOMBARDMENT MASS SPECTROMETRY A Thesis by LARRY NAYNE HILSCHER Submitted to the Gradu te College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfil" mert...

  11. Measurement of the Moments of the Hadronic Invariant Mass Distribution in Semileptonic Beta Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration TITLE=Measuremen

    2005-03-13

    Using 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, we measure the first two moments of the hadronic invariant mass-squared distribution in charmed semileptonic B decays. From these we determine the non-perturbative Heavy Quark Effective Theory parameters {Lambda} and {lambda}{sub 1} used to relate the B meson semileptonic branching ratio to the CKM matrix element |V{sub cb}|.

  12. WHY DO DIFFERENCES BETWEEN STATE-MEASURED ACHIEVEMENT GAPS AND NATIONALLY-MEASURED ACHIEVEMENT GAPS EXIST?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courtney, Christina Leigh

    2014-08-31

    of difference, the differential quotient, is determined. For the purposes of this dissertation, I calculated the reported achievement gaps between white and black fourth graders for the years 2005, 2007, and 2009 on the individual state reading and math...

  13. Sparse signal reconstruction from polychromatic X-ray CT measurements via mass attenuation discretization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Renliang; Dogandži?, Aleksandar [Iowa State University, Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, 1915 Scholl Road, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    We propose a method for reconstructing sparse images from polychromatic x-ray computed tomography (ct) measurements via mass attenuation coefficient discretization. The material of the inspected object and the incident spectrum are assumed to be unknown. We rewrite the Lambert-Beer’s law in terms of integral expressions of mass attenuation and discretize the resulting integrals. We then present a penalized constrained least-squares optimization approach for reconstructing the underlying object from log-domain measurements, where an active set approach is employed to estimate incident energy density parameters and the nonnegativity and sparsity of the image density map are imposed using negative-energy and smooth ?{sub 1}-norm penalty terms. We propose a two-step scheme for refining the mass attenuation discretization grid by using higher sampling rate over the range with higher photon energy, and eliminating the discretization points that have little effect on accuracy of the forward projection model. This refinement allows us to successfully handle the characteristic lines (Dirac impulses) in the incident energy density spectrum. We compare the proposed method with the standard filtered backprojection, which ignores the polychromatic nature of the measurements and sparsity of the image density map. Numerical simulations using both realistic simulated and real x-ray ct data are presented.

  14. Extending the Capabilities of Single Particle Mass Spectrometry: II. Measurements of Aerosol Particle Density without DMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaden, Timothy D.; Imre, D.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-01-04

    Particle density is an important and useful property that is difficult to measure because it usually 5 requires separate instruments to measure two particle attributes. As density measurements are 6 often performed on size-classified particles, they are hampered by low particle numbers, and 7 hence poor temporal resolution. We present here a new method for measuring particle densities 8 using our single particle mass spectrometer, SPLAT. This method takes advantage of the fact 9 that the detection efficiency in our single particle mass spectrometer drops off very rapidly as the 10 particle size decreases below ~125 nm creating a distinct sharp feature on the small particle side 11 of the vacuum aerodynamic size distribution. Thus, the two quantities needed to determine 12 particle density, the particle diameter and vacuum aerodynamic diameter, are known. We first 13 test this method on particles of known composition and find that the densities it yields are 14 sufficiently accurate. We then apply the method to obtain the densities of particles that were 15 characterized during an airborne field campaign. In addition, we show that the distinctive 16 features of the vacuum aerodynamic size distribution can be used to characterize the instrument 17 detection efficiency as a function of particle size. In general, the method presented here reduces 18 complexity and yields information with high temporal resolution while the instrument is 19 collecting routine data on particle size and composition.

  15. A measurement of the top quark mass with a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, Adam Paul; /UC, Berkeley

    2006-12-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark. The event sample is selected from proton-antiproton collisions, at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy, observed with the CDF detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. They consider a 318 pb{sup -1} dataset collected between March 2002 and August 2004. They select events that contain one energetic lepton, large missing transverse energy, exactly four energetic jets, and at least one displaced vertex b tag. The analysis uses leading-order t{bar t} and background matrix elements along with parameterized parton showering to construct event-by-event likelihoods as a function of top quark mass. From the 63 events observed with the 318 pb{sup -1} dataset they extract a top quark mass of 172.0 {+-} 2.6(stat) {+-} 3.3(syst) GeV/c{sup 2} from the joint likelihood. The mean expected statistical uncertainty is 3.2 GeV/c{sup 2} for m{sub t} = 178 GTeV/c{sup 2} and 3.1 GeV/c{sup 2} for m{sub t} = 172.5 GeV/c{sup 2}. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty of the jet energy scale.

  16. Measuring the Average Evolution of Luminous Galaxies at zEnergy Distribution, and Stellar Mass Density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory Rudnick; Ivo Labbe; Natascha M. Foerster Schreiber; Stijn Wuyts; Marijn Franx; Kristian Finlator; Mariska Kriek; Alan Moorwood; Hans-Walter Rix; Huub Roettgering; Ignacio Trujillo; Arjen van der Wel; Paul van der Werf; Pieter G. van Dokkum

    2006-06-21

    (Abridged) We present the evolution of the volume averaged properties of the rest-frame optically luminous galaxy population to z~3, determined from four disjoint deep fields with optical to near-infrared wavelength coverage. We select galaxies above a rest-frame V-band luminosity of 3x10^10 Lsol and characterize their rest-frame UV through optical properties via the mean spectral energy distribution (SED). To measure evolution we apply the same selection criteria to a sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and COMBO-17. The mean rest-frame 2200Ang through V-band SED becomes steadily bluer with increasing redshift but at zluminous galaxies has increased by a factor of 3.5-7.9 from z=3 to z=0.1, including field-to-field variance uncertainties. After correcting to total, the measured mass densities at z2.3) in our LV selected samples contribute 30% and 64% of the stellar mass budget at z~2 and z~ 2.8 respectively. These galaxies are largely absent from UV surveys and this result highlights the need for mass selection of high redshift galaxies.

  17. Precision measurement of the top quark mass from dilepton events at CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-12-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass, M{sub t}, in the dilepton decay channel of t{bar t} {yields} b{ell}{prime}{sup +} {nu}{sub {ell}}, {bar b}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} using an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the CDF II detector. We apply a method that convolutes a leading-order matrix element with detector resolution functions to form event-by-event likelihoods; we have enhanced the leading-order description to describe the effects of initial-state radiation. The joint likelihood is the product of the likelihoods from 78 candidate events in this sample, which yields a measurement of M{sub t} = 164.5 {+-} 3.9(stat.) {+-} 3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, the most precise measurement of M{sub t} in the dilepton channel.

  18. Development of microwave superconducting microresonators for neutrino mass measurement in the HOLMES framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giachero, A; Falferi, P; Faverzani, M; Ferri, E; Giordano, C; Maino, M; Margesin, B; Mezzena, R; Nizzolo, R; Nucciotti, A; Puiu, A; Zanetti, L

    2015-01-01

    The European Research Council has recently funded HOLMES, a project with the aim of performing a calorimetric measurement of the electron neutrino mass measuring the energy released in the electron capture decay of \\textsuperscript{163}Ho. The baseline for HOLMES are microcalorimeters coupled to Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) read out with rf-SQUIDs, for microwave multiplexing purposes. A promising alternative solution is based on superconducting microwave resonators, that have undergone rapid development in the last decade. These detectors, called MKIDs (Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors), are inherently multiplexed in the frequency domain and suitable for even larger-scale pixel arrays, with theoretical high energy resolution and fast response. The aim of our activity is to develop arrays of microresonator detectors for X-ray spectroscopy and suitable for the calorimetric measurement of the energy spectra of \\textsuperscript{163}Ho. Superconductive multilayer films composed by a sequence of pure Titani...

  19. Comparison of FTIR and Particle Mass Spectrometry for the Measurement of Paticulate Organic Nitrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruns, Emily; Perraud, Veronique; Zelenyuk, Alla; Ezell, Michael J.; Johnson, Stanley N.; Yu, Yong; Imre, D.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.; Alexander, M. L.

    2010-02-01

    While multifunctional organic nitrates are formed during the atmospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds, relatively little is known about their signatures in particle mass spectrometers. High resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-AMS) was applied to NH4NO3, NaNO3 and isosorbide 5-mononitrate (IMN) particles, and to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from NO3 radical reactions at 22 C and 1 atm in air with and pinene, 3-carene, limonene and isoprene. For comparison, single particle laser ablation mass spectra (SPLAT II) were also obtained for IMN and SOA from the pinene reaction. The mass spectra of all particles exhibit significant intensity at m/z 30, and for the SOA, weak peaks corresponding to various organic fragments containing nitrogen [CxHyNzOa]+ were identified using HR-ToF-AMS. The NO+/NO2+ ratios from HR-ToF-AMS were 10-15 for IMN and the SOA from the and pinene, 3-carene and limonene reactions, ~5 for the isoprene reaction, 2.4 for NH4NO3 and 80 for NaNO3. The N/H ratios from HR-ToF-AMS for the SOA were smaller by a factor of 2 to 4 than the -ONO2/C-H ratios measured using FTIR on particles impacted on ZnSe windows. While the NO+/NO2+ ratio may provide a generic indication of organic nitrates under some conditions, specific identification of particulate organic nitrates awaits further development of particle mass spectrometry techniques.

  20. MASS MEASUREMENT OF {sup 45}Cr AND ITS IMPACT ON THE Ca-Sc CYCLE IN X-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, X. L.; Xu, H. S.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Zhang, Y. H.; Tu, X. L.; Zhou, X. H.; He, J. J.; Sun, Y.; Wang, M.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xia, J. W.; Yang, J. C.; Jia, G. B.; Hu, Z. G.; Ma, X. W.; Mao, R. S.; Schatz, H.; Blaum, K.; Sun, B. H.; Audi, G.; and others

    2013-03-20

    Masses of neutron-deficient {sup 58}Ni projectile fragments have been measured at the HIRFL-CSR facility in Lanzhou, China employing the isochronous mass spectrometry technique. Masses of a series of short-lived T{sub z} = -3/2 nuclides including the {sup 45}Cr nucleus have been measured with a relative uncertainty of about 10{sup -6}-10{sup -7}. The new {sup 45}Cr mass turned out to be essential for modeling the astrophysical rp-process. In particular, we find that the formation of the predicted Ca-Sc cycle in X-ray bursts can be excluded.

  1. Laser pointing stability measured by an oblique-incidence optical transmittance difference technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    Laser pointing stability measured by an oblique-incidence optical transmittance difference an oblique-incidence optical transmittance technique for determining the pointing stability of a laser. In this technique, we follow the angular drift of a monochromatic laser beam by measuring the relative changes

  2. Measurements of benzene concentration by difference-frequency laser absorption spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurements of benzene concentration by difference-frequency laser absorption spectroscopy Weidong Chen, Fabrice Cazier, Frank Tittel, and Daniel Boucher Measurements of benzene concentration based:sapphire lasers in a GaSe nonlinear optical crystal. A minimum benzene concentration detection of 11.5 parts

  3. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass From Dileptonic $t\\bar{t}$ Decays With 2012 CMS Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Nally; for the CMS Collaboration

    2014-11-26

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass using 19.7 $\\pm$ 0.5 fb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV CMS data. In particular, we study dileptonic $t\\bar{t}$ decays, in which a top-antitop pair decays to a final state containing two electrons or muons. We use the Analytical Matrix Weighting Technique (AMWT), and have performed the first blind top mass measurement at CMS. The mass of the top quark is measured as $m_t = 172.47 \\pm 0.17(\\text{stat}) \\pm 1.40(\\text{syst})$ GeV.

  4. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Clowers, Brian H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-12-01

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that both fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm uses knowledge of the true signal peaks derived from the encoded data and allows for both artifacts and noise to be removed with high confidence, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. The result is that IMS-MS can be applied to increase measurement sensitivity while avoiding artifacts that have previously limited its utility.

  5. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in the All-Hadronic Mode at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2011-12-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass (M{sub top}) in the all-hadronic decay channel is presented. It uses 5.8 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} data collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Events with six to eight jets are selected by a neural network algorithm and by the requirement that at least one of the jets is tagged as a b quark jet. The measurement is performed with a likelihood fit technique, which simultaneously determines M{sub top} and the jet energy scale (JES) calibration. The fit yields a value of M{sub top} = 172.5 {+-} 1.4 (stat) {+-} 1.0 (JES) {+-} 1.1 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  6. Measuring test mass acceleration noise in space-based gravitational wave astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Congedo

    2014-09-29

    The basic constituent of interferometric gravitational wave detectors -- the test mass to test mass interferometric link -- behaves as a differential dynamometer measuring effective differential forces, comprising an integrated measure of gravity curvature, inertial effects, as well as non-gravitational spurious forces. This last contribution is going to be characterised by the LISA Pathfinder mission, a technology precursor of future space-borne detectors like eLISA. Changing the perspective from displacement to acceleration can benefit the data analysis of LISA Pathfinder and future detectors. The response in differential acceleration to gravitational waves is derived for a space-based detector's interferometric link. The acceleration formalism can also be integrated into time delay interferometry by building up the unequal-arm Michelson differential acceleration combination. The differential acceleration is nominally insensitive to the system free evolution dominating the slow displacement dynamics of low-frequency detectors. Working with acceleration also provides an effective way to subtract measured signals acting as systematics, including the actuation forces. Because of the strong similarity with the equations of motion, the optimal subtraction of systematic signals, known within some amplitude and time shift, with the focus on measuring the noise provides an effective way to solve the problem and marginalise over nuisance parameters. The $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic, in widespread use throughout the gravitation waves community, is included in the method and suitably generalised to marginalise over linear parameters and noise at the same time. The method is applied to LPF simulator data and, thanks to its generality, can also be applied to the data reduction and analysis of future gravitational wave detectors.

  7. Mass transport around comets and its impact on the seasonal differences in water production rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Thomas, N.; Fougere, N.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V. M.; Le Roy, L.

    2014-06-20

    Comets are surrounded by a thin expanding atmosphere, and although the nucleus' gravity is small, some molecules and grains, possibly with the inclusion of ices, can get transported around the nucleus through scattering (atoms/molecules) and gravitational pull (grains). Based on the obliquity of the comet, it is also possible that volatile material and icy grains get trapped in regions, which are in shadow until the comet passes its equinox. When the Sun rises above the horizon and the surface starts to heat up, this condensed material starts to desorb and icy grains will sublimate off the surface, possibly increasing the comet's neutral gas production rate on the outbound path. In this paper we investigate the mass transport around the nucleus, and based on a simplified model, we derive the possible contribution to the asymmetry in the seasonal gas production rate that could arise from trapped material released from cold areas once they come into sunlight. We conclude that the total amount of volatiles retained by this effect can only contribute up to a few percent of the asymmetry observed in some comets.

  8. A Facility for Accurate Heat Load and Mass Leak Measurements on Superfluid Helium Valves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bézaguet, Alain-Arthur; Ferlin, G; Losserand-Madoux, R; Perin, A; Vandoni, Giovanna; Van Weelderen, R

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting magnets of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be protected by safety relief valves operating at 1.9 K in superfluid helium (HeII). A test facility was developed to precisely determine the heat load and the mass leakage of cryogenic valves with HeII at their inlet. The temperature of the valve inlet can be varied from 1.8 K to 2 K for pressures up to 3.5 bar. The valve outlet pipe temperature can be regulated between 5 K and 20 K. The heat flow is measured with high precision using a Kapitza-resistance heatmeter and is also crosschecked by a vaporization measurement. After calibration, a precision of 10 mW for heat flows up to 1.1 W has been achieved. The helium leak can be measured up to 15 mg/s with an accuracy of 0.2 mg/s. We present a detailed description of the test facility and the measurements showing its performances.

  9. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the all-hadronic channel using the full CDF data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaltonen, T.

    The top-quark mass M[subscript top] is measured using top quark-antiquark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV and that decay into a fully hadronic final state. The full ...

  10. Relativistic cyclotron radiation detection of tritium decay electrons as a new technique for measuring the neutrino mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monreal, Benjamin

    The shape of the beta-decay energy distribution is sensitive to the mass of the electron neutrino. Attempts to measure the endpoint shape of tritium decay have so far seen no distortion from the zero-mass form, thus placing ...

  11. X-ray Spectral Measurements of the Most Massive Stars: Stellar Wind Mass-Loss Rates and Shock Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    X-ray Spectral Measurements of the Most Massive Stars: Stellar Wind Mass-Loss Rates and Shock, and their winds (the site of X-ray production). From the basic question of how the X-rays are produced, I have branched out to questions of wind structure and wind mass-loss rates that the X-ray observations can

  12. Motivation Motivic Euler Product Motivic Measures Special Uniformity of Zetas Total & Stable Motivic Masses Motivic Euler Product and Its Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Iku

    Motivation Motivic Euler Product Motivic Measures Special Uniformity of Zetas Total & Stable Motivic Masses Motivic Euler Product and Its Applications Lin WENG Kyushu University Arithmetic and Algebraic Geometry University of Tokyo January 30, 2014 #12;Motivation Motivic Euler Product Motivic

  13. Airborne and ground based measurements of volatile organic compounds using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry in Texas and Mexico City 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortner, Edward Charles

    2009-05-15

    Measurements of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) are reported from recent airborne and surface based field campaigns. The Southeast Texas Tetroon Study (SETTS) ...

  14. Measurements of wall heat (mass) transfer for flow through blockages with round and square holes in a wide rectangular channel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervantes, Joel

    2002-01-01

    Naphthalene sublimation and pressure measurement experiments were conducted to study heat (mass) transfer enhancement by blockages with staggered round and square holes for turbulent air flows through the holes in the blockages in an 8:1 rectangular...

  15. Measurement of Ultra-Low Potassium Contaminations with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. J. Dong

    2007-05-01

    Levels of trace radiopurity in active detector materials is a subject of major concern in low-background experiments. Among the radio-isotopes, $\\k40$ is one of the most abundant and yet whose signatures are difficult to reject. Procedures were devised to measure trace potassium concentrations in the inorganic salt CsI as well as in organic liquid scintillator (LS) with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), giving, respectively, the $\\k40$-contamination levels of $\\sim 10^{-10}$ and $\\sim 10^{-13}$ g/g. Measurement flexibilities and sensitivities are improved over conventional methods. The projected limiting sensitivities if no excess of potassium signals had been observed over background are $8 \\times 10^{-13}$ g/g and $3 \\times 10^{-17}$ g/g for the CsI and LS, respectively. Studies of the LS samples indicate that the radioactive contaminations come mainly in the dye solutes, while the base solvents are orders of magnitude cleaner. The work demonstrate the possibilities of measuring naturally-occurring isotopes with the AMS techniques.

  16. HOLMES - The Electron Capture Decay of 163Ho to Measure the Electron Neutrino Mass with sub-eV sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpert, B; Bennett, D; Biasotti, M; Boragno, C; Brofferio, C; Ceriale, V; Corsini, D; De Gerone, M; Dressler, R; Faverzani, M; Ferri, E; Fowler, J; Gatti, F; Giachero, A; Hays-Wehle, J; Heinitz, S; Hilton, G; Koester, U; Lusignoli, M; Maino, M; Mates, J; Nisi, S; Nizzolo, R; Nucciotti, A; Pessina, G; Pizzigoni, G; Puiu, A; Ragazzi, S; Reintsema, C; Gomes, M Ribeiro; Schmidt, D; Schumann, D; Sisti, M; Swetz, D; Terranova, F; Ullom, J

    2014-01-01

    The European Research Council has recently funded HOLMES, a new experiment to directly measure the neutrino mass. HOLMES will perform a calorimetric measurement of the energy released in the decay of 163Ho. The calorimetric measurement eliminates systematic uncertainties arising from the use of external beta sources, as in experiments with beta spectrometers. This measurement was proposed in 1982 by A. De Rujula and M. Lusignoli, but only recently the detector technological progress allowed to design a sensitive experiment. HOLMES will deploy a large array of low temperature microcalorimeters with implanted 163Ho nuclei. The resulting mass sensitivity will be as low as 0.4 eV. HOLMES will be an important step forward in the direct neutrino mass measurement with a calorimetric approach as an alternative to spectrometry. It will also establish the potential of this approach to extend the sensitivity down to 0.1 eV. We outline here the project with its technical challenges and perspectives.

  17. HOLMES - The Electron Capture Decay of 163Ho to Measure the Electron Neutrino Mass with sub-eV sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Alpert; M. Balata; D. Bennett; M. Biasotti; C. Boragno; C. Brofferio; V. Ceriale; D. Corsini; P. K. Day; M. De Gerone; R. Dressler; M. Faverzani; E. Ferri; J. Fowler; F. Gatti; A. Giachero; J. Hays-Wehle; S. Heinitz; G. Hilton; U. Koester; M. Lusignoli; M. Maino; J. Mates; S. Nisi; R. Nizzolo; A. Nucciotti; G. Pessina; G. Pizzigoni; A. Puiu; S. Ragazzi; C. Reintsema; M. Ribeiro Gomes; D. Schmidt; D. Schumann; M. Sisti; D. Swetz; F. Terranova; J. Ullom

    2015-03-17

    The European Research Council has recently funded HOLMES, a new experiment to directly measure the neutrino mass. HOLMES will perform a calorimetric measurement of the energy released in the decay of 163Ho. The calorimetric measurement eliminates systematic uncertainties arising from the use of external beta sources, as in experiments with beta spectrometers. This measurement was proposed in 1982 by A. De Rujula and M. Lusignoli, but only recently the detector technological progress allowed to design a sensitive experiment. HOLMES will deploy a large array of low temperature microcalorimeters with implanted 163Ho nuclei. The resulting mass sensitivity will be as low as 0.4 eV. HOLMES will be an important step forward in the direct neutrino mass measurement with a calorimetric approach as an alternative to spectrometry. It will also establish the potential of this approach to extend the sensitivity down to 0.1 eV. We outline here the project with its technical challenges and perspectives.

  18. Separation Of Uranium And Plutonium Isotopes For Measurement By Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinelli, R E; Hamilton, T F; Williams, R W; Kehl, S R

    2009-03-29

    Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 242}Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA{reg_sign} column coupled to a UTEVA{reg_sign} column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U, and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment.

  19. Energy spectra of massive two-body decay products and mass measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Hong, Sungwoo; Kim, Doojin

    2015-01-01

    We have recently established a new method for measuring the mass of unstable particles produced at hadron colliders based on the analysis of the energy distribution of a massless product from their two-body decays. The central ingredient of our proposal is the remarkable result that, for an unpolarized decaying particle, the location of the peak in the energy distribution of the observed decay product is identical to the (fixed) value of the energy that this particle would have in the rest-frame of the decaying particle, which, in turn, is a simple function of the involved masses. In addition, we utilized the property that this energy distribution is symmetric around the location of peak when energy is plotted on a logarithmic scale. The general strategy was demonstrated in several specific cases, including both beyond the SM particles, as well as for the top quark. In the present work, we generalize this method to the case of a massive decay product from a two-body decay; this procedure is far from trivial b...

  20. Combination of CDF and D0 W-Boson mass measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Chen, G.; Clutter, Justace Randall; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Amerio, S.

    2013-09-23

    Combination of CDF and D0W-Boson mass measurements T. Aaltonen,21,a V.M. Abazov,13,b B. Abbott,116,b B. S. Acharya,81,b M. Adams,98,b T. Adams,97,b J. P. Agnew,94,b G.D. Alexeev,13,b G. Alkhazov,89,b A. Alton,32,b,ll S. Amerio,40b,40a,a D. Amidei,32...,a A. Anastassov,15,a,y A. Annovi,17,a J. Antos,12,a G. Apollinari,15,a J. A. Appel,15,a T. Arisawa,53,a A. Artikov,13,a J. Asaadi,48,a W. Ashmanskas,15,a A. Askew,97,b S. Atkins,106,b B. Auerbach,2,a K. Augsten,63,b A. Aurisano,48,a C. Avila,61,b F...

  1. Air/water subchannel measurements of the equilibrium quality and mass-flux distribution in a rod bundle. [BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterner, R.W.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1983-07-01

    Subchannel measurements were performed in order to determine the equilibrium quality and mass flux distribution in a four rod bundle, using air/water flow. An isokinetic technique was used to sample the flow in the center, side and corner subchannels of this test section. Flow rates of the air and water in each sampled subchannel were measured. Experiments were performed for two test-section-average mass fluxes (0.333x10/sup 6/ and 0.666x10/sup 6/ lb/sub m//h-ft/sup 2/), and the test-section-average quality was varied from 0% to 0.54% for each mass flux. Single-phase liquid, bubbly, slug and churn-turbulent two-phase flow regimes were achieved. The observed data trends agreed with previous diabatic measurements in which the center subchannel had the highest quality and mass flux, while the corner subchannel had the lowest.

  2. Time-separated oscillatory fields for high-precision mass measurements on short-lived Al and Ca nuclides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. George; G. Audi; B. Blank; K. Blaum; M. Breitenfeldt; U. Hager; F. Herfurth; A. Herlert; A. Kellerbauer; H. -J. Kluge; M. Kretzschmar; D. Lunney; R. Savreux; S. Schwarz; L. Schweikhard; C. Yazidjian

    2008-01-17

    High-precision Penning trap mass measurements on the stable nuclide 27Al as well as on the short-lived radionuclides 26Al and 38,39Ca have been performed by use of radiofrequency excitation with time-separated oscillatory fields, i.e. Ramsey's method, as recently introduced for the excitation of the ion motion in a Penning trap, was applied. A comparison with the conventional method of a single continuous excitation demonstrates its advantage of up to ten times shorter measurements. The new mass values of 26,27Al clarify conflicting data in this specific mass region. In addition, the resulting mass values of the superallowed beta-emitter 38Ca as well as of the groundstate of the beta-emitter 26Al m confirm previous measurements and corresponding theoretical corrections of the ft-values.

  3. Mass measurement of 56Sc reveals a small A=56 odd-even mass staggering, implying a cooler accreted neutron star crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Meisel; S. George; S. Ahn; D. Bazin; B. A. Brown; J. Browne; J. F. Carpino; H. Chung; A. L. Cole; R. H. Cyburt; A. Estradé; M. Famiano; A. Gade; C. Langer; M. Matoš; W. Mittig; F. Montes; D. J. Morrissey; J. Pereira; H. Schatz; J. Schatz; M. Scott; D. Shapira; K. Smith; J. Stevens; W. Tan; O. Tarasov; S. Towers; K. Wimmer; J. R. Winkelbauer; J. Yurkon; R. G. T. Zegers

    2015-10-06

    We present the mass excesses of 52-57Sc, obtained from recent time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The masses of 56Sc and 57Sc were determined for the first time with atomic mass excesses of -24.85(59)(+0 -54) MeV and -21.0(1.3) MeV, respectively, where the asymmetric uncertainty for 56Sc was included due to possible contamination from a long-lived isomer. The 56Sc mass indicates a small odd-even mass staggering in the A = 56 mass-chain towards the neutron drip line, significantly deviating from trends predicted by the global FRDM mass model and favoring trends predicted by the UNEDF0 and UNEDF1 density functional calculations. Together with new shell-model calculations of the electron-capture strength function of 56Sc, our results strongly reduce uncertainties in model calculations of the heating and cooling at the 56Ti electron-capture layer in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars. We found that, in contrast to previous studies, neither strong neutrino cooling nor strong heating occurs in this layer. We conclude that Urca cooling in the outer crusts of accreting neutron stars that exhibit superbursts or high temperature steady-state burning, which are predicted to be rich in A=56 nuclei, is considerably weaker than predicted. Urca cooling must instead be dominated by electron capture on the small amounts of adjacent odd-A nuclei contained in the superburst and high temperature steady-state burning ashes. This may explain the absence of strong crust Urca cooling inferred from the observed cooling light curve of the transiently accreting x-ray source MAXI J0556-332.

  4. PDF uncertainties on the W boson mass measurement from the lepton transverse momentum distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Bozzi; Luca Citelli; Alessandro Vicini

    2015-05-22

    We study the charged current Drell-Yan process and we evaluate the proton parton densities uncertainties on the lepton transverse momentum distribution and their impact on the determination of the W-boson mass. We consider the global PDF sets CT10, MSTW2008CPdeut, NNPDF2.3, NNPDF3.0, MMHT2014, and apply the PDF4LHC recipe to combine the individual results, obtaining an uncertainty on MW that ranges between +-18 and +-24 MeV, depending on the final state, collider energy and kind. We discuss the dependence of the uncertainty on the acceptance cuts and the role of the individual parton densities in the final result. We remark that some PDF sets predict an uncertainty on MW of O(10 MeV); this encouraging result is spoiled, in the combined analysis of the different sets, by an important spread of the central values predicted by each group.

  5. PDF uncertainties on the W boson mass measurement from the lepton transverse momentum distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozzi, Giuseppe; Vicini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    We study the charged current Drell-Yan process and we evaluate the proton parton densities uncertainties on the lepton transverse momentum distribution and their impact on the determination of the W-boson mass. We consider the global PDF sets CT10, MSTW2008CPdeut, NNPDF2.3, NNPDF3.0, MMHT2014, and apply the PDF4LHC recipe to combine the individual results, obtaining an uncertainty on MW that ranges between +-18 and +-24 MeV, depending on the final state, collider energy and kind. We discuss the dependence of the uncertainty on the acceptance cuts and the role of the individual parton densities in the final result. We remark that some PDF sets predict an uncertainty on MW of O(10 MeV); this encouraging result is spoiled, in the combined analysis of the different sets, by an important spread of the central values predicted by each group.

  6. A Precision Measurement of the W Boson Mass with 1 Inverse Femtobarn of DZero Run IIa Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osta, Jyotsna; /Notre Dame U.

    2009-10-01

    This thesis is a detailed presentation of a precision measurement of the mass of the W boson. It has been obtained by analyzing W {yields} e{nu} decays. The data used for this analysis was collected from 2002 to 2006 with the D0 detector, during Run IIa of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. It corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1}. With a sample of 499,830 W {yields} e{nu} candidate events, we obtain a mass measurement of M{sub W} = 80.401 {+-} 0.043 GeV. This is the most precise measurement from a single experiment to date.

  7. PHYSICAL ORIGIN OF DIFFERENCES AMONG VARIOUS MEASURES OF SOLAR MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Gilman, Peter A.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2010-10-10

    We show that systematic differences between surface Doppler and magnetic element tracking measures of solar meridional flow can be explained by the effects of surface turbulent magnetic diffusion. Feature-tracking speeds are lower than plasma speeds in low and mid latitudes, because magnetic diffusion opposes poleward plasma flow in low latitudes whereas it adds to plasma flow at high latitudes. Flux-transport dynamo models must input plasma flow; the model outputs yield estimates of the surface magnetic feature tracking speed. We demonstrate that the differences between plasma speed and magnetic pattern speed in a flux-transport dynamo are consistent with the observed difference between these speeds.

  8. Measuring Just Noticeable Differences For Haptic Force Feedback: Implications for Rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measuring Just Noticeable Differences For Haptic Force Feedback: Implications for Rehabilitation subjects but none, to our knowledge, has tailored this knowledge to the rehabilitation domain [1 during the course of rehabilitation as a patient's sensory and motor capacities improve or otherwise

  9. How Different Electrical Circuits of ECC Designs Influence the Shape of Power Traces measured on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    How Different Electrical Circuits of ECC Designs Influence the Shape of Power Traces measured and the electrical circuit of devices, that are identical to the target, is analyzed. By side channel attacks usually of the electrical circuit of a cryptographic implementation on the shape of the resulting power trace, because

  10. Impedance measurements of ex vivo rat lung at different volumes of inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Impedance measurements of ex vivo rat lung at different volumes of inflation Michael L. Oelze that the occurrence of ultrasonically induced lung hemorrhage in rats was directly correlated to the level of lung inflation. In that study, it was hypothesized that the lung could be modeled as two components consisting

  11. A comparison of option prices under different pricing measures in a stochastic volatility model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A comparison of option prices under different pricing measures in a stochastic volatility model option prices in an incomplete stochastic volatility model with correlation. In a general setting, we prove an ordering result which says that prices for European options with convex payoffs are decreasing

  12. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J.; Ambers, Scott D.

    2011-01-14

    The Next Generation Safeguard Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S Department of Energy is supporting a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The following 14 NDA techniques are being studied: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Gamma, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis. Understanding and maturity of the techniques vary greatly, ranging from decades old, well-understood methods to new approaches. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that had not previously been studied for SNF assay or similar applications. Since NRF generates isotope-specific signals, the promise and appeal of the technique lies in its potential to directly measure the amount of a specific isotope in an SNF assay target. The objectives of this study were to design and model suitable NRF measurement methods, to quantify capabilities and corresponding instrumentation requirements, and to evaluate prospects and the potential of NRF for SNF assay. The main challenge of the technique is to achieve the sensitivity and precision, i.e., to accumulate sufficient counting statistics, required for quantifying the mass of Pu isotopes in SNF assemblies. Systematic errors, considered a lesser problem for a direct measurement and only briefly discussed in this report, need to be evaluated for specific instrument designs in the future. Also, since the technical capability of using NRF to measure Pu in SNF has not been established, this report does not directly address issues such as cost, size, development time, nor concerns related to the use of Pu in measurement systems. This report discusses basic NRF measurement concepts, i.e., backscatter and transmission methods, and photon source and {gamma}-ray detector options in Section 2. An analytical model for calculating NRF signal strengths is presented in Section 3 together with enhancements to the MCNPX code and descriptions of modeling techniques that were drawn upon in the following sections. Making extensive use of the model and MCNPX simulations, the capabilities of the backscatter and transmission methods based on bremsstrahlung or quasi-monoenergetic photon sources were analyzed as described in Sections 4 and 5. A recent transmission experiment is reported on in Appendix A. While this experiment was not directly part of this project, its results provide an important reference point for our analytical estimates and MCNPX simulations. Used fuel radioactivity calculations, the enhancements to the MCNPX code, and details of the MCNPX simulations are documented in the other appendices.

  13. Measurement of three-jet production cross-sections in pp collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-05-27

    Double-differential three-jet production cross-sections are measured in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of ?s=7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. The measurements are presented as a function of the three-jet mass (mjjj), in bins of the sum of the absolute rapidity separations between the three leading jets (|Y*|). Invariant masses extending up to 5 TeV are reached for 8*|11. Jets are identified using the anti-kt algorithm with two different jet radius parameters, R=0.4more »and R=0.6. The dominant uncertainty in these measurements comes from the jet energy scale. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected to account for non-perturbative effects are compared to the measurements. Good agreement is found between the data and the theoretical predictions based on most of the available sets of parton distribution functions, over the full kinematic range, covering almost seven orders of magnitude in the measured cross-section values.« less

  14. Measurement of three-jet production cross-sections in pp collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy using the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-05-26

    Double-differential three-jet production cross-sections are measured in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The measurements are presented as a function of the three-jet mass $(m_{jjj})$, in bins of the sum of the absolute rapidity separations between the three leading jets $(|Y^\\ast|)$. Invariant masses extending up to 5 TeV are reached for $8integrated luminosity of 4.51 fb$^{-1}$. Jets are identified using the anti-$k_t$ algorithm with two different jet radius parameters, R=0.4 and R=0.6. The dominant uncertainty in these measurements comes from the jet energy scale. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected to account for non-perturbative effects are compared to the measurements. Good agreement is found between the data and the theoretical predictions based on most of the available sets of parton distribution functions, over the full kinematic range, covering almost seven orders of magnitude in the measured cross-section values.

  15. Measurement of three-jet production cross-sections in pp collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-05-01

    Double-differential three-jet production cross-sections are measured in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of ?s = 7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. The measurements are presented as a function of the three-jet mass (mjjj), in bins of the sum of the absolute rapidity separations between the three leading jets (|Y*|). Invariant masses extending up to 5 TeV are reached for 8*|–1. Jets are identified using the anti-kt algorithm with two different jet radiusmore »parameters, R = 0.4 and R = 0.6. The dominant uncertainty in these measurements comes from the jet energy scale. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations corrected to account for non-perturbative effects are compared to the measurements. Good agreement is found between the data and the theoretical predictions based on most of the available sets of parton distribution functions, over the full kinematic range, covering almost seven orders of magnitude in the measured cross-section values.« less

  16. Charge and frequency resolved isochronous mass spectrometry in storage rings: First direct mass measurement of the short-lived neutron-deficient $^{51}$Co nuclide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Shuai; H. S. Xu; X. L. Tu; Y. H. Zhang; B. H. Sun; Yu. A. Litvinov; X. L. Yan; K. Blaum; M. Wang; X. H. Zhou; J. J. He; Y. Sun; K. Kaneko; Y. J. Yuan; J. W. Xia; J. C. Yang; G. Audi; X. C. Chen; G. B. Jia; Z. G. Hu; X. W. Ma; R. S. Mao; B. Mei; Z. Y. Sun; S. T. Wang; G. Q. Xiao; X. Xu; T. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamaguchi; Y. D. Zang; H. W. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; W. Zhang; W. L. Zhan

    2014-04-08

    Revolution frequency measurements of individual ions in storage rings require sophisticated timing detectors. One of common approaches for such detectors is the detection of secondary electrons released from a thin foil due to penetration of the stored ions. A new method based on the analysis of intensities of secondary electrons was developed which enables determination of the charge of each ion simultaneously with the measurement of its revolution frequency. Although the mass-over-charge ratios of $^{51}$Co$^{27+}$ and $^{34}$Ar$^{18+}$ ions are almost identical, and therefore, the ions can not be resolved in a storage ring, by applying the new method the mass excess of the short-lived $^{51}$Co is determined for the first time to be ME($^{51}$Co)=-27342(48) keV. Shell-model calculations in the $fp$-shell nuclei compared to the new data indicate the need to include isospin-nonconserving forces.

  17. Charge and frequency resolved isochronous mass spectrometry in storage rings: First direct mass measurement of the short-lived neutron-deficient $^{51}$Co nuclide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuai, P; Tu, X L; Zhang, Y H; Sun, B H; Litvinov, Yu A; Yan, X L; Blaum, K; Wang, M; Zhou, X H; He, J J; Sun, Y; Kaneko, K; Yuan, Y J; Xia, J W; Yang, J C; Audi, G; Chen, X C; Jia, G B; Hu, Z G; Ma, X W; Mao, R S; Mei, B; Sun, Z Y; Wang, S T; Xiao, G Q; Xu, X; Yamaguchi, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Zang, Y D; Zhao, H W; Zhao, T C; Zhang, W; Zhan, W L

    2014-01-01

    Revolution frequency measurements of individual ions in storage rings require sophisticated timing detectors. One of common approaches for such detectors is the detection of secondary electrons released from a thin foil due to penetration of the stored ions. A new method based on the analysis of intensities of secondary electrons was developed which enables determination of the charge of each ion simultaneously with the measurement of its revolution frequency. Although the mass-over-charge ratios of $^{51}$Co$^{27+}$ and $^{34}$Ar$^{18+}$ ions are almost identical, and therefore, the ions can not be resolved in a storage ring, by applying the new method the mass excess of the short-lived $^{51}$Co is determined for the first time to be ME($^{51}$Co)=-27342(48) keV. Shell-model calculations in the $fp$-shell nuclei compared to the new data indicate the need to include isospin-nonconserving forces.

  18. The prospects for constraining dark energy with future X-ray cluster gas mass fraction measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Rapetti; Steven W. Allen; Adam Mantz

    2008-06-25

    We examine the ability of a future X-ray observatory to constrain dark energy via measurements of the cluster X-ray gas mass fraction, fgas. We find that fgas measurements for a sample of ~500 hot, X-ray bright, dynamically relaxed clusters, to a precision of ~5 per cent, can be used to constrain dark energy with a Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) figure of merit of 15-40, with the possibility of boosting these values by 40 per cent or more by optimizing the redshift distribution of target clusters. Such constraints are comparable to those predicted by the DETF for other leading, planned dark energy experiments. A future fgas experiment will be preceded by a large X-ray or SZ survey that will find hot, X-ray luminous clusters out to high redshifts. Short `snapshot' observations with the new X-ray observatory should then be able to identify a sample of ~500 suitably relaxed systems. The redshift, temperature and X-ray luminosity range of interest has already been partially probed by existing X-ray cluster surveys which allow reasonable estimates of the fraction of clusters that will be suitably relaxed for fgas work. Our analysis uses a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method which fully captures the relevant degeneracies between parameters and facilitates the incorporation of priors and systematic uncertainties in the analysis. We explore the effects of such uncertainties for scenarios ranging from optimistic to pessimistic. We conclude that the fgas experiment will provide tight constraints on the mean matter and dark energy densities, with a peak sensitivity for dark energy work at redshifts midway between those of supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillation/weak lensing/cluster number counts experiments. In combination, these experiments should enable a precise measurement of the evolution of dark energy. (Abridged)

  19. Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass from the H ? ?? and H ? ZZ* ? 4? Channels in pp Collisions at Center-of-Mass Energies of 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    An improved measurement of the mass of the Higgs boson is derived from a combined fit to the reconstructed invariant mass spectra of the decay channels H ? ?? and H ? ZZ[superscript ?] ? 4?. The analysis uses the pp collision ...

  20. Direct mass measurements of cadmium and palladium isotopes and their double-beta transition Q-values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Smorra; T. Beyer; K. Blaum; M. Block; Ch. E. Düllmann; K. Eberhardt; M. Eibach; S. Eliseev; Sz. Nagy; W. Nörtershäuser; D. Renisch

    2012-01-31

    The Q-value of the double-electron capture in Cd-108 has been determined to be (272.04 +/- 0.55) keV in a direct measurement with the double-Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP. Based on this result a resonant enhancement of the decay rate of Cd-108 is excluded. We have confirmed the double-beta transition Q-values of Cd-106 and Pd-110 recently measured with the Penning-trap mass spectrometers SHIPTRAP and ISOLTRAP, respectively. Furthermore, the atomic masses of the involved nuclides Cd-106, Cd-108, Cd-110, Pd-106, Pd-108 and Pd-110 have been directly linked to the atomic mass standard.

  1. {beta}{sub {beta}} measurements of neutron-rich isotopes in the mass region 147{le}A{le}152

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikuta, T.; Taniguchi, A.; Yamamoto, H.; Kawade, K. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Kawase, Y. [Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    The systematic Q{sub {beta}} measurements of 14 neutron-rich nuclei in the mass region from A=147 to A=152 have been performed with an HPGe detector. Neutron-rich nuclei were mass-separated from the thermal neutron induced fission of {sup 235}U using a He-N{sub 2} mixture-jet type on-line isotope separator which has been developed at the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR-ISOL). From a {beta}-ray singles and {beta}-{gamma} coincidence measurements, the Q{sub {beta}} values of {sup 147}La, {sup 147-150}Ce, {sup 147-152}Pr, {sup 152}Nd and {sup 152}Pm have been determined. In addition, the atomic masses derived from the experimental Q{sub {beta}} values are compared with the predictions of theoretical mass calculations.

  2. EVOLUTION, NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND YIELDS OF LOW-MASS ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS AT DIFFERENT METALLICITIES. II. THE FRUITY DATABASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cristallo, S.; Dominguez, I.; Abia, C. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O.; Gallino, R.; Di Rico, G.; Quintini, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, 64100 Teramo (Italy); Bisterzo, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale, Universita di Torino, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2011-12-01

    By using updated stellar low-mass stars models, we systematically investigate the nucleosynthesis processes occurring in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. In this paper, we present a database dedicated to the nucleosynthesis of AGB stars: FRANEC Repository of Updated Isotopic Tables and Yields (FRUITY). An interactive Web-based interface allows users to freely download the full (from H to Bi) isotopic composition, as it changes after each third dredge-up (TDU) episode and the stellar yields the models produce. A first set of AGB models, having masses in the range 1.5 {<=}M/M{sub Sun} {<=} 3.0 and metallicities 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} {<=} Z {<=} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2}, is discussed. For each model, a detailed description of the physical and the chemical evolution is provided. In particular, we illustrate the details of the s-process and we evaluate the theoretical uncertainties due to the parameterization adopted to model convection and mass loss. The resulting nucleosynthesis scenario is checked by comparing the theoretical [hs/ls] and [Pb/hs] ratios to those obtained from the available abundance analysis of s-enhanced stars. On the average, the variation with the metallicity of these spectroscopic indexes is well reproduced by theoretical models, although the predicted spread at a given metallicity is substantially smaller than the observed one. Possible explanations for such a difference are briefly discussed. An independent check of the TDU efficiency is provided by the C-stars luminosity function. Consequently, theoretical C-stars luminosity functions for the Galactic disk and the Magellanic Clouds have been derived. We generally find good agreement with observations.

  3. Pinning Down the Mechanism of Neutrinoless Double {beta} Decay with Measurements in Different Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deppisch, Frank [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Paes, Heinrich [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States)

    2007-06-08

    A measurement of neutrinoless double beta decay in one isotope does not allow us to determine the underlying physics mechanism. We discuss the discrimination of mechanisms for neutrinoless double beta decay by comparing ratios of half-life measurements for different isotopes. Six prominent examples for specific new physics contributions to neutrinoless double beta decay are analyzed. We find that the change in corresponding ratios of half lives varies from 60% for supersymmetric models up to a factor of 5-20 for extra-dimensional and left-right-symmetric mechanisms.

  4. Pinning down the mechanism of neutrinoless double beta decay with measurements in different nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Deppisch; H. Päs

    2007-06-25

    A measurement of neutrinoless double beta decay in one isotope does not allow to determine the underlying physics mechanism. We discuss the discrimination of mechanisms for neutrinoless double beta decay by comparing ratios of half life measurements for different isotopes. Six prominent examples for specific new physics contributions to neutrinoless double beta decay are analyzed. We find that the change in corresponding ratios of half lives varies from 60% for supersymmetric models up to a factor of 5-20 for extra-dimensional and left-right-symmetric mechanisms.

  5. Precision Mass Measurements of 129-131Cd and Their Impact on Stellar Nucleosynthesis via the Rapid Neutron Capture Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Atanasov; P. Ascher; K. Blaum; R. B. Cakirli; T. E. Cocolios; S. George; F. Herfurth; D. Kisler; M. Kowalska; S. Kreim; Yu. A. Litvinov; D. Lunney; V. Manea; D. Neidherr; M. Rosenbusch; L. Schweikhard; A. Welker; F. Wienholtz; R. N. Wolf; K. Zuber

    2015-12-17

    Masses adjacent to the classical waiting-point nuclide 130Cd have been measured by using the Penning- trap spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN. We find a significant deviation of over 400 keV from earlier values evaluated by using nuclear beta-decay data. The new measurements show the reduction of the N = 82 shell gap below the doubly magic 132Sn. The nucleosynthesis associated with the ejected wind from type-II supernovae as well as from compact object binary mergers is studied, by using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations. We find a consistent and direct impact of the newly measured masses on the calculated abundances in the A = 128 - 132 region and a reduction of the uncertainties from the precision mass input data.

  6. First measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in bottom-quark pair production at high mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaltonen, T; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Marchese, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; D'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Ramos, J P Fernández; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; López, O González; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucà, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Fernández, I Redondo; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; Denis, R St; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W -M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2015-01-01

    We measure the particle-level forward-backward production asymmetry in $b\\bar{b}$ pairs with masses $m(b\\bar{b})$ larger than 150 GeV/$c^2$, using events with hadronic jets and employing jet charge to distinguish $b$ from $\\bar{b}$. The measurement uses 9.5/fb of ppbar collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV recorded by the CDF II detector. The asymmetry as a function of $m(b\\bar{b})$ is consistent with zero, as well as with the predictions of the standard model. The measurement disfavors a simple model including an axigluon with a mass of 200 GeV/$c^2$ whereas a model containing a heavier 345 GeV/$c^2$ axigluon is not excluded.

  7. DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURE ANALYSIS OF MULTIPLE STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE INNER CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, J. [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Saar, S. H., E-mail: xincheng@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhang7@gmu.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    In this paper, we study the temperature and density properties of multiple structural components of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using differential emission measure (DEM) analysis. The DEM analysis is based on the six-passband EUV observations of solar corona from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The structural components studied include the hot channel in the core region (presumably the magnetic flux rope of the CME), the bright loop-like leading front (LF), and coronal dimming in the wake of the CME. We find that the presumed flux rope has the highest average temperature (>8 MK) and density ({approx}1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}), resulting in an enhanced emission measure over a broad temperature range (3 {<=} T(MK) {<=} 20). On the other hand, the CME LF has a relatively cool temperature ({approx}2 MK) and a narrow temperature distribution similar to the pre-eruption coronal temperature (1 {<=} T(MK) {<=} 3). The density in the LF, however, is increased by 2%-32% compared with that of the pre-eruption corona, depending on the event and location. In coronal dimmings, the temperature is more broadly distributed (1 {<=} T(MK) {<=} 4), but the density decreases by {approx}35%-{approx}40%. These observational results show that: (1) CME core regions are significantly heated, presumably through magnetic reconnection; (2) CME LFs are a consequence of compression of ambient plasma caused by the expansion of the CME core region; and (3) the dimmings are largely caused by the plasma rarefaction associated with the eruption.

  8. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton plus Jets Channel Using a Modified Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2008-12-01

    The authors report a measurement of the top quark mass, m{sub t}, obtained from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. They analyze a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 rfb{sup -1}. They select events with an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets in the central region of the detector, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. They calculate a signal likelihood using a matrix element integration method, where the matrix element is modified by using effective propagators to take into account assumptions on event kinematics. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter JES that determines in situ the calibration of the jet energies. They use a neural network discriminant to distinguish signal from background events. They also apply a cut on the peak value of each event likelihood curve to reduce the contribution of background and badly reconstructed events. Using the 318 events that pass all selection criteria, they find m{sub t} = 172.7 {+-} 1.8 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.2(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  9. Constraining bubble dynamics and mixing with dissolved gases: Implications for productivity measurements by oxygen mass balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamme, Roberta C

    2006-01-01

    Implications for productivity measurements by oxygen masszone. Because the productivity measurement in the mixedproductivity estimates from continuous O 2 /Ar ratio measurements

  10. Relativistic Cyclotron Radiation Detection of Tritium Decay Electrons as a New Technique for Measuring the Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Monreal; Joseph A. Formaggio

    2009-04-18

    The shape of the beta decay energy distribution is sensitive to the mass of the electron neutrino. Attempts to measure the endpoint shape of tritium decay have so far seen no distortion from the zero-mass form, thus placing an upper limit of m_nu_beta detect the coherent cyclotron radiation emitted by an energetic electron in a magnetic field. For mildly relativistic electrons, like those in tritium decay, the relativistic shift of the cyclotron frequency allows us to extract the electron energy from the emitted radiation. We present calculations for the energy resolution, noise limits, high-rate measurement capability, and systematic errors expected in such an experiment.

  11. Mass Measurements of Very Neutron-Deficient Mo and Tc Isotopes and Their Impact on rp Process Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haettner, E.; Plass, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Eliseev, S.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Kluge, H.-J.; Audi, G.; Blaum, K.; Ketter, J.; Fleckenstein, T.; Ketelaer, J.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Mazzocco, M.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Vorobjev, G.

    2011-03-25

    The masses of ten proton-rich nuclides, including the N=Z+1 nuclides {sup 85}Mo and {sup 87}Tc, were measured with the Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP. Compared to the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2003 a systematic shift of the mass surface by up to 1.6 MeV is observed causing significant abundance changes of the ashes of astrophysical x-ray bursts. Surprisingly low {alpha} separation energies for neutron-deficient Mo and Tc are found, making the formation of a ZrNb cycle in the rp process possible. Such a cycle would impose an upper temperature limit for the synthesis of elements beyond Nb in the rp process.

  12. Mass measurements of very neutron-deficient Mo and Tc isotopes and their impact on rp process nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Haettner; D. Ackermann; G. Audi; K. Blaum; M. Block; S. Eliseev; T. Fleckenstein; F. Herfurth; F. P. Heßberger; S. Hofmann; J. Ketelaer; J. Ketter; H. -J. Kluge; G. Marx; M. Mazzocco; Yu. N. Novikov; W. R. Plaß; S. Rahaman; T. Rauscher; D. Rodríguez; H. Schatz; C. Scheidenberger; L. Schweikhard; B. Sun; P. G. Thirolf; G. Vorobjev; M. Wang; C. Weber

    2011-03-28

    The masses of ten proton-rich nuclides, including the N=Z+1 nuclides 85-Mo and 87-Tc, were measured with the Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP. Compared to the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2003 a systematic shift of the mass surface by up to 1.6 MeV is observed causing significant abundance changes of the ashes of astrophysical X-ray bursts. Surprisingly low alpha-separation energies for neutron-deficient Mo and Tc are found, making the formation of a ZrNb cycle in the rp process possible. Such a cycle would impose an upper temperature limit for the synthesis of elements beyond Nb in the rp process.

  13. Measuring single-cell density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, William H.

    We have used a microfluidic mass sensor to measure the density of single living cells. By weighing each cell in two fluids of different densities, our technique measures the single-cell mass, volume, and density of ...

  14. A Space Weather Information Service Based Upon Remote and In-Situ Measurements of Coronal Mass Ejections Heading for Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritter, Birgit; Miles, Oscar; Rußwurm, Michael; Scully, Stephen; Roldán, Andrés; Hartkorn, Oliver; Jüstel, Peter; Réville, Victor; Lupu, Sorina; Ruffenach, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's magnetosphere is formed as a consequence of interaction between the planet's magnetic field and the solar wind, a continuous plasma stream from the Sun. A number of different solar wind phenomena have been studied over the past forty years with the intention of understanding and forecasting solar behavior. One of these phenomena in particular, Earth-bound interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs), can significantly disturb the Earth's magnetosphere for a short time and cause geomagnetic storms. This publication presents a mission concept consisting of six spacecraft that are equally spaced in a heliocentric orbit at 0.72 AU. These spacecraft will monitor the plasma properties, the magnetic field's orientation and magnitude, and the 3D-propagation trajectory of CMEs heading for Earth. The primary objective of this mission is to increase space weather (SW) forecasting time by means of a near real-time information service, that is based upon in-situ and remote measurements of the aforementioned CM...

  15. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 014607 (2010) Fission fragment mass and energy distributions as a function of incident neutron energy measured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    2010-01-01

    , and Nuclear Engineering, NES 1-25, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180, USA 2 Los Alamos National Lab, Los; published 19 January 2010) A new method of measuring fission fragment mass and energy distributions as a function of incident neutron energy are necessary for accurate, detailed neutronics calculations for new

  16. Measurement of the high-mass Drell-Yan cross section and limits on quark-electron compositeness scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1999-06-01

    We present a measurement of the Drell-Yan cross section at high dielectron invariant mass using 120 pb(-1) of data collected in p (p) over bar, collisions at root s = 1.8TeV by the D0 Collaboration during 1992-1996. No ...

  17. High-precision Penning trap mass measurements for tests of the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaum, Klaus; Eliseev, Sergey; Nagy, Szilard

    2010-08-04

    With the nowadays achievable accuracy in Penning trap mass spectrometry on short-lived exotic nuclides as well as stable atoms, precision fundamental tests can be performed, among them a test of the Standard Model, in particular with regard to the weak interaction, the CPT symmetry conservation, and the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix. In addition, accurate mass values of specific nuclides are important for neutrino physics. The presently best tests of the Standard Model with high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometry will be reviewed.

  18. Measurement of the Translational Energy of Ions with a Time?of?Flight Mass Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, J. L.; Hierl, Peter M.; Whan, David A.

    1967-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of peak shapes in a Bendix time?of?flight mass spectrometer shows that ions formed with excess translational energy exhibit considerable peak broadening. A method is developed by which this translational ...

  19. Feasibility of Measuring the Cosmological Constant [LAMBDA] and Mass Density [Omega] using Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goobar, A.

    2008-01-01

    at z = 1. uncertainty for supernovae at z = 1. mR Adding theMass Density .Q Using Type Ia Supernovae A. Goobar and S.Density Q Using Type Ia Supernovae Ariel Goobar l and Saul

  20. The black hole mass of NGC 4151. II. Stellar dynamical measurement from near-infrared integral field spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onken, Christopher A.; Ferrarese, Laura [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Valluri, Monica; Brown, Jonathan S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); McGregor, Peter J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Peterson, Bradley M.; Pogge, Richard W. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bentz, Misty C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, 25 Park Place, Office 610, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Vestergaard, Marianne [Dark Cosmology Centre, The Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Instituto de Física, CP 15051, Porto Alegre 91501-970, RS (Brazil); Riffel, Rogemar A., E-mail: christopher.onken@anu.edu.au, E-mail: mvalluri@umich.edu [Departamento de Física, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Exatas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2014-08-10

    We present a revised measurement of the mass of the central black hole (M{sub BH} ) in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. The new stellar dynamical mass measurement is derived by applying an axisymmetric orbit-superposition code to near-infrared integral field data obtained using adaptive optics with the Gemini Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS). When our models attempt to fit both the NIFS kinematics and additional low spatial resolution kinematics, our results depend sensitively on how ?{sup 2} is computed—probably a consequence of complex bar kinematics that manifest immediately outside the nuclear region. The most robust results are obtained when only the high spatial resolution kinematic constraints in the nuclear region are included in the fit. Our best estimates for the black hole mass and H-band mass-to-light ratio are M{sub BH} ? 3.76 ± 1.15 × 10{sup 7} M{sub ?} (1? error) and Y{sub H} ? 0.34 ± 0.03 M{sub ?}/L{sub ?} (3? error), respectively (the quoted errors reflect the model uncertainties). Our black hole mass measurement is consistent with estimates from both reverberation mapping (3.57{sub ?0.37}{sup +0.45}×10{sup 7} M{sub ?}) and gas kinematics (3.0{sub ?2.2}{sup +0.75}×10{sup 7} M{sub ?}; 1? errors), and our best-fit mass-to-light ratio is consistent with the photometric estimate of Y{sub H} = 0.4 ± 0.2 M{sub ?}/L{sub ?}. The NIFS kinematics give a central bulge velocity dispersion ?{sub c} = 116 ± 3 km s{sup –1}, bringing this object slightly closer to the M{sub BH}-? relation for quiescent galaxies. Although NGC 4151 is one of only a few Seyfert 1 galaxies in which it is possible to obtain a direct dynamical black hole mass measurement—and thus, an independent calibration of the reverberation mapping mass scale—the complex bar kinematics makes it less than ideally suited for this purpose.

  1. SU-E-I-53: Variation in Measurements of Breast Skin Thickness Obtained Using Different Imaging Modalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, U; Kumaraswamy, N; Markey, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate variation in measurements of breast skin thickness obtained using different imaging modalities, including mammography, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Breast skin thicknesses as measured by mammography, CT, ultrasound, and MRI were compared. Mammographic measurements of skin thickness were obtained from published studies that utilized standard positioning (upright) and compression. CT measurements of skin thickness were obtained from a published study of a prototype breast CT scanner in which the women were in the prone position and the breast was uncompressed. Dermatological ultrasound exams of the breast skin were conducted at our institution, with the subjects in the upright position and the breast uncompressed. Breast skin thickness was calculated from breast MRI exams at our institution, with the patient in the prone position and the breast uncompressed. Results: T tests for independent samples demonstrated significant differences in the mean breast skin thickness as measured by different imaging modalities. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant differences in breast skin thickness across different quadrants of the breast for some modalities. Conclusion: The measurement of breast skin thickness is significantly different across different imaging modalities. Differences in the amount of compression and differences in patient positioning are possible reasons why measurements of breast skin thickness vary by modality.

  2. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in the Lepton+Jets Channel Using the Lepton Transverse Momentum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-01-01

    This letter reports a measurement of the top quark mass, M{sub top}, in data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to 2.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. Events with the lepton+jets topology are selected. An unbinned likelihood is constructed based on the dependence of the lepton transverse momentum, P{sub T}, on M{sub top}. A maximum likelihood fit to the data yields a measured mass M{sub top} = 176.9 {+-} 8.0{sub stat} {+-} 2.7{sub syst} GeV/c{sup 2}. In this measurement, the contribution by the jet energy scale uncertainty to the systematic error is negligible. The result provides an important consistency test for other M{sub top} measurements where explicit use of the jet energy is made for deriving the top quark mass.

  3. Strong and weak lensing united III: Measuring the mass distribution of the merging galaxy cluster 1E0657-56

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marusa Bradac; Douglas Clowe; Anthony H. Gonzalez; Phil Marshall; William Forman; Christine Jones; Maxim Markevitch; Scott Randall; Tim Schrabback; Dennis Zaritsky

    2006-08-18

    The galaxy cluster 1E0657-56 (z = 0.296) is remarkably well-suited for addressing outstanding issues in both galaxy evolution and fundamental physics. We present a reconstruction of the mass distribution from both strong and weak gravitational lensing data. Multi-color, high-resolution HST ACS images allow detection of many more arc candidates than were previously known, especially around the subcluster. Using the known redshift of one of the multiply imaged systems, we determine the remaining source redshifts using the predictive power of the strong lens model. Combining this information with shape measurements of "weakly" lensed sources, we derive a high-resolution, absolutely-calibrated mass map, using no assumptions regarding the physical properties of the underlying cluster potential. This map provides the best available quantification of the total mass of the central part of the cluster. We also confirm the result from Clowe et al. (2004,2006a).

  4. Measurable neutrino mass scale in A{sub 4}xSU(5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antusch, S.; Spinrath, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Muenchen (Germany); King, Stephen F. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-01

    We propose a supersymmetric A{sub 4}xSU(5) model of quasidegenerate neutrinos which predicts the effective neutrino mass m{sub ee} relevant for neutrinoless double beta decay to be proportional to the neutrino mass scale, thereby allowing its determination approximately independently of unknown Majorana phases. Such a natural quasidegeneracy is achieved by using A{sub 4} family symmetry (as an example of a non-Abelian family symmetry with real triplet representations) to enforce a contribution to the neutrino mass matrix proportional to the identity. Tribimaximal neutrino mixing as well as quark CP violation with {alpha}{approx_equal}90 deg. d a leptonic CP phase {delta}{sub MNS{approx_equal}}90 deg. arise from the breaking of the A{sub 4} family symmetry by the vacuum expectation values of four 'flavon' fields pointing in specific postulated directions in flavor space.

  5. Measurement of the Top-Quark Mass in the All-Hadronic Channel using the full CDF data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Lucà; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; M. Martínez; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; N. Ranjan; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida; G. B. Yu

    2014-10-08

    The top-quark mass M_top is measured using top quark-antiquark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV and decaying into a fully hadronic final state. The full data set collected with the CDFII detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.3 fb-1, is used. Events are selected that have six to eight jets, at least one of which is identified as having originated from a b quark. In addition, a multivariate algorithm, containing multiple kinematic variables as inputs, is used to discriminate signal events from background events due to QCD multijet production. Templates for the reconstructed top-quark mass are combined in a likelihood fit to measure M_top with a simultaneous calibration of the jet-energy scale. A value of M_top = 175.07+- 1.19(stat)+1.55-1.58(syst) GeV/c^2 is obtained for the top-quark mass.

  6. Tracing the geometry around a massive, axisymmetric body to measure, through gravitational waves, its mass moments and electromagnetic moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Sotiriou; T. A. Apostolatos

    2004-10-25

    The geometry around a rotating massive body, which carries charge and electrical currents, could be described by its multipole moments (mass moments, mass-current moments, electric moments, and magnetic moments). When a small body is orbiting this massive body, it will move on geodesics, at least for a time interval that is short with respect to the characteristic time of the binary due to gravitational radiation. By monitoring the waves emitted by the small body we are actually tracing the geometry of the central object, and hence, in principle, we can infer all its multipole moments. This paper is a generalization of previous similar results by Ryan. The fact that the electromagnetic moments of spacetime can be measured demonstrates that one can obtain information about the electromagnetic field purely from gravitational wave analysis. Additionally, these measurements could be used as a test of the no-hair theorem for black holes.

  7. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters Final Report to the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-10

    . In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Our study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area.

  8. Measuring Multivariate Selection We have found that there are fundamental differences between the surviving birds and those

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Bruce

    29 Measuring Multivariate Selection We have found that there are fundamental differences between all the measures of phenotypic selection discussed here are multivariate extensions of measures is as follows: We first introduce the multivariate versions of differentials and gradients and their properties

  9. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A

    2011-01-01

    and Nuclear Recoil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Quantitative Measurements using NRF 2.1 Nuclear ResonanceFuture Work A Transmission Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence

  10. Chemistry of ?-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products generated in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber as measured by acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent developments in high resolution, time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made possible the direct detection of atmospheric organic compounds in real-time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, for the first time, we examine gas-phase O3 and OH oxidation products of ?-pinene and naphthalene formed in the PAM flow reactor with an HR-ToF-CIMS using acetate reagent ion chemistry. Integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec cm?3 s, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 daysmore »of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. We present a method that estimates vapor pressures of organic molecules using the measured O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and carbon number for each compound detected by the CIMS. The predicted condensed-phase SOA average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous AMS measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  11. Can we constrain interior structure of rocky exoplanets from mass and radius measurements?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Caroline; Heng, Kevin; Alibert, Yann; Connolly, James A D; Benz, Willy; Tackley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We present an inversion method based on Bayesian analysis to constrain the interior structure of terrestrial exoplanets, in the form of chemical composition of the mantle and core size. Specifically, we identify what parts of the interior structure of terrestrial exoplanets can be determined from observations of mass, radius, and stellar elemental abundances. We perform a full probabilistic inverse analysis to formally account for observational and model uncertainties and obtain confidence regions of interior structure models. This enables us to characterize how model variability depends on data and associated uncertainties. We test our method on terrestrial solar system planets and find that our model predictions are consistent with independent estimates. Furthermore, we apply our method to synthetic exoplanets up to 10 Earth masses and up to 1.7 Earth radii as well as to exoplanet Kepler-36b. Importantly, the inversion strategy proposed here provides a framework for understanding the level of precision requ...

  12. Precision Measurements at The Higgs Resonance: A Probe of Radiative Fermion Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. M. Borzumati; G. R. Farrar; N. Polonsky; S. Thomas

    1997-12-17

    The possibility of radiative generation of fermion masses from soft supersymmetry breaking chiral flavor violation is explored. Consistent models are identified and classified. Phenomenological implications for electric dipole moments and magnetic moments, as well as collider probes -- in particular those relevant at the Higgs resonance -- are discussed. It is shown that partial widths $\\Gamma_{h^{0} \\to ff}$ are enhanced compared with the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  13. Constraining the strangeness content of the nucleon by measuring the $?$ meson mass shift in nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Gubler; Keisuke Ohtani

    2015-02-07

    The behavior of the $\\phi$ meson at finite density is studied, making use of a QCD sum rule approach in combination with the maximum entropy method. It is demonstrated that a possible mass shift of the $\\phi$ in nuclear matter is strongly correlated to the strangeness content of the nucleon, which is proportional to the strange sigma term, $\\sigma_{sN} = m_s \\langle N | \\overline{s}s | N \\rangle$. Our results furthermore show that, depending on the value of $\\sigma_{sN}$, the $\\phi$ meson could receive both a positive or negative mass shift at nuclear matter density. We find that these results depend only weakly on potential modifications of the width of the $\\phi$ meson peak and on assumptions made on the behavior of four-quark condensates at finite density. To check the stability of our findings, we take into account several higher order corrections to the operator product expansion, including $\\alpha_s$-corrections, terms of higher order in the strange quark mass and terms of higher twist that have not been considered in earlier works.

  14. Measures of galaxy dust and gas mass with Herschel photometry and prospects for ALMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berta, S; Genzel, R; Foerster-Schreiber, N M; Tacconi, L J

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) Combining the deepest Herschel extragalactic surveys (PEP, GOODS-H, HerMES), and Monte Carlo mock catalogs, we explore the robustness of dust mass estimates based on modeling of broad band spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with two popular approaches: Draine & Li (2007, DL07) and a modified black body (MBB). As long as the observed SED extends to at least 160-200 micron in the rest frame, M(dust) can be recovered with a >3 sigma significance and without the occurrence of systematics. An average offset of a factor ~1.5 exists between DL07- and MBB-based dust masses, based on consistent dust properties. At the depth of the deepest Herschel surveys (in the GOODS-S field) it is possible to retrieve dust masses with a S/N>=3 for galaxies on the main sequence of star formation (MS) down to M(stars)~1e10 [M(sun)] up to z~1. At higher redshift (z1, the delta(GDR) dependence on metallicity is consistent with the local relation. We combine far-IR Herschel data and sub-mm ALMA expected fluxes to study ...

  15. The Dense Matter Equation of State from Neutron Star Radius and Mass Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozel, Feryal; Guver, Tolga; Baym, Gordon; Heinke, Craig; Guillot, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of spectroscopic radius measurements of twelve neutron stars obtained during thermonuclear bursts or in quiescence. We incorporate, for the first time, a large number of systematic uncertainties in the measurement of the apparent angular sizes, Eddington fluxes, and distances, in the composition of the interstellar medium, and in the flux calibration of X-ray detectors. We also take into account the results of recent theoretical calculations of rotational effects on neutron star radii, of atmospheric effects on surface spectra, and of relativistic corrections to the Eddington critical flux. We employ Bayesian statistical frameworks to obtain neutron star radii from the spectroscopic measurements as well as to infer the equation of state from the radius measurements. Combining these with the results of experiments in the vicinity of nuclear saturation density and the observations of ~2 Msun neutron stars, we place strong and quantitative constraints on the properties of the equ...

  16. Measurements of the masses, lifetimes and mixings of B hadrons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malde, S; /Oxford U.

    2009-09-01

    The Tevatron, with p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, can produce all flavors of B hadrons and allows for unprecedented studies in the B physics sector. The CDF and D0 collaborations have more than 5 fb{sup -1} of data recorded. I present here a selection of recent results on the masses, lifetimes and mixings of B hadrons using between 1.0 and 2.8 fb{sup -1} of data.

  17. First Use of High Charge States for Mass Measurements of Short-Lived Nuclides in a Penning Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A. T.; Dilling, J.; Simon, M. C.; Chaudhuri, A.; Mane, E.; Delheij, P.; Pearson, M. R.; Brunner, T.; Chowdhury, U.; Simon, V. V.; Brodeur, M.; Andreoiu, C.; Audi, G.; Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Ullrich, J.; Gwinner, G.; Lapierre, A.; Lunney, D.; Ringle, R.

    2011-12-30

    Penning trap mass measurements of short-lived nuclides have been performed for the first time with highly charged ions, using the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. Compared to singly charged ions, this provides an improvement in experimental precision that scales with the charge state q. Neutron-deficient Rb isotopes have been charge bred in an electron beam ion trap to q=8-12+ prior to injection into the Penning trap. In combination with the Ramsey excitation scheme, this unique setup creating low energy, highly charged ions at a radioactive beam facility opens the door to unrivaled precision with gains of 1-2 orders of magnitude. The method is particularly suited for short-lived nuclides such as the superallowed {beta} emitter {sup 74}Rb (T{sub 1/2}=65 ms). The determination of its atomic mass and an improved Q{sub EC} value are presented.

  18. First Use of High Charge States for Mass Measurements of Short-lived Nuclides in a Penning Trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Ettenauer; M. C. Simon; A. T. Gallant; T. Brunner; U. Chowdhury; V. V. Simon; M. Brodeur; A. Chaudhuri; E. Mané; C. Andreoiu; G. Audi; J. R. Crespo López-Urrutia; P. Delheij; G. Gwinner; A. Lapierre; D. Lunney; M. R. Pearson; R. Ringle; J. Ullrich; J. Dilling

    2011-09-15

    Penning trap mass measurements of short-lived nuclides have been performed for the first time with highly-charged ions (HCI), using the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. Compared to singly-charged ions, this provides an improvement in experimental precision that scales with the charge state q. Neutron-deficient Rb-isotopes have been charge bred in an electron beam ion trap to q = 8 - 12+ prior to injection into the Penning trap. In combination with the Ramsey excitation scheme, this unique setup creating low energy, highly-charged ions at a radioactive beam facility opens the door to unrivalled precision with gains of 1-2 orders of magnitude. The method is particularly suited for short-lived nuclides such as the superallowed {\\beta} emitter 74Rb (T1/2 = 65 ms). The determination of its atomic mass and an improved QEC-value are presented.

  19. Measuring Galaxy Disk Mass with the SparsePak Integral Field Unit on WIYN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Verheijen; Matthew Bershady; David Andersen

    2002-01-21

    We present first results from commissioning data of the SparsePak Integral Field Unit on the WIYN telescope. SparsePak is a bundle of 82 fibers, each 5 arcsec in diameter and arranged in a sparsely filled, 76x77 arcsec hexagonal grid. NGC 3982, a nearly face-on, blue and very high surface brightness galaxy, was mapped in three spectral regions; around 5130A (MgI), 6680A (H-alpha) and 8660A (CaII-triplet) with FWHM spectral resolutions of 24, 16 and 37 km/s respectively. At 3.5 disk scale lengths, the spectra of 18 fibers were averaged after deprojection of the rotation curve. Stellar velocity dispersions were determined in the CaII region by convolving the spectrum of a K0.5-III template star with a Gaussian of varying FWHM and finding the best match to the azimuthally avaraged galaxy spectra. A radial mass surface density profile has been derived for a variety of scale heights assuming an isothermal vertical density profile. At two disk scale lengths, the mass surface density of N3982 is ~3 times higher than that of the Milky Way in the solar neighborhood. Surprisingly, the stellar rotation curve of this compact and high surface brightness galaxy is substantially sub-maximum.

  20. Neutron to proton mass difference, parton distribution functions and baryon resonances from dynamics on the Lie group u(3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ole L. Trinhammer

    2012-06-25

    We present a hamiltonian structure on the Lie group u(3) to describe the baryon spectrum. The ground state is identified with the proton. From this single fit we calculate approximately the relative neutron to proton mass shift to within half a percentage of the experimental value. From the same fit we calculate the nucleon and delta resonance spectrum with correct grouping and no missing resonances. For specific spin eigenfunctions we calculate the delta to nucleon mass ratio to within one percent. Finally we derive parton distribution functions that compare well with those for the proton valence quarks. The distributions are generated by projecting the proton state to space via the exterior derivative on u(3). We predict scarce neutral flavour singlets which should be visible in neutron diffraction dissociation experiments or in invariant mass spectra of protons and negative pions in B-decays and in photoproduction on neutrons. The presence of such singlet states distinguishes experimentally the present model from the standard model as does the prediction of the neutron to proton mass splitting. Conceptually the Hamiltonian may describe an effective phenomenology or more radically describe interior dynamics implying quarks and gluons as projections from u(3) which we then call allospace.

  1. Measuring Supersymmetric Particle Masses at the LHC in Scenarios with Baryon-Number R-Parity Violating Couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. C. Allanach; A. J. Barr; L. Drage; C. G. Lester; D. Morgan; M. A. Parker; P. Richardson B. R. Webber

    2001-02-14

    The measurement of sparticle masses in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model at the LHC is analysed, in the scenario where the lightest neutralino decays into three quarks. Such decays, occurring through the baryon-number violating coupling lambda"\\_ijk, pose a severe challenge to the capability of the LHC detectors since the final state has no missing energy signature and a high jet multiplicity. We focus on the case of non-zero lambda"\\_212 which is the most difficult experimentally. The proposed method is valid over a wide range of SUGRA parameter space with lambda"\\_212 between 10^{-5}-0.1. Simulations are performed of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Using the lightest neutralino from the decay chain left-squark to quark + next-to-lightest neutralino to right-slepton + lepton + quark and finally to lightest neutralino + lepton pair + quark, we show that the lightest and next-to-lightest neutralino masses can be measured by 3-jet and 3-jet + lepton pair invariant mass combinations. At the SUGRA point M_0=100 GeV, M_{1/2}=300 GeV, A_0=300 GeV, tan beta=10, sign of mu positive and with lambda"\\_212=0.005, we achieve statistical (systematic) errors of 3 (3), 3 (3), 0.3 (4) and 5 (12) GeV respectively for the masses of the lightest neutralino, next-to-lightest neutralino, right-slepton and left-squark, with an integrated luminosity of 30 fb^{-1}.

  2. Method for ultra-trace cesium isotope ratio measurements from environmental samples using thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Mathew S.; Snyder, Darin C.; Mann, Nick R.; White, Byron M.

    2015-05-01

    135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios can provide the age, origin and history of environmental Cs contamination. Relatively high precision 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratio measurements from samples containing femtogram quantities of 137Cs are needed to accurately track contamination resuspension and redistribution following environmental 137Cs releases; however, mass spectrometric analyses of environmental samples are limited by the large quantities of ionization inhibitors and isobaric interferences which are present at relatively high concentrations in the environment. We report a new approach for Cs purification from environmental samples. An initial ammonium molybdophosphate-polyacrylonitrile (AMP-PAN) column provides a robust method for extracting Cs under a wide variety of sample matrices and mass loads. Cation exchange separations using a second AMP-PAN column result in more than two orders of magnitude greater Cs/Rb separation factors than commercially available strong cation exchangers. Coupling an AMP-PAN cation exchanging step to a microcation column (AG50W resin) enables consistent 2-4% (2?) measurement errors for samples containing 3-6,000 fg 137Cs, representing the highest precision 135Cs/137Cs ratio measurements currently reported for soil samples at the femtogram level.

  3. Measurement and simulation of jet mass caused by a high-aspect ratio hole perturbation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, D C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kyrala, George A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blue, Brent E [LLNL; Edwards, J [LLNL; Elliott, James B [LLNL; Robey, H F [LLNL; Spears, B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule performance can be negatively impacted by the presence of hydrodynamic instabilities. To perform a gas fill on an ICF capsule, current plans involve drilling a small hole and inserting a fill tube to inject the gas mixture into the capsule. This introduces a perturbation on the capsule, which can seed hydrodynamic instabilities. The small hole can cause jetting of the shell material into the gas, which might adversely affect the capsule performance. We have performed simulations and experiments to study the hydrodynamic evolution of jets from high-aspect ratio holes, such as the fill tube hole. Although simulations using cold materials overpredict the amount of mass in the jet, when a reasonable amount of preheat (<1 eV) is introduced, the simulations are in better agreement with the experiment.

  4. Measurement and simulation of jet mass caused by a high-aspect ratio pertubation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kyrala, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Doug [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blue, Brent [LLNL/GA; Elliott, Jim [LLNL; Edwards, John [LLNL; Robey, Harry [LLNL; Spears, Brian [LLNL

    2009-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule performance can be negatively impacted by the presence of hydrodynamic instabilities. To perform a gas fill on an ICF capsule current plans involve drilling a small hole and inserting a fill tube to inject the gas mixture into the capsule. This introduces a perturbation on the capsule, which can seed hydrodynamic instabilities. The small hole can cause jetting of the shell material into the gas, which might adversely affect the capsule performance. We have performed simulations and experiments to study the hydrodynamic evolution of jets from high-aspect ratio holes, such as the fill tube hole. Although simulations using cold materials over predict the amount of mass in the jet, when a reasonable amount of preheat (< 1 eV) is introduced, the simulations are in better agreement with the experiment.

  5. Measurement and simulation of jet mass caused by a high-aspect ratio hole perturbation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, P. A.; Cooley, J. H.; Kyrala, G. A.; Wilson, D. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Elliott, J. B.; Blue, B. E.; Edwards, J.; Robey, H. F.; Spears, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule performance can be negatively impacted by the presence of hydrodynamic instabilities. To perform a gas fill on an ICF capsule, current plans involve drilling a small hole and inserting a fill tube to inject the gas mixture into the capsule. This introduces a perturbation on the capsule, which can seed hydrodynamic instabilities. The small hole can cause jetting of the shell material into the gas, which might adversely affect the capsule performance. We have performed simulations and experiments to study the hydrodynamic evolution of jets from high-aspect ratio holes, such as the fill tube hole. Although simulations using cold materials overpredict the amount of mass in the jet, when a plausible amount of preheat (<1 eV) is introduced, the simulations are in better agreement with the experiment.

  6. The Dense Matter Equation of State from Neutron Star Radius and Mass Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feryal Ozel; Dimitrios Psaltis; Tolga Guver; Gordon Baym; Craig Heinke; Sebastien Guillot

    2015-05-19

    We present a comprehensive study of spectroscopic radius measurements of twelve neutron stars obtained during thermonuclear bursts or in quiescence. We incorporate, for the first time, a large number of systematic uncertainties in the measurement of the apparent angular sizes, Eddington fluxes, and distances, in the composition of the interstellar medium, and in the flux calibration of X-ray detectors. We also take into account the results of recent theoretical calculations of rotational effects on neutron star radii, of atmospheric effects on surface spectra, and of relativistic corrections to the Eddington critical flux. We employ Bayesian statistical frameworks to obtain neutron star radii from the spectroscopic measurements as well as to infer the equation of state from the radius measurements. Combining these with the results of experiments in the vicinity of nuclear saturation density and the observations of ~2 Msun neutron stars, we place strong and quantitative constraints on the properties of the equation of state between ~2-8 times the nuclear saturation density. We find that around M=1.5 Msun, the preferred equation of state predicts a radius of 10.8-0.4+0.5 km. When interpreting the pressure constraints in the context of high density equations of state based on interacting nucleons, our results suggest a weaker contribution of the three-body interaction potential than previously considered.

  7. The Measurement of Trace Emissions and Combustion Characteristics for a Mass Fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fuels, temperature profiles, and fluid motions within and adjacent to large fires. Feedback mechanisms and burning condition of the fuel. Measurements made by satellites or aircraft can be used to estimate areas actual amounts of fuel consumed, the rate of fuel consumption, and carbon and heat release by the fire

  8. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the lepton plus jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and in situ Jet Energy Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass mt [m subscript t] is obtained using a sample of tt? events from pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, ...

  9. Measurements of the Top-Quark Mass and the tt? Cross Section in the Hadronic ?+jets Decay Channel at ?s=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We present the first direct measurement of the top-quark mass using tt? events decaying in the hadronic ?+jets decay channel. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2??fb[superscript -1] collected by the ...

  10. Measurement and Interpretation of Moments of the Combined Hadronic Mass and Energy Spectrum in Inclusive Semileptonic B-Meson Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klose, Verena; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2011-08-12

    This thesis presents first measurements of moments of the hadronic n{sub X}{sup 2} distribution measured in inclusive semileptonic decays of B mesons to final states containing a charm quark, B {yields} X{sub c}{ell}{nu}. The variable n{sub X}{sup 2} is a combination of the invariant mass of the charmed meson m{sub X}, its energy in the B-meson rest-frame E{sub X;BRF}, and a constant {tilde {Lambda}} = 0.65 GeV, n{sub X}{sup 2} = m{sub X}{sup 2}c{sup 4}-2{tilde {Lambda}}E{sub X,BRF} + {tilde {Lambda}}{sup 2}. The moments with k = 2,4,6 are measured as proposed by theory to constrain assumptions made in the theoretical description of inclusive observables in semileptonic B-meson decays. This description uses Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), an effective QCD combined with an Operator Product Expansion. The measurement is based on a sample of 231.6 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events recorded with the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -}-storage rings at SLAC. We reconstruct the semileptonic decay by identifying a charged lepton in events tagged by a fully reconstructed hadronic decay of the second B meson. Correction procedures are derived from Monte Carlo simulations to ensure an unbiased measurement of the moments of the n{sub X}{sup 2} distribution. All moments are measured requiring minimum lepton momenta between 0.8 GeV/c and 1.9 GeV/c in the rest frame of the B meson. Performing a simultaneous fit to the measured moments up to order k = 6 combined with other measurements of moments of the lepton-energy spectrum in decays B {yields} X{sub c}{ell}{nu} and moments of the photon-energy spectrum in decays B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, we determine the quark-mixing parameter |V{sub cb}|, the bottom and charm quark masses, the semileptonic branching fraction {Beta}(B {yields} X{sub c}{ell}{nu}), and four non-perturbative heavy quark parameters. Using HQE calculations in the kinetic scheme up to order 1/m{sub b}{sup 3} we find |V{sub cb}| = (41.65 {+-} 0.43 {+-} 0.40 {+-} 0.58) {center_dot} 10{sup -3} and m{sub b} = (4.570 {+-} 0.033 {+-} 0.043) GeV/c{sup 2}, where the first uncertainty refers to experimental contributions, the second to uncertainties in the HQE, and the third to theoretical uncertainties in the calculations of the semileptonic decay rate {Lambda}(B {yields} X{sub c}{ell}{nu}). All obtained results are consistent with previous determinations. The inclusion of the moments decreases the uncertainty on the HQE parameters {mu}{sub {pi}}{sup 2} and {rho}{sub D}{sup 3}. Furthermore, the theoretical treatment of higher order corrections in the HQE used for the moments has been verified with these new measurements.

  11. Comparing and assessing different measurement techniques for mercury in coal systhesis gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, D.P.; Richardson, C.F. [Radian Corporation, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Three mercury measurement techniques were performed on synthesis gas streams before and after an amine-based sulfur removal system. The syngas was sampled using (1) gas impingers containing a nitric acid-hydrogen peroxide solution, (2) coconut-based charcoal sorbent, and (3) an on-line atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a gold amalgamation trap and cold vapor cell. Various impinger solutions were applied upstream of the gold amalgamation trap to remove hydrogen sulfide and isolate oxidized and elemental species of mercury. The results from these three techniques are compared to provide an assessment of these measurement techniques in reducing gas atmospheres.

  12. Validating mass spectrometry measurements of nuclear materials via a non-contact volume analysis method of ion sputter craters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willingham, David G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Fahey, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    A combination of secondary ion mass spectrometry, optical profilometry and a statistically-driven algorithm was used to develop a non-contact volume analysis method to validate the useful yields of nuclear materials. The volume analysis methodology was applied to ion sputter craters created in silicon and uranium substrates sputtered by 18.5 keV O- and 6.0 keV Ar+ ions. Sputter yield measurements were determined from the volume calculations and were shown to be comparable to Monte Carlo calculations and previously reported experimental observations. Additionally, the volume calculations were used to determine the useful yields of Si+, SiO+ and SiO2+ ions from the silicon substrate and U+, UO+ and UO2+ ions from the uranium substrate under 18.5 keV O- and 6.0 keV Ar+ ion bombardment. This work represents the first steps toward validating the interlaboratory and cross-platform performance of mass spectrometry for the analysis of nuclear materials.

  13. Rebates: The Energy Efficiency Measure that Can Make a Major Difference 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haun, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    no weatherization improvements have been made, tenants suddenly finb themselves responsible for additional payments for which they either have not budgeted, or for which they simply do not have sufficient resources. 1 Even when weatherization measures have been... Technology is pressing for passage of an ordinance in Chicago that would require building owners to bring property up to energy-efficiency weatherization standards before they would be permitted to convert. MANAGEMENT CONTROL Through the use of a...

  14. Quantification of absorption, retention and elimination of two different oral doses of vitamin A in Zambian boys using accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aklamati, E K; Mulenga, M; Dueker, S R; Buchholz, B A; Peerson, J M; Kafwembe, E; Brown, K H; Haskell, M J

    2009-10-12

    A recent survey indicated that high-dose vitamin A supplements (HD-VAS) had no apparent effect on vitamin A (VA) status of Zambian children <5 y of age. To explore possible reasons for the lack of response to HD-VAS among Zambian children, we quantified the absorption, retention, and urinary elimination of either a single HDVAS (60 mg) or a smaller dose of stable isotope (SI)-labeled VA (5 mg), which was used to estimate VA pool size, in 3-4 y old Zambian boys (n = 4 for each VA dose). A 25 nCi tracer dose of [{sup 14}C{sub 2}]-labeled VA was co-administered with the HD-VAS or SI-labeled VA, and 24-hr stool and urine samples were collected for 3 and 7 consecutive days, respectively, and 24-hr urine samples at 4 later time points. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) was used to measure the cumulative excretion of {sup 14}C in stool and urine 3d after dosing to estimate, respectively, absorption and retention of the VAS and SI-labeled VA. The urinary elimination rate (UER) was estimated by plotting {sup 14}C in urine vs. time, and fitting an exponential equation to the data. Estimates of mean absorption, retention and the UER were 83.8 {+-} 7.1%, 76.3 {+-} 6.7%, and 1.9 {+-} 0.6%/d, respectively, for the HD-VAS and 76.5 {+-} 9.5%, 71.1 {+-} 9.4%, and 1.8 {+-} 1.2%/d, respectively for the smaller dose of SI-labeled VA. Estimates of absorption, retention and the UER did not differ by size of the VA dose administered (P=0.26, 0.40, 0.88, respectively). Estimated absorption and retention were negatively associated with reported fever (P=0.011) and malaria (P =0.010). HD-VAS and SI-labeled VA were adequately absorbed, retained and utilized in apparently healthy Zambian preschool-age boys, although absorption and retention may be affected by recent infections.

  15. Measurement of the top quark mass using the template method in the lepton plus jets channel with in situ W ---> j j calibration at CDF-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adelman, Jahred A.; Arguin, J.F.; Bellettini, G.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Chlachidze, G.; Demortier, L.; Gibson, A.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Maruyama, T.; Sato, K.; Shochet, M.; Sinervo, P.; Tomura, T.; Velev, G.; Xie, S.; Yang, U.K.; /Chicago U. /Toronto U. /INFN, Pisa /Dubna, JINR /Rockefeller U. /LBL, Berkeley /Tsukuba U. /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    We report an updated measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton plus jets channel of t{bar t} events from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This measurement uses a dataset with integrated luminosity of 680 pb{sup -1}, containing 360 t{bar t} candidates separated into four subsamples. A top quark mass is reconstructed for each event by using energy and momentum constraints on the top quark pair decay products. We also employ the reconstructed mass of hadronic W boson decays W {yields} jj to constrain in situ the largest systematic uncertainty of the top quark mass measurement: the jet energy scale. Monte Carlo templates of the reconstructed top quark and W boson mass are produced as a function of the true top quark mass and the jet energy scale. The distribution of reconstructed top quark and W boson mass in the data are compared to the Monte Carlo templates using a likelihood fit to obtain: M{sub top} = 173.4 {+-} 2.8 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  16. Production of highly-enriched 134Ba for a reference material for isotope dilution mass spectrometry measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Horkley, J. J.; Carney, K. P.; Gantz, E. M.; Davies, J. E.; Lewis, R. R.; Crow, J. P.; Poole, C. A.; Grimes, T. S.; Giglio, J. J.

    2015-03-17

    Isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is an analytical technique capable of providing accurate and precise quantitation of trace isotope abundance and assay providing measurement uncertainties below 1 %. To achieve these low uncertainties, the IDMS method ideally utilizes chemically pure “spike” solutions that consist of a single highly enriched isotope that is well-characterized relating to the abundance of companion isotopes and concentration in solution. To address a current demand for accurate 137Cs/137Ba ratio measurements for “age” determination of radioactive 137Cs sources, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is producing enriched 134Ba isotopes that are tobe used for IDMS spikes to accurately determinemore »137Ba accumulation from the decay of 137Cs. The final objective of this work it to provide a homogenous set of reference materials that the National Institute of Standards and Technology can certify as standard reference materials used for IDMS. The process that was developed at INL for the separation and isolation of Ba isotopes, chemical purification of the isotopes in solution, and the encapsulation of the materials will be described.« less

  17. Production of highly-enriched 134Ba for a reference material for isotope dilution mass spectrometry measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.J. Horkley; K.P E.M. Gantz; J.E. Davis; R.R. Lewis; J.P. Crow; C.A. Poole; T.S. Grimes; J.J. Giglio

    2015-03-01

    t Isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is an analytical technique capable of providing accurate and precise quantitation of trace isotope abundance and assay providing measurement uncertainties below 1 %. To achieve these low uncertainties, the IDMS method ideally utilizes chemically pure ‘‘spike’’ solutions that consist of a single highly enriched isotope that is well-characterized relating to the abundance of companion isotopes and concentration in solution. To address a current demand for accurate 137Cs/137Ba ratio measurements for ‘‘age’’ determination of radioactive 137Cs sources, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is producing enriched 134Ba isotopes that are tobe used for IDMS spikes to accurately determine 137Ba accumulation from the decay of 137Cs. The final objective of this work it to provide a homogenous set of reference materials that the National Institute of Standards and Technology can certify as standard reference materials used for IDMS. The process that was developed at INL for the separation and isolation of Ba isotopes, chemical purification of the isotopes in solution,

  18. Production of highly-enriched 134Ba for a reference material for isotope dilution mass spectrometry measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horkley, J. J.; Carney, K. P.; Gantz, E. M.; Davies, J. E.; Lewis, R. R.; Crow, J. P.; Poole, C. A.; Grimes, T. S.; Giglio, J. J.

    2015-03-17

    Isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is an analytical technique capable of providing accurate and precise quantitation of trace isotope abundance and assay providing measurement uncertainties below 1 %. To achieve these low uncertainties, the IDMS method ideally utilizes chemically pure “spike” solutions that consist of a single highly enriched isotope that is well-characterized relating to the abundance of companion isotopes and concentration in solution. To address a current demand for accurate 137Cs/137Ba ratio measurements for “age” determination of radioactive 137Cs sources, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is producing enriched 134Ba isotopes that are tobe used for IDMS spikes to accurately determine 137Ba accumulation from the decay of 137Cs. The final objective of this work it to provide a homogenous set of reference materials that the National Institute of Standards and Technology can certify as standard reference materials used for IDMS. The process that was developed at INL for the separation and isolation of Ba isotopes, chemical purification of the isotopes in solution, and the encapsulation of the materials will be described.

  19. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the fully hadronic decay channel from ATLAS data at ?s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-04-23

    In this study, the mass of the top quark is measured in a data set corresponding to 4.6 fb-1 of proton–proton collisions with centre-of-mass energy ?s=7 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Events consistent with hadronic decays of top–antitop quark pairs with at least six jets in the final state are selected. The substantial background from multijet production is modelled with data-driven methods that utilise the number of identified b-quark jets and the transverse momentum of the sixth leading jet, which have minimal correlation. The top-quark mass is obtained from template fits to the ratio of three-jetmore »to dijet mass. The three-jet mass is calculated from the three jets produced in a top-quark decay. Using these three jets the dijet mass is obtained from the two jets produced in the W boson decay. The top-quark mass obtained from this fit is thus less sensitive to the uncertainty in the energy measurement of the jets. A binned likelihood fit yields a top-quark mass of mt=175.1±1.4(stat.) ±1.2(syst.) GeV.« less

  20. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voutilainen, Mikko Antero; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys. /Helsinki U. of Tech. /Nebraska U. /Saclay

    2008-07-01

    This thesis studies the high-energy collisions of protons and antiprotons. The data used in the measurement were collected during 2004-2005 with the D0 detector at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and correspond to 0.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. High energy hadron collisions usually produce collimated sprays of particles called jets. The energy of the jets is measured using a liquid Argon-Uranium calorimeter and the production angle is determined with the help of silicon microstrip and scintillating fiber trackers. The inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions is measured as a function of jet transverse momentum p{sub T} in six bins of jet rapidity at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The measurement covers jet transerve momenta from 50 GeV up to 600 GeV and jet rapidities up to |y| = 2.4. The data are collected using a set of seven single jet triggers. Event and jet cuts are applied to remove non-physical backgrounds and cosmic-ray interactions. The data are corrected for jet energy calibration, cut and trigger efficiencies and finite jet p{sub T} resolution. The corrections are determined from data and the methods are tested with Monte Carlo simulation. The main experimental challenges in the measurement are the calibration of jet energies and the determination of the jet p{sub T} resolution. New methods are developed for the jet energy calibration that take into account physical differences between the {gamma}+jet and dijet calibration samples arising from quark and gluon jet differences. The uncertainty correlations are studied and provided as a set of uncertainty sources. The production of particle jets in hadron collisions is described by the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). When the transverse jet momentum is large, the contributions from long-distance physics processes are small and the production rates of jets can be predicted by perturbative QCD. The inclusive jet cross section in p{bar p} collisions at large p{sub T} is directly sensitive to the strong coupling constant ({alpha}{sub s}) and the parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton. This measurement can be used to constrain the PDFs, in particular the gluon PDF at high proton momentum fraction x, and to look for quark substructure at the TeV scale. The data are compared to the theory predictions with perturbative QCD in the next-to-leading order precision and a good agreement between data and theory is observed.

  1. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A

    2011-10-14

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy ?s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of tt? pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) amounts to an additional in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the top-quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat + ?JES) ± 1.3 (syst) GeV/c2.

  2. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati

    2011-10-14

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy ?s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of tt? pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) amounts to an additional in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the top-quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat + ?JES) ± 1.3 (syst) GeV/c2.

  3. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-14

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy ?s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of tt? pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and amore »correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) amounts to an additional in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the top-quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat + ?JES) ± 1.3 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  4. Assessing Long-Term Wind Conditions by Combining Different Measure-Correlate-Predict Algorithms: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Chowdhury, S.; Messac, A.; Hodge, B. M.

    2013-08-01

    This paper significantly advances the hybrid measure-correlate-predict (MCP) methodology, enabling it to account for variations of both wind speed and direction. The advanced hybrid MCP method uses the recorded data of multiple reference stations to estimate the long-term wind condition at a target wind plant site. The results show that the accuracy of the hybrid MCP method is highly sensitive to the combination of the individual MCP algorithms and reference stations. It was also found that the best combination of MCP algorithms varies based on the length of the correlation period.

  5. Measurement of the ? ? * distribution of muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV in 10.4 fb - 1 of p p ¯ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.?M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.?S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.?P.; Alexeev, G.?D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2015-04-06

    We present a measurement of the distribution of the variable ?*? for muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV, using the complete run II data set collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb?¹ at ?s=1.96 TeV. The data are corrected for detector effects and presented in bins of dimuon rapidity and mass. The variable ?*? probes the same physical effects as the Z/?* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. These are the first measurements at anymore »collider of the ?*? distributions for dilepton masses away from the Z?l?l? boson mass peak. The data are compared to QCD predictions based on the resummation of multiple soft gluons.« less

  6. Measurement of the ? ? * distribution of muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV in 10.4 fb - 1 of p p ¯ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.?M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.?S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.?P.; Alexeev, G.?D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D.?V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J.?F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S.?B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.?C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.?E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X.?B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C.?P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B.?C.?K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K.?M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S.?W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W.?E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S.?J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.?P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H.?T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P.?F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.?V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.?D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V.?N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.?E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P.?H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J.?A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.?E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P.?D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M.?W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J.?M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A.?P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.?D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J.?D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J.?L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A.?S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M.?S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A.?W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y.?N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J.?M.; Kozelov, A.?V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V.?A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H.?S.; Lee, S.?W.; Lee, W.?M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.?Z.; Li, X.; Lim, J.?K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.?V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A.?L.; Maciel, A.?K.?A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.?L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C.?L.; Meijer, M.?M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P.?G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N.?K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.?A.; Negret, J.?P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.?T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.?K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V.?M.; Popov, A.?V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P.?N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M.?P.; Santos, A.?S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R.?D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A.?A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G.?R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D.?A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V.?V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W.?M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E.?W.; Vasilyev, I.?A.; Verkheev, A.?Y.; Vertogradov, L.?S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H.?D.; Wang, M.?H.?L.?S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.

    2015-04-01

    We present a measurement of the distribution of the variable ?*? for muon pairs with masses between 30 and 500 GeV, using the complete run II data set collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb?¹ at ?s=1.96 TeV. The data are corrected for detector effects and presented in bins of dimuon rapidity and mass. The variable ?*? probes the same physical effects as the Z/?* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. These are the first measurements at any collider of the ?*? distributions for dilepton masses away from the Z?l?l? boson mass peak. The data are compared to QCD predictions based on the resummation of multiple soft gluons.

  7. Schottky mass measurements of heavy neutron-rich nuclides in the element range $70\\leZ \\le79$ at the ESR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Shubina; R. B. Cakirli; Yu. A. Litvinov; K. Blaum; C. Brandau; F. Bosch; J. J. Carroll; R. F. Casten; D. M. Cullen; I. J. Cullen; A. Y. Deo; B. Detwiler; C. Dimopoulou; F. Farinon; H. Geissel; E. Haettner; M. Heil; R. S. Kempley; C. Kozhuharov; R. Knöbel; J. Kurcewicz; N. Kuzminchuk; S. A. Litvinov; Z. Liu; R. Mao; C. Nociforo; F. Nolden; Z. Patyk; W. R. Plass; A. Prochazka; M. W. Reed; M. S. Sanjari; C. Scheidenberger; M. Steck; Th. Stöhlker; B. Sun; T. P. D. Swan; G. Trees; P. M. Walker; H. Weick; N. Winckler; M. Winkler; P. J. Woods; T. Yamaguchi; C. Zhou

    2013-08-14

    Storage-ring mass spectrometry was applied to neutron-rich $^{197}$Au projectile fragments. Masses of $^{181,183}$Lu, $^{185,186}$Hf, $^{187,188}$Ta, $^{191}$W, and $^{192,193}$Re nuclei were measured for the first time. The uncertainty of previously known masses of $^{189,190}$W and $^{195}$Os nuclei was improved. Observed irregularities on the smooth two-neutron separation energies for Hf and W isotopes are linked to the collectivity phenomena in the corresponding nuclei.

  8. Measured difference between 206Pb, 205Tl charge distributions and the proton 3s1/2 wave function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Anders; S. Shlomo; I. Talmi

    2015-04-21

    Charge density difference between 206Pb and 205Tl, measured by elastic electron scattering, is very similar to the charge density due to a proton in a 3s1/2 orbit. We look for a potential well whose 3s1/2 wave function yields the measured data. We developed a novel method to obtain the potential directly from the density and its first and second derivatives. Fits to parametrized potentials were also carried out. The 3s1/2 wave functions of the potentials determined here, reproduce fairly well the experimental data within the quoted errors. To detect possible effects of short-range two-body correlations on the 3s1/2 shell model wave function, more accurate measurements are required.

  9. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using the Decay Length Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-12-01

    We report the first measurement of the top quark mass using the decay length technique in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. This technique uses the measured flight distance of the b hadron to infer the mass of the top quark in lepton plus jets events with missing transverse energy. It relies solely on tracking and avoids the jet energy scale uncertainty that is common to all other methods used so far. We apply our novel method to a 695 pb{sup -1} data sample recorded by the CDF II detector at Fermilab and extract a measurement of m{sub t} = 180.7{sub -13.4}{sup +15.5}(stat.) {+-} 8.6 (syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. While the uncertainty of this result is larger than that of other measurements, the dominant uncertainties in the decay length technique are uncorrelated with those in other methods. This result can help reduce the overall uncertainty when combined with other existing measurements of the top quark mass.

  10. Anthropogenic emissions of NOx over China: Reconciling the difference of inverse modeling results using GOME-2 and OMI measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Dasa; Wang, Yuhang; Smeltzer, Charles; Boersma, K. Folkert

    2014-06-27

    Inverse modeling using satellite observations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns has been extensively used to estimate nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions in China. Recently, the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) provide independent global NO2 column measurements on a nearly daily basis at around 9:30 and 13:30 local time across the equator, respectively. Anthropogenic NOx emission estimates by applying previously developed monthly inversion (MI) or daily inversion (DI) methods to these two sets of measurements show substantial differences. We improve the DI method by conducting model simulation, satellite retrieval, and inverse modeling sequentially on a daily basis. After each inversion, we update anthropogenic NOx emissions in the model simulation with the newly obtained a posteriori results. Consequently, the inversion-optimized emissions are used to compute the a priori NO2 profiles for satellite retrievals. As such, the a priori profiles used in satellite retrievals are now coupled to inverse modeling results. The improved procedure was applied to GOME-2 and OMI NO2 measurements in 2011. The new daily retrieval-inversion (DRI) method estimates an average NOx emission of 6.9 Tg N/yr over China, and the difference between using GOME-2 and OMI measurements is 0.4 Tg N/yr, which is significantly smaller than the difference of 1.3 Tg N/yr using the previous DI method. Using the more consistent DRI inversion results, we find that anthropogenic NOx emissions tend to be higher in winter and summer than spring (and possibly fall) and the weekday-to-weekend emission ratio tends to increase with NOx emission in China.

  11. Measurement of the w boson mass at the Collider Detector at Fermilab from a fit to the transverse momentum spectrum of the muon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vollrath, Ian Eberhard; /Toronto U.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the W boson mass from a fit to the transverse momentum spectrum of the muon in W decay. In past measurements this technique was used as a cross-check, however, now presents the best method in terms of systematic uncertainty. We discuss all sources of systematic uncertainty with emphasis on those to which the muon p{sub T} measurement is particularly sensitive, specifically, those associated with modeling the production and decay of W bosons. The data were collected with the CDF II detector between March 2002 and September 2003 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of (191 {+-} 11) pb{sup -1}. We measure the W mass to be (80.316 {+-} 0.066{sub stat.} {+-} 0.051{sub syst.}) GeV/c{sup 2} = (80.316 {+-} 0.083) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  12. Stir bar sorptive extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the2 determination of pesticides in water samples: method validation and measurement uncertainty3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    carry-over between consecutive extractions with the same stir21 bar. Pesticide quantification in water1 Title :1 Stir bar sorptive extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the2 determination of pesticides in water samples: method validation and measurement uncertainty3

  13. Combined Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass in pp Collisions at ?s = 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS and CMS Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A measurement of the Higgs boson mass is presented based on the combined data samples of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN LHC in the H ? ?? and H ? ZZ ? 4? decay channels. The results are obtained from a simultaneous ...

  14. Measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in the decay X(3872) [right arrow] J/ [psi] [pi]? [pi]? at the CDFII experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rakitin, Alexander (Alexander Yurevich)

    2005-01-01

    We present a measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in the decay X(3872) [right arrow] J/ [psi] [pi]? [pi]? using a 360 pb-1 sample of pp collisions at av [square root]s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at ...

  15. Measurement of the double differential diject mass cross section in pp(bar) collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen; /Oklahoma U.

    2009-07-01

    This thesis presents the analysis of the double differential dijet mass cross section, measured at the D0 detector in Batavia, IL, using p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The dijet mass was calculated using the two highest p{sub T} jets in the event, with approximately 0.7 fb{sup -1} of data collected between 2004 and 2005. The analysis was presented in bins of dijet mass (M{sub JJ}) and rapidity (y), and extends the measurement farther in M{sub JJ} and y than any previous measurement. Corrections due to detector effects were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation and applied to data. The errors on the measurement consist of statistical and systematic errors, of which the Jet Energy Scale was the largest. The final result was compared to next-to-leading order theory and good agreement was found. These results may be used in the determination of the proton parton distribution functions and to set limits on new physics.

  16. Rock Joint Surfaces Measurement and Analysis of Aperture Distribution under Different Normal and Shear Loading Using GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharifzadeh, Mostafa; Esaki, Tetsuro

    2009-01-01

    Geometry of the rock joint is a governing factor for joint mechanical and hydraulic behavior. A new method of evaluating aperture distribution based on measurement of joint surfaces and three dimensional characteristics of each surface is developed. Artificial joint of granite surfaces are measured,processed, analyzed and three dimensional approaches are carried out for surface characterization. Parameters such as asperity's heights, slope angles, and aspects distribution at micro scale,local concentration of elements and their spatial localization at local scale are determined by Geographic Information System (GIS). Changes of aperture distribution at different normal stresses and various shear displacements are visualized and interpreted. Increasing normal load causes negative changes in aperture frequency distribution which indicates high joint matching. However, increasing shear displacement causes a rapid increase in the aperture and positive changes in the aperture frequency distribution which could be ...

  17. PROPER MOTIONS OF THE ARCHES CLUSTER WITH KECK LASER GUIDE STAR ADAPTIVE OPTICS: THE FIRST KINEMATIC MASS MEASUREMENT OF THE ARCHES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarkson, W. I. [Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, Physics and Astronomy Building, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Ghez, A. M.; Morris, M. R.; Yelda, S. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, 727 East 3rd Street, Swain West 319, Bloomington, IN 47405-7105 (United States); Lu, J. R. [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822-1839 (United States); Stolte, A. [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); McCrady, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Montana, 32 Campus Drive, No. 1080, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States); Do, T., E-mail: wiclarks@indiana.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    We report the first detection of the intrinsic velocity dispersion of the Arches cluster-a young ({approx}2 Myr), massive (10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }) starburst cluster located only 26 pc in projection from the Galactic center. This was accomplished using proper motion measurements within the central 10'' Multiplication-Sign 10'' of the cluster, obtained with the laser guide star adaptive optics system at Keck Observatory over a three-year time baseline (2006-2009). This uniform data set results in proper motion measurements that are improved by a factor {approx}5 over previous measurements from heterogeneous instruments. By careful, simultaneous accounting of the cluster and field contaminant distributions as well as the possible sources of measurement uncertainties, we estimate the internal velocity dispersion to be 0.15 {+-} 0.01 mas yr{sup -1}, which corresponds to 5.4 {+-} 0.4 km s{sup -1} at a distance of 8.4 kpc. Projecting a simple model for the cluster onto the sky to compare with our proper motion data set, in conjunction with surface density data, we estimate the total present-day mass of the cluster to be M(r < 1.0 pc) = 1.5{sup +0.74}{sub -0.60} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. The mass in stars observed within a cylinder of radius R (for comparison to photometric estimates) is found to be M(R < 0.4 pc) = 0.90{sup +0.40}{sub -0.35} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} at formal 3{sigma} confidence. This mass measurement is free from assumptions about the mass function of the cluster, and thus may be used to check mass estimates from photometry and simulation. Photometric mass estimates assuming an initially Salpeter mass function ({Gamma}{sub 0} = 1.35, or {Gamma} {approx} 1.0 at present, where dN/d(log M){proportional_to}M{sup {Gamma}}) suggest a total cluster mass M{sub cl} {approx} (4-6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} and projected mass ({approx} 2 {<=} M(R < 0.4 pc) {<=} 3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. Photometric mass estimates assuming a globally top-heavy or strongly truncated present-day mass function (PDMF; with {Gamma} {approx} 0.6) yield mass estimates closer to M(R < 0.4 pc) {approx} 1-1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. Consequently, our results support a PDMF that is either top-heavy or truncated at low mass, or both. Collateral benefits of our data and analysis include: (1) cluster membership probabilities, which may be used to extract a clean-cluster sample for future photometric work; (2) a refined estimate of the bulk motion of the Arches cluster with respect to the field, which we find to be 172 {+-} 15 km s{sup -1}, which is slightly slower than suggested by previous measurements using one epoch each with the Very Large Telescope and the Keck telescope; and (3) a velocity dispersion estimate for the field itself, which is likely dominated by the inner Galactic bulge and the nuclear disk.

  18. Neutron interferometric measurement of the scattering length difference between the triplet and singlet states of n-$^3$He

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. G. Huber; M. Arif; W. C. Chen; T. R. Gentile; D. S. Hussey; T. C. Black; D. A. Pushin; C. B. Shahi; F. E. Wietfeldt; L. Yang

    2014-09-30

    We report a determination of the n-$^3$He scattering length difference $\\Delta b^{\\prime} = b_{1}^{\\prime}-b_{0}^{\\prime} = $ ($-5.411$ $\\pm$ $0.031$ (statistical) $\\pm$ $0.039$ (systematic)) fm between the triplet and singlet states using a neutron interferometer. This revises our previous result $\\Delta b^{\\prime} = $ (-5.610 $\\pm$ $0.027$ (statistical) $\\pm$ $0.032$ (systematic) fm obtained using the same technique in 2008. This revision is due to a re-analysis of the 2008 experiment that includes a more robust treatment of the phase shift caused by magnetic field gradients near the $^3$He cell. Furthermore, we more than doubled our original data set from 2008 by acquiring six months of additional data in 2013. Both the new data set and a re-analysis of the older data are in good agreement. Scattering lengths of low Z isotopes are valued for use in few-body nuclear effective field theories, provide important tests of modern nuclear potential models and in the case of $^3$He aid in the interpretation of neutron scattering from quantum liquids. The difference $\\Delta b^{\\prime}$ was determined by measuring the relative phase shift between two incident neutron polarizations caused by the spin-dependent interaction with a polarized $^3$He target. The target $^3$He gas was sealed inside a small, flat windowed glass cell that was placed in one beam path of the interferometer. The relaxation of $^3$He polarization was monitored continuously with neutron transmission measurements. The neutron polarization and spin flipper efficiency were determined separately using $^3$He analyzers and two different polarimetry analysis methods. A summary of the measured scattering lengths for n-$^3$He with a comparison to nucleon interaction models is given.

  19. The History of Nuclidic Masses and of their Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Audi

    2006-02-08

    This paper is centered on some historical aspects of nuclear masses, and their relations to major discoveries. Besides nuclear reactions and decays, the heart of mass measurements lies in mass spectrometry, the early history of which will be reviewed first. I shall then give a short history of the mass unit which has not always been defined as one twelfth of the carbon-12 mass. When combining inertial masses from mass spectrometry with energy differences obtained in reactions and decays, the conversion factor between the two is essential. The history of the evaluation of the nuclear masses (actually atomic masses) is only slightly younger than that of the mass measurements themselves. In their modern form, mass evaluations can be traced back to 1955. Prior to 1955, several tables were established, the oldest one in 1935.

  20. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt¯? lepton+jets and tt¯? dilepton channels using ?s = 7   TeV ATLAS data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt¯? lepton+jets and tt¯? dilepton (lepton = e,?) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of ?s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. The tt¯? lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks ormore »gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt¯? dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the m?b observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 ± 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) ± 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 ± 0.54(stat) ± 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt¯? lepton+jets and tt¯? dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 ± 0.48(stat) ± 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.« less

  1. Improvement in Thermal-Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) using Total Flash Evaporation (TFE) method for lanthanides isotope ratio measurements in transmutation targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mialle, S.; Gourgiotis, A.; Aubert, M.; Stadelmann, G.; Gautier, C.; Isnard, H.

    2011-07-01

    The experiments involved in the PHENIX french nuclear reactor to obtain precise and accurate data on the total capture cross sections of the heavy isotopes and fission products require isotopic ratios measurements with uncertainty of a few per mil. These accurate isotopic ratio measurements are performed with mass spectrometer equipped with multi-collector system. The major difficulty for the analyses of these actinides and fission products is the low quantity of the initial powder enclosed in steel container (3 to 5 mg) and the very low quantities of products formed (several {mu}g) after irradiation. Specific analytical developments are performed by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) to be able to analyse several nanograms of elements with this technique. A specific method of acquisition named Total Flash Evaporation was adapted in this study in the case of lanthanide measurements for quantity deposited on the filament in the order of 2 ng and applied on irradiated fuel. To validate the analytical approach and discuss about the accuracy of the data, the isotopic ratios obtained by TIMS are compared with other mass spectrometric techniques such as Multiple-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (MC-ICPMS). (authors)

  2. Measurement and image processing evaluation of surface modifications of dental implants G4 pure titanium created by different techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulutsuz, A. G.; Demircioglu, P. Bogrekci, I.; Durakbasa, M. N.

    2015-03-30

    Foreign substances and organic tissue interaction placed into the jaw in order to eliminate tooth loss involves a highly complex process. Many biological reactions take place as well as the biomechanical forces that influence this formation. Osseointegration denotes to the direct structural and functional association between the living bone and the load-bearing artificial implant's surface. Taking into consideration of the requirements in the manufacturing processes of the implants, surface characterizations with high precise measurement techniques are investigated and thus long-term success of dental implant is emphasized on the importance of these processes in this study. In this research, the detailed surface characterization was performed to identify the dependence of the manufacturing techniques on the surface properties by using the image processing methods and using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for morphological properties in 3D and Taylor Hobson stylus profilometer for roughness properties in 2D. Three implant surfaces fabricated by different manufacturing techniques were inspected, and a machined surface was included into the study as a reference specimen. The results indicated that different surface treatments were strongly influenced surface morphology. Thus 2D and 3D precise inspection techniques were highlighted on the importance for surface characterization. Different image analyses techniques such as Dark-light technique were used to verify the surface measurement results. The computational phase was performed using image processing toolbox in Matlab with precise evaluation of the roughness for the implant surfaces. The relationship between the number of black and white pixels and surface roughness is presented. FFT image processing and analyses results explicitly imply that the technique is useful in the determination of surface roughness. The results showed that the number of black pixels in the image increases with increase in surface roughness.

  3. Measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in the four-lepton channel in $pp$ collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-02-11

    The final ATLAS Run 1 measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in the decay channel $H\\to ZZ^{*}\\to\\ell^+\\ell^-\\ell^{'+}\\ell^{'-}$, where $\\ell,\\ell^{'}=e$ or $\\mu$, are presented. These measurements were performed using $pp$ collision data corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb$^{-1}$ and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV, respectively, recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The $H\\to ZZ^{*}\\to 4\\ell$ signal is observed with a significance of 8.1 standard deviations, with an expectation of 6.2 standard deviations, at $m_{H}$ = 125.36 GeV, the combined ATLAS measurement of the Higgs boson mass from the $H\\to \\gamma\\gamma$ and $H\\to ZZ^{*}\\to 4\\ell$ channels. The production rate relative to the Standard Model expectation, the signal strength, is measured in four different production categories in the $H\\to ZZ^{*}\\to 4\\ell$ channel. The measured signal strength, at this mass, and with all categories combined, is 1.44 $^{+0.40}_{-0.33}$. The signal strength for Higgs boson production in gluon fusion or in association with $t\\bar{t}$ or $b\\bar{b}$ pairs is found to be 1.7 $^{+0.5}_{-0.4}$, while the signal strength for vector-boson fusion combined with $WH/ZH$ associated production is found to be 0.3 $^{+1.6}_{-0.9}$.

  4. Top Quark Measurements in CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efe Yazgan; for the CMS Collaboration

    2014-09-12

    Measurements involving top quarks provide important tests of QCD. A selected set of top quark measurements in CMS including the strong coupling constant, top quark pole mass, constraints on parton distribution functions, top quark pair differential cross sections, ttbar+0 and >0 jet events, top quark mass studied using various kinematic variables in different phase-space regions, and alternative top quark mass measurements is presented. The evolution of expected uncertainties in future LHC runs for the standard and alternative top quark mass measurements is also presented.

  5. Characterization of a real-time tracer for Isoprene Epoxydiols-derived Secondary Organic Aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, W. W.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Krechmer, J. E.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Liu, Y. J.; et al

    2015-04-16

    Substantial amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be formed from isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), which are oxidation products of isoprene mainly under low-NO conditions. Total IEPOX-SOA, which may include SOA formed from other parallel isoprene low-NO oxidation pathways, was quantified by applying Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The IEPOX-SOA fractions of OA in multiple field studies across several continents are summarized here and show consistent patterns with the concentration of gas-phase IEPOX simulated by the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. During the SOAS study, 78% of IEPOX-SOA is accounted for the measured molecular tracers, making itmore »the highest level of molecular identification of an ambient SOA component to our knowledge. Enhanced signal at C5H6O+ (m/z 82) is found in PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA spectra. To investigate the suitability of this ion as a tracer for IEPOX-SOA, we examine fC5H6O ( fC5H6O = C5H6O+/OA) across multiple field, chamber and source datasets. A background of ~ 1.7 ± 0.1‰ is observed in studies strongly influenced by urban, biomass-burning and other anthropogenic primary organic aerosol (POA). Higher background values of 3.1 ± 0.8‰ are found in studies strongly influenced by monoterpene emissions. The average laboratory monoterpene SOA value (5.5 ± 2.0‰) is 4 times lower than the average for IEPOX-SOA (22 ± 7‰). Locations strongly influenced by isoprene emissions under low-NO levels had higher fC5H6O (~ 6.5 ± 2.2‰ on average) than other sites, consistent with the expected IEPOX-SOA formation in those studies. fC5H6O in IEPOX-SOA is always elevated (12–40‰) but varies substantially between locations, which is shown to reflect large variations in its detailed molecular composition. The low fC5H6O (< 3‰) observed in non IEPOX-derived isoprene-SOA indicates that this tracer ion is specifically enhanced from IEPOX-SOA, and is not a tracer for all SOA from isoprene. We introduce a graphical diagnostic to study the presence and aging of IEPOX-SOA as a "triangle plot" of fCO2 vs. fC5H6O. Finally, we develop a simplified method to estimate ambient IEPOX-SOA mass concentrations, which is shown to perform well compared to the full PMF method. The uncertainty of the tracer method is up to a factor of ~ 2 if the fC5H6O of the local IEPOX-SOA is not available. When only unit mass resolution data is available, as with the aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM), all methods may perform less well because of increased interferences from other ions at m/z 82. This study clarifies the strengths and limitations of the different AMS methods for detection of IEPOX-SOA and will enable improved characterization of this OA component.« less

  6. Isolation and Puification of Uranium Isotopes for Measurement by Mass-Spectrometry (233, 234, 235, 236, 238U) and Alpha Spectrometry (232U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinelli, R; Hamilton, T; Brown, T; Marchetti, A; Williams, R; Tumey, S

    2006-05-30

    This report describes a standardized methodology used by researchers from the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) (Energy and Environment Directorate) and the Environmental Radiochemistry Group (Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the full isotopic analysis of uranium from solution. The methodology has largely been developed for use in characterizing the uranium composition of selected nuclear materials but may also be applicable to environmental studies and assessments of public, military or occupational exposures to uranium using in-vitro bioassay monitoring techniques. Uranium isotope concentrations and isotopic ratios are measured using a combination of Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC ICP-MS), Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Alpha Spectrometry.

  7. Measurement of ww + wz production cross section and study of the dijet mass spectrum in the lnu + jets final state at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavaliere, Viviana; /Siena U.

    2010-12-01

    We present the measurement of the WW and WZ production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, in a final state consisting of an electron or muon, neutrino and jets. The data analyzed were collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider and correspond to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The analysis uses a fit to the dijet mass distribution to extract the diboson contribution. We observe 1582 {+-} 275(stat.) {+-} 107(syst.) diboson candidate events and measure a cross section of {sigma}{sub WW/WZ} = 18.1 {+-} 3.3(stat.) {+-} 2.5(syst.) pb, consistent with the Standard Model prediction of 15.9 {+-} 0.9 pb. The best fit to the dijet mass of the known components shows a good agreement with the data except for the [120, 160] GeV/c{sup 2} mass range, where an excess is observed. We perform detailed checks of our background model and study the significance of the excess, assuming an additional gaussian component with a width compatible with the expected dijet mass resolution. A standard {Delta}{sub {chi}}{sup 2} test of the presence of the additional component, returns a p-value of 4.2 x 10{sup -4} when standard sources of systematics are considered, corresponding to a significance of 3.3{sigma}.

  8. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and \\textit{in situ} Jet Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-10-01

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass m{sub t} is obtained using a sample of t{bar t} events from p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter {Delta}{sub JES} used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events, a value of m{sub t} = 173.0 {+-} 1.2 GeV/c{sup 2} is measured.

  9. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass with the D0 Detector at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using the Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroeninger, Kevin Alexander; /Bonn U.

    2004-04-01

    Using a data set of 158 and 169 pb{sup -1} of D0 Run-II data in the electron and muon plus jets channel, respectively, the top quark mass has been measured using the Matrix Element Method. The method and its implementation are described. Its performance is studied in Monte Carlo using ensemble tests and the method is applied to the Moriond 2004 data set.

  10. A gas chromatography/pyrolysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry system for high-precision dD measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Hubertus

    A gas chromatography/pyrolysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry system for high-precision d we present a highly automated, high-precision online gas chromatography/pyrolysis/isotope ratio from ice, preconcentration, gas chromatographic separation and pyrolysis of CH4 from roughly 500 g

  11. Measurements of the exclusive decays of the Upsilon(5S) to B meson final states and improved B-s(*) mass measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besson, David Zeke

    2006-04-01

    Using 420 pb(-1) of data collected on the Upsilon(5S) resonance with the CLEO III detector, we reconstruct B mesons in 25 exclusive decay channels to measure or set upper limits on the decay rate of Upsilon(5S) into B meson final states. We measure...

  12. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient and determination of the imaginary component of the atomic form factor of tin over the energy range of 29-60 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonge, Martin D. de; Tran, Chanh Q.; Chantler, Christopher T.; Barnea, Zwi; Dhal, Bipin B.; Paterson, David; Kanter, Elliot P.; Southworth, Stephen H.; Young, Linda; Beno, Mark A.; Linton, Jennifer A.; Jennings, Guy [X-Ray Operations and Research, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Australian Synchrotron Project, Major Projects Victoria, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); BESSRC-CAT, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    We use the x-ray extended-range technique (XERT) [C. T. Chantler et al., Phys. Rev. A 64, 062506 (2001)] to measure the mass attenuation coefficients of tin in the x-ray energy range of 29-60 keV to 0.04-3 % accuracy, and typically in the range 0.1-0.2 %. Measurements made over an extended range of the measurement parameter space are critically examined to identify, quantify, and correct a number of potential experimental systematic errors. These results represent the most extensive experimental data set for tin and include absolute mass attenuation coefficients in the regions of x-ray absorption fine structure, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray absorption near-edge structure. The imaginary component of the atomic form factor f{sub 2} is derived from the photoelectric absorption after subtracting calculated Rayleigh and Compton scattering cross sections from the total attenuation. Comparison of the result with tabulations of calculated photoelectric absorption coefficients indicates that differences of 1-2 % persist between calculated and observed values.

  13. Simultaneous factor analysis of organic particle and gas1 mass spectra: AMS and PTR-MS measurements at an2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    S1 Simultaneous factor analysis of organic particle and gas1 mass spectra: AMS and PTR: Traffic F2PTR: LRT + Local Source F3PTR: LRT + Painting F4PTR: LRT + Local Oxidation F5PTR: Oxygenates+Local Source) F3PTR (LRT+Painting) F4PTR: Local Oxidation F5PTR: Oxygenates fPeak = -1.0 fPeak = 0 fPeak = 1

  14. Improvements in the M-T relation and mass function and the measured Omega_m through clusters evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo

    2003-09-05

    In this paper, I revisit the constraints obtained by several authors (Reichart et al. 1999; Eke et al. 1998; Henry 2000) on the estimated values of Omega_m, n and sigma_8 in the light of recent theoretical developments: 1) new theoretical mass functions (Sheth & Tormen 1999, Sheth, Mo & Tormen 1999, Del Popolo 2002b); 2) a more accurate mass-temperature relation, also determined for arbitrary Omega_m and Omega_{\\Lambda} (Voit 2000, Pierpaoli et al. 2001, Del Popolo 2002a). Firstly, using the quoted improvements, I re-derive an expression for the X-ray Luminosity Function (XLF), similarly to Reichart et al. (1999), and then I get some constraints to \\Omega_m and n, by using the ROSAT BCS and EMSS samples and maximum-likelihood analysis. Then I re-derive the X-ray Temperature Function (XTF), similarly to Henry (2000) and Eke et al. (1999), re-obtaining the constraints on Omega_m, n, sigma_8. Both in the case of the XLF and XTF, the changes in the mass function and M-T relation produces an increase in Omega_m of \\simeq 20% and similar results in sigma_8 and n.

  15. Measurement of the Mass and Width of the W Boson in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 - 209 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, P; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Buschbeck, B; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Duperrin, A; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Kokkinias, P; Leinonen, L; Katsoufis, E; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Krumshtein, Z; Lesiak, T; Kerzel, U; Liebig, W; King, B T; Lamsa, J; Liko, D; Kjaer, N J; Leder, G; Kluit, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Leitner, R; Kuznetsov, O; Kucharczyk, M; Ledroit, F; Lopes, J H; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lipniacka, A; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Paganoni, M; Nassiakou, M; Paiano, S; Navarria, F; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Ouraou, A; Parkes, C; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Oyanguren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevski, A; Palacios, J P; Onofre, A; Palka, H; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pape, L; Papadopoulou, T D; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Radojicic, D; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Sopczak, A; Szeptycka, M; Sekulin, R; Siebel, M; Spassoff, Tz; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Simard, L; Stanitzki, M; Tegenfeldt, F; Sisakian, A; Stocchi, A; Thomas, J; Smadja, G; Strauss, J; Smirnova, O; Stugu, B; Sokolov, A; Sosnowski, R; Szumlak, T; Szczekowski, M; Tkatchev, L; Tobin, M; Timmermans, J; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Vilanova, D; Winter, M; Van Remortel, N; Vitale, L; Witek, M; Vrba, V; Van Vulpen, I; Wahlen, H; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Weiser, C; Venus, W; Wicke, D; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Washbrook, A J; Wickens, J; Wilkinson, G; Zimin, N I; Yushchenko, O; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2008-01-01

    A measurement of the W boson mass and width has been performed by the DELPHI collaboration using the data collected during the full LEP2 programme (1996-2000). The data sample has an integrated luminosity of 660 pb^-1 and was collected over a range of centre-of-mass energies from 161 to 209 GeV. Results are obtained by applying the method of direct reconstruction of the mass of the W from its decay products in both the W+W- -> lvqq and W+W- -> qqqq channels. The W mass result for the combined data set is M_W = 80.336 +/- 0.055 (Stat.) +/- 0.028 (Syst.) +/- 0.025 (FSI) +/- 0.009 (LEP) GeV/c^2, where FSI represents the uncertainty due to final state interaction effects in the qqqq channel, and LEP represents that arising from the knowledge of the collision energy of the accelerator. The combined value for the W width is Gamma_W = 2.404 +/- 0.140 (Stat.) +/- 0.077 (Syst.) +/- 0.065 (FSI) GeV/c^2. These results supersede all values previously published by the DELPHI collaboration. This paper is dedicated to the m...

  16. Measurement of the top-quark mass in all-hadronic decays in p anti-p collisions at CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Fermilab /Frascati

    2006-12-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass, M{sub tpo}, in the all-hadronic decay channel t{bar t} {yields} W{sup +}bW{sup -}{bar b} {yields} q{sub 1}{bar q}{sub 2}bq{sub 3}{bar q}{sub 4}{bar b}. The analysis is performed using 310 pb{sup -1} of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions collected with the CDF II detector using a multi-jet trigger. The mass measurement is based on an event-by-event likelihood which depends on both the sample purity and the value of the top-quark mass, using 90 possible jet-to-parton assignments in the six-jet final state. The joint likelihood of 290 selected events yields a value of M{sub top} = 177.1 {+-} 4.9(stat.) {+-} 4.7(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  17. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the ${t\\bar{t}}$ dilepton channel using the full CDF Run II data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaltonen, T; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Marchese, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; D'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Ramos, J P Fernández; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; López, O González; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucà, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Fernández, I Redondo; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; Denis, R St; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W -M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2015-01-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass in events containing two leptons (electrons or muons) with a large transverse momentum, two or more energetic jets, and a transverse-momentum imbalance. We use the full proton-antiproton collision data set collected by the CDF experiment during the Fermilab Tevatron Run~II at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.1 fb$^{-1}$. A special observable is exploited for an optimal reduction of the dominant systematic uncertainty, associated with the knowledge of the absolute energy of the hadronic jets. The distribution of this observable in the selected events is compared to simulated distributions of ${t\\bar{t}}$ dilepton signal and background.We measure a value for the top-quark mass of $171.5\\pm 1.9~{\\rm (stat)}\\pm 2.5~{\\rm (syst)}$ GeV/$c^2$.

  18. Characterization of 350 HZ thermoacoustic driven orifice pulse tube refrigerator with measurements of the phase of the mass flow and pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godshalk, K.M.; Jin, C.; Kwong, Y.K.

    1996-12-31

    The world`s first 350 Hz thermoacoustic driven orifice pulse tube refrigerator (TADOPTR) has been designed and built by Tektronix, Inc., in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). This highly instrumented system includes hot wire anemometers and pressure sensors for measuring the phase of the mass flow and pressure at all key locations in the TADOPTR, permitting for the first time detailed comparison to analytical models developed by LANL and NIST. Characterization results for velocity and pressure phase, pressure amplitude, and enthalpy flow show good agreement with the simulations. The authors have also demonstrated a new design method that uses the inertance of the pulse tube at 350 Hz to achieve the desired phase between the mass flow and pressure, rather than the usual double inlet design. The authors have designed and characterized single stage and two stage 350 Hz TADOPTRs.

  19. Measurement of the invariant mass distributions for the pp -> ppeta' reaction at excess energy of Q = 16.4 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Klaja; P. Moskal; E. Czerwinski; R. Czyzykiewicz; A. Deloff; D. Gil; D. Grzonka; L. Jarczyk; B. Kamys; A. Khoukaz; J. Klaja; K. Nakayama; W. Oelert; J. Ritman; T. Sefzick; M. Siemaszko; M. Silarski; J. Smyrski; A. Taeschner; M. Wolke; J. Zdebik; M. Zielinski; W. Zipper

    2010-01-28

    The proton-proton and proton-eta' invariant mass distributions have been determined for the pp -> ppeta' reaction at an excess energy of Q = 16.4 MeV. The measurement was carried out using the COSY-11 detector setup and the proton beam of the cooler synchrotron COSY. The shapes of the determined invariant mass distributions are similar to those of the pp -> ppeta reaction and reveal an enhancement for large relative proton-proton momenta. This result, together with the fact that the proton-eta interaction is much stronger that the proton-eta' interaction, excludes the hypothesis that the observed enhancement is caused by the interaction between the proton and the meson.

  20. Airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide, dimethyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, A.R.; Thornton, D.C.; Driedger, A.R. III [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer is described for determining atmospheric sulfur dioxide, carbon disulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbonyl sulfide from aircraft and ship platforms. Isotopically labelled variants of each analyte were used as internal standards to achieve high precision. The lower limit of detection for each species for an integration time of 3 min was 1 pptv for sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide and 0.2 pptv for carbon disulfide and carbonyl sulfide. All four species were simultaneously determined with a sample frequency of one sample per 6 min or greater. When only one or two species were determined, a frequency of one sample per 4 min was achieved. Because a calibration is included in each sample, no separate calibration sequence was needed. Instrument warmup was only a few minutes. The instrument was very robust in field deployments, requiring little maintenance.

  1. Mass flow rate measurements in gas-liquid flows by means of a venturi or orifice plate coupled to a void fraction sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, Jorge Luiz Goes; Passos, Julio Cesar [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica-LEPTEN/Boiling-UFSC, Campus Universitario, Trindade, 88.040-900 Florianopolis-SC (Brazil); Verschaeren, Ruud; Geld, Cees van der [Eindhoven University of Technology, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, W-hoog 2.135, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2009-01-15

    Two-phase flow measurements were carried out using a resistive void fraction meter coupled to a venturi or orifice plate. The measurement system used to estimate the liquid and gas mass flow rates was evaluated using an air-water experimental facility. Experiments included upward vertical and horizontal flow, annular, bubbly, churn and slug patterns, void fraction ranging from 2% to 85%, water flow rate up to 4000 kg/h, air flow rate up to 50 kg/h, and quality up to almost 10%. The fractional root mean square (RMS) deviation of the two-phase mass flow rate in upward vertical flow through a venturi plate is 6.8% using the correlation of Chisholm (D. Chisholm, Pressure gradients during the flow of incompressible two-phase mixtures through pipes, venturis and orifice plates, British Chemical Engineering 12 (9) (1967) 454-457). For the orifice plate, the RMS deviation of the vertical flow is 5.5% using the correlation of Zhang et al. (H.J. Zhang, W.T. Yue, Z.Y. Huang, Investigation of oil-air two-phase mass flow rate measurement using venturi and void fraction sensor, Journal of Zhejiang University Science 6A (6) (2005) 601-606). The results show that the flow direction has no significant influence on the meters in relation to the pressure drop in the experimental operation range. Quality and slip ratio analyses were also performed. The results show a mean slip ratio lower than 1.1, when bubbly and slug flow patterns are encountered for mean void fractions lower than 70%. (author)

  2. Quantum chaos and nuclear mass systematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge G. Hirsch; Victor Velazquez; Alejandro Frank

    2004-07-15

    The presence of quantum chaos in nuclear mass systematics is analyzed by considering the differences between measured and calculated nuclear masses as a time series described by the power law 1/ f^alpha. While for the liquid droplet model plus shell corrections a quantum chaotic behavior alpha approx 1 is found, errors in the microscopic mass formula have alpha approx 0.5, closer to white noise. The chaotic behavior seems to arise from many body effects not included in the mass formula.

  3. The rest mass of a system of two photons in different inertial reference frames: 0+0=0 and 0+0>0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berhard Rothenstein; Doru P?unescu; ?tefan Popescu

    2007-08-31

    We show that the rest mass of a system consisting of two photons is a relativistic invariant having the same magnitude in all inertial reference frames in relative motion. A scenario which starts with two photons where theirs frequencies are equal to each other the magnitude of the rest mass of the system depends on the angle made by the momentums of the two photons. The behavior of the photons when detected from two inertial reference frames is illustrated using a relativistic diagram which displays in true values the physical quantities (scalar and vector) introduced in order to characterize the dynamical properties of the photon. We consider that the obtained results should be taken in the discussions, some time fierce, between those who ban the concept of relativistic mass and those who consider that its use is harmless.

  4. Measurement of the Three-jet Mass Cross Section in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubacek, Zdenek

    2010-06-01

    This thesis describes the measurement of the inclusive three-jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV measured at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois, USA. The cross section as a function of three-jet invariant mass is provided in three regions of the third jet transverse momentum and three regions of jet rapidities. It utilizes a data sample collected in the so called Run IIa data taking period (2002-2006) corresponding to the integrated luminosity of about 0.7 fb{sup -1}. The results are used to test the next-to-leading order predictions of Quantum chromodynamics computed using the latest parton distribution functions.

  5. Application of high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry measurements to estimate volatility distributions of ?-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-05

    Recent developments in high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made it possible to directly detect atmospheric organic compounds in real time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low-volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, using ions identified by high-resolution spectra from an HR-ToF-CIMS with acetate reagent ion chemistry, we develop an algorithm to estimate the vapor pressures of measured organic acids. The algorithm uses identified ion formulas and calculated double bond equivalencies, information unavailable in quadrupole CIMS technology, as constraints for the number of possible oxygen-containing functionalmore »groups. The algorithm is tested with acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry (acetate-CIMS) spectra of O3 and OH oxidation products of ?-pinene and naphthalene formed in a flow reactor with integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec s cm?3, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. The predicted condensed-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA) average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous chamber and flow reactor measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  6. A more accurate and penetrating method to measure the enrichment and mass of UF6 storage containers using passive neutron self-interrogation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Miller, Karen A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an unattended mode neutron measurement that can provide the enrichment of the uranium in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The new passive neutron measurement provides better penetration into the uranium mass than prior gamma-ray enrichment measurement methods. The Passive Neutron Enrichment Monitor (PNEM) provides a new measurement technique that uses passive neutron totals and coincidence counting together with neutron self-interrogation to measure the enrichment in the cylinders. The measurement uses the neutron rates from two detector pods. One of the pods has a bare polyethylene surface next to the cylinder and the other polyethylene surface is covered with Cd to prevent thermal neutrons from returning to the cylinder. The primary neutron source from the enriched UF{sub 6} is the alpha-particle decay from the {sub 234}U that interacts with the fluorine to produce random neutrons. The singles neutron counting rate is dominated by the {sub 234}U neutrons with a minor contribution from the induced fissions in the {sub 235}U. However, the doubles counting rate comes primarily from the induced fissions (i.e., multiplication) in the {sub 235}U in enriched uranium. The PNEM concept makes use of the passive neutrons that are initially produced from the {sub 234}U reactions that track the {sub 235}U enrichment during the enrichment process. The induced fission reactions from the thermal-neutron albedo are all from the {sub 235}U and provide a measurement of the {sub 235}U. The Cd ratio has the desirable feature that all of the thermal-neutron-induced fissions in {sub 235}U are independent of the original neutron source. Thus, the ratio is independent of the uranium age, purity, and prior reactor history.

  7. Systematic Uncertainties in the Spectroscopic Measurements of Neutron-Star Masses and Radii from Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts. III. Absolute Flux Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guver, Tolga; Marshall, Herman; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Guainazzi, Matteo; Diaz-Trigo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Many techniques for measuring neutron star radii rely on absolute flux measurements in the X-rays. As a result, one of the fundamental uncertainties in these spectroscopic measurements arises from the absolute flux calibrations of the detectors being used. Using the stable X-ray burster, GS 1826-238, and its simultaneous observations by Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and RXTE/PCA as well as by XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and RXTE/PCA, we quantify the degree of uncertainty in the flux calibration by assessing the differences between the measured fluxes during bursts. We find that the RXTE/PCA and the Chandra gratings measurements agree with each other within their formal uncertainties, increasing our confidence in these flux measurements. In contrast, XMM-Newton EPIC-pn measures 14.0$\\pm$0.3% less flux than the RXTE/PCA. This is consistent with the previously reported discrepancy with the flux measurements of EPIC-pn, compared to EPIC-MOS1, MOS2 and ACIS-S detectors. We also address the calibration uncertainty in the RXTE/PCA int...

  8. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions Using a Novel Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CDF Collaboration; Freeman, John; Freeman, John

    2007-09-30

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t{bar t} {yields} l + jets candidate events, obtained from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix element techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for t{bar t} production and decay. However, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb{sup -1} data sample, using events with a high-p{sub T} lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find M{sub meas} = 169.8 {+-} 2.3(stat.) {+-} 1.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  9. A measurement of the top quark mass in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions using a novel matrix element method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, John C.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-12-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t{bar t} {yields} l + jets candidate events, obtained from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix elements techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for tt production and decay. however, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb{sup -1} data sample, using events with a high-p{sub T} lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find M{sub meas} = 169.8 {+-} 2.3(stat.) {+-} 1.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By SarahMODELING CLOUD PROCESSESMeaningful MoneyHall

  11. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. Measurement

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  14. Measurement

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  15. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By SarahMODELING CLOUD1 H( 7 Be, 8 B)γ cross section

  16. Measurements

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  17. Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By SarahMODELING CLOUD1 H( 7 Be,radial profile

  18. Measurements

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By SarahMODELING CLOUD1 H( 7 Be,radial profilemagnetic

  19. Measurements

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By SarahMODELING CLOUD1 H( 7 Be,radial

  20. Measurements

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  1. First Measurement of the Angular Coefficients of Drell-Yan e+e- Pairs in the Z Mass Region from pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We report on the first measurement of the angular distributions of final state electrons in pp? ??*/Z?e+e-+X [p p overstrike ? gamma* / Z?e superscript + e superscript - + X] events produced in the Z boson mass region ...

  2. Test of the Conserved Vector Current Hypothesis by beta-ray Angular Distribution Measurement in the Mass-8 System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Sumikama; K. Matsuta; T. Nagatomo; M. Ogura; T. Iwakoshi; Y. Nakashima; H. Fujiwara; M. Fukuda; M. Mihara; K. Minamisono; T. Yamaguchi; T. Minamisono

    2011-05-09

    The beta-ray angular correlations for the spin alignments of 8Li and 8B have been observed in order to test the conserved vector current (CVC) hypothesis. The alignment correlation terms were combined with the known beta-alpha-angular correlation terms to determine all the matrix elements contributing to the correlation terms. The weak magnetism term, 7.5\\pm0.2, deduced from the beta-ray correlation terms was consistent with the CVC prediction 7.3\\pm0.2, deduced from the analog-gamma-decay measurement based on the CVC hypothesis. However, there was no consistent CVC prediction for the second-forbidden term associated with the weak vector current. The experimental value for the second-forbidden term was 1.0 \\pm 0.3, while the CVC prediction was 0.1 \\pm 0.4 or 2.1 \\pm 0.5.

  3. Measurement of the inelastic cross section in proton-lead collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-09-13

    The inelastic hadronic cross section in proton-lead collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV is measured with the CMS detector at the LHC. The data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 12.6 +/- 0.4 inverse nanobarns, has been collected with an unbiased trigger for inclusive particle production. The cross section is obtained from the measured number of proton-lead collisions with hadronic activity produced in the pseudorapidity ranges 3contributions, experimental acceptance, and other instrumental effects. The inelastic cross section is measured to be sigma[inel,pPb]=2061 +/- 3 (stat) +/- 34 (syst) +/- 72 (lum) mb. Various Monte Carlo generators, commonly used in heavy ion and cosmic ray physics, are found to reproduce the data within uncertainties. The value of sigma[inel,pPb] is compatible with that expected from the proton-proton cross section at 5.02 TeV scaled up within a simple Glauber approach to account for multiple scatterings in the lead nucleus, indicating that further net nuclear corrections are small.

  4. Properties of jets measured from tracks in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energy ?s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2011-09-20

    Jets are identified and their properties studied in center-of-mass energy ?s=7 TeV proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider using charged particles measured by the ATLAS inner detector. Events are selected using a minimum bias trigger, allowing jets at very low transverse momentum to be observed and their characteristics in the transition to high-momentum fully perturbative jets to be studied. Jets are reconstructed using the anti-kt algorithm applied to charged particles with two radius parameter choices, 0.4 and 0.6. An inclusive charged jet transverse momentum cross section measurement from 4 GeV to 100 GeV is shown for four ranges inmore »rapidity extending to 1.9 and corrected to charged particle-level truth jets. The transverse momenta and longitudinal momentum fractions of charged particles within jets are measured, along with the charged particle multiplicity and the particle density as a function of radial distance from the jet axis. Comparison of the data with the theoretical models implemented in existing tunings of Monte Carlo event generators indicates reasonable overall agreement between data and Monte Carlo. These comparisons are sensitive to Monte Carlo parton showering, hadronization, and soft physics models.« less

  5. Exotic low mass narrow baryons extracted from charge exchange reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tatischeff; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson

    2010-02-12

    This paper aims to give further evidence for the existence of low mass exotic baryons. Narrow structures in baryonic missing mass or baryonic invariant mass were observed during the last twelve years. Since their evidence is still under debate, various data, measured with incident hadrons, by different collaborations, are reanalyzed to bring evidence on these narrow exotic baryonic resonances excited in charge-exchange reactions. These structures are clearly exotic as there is no room for them in the $qqq$ configurations: their width is smaller than the widths of "classical" baryonic resonances, moreover some of the masses lie below the pion threshold mass.

  6. Multilayer graphene stacks grown by different methods-thickness measurements by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and optical transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokarczyk, M., E-mail: mateusz.tokarczyk@fuw.edu.pl; Kowalski, G.; K?pa, H.; Grodecki, K.; Drabi?ska, A. [University of Warsaw, Institute of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Physics (Poland); Strupi?ski, W. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology (Poland)

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Optical absorption estimates of the thickness of graphene multi layer stacks (number of graphene layers) are presented for three different growth techniques. The objective of this work was focused on comparison and reconciliation of the two already widely used methods for thickness estimates (Raman and Absorption) with the calibration of the X-ray method as far as Scherer constant K is concerned and X-ray based Wagner-Aqua extrapolation method.

  7. Measurement of void fraction at different flow regimes in vertical upward two-phase flow of cryogenic fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pattanayak, S.Ch.; Das, R.K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India)

    1995-12-01

    Local void fraction in a vertical cryogenic two-phase flow has been measured with the help of a small capacitance sensor. The time varying capacitance signal of the sensor is used to modulate the pulse width of a multivibrator. The probability distribution function (PDF) of the pulse width data is analysed for identifying the flow regimes, while average pulse width is correlated with the average void fraction. The calibrations of the void fraction sensor are found to be sensitive to the flow regimes. In slug and churn flow regimes the calibrations are also found to be sensitive to fluid flow rates. But no such dependence is observed in bubble and annular flow regimes. The sensitivity towards flow rates could be correlated with the position of PDF peaks of the concerned flow regimes.

  8. Masses of Fe-61 and Fe-62 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cossairt, J. D.; Tribble, Robert E.; Kenefick, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    been measured using the Ni(a, Be) 'Fe and Ni("B,"N) Fe reactions. The mass excesses obtained are M( 'Fe) = ?58.92 ~ 0.02 MeV and M("Fe) = ?58.85 + 0.07 MeV. The results are consistent with recent predictions from two different mass relations. NUCLEAR... represents a differential cross section of about 24 pb/sr at 9?,?=10 . The mass excess is found to be -58.85+0.07 MeV. Our result is not in good agreement with the P-decay measurement that determined the mass excess to be -58.5 + 0.2 MeV (Ref. 7). We...

  9. Search for High-Mass Resonances Decaying into Leptons of Different Flavor (e mu, e tau, mu tau) in p anti-p Collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, Yanjun; /Pennsylvania U.

    2008-10-01

    We present a search for high-mass resonances decaying into two leptons of different flavor: e{mu}, e{tau}, and {mu}{tau}. These resonances are predicted by several models beyond the standard model, such as the R-parity-violating MSSM. The search is based on 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II) in proton anti-proton collisions. Our observations are consistent with the standard model expectations. The results are interpreted to set 95% C.L. upper limits on {sigma} x BR of {tilde {nu}}{sub {tau}} {yields} e{mu}, e{tau}, {mu}{tau}.

  10. Algorithm for Screening Phasor Measurement Unit Data for Power System Events and Categories and Common Characteristics for Events Seen in Phasor Measurement Unit Relative Phase-Angle Differences and Frequency Signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, A.; Santoso, S.; Muljadi, E.

    2013-08-01

    A network of multiple phasor measurement units (PMU) was created, set up, and maintained at the University of Texas at Austin to obtain actual power system measurements for power system analysis. Power system analysis in this report covers a variety of time ranges, such as short- term analysis for power system disturbances and their effects on power system behavior and long- term power system behavior using modal analysis. The first objective of this report is to screen the PMU data for events. The second objective of the report is to identify and describe common characteristics extracted from power system events as measured by PMUs. The numerical characteristics for each category and how these characteristics are used to create selection rules for the algorithm are also described. Trends in PMU data related to different levels and fluctuations in wind power output are also examined.

  11. Seismic mass Top electrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Michael

    assembly process. For the measurements of the physical dimensions of the seismic mass a micrometer was usedSeismic mass Top electrode Bottom electrode x C1 C2 Chapter 4: The Micromachined Sensing Element supplied by Druck, Ltd., Groby, Leics. The manufacturing process at Druck was still in its experimental

  12. Apparatus and method for quantitative measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity between two samples using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cremers, D.A.; Keller, R.A.

    1984-05-08

    An apparatus and method for the measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity of weakly absorbing solutions using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect have been developed. Two sample cells are placed in each arm of an interferometer and are traversed by colinear probe and heating laser beams. The interrogation probe beams are recombined forming a fringe pattern, the intensity of which can be related to changes in optical path length of these laser beams through the cells. This in turn can be related to small differences in optical absorptivity which results in different amounts of sample heating when the heating laser beams are turned on, by the fact that the index of refraction of a liquid is temperature dependent. A critical feature of this invention is the stabilization of the optical path of the probe beams against drift. Background (solvent) absorption can then be suppressed by a factor of approximately 400. Solute absorptivities of about 10[sup [minus]5] cm[sup [minus]1] can then be determined in the presence of background absorptions in excess of 10[sup [minus]3] cm[sup [minus]1]. In addition, the smallest absorption measured with the instant apparatus and method is about 5 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] cm[sup [minus]1]. 6 figs.

  13. Apparatus and method for quantitative measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity between two samples using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cremers, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Keller, Richard A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity of weakly absorbing solutions using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect has been developed. Two sample cells are placed in each arm of an interferometer and are traversed by colinear probe and heating laser beams. The interrogation probe beams are recombined forming a fringe pattern, the intensity of which can be related to changes in optical pathlength of these laser beams through the cells. This in turn can be related to small differences in optical absorptivity which results in different amounts of sample heating when the heating laser beams are turned on, by the fact that the index of refraction of a liquid is temperature dependent. A critical feature of this invention is the stabilization of the optical path of the probe beams against drift. Background (solvent) absorption can then be suppressed by a factor of approximately 400. Solute absorptivities of about 10.sup.-5 cm.sup.-1 can then be determined in the presence of background absorptions in excess of 10.sup.-3 cm.sup.-1. In addition, the smallest absorption measured with the instant apparatus and method is about 5.times. 10.sup.-6 cm.sup.-1.

  14. Apparatus and method for quantitative measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity between two samples using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cremers, D.A.; Keller, R.A.

    1982-06-08

    An apparatus and method for the measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity of weakly absorbing solutions using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect has been developed. Two sample cells are placed in each arm of an interferometer and are traversed by colinear probe and heating laser beams. The interrogation probe beams are recombined forming a fringe pattern, the intensity of which can be related to changes in optical pathlength of these laser beams through the cells. This in turn can be related to small differences in optical absorptivity which results in different amounts of sample heating when the heating laser beams are turned on, by the fact that the index of refraction of a liquid is temperature dependent. A critical feature of this invention is the stabilization of the optical path of the probe beams against drift. Background (solvent) absorption can then be suppressed by a factor of approximately 400. Solute absorptivities of about 10/sup -5/ cm/sup -1/ can then be determined in the presence of background absorptions in excess of 10/sup -3/ cm/sup -1/. In addition, the smallest absorption measured with the instant apparatus and method is about 5 x 10/sup -6/ cm/sup -1/.

  15. Planet hunters. VII. Discovery of a new low-mass, low-density planet (PH3 C) orbiting Kepler-289 with mass measurements of two additional planets (PH3 B and D)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Fischer, Debra A.; Wang, Ji; Margossian, Charles; Brewer, John M.; Giguere, Matthew J. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Agol, Eric [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Deck, Katherine M. [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Rogers, Leslie A. [Department of Astronomy and Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, MC249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gazak, J. Zachary [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Holman, Matthew J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Jek, Kian J.; Omohundro, Mark R.; Winarski, Troy; Lintott, Chris; Simpson, Robert [Oxford Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Lynn, Stuart; Parrish, Michael [Adler Planetarium, 1300 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Schawinski, Kevin [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 16, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Schwamb, Megan E., E-mail: joseph.schmitt@yale.edu [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica: 11F Astronomy-Mathematics Building, National Taiwan University. No.1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); and others

    2014-11-10

    We report the discovery of one newly confirmed planet (P = 66.06 days, R {sub P} = 2.68 ± 0.17 R {sub ?}) and mass determinations of two previously validated Kepler planets, Kepler-289 b (P = 34.55 days, R {sub P} = 2.15 ± 0.10 R {sub ?}) and Kepler-289-c (P = 125.85 days, R {sub P} = 11.59 ± 0.10 R {sub ?}), through their transit timing variations (TTVs). We also exclude the possibility that these three planets reside in a 1:2:4 Laplace resonance. The outer planet has very deep (?1.3%), high signal-to-noise transits, which puts extremely tight constraints on its host star's stellar properties via Kepler's Third Law. The star PH3 is a young (?1 Gyr as determined by isochrones and gyrochronology), Sun-like star with M {sub *} = 1.08 ± 0.02 M {sub ?}, R {sub *} = 1.00 ± 0.02 R {sub ?}, and T {sub eff} = 5990 ± 38 K. The middle planet's large TTV amplitude (?5 hr) resulted either in non-detections or inaccurate detections in previous searches. A strong chopping signal, a shorter period sinusoid in the TTVs, allows us to break the mass-eccentricity degeneracy and uniquely determine the masses of the inner, middle, and outer planets to be M = 7.3 ± 6.8 M {sub ?}, 4.0 ± 0.9M {sub ?}, and M = 132 ± 17 M {sub ?}, which we designate PH3 b, c, and d, respectively. Furthermore, the middle planet, PH3 c, has a relatively low density, ? = 1.2 ± 0.3 g cm{sup –3} for a planet of its mass, requiring a substantial H/He atmosphere of 2.1{sub ?0.3}{sup +0.8}% by mass, and joins a growing population of low-mass, low-density planets.

  16. Top quark mass measurement in the tt[over -bar] all hadronic channel using a matrix element technique in pp[over -bar] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the all hadronic channel (tt??bb?q[subscript 1]q?[subscript 2]q[subscript 3]q?[subscript 4] using 943??pb[superscript -1] of pp? collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV collected at the ...

  17. Quark Masses: An Environmental Impact Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert L. Jaffe; Alejandro Jenkins; Itamar Kimchi

    2009-04-03

    We investigate worlds that lie on a slice through the parameter space of the Standard Model over which quark masses vary. We allow as many as three quarks to participate in nuclei, while fixing the mass of the electron and the average mass of the lightest baryon flavor multiplet. We classify as "congenial" worlds that satisfy the environmental constraint that the quark masses allow for stable nuclei with charges one, six, and eight, making organic chemistry possible. Whether a congenial world actually produces observers depends on a multitude of historical contingencies, beginning with primordial nucleosynthesis, which we do not explore. Such constraints may be independently superimposed on our results. Environmental constraints such as the ones we study may be combined with information about the a priori distribution of quark masses over the landscape of possible universes to determine whether the measured values of the quark masses are determined environmentally, but our analysis is independent of such an anthropic approach. We estimate baryon masses as functions of quark masses and nuclear masses as functions of baryon masses. We check for the stability of nuclei against fission, strong particle emission, and weak nucleon emission. For two light quarks with charges 2/3 and -1/3, we find a band of congeniality roughly 29 MeV wide in their mass difference. We also find another, less robust region of congeniality with one light, charge -1/3 quark, and two heavier, approximately degenerate charge -1/3 and 2/3 quarks. No other assignment of light quark charges yields congenial worlds with two baryons participating in nuclei. We identify and discuss the region in quark-mass space where nuclei would be made from three or more baryon species.

  18. Measurement of the Higgs boson production cross section at 7, 8 and 13 TeV center-of-mass energies in the $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ channel with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the fiducial cross section performed in the $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ decay channel are presented for Higgs boson production in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7, 8 and 13 TeV at the ATLAS experiment. Values for the measured total production cross section for a Standard Model Higgs boson are also given. The signal is extracted using a fit to the diphoton invariant-mass spectrum assuming that the natural width of the resonance is much smaller than the experimental resolution. The signal yield is corrected for the effects of detector efficiency and resolution. The measured cross sections, statistically limited, are in agreement with Standard Model expectation.

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF DARK MATTER HALOS ON DYNAMICAL ESTIMATES OF BLACK HOLE MASS: 10 NEW MEASUREMENTS FOR HIGH-{sigma} EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusli, S. P.; Thomas, J.; Saglia, R. P.; Fabricius, M.; Erwin, P.; Bender, R.; Nowak, N.; Lee, C. H.; Riffeser, A.; Sharp, R.

    2013-09-15

    Adaptive optics assisted SINFONI observations of the central regions of 10 early-type galaxies are presented. Based primarily on the SINFONI kinematics, 10 black hole (BH) masses occupying the high-mass regime of the M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation are derived using three-integral Schwarzschild models. The effect of dark matter (DM) inclusion on the BH mass is explored. The omission of a DM halo in the model results in a higher stellar mass-to-light ratio, especially when extensive kinematic data are used in the model. However, when the diameter of the sphere of influence-computed using the BH mass derived without a dark halo-is at least 10 times the point-spread function FWHM during the observations, it is safe to exclude a DM component in the dynamical modeling, i.e., the change in BH mass is negligible. When the spatial resolution is marginal, restricting the mass-to-light ratio to the right value returns the correct M{sub BH} although a dark halo is not present in the model. Compared to the M{sub BH}-{sigma} and M{sub BH}-L relations of McConnell et al., the 10 BHs are all more massive than expected from the luminosities and 7 BH masses are higher than expected from the stellar velocity dispersions of the host bulges. Using new fitted relations, which include the 10 galaxies, we find that the space density of the most massive BHs (M{sub BH} {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) estimated from the M{sub BH}-L relation is higher than the estimate based on the M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation and the latter is higher than model predictions based on quasar counts, each by about an order of magnitude.

  20. Riddle of the Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yu. Smirnov

    2015-02-16

    We discuss some known approaches and results as well as few new ideas concerning origins and nature of neutrino mass. The key issues include (i) connections of neutrino and charged fermions masses, relation between masses and mixing, energy scale of new physics behind neutrino mass where possibilities spread from the Planck and GUT masses down to a sub-eV scale. The data hint two different new physics involved in generation of neutrino mass. Determination of the CP phase as well as mass hierarchy can play important role in identification of new physics. It may happen that sterile neutrinos provide the key to resolve the riddle.

  1. Riddle of the Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smirnov, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    We discuss some known approaches and results as well as few new ideas concerning origins and nature of neutrino mass. The key issues include (i) connections of neutrino and charged fermions masses, relation between masses and mixing, energy scale of new physics behind neutrino mass where possibilities spread from the Planck and GUT masses down to a sub-eV scale. The data hint two different new physics involved in generation of neutrino mass. Determination of the CP phase as well as mass hierarchy can play important role in identification of new physics. It may happen that sterile neutrinos provide the key to resolve the riddle.

  2. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-06-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrium integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi})Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geo-physical and chemical engineering literature.

  3. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-07-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrum integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi}) Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geophysical and chemical engineering literature.

  4. Analysis of the JINR p(660 MeV) + [sup 129]I, [sup 23]Np, and [sup 231]Am measurements with eleven different models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashnik, S. G. (Stepan G.); Pronskikh, V. S.; Adam, J.; Balabekyan, A.; Barashenkov, V.; Filinova, V. P.; Solnyshkin, A. A.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V. M.; Brandt, R.; Odoj, R.; Sierk, A. J. (Arnold J.); Prael, R. E. (Richard E.); Gudima, K. K. (Konstantin K.); Baznat, M. I. (Mircha Ivanovich)

    2004-01-01

    Isotopically enriched {sup 129}I (85% {sup 129}I and 15% {sup 127}I), {sup 237}Np, and {sup 241}Am targets were irradiated with a beam of 660-MeV protons at the JINR DLNP Phasotron and cross sections of formation of 207 residual products (74 from {sup 129}I, 53 from {sup 237}Np, and 80 from {sup 241}Am) were determined using the {gamma}-spectrometry method. Here, they analyze all these data using eleven different models, realized in eight codes: LAHET (Bertini, ISABEL, INCL+ABLA, and INCL+RAL options), CASCADE, CEM95, CEM2k, LAQGSM+GEM2, CEM2k+GEM2, LAQGSM+GEMINI, and CEM2k+GEMINI, in order to validate the tested models against the experimental data and to understand better the mechanisms for production of residual nuclei. The agreement of different models with the data varies quite a bit. They find that most of the codes are fairly reliable in predicting cross sections for nuclides not too far away in mass from the targets, but differ greatly in the deep spallation, fission, and fragmentation regions. None of the codes tested here except GEMINI allow fission of nuclei as light as iodine, therefore the best agreement with the {sup 129}I data, especially in the A = 40-90 region, is shown by the codes CEM2k and LAQGSM when they are merged with GEMINI. At the same time, GEMINI is not yet very reliable for an accurate description of actinides and the {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am data are reproduced better by LAHET (Bertini, ISABEL, or INCL+RAL/ABLA options), and by CEM2k and LAQGSM merged with GEM2 and not so well when using GEMINI. They conclude that none of the codes tested here are able to reproduce well all these data and all of them need to be further improved; development of a better universal evaporation/fission model should be of a high priority.

  5. Otolith elemental signatures reflect residency in coastal water masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishimoto, Mary M.; Washburn, Libe; Warner, Robert R.; Love, Milton S.; Paradis, Georges L.

    2010-01-01

    residency in coastal water masses Mary M. Nishimoto & LibeSebastes jordani) resid- ing in water masses with distinctthat resided in different water masses that were associated

  6. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  7. Measurement of the high-field Q-drop in a high-purity large-grain niobium cavity for different oxidation processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; alex gurevich

    2007-06-01

    The most challenging issue for understanding the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio > 200) niobium is due to a sharp degradation (“Q-drop”) of the cavity quality factor Q0(Bp) as the peak surface magnetic field (Bp) exceeds about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. In addition, a low-temperature (100 – 140 ?C) “in-situ” baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q-drop. In this contribution, we present the results from a series of rf tests at 1.7 K and 2.0 K on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large (with area of the order of few cm2) grain niobium which underwent various oxidation processes, after initial buffered chemical polishing, such as anodization, baking in pure oxygen atmosphere and baking in air up to 180 °C, with the objective of clearly identifying the role of oxygen and the oxide layer on the Q-drop. During each rf test a temperature mapping system allows measuring the local temperature rise of the cavity outer surface due to rf losses, which gives information about the losses location, their field dependence and space distribution. The results confirmed that the depth affected by baking is about 20 – 30 nm from the surface and showed that the Q-drop did not re-appear in a previously baked cavity by further baking at 120 °C in pure oxygen atmosphere or in air up to 180 °C. These treatments increased the oxide thickness and oxygen concentration, measured on niobium samples which were processed with the cavity and were analyzed with Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Nevertheless, the performance of the cavity after air baking at 180 °C degraded significantly and the temperature maps showed high losses, uniformly distributed on the surface, which could be completely recovered only by a post-purification treatment at 1250 °C. A statistic of the position of the “hot-spots” on the cavity surface showed that grain-boundaries are not the preferred location. An interesting correlation was found between the Q-drop onset, the quench field and the low-field energy gap, which supports the hypothesis of thermo-magnetic instability governing the Q-drop and the baking effect.

  8. W Boson Mass Working Group Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgore, W.; Kilgore, W.

    2010-06-14

    The W boson mass working group discussed the current status of the W boson mass measurement and the prospects for improving on LEP and Tevatron measurements at the LHC.

  9. Light Quark Mass Reweighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi Liu; Norman H. Christ; Chulwoo Jung

    2012-06-01

    We present a systematic study of the effectiveness of light quark mass reweighting. This method allows a single lattice QCD ensemble, generated with a specific value of the dynamical light quark mass, to be used to determine results for other, nearby light dynamical quark masses. We study two gauge field ensembles generated with 2+1 flavors of dynamical domain wall fermions with light quark masses m_l=0.02 (m_\\pi=620 MeV) and m_l=0.01 (m_\\pi=420 MeV). We reweight each ensemble to determine results which could be computed directly from the other and check the consistency of the reweighted results with the direct results. The large difference between the 0.02 and 0.01 light quark masses suggests that this is an aggressive application of reweighting as can be seen from fluctuations in the magnitude of the reweighting factor by four orders of magnitude. Never-the-less, a comparison of the reweighed topological charge, average plaquette, residual mass, pion mass, pion decay constant, and scalar correlator between these two ensembles shows agreement well described by the statistical errors. The issues of the effective number of configurations and finite sample size bias are discussed. An examination of the topological charge distribution implies that it is more favorable to reweight from heavier mass to lighter quark mass.

  10. Measurement of gas species, temperatures, coal burnout, and wall heat fluxes in a 200 MWe lignite-fired boiler with different overfire air damper openings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jianping Jing; Zhengqi Li; Guangkui Liu; Zhichao Chen; Chunlong Liu

    2009-07-15

    Measurements were performed on a 200 MWe, wall-fired, lignite utility boiler. For different overfire air (OFA) damper openings, the gas temperature, gas species concentration, coal burnout, release rates of components (C, H, and N), furnace temperature, and heat flux and boiler efficiency were measured. Cold air experiments for a single burner were conducted in the laboratory. The double-swirl flow pulverized-coal burner has two ring recirculation zones starting in the secondary air region in the burner. As the secondary air flow increases, the axial velocity of air flow increases, the maxima of radial velocity, tangential velocity and turbulence intensity all increase, and the swirl intensity of air flow and the size of recirculation zones increase slightly. In the central region of the burner, as the OFA damper opening widens, the gas temperature and CO concentration increase, while the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and coal particles ignite earlier. In the secondary air region of the burner, the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and the gas temperature and CO concentration vary slightly. In the sidewall region, the gas temperature, O{sub 2} concentration, and NOx concentration decrease, while the CO concentration increases and the gas temperature varies slightly. The furnace temperature and heat flux in the main burning region decrease appreciably, but increase slightly in the burnout region. The NOx emission decreases from 1203.6 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 0% to 511.7 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 80% and the boiler efficiency decreases from 92.59 to 91.9%. 15 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Measurement of Hadronic Event Shapes and Jet Substructure in Proton-Proton Collisions at 7.0 TeV Center-of-Mass Energy with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David Wilkins

    2012-03-20

    This thesis presents the first measurement of 6 hadronic event shapes in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Results are presented at the particle-level, permitting comparisons to multiple Monte Carlo event generator tools. Numerous tools and techniques that enable detailed analysis of the hadronic final state at high luminosity are described. The approaches presented utilize the dual strengths of the ATLAS calorimeter and tracking systems to provide high resolution and robust measurements of the hadronic jets that constitute both a background and a signal throughout ATLAS physics analyses. The study of the hadronic final state is then extended to jet substructure, where the energy flow and topology within individual jets is studied at the detector level and techniques for estimating systematic uncertainties for such measurements are commissioned in the first data. These first substructure measurements in ATLAS include the jet mass and sub-jet multiplicity as well as those concerned with multi-body hadronic decays and color flow within jets. Finally, the first boosted hadronic object observed at the LHC - the decay of the top quark to a single jet - is presented.

  12. Top Mass and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen-Chu Chen

    2008-05-15

    The top quark was discovered in 1995. The top quark mass is now well measured at the Tevatron, with uncertainty getting below 1% of the top mass. The world average from last year was 170.9 $\\pm$ 1.8 GeV/$c^2$. The new CDF measurement is 172 $\\pm$ 1.2 (stat) $\\pm$ 1.5 (sys) GeV/$c^2$, and D0 will soon present a new measurement. The top quark mass is an important parameter in the Standard Model, and should be measured as precisely as possible. To learn more about the top quark observed and study possible new physics, other properties also should be measured. At the Tevatron, the charge of the top quark can be measured directly. Examples of other properties studied and reported in this presentation are W helicity, top decay branching ratio to b ($R_b$), searches for $t \\to H b$ and for flavor changing neutral current (FCNC). The results are all consistent with the Standard Model within current statistics. With significantly more data being collected at the Tevatron, precision measurements of the top properties are just starting.

  13. Investigation of structure and properties of the Nb rods manufactured by different deformation and heat treatment regimes in mass production conditions for the Nb{sub 3}Sn strands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdyukhanov, I. M.; Vorobieva, A. E.; Alekseev, M. V.; Mareev, K. A.; Dergunova, E. A.; Peredkova, T. N. [JSC Bochvar High-Technology Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, 5a Rogova St., Moscow, 123060 (Russian Federation); Shikov, A. K. [NRC Kurchatov Institute, 1 Akademika Kurchatova Sq., Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); Utkin, K. V.; Vorobieva, A. V.; Kharkovsky, D. N. [JSC Chepetsky Mechanical Plant, 7 Belova St., Glazov, 427620 (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-27

    From 2009 the mass production of the Nb{sub 3}Sn strands for ITER with the yield of several tens of tons per year operates at JSC Chepetsky Mechanical Plant (Glazov, Russia). In order to enhance the stability of output characteristics of the produced Nb{sub 3}Sn strands, to increase the Nb filaments dimensional homogeneity the manufacture regimes improvement of the used semiproducts such as Nb rods intended for the superconducting filaments formation in the finished strands has been carried out. In the work the investigations of the Nb rheological behavior, the influence of heat treatment in the wide temperature range from 700 to 1300 °C on the predeformed Nb rods structure and mechanical properties have been performed. Different production routes of the Nb rods, including such operations like forging, extrusion and drawing combined with the recrystallization annealings, were used. Composite Nb{sub 3}Sn strands have been produced and their electrophysical properties have been tested. For the first time influence of the niobium rods manufacture regimes on the current carrying capacity of the industrial Nb{sub 3}Sn strands has been investigated.

  14. Measurement of the Difference in CP-Violating Asymmetries in D[superscript 0]?K[superscript +]K[superscript -] and D[superscript 0]??[superscript +]?[superscript -] Decays at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We report a measurement of the difference (?ACP) between time-integrated CP-violating asymmetries in D[superscript 0]?K[superscript +]K[superscript -] and D[superscript 0]??[superscript +]?[superscript -] decays reconstructed ...

  15. A Measurement of the production cross section of top-antitop pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass of 1.96 TeV using secondary vertex b-tagging.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachacou, Henri

    2004-12-01

    A measurement of the t{bar t} pair production cross section is presented using 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF experiment during Run II at the Tevatron. t{bar t} events in the lepton+jets channel are isolated by identifying electrons and muons, reconstructing jets and transverse missing energy, and identifying b jets with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. The efficiency of the algorithm is measured in a control sample using a novel technique that is less dependent on the simulation. For a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, a cross section of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 5.6{sub -1.1}{sup +1.2}(stat.){sub -0.6}{sup +0.9}(syst.)pb is measured.

  16. Measurement of $d\\sigma/dy$ of Drell-Yan $e^+e^-$ pairs in the $Z$ Mass Region from $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, Jahred A.; /Chicago U., EFI; Gonzalez, Barbara Alvarez; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, Silvia; /Padua U., CISAS; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U. /INFN, Padua; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, Alberto; /Frascati; Antos, Jaroslav; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, Giorgio; /Fermilab; Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, Artur; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-03-01

    We report on a CDF measurement of the total cross section and rapidity distribution, d{sigma}/dy, for q{bar q} {yields} {gamma}{sup *}/Z {yields} e{sup +} e {sup -} events in the Z boson mass region (66 < M {sub ee} < 116 GeV/c {sub 2}) produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with 2.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The measured cross section of 257 {+-} 16pb and d{sigma}/dy distribution are compared with Next-to-Leading-Order (NLO) and Next-to-Next-to-Leading-Order (NNLO) QCD theory predictions with CTEQ and MRST/MSTW parton distribution functions (PDFs). There is good agreement between the experimental total cross section and d{sigma}/dy measurements with theoretical calcualtion with the most recent NNLO PDFs.

  17. Commissioning Measurements and Experience Obtained from the Installation of a Fissile Mass Flow monitor in the URAL Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) in Novouralsk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March-Leuba, J.; Mastal, E.; Powell, D.; Sumner, J.; Uckan, T.; Vines, V.

    1999-07-25

    The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) equipment sent earlier to the Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) at Novouralsk, Russia, was installed and implemented successfully on February 2, 1999. The BDMS installation supports the highly enriched uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program for material subject to monitoring under the HEU purchase agreement between the United States of America (USA) and the Russian Federation (RF). The BDMS consists of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile (uranium-235) Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Enrichment Monitor (EM). Two BDMS?s for monitoring the Main and Reserve HEU blending process lines were installed at UEIP. Independent operation of the FMFM Main and FMFM Reserve was successfully demonstrated for monitoring the fissile mass flow as well as the traceability of HEU to the product low enriched uranium. The FMFM systems failed when both systems were activated during the calibration phase due to a synchronization problem between the systems. This operational failure was caused by the presence of strong electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the blend point. The source-modulator shutter motion of the two FMFM systems was not being properly synchronized because of EMI producing a spurious signal on the synchronization cable connecting the two FMFM cabinets. The signature of this failure was successfully reproduced at ORNL after the visit. This unexpected problem was eliminated by a hardware modification and software improvements during a recent visit (June 9-11, 1999) to UEIP, and both systems are now operating as expected.

  18. Measurement of the inelastic pp cross-section at a centre-of-mass energy of ?s = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Counts, Ian Thomas Hunt

    The cross-section for inelastic proton-proton collisions, with at least one prompt long-lived charged particle of transverse momentum p [subscript T] > 0.2GeV/c in the pseudorapidity range 2.0 < ? < 4.5, is measured by the ...

  19. Electron Effective Mass in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viktor Ariel; Amir Natan

    2012-08-12

    The particle effective mass in graphene is a challenging concept because the commonly used theoretical expression is mathematically divergent. In this paper, we use basic principles to present a simple theoretical expression for the effective mass that is suitable for both parabolic and non-parabolic isotropic materials. We demonstrate that this definition is consistent with the definition of the cyclotron effective mass, which is one of the common methods for effective mass measurement in solid state materials. We apply the proposed theoretical definition to graphene and demonstrate linear dependence of the effective mass on momentum, as confirmed by experimental cyclotron resonance measurements. Therefore, the proposed definition of the effective mass can be used for non-parabolic materials such as graphene.

  20. Quark Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasser, Juerg

    2005-10-26

    In my talk, I reviewed some basic aspects of quark masses: what do they mean, how can they be determined, what is our present knowledge on them. The talk was addressed to non specialists in the field, and so is this write up.

  1. A measurement of. Delta. sigma. sub L (np), the difference between neutron-proton total cross sections in pure longitudinal spin states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beddo, M.E.

    1990-10-01

    A measurement off {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(np), the difference between neutron-proton total cross sections in pure longitudinal spin states, is described. The results will help determine the isospin-zero (I = 0) scattering amplitudes, which are not well known above laboratory energies of 500 MeV, whereas the isospin-one (I = 1) amplitudes are fairly well-determined to 1 GeV. Data points were taken at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) at Los Alamos, New Mexico, for five neutron beam energies: 484, 568, 634,720 and 788 MeV; they are the first in this energy range. Polarized neutrons were produced by charge-exchange of polarized protons on a liquid deuterium target (LD{sub 2}). Large-volume neutron counters detected the neutrons that passed through a polarized proton target. The counters subtended a range of solid angles large enough to allow extrapolation of the scattered neutrons to 0{degree}. Two modifications to the LAMPF accelerator system which were made for this work are described. They included a beam buncher,'' which modified the normal rf-time structure of the proton beam and allowed for the selection of peak-energy neutrons by time-of-flight means, and a computerized beam steering program, which reduced systematic effects due to beam motion at the LD{sub 2} target. The experimental values of {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(np) are found to be consistent with other np data, including preliminary data from SIN and Saclay, but not with some results from Argonne which used a polarized proton beam and a polarized deuteron target. The I = 0 component was extracted from {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(np) using existing pp data (I = 1), with the unexpected result that {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(I = 0) was found to be essentially identical in shape to {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(I = 1). The significance of this is not yet understood.

  2. Measurement of d sigma/dy of Drell-Yan e+ e- pairs in the Z Mass Region from p anti-p Collisions at s88(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-08-01

    We report on a CDF measurement of the total cross section and rapidity distribution, d{sigma}/dy, for q{bar q} {yields} {gamma}*/Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} events in the Z boson mass region (66 < M{sub ee} < 116 GeV/c{sup 2}) produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with 2.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The measured cross section of 256 {+-} 16 pb and d{sigma}/dy distribution are compared with Next-to-Leading-Order and Next-to-Next-to-Leading-Order QCD theory predictions with CTEQ and MRST parton distribution functions (PDFs). There is good agreement between data and theory except at large rapidity for which further tuning of PDF models may be needed.

  3. Improved D0 W boson mass determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. M. Abazov et al.

    2001-10-03

    We present a measurement of the W boson mass in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV based on a data sample of 82 pb{sup -1} integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We utilize e{nu} events in which the electron shower is close to the phi edge of one of the 32 modules in the D0 central calorimeter. The electromagnetic calorimenter response and resolution in this region differs from that in the rest of the module and electrons in this region were not previously utilized. We determine the calorimeter response and resolution in this region using Z {yields} ee events. We extract the W boson mass by fitting to the transverse mass and to the electron and neutrino transverse momentum distributions. The result is combined with previous D0 results to obtain an improved measurement of the W boson mass: m{sub W} = 80.483 {+-} 0.084 GeV.

  4. Time and space resolved measurement of the electron temperature, mass density and ionization state in the ablation plasma between two exploding Al wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, P. F.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Hansen, S. B.

    2012-05-15

    We have determined the properties of plasma around and between two exploding wires using high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plasma densities and temperatures ranging from Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 0.1g/cm{sup 3} and a few eV to less than 0.01 g/cm{sup 3} and 30 eV have been measured in experiments at Cornell University with two 40 {mu}m aluminum (Al) wires spaced 1 mm apart driven by {approx}150 kA peak current pulses with 100 ns rise time. The wire plasma was backlit by the 1.4-1.6 keV continuum radiation produced by a Mo wire X-pinch. The spectrometer employed two spherically bent quartz crystals to record the absorption and backlighter spectra simultaneously. The transition between the dense Al wire core and the coronal plasma is seen as a transition from cold K-edge absorption to Mg-, Na-, and finally Ne-like absorption at the boundary. In the plasma that accumulates between the wires, ionization states up to C-Like Al are observed. The spectrometer geometry and {approx}2{mu}m X-pinch source size provide 0.3 eV spectral resolution and 20 {mu}m spatial resolution enabling us to see 1s{yields} 2p satellite transitions as separate lines as well as O-, F-, and Ne-like 1s{yields} 3p transitions that have not been seen before. A step wedge was used to calibrate the transmission, enabling density to be measured within a factor of two and temperature to be measured within {+-}25%. A genetic algorithm was developed to fit synthetic spectra calculated using the collisional-radiative code SCRAM to the experimental spectra. In order to obtain agreement it was necessary to assume multiple plasma regions with variable thicknesses, thereby allowing the inferred plasma conditions to vary along the absorption path.

  5. Absolute Values of Neutrino Masses: Status and Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Bilenky; C. Giunti; J. A. Grifols; E. Masso

    2003-03-27

    Compelling evidences in favor of neutrino masses and mixing obtained in the last years in Super-Kamiokande, SNO, KamLAND and other neutrino experiments made the physics of massive and mixed neutrinos a frontier field of research in particle physics and astrophysics. There are many open problems in this new field. In this review we consider the problem of the absolute values of neutrino masses, which apparently is the most difficult one from the experimental point of view. We discuss the present limits and the future prospects of beta-decay neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double-beta decay. We consider the important problem of the calculation of nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double-beta decay and discuss the possibility to check the results of different model calculations of the nuclear matrix elements through their comparison with the experimental data. We discuss the upper bound of the total mass of neutrinos that was obtained recently from the data of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey and other cosmological data and we discuss future prospects of the cosmological measurements of the total mass of neutrinos. We discuss also the possibility to obtain information on neutrino masses from the observation of the ultra high-energy cosmic rays (beyond the GZK cutoff). Finally, we review the main aspects of the physics of core-collapse supernovae, the limits on the absolute values of neutrino masses from the observation of SN1987A neutrinos and the future prospects of supernova neutrino detection.

  6. Static-light meson masses from twisted mass lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ETM Collaboration; Karl Jansen; Chris Michael; Andrea Shindler; Marc Wagner

    2008-08-15

    We compute the static-light meson spectrum using two-flavor Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD. We have considered five different values for the light quark mass corresponding to 300 MeV < m_PS < 600 MeV. We have extrapolated our results, to make predictions regarding the spectrum of B and B_s mesons.

  7. Measurement of spin-dependent total cross-section difference $??_T$ in neutron-proton scattering at 16 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Broz; J. Cerny; Z. Dolezal; G. M. Gurevich M. Jirasek; P. Kubik; A. A. Lukhanin; J. Svejda; I. Wilhelm; N. S. Borisov; Yu. M. Kazarinov B. A. Khachaturov; E. S. Kuzmin; V. N. Matafonov; A. B. Neganov; I. L. Pisarev; Yu. A. Plis; Yu. A. Usov; M. Rotter; B. Sedlak

    1995-07-28

    A new measurement of $\\Delta\\sigma_T$ for polarized neutrons transmitted through a polarized proton target at 16.2 MeV has been made. A polarized neutron beam was obtained from the $^{3}\\rm{H}(d,\\vec n)^{4}\\rm{He}$ reaction; proton polarization over 90\\% was achieved in a frozen spin target of 20 cm$^3$ volume. The measurement yielded the value $\\Delta\\sigma_T=(-126\\pm21\\pm14)$ mb. The result of a simple phase shift analysis for the $^3S_1-^3D_1$ mixing parameter $\\epsilon_1$ is presented and compared with the theoretical potential model predictions.

  8. SANS and Contrast Variation Measurement of the Different Contributions to the Total Surface Area in PBX 9501 as a Function of Pressing Intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mang, Joseph T.; Hjelm, Rex P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2006-07-28

    We have used small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) in conjunction with the method of contrast variation to measure the surface area (SHB, SHV, and SBV) associated with the three interfaces (HMX-binder (HB), HMX-voids (HV) and binder-voids (BV)) in pressed pellets of PBX 9501 (95% HMX and 5% binder, by weight). These interfaces are of interest as they may influence the transmission of microstresses and hot spot formation under shock conditions. Because of the difficulty in making measurements, little is known about the microstructure of pressed PBX 9501 parts and thus how it is affected by processing. Here, we explore the effect of varying the pressing intensity on the PBX 9501 microstructure and in particular, how the three interfaces (HB, HV and BV) are affected. Disk-shaped samples of PBX 9501 were die-pressed with applied pressures ranging between 5,000 and 29,000 psi. SANS measurements were performed on 4-5 pellets at each pressure. Analysis of the SANS data indicates systematic changes in SHB, SHV, and SBV with applied pressure.

  9. First Measurement of the Angular Coefficients of Drell-Yan e?e? Pairs in the Z Mass Region from pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2011-06-01

    We report on the first measurement of the angular distributions of final state electrons in pp???*/Z?e?e?+X events produced in the Z boson mass region at ?s=1.96 TeV. The data sample collected by the CDF II detector for this result corresponds to 2.1 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity. The angular distributions are studied as a function of the transverse momentum of the electron-positron pair and show good agreement with the Lam-Tung relation, consistent with a spin-1 description of the gluon, and demonstrate that, at high values of the transverse momentum, Z bosons are produced via quark-antiquark annihilation and quark-gluon Compton processes.

  10. First Measurement of the Angular Coefficients of Drell-Yan $e^{+}e^{-}$ pairs in the Z Mass Region from $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    We report on the first measurement of the angular distributions of final state electrons in p{bar p} {yields} {gamma}*/Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} + X events produced in the Z boson mass region at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data sample collected by the CDF II detector for this result corresponds to 2.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The angular distributions are studied as a function of the transverse momentum of the electron-positron pair and show good agreement with the Lam-Tung relation, consistent with a spin-1 description of the gluon, and demonstrate that at high values of the transverse momentum, Z bosons are produced via quark anti-quark annihilation and quark-gluon Compton processes.

  11. Measurement of the correlation between flow harmonics of different order in lead-lead collisions at s NN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-14

    Correlations between the elliptic or triangular flow coefficients vm (m=2 or 3) and other flow harmonics vn (n=2 to 5) are measured using ?sNN=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collision data collected in 2010 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7 ?b-1. The vm-vn correlations are measured in midrapidity as a function of centrality, and, for events within the same centrality interval, as a function of event ellipticity or triangularity defined in a forward rapidity region. For events within the same centrality interval, v3 is found to be anticorrelated with v2 and this anticorrelation is consistentmore »with similar anticorrelations between the corresponding eccentricities, ?2 and ?3. However, it is observed that v4 increases strongly with v2, and v5 increases strongly with both v2 and v3. The trend and strength of the vm-vn correlations for n=4 and 5 are found to disagree with ?m-?n correlations predicted by initial-geometry models. Instead, these correlations are found to be consistent with the combined effects of a linear contribution to vn and a nonlinear term that is a function of v22 or of v2v3, as predicted by hydrodynamic models. A simple two-component fit is used to separate these two contributions. The extracted linear and nonlinear contributions to v4 and v5 are found to be consistent with previously measured event-plane correlations.« less

  12. A Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method to Compare Armor Materials or Components (Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Langhorst; Thomas M Lillo; Henry S Chu

    2014-05-01

    A statistics based ballistic test method is presented for use when comparing multiple groups of test articles of unknown relative ballistic perforation resistance. The method is intended to be more efficient than many traditional methods for research and development testing. To establish the validity of the method, it is employed in this study to compare test groups of known relative ballistic performance. Multiple groups of test articles were perforated using consistent projectiles and impact conditions. Test groups were made of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) plates and differed in thickness. After perforation, each residual projectile was captured behind the target and its mass was measured. The residual masses measured for each test group were analyzed to provide ballistic performance rankings with associated confidence levels. When compared to traditional V50 methods, the residual mass (RM) method was found to require fewer test events and be more tolerant of variations in impact conditions.

  13. Measurement and Analysis of Radio-frequency Radiation Exposure Level from Different Mobile Base Transceiver Stations in Ajaokuta and Environs, Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ushie, P O; Bolaji, Ayinmode; Osahun, O D

    2013-01-01

    We present the result of a preliminary assessment of radio-frequency radiation exposure from selected mobile base stations in Ajaokuta environs. The Power density of RF radiation within a radial distance of 125m was measured. Although values fluctuated due to the influence of other factors, including wave interference from other electromagnetic sources around reference base stations, we show from analysis that radiation exposure level is below the standard limit (4.5W/sqm for 900MHz and 9W/sqm for 18000MHz) set by the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and other regulatory agencies.

  14. Gluon correlations from a glasma flux-tube model compared to measured hadron correlations on transverse momentum (pt,pt) and angular differences (??,??)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Trainor, Thomas A.; Ray, R. L.

    2011-09-09

    A glasma flux-tube model has been proposed to explain strong elongation on pseudorapidity ? of the same-side two-dimensional (2D) peak in minimum-bias angular correlations from ?(sNN)=200 GeV Au-Au collisions. The same-side peak or “soft ridge” is said to arise from coupling of flux tubes to radial flow whereby gluons radiated transversely from flux tubes are boosted by radial flow to form a narrow structure or ridge on azimuth. In this study we test the theory conjecture by comparing measurements to predictions for particle production, spectra, and correlations from the glasma model and from conventional fragmentation processes. We conclude that themore »glasma model is contradicted by measured hadron yields, spectra, and correlations, whereas a two-component model of hadron production, including minimum-bias parton fragmentation, provides a quantitative description of most features of the data, although ? elongation of the same-side 2D peak remains undescribed.« less

  15. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, hadronic top decays with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegeman, Jeroen Guido; /Twente U. Tech., Enschede

    2009-01-16

    Of the six quarks in the standard model the top quark is by far the heaviest: 35 times more massive than its partner the bottom quark and more than 130 times heavier than the average of the other five quarks. Its correspondingly small decay width means it tends to decay before forming a bound state. Of all quarks, therefore, the top is the least affected by quark confinement, behaving almost as a free quark. Its large mass also makes the top quark a key player in the realm of the postulated Higgs boson, whose coupling strengths to particles are proportional to their masses. Precision measurements of particle masses for e.g. the top quark and the W boson can hereby provide indirect constraints on the Higgs boson mass. Since in the standard model top quarks couple almost exclusively to bottom quarks (t {yields} Wb), top quark decays provide a window on the standard model through the direct measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element V{sub tb}. In the same way any lack of top quark decays into W bosons could imply the existence of decay channels beyond the standard model, for example charged Higgs bosons as expected in two-doublet Higgs models: t {yields} H{sup +}b. Within the standard model top quark decays can be classified by the (lepton or quark) W boson decay products. Depending on the decay of each of the W bosons, t{bar t} pair decays can involve either no leptons at all, or one or two isolated leptons from direct W {yields} e{bar {nu}}{sub e} and W {yields} {mu}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} decays. Cascade decays like b {yields} Wc {yields} e{bar {nu}}{sub e}c can lead to additional non-isolated leptons. The fully hadronic decay channel, in which both Ws decay into a quark-antiquark pair, has the largest branching fraction of all t{bar t} decay channels and is the only kinematically complete (i.e. neutrino-less) channel. It lacks, however, the clear isolated lepton signature and is therefore hard to distinguish from the multi-jet QCD background. It is important to measure the cross section (or branching fraction) in each channel independently to fully verify the standard model. Top quark pair production proceeds through the strong interaction, placing the scene for top quark physics at hadron colliders. This adds an additional challenge: the huge background from multi-jet QCD processes. At the Tevatron, for example, t{bar t} production is completely hidden in light q{bar q} pair production. The light (i.e. not bottom or top) quark pair production cross section is six orders of magnitude larger than that for t{bar t} production. Even including the full signature of hadronic t{bar t} decays, two b-jets and four additional jets, the QCD cross section for processes with similar signature is more than five times larger than for t{bar t} production. The presence of isolated leptons in the (semi)leptonic t{bar t} decay channels provides a clear characteristic to distinguish the t{bar t} signal from QCD background but introduces a multitude of W- and Z-related backgrounds.

  16. The Subatomic Particle Mass Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Oldershaw

    2010-09-20

    Representative members of the subatomic particle mass spectrum in the 100 MeV to 7,000 MeV range are retrodicted to a first approximation using the Kerr solution of General Relativity. The particle masses appear to form a restricted set of quantized values of a Kerr-based angular momentum-mass relation: m = (sqrt n)(M), where values of n are a set of discrete integers and M is a revised Planck mass. A fractal paradigm manifesting global discrete self-similarity is critical to a proper determination of M, which differs from the conventional Planck mass by roughly 19 orders of magnitude. This exceedingly simple and generic mass equation retrodicts the masses of a representative set of 27 well-known particles with an average relative error of 1.6%. A more rigorous mass formula, which includes the total spin angular momentum rule of Quantum Mechanics, the canonical spin values of the particles, and the dimensionless rotational parameter of the Kerr angular momentum-mass relation, is able to retrodict the masses of the 8 dominant baryons in the 900 MeV to 1700 MeV range at the 99.7% level, on average.

  17. High-speed multiple-mode mass-sensing resolves dynamic nanoscale mass distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olcum, Selim

    Simultaneously measuring multiple eigenmode frequencies of nanomechanical resonators can determine the position and mass of surface-adsorbed proteins, and could ultimately reveal the mass tomography of nanoscale analytes. ...

  18. Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    using the PMP Methodologies Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan....

  19. CALIBRATING C-IV-BASED BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Daeseong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Shin, Jaejin [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Denney, Kelly D., E-mail: pds2001@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jjshin@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: kelly@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2013-06-20

    We present the single-epoch black hole mass estimators based on the C IV {lambda}1549 broad emission line, using the updated sample of the reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei and high-quality UV spectra. By performing multi-component spectral fitting analysis, we measure the C IV line widths (FWHM{sub C{sub IV}} and line dispersion, {sigma}{sub C{sub IV}}) and the continuum luminosity at 1350 A (L{sub 1350}) to calibrate the C-IV-based mass estimators. By comparing with the H{beta} reverberation-based masses, we provide new mass estimators with the best-fit relationships, i.e., M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.50{+-}0.07}{sigma}{sub C{sub IV}{sup 2}} and M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.52{+-}0.09} FWHM{sub C{sub IV}{sup 0.56{+-}0.48}}. The new C-IV-based mass estimators show significant mass-dependent systematic difference compared to the estimators commonly used in the literature. Using the published Sloan Digital Sky Survey QSO catalog, we show that the black hole mass of high-redshift QSOs decreases on average by {approx}0.25 dex if our recipe is adopted.

  20. Birefringence Measurements on Crystalline Silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krüger, Christoph; Khalaidovski, Alexander; Steinlechner, Jessica; Nawrodt, Ronny; Schnabel, Roman; Lück, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Crystalline silicon has been proposed as a new test mass material in third generation gravitational wave detectors such as the Einstein Telescope (ET). Birefringence can reduce the interferometric contrast and can produce dynamical disturbances in interferometers. In this work we use the method of polarisation-dependent resonance frequency analysis of Fabry-Perot-cavities containing silicon as a birefringent medium. Our measurements show a birefringence of silicon along the (111) axis of the order of $\\Delta\\, n \\approx 10^{-7}$ at a laser wavelength of 1550nm and room temperature. A model is presented that explains the results of different settings of our measurements as a superposition of elastic strains caused by external stresses in the sample and plastic strains possibly generated during the production process. An application of our theory on the proposed ET test mass geometry suggests no critical effect on birefringence due to elastic strains.

  1. Mass-matrix ansatz and constraints on B{sub s}{sup 0}-B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing in 331 models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, R.; Ochoa, F.

    2008-03-15

    Comparing the theoretically predicted and measured values of the mass difference of the B{sub s}{sup 0} system, we estimate the lower bound on the mass of the Z{sup '} boson of models based on the SU(3){sub c} x SU(3){sub L} x U(1){sub X} gauge group. By assuming zero-texture approaches of the quark mass matrices, we find the ratio of the measured value to the theoretical prediction from the standard model and the Z{sup '} contribution from the 331 models of the mass difference of the B{sub s}{sup 0} system. We find lower bounds on the Z{sup '} mass ranging between 1 TeV and 30 TeV for the two most popular 331 models, and four different zero-textures ansaetze. The above results are expressed as a function of the weak angle associated to the b-s-Z{sup '} couplings.

  2. Top-Quark Mass Data and the Sum of Quasi-Degenerate Neutrino Masses (One small electroweak-bound e-parameter organizes elementary particle 3-flavor phenomenology)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. M. Lipmanov

    2008-10-01

    The absolute neutrino masses and type of neutrino mass hierarchy are among the main problems in neutrino physics. Top-quark mass is another topical problem in particle physics. These problems extend the old puzzle of electron-muon mass ratio close to the fine structure constant, which is still not solved by known theory. Here I continue the search for a general flavor pattern that may incorporate these problems. Relations between neutrino/electron and electron/top-quark pole mass ratios are obtained from supposition that realistic elementary particle dimensionless bare flavor quantities are small deviated (measured by universal parameter e) from the values of a stated flavor pattern (at e=0) and experimental data hints. With the world average t-quark mass data the sum of QD-neutrino masses is estimated (0.50 +- 0.003)eV in agreement with cosmological constraints and known QD-neutrino mass estimations from experimental data on neutrino oscillation mass-squared differences.

  3. Measurements of the total cross sections for Higgs boson production combining the $H \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ and $H \\to ZZ^* \\to 4\\ell$ decay channels at 7, 8 and 13 TeV center-of-mass energies with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of total cross sections are presented for Higgs boson production in proton-proton collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The data correspond to 4.5 fb$^{-1}$ collected at the center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at 8 TeV, and most recently 3.2 fb$^{-1}$ at 13 TeV. Cross sections are obtained from measured $H \\to \\gamma\\gamma$ and $H \\to ZZ^{*} \\to 4\\ell$ event yields, which are combined accounting for detector effects, fiducial acceptances and branching fractions. The total Higgs boson production cross sections are measured to be $34^{+11}_{-10}$ pb, $33.3^{+5.8}_{-5.5}$ pb, and $24^{+21}_{-18}$ pb for center-of-mass energies of 7, 8 and 13 TeV, respectively. These measurements are compared to state-of-the-art Standard Model theoretical predictions.

  4. Measuring Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By SarahMODELING CLOUD1 H( 7Measurements ofMeasurement

  5. Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2005-12-06

    Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

  6. Measurement of the front back asymmetry in top-antitop quark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions at center of mass energy = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Thomas A.; /Michigan U.

    2006-01-01

    Quarks, along with leptons and force carrying particles, are predicted by the Standard Model to be the fundamental constituents of nature. In distinction from the leptons, the quarks interact strongly through the chromodynamic force and are bound together within the hadrons. The familiar proton and neutron are bound states of the light ''up'' and ''down'' quarks. The most massive quark by far, the ''top'' quark, was discovered by the CDF and D0 experiments in March, 1995. The new quark was observed in p{bar p} collisions at 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass of the top quark was measured to be 176 {+-} 13 GeV/c{sup 2} and the cross section 6.8{sub -2.4}{sup +3.6} pb. It is the Q = 2/3, T{sub 3} = +1/2 member of the third generation weak-isospin doublet along with the bottom quark. The top quark is the final Standard Model quark to be discovered. Along with whatever is responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking, top quark physics is considered one of the least understood sectors of the Standard Model and represents a front line of our understanding of particle physics. Currently, the only direct measurements of top quark properties come from the CDF and D0 experiments observing p{bar p} collisions at the Tevatron. Top quark production at the Tevatron is almost exclusively by quark-antiquark annihilation, q{bar q} {yields} t{bar t} (85%), and gluon fusion, gg {yields} t{bar t} (15%), mediated by the strong force. The theoretical cross-section for this process is {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 6.7 {+-} 0.8 pb for m{sub t} = 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. Top quarks can also be produced at the Tevatron via q{bar b}{prime} {yields} tb and qg {yields} q{prime}tb through the weak interaction. The cross section for these processes is lower (3pb) and the signal is much more difficult to isolate as backgrounds are much higher. The top quark is predicted to decay almost exclusively into a W-boson and a bottom quark (t {yields} Wb). The total decay width t {yields} Wb is {Lambda} = 1.50 GeV. This corresponds to an incredibly short lifetime of 0.5 x 10{sup -24} seconds. This happens so quickly that hadronization and bound states do not take place, which leads to the interesting consequence that the top quark spin information is passed to the decay products.

  7. Precision Spectroscopy of Pionic Atoms: From Pion Mass Evaluation to Tests of Chiral Perturbation Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martino Trassinelli

    2004-09-14

    Preliminary results of the strong interaction shift and width in pionic hydrogen ($\\pi H$) using an X-ray spectrometer with spherically bent crystals and CCDs as X-ray detector are presented. In the experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute three different $(np\\to 1s)$ transitions in $\\pi H$ were measured. Moreover the pion mass measurement using the $(5 \\to 4)$ transitions in pionic nitrogen and muonic oxygen is presented

  8. SIEMENS ADVANCED QUANTRA FTICR MASS SPECTROMETER FOR ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION AT LOW MASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, W; Laura Tovo, L

    2008-07-08

    The Siemens Advanced Quantra Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was evaluated as an alternative instrument to large double focusing mass spectrometers for gas analysis. High resolution mass spectrometers capable of resolving the common mass isomers of the hydrogen isotopes are used to provide data for accurate loading of reservoirs and to monitor separation of tritium, deuterium, and helium. Conventional double focusing magnetic sector instruments have a resolution that is limited to about 5000. The Siemens FTICR instrument achieves resolution beyond 400,000 and could possibly resolve the tritium ion from the helium-3 ion, which differ by the weight of an electron, 0.00549 amu. Working with Y-12 and LANL, SRNL requested Siemens to modify their commercial Quantra system for low mass analysis. To achieve the required performance, Siemens had to increase the available waveform operating frequency from 5 MHz to 40 MHz and completely redesign the control electronics and software. However, they were able to use the previous ion trap, magnet, passive pump, and piezo-electric pulsed inlet valve design. NNSA invested $1M in this project and acquired four systems, two for Y-12 and one each for SRNL and LANL. Siemens claimed a $10M investment in the Quantra systems. The new Siemens Advanced Quantra demonstrated phenomenal resolution in the low mass range. Resolution greater than 400,000 was achieved for mass 2. The new spectrometer had a useful working mass range to 500 Daltons. However, experiments found that a continuous single scan from low mass to high was not possible. Two useful working ranges were established covering masses 1 to 6 and masses 12 to 500 for our studies. A compromise performance condition enabled masses 1 to 45 to be surveyed. The instrument was found to have a dynamic range of about three orders of magnitude and quantitative analysis is expected to be limited to around 5 percent without using complex fitting algorithms. Analysis of low concentration ions, at the ppm level, required a separate analysis using ion ejection techniques. Chemical ionization due to the formation of the MH{sup +} ion or MD{sup +} increased the complexity of the spectra compared to magnetic sector mass spectra and formation of the protonated or deuterated complex was a dynamic function of the trap ion concentration. This made quantitative measurement more of a challenge. However, the resolution of the instrument was far superior to any other mass spectrometry technique that has been applied to the analysis of the hydrogen isotopes. The piezo-electric picoliter injection device offers a new way of submitting small quantities of atmospheric pressure sample gas for analysis. The new software had many improvements over the previous version but significant flaws in the beta codes remain that make the prototype units less than ideal. The instrument is a promising new technology that experience will likely improve. Unfortunately, Siemens has concluded that the technology will not be a commercial success and has decided to stop producing this product.

  9. Metrics For Comparing Plasma Mass Filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2012-08-15

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter. __________________________________________________

  10. Metrics for comparing plasma mass filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-10-15

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter.

  11. An alternative heavy Higgs mass limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Castorina; M. Consoli; D. Zappalá

    2008-05-20

    After commenting on the present value of the Higgs particle mass from radiative corrections, we explore the phenomenological implications of an alternative, non-perturbative renormalization of the scalar sector where the mass of the Higgs particle does not represent a measure of observable interactions at the Higgs mass scale. In this approach the Higgs particle could be very heavy, even heavier than 1 TeV, and remain nevertheless a relatively narrow resonance.

  12. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Randall W (Phoenix, AZ); Williams, Peter (Phoenix, AZ); Krone, Jennifer Reeve (Granbury, TX)

    2007-12-04

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  13. Higher-Order Mass Defect Analysis for Mass Spectra of Complex Organic Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Patrick J.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2011-06-15

    Higher-order mass defect analysis is introduced as a unique formula assignment and visualization method for the analysis of complex mass spectra. This approach is an extension of the concepts of Kendrick mass transformation widely used for identification of homologous compounds differing only by a number of base units (e.g., CH2, H2, O, CH2O, etc.) in complex mixtures. We present an iterative renormalization routine for defining higher order homologous series and multidimensional clustering of mass spectral features. This approach greatly simplifies visualization of complex mass spectra and increases the number of chemical formulae that can be confidently assigned for given mass accuracy. The potential for using higher-order mass defects for data reduction and visualization is shown. Higher-order mass defect analysis is described and demonstrated through third-order analysis of a de-isotoped high-resolution mass spectrum of crude oil containing nearly 13,000 peaks.

  14. Neutrino Mass and Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David O. Caldwell

    1998-12-01

    Despite direct observations favoring a low mass density, a critical density universe with a neutrino component of dark matter provides the best existing model to explain the observed structure of the universe over more than three orders of magnitude in distance scale. In principle this hot dark matter could consist of one, two, or three species of active neutrinos. If all present indications for neutrino mass are correct, however, only the two-species (muon neutrino and tau neutrino) possibility works. This requires the existence of at least one light sterile neutrino to explain the solar electron neutrino deficit via nu(e)->nu(s), leaving nu(mu)->nu(tau) as the explanation for the anomalous nu(mu)/nu(e) ratio produced by atmospheric neutrinos, and having the LSND experiment demonstrating via anti-nu(mu)-> anti-nu(e) the mass difference between the light nu(e)-nu(s) pair and the heavier nu(mu)-nu(tau) pair required for dark matter. Other experiments do not conflict with the LSND results when all the experiments are analyzed in the same way, and when analyzed conservatively the LSND data is quite compatible with the mass difference needed for dark matter. Further support for this mass pattern is provided by the need for a sterile neutrino to rescue heavy-element nucleosynthesis in supernovae, and it could even aid the concordance in light element abundances from the early universe.

  15. Measurement and numerical analysis of freezing in solutions enclosed in a small container

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowengrub, John

    Measurement and numerical analysis of freezing in solutions enclosed in a small container the magnitude and dynamics of latent heat during freezing of 14 different pre-nucleated solute laden aqueous the experimentally measured behavior based on the full set of heat and mass transport equations during the freezing

  16. Precision Electroweak Parameters and the Higgs Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William J. Marciano

    2000-03-17

    The status of various precisely measured electroweak parameters is reviewed. Natural relations among them are shown to constrain the Higgs mass, m_H, via quantum loop effects to relatively low values. A comparison with direct Higgs searches is made.

  17. Search for SUSY at LHC: Precision Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank E. Paige

    1997-12-16

    Methods to make precision measurements of SUSY masses and parameters at the CERN Large Hadron Collider are described.

  18. Mass-radius relations and core-envelope decompositions of super...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hsub 2-He envelope masses, and associated envelope entropies. For planets in the super-Earthsub-Neptune regime for which both radius and mass are measured, we estimate...

  19. Moving beyond mass-based parameters for conductivity analysis of sulfonated polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pivovar, Bryan [NREL

    2009-01-01

    Proton conductivity of polymer electrolytes is critical for fuel cells and has therefore been studied in significant detail. The conductivity of sulfonated polymers has been linked to material characteristics in order to elucidate trends. Mass based measurements based on water uptake and ion exchange capacity are two of the most common material characteristics used to make comparisons between polymer electrolytes, but have significant limitations when correlated to proton conductivity. These limitations arise in part because different polymers can have significantly different densities and conduction happens over length scales more appropriately represented by volume measurements rather than mass. Herein, we establish and review volume related parameters that can be used to compare proton conductivity of different polymer electrolytes. Morphological effects on proton conductivity are also considered. Finally, the impact of these phenomena on designing next generation sulfonated polymers for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is discussed.

  20. Measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in the four-lepton channel in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    The final ATLAS Run 1 measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in the decay channel H?ZZ*??[superscript +]?[superscript?]?' [superscript +], ?' [superscript ?], where ?, ??=e or ?, are presented. These measurements ...

  1. Possible Measurable Effects of Dark Energy in Rotating Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clovis Jacinto de Matos; Christian Beck

    2007-07-12

    We discuss recent laboratory experiments with rotating superconductors and show that three so far unexplained experimentally observed effects (anomalous acceleration signals, anomalous gyroscope signals, Cooper pair mass excess) can be physically explained in terms of a possible interaction of dark energy with Cooper pairs. Our approach is based on a Ginzburg-Landau-like model of electromagnetic dark energy, where gravitationally active photons obtain mass in the superconductor. We show that this model can account simultaneously for the anomalous acceleration and anomalous gravitomagnetic fields around rotating superconductors measured by Tajmar et al. and for the anomalous Cooper pair mass in superconductive Niobium, measured by Cabrera and Tate. It is argued that these three different physical effects are ultimately different experimental manifestations of the simultaneous spontaneous breaking of gauge invariance, and of the principle of general covariance in superconductive materials.

  2. Thermal gradient-induced forces on geodesic reference masses for LISA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbone, L.; Ciani, G.; Dolesi, R.; Hueller, M.; Tombolato, D.; Vitale, S.; Weber, W. J.; Cavalleri, A.

    2007-11-15

    The low frequency sensitivity of space-borne gravitational wave observatories will depend critically on the geodesic purity of the trajectories of orbiting test masses. Fluctuations in the temperature difference across the enclosure surrounding the free-falling test mass can produce noisy forces through several processes, including the radiometric effect, radiation pressure, and outgassing. We present here a detailed experimental investigation of thermal gradient-induced forces for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) gravitational wave mission and the LISA Pathfinder, employing high resolution torsion pendulum measurements of the torque on a LISA-like test mass suspended inside a prototype of the LISA gravitational reference sensor that will surround the test mass in orbit. The measurement campaign, accompanied by numerical simulations of the radiometric and radiation pressure effects, allows a more accurate and representative characterization of thermal-gradient forces in the specific geometry and environment relevant to LISA free-fall. The pressure dependence of the measured torques allows clear identification of the radiometric effect, in quantitative agreement with the model developed. In the limit of zero gas pressure, the measurements are most likely dominated by outgassing, but at a low level that does not threaten the current LISA noise estimate, which assumes a maximum net force per degree of temperature difference of 100(pN/K) for the overall thermal gradient-induced effects.

  3. Size, effect of flexible proof mass on the mechanical behavior of micron-scale cantilevers for energy harvesting appications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, M.; Hong, S.; Miller, D. J.; Dugundji, J.; Wardle, B. L. (Materials Science Division); (MIT)

    2011-12-15

    Mechanical behavior of micron-scale cantilevers with a distributed, flexible proof mass is investigated to understand proof mass size effects on the performance of microelectromechanical system energy harvesters. Single-crystal silicon beams with proof masses of various lengths were fabricated using focused ion beam milling and tested using atomic force microscopy. Comparison of three different modeling results with measured data reveals that a 'two-beam' method has the most accurate predictive capability in terms of both resonant frequency and strain. Accurate strain prediction is essential because energy harvested scales with strain squared and maximum strain will be a design limit in fatigue.

  4. Effective atomic numbers of blue topaz at different gamma-rays energies obtained from Compton scattering technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuschareon, S. Limkitjaroenporn, P. Kaewkhao, J.

    2014-03-24

    Topaz occurs in a wide range of colors, including yellow, orange, brown, pink-to-violet and blue. All of these color differences are due to color centers. In order to improve the color of natural colorless topaz, the most commonly used is irradiated with x- or gamma-rays, indicated that attenuation parameters is important to enhancements by irradiation. In this work, the mass attenuation coefficients of blue topaz were measured at the different energy of ?-rays using the Compton scattering technique. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficient are in good agreement with the theoretical values. The mass attenuation coefficients increase with the decrease in gamma rays energies. This may be attributed to the higher photon interaction probability of blue topaz at lower energy. This result is a first report of mass attenuation coefficient of blue topaz at different gamma rays energies.

  5. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

  6. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1994-01-01

    Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

  7. Mass and the creation of spatial volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Herzenberg

    2011-05-13

    The distortion of space by the presence of mass in general relativity appears to be capable of increasing three dimensional spatial volume. We examine excess volume effects associated with an isolated mass described by the Schwarzschild solution to the field equations. Fractional differential excess spatial volume in the vicinity of a mass is shown to be a direct measure of gravitational potential which can be easily visualized. The total amount of excess spatial volume associated with an isolated mass is evaluated and shown to be appreciable. Summing over the excess spatial volume contributions from individual masses present throughout the universe leads to an overall excess spatial volume comparable in magnitude to the volume of the observable universe. Interpretations of these results are discussed, including the possibility that this excess volume might contribute to clarifying the issue of missing matter in the contemporary universe. Alternatively, it is proposed speculatively that mass, rather than simply distorting preexisting space, might actually create it.

  8. MassMass transfer andtransfer and separation technologyseparation technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    or heat exchange surfaces ­ Improved mass transfer, especially for immiscible liquids, G/L and L; for example L/L, L/S, S/S, G/L, G/L/Sexample L/L, L/S, S/S, G/L, G/L/S ­ Improved heat transfer to walls directions. Most important types, i i diff t t fgiving different types of flow patterns: ­ a Flat

  9. Anomalous pressure dependence of thermal conductivities of large mass ratio compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, Lucas R; Broido, David; Carrete, Jesus; Mingo, Natalio; Reinecke, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The lattice thermal conductivities ( ) of binary compound materials are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure, P, using a first-principles approach. Compound materials with relatively small mass ratios, such as MgO, show an increase in with P, consistent with measurements. Conversely, compounds with large mass ratios (e.g., BSb, BAs, BeTe, BeSe) exhibit decreasing with increasing P, a behavior that cannot be understood using simple theories of . This anomalous P dependence of arises from the fundamentally different nature of the intrinsic scattering processes for heat-carrying acoustic phonons in large mass ratio compounds compared to those with small mass ratios. This work demonstrates the power of first principles methods for thermal properties and advances the understanding of thermal transport in non-metals.

  10. Non-Oscillation Probes of Neutrino Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster Institut fuer Kernphysik, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 9, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2010-03-30

    The absolute scale of neutrino masses is very important for understanding the evolution and the structure formation of the universe as well as for nuclear and particle physics beyond the present Standard Model. Complementary to deducing statements on the neutrino mass from cosmological observations, two different methods to determine the neutrino mass scale in the laboratory are pursued: the search for neutrinoless double beta decay and the direct neutrino mass search. For both methods currently experiments with a sensitivity of O(100) meV are being set up or commissioned.

  11. Measurable Maximal Energy and Minimal Time Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eiman Abou El Dahab; Abdel Nasser Tawfik

    2014-01-14

    The possibility of finding the measurable maximal energy and the minimal time interval is discussed in different quantum aspects. It is found that the linear generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) approach gives a non-physical result. Based on large scale Schwarzshild solution, the quadratic GUP approach is utilized. The calculations are performed at the shortest distance, at which the general relativity is assumed to be a good approximation for the quantum gravity and at larger distances, as well. It is found that both maximal energy and minimal time have the order of the Planck time. Then, the uncertainties in both quantities are accordingly bounded. Some physical insights are addressed. Also, the implications on the physics of early Universe and on quantized mass are outlined. The results are related to the existence of finite cosmological constant and minimum mass (mass quanta).

  12. Resonance searches with the $t\\overline{t}$ Invariant Mass Distribution measured with the D\\O\\, Experiment at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\,\\textrm{TeV}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schliephake, Thorsten Dirk; /Wuppertal U.

    2010-06-01

    Understanding the universe, its birth and its future is one of the biggest motivations in physics. In order to understand the cosmos, the fundamental particles forming the universe, the components our matter is built of need to be known and understood. Over time physicists have built a theory which describes the physics of the known fundamental particles very well: the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. The SM describes the particles, their interactions and phenomena with high precision. So far no proven deviations from the SM have been found, though recently evidence for possible physics beyond the SM has been observed. The SM is not describing the mass of the elementary particles however and even with the addition of the Higgs mechanism giving mass to the particles, we have no full theory for all four fundamental forces. We know the model needs to be extended or replaced by another one, as gravitation is not included in the SM. Having a theory which describes all fundamental particles found so far and all but one fundamental interaction is a great success. However, all this describes about 4% of the universe we live in. 23% is dark matter and 73% is dark energy. Dark matter is believed to interact only through gravity and maybe the weak force, which makes it hardly observable. Dark energy is even more elusive. Among other theories the cosmologic constant and scalar fields are discussed to describe it. One should also note that other models exist which for example modify the Newtonian law of gravity. The Higgs mechanism has become the most popular model for mass generation. Alternative theories like Super Symmetry (SUSY), large Extra Dimensions, Technicolor, String Theory, to name just a few, have spread to describe the necessary mass generation or new particles. As proof for new physics beyond the SM has not been found yet, one assumes that new physics will manifest itself at a larger energy scale and therefore a higher particle mass. Particles with high masses are therefore presumed to be a window to test the SM for deviations caused by new physics. The heaviest fundamental particle which is in our reach is the top quark. Its mass is almost as large as that of a complete tungsten atom. It is so heavy, that it decays faster than it can hadronize. It seems the perfect probe to study new physics at the moment. In this analysis the top quark is used as a probe to search for a new resonance, whose properties are similar to a SM Z boson but is much more massive. This analysis will study t{bar t} decays to search for an excess in the invariant mass distribution of the t{bar t} pairs. Resonant states are suggested for massive Z-like bosons in extended gauge theories, Kaluza Klein states of the gluon or Z, axigluons, topcolor, and other beyond the Standard Model theories. Independent of the exact model a resonant production mechanism should be visible in the t{bar t} invariant mass distribution. In this thesis a model-independent search for a narrow-width heavy resonance X decaying into t{bar t} is performed. In the SM, the top quark decays into a W boson and a b quark nearly 100% of the time, which has been proven experimentally, too. The t{bar t} event signature is fully determined by the W boson decay modes. In this analysis, only the lepton+jets final state, which results from the leptonic decay of one of the W bosons and the hadronic decay of the other, is considered. The event signature is an isolated electron or muon with high transverse momentum, large transverse energy imbalance due to the undetected neutrino, and at least three jets, two of which result from the hadronization of b quarks.

  13. Top-quark production measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Cristinziani

    2015-11-13

    Recent measurements of top-quark production at hadron colliders are reviewed. The inclusive top-quark pair production is determined at four centre-of-mass energies at Tevatron and LHC with experimental uncertainties that are close to the uncertainties in theoretical calculations at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD. Several differential measurements are performed and compared to simulation. Production of single top quarks is studied in the three different production channels. Top-quark pair production with neutral and charged vector bosons has been observed by the LHC experiments. Finally, production of additional heavy flavour quark pairs ($b\\bar{b}$, $t\\bar{t}$) is studied or searched for.

  14. Using fat and muscle measurements from different areas of the carcass in the prediction of yield of pork four lean cuts and primals as affected by cutting method and trim level 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Shawn Dale

    1995-01-01

    , carcass cross sections were photographed onto slide film, scanned, and then various fat and muscle deposits were measured with an image analysis program. Regression equations were produced using carcass cross section measurements to predict RFLC and bone...

  15. Nuclear Masses in Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christine Weber; Klaus Blaum; Hendrik Schatz

    2008-12-09

    Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of N and Z and the data obtained apply to a variety of physics topics. One of the most crucial questions to be addressed in mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides is the one of understanding the processes of element formation in the Universe. To this end, accurate atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations. In this paper, a review on the latest achievements in mass spectrometry for nuclear astrophysics is given.

  16. Multiple mass solvers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Jegerlehner

    1997-08-29

    We present a general method to construct multiple mass solvers from standard algorithms. As an example, the BiCGstab-M algorithm is derived.

  17. Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Scime, Earl E. (Morgantown, WV)

    1996-01-01

    The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

  18. Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1993-02-23

    Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and [sup 3]He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

  19. Thermal gradient-induced forces on geodetic reference masses for LISA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Carbone; A. Cavalleri; G. Ciani; R. Dolesi; M. Hueller; D. Tombolato; S. Vitale; W. J. Weber

    2007-06-29

    The low frequency sensitivity of space-borne gravitational wave observatories will depend critically on the geodetic purity of the trajectories of orbiting test masses. Fluctuations in the temperature difference across the enclosure surrounding the free-falling test mass can produce noisy forces through several processes, including the radiometric effect, radiation pressure, and outgassing. We present here a detailed experimental investigation of thermal gradient-induced forces for the LISA gravitational wave mission and the LISA Pathfinder, employing high resolution torsion pendulum measurements of the torque on a LISA-like test mass suspended inside a prototype of the LISA gravitational reference sensor that will surround the test mass in orbit. The measurement campaign, accompanied by numerical simulations of the radiometric and radiation pressure effects, allows a more accurate and representative characterization of thermal-gradient forces in the specific geometry and environment relevant to LISA free-fall. The pressure dependence of the measured torques allows clear identification of the radiometric effect, in quantitative agreement with the model developed. In the limit of zero gas pressure, the measurements are most likely dominated by outgassing, but at a low level that does not threaten the LISA sensitivity goals.

  20. Volume 159B, number 1 PHYSICS LETTERS 12 September 1985 NEUTRINO MASSES AND FAMILY SYMMETRY *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preskill, John

    on the measurement of the electron neutrino mass and on the search for neutrinoless double beta decay (#12

  1. Mass Distributions of Clusters Using Gravitational Magnification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst

    1995-05-03

    Lensing in the context of rich clusters is normally quantified from small image distortions, yielding a relative mass distribution in the limit of weak lensing. Here we show the magnification effect of lensing can also be mapped over a cluster, resulting in absolute mass determinations for the weak limit. Furthermore, given both magnification and distortion measurements, the mass distribution may be constrained in the strong regime. Methods for obtaining the magnification using spectroscopic and/or photometric information are discussed, for object detection within a fixed isophote or to a given flux limit. A map of the magnification around A1689 is constructed from the observed depletion of background red galaxy counts.

  2. Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

  3. The Origins of Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-07-30

    The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

  4. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

    1994-08-16

    The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

  5. The Origins of Mass

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

  6. EFFECTS OF THE NEUTRINO MASS SPLITTING ON THE NONLINEAR MATTER POWER SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Christian; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul [Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-06-20

    We have performed cosmological N-body simulations which include the effect of the masses of the individual neutrino species. The simulations were aimed at studying the effect of different neutrino hierarchies on the matter power spectrum. Compared to the linear theory predictions, we find that nonlinearities enhance the effect of hierarchy on the matter power spectrum at mildly nonlinear scales. The maximum difference between the different hierarchies is about 0.5% for a sum of neutrino masses of 0.1 eV. Albeit this is a small effect, it is potentially measurable from upcoming surveys. In combination with neutrinoless double-{beta} decay experiments, this opens up the possibility of using the sky to determine if neutrinos are Majorana or Dirac fermions.

  7. Effects of the neutrino mass splitting on the non-linear matter power spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Wagner; Licia Verde; Raul Jimenez

    2012-03-23

    We have performed cosmological N-body simulations which include the effect of the masses of the individual neutrino species. The simulations were aimed at studying the effect of different neutrino hierarchies on the matter power spectrum. Compared to the linear theory predictions, we find that non-linearities enhance the effect of hierarchy on the matter power spectrum at mildly non-linear scales. The difference between the different hierarchies is about 0.5% for a sum of neutrino masses of 0.1eV. Albeit this is a small effect, it is potentially measurable from upcoming surveys. In combination with neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments, this opens up the possibility of using the sky to determine if neutrinos are Majorana or Dirac fermions.

  8. Measurement of Higgs boson production in the diphoton decay channel in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A measurement of the production processes of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed in the two-photon final state using 4.5??fb[superscript ?1] of proton-proton collisions data at ?s=7??TeV and 20.3??fb[superscript ...

  9. ON THE DISCREPANCY BETWEEN THEORETICAL AND X-RAY CONCENTRATION-MASS RELATIONS FOR GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasia, E. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Borgani, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Trieste, Sezione di Astronomia, via Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); Ettori, S.; Meneghetti, M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127, Bologna (Italy); Mazzotta, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133, Roma (Italy)

    2013-10-10

    In the past 15 years, the concentration-mass relation has been investigated diffusely in theoretical studies. On the other hand, only recently has this relation been derived from X-ray observations. When that happened, the results caused a certain level of concern: the X-ray normalizations and slopes were found significantly dissimilar from those predicted by theory. We analyzed 52 galaxy clusters and groups, simulated with different descriptions of the physical processes that affect the baryonic component, with the purpose of determining whether these discrepancies are real or induced by biases in the computation of the concentration parameter or in the determination of the selection function of the cluster sample for which the analysis is carried out. In particular, we investigate how the simulated concentration-mass relation depends (1) on the radial range used to derive the concentration; (2) on the presence of baryons in the simulations, and on the effect of star formation and feedback from supernovae and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Finally, we evaluate (3) how the results differ when adopting an X-ray approach for the analysis and (4) how the selection function based on X-ray luminosity can impact the results. All effects studied go in the direction of alleviating the discrepancy between observations and simulations, although with different significance: while the choice of the radial range to fit the profiles and the inclusion of the baryonic component play only a minor role, the X-ray approach to reconstruct the mass profiles and the selection of the cluster sample have a strong impact on the resulting concentration-mass relation. Extending the fit to the most central regions or reducing the fitting radius from the virial boundary to the typical X-ray external radius causes an increase of the normalization in radiative simulations by 5%-10%. In the second case, we measure a slope that is up to twice steeper than that derived by using the typical theoretical radial range. Radiative simulations including only supernova feedback produce 30% higher concentrations than the dark matter case. Such a difference is largely reduced when including the effect of AGN feedback. The concentration-mass relation derived from the X-ray synthetic catalog is significantly steeper due to the combination of several different effects, such as environment, dynamical state and dynamical history of the clusters, bias in mass and temperature measurements, and their dependence on the radius and on the mass of the system. Finally, selecting clusters according to their X-ray luminosity produces a net increase in both normalization and slope of the relation, since at fixed mass, the most luminous clusters are also the most concentrated.

  10. Mass of Ca-36 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tribble, Robert E.; Cossairt, J. D.; Kenefick, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    VIK W C VO I. UMK 15, 5 UMBER 6 Mass of ~Cat R. E. Tribble, ~ J. D. Cossairt, and R. A. Kenefick Cyclotron Institute and Physics Department, Texas AChM University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 14 October 1976) The ' Ca('He, He)' Ca... reaction has been used to provide the first observation of the nuclide ' Ca. The Q value and mass excess were found to be ?57.58~0.04 and ?6.44+0.04 MeV, respectively. The new mass completes four members of the A = 36 isobaric quintet and hence serves...

  11. QCD measurements of vector-boson production with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondrashova, Natalia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    -First Run 2 measurements with vector bosons, i.e W, Z -Run 1 measurements of W and Z/Drell-Yan production cross sections differentially in multi-dimensions and in different mass ranges at 7 and 8 TeV and PDF interpretation -Run 1 measurement of Z transverse momentum and phi* at 8 TeV -Run 1 measurement of Z boson production polarisation at 8 TeV -Run 1 measurements of vector bosons plus jets production cross sections at 8 TeV

  12. Dynamic effective mass of granular media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Valenza; Chaur-Jian Hsu; Rohit Ingale; Nicolas Gland; Hernán A. Makse; David Linton Johnson

    2009-05-08

    We report an experimental and theoretical investigation of the frequency-dependent effective mass, $\\tilde{M}(\\omega)$, of loose granular particles which occupy a rigid cavity to a given filling fraction, the remaining volume being air of differing humidities. This allow us to study the mechanisms of elastic response and attenuation of acoustic modes in granular media. We demonstrate that this is a sensitive and direct way to measure those properties of the granular medium that are the cause of the changes in acoustic properties of structures containing grain-filled cavities. Specifically, we apply this understanding to the case of the flexural resonances of a rectangular bar with a grain-filled cavity within it. The dominant features of $\\tilde{M}(\\omega)$ are a sharp resonance and a broad background, which we analyze within the context of simple models. We find that: a) These systems may be understood in terms of a height-dependent and diameter-dependent effective sound speed ($\\sim 100-300$ m/s) and an effective viscosity ($\\sim 5\\times 10^4$ Poise). b) There is a dynamic Janssen effect in the sense that, at any frequency, and depending on the method of sample preparation, approximately one-half of the effective mass is borne by the side walls of the cavity and one-half by the bottom. c) By performing experiments under varying humidity conditions we conclude that, on a fundamental level, damping of acoustic modes is dominated by adsorbed films of water at grain-grain contacts in our experiments, not by global viscous dampening. d) There is a monotonically increasing effect of humidity on the dampening of the fundamental resonance within the granular medium which translates to a non-monotonic, but predictable, variation of dampening within the grain-loaded bar.

  13. The Ramsey method in high-precision mass spectrometry with Penning traps: Experimental results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. George; K. Blaum; F. Herfurth; A. Herlert; M. Kretzschmar; S. Nagy; S. Schwarz; L. Schweikhard; C. Yazidjian

    2007-01-22

    The highest precision in direct mass measurements is obtained with Penning trap mass spectrometry. Most experiments use the interconversion of the magnetron and cyclotron motional modes of the stored ion due to excitation by external radiofrequency-quadrupole fields. In this work a new excitation scheme, Ramsey's method of time-separated oscillatory fields, has been successfully tested. It has been shown to reduce significantly the uncertainty in the determination of the cyclotron frequency and thus of the ion mass of interest. The theoretical description of the ion motion excited with Ramsey's method in a Penning trap and subsequently the calculation of the resonance line shapes for different excitation times, pulse structures, and detunings of the quadrupole field has been carried out in a quantum mechanical framework and is discussed in detail in the preceding article in this journal by M. Kretzschmar. Here, the new excitation technique has been applied with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN for mass measurements on stable as well as short-lived nuclides. The experimental resonances are in agreement with the theoretical predictions and a precision gain close to a factor of four was achieved compared to the use of the conventional excitation technique.

  14. Heavy Hybrid mesons Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Iddir; L. Semlala

    2006-11-25

    We estimate the ground state masses of the heavy hybrid mesons using a phenomenological QCD-type potential. 0^{- -},1^{- -},0^{- +},1^{- +} and 0^{+ -} J^{PC} states are considered.

  15. Solids mass flow determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Macko, Joseph E. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  16. Neutron Majorana mass from Exotic Instantons in a Pati-Salam model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Addazi; Massimo Bianchi

    2015-02-27

    We show how exotic stringy instantons can generate an effective interaction between color diquark sextets in a Pati-Salam model, inducing a Majorana mass term for the neutron. In particular, we discuss a simple quiver theory for a Pati-Salam like model, as an example in which the calculations of exotic instantons' effects are simple and controllable. We discuss some different possibilities in order to generate $n-\\bar{n}$ oscillation testable in the next generation of experiments, Majorana mass matrices for neutrini and a Post-Sphaleron Baryogenesis scenario. Connections with Dark Matter issues and the Higgs mass Hierarchy problem are discussed, in view of implications for LHC and rare processes physics. The model may be viewed as a completion of Left-Right symmetry, alternative to a GUT-inspired scenario. Combined measures in Neutron-Antineutron physics, FCNC, LHC, Dark Matter could rule out the proposed model or uncover aspects of physics at the Planck scale!

  17. An Axial Vector Nature of a Neutrino with an Electroweak Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasulkhozha S. Sharafiddinov

    2011-11-09

    A classification of elementary particles with respect to C-operation admits the existence of truly neutral types of fermions. Among them one can find both a Dirac and a Majorana neutrinos of an electroweak nature. Their mass includes the electric and weak parts, in the presence of which a neutrino has the anapole charge, charge radius and electric dipole moment. They constitute the paraneutrino of true neutrality, for example, at the neutrino interaction with a spinless nucleus of an axial-vector current. We derive the united equations which relate the structural components of mass to anapole, charge radius and electric dipole of each truly neutral neutrino at the level of flavour symmetry. Such a principle can explain the C-noninvariant nature of neutrinos and fields in the framework of constancy law of the size implied from the multiplication of a weak mass of the C-odd neutrino by its electric mass. From this point of view, all neutrinos of C-antisymmetricality regardless of the difference in masses of an axial-vector character, possess the same anapole with his radius as well as the identical electric dipole. Their analysis together with earlier measurements of an electric dipole moment of neutrino gives the right to accept not only the existence of truly neutral types of Dirac neutrinos and fields but also the availability of mass structure in them as the one of experimentally established facts.

  18. Probing the Absolute Mass Scale of Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. Joseph A. Formaggio

    2011-10-12

    The experimental efforts of the Neutrino Physics Group at MIT center primarily around the exploration of neutrino mass and its significance within the context of nuclear physics, particle physics, and cosmology. The group has played a prominent role in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, a neutrino experiment dedicated to measure neutrino oscillations from 8B neutrinos created in the sun. The group is now focusing its efforts in the measurement of the neutrino mass directly via the use of tritium beta decay. The MIT group has primary responsibilities in the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino mass experiment, expected to begin data taking by 2013. Specifically, the MIT group is responsible for the design and development of the global Monte Carlo framework to be used by the KATRIN collaboration, as well as responsibilities directly associated with the construction of the focal plane detector. In addition, the MIT group is sponsoring a new research endeavor for neutrino mass measurements, known as Project 8, to push beyond the limitations of current neutrino mass experiments.

  19. Inference on gravitational waves from coalescences of stellar-mass compact objects and intermediate-mass black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haster, Carl-Johan; Berry, Christopher P L; Stevenson, Simon; Veitch, John; Mandel, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescences of neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes into intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) of $\\gtrsim 100$ solar masses represent one of the exciting possible sources for advanced gravitational-wave detectors. These sources can provide definitive evidence for the existence of IMBHs, probe globular-cluster dynamics, and potentially serve as tests of general relativity. We analyse the accuracy with which we can measure the masses and spins of the IMBH and its companion in intermediate-mass ratio coalescences. We find that we can identify an IMBH with a mass above $100 ~ M_\\odot$ with $95\\%$ confidence provided the massive body exceeds $130 ~ M_\\odot$. For source masses above $\\sim200 ~ M_\\odot$, the best measured parameter is the frequency of the quasi-normal ringdown. Consequently, the total mass is measured better than the chirp mass for massive binaries, but the total mass is still partly degenerate with spin, which cannot be accurately measured. Low-frequency detector sen...

  20. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Cross Section in the Lepton Plus Jets Final State in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 TeV Using the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Zhenbin

    2012-01-01

    We present a measurement of the single top quark cross section in the lepton plus jets final state using an integrated luminosity corresponding to 7.5~\\text{fb}^{-1} of p\\bar p collision data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The single top candidate events are identified by the signature of a charged lepton, large missing transverse energy, and two or three jets with at least one of them identified as originating from a bottom quark. A new Monte Carlo generator \\textsc{powheg} is used to model the single top quark production processes, which include {s}-channel, {t}-channel, and {Wt}-channel. A neural network multivariate method is exploited to discriminate the single top quark signal from the comparatively large backgrounds. We measure a single top production cross section of $3.04^{+0.57}_{-0.53}$ (\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.}) pb assuming $m_{\\rm top}=172.5$~GeV/$c^2$. In addition, we extract the CKM matrix element value $|V_{tb}|=0.96\\pm 0.09~(\\mathrm{stat.~+~syst.})\\pm 0.05~(\\mathrm{theory})$ and set a lower limit of |V_{tb}|>0.78 at the 95\\% credibility level.

  1. Mass and Isospin Effects in Multifragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sfienti; the ALADiN2000 Collaboration

    2004-10-29

    A systematic study of isospin effects in the breakup of projectile spectators at relativistic energies has been performed with the ALADiN spectrometer at the GSI laboratory (Darmstadt). Four different projectiles 197Au, 124La, 124Sn and 107Sn, all with an incident energy of 600 AMeV, have been used, thus allowing a study of various combinations of masses and N/Z ratios in the entrance channel. The measurement of the momentum vector and of the charge of all projectile fragments with Z>1 entering the acceptance of the ALADiN magnet has been performed with the high efficiency and resolution achieved with the TP-MUSIC IV detector. The Rise and Fall behavior of the mean multiplicity of IMFs as a function of Zbound and its dependence on the isotopic composition has been determined for the studied systems. Other observables investigated so far include mean N/Z values of the emitted light fragments and neutron multiplicities. Qualitative agreement has been obtained between the observed gross properties and the predictions of the Statistical Multifragmentation Model.

  2. Neutrino mass limits: robust information from the power spectrum of galaxy surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio J. Cuesta; Viviana Niro; Licia Verde

    2015-11-18

    We present cosmological upper limits on the sum of active neutrino masses using large-scale power spectrum data from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey and from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) sample of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG). Combining measurements on the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarisation anisotropies by the Planck satellite together with WiggleZ power spectrum results in a neutrino mass bound of 0.43 eV at 95% C.L., while replacing WiggleZ by the SDSS-DR7 LRG power spectrum, the 95% C.L. bound on the sum of neutrino masses improves to 0.17 eV. Adding Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) distance scale measurements, the neutrino mass upper limits greatly improve, since BAO data break degeneracies in parameter space. Within a $\\Lambda$CDM model, we find an upper limit of 0.11 eV (0.15 eV) at 95% C.L., when using SDSS-DR7 LRG (WiggleZ) together with BAO and Planck. The addition of BAO data makes the neutrino mass upper limit robust, showing only a weak dependence on the power spectrum used. We also quantify the dependence of neutrino mass limit reported here on the CMB lensing information. The tighter upper limit (0.11 eV) obtained with SDSS-DR7 LRG is very close to that recently obtained using Lyman-alpha clustering data, yet uses a completely different probe and redshift range, further supporting the robustness of the constraint. This constraint puts under some pressure the inverted mass hierarchy and favours the normal hierarchy.

  3. Double beta decay and neutrino mass models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helo, J C; Ota, T; Santos, F A Pereira dos

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay allows to constrain lepton number violating extensions of the standard model. If neutrinos are Majorana particles, the mass mechanism will always contribute to the decay rate, however, it is not a priori guaranteed to be the dominant contribution in all models. Here, we discuss whether the mass mechanism dominates or not from the theory point of view. We classify all possible (scalar-mediated) short-range contributions to the decay rate according to the loop level, at which the corresponding models will generate Majorana neutrino masses, and discuss the expected relative size of the different contributions to the decay rate in each class. We also work out the phenomenology of one concrete 2-loop model in which both, mass mechanism and short-range diagram, might lead to competitive contributions, in some detail.

  4. Photon: history, mass, charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. B. Okun

    2006-02-13

    The talk consists of three parts. ``History'' briefly describes the emergence and evolution of the concept of photon during the first two decades of the 20th century. ``Mass'' gives a short review of the literature on the upper limit of the photon's mass. ``Charge'' is a critical discussion of the existing interpretation of searches for photon charge. Schemes, in which all photons are charged, are grossly inconsistent. A model with three kinds of photons (positive, negative and neutral) seems at first sight to be more consistent, but turns out to have its own serious problems.

  5. Static-light meson masses from twisted mass lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Static-light meson masses from twisted mass lattice QCD Karl Jansen, Chris Michael, Andrea Shindler of Groningen. · Spain: University of Valencia. · Switzerland: University of Bern. Marc Wagner, "Static-light meson masses from twisted mass lattice QCD", July 16, 2008 #12;Introduction · Static-light meson

  6. Gravitational `Convergence' and Cluster Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst

    1995-12-01

    Two colour photometry of the cluster A1689 reveals a `relative magnification-bias' between lensed blue and red background galaxies, arising from a dependence of the faint galaxy count-slope on colour. The colour distribution is skewed blueward of the far field, allowing us to measure the cluster magnification and to understand the notorious blueness of large arcs. We show that the magnification information can be combined with the usual image distortion measurements to isolate the local `convergence' component of lensing and hence derive the projected mass. This is achieved through a simple local relation between the convergence and the observables, which can be applied generally over the surface a cluster. In the weak lensing limit, the convergence reduces to a dependence on the magnification alone, so that in the outskirts of clusters the surface-density of matter is obtained directly from the surface-density of background galaxies. Hence, useful lensing work requires colour information but not necessarily good seeing. Interestingly, convergence varies slowly at high redshift, saturating at a level depending on the Horizon distance, allowing a useful model-independent measurement of the Global Geometry.

  7. The study of light nuclei production in different interactions at 4.2 AGeV/c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamal Hussain Khan; M. K. Suleymanov; M. Ajaz; Ali Zaman

    2015-09-01

    Average multiplicity of light nuclei produced in different interactions at 4.2A GeVc is studied as a function of centrality. A change in multiplicity is observed with increase in the mass of projectile. In 12CC-interactions an unexpected increase in the multiplicity is seen for the most central events. These measurements are compared with the predictions of Cascade and Fritiof Models which fail to account for the experimentally observed effects. In case of 12CC it is suggested that the inclusion of nuclear coalescence effect can be an explanatory reason for the differences between the experimental measurements and the models predictions.

  8. Engineering rock mass classifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a reference on rock mass classification, consolidating into one handy source information widely scattered through the literature. Includes new, unpublished material and case histories. Presents the fundamental concepts of classification schemes and critically appraises their practical application in industrial projects such as tunneling and mining.

  9. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  10. Analytical mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  11. Deuterium Pellet Mass Redistribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budny, Robert

    Deuterium Pellet Mass Redistribution G L Schmidt, S Jardin, E Fredrickson, G Taylor P2.10P2 ·Pellets of solid hydrogen are used routinely for plasma fuelling and perturbation studies in tokamak discharges.[1]. ·The pellet source function determines to a large extent the pellet's effectiveness either

  12. Residential Thermal Mass Construction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thieken, J. S.

    1988-01-01

    The southwest has long known the value of building homes with high mass materials. The ancient Pueblo Indians found that by using "adobe" they could capture the energy necessary to survive the harsh desert climate. Our ancestors knew that a heavy...

  13. Abstract: Measurement of the number density evolution of galaxy clusters directly probes cosmological structure growth and has been identified as one of the most promising tools for Dark Energy studies. Achieving the sensitivity for distinguishing differe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boehringer, Hans

    Using Distant X-ray Luminous Galaxy Clusters as Dark Energy Probes The XMM-Newton Distant Cluster cosmological structure growth and has been identified as one of the most promising tools for Dark Energy studies. Achieving the sensitivity for distinguishing different Dark Energy scenarios rests largely

  14. Mass and Angular Momentum of Sgr A*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2004-10-13

    For very fast spinning black holes with a>0.9953 the orbital velocity of a test particle unexpectly shows a positive radial gradient for low orbits, an effect of GR which has been overlooked so far. For a=0.99616 the maximum radial change of the orbital velocity equals the radial epicyclic frequency, which in turn is in a 1:3 resonance with the vertical epicyclic frequency. Application to Sgr A* using the quasi-periodic oscillations recently measured suggest that the mass of Sgr A* is 3.28 +/- 0.13 million solar masses.

  15. Measurement of the correlation between flow harmonics of different order in lead-lead collisions at ?sNN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-14

    Correlations between the elliptic or triangular flow coefficients vm (m=2 or 3) and other flow harmonics vn (n=2 to 5) are measured using ?sNN=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collision data collected in 2010 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7 ?b-1. The vm-vn correlations are measured in midrapidity as a function of centrality, and, for events within the same centrality interval, as a function of event ellipticity or triangularity defined in a forward rapidity region. For events within the same centrality interval, v3 is found to be anticorrelated with v2 and this anticorrelation is consistentmore »with similar anticorrelations between the corresponding eccentricities, ?2 and ?3. However, it is observed that v4 increases strongly with v2, and v5 increases strongly with both v2 and v3. The trend and strength of the vm-vn correlations for n=4 and 5 are found to disagree with ?m-?n correlations predicted by initial-geometry models. Instead, these correlations are found to be consistent with the combined effects of a linear contribution to vn and a nonlinear term that is a function of v22 or of v2v3, as predicted by hydrodynamic models. A simple two-component fit is used to separate these two contributions. The extracted linear and nonlinear contributions to v4 and v5 are found to be consistent with previously measured event-plane correlations.« less

  16. Measurement of the correlation between flow harmonics of different order in lead-lead collisions at ?sNN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-14

    Correlations between the elliptic or triangular flow coefficients vm (m=2 or 3) and other flow harmonics vn (n=2 to 5) are measured using ?sNN=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collision data collected in 2010 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7 ?b-1. The vm-vn correlations are measured in midrapidity as a function of centrality, and, for events within the same centrality interval, as a function of event ellipticity or triangularity defined in a forward rapidity region. For events within the same centrality interval, v3 is found to be anticorrelated with v2 and this anticorrelation is consistent with similar anticorrelations between the corresponding eccentricities, ?2 and ?3. However, it is observed that v4 increases strongly with v2, and v5 increases strongly with both v2 and v3. The trend and strength of the vm-vn correlations for n=4 and 5 are found to disagree with ?m-?n correlations predicted by initial-geometry models. Instead, these correlations are found to be consistent with the combined effects of a linear contribution to vn and a nonlinear term that is a function of v22 or of v2v3, as predicted by hydrodynamic models. A simple two-component fit is used to separate these two contributions. The extracted linear and nonlinear contributions to v4 and v5 are found to be consistent with previously measured event-plane correlations.

  17. Twisted mass finite volume effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Wenger, Urs; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2010-08-01

    We calculate finite-volume effects on the pion masses and decay constant in twisted mass lattice QCD at finite lattice spacing. We show that the lighter neutral pion in twisted mass lattice QCD gives rise to finite-volume effects that are exponentially enhanced when compared to those arising from the heavier charged pions. We demonstrate that the recent two flavor twisted mass lattice data can be better fitted when twisted mass effects in finite-volume corrections are taken into account.

  18. Gluon correlations from a glasma flux-tube model compared to measured hadron correlations on transverse momentum (pt,pt) and angular differences (??,??)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainor, Thomas A.; Ray, R. L.

    2011-09-09

    A glasma flux-tube model has been proposed to explain strong elongation on pseudorapidity ? of the same-side two-dimensional (2D) peak in minimum-bias angular correlations from ?(sNN)=200 GeV Au-Au collisions. The same-side peak or “soft ridge” is said to arise from coupling of flux tubes to radial flow whereby gluons radiated transversely from flux tubes are boosted by radial flow to form a narrow structure or ridge on azimuth. In this study we test the theory conjecture by comparing measurements to predictions for particle production, spectra, and correlations from the glasma model and from conventional fragmentation processes. We conclude that the glasma model is contradicted by measured hadron yields, spectra, and correlations, whereas a two-component model of hadron production, including minimum-bias parton fragmentation, provides a quantitative description of most features of the data, although ? elongation of the same-side 2D peak remains undescribed.

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry program at the University of Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farwell, G.W.; Leach, D.D.; Grootes, P.M.; Schmidt, F.H.

    1984-04-10

    The University uses an FN-Tandem for /sup 14/C and /sup 10/Be measurements. Three main problems for accelerator-mass-spectrometry are normalization, stability, and sample preparation. The approach to these problems is discussed. (GHT)

  20. Top quark mass and properties at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -F. Arguin; for the CDF; D0 Collaborations

    2005-07-29

    We present recent analyses of top quark properties performed at Run II of the Tevatron. Measurements of the top quark mass, branching ratios and W boson helicity inside top quark decays are covered.

  1. Nanoscale mass conveyors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Regan, Brian C. (Oakland, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA)

    2008-03-11

    A mass transport method and device for individually delivering chargeable atoms or molecules from source particles is disclosed. It comprises a channel; at least one source particle of chargeable material fixed to the surface of the channel at a position along its length; a means of heating the channel; and a means for applying an controllable electric field along the channel, whereby the device transports the atoms or molecules along the channel in response to applied electric field. In a preferred embodiment, the mass transport device will comprise a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT), although other one dimensional structures may also be used. The MWNT or other structure acts as a channel for individual or small collections of atoms due to the atomic smoothness of the material. Also preferred is a source particle of a metal such as indium. The particles move by dissociation into small units, in some cases, individual atoms. The particles are preferably less than 100 nm in size.

  2. HIGEE Mass Transfer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, R. J.; Fowler, R.

    1986-01-01

    compared with other more conventional mass transfer equipment, will show up to advantage at reasonably large capacity but compare poorly for low capacity duties. (3) Capacity and separation capability (i.e. number of stages) in a HIGEE... are not independent variables, because diameter features in both. If the casing dimensions, OD and axial length, are arbitrarily fixed; then for a duty requiring a large number of stages the packing thickness will be greater and the ID correspondingly smaller...

  3. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  4. Radiative Gaugino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar; Antonio Masiero

    1995-01-12

    We investigate the possibility that gauginos are massless at tree level and that the U(1) R-invariance is broken spontaneously by Higgs vevs, like the chiral symmetry of quarks in the standard model, or else explicitly by dimension 2 or 3 SUSY-breaking terms in the low energy effective Lagrangian. Gluino and lightest neutralino masses then depend on only a few parameters. For a SUSY-breaking scale <~ 400 GeV, the gluino and lightest neutralino have masses typically in the range 1/10 ~ 2 1/2 GeV. On the other hand, for a SUSY-breaking scale several TeV or larger, radiative contributions can yield gluino and lightest neutralino masses of O(50-300) GeV and O(10-30) GeV, respectively. As long as the Higgs vev is the only source of R-invariance breaking, or if SUSY breaking only appears in dimension 2 terms in the effective Lagrangian, the gluino is generically the lightest SUSY particle, modifying the usual phenomenology in interesting ways.

  5. INFLUENCE OF MASS ON DISPLACEMENT THRESHOLD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, A.; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-12-30

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the effect of mass on displacement threshold energy in Cr, Mo, Fe and W. For each interatomic potential, the mass of the atoms is varied among those metals for a total of 16 combinations. The average threshold energy over all crystal directions is calculated within the irreducible crystal directions using appropriate weighting factors. The weighting factors account for the different number of equivalent directions among the grid points and the different solid angle coverage of each grid point. The grid points are constructed with a Miller index increment of 1/24 for a total of 325 points. For each direction, 10 simulations each with a different primary-knock-on atom are performed. The results show that for each interatomic potential, the average threshold energy is insensitive to the mass; i.e., the values are the same within the standard error. In the future, the effect of mass on high-energy cascades for a given interatomic potential will be investigated.

  6. Relativistic electromagnetic mass models in spherically symmetric spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K. Maurya; Y. K. Gupta; Saibal Ray; Vikram Chatterjee

    2015-07-04

    Under the static spherically symmetric Einstein-Maxwell spacetime of embedding class one we explore possibility of electromagnetic mass model where mass and other physical parameters have purely electromagnetic origin (Tiwari 1984, Gautreau 1985, Gron 1985). This work is in continuation of our earlier investigation (Maurya 2015a) where we developed an algorithm and found out three new solutions of electromagnetic mass models. In the present letter we consider different metric potentials $\

  7. Precision Electroweak Measurements on the Z Presonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleph,Delphi,L3,Opal,SLD , Collaborations

    2005-09-08

    The authors report on the final electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the Z resonance by the experiments operating at the electron-positron colliders SLC and LEP. the data consist of 17 million Z decays accumulated by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP, and 600 thousand Z decays by the SLD experiment using a polarized beam at SLC. The measurements include cross-sections, forward-backward asymmetries and polarized asymmetries. The mass and width of the Z boson, m{sub Z} and {Lambda}{sub Z}, and its couplings to fermions, for example the {rho} parameter and the effective electroweak mixing angle for leptons, are precisely measured: m{sub Z} = 91.1875 {+-} 0.0021 GeV; {Lambda}{sub Z} = 2.4952 {+-} 0.0023 GeV; {rho}{sub {ell}} = 1.0050 {+-} 0.0010; sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup lept} = 0.23153 {+-} 0.00016. The number of light neutrino species is determined to be 2.9840 {+-} 0.0082, in agreement with the three observed generations of fundamental fermions. The results are compared to the predictions of the Standard Model. At the Z-pole, electroweak radiative corrections beyond the running of the QED and QCD coupling constants are observed with a significance of five standard deviations, and in agreement with the Standard Model. of the many Z-pole measurements, the forward-backward asymmetry in b-quark production shows the largest difference with respect to its Standard Model expectation, at the level of 2.8 standard deviations. Through radiative corrections evaluated in the framework of the Standard Model, the Z-pole data are also used to predict the mass of the top quark, m{sub t} = 173{sub -10}{sup +13} GeV, and the mass of the W boson, m{sub W} = 80.363 {+-} 0.032 GeV. These indirect constraints are compared to the direct measurements, providing a stringent test of the Standard Model. Using in addition the direct measurements of m{sub t} and m{sub W}, the mass of the as yet unobserved Standard Model Higgs boson is predicted with a relative uncertainty of about 50% and found to be less than 285 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  8. Method for increasing the dynamic range of mass spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Mikhail; Smith, Richard D.; Udseth, Harold R.

    2004-09-07

    A method for enhancing the dynamic range of a mass spectrometer by first passing a sample of ions through the mass spectrometer having a quadrupole ion filter, whereupon the intensities of the mass spectrum of the sample are measured. From the mass spectrum, ions within this sample are then identified for subsequent ejection. As further sampling introduces more ions into the mass spectrometer, the appropriate rf voltages are applied to a quadrupole ion filter, thereby selectively ejecting the undesired ions previously identified. In this manner, the desired ions may be collected for longer periods of time in an ion trap, thus allowing better collection and subsequent analysis of the desired ions. The ion trap used for accumulation may be the same ion trap used for mass analysis, in which case the mass analysis is performed directly, or it may be an intermediate trap. In the case where collection is an intermediate trap, the desired ions are accumulated in the intermediate trap, and then transferred to a separate mass analyzer. The present invention finds particular utility where the mass analysis is performed in an ion trap mass spectrometer or a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

  9. THE MASS OF KOI-94d AND A RELATION FOR PLANET RADIUS, MASS, AND INCIDENT FLUX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Lauren M.

    We measure the mass of a modestly irradiated giant planet, KOI-94d. We wish to determine whether this planet, which is in a 22 day orbit and receives 2700 times as much incident flux as Jupiter, is as dense as Jupiter or ...

  10. The Average Mass Profile of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Carlberg; H. K. C. Yee; E. Ellingson; S. L. Morris; R. Abraham; P. Gravel; C. J. Pritchet; T. Smecker-Hane; F. D. A. Hartwick; J. E. Hesser; J. B. Hutchings; J. B. Oke

    1997-05-23

    The average mass density profile measured in the CNOC cluster survey is well described with the analytic form rho(r)=A/[r(r+a_rho)^2], as advocated on the basis on n-body simulations by Navarro, Frenk & White. The predicted core radii are a_rho=0.20 (in units of the radius where the mean interior density is 200 times the critical density) for an Omega=0.2 open CDM model, or a_rho=0.26 for a flat Omega=0.2 model, with little dependence on other cosmological parameters for simulations normalized to the observed cluster abundance. The dynamically derived local mass-to-light ratio, which has little radial variation, converts the observed light profile to a mass profile. We find that the scale radius of the mass distribution, 0.20<= a_rho <= 0.30 (depending on modeling details, with a 95% confidence range of 0.12-0.50), is completely consistent with the predicted values. Moreover, the profiles and total masses of the clusters as individuals can be acceptably predicted from the cluster RMS line-of-sight velocity dispersion alone. This is strong support of the hierarchical clustering theory for the formation of galaxy clusters in a cool, collisionless, dark matter dominated universe.

  11. Heat and mass exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

    2011-06-28

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  12. Heat and mass exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

    2007-09-18

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  13. Matching Hagedorn mass spectrum with Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Pok Man; Redlich, Krzysztof; Sasaki, Chihiro

    2015-01-01

    Based on recent Lattice QCD (LQCD) results obtained at finite temperature, we discuss modeling of the hadronic phase of QCD in the framework of Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) with discrete and continuous mass spectra. We focus on fluctuations of conserved charges, and show how a common limiting temperature can be used to constrain the Hagedorn exponential mass spectrum in different sectors of quantum number, through a matching of HRG and LQCD. For strange baryons, the extracted spectra are found to be consistent with all known and expected states listed by the Particle Data Group (PDG). The strange-mesonic sector, however, requires additional states in the intermediate mass range beyond that embodied in the database.

  14. Matching Hagedorn mass spectrum with Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pok Man Lo; Micha? Marczenko; Krzysztof Redlich; Chihiro Sasaki

    2015-07-23

    Based on recent Lattice QCD (LQCD) results obtained at finite temperature, we discuss modeling of the hadronic phase of QCD in the framework of Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) with discrete and continuous mass spectra. We focus on fluctuations of conserved charges, and show how a common limiting temperature can be used to constrain the Hagedorn exponential mass spectrum in different sectors of quantum number, through a matching of HRG and LQCD. For strange baryons, the extracted spectra are found to be consistent with all known and expected states listed by the Particle Data Group (PDG). The strange-mesonic sector, however, requires additional states in the intermediate mass range beyond that embodied in the database.

  15. FERMILABPUB95/0351995 Measurement of the W Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    . Campagnari, 7 M. Campbell, 16 A. Caner, 7 W. Carithers, 14 D. Carlsmith, 33 A. Castro, 20 Y. Cen, 21 F

  16. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass Kirsten Anne Tollefson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    energy physics under the direction of Professor Paul Tipton, and received the Master of Arts degree about the wilder side of life, to Phil for teaching me the proper english language usage of the word school. This thesis builds upon and incorporates work done by many other physicists. I would like

  17. Bacterial Abundance Measure bacterial numbers and mass per unit volume.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    at all). Basic method: · Aseptically collect and filter water onto sterile filter. · Place filter-methylene blue dye) · Incubate filter at 40ºC (or higher) · Count colonies to determine colonies/100 ml water EPA for isolation or water testing, such as coliform test. 9 ml 100 #12;Dilution Plate Calculations N: Number

  18. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass by Dynamical Likelihood Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    of Energy and National Science Foundation; the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; the Swiss National Science Program in Physics) Submitted in partial ful#12;llment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor

  19. Experiments for the Measurement of LNG Mass Burning Rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera Gomez, Lady Carolina

    2012-07-16

    Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) is a commonly used flammable fuel that has safety concerns associated with vapor dispersion and radiation emitted from pool fires. The main objective of this effort is to advance the knowledge of pool fires and to expand...

  20. Acceleraor Mass Spectrometric Measurements on Foraminifera from deep ocean sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1992-01-01

    Amino Acids From Collagen Demineralization We subsequentlystops. During demineralization, some of the collagen fibersis too high or demineralization time is too long (Longin

  1. Tau Lepton Mass Measurements (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback SystemGimbaled X-Ray HeadSTRATIFICATION(JournalConnect

  2. Measurements of Low-Enriched Uranium Holdup.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belian, A. P. (Anthony P.); Reilly, T. D. (T. Douglas); Russo, P. A. (Phyllis A.); Tobin, S. J. (Stephen J.)

    2005-01-01

    A recent effort determined uranium holdup at a large fuel fabrication facility abroad where low enriched ({approx} 3%) uranium (LEU) oxide feeds the pellet manufacturing process. Measurements taken with both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry systems include extensive data for the ventilation and vacuum systems. Equipment dimensions and the corresponding holdup deposit masses are large for LEU. Because deposits are infinitely thick to the 186 keV gamma ray in many locations in an LEU environment, measurements of both the 186 and 1001 keV gamma-rays were required, and self-attenuation was significant at 1001 keV in many cases. These wide-dynamic-range measruements used short count times, portable scintillator detectors, and portable MCAs. Because equipment is elevated above floor levels, most measurements were made with detectors mounted on extended telescoping poles. One of the main goals of this effort was to demonstrate and validate methods for measurement and quantitative analysis of LEU holdup using low-resolution detectors and the Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) techniques. The current GGH approach is applied elsewhere for holdup measurements of plutonium and high-enriched uranium. The recent experience is directly applicable to holdup measruements at LEU facilities such as the Paducah and Portmouth gaseous diffusion enrichment plants and elsewhere, including LEU sites where D and D is active. This report discusses the measurement methodology, calibration of the measurement equipment, measurement control, analysis of the data, and the global and local assay results including random and systematic uncertainties. It includes field-validation exercises (multiple calibrated systems that perform measruements on the same extended equipment) as well as quantitative validation results obtained on reference materials assembled to emulate the deposits in an extended vacuum line that was also measured by these techniques. The paper examines the differences in assay results between the low-resolution system using the GGH method and the high-resolution system utilizing the commercially available ISOCS analysis method.

  3. Quark masses, the Dashen phase, and gauge field topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creutz, Michael

    2013-12-15

    The CP violating Dashen phase in QCD is predicted by chiral perturbation theory to occur when the up–down quark mass difference becomes sufficiently large at fixed down-quark mass. Before reaching this phase, all physical hadronic masses and scattering amplitudes are expected to behave smoothly with the up-quark mass, even as this mass passes through zero. In Euclidean space, the topological susceptibility of the gauge fields is positive at positive quark masses but diverges to negative infinity as the Dashen phase is approached. A zero in this susceptibility provides a tentative signal for the point where the mass of the up quark vanishes. I discuss potential ambiguities with this determination. -- Highlights: •The CP violating Dashen phase in QCD occurs when the up quark mass becomes sufficiently negative. •Before reaching this phase, all physical hadronic masses and scattering amplitudes behave smoothly with the up-quark mass. •The topological susceptibility of the gauge fields diverges to negative infinity as the Dashen phase is approached. •A zero in the topological susceptibility provides a tentative signal for the point where the mass of the up quark vanishes. •The universality of this definition remains unproven. Potential ambiguities are discussed.

  4. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    In this proceedings I review the physics that future experiments will use to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  5. Peak mass and dynamical friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo; M. Gambera

    1995-06-09

    We show how the results given by several authors relatively to the mass of a density peak are changed when small scale substructure induced by dynamical friction are taken into account. The peak mass obtained is compared to the result of Peacock \\& Heavens (1990) and to the peak mass when dynamical friction is absent to show how these effects conspire to reduce the mass accreted by the peak.

  6. Energy Grasses for the Masses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1-D: The Pitch Energy Grasses for the Masses Jason Force, Chief Executive Officer, Iron Goat Technology, Inc.

  7. SU-E-I-62: Assessing Radiation Dose Reduction and CT Image Optimization Through the Measurement and Analysis of the Detector Quantum Efficiency (DQE) of CT Images Using Different Beam Hardening Filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collier, J; Aldoohan, S; Gill, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Reducing patient dose while maintaining (or even improving) image quality is one of the foremost goals in CT imaging. To this end, we consider the feasibility of optimizing CT scan protocols in conjunction with the application of different beam-hardening filtrations and assess this augmentation through noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detector quantum efficiency (DQE) analysis. Methods: American College of Radiology (ACR) and Catphan phantoms (The Phantom Laboratory) were scanned with a 64 slice CT scanner when additional filtration of thickness and composition (e.g., copper, nickel, tantalum, titanium, and tungsten) had been applied. A MATLAB-based code was employed to calculate the image of noise NPS. The Catphan Image Owl software suite was then used to compute the modulated transfer function (MTF) responses of the scanner. The DQE for each additional filter, including the inherent filtration, was then computed from these values. Finally, CT dose index (CTDIvol) values were obtained for each applied filtration through the use of a 100 mm pencil ionization chamber and CT dose phantom. Results: NPS, MTF, and DQE values were computed for each applied filtration and compared to the reference case of inherent beam-hardening filtration only. Results showed that the NPS values were reduced between 5 and 12% compared to inherent filtration case. Additionally, CTDIvol values were reduced between 15 and 27% depending on the composition of filtration applied. However, no noticeable changes in image contrast-to-noise ratios were noted. Conclusion: The reduction in the quanta noise section of the NPS profile found in this phantom-based study is encouraging. The reduction in both noise and dose through the application of beam-hardening filters is reflected in our phantom image quality. However, further investigation is needed to ascertain the applicability of this approach to reducing patient dose while maintaining diagnostically acceptable image qualities in a clinical setting.

  8. Mass transfer effects in a gasification riser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breault, Ronald W [U.S. DOE; Li, Tingwen [URS; Nicoletti, Phillip [URS

    2013-01-01

    In the development of multiphase reacting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, a number of simplifications were incorporated into the codes and models. One of these simplifications was the use of a simplistic mass transfer correlation for the faster reactions and omission of mass transfer effects completely on the moderate speed and slow speed reactions such as those in a fluidized bed gasifier. Another problem that has propagated is that the mass transfer correlation used in the codes is not universal and is being used far from its developed bubbling fluidized bed regime when applied to circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser reactors. These problems are true for the major CFD codes. To alleviate this problem, a mechanistic based mass transfer coefficient algorithm has been developed based upon an earlier work by Breault et al. This fundamental approach uses the local hydrodynamics to predict a local, time varying mass transfer coefficient. The predicted mass transfer coefficients and the corresponding Sherwood numbers agree well with literature data and are typically about an order of magnitude lower than the correlation noted above. The incorporation of the new mass transfer model gives the expected behavior for all the gasification reactions evaluated in the paper. At the expected and typical design values for the solid flow rate in a CFB riser gasifier an ANOVA analysis has shown the predictions from the new code to be significantly different from the original code predictions. The new algorithm should be used such that the conversions are not over predicted. Additionally, its behaviors with changes in solid flow rate are consistent with the changes in the hydrodynamics.

  9. Orbital masses of nearby luminous galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kudrya, Yuri N. E-mail: yukudrya@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    We use observational properties of galaxies accumulated in the Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog to derive a dark matter mass of luminous galaxies via motions of their companions. The data on orbital-to-stellar mass ratio are presented for 15 luminous galaxies situated within 11 Mpc from us: the Milky Way, M31, M81, NGC 5128, IC342, NGC 253, NGC 4736, NGC 5236, NGC 6946, M101, NGC 4258, NGC 4594, NGC 3115, NGC 3627, and NGC 3368, as well as for a composite suite around other nearby galaxies of moderate and low luminosity. The typical ratio for these galaxies is M {sub orb}/M {sub *} = 31, corresponding to the mean local density of matter ? {sub m} = 0.09, i.e., one-third of the global cosmic density. This quantity seems to be rather an upper limit of dark matter density, since the peripheric population of the suites may suffer from the presence of fictitious unbound members. We note that the Milky Way and M31 halos have lower dimensions and lower stellar masses than those of the other 13 nearby luminous galaxies. However, the dark-to-stellar mass ratio for both the Milky Way and M31 is typical for other neighboring luminous galaxies. The distortion in the Hubble flow, observed around the Local Group and five other neighboring groups, yields their total masses within the radius of a zero velocity surface, R {sub 0}; these masses are slightly lower than the orbital and virial values. This difference may be due to the effect of dark energy producing a kind of 'mass defect' within R {sub 0}.

  10. Effective Majorana Mass and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Benato

    2015-10-05

    The probability distribution for the effective Majorana mass as a function of the lightest neutrino mass in the standard three neutrino scheme is computed via a random sampling from the distributions of the involved mixing angles and squared mass diffences. A flat distribution in the [0,2pi] range for the Majorana phases is assumed, and the dependence of small values of the effective mass on the Majorana phases is highlighted. The study is then extended with the addition of the cosmological bound on the sum of the neutrino masses. Finally, the prospects for neutrinoless double beta decay search with 76Ge, 130Te and 136Xe are discussed, as well as those for the measurement of the electron neutrino mass.

  11. Effective Majorana Mass and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benato, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The probability distribution for the effective Majorana mass as a function of the lightest neutrino mass in the standard three neutrino scheme is computed via a random sampling from the distributions of the involved mixing angles and squared mass diffences. A flat distribution in the [0,2pi] range for the Majorana phases is assumed, and the dependence of small values of the effective mass on the Majorana phases is highlighted. The study is then extended with the addition of the cosmological bound on the sum of the neutrino masses. Finally, the prospects for neutrinoless double beta decay search with 76Ge, 130Te and 136Xe are discussed, as well as those for the measurement of the electron neutrino mass.

  12. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuszewski, Michel G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector.

  13. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuszewski, M.G.

    1997-07-22

    A mass spectrometer and methods are disclosed for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector. 7 figs.

  14. A laser and molecular beam mass spectrometer study of low-pressure dimethyl ether flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew McIlroy; Toby D. Hain; Hope A. Michelsen; Terrill A. Cool

    2000-12-15

    The oxidation of dimethyl ether (DME) is studied in low-pressure flames using new molecular beam mass spectrometer and laser diagnostics. Two 30.0-Torr, premixed DME/oxygen/argon flames are investigated with stoichiometries of 0.98 and 1.20. The height above burner profiles of nine stable species and two radicals are measured. These results are compared to the detailed chemical reaction mechanism of Curran and coworkers. Generally good agreement is found between the model and data. The largest discrepancies are found for the methyl radical profiles where the model predicts qualitatively different trends in the methyl concentration with stoichiometry than observed in the experiment.

  15. THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING MAGNIFICATION USING VARIABILITY Accurate measurement of galaxy cluster masses is an essential component not only in studies of cluster physics but...

  16. Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    UC Davis; Cappa, Christopher D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-10-28

    Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure the evolution of chemical composition for two distinct organic aerosol types as they are passed through a thermodenuder at different temperatures. The two organic aerosol types considered are primary lubricating oil (LO) aerosol and secondary aerosol from the alpha-pinene + O3 reaction (alphaP). The evolution of the VUV mass spectra for the two aerosol types with temperature are observed to differ dramatically. For LO particles, the spectra exhibit distinct changes with temperature in which the lower m/z peaks, corresponding to compounds with higher vapor pressures, disappear more rapidly than the high m/z peaks. In contrast, the alphaP aerosol spectrum is essentially unchanged by temperature even though the particles experience significant mass loss due to evaporation. The variations in the LO spectra are found to be quantitatively in agreement with expectations from absorptive partitioning theory whereas the alphaP spectra suggest that the evaporation of alphaP derived aerosol appears to not be governed by partitioning theory. We postulate that this difference arises from the alphaP particles existing as in a glassy state instead of having the expected liquid-like behavior. To reconcile these observations with decades of aerosol growth measurements, which indicate that OA formation is described by equilibrium partitioning, we present a conceptual model wherein the secondary OA is formed and then rapidly converted from an absorbing form to a non-absorbing form. The results suggest that although OA growth may be describable by equilibrium partitioning theory, the properties of organic aerosol once formed may differ significantly from the properties determined in the equilibrium framework.

  17. Determination of the sign of the decay width difference in the B_s system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LHCb Collaboration; R. Aaij; C. Abellan Beteta; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Anderson; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; L. Arrabito; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; D. S. Bailey; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; I. Bediaga; S. Belogurov; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; T. Bird; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bjørnstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; K. de Bruyn; A. Büchler-Germann; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; Ch. Cauet; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; N. Chiapolini; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; P. Collins; A. Comerma-Montells; F. Constantin; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; G. Corti; B. Couturier; G. A. Cowan; R. Currie; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; P. N. Y. David; I. De Bonis; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; F. De Lorenzi; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; H. Degaudenzi; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; D. Derkach; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; P. Diniz Batista; F. Domingo Bonal; S. Donleavy; F. Dordei; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; R. Dzhelyadin; A. Dziurda; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; Ch. Elsasser; D. Elsby; D. Esperante Pereira; A. Falabella; E. Fanchini; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; O. Francisco; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; J. Garofoli; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; D. Gascon; C. Gaspar; R. Gauld; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; E. Greening; S. Gregson; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; C. Hadjivasiliou; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; R. Harji; N. Harnew; J. Harrison; P. F. Harrison; T. Hartmann; J. He; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; E. Hicks; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; P. Ilten; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; M. Kaballo; S. Kandybei; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; I. R. Kenyon; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; R. F. Koopman; P. Koppenburg; M. Korolev; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; C. Lazzeroni; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefèvre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; L. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Lieng; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. von Loeben; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; N. Lopez-March; H. Lu; J. Luisier; A. Mac Raighne; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; S. Malde; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; A. Martín Sánchez; D. Martinez Santos; A. Massafferri; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; M. Matveev; E. Maurice; B. Maynard; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; R. McNulty; M. Meissner; M. Merk; J. Merkel; R. Messi; S. Miglioranzi; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; J. Molina Rodriguez; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan; B. Muryn; B. Muster; M. Musy; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; I. Nasteva; M. Nedos; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; A. D. Nguyen; C. Nguyen-Mau; M. Nicol; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; A. Nomerotski; A. Novoselov; A. Oblakowska-Mucha; V. Obraztsov

    2012-07-19

    The interference between the K+K- S-wave and P-wave amplitudes in B_s -> J/psi K+K- decays with the K+K- pairs in the region around the phi(1020) resonance is used to determine the variation of the difference of the strong phase between these amplitudes as a function of K+K- invariant mass. Combined with the results from our CP asymmetry measurements in B_s -> J/psi phi decays, we conclude that the B_s mass eigenstate that is almost CP =+1 is lighter and decays faster than the mass eigenstate that is almost CP =-1. This determines the sign of the decay width difference DeltaGamma_s == Gamma_L -Gamma_H to be positive. Our result also resolves the ambiguity in the past measurements of the CP violating phase phi_s to be close to zero rather than pi. These conclusions are in agreement with the Standard Model expectations.

  18. Advanced Mass Spectrometric Methods for the Rapid and Quantitative Characterization of Proteomes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Progress is reviewed towards the development of a global strategy that aims to extend the sensitivity, dynamic range, comprehensiveness and throughput of proteomic measurements based upon the use of high performance separations and mass spectrometry. The approach uses high accuracy mass measurements from Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR) to validate peptide ‘accurate mass tags’ (AMTs) produced by global protein enzymatic digestions for a specific organism, tissue or cell type from ‘potential mass tags’ tentatively identified using conventional tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). This provides the basis for subsequent measurements without the need for MS/ MS. High resolutionmore »capillary liquid chromatography separations combined with high sensitivity, and high resolution accurate FTICR measurements are shown to be capable of characterizing peptide mixtures of more than 10 5 components. The strategy has been initially demonstrated using the microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Deinococcus radiodurans. Advantages of the approach include the high confidence of protein identification, its broad proteome coverage, high sensitivity, and the capability for stableisotope labeling methods for precise relative protein abundance measurements. Abbreviations : LC, liquid chromatography; FTICR, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance; AMT, accurate mass tag; PMT, potential mass tag; MMA, mass measurement accuracy; MS, mass spectrometry; MS/MS, tandem mass spectrometry; ppm, parts per million. « less

  19. WMAPping out Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron Pierce; Hitoshi Murayama

    2003-10-28

    Recent data from from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) place important bounds on the neutrino sector. The precise determination of the baryon number in the universe puts a strong constraint on the number of relativistic species during Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis. WMAP data, when combined with the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), also directly constrain the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. These results impinge upon a neutrino oscillation interpretation of the result from the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND). We also note that the Heidelberg--Moscow evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay is only consistent with the WMAP+2dFGRS data for the largest values of the nuclear matrix element.

  20. The difference between “equivalent” and “not different

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.; Borror, Connie M.

    2015-10-27

    Often, experimenters wish to establish that populations of units can be considered equivalent to each other, in order to leverage improved knowledge about one population for characterizing the new population, or to establish the comparability of items. Equivalence tests have existed for many years, but their use in industry seems to have been largely restricted to biomedical applications, such as for assessing the equivalence of two drugs or protocols. We present the fundamentals of equivalence tests, compare them to traditional two-sample and ANOVA tests that are better suited to establishing differences in populations, and propose the use of a graphicalmore »summary to compare p-values across different thresholds of practically important differences.« less