Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Measurements of the tau Mass and Mass Difference of the tau^+ and tau^- at BABAR  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the result of a precision measurement of the mass of the {tau} lepton, M{sub {tau}}, based on 423 fb{sup -1} of data recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, they determine the mass to be 1776.68 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.41(syst) MeV. They also measure the mass difference between the {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -}, and obtain (M{sub {tau}{sup +}} - M{sub {tau}{sup -}})/M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} = (-3.4 {+-} 1.3(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, where M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} is the average value of M{sub {tau}{sup +}} and M{sub {tau}{sup -}}.

Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

Direct measurement of the mass difference between top and antitop quarks  

SciTech Connect

We present a direct measurement of the mass difference between top and antitop quarks ({Delta}m) in lepton+jets t{bar t} final states using the 'matrix element' method. The purity of the lepton+jets sample is enhanced for t{bar t} events by identifying at least one of the jet as originating from a b quark. The analyzed data correspond to 3.6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV acquired by D0 in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The combination of the e+jets and m+jets channels yields {Delta}m = 0.8 {+-} 1.8 (stat) {+-} 0.5 (syst) GeV, which is in agreement with the standard model expectation of no mass difference.

Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Aoki, Masato; /Fermilab /Louisiana Tech. U.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Mass Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST maintains the national standard for mass in the form of the prototype kilogram (K20) and provides services to support the parts of the national ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

4

Measurement of the D[superscript *](2010)[superscript +] Meson Width and the D[superscript *](2010)[superscript +]-D[superscript 0] Mass Difference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the mass difference ?m0 between the D[superscript *](2010)[superscript +] and the D[superscript 0] and the natural linewidth ? of the transition D[superscript *](2010)[superscript +]?D[superscript 0]?[superscript ...

Cowan, Ray Franklin

5

Top Quark Mass Measurements at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

We report the latest results on the top-quark mass and on the top-antitop mass difference from the CDF and D0 collaborations using data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We discuss general issues in top-quark mass measurements and present new results from direct measurements and from top-pair production cross-section. We also report new results on the top-antitop mass difference.

Ye, Zhenyu; /Fermilab

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

ON THE MESON MASS DIFFERENCES  

SciTech Connect

In view of ihe recent experimental evidence indicating lfmasses is reinvestigated. A semi-phenomenological approach is used by the introduction of a nonlocal effective interaction hamiltonian, gauge invariant up to the order e/ sup 2/ where new terms corresponding to one-photon and twophoton vertices are considered to take into account the effects of the strong interactions. It is shown thai the contrasting experimental results can be explained as the result of the different nature of the neutral kaons as c npared with the neutral pion. Some different ways to realize the experimental results are explicitly discussed. (auth)

Bund, G.W.; Ferreira, P.L.

1960-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Problems in electromagnetic mass-difference calculations  

SciTech Connect

A brief discussion is given on the progress made thus far in calculating the electromagnetic mass differences of elementary particles. Some of the methods discussed include Feynman's method, Cottinghams method, the methods involving Bjorken scaling iunctions, and the formalism of Dashen and Frautschi. (LBS)

Majumdar, D.P.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Top quark mass measurement at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on the latest experimental measurements of the top quark mass by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron. They present a new top mass measurement using the t{bar t} events collected by the D0 Collaboration in Run I between 1994 and 1996. This result is combined with previous measurements to yield a new world top mass average. They also describe several preliminary results using up to 193 pb{sup -1} of t{bar t} events produced in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV during the Run II of the Tevatron.

Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; /Harvard U.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Skyrme Model with Different Mass Terms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a one parameter family of mass terms for the Skyrme model that disfavours shell-like configurations for multi-baryon classical solutions. We argue that a model with such mass terms can provide a better description of nuclei as shell like configurations are now less stable than in the traditional massive Skyrme model

Bernard Piette; Wojtek J. Zakrzewski

2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

10

Top Mass Measurements at the Tevatron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First observed in 1995, the top quark is the third-generation up-type quark of the standard model of particle physics (SM). The CDF and D0 collaborations have analyzed many t{bar t} events produced by the Tevatron collider, studying many properties of the top quark. Among these, the mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the SM, since its value constrains the mass of the yet to be observed Higgs boson. The analyzed events were used to measure the mass of the top quark m{sub t} {approx_equal} 173.2 GeV/c{sup 2} with an uncertainty of less than 1 GeV/c{sup 2}. We report on the latest top mass measurements at the Tevatron, using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of data for each experiment.

Potamianos, Karolos; /Purdue U.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Mass and Lifetime Measurements in Storage Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Masses of nuclides covering a large area of the chart of nuclides can be measured in storage rings where many ions circulate at the same time. In this paper the recent progress in the analysis of Schottky mass spectrometry data is presented as well as the technical improvements leading to higher accuracy for isochronous mass measurements with a time-of-flight detector. The high sensitivity of the Schottky method down to single ions allows to measure lifetimes of nuclides by observing mother and daughter nucleus simultaneously. In this way we investigated the decay of bare and H-like 140Pr. As we could show the lifetime can be even shortened compared to those of atomic nuclei despite of a lower number of electrons available for internal conversion or electron capture.All these techniques will be implemented with further improvements at the storage rings of the new FAIR facility at GSI in the future.

Weick, H.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Winkler, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Scheidenberger, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); II. Phys. Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, 35392 Giessen (Germany)] (and others)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

12

BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT A.RASPEREZA DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D­22607#erential luminosity spectrum measurements and beam energy spread on the precision of the Higgs boson mass measurement possible impact of the beam related systematic errors on the Higgs boson mass measurement is discussed

13

LCPHSM2001054 Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LC­PHSM­2001­054 Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass and Cross Section with a Linear e + e \\Gamma for the measurement of the Higgs boson mass and produc­ tion cross section. An integrated luminosity of 500 fb \\Gamma1 is assumed. For Higgs boson masses of 120, 150 and 180 GeV the uncertainty on the Higgs boson mass

14

Implement Robotic Mass Measurements in SP250 Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... services will dramatically reduce the turnaround time for mass measurement services by a predicted factor of four, eliminate human errors and other ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

Enthalpy and mass flowrate measurements for two-phase geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conference Proceedings: Enthalpy and mass flowrate measurements for two-phase geothermal production by Tracer dilution techniques edit Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions...

16

White Paper: Measuring the Neutrino Mass Hierarchy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This white paper is a condensation of a report by a committee appointed jointly by the Nuclear Science and Physics Divisions at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The goal of this study was to identify the most promising technique(s) for resolving the neutrino mass hierarchy. For the most part, we have relied on calculations and simulations presented by the proponents of the various experiments. We have included evaluations of the opportunities and challenges for these experiments based on what is available already in the literature.

Cahn, R N; Freedman, S J; Haxton, W C; Kadel, R W; Kolomensky, Yu G; Luk, K B; McDonald, P; Gann, G D Orebi; Poon, A W P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

White Paper: Measuring the Neutrino Mass Hierarchy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This white paper is a condensation of a report by a committee appointed jointly by the Nuclear Science and Physics Divisions at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The goal of this study was to identify the most promising technique(s) for resolving the neutrino mass hierarchy. For the most part, we have relied on calculations and simulations presented by the proponents of the various experiments. We have included evaluations of the opportunities and challenges for these experiments based on what is available already in the literature.

R. N. Cahn; D. A. Dwyer; S. J. Freedman; W. C. Haxton; R. W. Kadel; Yu. G. Kolomensky; K. B. Luk; P. McDonald; G. D. Orebi Gann; A. W. P. Poon

2013-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

18

Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, 10-Earth Mass Planet and Its Host Star  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, made with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of m_p = 10.4 +- 1.7 Earth masses and orbits a star of mass M_* = 0.56 +- 0.09 Solar masses at a semi-major axis of a = 3.2 (+1.9 -0.5) AU and an orbital period of P = 7.6 (+7.7 -1.5} yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are enabled by the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect, which is seen primarily in the light curve distortion due to the orbital motion of the Earth. But, the analysis also demonstrates the capability to measure microlensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a "failed" gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the preval...

Muraki, Y; Bennett, D P; Suzuki, D; Monard, L A G; Street, R; Jorgensen, U G; Kundurthy, P; Skowron, J; Becker, A C; Albrow, M D; Fouque, P; Heyrovsky, D; Barry, R K; Beaulieu, J -P; Wellnitz, D D; Bond, I A; Sumi, T; Dong, S; Gaudi, B S; Bramich, D M; Dominik, M; Abe, F; Botzler, C S; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Hayashi, F; Hearnshaw, J B; Hosaka, S; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A V; Kilmartin, P M; Lin, W; Ling, C H; Makita, S; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Nishimoto, K; Ohnishi, K; Perrott, Y C; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D J; Sweatman, W L; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Christie, G W; DePoy, D L; Gorbikov, E; Gould, A; Kaspi, S; Lee, C -U; Mallia, F; Maoz, D; McCormick, J; Moorhouse, D; Natusch, T; Park, B -G; Pogge, R W; Polishook, D; Shporer, A; Thornley, G; Yee, J C; Allan, A; Browne, P; Horne, K; Kains, N; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Batista, V; Bennett, C S; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cassan, A; Cole, A; Corrales, R; Coutures, Ch; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Greenhill, J; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Martin, R; Menzies, J; Sahu, K C; Waldman, I; Zub, A Williams M; Bourhrous, H; Matsuoka, Y; Nagayama, T; Oi, N; Randriamanakoto, Z; Bozza, V; Burgdorf, M J; Novati, S Calchi; Dreizler, S; Finet, F; Glitrup, M; Harpsoe, K; Hinse, T C; Hundertmark, M; Liebig, C; Maier, G; Mancini, L; Mathiasen, M; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Surdej, J; Southworth, J; Wambsganss, J; Zimmer, F; Udalski, A; Poleski, R; Wyrzykowski, L; Ulaczyk, K; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Report of the working group on precision measurements - measurements of the W boson mass and width.  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the prospects for measuring the W mass and width in Run II. The basic techniques used to measure M{sub W} are described and the statistical, theoretical and detector-related uncertainties are discussed in detail. Alternative methods of measuring the W mass at the Tevatron and the prospects for M{sub W} measurements at other colliders are also described.

Brock, R.; Erler, J.; Kim, Y.-K.; Marciano, W.; Ashmanskas, W.; Baur, U.; Ellison, J.; Lancaster, M.; Nodulman, L.; Rha, J.; Waters, D.; Womersley, J.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

20

Precise measurements of the $W$ mass at the Tevatron and indirect constraints on the Higgs mass  

SciTech Connect

I describe the latest D0 and CDF W boson mass measurements. The D0 measurement is performed with 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity in the electron decay channel with a data set of 1.68 x 10{sup 8} W candidates. The value of the W boson mass measured by D0 is M{sub W} = 80.375 {+-} 0.023 GeV when combined with the previously analyzed 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The CDF measurement uses 2.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity in both electron and muon decay channels with a total of 1.1 x 10{sup 8} W candidates. The value of the W boson mass measured by CDF is M{sub W} = 80.387 {+-} 0.019 GeV. I report the combination of these two measurements with previous Tevatron measurements and with the LEP measurements of the W boson mass. The new world average is M{sub W} = 80.385 {+-} 0.015GeV. I discuss the implications of the new measurement to the indirect measurement of the Standard Model Higgs boson mass.

Lopes de Sa, Rafael

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A top quark mass measurement using a matrix element method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A measurement of the mass of the top quark is presented, using top-antitop pair (t{bar t}) candidate events for the lepton+jets decay channel. The measurement makes use of Tevatron p{bar p} collision data at centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected at the CDF detector. The top quark mass is measured by employing an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal (t{bar t}) and background (W+jets) matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterised jet-to-parton mapping functions. The likelihood function is maximised with respect to the top quark mass, the fraction of signal events, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) provides an in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using 578 lepton+jets candidate events corresponding to 3.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, the top quark mass is measured to be m{sub t} = 172.4 {+-} 1.4 (stat+{Delta}{sub JES}) {+-} 1.3 (syst) GeV=c{sup 2}, one of the most precise single measurements to date.

Linacre, Jacob Thomas; /Oxford U.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Time-of-Flight Mass Measurements of Exotic Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic masses play an important role in nuclear physics and astrophysics. The need of experimental mass values for unstable nuclides has triggered the development of a wide range of mass measurement techniques, with devices installed at many laboratories around the world. We have implemented a time-of-flight magnetic-rigidity (TOF-B ) technique at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) that includes a position measurement for magnetic rigidity corrections and uses the A1900 separator and the S800 spectrograph. We performed a successful first experiment measuring masses of neutron-rich isotopes in the region of Z 20 30, important for calculations of processes occurring in the crust of accreting neutron stars. The masses of 16 nuclei were determined, for 61V, 63Cr, 66Mn, and 74Ni for the first time, with atomic mass excesses of 30.510(890) MeV, 35.280(650) MeV, 36.900(790) MeV, and 49.210(990) MeV, respectively. The mass resolution achieved was 1.8 10 4.

Matos, M. [Michigan State Univ./JINA/Louisiana State University; Estrade, A. [Michigan State Univ./JINA/LSU/Saint Mary's Univ./GSI Darmstadt, GE; Schatz, H. [Michigan State Univ./JINA; Bazin, D. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Famiano, M. [Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo; Gade, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; George, S. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing; Lynch, W. G. [NSCL, Michigan State Univ./JINA; Meisel, Z. [NSCL, Michigan State Univ./JINA; Portillo, M. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing; Rogers, A. [NSCL, Michigan State Univ./JINA; Shapira, Dan [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Wallace, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Yurkon, J. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20~250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semi-empirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

Liu, Min; Li, Zhuxia; Zhang, Fengshou

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20~250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semi-empirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Fengshou Zhang

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

Measurements of the top quark mass at the Tevatron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mass of the top quark (m{sub top}) is a fundamental parameter of the standard model (SM). Currently, its most precise measurements are performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We review the most recent of those measurements, performed on data samples of up to 8.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The Tevatron combination using up to 5.8 fb{sup -1} of data results in a preliminary world average top quark mass of m{sub top} = 173.2 {+-} 0.9 GeV. This corresponds to a relative precision of about 0.54%. We conclude with an outlook of anticipated precision the final measurement of m{sub top} at the Tevatron.

Brandt, Oleg; /Gottingen U., II. Phys. Inst.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Experiments for the Measurement of LNG Mass Burning Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) is a commonly used flammable fuel that has safety concerns associated with vapor dispersion and radiation emitted from pool fires. The main objective of this effort is to advance the knowledge of pool fires and to expand the data that is commonly used to validate semi-empirical models. This includes evaluation of the methods that are utilized to obtain experimental values of mass burning rates, which are used in models where semi-empirical correlations cannot be applied. A total of three small-size experiments designed to study the radiative characteristics of LNG pool fires were carried out at Texas A & M University's Brayton Fire Training Field (BFTF). This set of experiments was designed to study how the heat feedback from the fire to the pool surface is subsequently distributed through the liquid volume and the validity of different methods for measuring burning rates. In this work, a number of semi-empirical correlations were used to predict the characteristics of the flame and examine the predictive accuracy of these correlations when compared to the values obtained experimentally. In addition, the heat transferred from the energy received at the pool's surface to the surroundings was investigated. Finally, the parameters that influenced the measurement of radiative head feedback to the liquid pool were analyzed to investigate potential causes of calibration drift in the instrumentation. The results of this work provided information regarding the validity of certain techniques for the measurement of mass burning rates and the use of correlations to predict the characteristics of an LNG pool fire on a small-scale. The findings from this work indicate that the energy received at the liquid surface was used entirely for evaporation and no indications of transmission to the surroundings were observed. Lastly, it was found that during the experiments, the sink temperature of the sensor was not constant, and therefore, the readings of the radiative heat were unreliable. This was due to the insufficient cooling effect of the water circulated. It was later shown in the laboratory that through a series of qualitative tests, a change of 20C in the cooling water resulted in a calibration drift.

Herrera Gomez, Lady Carolina

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry System for Measurement of Environmental Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) system has been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for sensitive and selective determination of radio?cesium in the environment. The overall efficiency was determined to be 410?7 with a combined (laser and mass spectrometer) selectivity of 108 for both 135Cs and 137Cs with respect to 133Cs. RIMS isotopic ratio measurements of 135Cs/ 137Cs were performed on a nuclear fuel burn?up sample and compared to measurements on a similar system at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and to conventional thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Results of preliminary RIMS investigations on a freshwater lake sediment sample are also discussed.

L. Pibida; C. A. McMahon; W. Nrtershuser; B. A. Bushaw

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Development Of Competences Of National Reference Laboratory For Mass Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The national reference laboratory for mass in Bosnia and Herzegovina uses non-automatic weighing scales as a national reference standard. This research was performed in order to prove competences of this laboratory through accreditation in accordance with international standard EN ISO/IEC 17025. The analysis of measurement results obtained by calibration of weighing instruments described in this paper, describes the effects of individual contributions to the combined measurement uncertainty.

Samir Leme; Nermina Zaimovi?-Uzunovi?; ejla Alii?; Haris Memic

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Precision Top-Quark Mass Measurements at CDF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb{sup -1}. Using a sample of t{bar t} candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the W boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, mtop = 172.85 {+-} 0.71 (stat) {+-} 0.85 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Top quark mass and property measurements at Tevatron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The top quark, discovered in 1995 at the Fermilab Tevatron collider from CDF and D0 experiments, remains by far the most interesting particle to test standard model because of its large mass and unique properties. Having data collected about 10 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity of p{bar p} collision, both experiments have been studied the top quark in all the possible directions. In this article, we present the recent measurements of the top quark properties from Tevatron including the mass, width, spin correlation, and W boson helicity using t{bar t} signature.

Lee, Hyun Su

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Precision measurements of the top quark mass and width with the D0 detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the discovery of the top quark in 1995 at the Fermliab Tevatron Collider, top quark properties have been measured with ever higher precision. In this article, recent measurements of the top quark mass and its width using up to 3.6 fb{sup -1} of D0 data are summarized. Different techniques and final states have been examined and no deviations within these measurements have been observed. In addition to the direct measurements, a measurement of the top quark mass from its production cross section and a measurement of the top-antitop quark mass difference are discussed. With a mass of 173.3 {+-} 1.1 GeV, the top quark is the heaviest of all known fundamental particles. Due to the high mass, its Yukawa coupling is close to unity suggesting that it may play a special role in electroweak symmetry breaking. Precise measurements of both, the W boson and the top quark mass, constrain the mass of the yet unobserved Higgs boson and allow to restrict certain extensions of the Standard Model. At the Tevatron collider with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, 85% of the top quark pairs are produced in quark-antiquark annihilation; 15% originate from gluon fusion. Top quarks are predicted to decay almost exclusively to a W boson and a bottom quark. According to the number of hadronic W decays, top events are classified into all-jets, lepton+jets and dilepton events. The lepton+jets channel is characterized by four jets, one isolated, energetic charged lepton and missing transverse energy. With 30%, the branching fraction of the lepton+jets channel is about seven times larger than the one of the dilepton channel whereas the signal to background ratio is about three times smaller. The main background in this final state comes from W +jets events. Instrumental background arises from events in which a jet is misidentified as an electron and events with heavy hadrons that decay into leptons which pass the isolation requirements. The topology of the dilepton channel is described by two jets, two isolated, energetic charged leptons and significant missing transverse energy from the undetected neutrinos. The main background are Z + jets and diboson events (WW/WZ/ZZ+jets) as well as instrumental background as characterized above. At the D0 experiment, different techniques are used to measure the top quark mass. They are summarized in the following sections together with the first measurement of the top anti-top quark mass difference and the first precise determination of the top quark width.

Grohsjean, Alexander; /IRFU, SPP, Saclay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Measurements of the top quark mass and decay width with the D0 detector  

SciTech Connect

The top quark discovery in 1995 at Fermilab is one of the major proofs of the standard model (SM). Due to its unique place in SM, the top quark is an important particle for testing the theory and probing for new physics. This article presents most recent measurements of top quark properties from the D0 detector. In particular, the measurement of the top quark mass, the top antitop mass difference and the top quark decay width. The discovery of the top quark in 1995 confirmed the existence of a third generation of quarks predicted in the standard model (SM). Being the heaviest elementary particle known, the top quark appears to become an important particle in our understanding of the standard model and physics beyond it. Because of its large mass the top quark has a very short lifetime, much shorter than the hadronization time. The predicted lifetime is only 3.3 {center_dot} 10{sup -25}s. Top quark is the only quark whose properties can be studied in isolation. A Lorentz-invariant local Quantum Field Theory, the standard model is expected to conserve CP. Due to its unique properties, the top quark provides a perfect test of CPT invariance in the standard model. An ability to look at the quark before being hadronized allows to measure directly mass of the top quark and its antiquark. An observation of a mass difference between particle and antiparticle would indicate violation of CPT invariance. Top quark through its radiative loop correction to the W mass constrains the mass of the Higgs boson. A precise measurement of the top quark mass provides useful information to the search of Higgs boson by constraining its region of possible masses. Another interesting aspect is that the top quark's Yukawa coupling to the Higgs boson is very close to unity (0.996 {+-} 0.006). That implies it may play a special role in the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism.

Ilchenko, Yuriy

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

arXiv:hepex/0505096 Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

################ arXiv:hep­ex/0505096 v1 30 May 2005 Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass for the measurement of the Higgs boson mass. An integrated luminosity of 500 fb 1 is assumed. For Higgs boson masses of 120, 150 and 180 GeV the uncertainty on the Higgs boson mass measurement is estimated to be 40, 65

34

Fission Yield Measurements by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Correct prediction of the fission products inventory in irradiated nuclear fuels is essential for accurate estimation of fuel burnup, establishing proper requirements for spent fuel transportation and storage, materials accountability and nuclear forensics. Such prediction is impossible without accurate knowledge of neutron induced fission yields. Unfortunately, the accuracy of the fission yields reported in the ENDF/B-VII.0 library is not uniform across all of the data and much of the improvement is desired for certain isotopes and fission products. We discuss our measurements of cumulative fission yields in nuclear fuels irradiated in thermal and fast reactor spectra using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

Irina Glagolenko; Bruce Hilton; Jeffrey Giglio; Daniel Cummings; Karl Grimm; Richard McKnight

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Press Pass - Press Release - W mass precisions measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the W boson mass will lead to stricter bounds on the mass of the elusive Higgs boson. The W boson is a carrier of the weak nuclear force and a key element of the...

36

Differences Between the Pole and On-Shell Masses and Widths of the Higgs Boson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The differences between the on-shell mass and width of the Higgs boson and their pole counterparts are evaluated in leading order. For a heavy Higgs boson, they are found to be sensitive functions of the gauge parameter and become numerically large over a class of gauges that includes the unitary gauge. For a light Higgs boson, the differences remain small in all gauges. The pinch-technique mass and width are found to be close to their pole counterparts over a large range of Higgs boson masses.

B. A. Kniehl; A. Sirlin

1998-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

37

In-Situ Mass, Temperature, and Resistance Measurements during ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a simple household microwave, several materials properties (resistance, mass, and ... Numeric Simulation of the Cooling Process of the Iron Ore Sinter.

38

The Kilogram and Measurements of Mass and Force  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... that the mass of the check standard does not change from ... of the density of moist air (1981/91), Metrologia ... [12] RD Deslattes, Proceedings of course ...

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

39

Mass-resolved retarding field energy analyzer and its measurement of ion energy distribution in helicon plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass-resolved retarding field energy analyzer and its measurement of ion energy distribution) are measured at rf power of 1000 W. The results show that the fairly broad energy distributions of different analyzer; Ion energy distribution; Helicon plasma 1. Introduction It is well recognized that ion

Zexian, Cao

40

Prospects to Measure the Higgs Boson Mass and Cross Section in ee-->ZH Using the Recoil Mass Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The process ee-->ZH allows to measure the Higgs boson in the recoil mass spectrum against the Z boson without any assumptions on the Higgs boson decay. We performed a full simulation and reconstruction of ee-->ZH using the MOKKA and MARLIN packages describing the LDC detector. The Z is reconstructed from its decays into electrons and muons. The mass of the Higgs boson is set to 120 GeV. Assuming a centre-of-mass energy of 250 GeV and an integrated luminosity of 50/fb the Higgs boson mass and the Higgs-strahlung cross section can be measured with a precision of 120 MeV and 9%, respectively.

W. Lohmann; M. Ohlerich; A. Raspereza; A. Schlicke

2007-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass with a Linear e+e- Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential of a linear e+e- collider operated at a centre-of-mass energy of 350 GeV is studied for the measurement of the Higgs boson mass. An integrated luminosity of 500 fb-1 is assumed. For Higgs boson masses of 120, 150 and 180 GeV the uncertainty on the Higgs boson mass measurement is estimated to be 40, 65 and 70 MeV, respectively. The effects of beam related systematics, namely a bias in the beam energy measurement, the beam energy spread and the luminosity spectrum due to beamstrahlung, on the precision of the Higgs boson mass measurement are investigated. In order to keep the systematic uncertainty on the Higgs boson mass well below the level of the statistical error, the beam energy measurement must be controlled with a relative precision better than 10-4.

P. Garcia-Abia; W. Lohmann; A. Raspereza

2005-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

42

Measuring the mass of a sterile neutrino with a very short baseline reactor experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis of the world's neutrino oscillation data, including sterile neutrinos, (M. Sorel, C. M. Conrad, and M. H. Shaevitz, Phys. Rev. D 70, 073004) found a peak in the allowed region at a mass-squared difference $\\Delta m^2 \\cong 0.9$ eV$^2$. We trace its origin to harmonic oscillations in the electron survival probability $P_{ee}$ as a function of L/E, the ratio of baseline to neutrino energy, as measured in the near detector of the Bugey experiment. We find a second occurrence for $\\Delta m^2 \\cong 1.9$ eV$^2$. We point out that the phenomenon of harmonic oscillations of $P_{ee}$ as a function of L/E, as seen in the Bugey experiment, can be used to measure the mass-squared difference associated with a sterile neutrino in the range from a fraction of an eV$^2$ to several eV$^2$ (compatible with that indicated by the LSND experiment), as well as measure the amount of electron-sterile neutrino mixing. We observe that the experiment is independent, to lowest order, of the size of the reactor and suggest the possibility of a small reactor with a detector sitting at a very short baseline.

D. C. Latimer; J. Escamilla; D. J. Ernst

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

43

Measurement of the Mass and Width of the Ds1(2536)+ Meson  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decay width and mass of the D{sub s1}(2536){sup +} meson are measured via the decay channel D{sub s1}{sup +} {yields} D*{sup +} K{sub S}{sup 0} using 385 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the BABAR detector in the vicinity of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy electron-positron collider. The result for the decay width is {Gamma}(D{sub s1}{sup +}) = 0.92 {+-} 0.03 (stat.) {+-} 0.04 (syst.)MeV. For the mass, a value of m(D{sub s1}{sup +}) = 2535.08 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.15 (syst.)MeV/c{sup 2} is obtained. The mass difference between the D{sub s1}{sup +} and the D*{sup +} is measured to be m(D{sub s1}{sup +})-m(D*{sup +}) = 524.83 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.04 (syst.)MeV/c{sup 2}, representing a significant improvement compared to the current world average. The unnatural spin-parity assignment for the D{sub s1}{sup +} meson is confirmed.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Palano, A.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

44

Integrated measurement of the mass and surface charge of discrete microparticles using a suspended microchannel resonator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of the mass and surface charge of microparticles are employed in the characterization of many types of colloidal dispersions. The suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) is capable of measuring individual ...

Dextras, Philip

45

Method for simultaneous measurement of mass loading and fluid property changes using a quartz crystal microbalance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method, using a quartz crystal microbalance, to obtain simultaneous measurement of solid mass accumulation and changes in liquid density-viscosity product. The simultaneous real-time measurements of electrical parameters yields that changes in surface mass can be differentiated from changes in solution properties. Two methods to obtain the admittance/frequency data are employed.

Granstaff, V.E.; Martin, S.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometer for the in situ measurement of methyl hydrogen peroxide  

SciTech Connect

A new approach for measuring gas-phase methyl hydrogen peroxide [(MHP) CH{sub 3}OOH] utilizing chemical ionization mass spectrometry is presented. Tandem mass spectrometry is used to avoid mass interferences that hindered previous attempts to measure atmospheric CH{sub 3}OOH with CF{sub 3}O{sup -} clustering chemistry. CH{sub 3}OOH has been successfully measured in situ using this technique during both airborne and ground-based campaigns. The accuracy and precision for the MHP measurement are a function of water vapor mixing ratio. Typical precision at 500 pptv MHP and 100 ppmv H{sub 2}O is {+-}80 pptv (2 sigma) for a 1 s integration period. The accuracy at 100 ppmv H{sub 2}O is estimated to be better than {+-}40%. Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry shows considerable promise for the determination of in situ atmospheric trace gas mixing ratios where isobaric compounds or mass interferences impede accurate measurements.

St Clair, Jason M.; McCabe, David C. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Crounse, John D. [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Steiner, Urs [Varian, Inc., Santa Clara, California 95051 (United States); Wennberg, Paul O. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Division of Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Energy Spectrum and Mass Composition around the Knee by EAS Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Primary cosmic ray particles above energies of about 100 TeV are investigated by large-area ground based detector installations, observing various components of the development of extensive air-showers (EAS). By such an indirect access to the primary cosmic ray spectrum a steepening of the powerlaw falls off at around 3-5 PeV, known as the knee has been identified. Different experimental techniques are used to deduce mass- and energy-sensitive observables of EAS experiments. The experiments involve measurements of secondary particle distributions at various observation levels and of muons deep underground as well as of observables reconstructed by measuring the air Cherenkov light emitted with the shower development in the atmosphere. Recently methods for analysing multidimensional distributions get favoured since they are able to take into account the correlations between different observables and the influence of large intrinsic fluctuations of the air-shower development. Additionally the use of a larger set of observables provides the possibility to test simultaneously the consistency of the Monte-Carlo models underlying the reconstruction procedures. By many experiments the existence of the knee in the primary energy spectrum is confirmed and a tendency of an increasing mean mass above the knee energy is indicated. Recent results show that the knee originates from a decrease of the flux of light primary particles, whereas heavy cosmic ray particles seem to miss a kink in the energy range of 1 and 10 PeV.

Andreas Haungs

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Isotopic yield measurement in the heavy mass region for {sup 239}Pu thermal neutron induced fission  

SciTech Connect

Despite the huge number of fission yield data available in the different evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, and JENDL-4.0, more accurate data are still needed both for nuclear energy applications and for our understanding of the fission process itself. It is within the framework of this that measurements on the recoil mass spectrometer Lohengrin (at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France) was undertaken, to determine isotopic yields for the heavy fission products from the {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th},f) reaction. In order to do this, a new experimental method based on {gamma}-ray spectrometry was developed and validated by comparing our results with those performed in the light mass region with completely different setups. Hence, about 65 fission product yields were measured with an uncertainty that has been reduced on average by a factor of 2 compared to that previously available in the nuclear data libraries. In addition, for some fission products, a strongly deformed ionic charge distribution compared to a normal Gaussian shape was found, which was interpreted as being caused by the presence of a nanosecond isomeric state. Finally, a nuclear charge polarization has been observed in agreement, with the one described on other close fissioning systems.

Bail, A.; Serot, O.; Mathieu, L.; Litaize, O.; Materna, T.; Koester, U.; Faust, H.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S. [CEA, DEN-Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, B.P. 156, F-38042, Grenoble (France); CEA, DSM-Saclay, IRFU/SPhN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Measurement of the lifetimes of B meson mass eigenstates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation, we present the results of the average lifetime measurements in ..., ..., and ... decays, as well as the results of a time-dependent angular analysis of ... and ... decays. The time-dependent angular ...

Anikeev, Konstantin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Method for single-cell mass and electrophoretic mobility measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of single cells using flow cytometry techniques has created a wealth of knowledge about cellular phenomena that could not be obtained by population average measurements. As these techniques are integrated with ...

Dextras, Philip

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Measurement of the electron antineutrino mass in tritium beta decay in the Troitsk nu-mass experiment  

SciTech Connect

The results obtained in the Troitsk nu-mass experiment by measuring the electron-antineutrino mass in tritium beta decay are presented. The facility used consists of a gaseous windowless tritium source and an electrostatic electron spectrometer involving an adiabatic magnetic collimation. Runs in which measurement conditions were reliably established were thoroughly selected in analyzing data obtained from 1994 to 2004. All known systematic effects were taken into account. For the square of the electron-antineutrino mass, the treatment of measured spectra yielded the following result: m{sub {nu}}{sup 2} = -0.67 {+-} 1.89{sub stat.} {+-} 1.68{sub syst.} eV{sup 2}. The use of the Bayesian method and the Feldman-Cousins unified approach made it possible to obtain the following upper limits on the mass: m{sub {nu}} < 2.12 eV (at a 95% C.L.; Bayesian method) and m{sub {nu}} < 2.05 eV (at a 95% C.L., Feldman-Cousins method). At the same time, an estimation of the sensitivity limit without allowance for negative values of the square of the mass leads to m{sub {nu}} < 2.2 eV (at a 95% C.L.). Measured spectra were analyzed for the possible existence of an additional structure (step) in the electron spectrum near the boundary energy. The conclusion drawn from this analysis was that, within the existing statistical errors, there are no reasons for introducing such a feature.

Aseev, V. N.; Belesev, A. I.; Berlev, A. I.; Geraskin, E. V.; Golubev, A. A.; Lihovid, N. A.; Lobashev, V. M.; Nozik, A. A.; Pantuev, V. S.; Parfenov, V. I.; Skasyrskaya, A. K.; Tkachov, F. V.; Zadorozhny, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Energy and Effective Mass Dependence of Electron Tunnelling Through Multiple Quantum barriers in Different Heterostructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tunneling of electrons through the barriers in heterostructures has been studied, within unified transfer matrix approach. The effect of barrier width on the transmission coefficient of the electrons has been investigated for different pairs of semi conducting materials that are gaining much importance recently. These pairs include CdS/CdSe, AlGaAs/GaAs and InAs/AlSb. Barrier dimensions have been reduced from 20nm to 5nm to observe the effect of scaling on tunneling properties. Material depended is highlighted for electrons with energy varying from below the barrier height to above it. The electron effective mass inside the barrier and the well are often different. The results show that the coupling effect leads to significant changes on the transmission effect. . The effective-mass dependant transmission coefficient has been plotted with respect to electron energy. The computation is based on the transfer matrix method by using MATLAB.

Jatindranath Gain; Madhumita Das Sarkar; Sudakshina Kundu

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

53

First Results from the CARIBU Facility: Mass Measurements on the r-Process Path  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer has made mass measurements of 33 neutron-rich nuclides provided by the new Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The studied region includes the 132Sn double shell closure and ranges in Z from In to Cs, with Sn isotopes measured out to A = 135, and the typical measurement precision is at the 100 ppb level or better. The region encompasses a possible major waiting point of the astrophysical r process, and the impact of the masses on the r process is shown through a series of simulations. These first-ever simulations with direct mass information on this waiting point show significant increases in waiting time at Sn and Sb in comparison with commonly used mass models, demonstrating the inadequacy of existing models for accurate r-process calculations.

J. Van Schelt; D. Lascar; G. Savard; J. A. Clark; P. F. Bertone; S. Caldwell; A. Chaudhuri; 1 A. F. Levand; G. Li; G. E. Morgan; R. Orford; R. E. Segel; K. S. Sharma; M. G. Sternberg

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

2008-01-1748 An Analysis of Methods for Measuring Particulate Matter Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emission engine and was operated during testing with no exhaust aftertreatment devices. The engine of particulate emissions. This engine was operated under three conditions, with no aftertreatment, with a DPF as Engine 2 with the SCR aftertreatment device, the three mass measurement methods display comparable mass

Wu, Mingshen

55

New Mass and Lifetime Measurements of $^{152}$Sm Projectile Fragments with Time-Resolved Schottky Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The FRS-ESR facilities at GSI provide unique conditions for precision measurements with stored exotic nuclei over a large range in the chart of nuclides. In the present experiment the exotic nuclei were produced via fragmentation of $^{152}$Sm projectiles in a thick beryllium target at 500-600 MeV/u, separated in-flight with the fragment separator FRS, and injected into the storage-cooler ring ESR. Mass and lifetime measurements have been performed with bare and few-electron ions. The experiment and first results will be presented in this contribution.

Litvinov, Y A; Geissel, H; Weick, H; Beckert, Karl; Beller, Peter; Boutin, D; Brandau, C; Chen, L; Klepper, O; Knbel, R; Kozhuharov, C; Kurcewicz, J; Litvinov, S A; Mazzocco, M; Mnzenberg, G; Nociforo, C; Nolden, F; Plass, W; Scheidenberger, C; Steck, Markus; Sun, B; Winkler, M; Litvinov, Yu.A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Ground-Based Measurements of Nitric Acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) instrument has been developed for high-precision measurements of gaseous nitric acid (HNO3) specifically under high- and variable-humidity conditions in the boundary layer. The instruments ...

Kazuyuki Kita; Yu Morino; Yutaka Kondo; Yuichi Komazaki; Nobuyuki Takegawa; Yuzo Miyazaki; Jun Hirokawa; Shigeru Tanaka; Thomas L. Thompson; Ru-Shan Gao; David W. Fahey

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and S.J. Thompson,Determining Plutonium in Spent Fuel withTobin, Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent FuelFluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

Ludewigt, Bernhard A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry during the MILAGRO 2006 Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) on a rooftop in the urban mixed residential and industrial area North Northeast of downtown Mexico City as part of ...

Fortner, E. C.

59

Measuring the Higgs boson mass in dileptonic W-boson decays at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ar X iv :0 90 2. 48 64 v2 [ he p- ph ] 22 Ju l 2 00 9 Cavendish-HEP-09/04 Measuring the Higgs boson mass in dileptonic W -boson decays at hadron colliders Alan J. Barr,1, ? Ben Gripaios,2, and Christopher G. Lester3, 1Denys Wilkinson... measurements of the Higgs boson mass using the decay h ? W+W?, followed by the leptonic decay of each W -boson, will be performed by fitting the shape of a distribution that is sensitive to the Higgs mass. We demonstrate that the variable most commonly used...

Barr, Alan; Gripaios, Ben; Lester, Christopher G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Mass Measurement of the W-boson using the ALEPH Detector at LEP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The W-boson mass has been measured using the ALEPH detector at LEP. Preliminary results from data taken in 1998 are added to previous measurements to give mW = 80.411 +- 0.064(stat.) +- 0.037(syst.) +- 0.022(BE-CR) +- 0.018(LEP) GeV/c2.

A. S. Thompson

1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Investigation of top mass measurements with the ATLAS detector at LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several methods for the determination of the mass of the top quark with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. All dominant decay channels of the top quark can be explored. The measurements are in most cases dominated by systematic uncertainties. New methods have been developed to control those related to the detector. The results indicate that a total error on the top mass at the level of 1 GeV should be achievable.

I. Borjanovic; I. Efthymiopoulos; F. Fassi; P. Grenier; P. Homola; V. Kostioukhine; R. Leitner; I. Mendas; D. Pallin; D. Popovic; P. Roy; V. Simak; L. Simic; G. Skoro; J. Valenta

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Low-mass fission detector for the fission neutron spectrum measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the fission neutron spectrum measurement, the neutron energy is determined in a time-of-flight experiment by the time difference between the fission event and detection of the neutron. Therefore, the neutron energy resolution is directly determined by the time resolution of both neutron and fission detectors. For the fission detection, the detector needs not only a good timing response but also the tolerance of radiation damage and high {alpha}-decay rate. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to particles, which is important for experiments with - emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. In the following sections, the description will be given for the design and performance of a new low-mass PPAC for the fission-neutron spectrum measurements at LANL.

Wu, C Y; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Haight, R C; Lee, H Y

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector Filling System and Liquid Mass Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment has measured the neutrino mixing angle \\theta_{13} to world-leading precision. The experiment uses eight antineutrino detectors filled with 20-tons of gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator to detect antineutrinos emitted from the Daya Bay nuclear power plant through the inverse beta decay reaction. The precision measurement of sin^{2}2\\theta_{13} relies on the relative antineutrino interaction rates between detectors at near (400 m) and far (roughly 1.8 km) distances from the nuclear reactors. The measured interaction rate in each detector is directly proportional to the number of protons in the liquid scintillator target. A precision detector filling system was developed to simultaneously fill the three liquid zones of the antineutrino detectors and measure the relative target mass between detectors to <0.02%. This paper describes the design, operation, and performance of the system and the resulting precision measurement of the detectors' target liquid masses.

H. R. Band; J. J. Cherwinka; E. Draeger; K. M. Heeger; P. Hinrichs; C. A. Lewis; H. Mattison; M. C. McFarlane; D. M. Webber; D. Wenman; W. Wang; T. Wise; Q. Xiao

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

64

Enthalpy and mass flowrate measurements for two-phase geothermal production by Tracer dilution techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique has been developed for the measurement of steam mass flowrate, water mass flowrate and total enthalpy of two-phase fluids produced from geothermal wells. The method involves precisely metered injection of liquid and vapor phase tracers into the two-phase production pipeline and concurrent sampling of each phase downstream of the injection point. Subsequent chemical analysis of the steam and water samples for tracer content enables the calculation of mass flowrate for each phase given the known mass injection rates of tracer. This technique has now been used extensively at the Coso geothermal project, owned and operated by California Energy Company. Initial validation of the method was performed at the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal project on wells producing to individual production separators equipped with orificeplate flowmeters for each phase.

Hirtz, Paul; Lovekin, Jim; Copp, John; Buck, Cliff; Adams, Mike

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

65

Quantization of Differences Between Atomic and Nuclear Rest Masses and Selforganization of Atoms and Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We come to the conclusion that all atomic models based on either the Newton equation and the Kepler laws, or the Maxwell equations, or the Schrodinger and Dirac equations are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. We can only suspect that these equations are grounded on the same fundamental principle(s) which is (are) not known or these equations can be transformed into each other. We proposed a new mechanism of LENR: cooperative processes in the whole system - nuclei+atoms+condensed matter - nuclear reactions in plasma - can occur at smaller threshold energies than the corresponding ones on free constituents. We were able to quantize phenomenologically the first time the differences between atomic and nuclear rest masses by the formula (in MeV/$c^{2}$) $\\Delta M=\\frac{n_{1}}{n_{2}}*0.0076294, n_{i}=1,2,3,...$ Note that this quantization rule is justified for atoms and nuclei with different $A, N$ and $Z$ and the nuclei and atoms represent a coherent synchronized systems - a complex of coupled oscillators (resonators). The cooperative resonance synchronization mechanisms are responsible for explanation of how the electron volt world can influence the nuclear mega electron volt world. It means that we created new possibilities for inducing and controlling nuclear reactions by atomic processes.

F. A. Gareev; I. E. Zhidkova

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

A link between measured neutron star masses and lattice QCD data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the hadron-quark phase transition in neutron star matter and the structural properties of hybrid stars using an equation of state (EOS) for the quark phase derived with the field correlator method (FCM). We make use of the measured neutron star masses, and particularly the mass of PSR J1614-2230, to constrain the values of the gluon condensate $G_2$ which is one of the EOS parameter within the FCM. We find that the values of $G_2$ extracted from the mass measurement of PSR J1614-2230 are fully consistent with the values of the same quantity derived, within the FCM, from recent lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) calculations of the deconfinement transition temperature at zero baryon chemical potential. The FCM thus provides a powerful tool to link numerical calculations of QCD on a space-time lattice with neutron stars physics.

Ignazio Bombaci; Domenico Logoteta

2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

67

Measurement of the $W$ boson mass with the D0 detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a detailed description of the measurement of the $W$ boson mass, $M_W$, performed on an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb$^{-1}$, which is based on similar techniques as used for our previous measurement done on an independent data set of 1 fb$^{-1}$ of data. The data were collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. This data set yields $1.68\\times 10^6$ $W\\rightarrow e\

D0 Collaboration

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Measurement of the Masses and Lifetimes of B Hadrons at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

The latest results for the B Hadron sector at the Tevatron Collider are summarized. The properties of B hadrons can be precisely measured at the Tevatron. In particularly they will focus on the masses and lifetimes. The new Tevatron results for the CP violation in B Hadrons are also discussed.

Catastini, Pierluigi; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Determining Meaningful Differences for SMACEX Eddy Covariance Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two eddy covariance instrument comparison studies were conducted before and after the Soil MoistureAtmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX) field campaign to 1) determine if observations from multiple sensors were equivalent for the measured ...

D. W. Meek; J. H. Prueger; W. P. Kustas; J. L. Hatfield

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg equivalents. AMS provides an sensitive, accurate and precise method of measuring drug compounds in biological matrices.

Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

71

Precise measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel at D0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the top quark mass (mt) in ppbar collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV using dilepton ttbar->W+bW-bbar->l+nubl-nubarbbar events, where l denotes an electron, a muon, or a tau that decays leptonically. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1 collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We obtain mt = 174.0 +- 1.8(stat) +- 2.4(syst) GeV, which is in agreement with the current world average mt = 173.3 +- 1.1 GeV. This is currently the most precise measurement of mt in the dilepton channel.

D0 Collaboration; V. M. Abazov; B. Abbott; B. S. Acharya; M. Adams; T. Adams; G. D. Alexeev; G. Alkhazov; A. Alton; G. Alverson; G. A. Alves; L. S. Ancu; M. Aoki; M. Arov; A. Askew; B. sman; O. Atramentov; C. Avila; J. BackusMayes; F. Badaud; L. Bagby; B. Baldin; D. V. Bandurin; S. Banerjee; E. Barberis; P. Baringer; J. Barreto; J. F. Bartlett; U. Bassler; V. Bazterra; S. Beale; A. Bean; M. Begalli; M. Begel; C. Belanger-Champagne; L. Bellantoni; S. B. Beri; G. Bernardi; R. Bernhard; I. Bertram; M. Besanon; R. Beuselinck; V. A. Bezzubov; P. C. Bhat; V. Bhatnagar; G. Blazey; S. Blessing; K. Bloom; A. Boehnlein; D. Boline; E. E. Boos; G. Borissov; T. Bose; A. Brandt; O. Brandt; R. Brock; G. Brooijmans; A. Bross; D. Brown; J. Brown; X. B. Bu; M. Buehler; V. Buescher; V. Bunichev; S. Burdin; T. H. Burnett; C. P. Buszello; B. Calpas; E. Camacho-Prez; M. A. Carrasco-Lizarraga; B. C. K. Casey; H. Castilla-Valdez; S. Chakrabarti; D. Chakraborty; K. M. Chan; A. Chandra; G. Chen; S. Chevalier-Thry; D. K. Cho; S. W. Cho; S. Choi; B. Choudhary; S. Cihangir; D. Claes; J. Clutter; M. Cooke; W. E. Cooper; M. Corcoran; F. Couderc; M. -C. Cousinou; A. Croc; D. Cutts; A. Das; G. Davies; K. De; S. J. de Jong; E. De La Cruz-Burelo; F. Dliot; M. Demarteau; R. Demina; D. Denisov; S. P. Denisov; S. Desai; C. Deterre; K. DeVaughan; H. T. Diehl; M. Diesburg; A. Dominguez; T. Dorland; A. Dubey; L. V. Dudko; D. Duggan; A. Duperrin; S. Dutt; A. Dyshkant; M. Eads; D. Edmunds; J. Ellison; V. D. Elvira; Y. Enari; H. Evans; A. Evdokimov; V. N. Evdokimov; G. Facini; T. Ferbel; F. Fiedler; F. Filthaut; W. Fisher; H. E. Fisk; M. Fortner; H. Fox; S. Fuess; A. Garcia-Bellido; V. Gavrilov; P. Gay; W. Geng; D. Gerbaudo; C. E. Gerber; Y. Gershtein; G. Ginther; G. Golovanov; A. Goussiou; P. D. Grannis; S. Greder; H. Greenlee; Z. D. Greenwood; E. M. Gregores; G. Grenier; Ph. Gris; J. -F. Grivaz; A. Grohsjean; S. Grnendahl; M. W. Grnewald; T. Guillemin; F. Guo; G. Gutierrez; P. Gutierrez; A. Haas; S. Hagopian; J. Haley; L. Han; K. Harder; A. Harel; J. M. Hauptman; J. Hays; T. Head; T. Hebbeker; D. Hedin; H. Hegab; A. P. Heinson; U. Heintz; C. Hensel; I. Heredia-De La Cruz; K. Herner; G. Hesketh; M. D. Hildreth; R. Hirosky; T. Hoang; J. D. Hobbs; B. Hoeneisen; M. Hohlfeld; Z. Hubacek; N. Huske; V. Hynek; I. Iashvili; R. Illingworth; A. S. Ito; S. Jabeen; M. Jaffr; D. Jamin; A. Jayasinghe; R. Jesik; K. Johns; M. Johnson; D. Johnston; A. Jonckheere; P. Jonsson; J. Joshi; A. W. Jung; A. Juste; K. Kaadze; E. Kajfasz; D. Karmanov; P. A. Kasper; I. Katsanos; R. Kehoe; S. Kermiche; N. Khalatyan; A. Khanov; A. Kharchilava; Y. N. Kharzheev; D. Khatidze; M. H. Kirby; J. M. Kohli; A. V. Kozelov; J. Kraus; S. Kulikov; A. Kumar; A. Kupco; T. Kur?a; V. A. Kuzmin; J. Kvita; S. Lammers; G. Landsberg; P. Lebrun; H. S. Lee; S. W. Lee; W. M. Lee; J. Lellouch; L. Li; Q. Z. Li; S. M. Lietti; J. K. Lim; D. Lincoln; J. Linnemann; V. V. Lipaev; R. Lipton; Y. Liu; Z. Liu; A. Lobodenko; M. Lokajicek; R. Lopes de Sa; H. J. Lubatti; R. Luna-Garcia; A. L. Lyon; A. K. A. Maciel; D. Mackin; R. Madar; R. Magaa-Villalba; S. Malik; V. L. Malyshev; Y. Maravin; J. Martnez-Ortega; R. McCarthy; C. L. McGivern; M. M. Meijer; A. Melnitchouk; D. Menezes; P. G. Mercadante; M. Merkin; A. Meyer; J. Meyer; F. Miconi; N. K. Mondal; G. S. Muanza; M. Mulhearn; E. Nagy; M. Naimuddin; M. Narain; R. Nayyar; H. A. Neal; J. P. Negret; P. Neustroev; S. F. Novaes; T. Nunnemann; G. Obrant; J. Orduna; N. Osman; J. Osta; G. J. Otero y Garzn; M. Padilla; A. Pal; N. Parashar; V. Parihar; S. K. Park; J. Parsons; R. Partridge; N. Parua; A. Patwa; B. Penning; M. Perfilov; K. Peters; Y. Peters; K. Petridis; G. Petrillo; P. Ptroff; R. Piegaia; J. Piper; M. -A. Pleier; P. L. M. Podesta-Lerma; V. M. Podstavkov; P. Polozov; A. V. Popov; M. Prewitt; D. Price; N. Prokopenko; S. Protopopescu; J. Qian; A. Quadt; B. Quinn; M. S. Rangel; K. Ranjan; P. N. Ratoff; I. Razumov; P. Renkel; M. Rijssenbeek; I. Ripp-Baudot; F. Rizatdinova; M. Rominsky; A. Ross; C. Royon; P. Rubinov; R. Ruchti; G. Safronov; G. Sajot; P. Salcido; A. Snchez-Hernndez; M. P. Sanders; B. Sanghi; A. S. Santos; G. Savage; L. Sawyer; T. Scanlon; R. D. Schamberger; Y. Scheglov; H. Schellman; T. Schliephake; S. Schlobohm; C. Schwanenberger; R. Schwienhorst; J. Sekaric; H. Severini; E. Shabalina; V. Shary; A. A. Shchukin; R. K. Shivpuri; V. Simak; V. Sirotenko; P. Skubic; P. Slattery; D. Smirnov; K. J. Smith; G. R. Snow; J. Snow; S. Snyder; S. Sldner-Rembold; L. Sonnenschein; K. Soustruznik; J. Stark; V. Stolin; D. A. Stoyanova; M. Strauss; D. Strom; L. Stutte; L. Suter; P. Svoisky; M. Takahashi; A. Tanasijczuk; W. Taylor; M. Titov; V. V. Tokmenin; Y. -T. Tsai; D. Tsybychev; B. Tuchming; C. Tully; L. Uvarov; S. Uvarov; S. Uzunyan; R. Van Kooten; W. M. van Leeuwen; N. Varelas; E. W. Varnes

2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

72

Measurement of the Moments of the Hadronic Invariant Mass Distribution in Semileptonic Beta Decays  

SciTech Connect

Using 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, we measure the first two moments of the hadronic invariant mass-squared distribution in charmed semileptonic B decays. From these we determine the non-perturbative Heavy Quark Effective Theory parameters {Lambda} and {lambda}{sub 1} used to relate the B meson semileptonic branching ratio to the CKM matrix element |V{sub cb}|.

Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration TITLE=Measuremen

2005-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

73

High mass resolution time of flight mass spectrometer for measuring products in heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate a combined microreactor and time of flight system for testing and characterization of heterogeneous catalysts with high resolution mass spectrometry and high sensitivity. Catalyst testing is performed in silicon-based microreactors which have high sensitivity and fast thermal response. Gas analysis is performed with a time of flight mass spectrometer with a modified nude Bayard-Alpert ionization gauge as gas ionization source. The mass resolution of the time of flight mass spectrometer using the ion gauge as ionization source is estimated to m/{Delta}m > 2500. The system design is superior to conventional batch and flow reactors with accompanying product detection by quadrupole mass spectrometry or gas chromatography not only due to the high sensitivity, fast temperature response, high mass resolution, and fast acquisition time of mass spectra but it also allows wide mass range (0-5000 amu in the current configuration). As a demonstration of the system performance we present data from ammonia oxidation on a Pt thin film showing resolved spectra of OH and NH{sub 3}.

Andersen, T.; Jensen, R.; Christensen, M. K.; Chorkendorff, I. [Department of Physics, Danish National Research Foundation's Center for Individual Nanoparticle Functionality (CINF), Technical University of Denmark, Building 312, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Pedersen, T.; Hansen, O. [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech Building 345 East, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Real time mass flux measurements of gas-solid suspensions at low velocities  

SciTech Connect

In previous work, measurement of the particulate mass flux was made based upon a novel electrostatic technique. A small conducting wire sensor was inserted in the flow and as each particle hit the sensor an individual pulse of current was identified. Through suitable electronic circuitry, the number of pulses in a given time were counted. This was a direct measure of the number of particle-probe collisions which was related to local particle mass flow. The technique is currently limited to monodisperse suspensions. A primary advantage of the impact counter system is that the output does not depend upon the magnitude of the actual charge transfer. As long as the pulses are sufficiently above the noise level, variations in charge transfer will not affect the measurement. For the current work, the technique was applied to vertical gas-solid flow where the fluid velocity was slightly above the particle terminal velocity. Under these conditions a sufficient signal to noise ratio was not found. The Cheng-Soo charge transfer theory indicated that the low particle-sensor impact velocity was responsible. The probe system was then modified by extracting a particulate sample isokinetically and accelerating the particles to a sufficient velocity by an area reduction in the sampling tube. With this technique the signal to noise ratio was about 12 to 1. Mass flux results are shown to compare favorably with filter collection and weighing.

Saunders, J H; Chao, B T; Soo, S L

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Measurement of the W Boson Mass with the D0 Detector  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of the W boson mass using data corresponding to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector during Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. With a sample of 1677394 W {yields} e{nu} candidate events, we measure M{sub W} = 80.367 {+-} 0.026 GeV. This result is combined with an earlier D0 result determined using an independent Run II data sample, corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, to yield M{sub W} = 80.375 {+-} 0.023 GeV.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Buszello C. P.; Camacho-Perez E.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Caughron S.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Feng L.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De la Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Howley I.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson E.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu H.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel K. A.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; et al.

2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

76

Performance assessment of mass flow rate measurement capability in a large scale transient two-phase flow test system  

SciTech Connect

Mass flow is an important measured variable in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Program. Large uncertainties in mass flow measurements in the LOFT piping during LOFT coolant experiments requires instrument testing in a transient two-phase flow loop that simulates the geometry of the LOFT piping. To satisfy this need, a transient two-phase flow loop has been designed and built. The load cell weighing system, which provides reference mass flow measurements, has been analyzed to assess its capability to provide the measurements. The analysis consisted of first performing a thermal-hydraulic analysis using RELAP4 to compute mass inventory and pressure fluctuations in the system and mass flow rate at the instrument location. RELAP4 output was used as input to a structural analysis code SAPIV which is used to determine load cell response. The computed load cell response was then smoothed and differentiated to compute mass flow rate from the system. Comparison between computed mass flow rate at the instrument location and mass flow rate from the system computed from the load cell output was used to evaluate mass flow measurement capability of the load cell weighing system. Results of the analysis indicate that the load cell weighing system will provide reference mass flows more accurately than the instruments now in LOFT.

Nalezny, C.L.; Chapman, R.L.; Martinell, J.S.; Riordon, R.P.; Solbrig, C.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A measurement of the top quark mass with a matrix element method  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark. The event sample is selected from proton-antiproton collisions, at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy, observed with the CDF detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. They consider a 318 pb{sup -1} dataset collected between March 2002 and August 2004. They select events that contain one energetic lepton, large missing transverse energy, exactly four energetic jets, and at least one displaced vertex b tag. The analysis uses leading-order t{bar t} and background matrix elements along with parameterized parton showering to construct event-by-event likelihoods as a function of top quark mass. From the 63 events observed with the 318 pb{sup -1} dataset they extract a top quark mass of 172.0 {+-} 2.6(stat) {+-} 3.3(syst) GeV/c{sup 2} from the joint likelihood. The mean expected statistical uncertainty is 3.2 GeV/c{sup 2} for m{sub t} = 178 GTeV/c{sup 2} and 3.1 GeV/c{sup 2} for m{sub t} = 172.5 GeV/c{sup 2}. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty of the jet energy scale.

Gibson, Adam Paul; /UC, Berkeley

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

In situ global method for measurement of oxygen demand and mass transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two aerobic microorganisms, Saccharomycopsis lipolytica and Brevibacterium lactofermentum, have been used in a study of mass transfer and oxygen uptake from a global perspective using a closed gas system. Oxygen concentrations in the gas and liquid were followed using oxygen electrodes, and the results allowed for easy calculation of in situ oxygen transport. The cell yields on oxygen for S. lipolytica and B. lactofermentum were 1.01 and 1.53 g/g respectively. The mass transfer coefficient was estimated as 10 h{sup {minus}1} at 500 rpm for both fermentations. The advantages with this method are noticeable since the use of model systems may be avoided, and the in situ measurements of oxygen demand assure reliable data for scale-up.

Klasson, K.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Lundbaeck, K.M.O.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L. [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A new method of alpha ray measurement using a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new method of alpha($\\alpha$)-ray measurement that detects helium atoms with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer(QMS). A demonstration is undertaken with a plastic-covered $^{241}$Am $\\alpha$-emitting source to detect $\\alpha$-rays stopped in the capsule. We successfully detect helium atoms that diffuse out of the capsule by accumulating them for one to 20 hours in a closed chamber. The detected amount is found to be proportional to the accumulation time. Our method is applicable to probe $\\alpha$-emitting radioactivity in bulk material.

Y. Iwata; Y. Inoue; M. Minowa

2007-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

New Precision Mass Measurements of Neutron-Rich Calcium and Potassium Isotopes and Three-Nucleon Forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present precision Penning trap mass measurements of neutron-rich calcium and potassium isotopes in the vicinity of neutron number N=32. Using the TITAN system, the mass of 51K was measured for the first time, and the precision of the 51,52Ca mass values were improved significantly. The new mass values show a dramatic increase of the binding energy compared to those reported in the atomic mass evaluation. In particular, 52Ca is more bound by 1.74 MeV, and the behavior with neutron number deviates substantially from the tabulated values. An increased binding was predicted recently based on calculations that include three-nucleon (3N) forces. We present a comparison to improved calculations, which agree remarkably with the evolution of masses with neutron number, making neutron-rich calcium isotopes an exciting region to probe 3N forces.

Gallant, A. T. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Bale, J. C. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia/Simon Fraser University-Canada; Brunner, T. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Chowdhury, U. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia/ University of Manitoba-Canada; Ettenauer, S. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Lennarz, A. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia/Westflische Wilhelms-Universitt-Germany; Robertson, D. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Simon, V. V. [TRIUMF-Canada/Ruprecht-Karls-Universitt Heidelberg/Max-Planck-Inst.-Heidelberg, Germany; Chaudhuri, A. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Holt, J. D. [UTK/ORNL; Kwiatkowski, A. A. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Man, E. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Menndez, J. [Inst. fr Kernphysik, Tech. Univ. Darmstadt-Germany/ExtreMe Matter Inst., GSI-Darmstadt; Schultz, B. E. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Simon, M. C. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Andreoiu, C. [Simon Fraser University, Canada; Delheij, P. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Pearson, M. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia; Savajols, H. [GANIL, Caen cedex, France; Schwenk, A. [Inst. fr Kernphysik, Tech. Univ. Darmstadt-Germany/ExtreMe Matter Inst., GSI-Darmstadt; Dilling, J. [TRIUMF, University of British Columbia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Penning trap mass measurements on (99-109)$Cd with ISOLTRAP and implications on the rp process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Penning trap mass measurements on neutron-deficient Cd isotopes (99-109)Cd have been performed with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN, all with relative mass uncertainties below 3*10^8. A new mass evaluation has been performed. The mass of 99Cd has been determined for the first time which extends the region of accurately known mass values towards the doubly magic nucleus 100Sn. The implication of the results on the reaction path of the rp process in stellar X-ray bursts is discussed. In particular, the uncertainty of the abundance and the overproduction created by the rp-process for the mass A = 99 is demonstrated by reducing the uncertainty of the proton-separation energy of 100In Sp(100In) by a factor of 2.5.

M. Breitenfeldt; G. Audi; D. Beck; K. Blaum; S. George; F. Herfurth; A. Herlert; A. Kellerbauer; H. -J. Kluge; M. Kowalska; D. Lunney; S. Naimi; D. Neidherr; H. Schatz; S. Schwarz; L. Schweikhard

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

82

Source modulation-correlation measurement for fissile mass flow in gas or liquid fissile streams  

SciTech Connect

The method of monitoring fissile mass flow on all three legs of a blending point, where the input is high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) and the product is PEU, can yield the fissile stream velocity and, with calibration, the [sup235]U content. The product of velocity and content integrated over the pipe gives the fissile mass flow in each leg. Also, the ratio of fissile contents in each pipe: HEU/LEU, HEU/PEU, and PEU/LEU, are obtained. By modulating the source on the input HEU pipe differently from that on the output pipe, the HEU gas can be tracked through the blend point. This method can be useful for monitoring flow velocity, fissile content, and fissile mass flow in HEU blenddown of UF[sub 6] if the pressures are high enough to contain some of the induced fission products. This method can also be used to monitor transfer of fissile liquids and other gases and liquids that emit radiation delayed from particle capture. These preliminary experiments with the Oak Ridge apparatus show that the method will work and the modeling is adequate.

Mihalczo, J.T.; March-Leuba, J.A.; Valentine, T.E.; Abston, R.A.; Mattingly, J.K.; Mullens, J.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Coincidence Measurements of Core-Excited Molecules and Clusters Using TOF Fragment-Mass Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

In order to investigate photo-induced processes and dynamics of photochemical reactions involving molecular complexes and clusters in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray region, a cluster beam-photoreactive scattering apparatus has been designed and constructed at the HiSOR facility in Hiroshima University. The apparatus has a basic arrangement of a cluster beam source and a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer, where it was designed to give strong cluster beam intensity enough to perform a variety of photoelectron and photoion coincidence measurements. Here, we present spectroscopic and coincidence measurements of the photo-induced processes of atomic and molecular clusters in the soft X-ray region to make a fundamental assessment for the present cluster beam-photoreactive scattering apparatus.

Tabayashi, Kiyohiko [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center (HSRC), Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Maruyama, Tomoe [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Tanaka, Kenichiro; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki [Department of Physical Science, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center (HSRC), Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

84

Measurement of the Top Quark Mass at CDF Using the Template Method in the Lepton + Jets Channel  

SciTech Connect

A measurement of the top quark mass in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The analysis uses a template method, in which the overconstrained kinematics of the Lepton+Jets channel of the t{bar t} system are used to measure a single quantity, the reconstructed top quark mass, that is strongly correlated with the true top quark mass. in addition, the dijet mass of the hadronically decaying W boson is used to constrain in situ the uncertain jet energy scale in the CDF detector. Two-dimensional probability density functions are derived using a kernel density estimate-based machinery. Using 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data, the top quark mass is measured to be 171.8{sub -1.9}{sup +1.9}(stat.) {+-} 1.0(syst.)GeV/c{sup 2}.

Adelman, Jahred A.; /Chicago U.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Airborne measurements of mass, momentum, and energy fluxes for the boardman-arm regional flux experiment-1991. Preliminary data release. Technical memo  

SciTech Connect

During 2 - 19 June 1991 the Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division of NOAA measured flux densities of mass, momentum, and energy from an airplane in support of DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Over 507 horizontal flux transects were completed, along with 24 vertical atmospheric profiles, during the 93 flight hours. Flux transects passed over both irrigated farmland and steppe. The report describes the variation in wind, radiation, and surface temperature, along with exchange of mass (CO2, H2O, and O3), momentum, and energy as observed along the transects. Airborne measurements are compared with those from flux towers in wheat, corn, and steppe. In general, the measurements correspond well. The largest difference occurs at the steppe tower, with stronger heat fluxes reported by the tower. This discrepancy increases as heat flux increases. The cause may be a significant vertical flux divergence or an inconsistant specification of the mean state.

Crawford, T.L.; Dobosy, R.J.; Birdwell, K.R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Measurements of Plutonium in Sediment and Seawater from the Marshall Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer 2000, I was given the opportunity to work for about three months as a technical trainee at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, or LLNL as I will refer to it hereafter. University of California runs this Department of Energy laboratory, which is located 70 km east of San Francisco, in the small city of Livermore. This master thesis in Radioecology is based on the work I did here. LLNL, as a second U.S.-facility for development of nuclear weapons, was built in Livermore in the beginning of the 1950's (Los Alamos in New Mexico was the other one). It has since then also become a 'science center' for a number of areas like magnetic and laser fusion energy, non-nuclear energy, biomedicine, and environmental science. The Laboratory's mission has changed over the years to meet new national needs. The following two statements were found on the homepage of LLNL (http://www.llnl.gov), at 2001-03-05, where also information about the laboratory and the scientific projects that takes place there, can be found. 'Our primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide'. 'Our goal is to apply the best science and technology to enhance the security and well-being of the nation and to make the world a safer place.' The Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology group at the Health and Ecological Assessments division employed me, and I also worked to some extent with the Centre for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) group. The work I did at LLNL can be divided into two parts. In the first part Plutonium (Pu) measurements in sediments from the Rongelap atoll in Marshall Islands, using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) were done. The method for measuring these kinds of samples is well understood at LLNL since soil samples have been measured with AMS for Pu in the past. Therefore it was the results that were of main interest and not the technique. The second part was to take advantage of AMS's very high sensitivity by measure the Pu-concentrations in small volumes (0.04-1 L) of seawater. The technique for using AMS at Pu-measurements in seawater is relatively new and the main task for me was to find out a method that could work in practice. The area where the sediment samples and the water samples were collected are high above background levels for many radionuclides, including Pu, because of the detonation of the nuclear bomb code-named Castle Bravo, in 1954.

Leisvik, M; Hamilton, T

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Comparison of Different Techniques for the Measurement of Precipitation in Tropical Montane Rain Forest Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of different precipitation measurements in a tropical mountain valley in southern Ecuador are compared in this study to determine potential errors. The instruments are used for different ecological purposes like erosion studies, ...

R. Rollenbeck; J. Bendix; P. Fabian; J. Boy; W. Wilcke; H. Dalitz; M. Oesker; P. Emck

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Separation Of Uranium And Plutonium Isotopes For Measurement By Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 242}Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA{reg_sign} column coupled to a UTEVA{reg_sign} column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U, and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment.

Martinelli, R E; Hamilton, T F; Williams, R W; Kehl, S R

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

89

Determination of the proton separation energy of {sup 93}Rh from mass measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed {nu}p process, which occurs in the early time proton-rich neutrino winds of core-collapse supernovae, has the potential to resolve the long-standing uncertainty in the production of the light p-nuclei {sup 92}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. A recent study incorporating this {nu}p process has indicated that the proton separation energy S{sub p} of {sup 93}Rh is especially important in determining the relative production of these two isotopes. To reproduce the observed solar {sup 92}Mo/{sup 94}Mo abundance ratio of 1.57 a S{sub p} value for {sup 93}Rh of 1.64{+-}0.1 MeV is required. The previously unknown masses of {sup 92}Ru and {sup 93}Rh have been measured with the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer resulting in an experimental value for S{sub p}({sup 93}Rh) of 2.007{+-}0.009 MeV. This implies that with our current understanding of the conditions in core-collapse supernova explosions the {nu}p process is not solely responsible for the observed solar {sup 92}Mo/{sup 94}Mo abundance ratio.

Fallis, J.; Russell, S.; Vorst, M. Scholte van de; Sharma, H.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, Y. [Department of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Clark, J. A. [Department of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Sharma, K. S. [Department of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Savard, G.; Caldwell, S.; Sternberg, M.; Schelt, J. Van [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Buchinger, F.; Crawford, J. E.; Gulick, S.; Lee, J. K. P. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Deibel, C. M.; Wrede, C. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Fisker, J. L. [Physical Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hecht, A. A. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] (and others)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Feasibility study on using fast calorimetry technique to measure a mass attribute as part of a treaty verification regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The attribute measurement technique provides a method for determining whether or not an item containing special nuclear material (SNM) possesses attributes that fall within an agreed upon range of values. One potential attribute is whether the mass of an SNM item is larger than some threshold value that has been negotiated as part of a nonproliferation treaty. While the historical focus on measuring mass attributes has been on using neutron measurements, calorimetry measurements may be a viable alternative for measuring mass attributes for plutonium-bearing items. Traditionally, calorimetry measurements have provided a highly precise and accurate determination of the thermal power that is being generated by an item. In order to achieve this high level of precision and accuracy, the item must reach thermal equilibrium inside the calorimeter prior to determining the thermal power of the item. Because the approach to thermal equilibrium is exponential in nature, a large portion of the time spent approaching equilibrium is spent with the measurement being within {approx}10% of its final equilibrium value inside the calorimeter. Since a mass attribute measurement only needs to positively determine if the mass of a given SNM item is greater than a threshold value, performing a short calorimetry measurement to determine how the system is approaching thermal equilibrium may provide sufficient information to determine if an item has a larger mass than the agreed upon threshold. In previous research into a fast calorimetry attribute technique, a two-dimensional heat flow model of a calorimeter was used to investigate the possibility of determining a mass attribute for plutonium-bearing items using this technique. While the results of this study looked favorable for developing a fast calorimetry attribute technique, additional work was needed to determine the accuracy of the model used to make the calculations. In this paper, the results from the current work investigating the fast calorimetry attribute technique will be presented.

Hauck, Danielle K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bracken, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mac Arthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Santi, Peter A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Comparison of mass balance, energy consumption and cost of composting facilities for different types of organic waste  

SciTech Connect

Mass balance, energy consumption and cost are basic pieces of information necessary for selecting a waste management technology. In this study, composting facilities that treat different types of organic waste were studied by questionnaire survey and via a chemical analysis of material collected at the facilities. The mass balance was calculated on a dry weight basis because the moisture content of organic waste was very high. Even though the ratio of bulking material to total input varied in the range 0-65% on a dry basis, the carbon and ash content, carbon/nitrogen ratio, heavy metal content and inorganic nutrients in the compost were clearly influenced by the different characteristics of the input waste. The use of bulking material was not correlated with ash or elemental content in the compost. The operating costs were categorised into two groups. There was some economy of scale for wages and maintenance cost, but the costs for electricity and fuel were proportional to the amount of waste. Differences in operating costs can be explained by differences in the process characteristics.

Zhang Huijun [Lab of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Matsuto, Toshihiko, E-mail: matsuto@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Lab of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Measurement of reactive and condensable gas permeation using a mass spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Permeation of water vapor, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide through polymer films is measured by the programed valving mass spectrometry (PVMS) method. The results are calibrated with a standard permeation rate for each gas to determine the detection sensitivity. The calibrated lower detection limits are 1.90x10{sup -7} g/m{sup 2} day for water vapor, 2.81x10{sup -2} cm{sup 3}/m{sup 2} day for oxygen, 2.15x10{sup -2} cm{sup 3}/m{sup 2} day for nitrogen, and 3.29x10{sup -2} cm{sup 3}/m{sup 2} day for carbon dioxide. The lower detection limits presented here for water vapor, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide are more than two orders of magnitude lower than the corresponding values offered by the NIST-traceable standard techniques. In addition, the PVMS water vapor lower detection limit meets the sensitivity requirement for detecting 'ultrabarrier' water vapor permeation rates, while the oxygen lower detection limit is higher than that offered by the standard technique. However, the results suggest a modified measurement protocol and/or system modifications to overcome this limitation. Effusivity through a flow orifice was also examined using the PVMS method for the above gases. The effusion results from the flow orifice, combined with the permeation results from polymer samples, provide insight into the factors that may influence gas detection sensitivities.

Zhang Xiaodong; Lewis, Jay S.; Parker, Charles B.; Glass, Jeffrey T.; Wolter, Scott D. [Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

A Precision Measurement of the W Boson Mass with 1 Inverse Femtobarn of DZero Run IIa Data  

SciTech Connect

This thesis is a detailed presentation of a precision measurement of the mass of the W boson. It has been obtained by analyzing W {yields} e{nu} decays. The data used for this analysis was collected from 2002 to 2006 with the D0 detector, during Run IIa of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. It corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1}. With a sample of 499,830 W {yields} e{nu} candidate events, we obtain a mass measurement of M{sub W} = 80.401 {+-} 0.043 GeV. This is the most precise measurement from a single experiment to date.

Osta, Jyotsna; /Notre Dame U.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Next Generation Safeguard Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S Department of Energy is supporting a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The following 14 NDA techniques are being studied: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Gamma, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis. Understanding and maturity of the techniques vary greatly, ranging from decades old, well-understood methods to new approaches. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that had not previously been studied for SNF assay or similar applications. Since NRF generates isotope-specific signals, the promise and appeal of the technique lies in its potential to directly measure the amount of a specific isotope in an SNF assay target. The objectives of this study were to design and model suitable NRF measurement methods, to quantify capabilities and corresponding instrumentation requirements, and to evaluate prospects and the potential of NRF for SNF assay. The main challenge of the technique is to achieve the sensitivity and precision, i.e., to accumulate sufficient counting statistics, required for quantifying the mass of Pu isotopes in SNF assemblies. Systematic errors, considered a lesser problem for a direct measurement and only briefly discussed in this report, need to be evaluated for specific instrument designs in the future. Also, since the technical capability of using NRF to measure Pu in SNF has not been established, this report does not directly address issues such as cost, size, development time, nor concerns related to the use of Pu in measurement systems. This report discusses basic NRF measurement concepts, i.e., backscatter and transmission methods, and photon source and {gamma}-ray detector options in Section 2. An analytical model for calculating NRF signal strengths is presented in Section 3 together with enhancements to the MCNPX code and descriptions of modeling techniques that were drawn upon in the following sections. Making extensive use of the model and MCNPX simulations, the capabilities of the backscatter and transmission methods based on bremsstrahlung or quasi-monoenergetic photon sources were analyzed as described in Sections 4 and 5. A recent transmission experiment is reported on in Appendix A. While this experiment was not directly part of this project, its results provide an important reference point for our analytical estimates and MCNPX simulations. Used fuel radioactivity calculations, the enhancements to the MCNPX code, and details of the MCNPX simulations are documented in the other appendices.

Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J.; Ambers, Scott D.

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

95

Measurement of the W Boson Mass with the D0 Run II Detector using the Electron P(T) Spectrum  

SciTech Connect

This thesis is a description of the measurement of the W boson mass using the D0 Run II detector with 770 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data. These collisions were produced by the Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV between 2002 and 2006. We use a sample of W {yields} e{nu} and Z {yields} ee decays to determine the W boson mass with the transverse momentum distribution of the electron and the transverse mass distribution of the boson. We measure M{sub W} = XXXXX {+-} 37 (stat.) {+-} 26 (sys. theo.) {+-} 51 (sys. exp.) MeV = XXXXX {+-} 68 MeV with the transverse momentum distribution of the electron and M{sub W} = XXXXX {+-} 28 (stat.) {+-} 17 (sys. theo.) {+-} 51 (sys. exp.) MeV = XXXXX {+-} 61 MeV with the transverse mass distribution.

Andeen, Timothy R., Jr.; /Northwestern U.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The on-line charge breeding program at TRIUMF's Ion Trap For Atomic and Nuclear Science for precision mass measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN) constitutes the only high precision mass measurement setup coupled to a rare isotope facility capable of increasing the charge state of short-lived nuclides prior to the actual mass determination in a Penning trap. Recent developments around TITAN's charge breeder, the electron beam ion trap, form the basis for several successful experiments on radioactive isotopes with half-lives as low as 65 ms and in charge states as high as 22+.

Simon, M. C.; Eberhardt, B.; Jang, F.; Luichtl, M.; Robertson, D.; Chaudhuri, A.; Delheij, P.; Grossheim, A.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Mane, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Schultz, B. E. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Bale, J. C. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Chowdhury, U. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A. T.; Dilling, J. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Lennarz, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Ma, T.; Andreoiu, C. [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); and others

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Top-quark mass measurement in events with jets and missing transverse energy using the full CDF data set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the top-quark mass using the full data set of Tevatron $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of \\invfb{8.7}. The analysis uses events with one semileptonic $t$ or $\\bar{t}$ decay, but without detection of the electron or muon. We select events with significant missing transverse energy and multiple jets. We veto events containing identified electrons or muons. We obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of the two jets from $W$-boson decays from data and compare these to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with {\\it in situ} calibration. A likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the top-quark mass, $\\mtop = \\gevcc{\\measStatSyst{173.93}{1.64}{0.87}}$. This result is the most precise measurement to date of the mass of the top quark in this event topology.

CDF Collaboration

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Measuring Smuon-Selectron Mass Splitting at the LHC and Patterns of Supersymmetry Breaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

01 . The enhancement diverges as the slepton mass approaches ei- ther neutralino mass. The benefits of the enhancement may be diluted for highly degenerate spectra by the fact that leptons coming from such chains will tend to be softer and thus harder...

Allanach, B C; Conlon, Jo; Lester, Christopher G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Development of Quantitative Measurement of Fuel Mass Distribution Using Planar Imaging Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantified fuel mass distribution of a spray was obtained from laser induced fluorescence images with optical patternation. In the dense spray region, however, the emitted fluorescence signal is significantly attenuated in the path of the detector ... Keywords: Imaging method, Laser induced fluorescence (LIF), Mass distribution, Signal Attenuation, Spray

H. Koh; K. Jung; Y. Yoon; K. Lee; K. -S. Jeong

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Measurement of the Top-Quark Mass in All-Hadronic Decays in p pbar Collisions at CDF II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the top-quark mass, $M_{\\mathrm{top}}$, in the all-hadronic decay channel $t\\bar{t} \\to W^+b W^- \\bar{b} \\to q_1\\bar{q}_2 b q_3 \\bar{q}_4 \\bar{b}$. The analysis is performed using 310 pb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt{s}$=1.96 TeV $p\\bar{p}$ collisions collected with the CDF II detector using a multi-jet trigger. The mass measurement is based on an event-by-event likelihood which depends on both the sample purity and the value of the top-quark mass, using 90 possible jet-to-parton assignments in the six-jet final state. The joint likelihood of 290 selected events yields a value of $M_{\\mathrm{top}}$=177.1 $\\pm$ 4.9 (stat.) $\\pm$ 4.7 (syst.) GeV/$c^2$.

T. Aaltonen

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

09-01188, ANS Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management IV, HiltonParameter Library Spent Nuclear Fuel Transmission detector (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to

Ludewigt, Bernhard A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. III. MEASURING AGES AND MASSES OF PARTIALLY RESOLVED STELLAR CLUSTERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The apparent age and mass of a stellar cluster can be strongly affected by stochastic sampling of the stellar initial mass function (IMF), when inferred from the integrated color of low-mass clusters ({approx}light of the fainter, more numerous unresolved stars can be analyzed separately. When comparing the light from the less luminous cluster members to models of unresolved light, more accurate age estimates can be obtained than when analyzing the integrated light from the entire cluster under the assumption that the IMF is fully populated. We show the success of this technique first using simulated clusters, and then with a stellar cluster in M31. This method represents one way of accounting for the discrete, stochastic sampling of the stellar IMF in less massive clusters and can be leveraged in studies of clusters throughout the Local Group and other nearby galaxies.

Beerman, Lori C.; Johnson, L. Clifton; Fouesneau, Morgan; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Ben F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Gouliermis, Dimitrios A. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kalirai, Jason S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Larsen, Soren S. [Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Melbourne, Jason L. [Caltech Optical Observatories, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Mail Stop 301-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rix, Hans-Walter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Skillman, Evan D., E-mail: beermalc@astro.washington.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Precise measurement of the {sup 64}Ge mass and its effect on the rp process  

SciTech Connect

The Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer has been used to determine the mass excesses of {sup 64}Ge and {sup 64}Ga as -54344(30) keV and -58832.5(39) keV, respectively. Under typical conditions used for modeling x-ray bursts, {sup 64}Ge is confirmed as a waiting-point nuclide and can contribute up to 35.5 s to the timescale of the rp process at a peak x-ray burst temperature of 1.5 GK.

Clark, J. A. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Sharma, K. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Savard, G. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Levand, A. F.; Zhou, Z.; Seweryniak, D.; Trimble, W. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Wang, J. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Blank, B. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Buchinger, F.; Crawford, J. E.; Gulick, S.; Lee, J. K. P. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Detection, size, measurement and structural analysis limits for the 2MASS, UKIDSS-LAS & VISTA VIKING surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 2MASS, UKIDSS-LAS and VISTA VIKING surveys have all now observed the GAMA 9hr region in the $K_s$ band. Here we compare the detection rates, photometry, basic size measurements, and single-component GALFIT structural measurements for a sample of 37,591 galaxies. We explore the sensitivity limits where the data agree for a variety of issues including: detection, star-galaxy separation, photometric measurements, size and ellipticity measurements, and S\\'{e}rsic measurements. We find that 2MASS fails to detect at least 20% of the galaxy population within all magnitude bins, however for those that are detected we find photometry is robust ($\\pm$ 0.2 mag) to 14.7 AB mag and star-galaxy separation to 14.8 AB mag. For UKIDSS-LAS we find incompleteness starts to enter at a flux limit of 18.9 AB mag, star-galaxy separation is robust to 16.3 AB mag and structural measurements are robust to 17.7 AB mag. VISTA VIKING data is complete to approximately 20.0 AB mag and structural measurements appear robust to 18.8 AB ma...

Andrews, Stephen K; Driver, Simon P; Robotham, Aaron S G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

STELLAR VELOCITY DISPERSION MEASUREMENTS IN HIGH-LUMINOSITY QUASAR HOSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE AGN BLACK HOLE MASS SCALE  

SciTech Connect

We present new stellar velocity dispersion measurements for four luminous quasars with the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer instrument and the ALTAIR laser guide star adaptive optics system on the Gemini North 8 m telescope. Stellar velocity dispersion measurements and measurements of the supermassive black hole (BH) masses in luminous quasars are necessary to investigate the coevolution of BHs and galaxies, trace the details of accretion, and probe the nature of feedback. We find that higher-luminosity quasars with higher-mass BHs are not offset with respect to the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation exhibited by lower-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with lower-mass BHs, nor do we see correlations with galaxy morphology. As part of this analysis, we have recalculated the virial products for the entire sample of reverberation-mapped AGNs and used these data to redetermine the mean virial factor (f) that places the reverberation data on the quiescent M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation. With our updated measurements and new additions to the AGN sample, we obtain (f) = 4.31 {+-} 1.05, which is slightly lower than, but consistent with, most previous determinations.

Grier, C. J.; Martini, P.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Zu, Y. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Watson, L. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bentz, M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Dasyra, K. M. [Observatoire de Paris, LERMA (CNRS:UMR8112), 61 Avenue de l'Observatoire, F-75014, Paris (France); Dietrich, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45601 (United States); Ferrarese, L. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria BV V9E 2E7 (Canada)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

Improving the neutrino mass hierarchy identification with inelasticity measurement in PINGU and ORCA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-megaton scale under ice and underwater detectors of atmospheric neutrinos with few GeV's energy threshold (PINGU, ORCA) open up new possibilities in the determination of neutrino properties, and in particular the neutrino mass hierarchy. With a dense array of optical modules it will be possible to determine the inelasticity, $y$, of the charged current $\

Mathieu Ribordy; Alexei Yu Smirnov

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

107

Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and in situ Jet Energy Calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A precision measurement of the top quark mass m_t is obtained using a sample of ttbar events from ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of m_t and a parameter DJES to calibrate the jet energy scale /in situ/. Using a total of 1087 events, a value of m_t = 173.0 +/- 1.2 GeV/c^2 is measured.

T. Aaltonen et al.

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

108

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurement of uranium enrichment and actinide compositionsIE indicates initial enrichment of uranium in the fuel, M U

Ludewigt, Bernhard A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Manifold and method of batch measurement of Hg-196 concentration using a mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample manifold and method of its use has been developed so that milligram quantities of mercury can be analyzed mass spectroscopically to determine the [sup 196]Hg concentration to less than 0.02 atomic percent. Using natural mercury as a standard, accuracy of [+-]0.002 atomic percent can be obtained. The mass spectrometer preferably used is a commercially available GC/MS manufactured by Hewlett Packard. A novel sample manifold is contained within an oven allowing flow rate control of Hg into the MS. Another part of the manifold connects to an auxiliary pumping system which facilitates rapid clean up of residual Hg in the manifold. Sample cycle time is about 1 hour. 8 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; Evans, R.

1991-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

110

Crosscheck of different techniques for two dimensional power spectral density measurements of x-ray optics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The consistency of different instruments and methods for measuring two-dimensional (2D) power spectral density (PSD) distributions are investigated. The instruments are an interferometric microscope, an atomic force microscope (AFM) and the X-ray Reflectivity and Scattering experimental facility, all available at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The measurements were performed with a gold-coated mirror with a highly polished stainless steel substrate. It was shown that these three techniques provide essentially consistent results. For the stainless steel mirror, an envelope over all measured PSD distributions can be described with an inverse power-law PSD function. It is also shown that the measurements can be corrected for the specific spatial frequency dependent systematic errors of the instruments. The AFM and the X-ray scattering measurements were used to determine the modulation transfer function of the interferometric microscope. The corresponding correction procedure is discussed in detail. Lower frequency investigation of the 2D PSD distribution was also performed with a long trace profiler and a ZYGO GPI interferometer. These measurements are in some contradiction, suggesting that the reliability of the measurements has to be confirmed with additional investigation. Based on the crosscheck of the performance of all used methods, we discuss the ways for improving the 2D PSD characterization of X-ray optics.

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Irick, Steve C.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Salmassi, Farhad; Warwick, Tony

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

Implications of the measurement of pulsars with two solar masses for quark matter in compact stars and HIC. A NJL model case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The precise measurement of the high masses of the pulsars PSR J1614-2230 (M_{1614}=1.97 +- 0.04 solar masses) and PSR J0348-0432 (M_{0348}=2.01 +- 0.04 solar masses) provides an important constraint for the equation of state of cold, dense matter and is suited to give interesting insights regarding the nature and existence of the possible phase transition to deconfined quark matter in the cores of neutron stars. We analyze the stability and composition of compact star sequences for a class of hybrid nuclear - quark-matter equations of state. The quark matter phase is described in the framework of a standard color superconducting 3-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model and the hadronic phase is given by the Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock equation of state for the Bonn-A potential. The phase transition is obtained by a Maxwell construction. Within this model setup we aim to constrain otherwise not strictly fixed parameters of the NJL model, namely the coupling strengths in the vector meson and diquark interaction channels. We perform this investigation for two different parameterizations characterized by a different scalar coupling constant. The analysis of flow data obtained in heavy-ion collisions resulted in a further constraint which we account for in our discussion. Massive hybrid stars with extended quark matter cores can be obtained in accordance with all of the considered constraints.

T. Klahn; D. B. Blaschke; R. ?astowiecki

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Nuclear Recoil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Quantitative Measurements using NRF 2.1 Nuclear ResonanceFuture Work A Transmission Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence

Ludewigt, Bernhard A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Toward understanding of differences in current cloud retrievals of ARM ground-based measurements  

SciTech Connect

Accurate observations of cloud microphysical properties are needed for evaluating and improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models and better estimate of the Earth radiative budget. However, large differences are found in current cloud products retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements using various retrieval algorithms. Understanding the differences is an important step to address uncertainties in the cloud retrievals. In this study, an in-depth analysis of nine existing ground-based cloud retrievals using ARM remote sensing measurements is carried out. We place emphasis on boundary layer overcast clouds and high level ice clouds, which are the focus of many current retrieval development efforts due to their radiative importance and relatively simple structure. Large systematic discrepancies in cloud microphysical properties are found in these two types of clouds among the nine cloud retrieval products, particularly for the cloud liquid and ice particle effective radius. Note that the differences among some retrieval products are even larger than the prescribed uncertainties reported by the retrieval algorithm developers. It is shown that most of these large differences have their roots in the retrieval theoretical bases, assumptions, as well as input and constraint parameters. This study suggests the need to further validate current retrieval theories and assumptions and even the development of new retrieval algorithms with more observations under different cloud regimes.

Zhao C.; Dunn M.; Xie, S.; Klein, S. A.; Protat, A.; Shupe, M. D.; McFarlane, S. A.; Comstock, J. M.; Delano, J.; Deng, M.; Hogan, R. J.; Huang, D.; Jensen, M. P.; Mace, G. G.; McCoy, R.; OConnor, E. J.; Turner, D. D.; Wang, Z.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

Weighing Wimps with Kinks at Colliders: Invisible Particle Mass Measurements from Endpoints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decay into one invisible daughter of unknown mass (represented by the lightly shaded arrows) and an arbitrary number of visible daughters. In the analysis and conclusions, we will find it necessary to draw a distinction between (a,b) events in which... arise at the boundary values of mN . The extremal values are fI = (?+m) 2. (22) For a true (N+1)-daughter point decay, ? fI = ?+ ?imi, ? fII = ??m1 +m0. (23) It is straightforward to check that all of equations (15), bar the last one...

Barr, Alan; Gripaios, Ben; Lester, Christopher G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Measuring sparticle masses in nonuniversal string inspired models at the LHC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

leptons and the other of the two highest pT jets is inconsistent with these being the decay products of a squark (i.e. mlljj > mcutoff). Although the above demand for inconsistency increases the purity of the signal, it has a significant detrimental effect... T ? 100 GeV, with at least one inside ?2.0 ? ?j ? 2.0. mbb within 17 GeV of Higgs peak in mbb spectrum. Since the desired edge is a maximum, the non-b jet (i.e. jq1 or jq2) chosen to form the mhq invariant mass is that which minimises mhq. Zq edge nleptons...

Allanach, B C; Lester, Christopher G; Parker, Michael A; Webber, Bryan R

116

A comparative analysis of energy conservation using schools with differing energy measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose was to determine the extent to which, if any, traditional and optimal energy-conservation measures contribute to serve as forces in reducing school operating costs and expenditures. The study was concerned with determining the differences in specific energy-conservation measures in schools categorized as traditionally or optimally equipped and assessing the differences in annual BTU usage and energy costs per square foot in these schools. The study was also concerned with the construction and retrofit costs of optimally and traditionally equipped schools. Data were gathered from eight optimally and traditionally equipped subject schools located in the Dallas suburban districts of Mesquite and Garland and from interviews held with school district personnel and energy engineers in the private sector. The data revealed substantial differences in specific features of the traditionally and optimally equipped schools' energy-conservation measures concerning building envelopes, electrical, and mechanical systems. The BTU usage and energy costs per square foot per year ranged from 16 to 31 % and from 7 to 32% less in the optimally equipped schools. Results indicated that the optimally equipped subject school's total contract cost as 1% higher than that of the traditionally equipped school.

Hopkins, M.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Quark-antiquark composite systems:the Bethe--Salpeter equation in the spectral-integration technique in the case of the different quark masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bethe--Salpeter equations for the quark-antiquark composite systems with different quark masses, such as $q\\bar s$ (with $q=u$,$d$), $q\\bar Q$ and $s \\bar Q$ (with $Q=c$,$b$), are written in terms of spectral integrals. For the mesons characterized by the mass $M$, spin $J$ and radial quantum number $n$, the equations are presented for the $(n,M^2)$-trajectories with fixed $J$. In the spectral-integral technique one can use the energy-dependent forces and get beyond instantaneous approximation. The mixing between states with different quark spin $S$ and angular momentum $L$ are also discussed.

A. V. Anisovich; V. V. Anisovich; V. N. Markov; M. A. Matveev; A. V. Sarantsev

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

118

Toward Understanding of Differences in Current Cloud Retrievals of ARM Ground-based Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Accurate observations of cloud microphysical properties are needed for evaluating and improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models. However, large differences are found in current cloud products retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements using various retrieval algorithms. Understanding the differences is an important step to address uncertainties in the cloud retrievals. In this study, an in-depth analysis of nine existing ground-based cloud retrievals using ARM remote sensing measurements is carried out. We place emphasize on boundary layer overcast clouds and high level ice clouds, which are the focus of many current retrieval development efforts due to their radiative importance and relatively simple structure. Large systematic discrepancies in cloud microphysical properties are found in these two types of clouds among the nine cloud retrieval products, particularly for the cloud liquid and ice effective radius. It is shown that most of these large differences have their roots in the retrieval algorithms used by these cloud products, including the retrieval theoretical bases, assumptions, as well as input and constraint parameters. This study suggests the need to further validate current retrieval theories and assumptions and even the development of new retrieval algorithms with more observations under different cloud regimes.

Zhao, Chuanfeng; Xie, Shaocheng; Klein, Stephen A.; Protat, Alain; Shupe, Matthew D.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Delanoe, Julien; Deng, Min; Dunn, Maureen; Hogan, Robin; Huang, Dong; Jensen, Michael; Mace, Gerald G.; McCoy, Renata; O'Conner, Ewan J.; Turner, Dave; Wang, Zhien

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

Precision mass measurements of very short-lived, neutron-rich Na isotopes using a radiofrequency spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass measurements of high precision have been performed on sodium isotopes out to $^{30}$Na using a new technique of radiofrequency excitation of ion trajectories in a homogeneous magnetic field. This method, especially suited to very short-lived nuclides, has allowed us to significantly reduce the uncertainty in mass of the most exotic Na isotopes: a relative error of 5\\audi was achieved for $^{28}$Na having a half-life of only 30.5 ms and 9\\audi for the weakly produced $^{30}$Na. Verifying and minimizing binding energy uncertainties in this region of the nuclear chart is important for clarification of a long standing problem concerning the strength of the $N~=~20$ magic shell closure. These results are the fruit of the commissioning of the new experimental program Mistral.

Lunney, M D; Doubre, H; Henry, S; Monsanglant, C; De Saint-Simon, M; Thibault, C; Toader, C F; Borcea, C; Bollen, G

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

First Use of High Charge States for Mass Measurements of Short-Lived Nuclides in a Penning Trap  

SciTech Connect

Penning trap mass measurements of short-lived nuclides have been performed for the first time with highly charged ions, using the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. Compared to singly charged ions, this provides an improvement in experimental precision that scales with the charge state q. Neutron-deficient Rb isotopes have been charge bred in an electron beam ion trap to q=8-12+ prior to injection into the Penning trap. In combination with the Ramsey excitation scheme, this unique setup creating low energy, highly charged ions at a radioactive beam facility opens the door to unrivaled precision with gains of 1-2 orders of magnitude. The method is particularly suited for short-lived nuclides such as the superallowed {beta} emitter {sup 74}Rb (T{sub 1/2}=65 ms). The determination of its atomic mass and an improved Q{sub EC} value are presented.

Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A. T.; Dilling, J. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Simon, M. C.; Chaudhuri, A.; Mane, E.; Delheij, P.; Pearson, M. R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Brunner, T. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Physik Department E12, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Chowdhury, U. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Simon, V. V. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, Heidelberg (Germany); Brodeur, M. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Andreoiu, C. [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 (Canada); Audi, G. [CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, Universite Paris 11, 91405 Orsay (France); Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Gwinner, G. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Lapierre, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab., Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Lunney, D. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, Univ. Paris 11, 91405 Orsay (France); Ringle, R. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab., Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

CDF measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton + jets channel using the multivariate template method  

SciTech Connect

The authors measure the mass of the top quark using 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF experiment at FNAL in Run II. The decay chain t{bar t} {yields} bq{bar q}{bar b}lv is studied using a novel technique called the Multivariate Template Method (MTM). Using this technique they obtain a result of M{sub top} = 179.6{sub -6.3}{sup +6.4} {+-} 6.8 GeV/c{sup 2} for the top quark.

Freeman, John; /Fermilab

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Airborne Measurements of Air Mass from O2 A-Band Absorption Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne experiments to assess the feasibility of remote sensing surface pressure from a space platform are described. The data are high-resolution spectra in the O2 A band (759771 nm) of sunlight reflected from the sea surface, measured by a ...

D. M. OBrien; R. M. Mitchell; S. A. English; G. A. Da Costa

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Explosive performance measurements on large, multiple-hole arrays and large masses of conventional explosive  

SciTech Connect

The COntinuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time EXperiment (CORRTEX) system was developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory for determining the energy released in a nuclear explosion by measuring the position of its shock front as a function of time. The CORRTEX system, fielding techniques, and the methods and software for data reduction and analysis were developed over a 15 year period with hundreds of measurements made on nuclear tests and high explosive experiments. CORRTEX is a compact, portable, fast-sampling, microprocessor-controlled system, based on time domain reflectometry, requiring only a 24 volt power source and a sensing element. Only the sensing element (a length of 50 ohm coaxial cable) is expended during the detonation. In 1979, the CORRTEX system was shown to be ideally suited for chemical explosive performance measurements. Its utility for diagnosing chemical explosives was further demonstrated with successful measurements on large multiple-hole chemical shots in rock quarries and strip mines. Accurate timing of the detonation of sequenced or ripple fired arrays, as well as data characterizing the initiation, explosive performance and detonation anomalies are obtained. This information can serve as the basis for empirical or modeled improvements to blasting operations. A summary of the special CORRTEX features and well developed analysis techniques together with the experiment designs, data, and conclusions regarding the measurements and explosive performance from several array detonations and the Chemical Kiloton Experiment, 2.9 million pounds of an ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) and emulsion blend conducted on the Nevada Test Site in 1993, are presented.

McKown, T.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Eilers, D.D. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Williams, P.E. [New Mexico Tech., Socorro, New Mexico (United States). Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A Measurement of the Mass and Full-Width of the $\\eta_{c}$ Meson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a sample of 7.8 million $J/\\psi$ decays collected in the BeijingSpectrometer, the process J/$\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta_c$ is observed for fivedifferent $\\eta_c$ decay channels: $K^+K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$,$K^\\pm K^0_S \\pi^\\mp$ (with $K^0_S\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$), $\\phi\\phi$ (with $\\phi\\toK^+K^-$) and $K^+K^-\\pi^0$. From these signals, we determine the mass of$\\eta_c$ to be $2976.6\\pm2.9\\pm1.3$ MeV. Combining this result with apreviously reported result from a similar study using $\\psi(2S)\\to\\gamma\\eta_c$detected in the same spectrometer gives $m_{\\eta_c} = 2976.3\\pm2.3\\pm1.2$ MeV.For the combined samples, we obtain $\\Gamma_{\\eta_c} = 11.0\\pm 8.1\\pm 4.1$ MeV.

Bai, J Z; Bian, J G; Blum, I K; Chen, A D; Chen, G P; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, J; Chen Jia Chao; Chen, X D; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Cheng Bao Sen; Choi, J B; Cui, X Z; Ding, H L; Dong, L Y; Du, Z Z; Dunwoodie, W M; Gao, C S; Gao, M L; Gao, S Q; Gratton, P; Gu, J H; Gu, S D; Gu, W X; Guo, Y N; Guo, Z J; Han, S W; Han, Y; Harris, F A; He, J; He, J T; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hitlin, D G; Hu, G Y; Hu, H M; Hu, J L; Hu, Q H; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, X P; Huang, Y Z; Izen, J M; Jiang, C H; Jin, Y; Jones, B D; Ju, X; Kang, J S; Ke, Z J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, B K; Kim, H J; Kim, S K; Kim, T Y; Kong, D; Lai, Y F; Lang, P F; Lankford, A J; Li, C G; Li, D; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, P Q; Li, W; Li, W G; Li, X H; Li Xiao Nan; Li Xue Qian; Li Zhong Chao; Liu, B; Liu, F; Liu Feng; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, R G; Liu, Y; Liu, Z X; Lou, X C; Lowery, B; Lu, G R; Lu, F; Lu, J G; Luo, X L; Ma, E C; Ma, J M; Malchow, R; Mao, H S; Mao, Z P; Meng, X C; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Olsen, S L; Oyang, J Y T; Paluselli, D; Pan, L J; Panetta, J; Park, H; Porter, F; Qi, N D; Qi, X R; Qian, C D; Qiu, J F; Qu, Y H; Que, Y K; Rong, G; Schernau, M; Shao, Y Y; Shen, B W; Shen, D L; Shen, H; Shen, H Y; Shen, X Y; Shi, F; Shi, H Z; Song, X F; Standifird, J; Suh, J Y; Sun, H S; Sun, L F; Sun, Y Z; Tang, S Q; Toki, W; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, F; Wang, L; Wang, L S; Wang, L Z; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S M; Wang, Y Y; Wang, Z Y; Weaver, M; Wei, C L; Wu, N; Wu, Y G; Xi, D M; Xia, X M; Xie, Y; Xie, Y H; Xu, G F; Xue, S T; Yan, J; Yan, W G; Yang, C M; Yang, C Y; Yang, H X; Yang, W; Yang, X F; Ye, M H; Ye Shu Wei; Ye, Y X; Yu, C S; Yu, C X; Yu, G W; Yu Yu Hei; Yu, Z Q; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zhang Bing Yun; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, D; Zhang, H L; Zhang, J; Zhang, J W; Zhang, L; Zhang Lei; Zhang, L S; Zhang, P; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Zhao, D X; Zhao, H W; Zhao, J; Zhao Jia Wei; Zhao, M; Zhao Wei Ren; Zhao, Z G; Zheng Jian Ping; Zheng Lin Sheng; Zheng, Y H; Zheng Zhi Peng; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, L; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Measurement of the top quark mass in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions using events with two leptons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the top quark mass (m{sub t}) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using t{bar t} events with two leptons (ee, e{mu} or {mu}{mu}) in the final state in 4.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We analyze the kinematically underconstrained dilepton events by integrating over the neutrino rapidity distributions. We reduce the dominant systematic uncertainties from jet energy calibration using a correction obtained from t{bar t} {yields} {ell} + jets events. We also correct jets in simulated events to replicate the quark flavor dependence of the jet response in data. In combination with our previous analysis, we measure m{sub t} = 174.0 {+-} 2.4(stat) {+-} 1.4(syst) GeV.

Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Aoki, Masato; /Fermilab; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Florida State U. /Stockholm U.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Aerometric measurement and modeling of the mass of CO2 emissions from Crystal Geyser, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Crystal Geyser in eastern Utah is a rare, non-geothermal geyser that emits carbon dioxide gas in periodic eruptions. This geyser is the largest single source of CO{sub 2} originating from a deep reservoir. For this study, the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted from Crystal Geyser is estimated through measurements of downwind CO{sub 2} air concentration applied to an analytical model for atmospheric dispersion. Five eruptions occurred during the 48-hour field study, for a total of almost 3 hours of eruption. Pre-eruption emissions were also timed and sampled. Slow wind during three of the active eruptions conveyed the plume over a grid of samplers arranged in arcs from 25 to 100 m away from the geyser. An analytical, straight-line Gaussian model matched the pattern of concentration measurements. Plume width was determined from least-squares fit of the CO{sub 2} concentrations integrated over time. The CO{sub 2} emission rate was found to be between 2.6 and 5.8 kg/s during the eruption events, and about 0.17 kg/s during the active pre-eruptive events. Our limited field study can be extrapolated to an annual CO{sub 2} emission of 12 kilotonnes from this geyser. As this is the first application of Gaussian dispersion modeling and objective timing to CO{sub 2} emissions from a geyser of any type, the present study demonstrates the feasibility of applying this method more completely in the future.

Gouveia, F J; Johnson, M R; Leif, R N; Friedmann, S J

2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

127

Laboratory and Field Measurements of Electrical Resistivity to Determine Saturation and Detect Fractures in a Heated Rock Mass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of intact and fractured representative geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to infer saturation and fracture location in a large-scale field test. Measurements were performed to simulate test conditions with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures to 145 C. Measurements presented are a first step toward making the search for fractures using electrical methods quantitatively. Intact samples showed a gradual resistivity increase when pore pressure was decreased below the phase-boundary pressure of free water, while fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling. The resistivity change is greatest for samples with the most exposed surface area. Analysis of a field test provided the opportunity to evaluate fracture detection using electrical methods at a large scale. Interpretation of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) images of resistivity contrasts, aided by laboratory derived resistivity-saturation-temperature relationships, indicates that dynamic saturation changes in a heated rock mass are observable and that fractures experiencing drying or resaturation can be identified. The same techniques can be used to locate fractures in geothermal reservoirs using electrical field methods.

Roberts, J J; Ramirez, A; Carlson, S; Ralph, W; Bonner, B P

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

128

THE DEFLECTION OF THE TWO INTERACTING CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS OF 2010 MAY 23-24 AS REVEALED BY COMBINED IN SITU MEASUREMENTS AND HELIOSPHERIC IMAGING  

SciTech Connect

In 2010 May 23-24, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed the launch of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which were subsequently tracked by the SECCHI suite on board STEREO. Using the COR2 coronagraphs and the heliospheric imagers (HIs), the initial direction of both CMEs is determined to be slightly west of the Sun-Earth line. We derive the CME kinematics, including the evolution of the CME expansion until 0.4 AU. We find that, during the interaction, the second CME decelerates from a speed above 500 km s{sup -1} to 380 km s{sup -1}, the speed of the leading edge of the first CME. STEREO observes a complex structure composed of two different bright tracks in HI2-A but only one bright track in HI2-B. In situ measurements from Wind show an 'isolated' interplanetary CME, with the geometry of a flux rope preceded by a shock. Measurements in the sheath are consistent with draping around the transient. By combining remote-sensing and in situ measurements, we determine that this event shows a clear instance of deflection of two CMEs after their collision, and we estimate the deflection of the first CME to be about 10 Degree-Sign toward the Sun-Earth line. The arrival time, arrival speed, and radius at Earth of the first CME are best predicted from remote-sensing observations taken before the collision of the CMEs. Due to the over-expansion of the CME after the collision, there are few, if any, signs of interaction in in situ measurements. This study illustrates that complex interactions during the Sun-to-Earth propagation may not be revealed by in situ measurements alone.

Lugaz, N.; Farrugia, C. J. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Davies, J. A.; Davis, C. J. [RAL Space, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (United Kingdom); Moestl, C. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Roussev, I. I. [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011, Yunnan (China); Temmer, M. [Kanzelhoehe Observatory-IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Discovery of {sup 229}Rn and the Structure of the Heaviest Rn and Ra Isotopes from Penning-Trap Mass Measurements  

SciTech Connect

The masses of the neutron-rich radon isotopes {sup 223-229}Rn have been determined for the first time, using the ISOLTRAP setup at CERN ISOLDE. In addition, this experiment marks the first discovery of a new nuclide, {sup 229}Rn, by Penning-trap mass measurement. The new, high-accuracy data allow a fine examination of the mass surface, via the valence-nucleon interaction {delta}V{sub pn}. The results reveal intriguing behavior, possibly reflecting either a N=134 subshell closure or an octupolar deformation in this region.

Neidherr, D.; Boehm, Ch. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Naimi, S. [CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, Universite de Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Beck, D.; Herfurth, F. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH Darmstadt, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Blaum, K.; George, S.; Kellerbauer, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Breitenfeldt, M.; Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L. [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Cakirli, R. B. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Department of Physics, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Casten, R. F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8124 (United States); Herlert, A.; Kowalska, M. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Noah, E.; Penescu, L. [Accelerators and Beams Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)] (and others)

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

130

Schottky mass measurements of heavy neutron-rich nuclides in the element range $70\\leZ \\le79$ at the ESR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage-ring mass spectrometry was applied to neutron-rich $^{197}$Au projectile fragments. Masses of $^{181,183}$Lu, $^{185,186}$Hf, $^{187,188}$Ta, $^{191}$W, and $^{192,193}$Re nuclei were measured for the first time. The uncertainty of previously known masses of $^{189,190}$W and $^{195}$Os nuclei was improved. Observed irregularities on the smooth two-neutron separation energies for Hf and W isotopes are linked to the collectivity phenomena in the corresponding nuclei.

D. Shubina; R. B. Cakirli; Yu. A. Litvinov; K. Blaum; C. Brandau; F. Bosch; J. J. Carroll; R. F. Casten; D. M. Cullen; I. J. Cullen; A. Y. Deo; B. Detwiler; C. Dimopoulou; F. Farinon; H. Geissel; E. Haettner; M. Heil; R. S. Kempley; C. Kozhuharov; R. Knbel; J. Kurcewicz; N. Kuzminchuk; S. A. Litvinov; Z. Liu; R. Mao; C. Nociforo; F. Nolden; Z. Patyk; W. R. Plass; A. Prochazka; M. W. Reed; M. S. Sanjari; C. Scheidenberger; M. Steck; Th. Sthlker; B. Sun; T. P. D. Swan; G. Trees; P. M. Walker; H. Weick; N. Winckler; M. Winkler; P. J. Woods; T. Yamaguchi; C. Zhou

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

131

Quantification of absorption, retention and elimination of two different oral doses of vitamin A in Zambian boys using accelerator mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

A recent survey indicated that high-dose vitamin A supplements (HD-VAS) had no apparent effect on vitamin A (VA) status of Zambian children <5 y of age. To explore possible reasons for the lack of response to HD-VAS among Zambian children, we quantified the absorption, retention, and urinary elimination of either a single HDVAS (60 mg) or a smaller dose of stable isotope (SI)-labeled VA (5 mg), which was used to estimate VA pool size, in 3-4 y old Zambian boys (n = 4 for each VA dose). A 25 nCi tracer dose of [{sup 14}C{sub 2}]-labeled VA was co-administered with the HD-VAS or SI-labeled VA, and 24-hr stool and urine samples were collected for 3 and 7 consecutive days, respectively, and 24-hr urine samples at 4 later time points. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) was used to measure the cumulative excretion of {sup 14}C in stool and urine 3d after dosing to estimate, respectively, absorption and retention of the VAS and SI-labeled VA. The urinary elimination rate (UER) was estimated by plotting {sup 14}C in urine vs. time, and fitting an exponential equation to the data. Estimates of mean absorption, retention and the UER were 83.8 {+-} 7.1%, 76.3 {+-} 6.7%, and 1.9 {+-} 0.6%/d, respectively, for the HD-VAS and 76.5 {+-} 9.5%, 71.1 {+-} 9.4%, and 1.8 {+-} 1.2%/d, respectively for the smaller dose of SI-labeled VA. Estimates of absorption, retention and the UER did not differ by size of the VA dose administered (P=0.26, 0.40, 0.88, respectively). Estimated absorption and retention were negatively associated with reported fever (P=0.011) and malaria (P =0.010). HD-VAS and SI-labeled VA were adequately absorbed, retained and utilized in apparently healthy Zambian preschool-age boys, although absorption and retention may be affected by recent infections.

Aklamati, E K; Mulenga, M; Dueker, S R; Buchholz, B A; Peerson, J M; Kafwembe, E; Brown, K H; Haskell, M J

2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

132

Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

This thesis studies the high-energy collisions of protons and antiprotons. The data used in the measurement were collected during 2004-2005 with the D0 detector at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and correspond to 0.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. High energy hadron collisions usually produce collimated sprays of particles called jets. The energy of the jets is measured using a liquid Argon-Uranium calorimeter and the production angle is determined with the help of silicon microstrip and scintillating fiber trackers. The inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions is measured as a function of jet transverse momentum p{sub T} in six bins of jet rapidity at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The measurement covers jet transerve momenta from 50 GeV up to 600 GeV and jet rapidities up to |y| = 2.4. The data are collected using a set of seven single jet triggers. Event and jet cuts are applied to remove non-physical backgrounds and cosmic-ray interactions. The data are corrected for jet energy calibration, cut and trigger efficiencies and finite jet p{sub T} resolution. The corrections are determined from data and the methods are tested with Monte Carlo simulation. The main experimental challenges in the measurement are the calibration of jet energies and the determination of the jet p{sub T} resolution. New methods are developed for the jet energy calibration that take into account physical differences between the {gamma}+jet and dijet calibration samples arising from quark and gluon jet differences. The uncertainty correlations are studied and provided as a set of uncertainty sources. The production of particle jets in hadron collisions is described by the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). When the transverse jet momentum is large, the contributions from long-distance physics processes are small and the production rates of jets can be predicted by perturbative QCD. The inclusive jet cross section in p{bar p} collisions at large p{sub T} is directly sensitive to the strong coupling constant ({alpha}{sub s}) and the parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton. This measurement can be used to constrain the PDFs, in particular the gluon PDF at high proton momentum fraction x, and to look for quark substructure at the TeV scale. The data are compared to the theory predictions with perturbative QCD in the next-to-leading order precision and a good agreement between data and theory is observed.

Voutilainen, Mikko Antero; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys. /Helsinki U. of Tech. /Nebraska U. /Saclay

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Radiation environment simulations at the Tevatron, studies of the beam profile and measurement of the Bc meson mass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The description of a computer simulation of the CDF detector at Fermilab and the adjacent accelerator parts is detailed, with MARS calculations of the radiation background in various elements of the model due to the collision of beams and machine-related losses. Three components of beam halo formation are simulated for the determination of the principal source of radiation background in CDF due to beam losses. The effect of a collimator as a protection for the detector is studied. The simulation results are compared with data taken by a CDF group. Studies of a 150 GeV Tevatron proton beam are performed to investigate the transverse diffusion growth and distribution. A technique of collimator scan is used to scrape the beam under various experimental conditions, and computer programs are written for the beam reconstruction. An average beam halo growth speed is given and the potential of beam tail reconstruction using the collimator scan is evaluated. A particle physics analysis is conducted in order to detect the B{sub c} {yields} J/{psi}{pi} decay signal with the CDF Run II detector in 360 pb{sup -1} of data. The cut variables and an optimization method to determine their values are presented along with a criterion for the detection threshold of the signal. The mass of the B{sub c} meson is measured with an evaluation of the significance of the signal.

Nicolas, Ludovic Y.; /Glasgow U.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Electronic measurement apparatus movable in a cased borehole and compensating for casing resistance differences  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of operation are described for an apparatus having at least two pairs of voltage measurement electrodes vertically disposed in a cased well to measure the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from inside the cased well. During stationary measurements with the apparatus at a fixed vertical depth within the cased well, the invention herein discloses methods of operation which include a measurement step and subsequent first and second compensation steps respectively resulting in improved accuracy of measurement. The invention also discloses multiple frequency methods of operation resulting in improved accuracy of measurement while the apparatus is simultaneously moved vertically in the cased well. The multiple frequency methods of operation disclose a first A.C. current having a first frequency that is conducted from the casing into formation and a second A.C. current having a second frequency that is conducted along the casing. The multiple frequency methods of operation simultaneously provide the measurement step and two compensation steps necessary to acquire accurate results while the apparatus is moved vertically in the cased well. 6 figures.

Vail, W.B. III.

1991-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

135

The relationship between turbulence measurements and transport in different heating regimes in TFTR  

SciTech Connect

The scaling of broad band density fluctuations in the confinement zone of TFTR measured by microwave scattering, beam emission spectroscopy (BES), and reflectometry show a relationship between these fluctuations and energy transport measured from power balance calculations. In L-mode plasmas scattering and BES indicates that the density fluctuation level, {delta}n{sup 2}, in the confinement zone for 0.2 < k{perpendicular}ps < 1.0 depends qualitatively on P{sub aux} and I{sub p} in a way that is consistent with variations in energy transport. Fluctuation levels measured with all systems increase strongly toward the edge in all heating regimes following increases in energy transport coefficients. Measurements using BES have shown that poloidal and radial correlation lengths in the confinement zone of L-mode and supershot plasmas fall in the range of 1 to 2 cm. with a wave structure which has k{sub max} {approx} 1 cm{sup {minus}1} (k{perpendicular}ps {approx} 0.2) in the poloidal direction and k{sub max} approaching zero in the radial direction. A simple estimate of the diffusion coefficient based on a measured radial correlation length and correlation time indicates good agreement with power balance calculations. Similar estimates using reflectometry give radial coherence lengths at 10 to 20 kHz in low density ohmic and supershot plasmas of between I and 2 cm.

Bretz, N.L.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Paul, S.F.; Hammett, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Fonck, R.J.; Durst, R.; Cosby, G. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The relationship between turbulence measurements and transport in different heating regimes in TFTR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scaling of broad band density fluctuations in the confinement zone of TFTR measured by microwave scattering, beam emission spectroscopy (BES), and reflectometry show a relationship between these fluctuations and energy transport measured from power balance calculations. In L-mode plasmas scattering and BES indicates that the density fluctuation level, [delta]n[sup 2], in the confinement zone for 0.2 < k[perpendicular]ps < 1.0 depends qualitatively on P[sub aux] and I[sub p] in a way that is consistent with variations in energy transport. Fluctuation levels measured with all systems increase strongly toward the edge in all heating regimes following increases in energy transport coefficients. Measurements using BES have shown that poloidal and radial correlation lengths in the confinement zone of L-mode and supershot plasmas fall in the range of 1 to 2 cm. with a wave structure which has k[sub max] [approx] 1 cm[sup [minus]1] (k[perpendicular]ps [approx] 0.2) in the poloidal direction and k[sub max] approaching zero in the radial direction. A simple estimate of the diffusion coefficient based on a measured radial correlation length and correlation time indicates good agreement with power balance calculations. Similar estimates using reflectometry give radial coherence lengths at 10 to 20 kHz in low density ohmic and supershot plasmas of between I and 2 cm.

Bretz, N.L.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Paul, S.F.; Hammett, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Fonck, R.J.; Durst, R.; Cosby, G. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Measuring East Asian Summer Monsoon Rainfall Contributions by Different Weather Systems over Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The east Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is characterized by a distinct life cycle consisting of the active, break, and revival monsoon phases. Different weather systems prevail in each phase following the change of large-scale flow regime. During ...

Shih-Yu Wang; Tsing-Chang Chen

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Evaluation of DBS Wind Measurement Technique in Different Beam Configurations for a VHF Wind Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric winds in the troposphere have been observed routinely for many years with wind profiling (VHF and UHF) radars using the Doppler beam swinging (DBS) technique. Accuracy of wind estimates using wind profiling radars with different beam ...

I. Srinivasa Rao; V. K. Anandan; P. Narasimha Reddy

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Measurement of the w boson mass at the Collider Detector at Fermilab from a fit to the transverse momentum spectrum of the muon  

SciTech Connect

This thesis describes a measurement of the W boson mass from a fit to the transverse momentum spectrum of the muon in W decay. In past measurements this technique was used as a cross-check, however, now presents the best method in terms of systematic uncertainty. We discuss all sources of systematic uncertainty with emphasis on those to which the muon p{sub T} measurement is particularly sensitive, specifically, those associated with modeling the production and decay of W bosons. The data were collected with the CDF II detector between March 2002 and September 2003 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of (191 {+-} 11) pb{sup -1}. We measure the W mass to be (80.316 {+-} 0.066{sub stat.} {+-} 0.051{sub syst.}) GeV/c{sup 2} = (80.316 {+-} 0.083) GeV/c{sup 2}.

Vollrath, Ian Eberhard; /Toronto U.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The History of Nuclidic Masses and of their Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is centered on some historical aspects of nuclear masses, and their relations to major discoveries. Besides nuclear reactions and decays, the heart of mass measurements lies in mass spectrometry, the early history of which will be reviewed first. I shall then give a short history of the mass unit which has not always been defined as one twelfth of the carbon-12 mass. When combining inertial masses from mass spectrometry with energy differences obtained in reactions and decays, the conversion factor between the two is essential. The history of the evaluation of the nuclear masses (actually atomic masses) is only slightly younger than that of the mass measurements themselves. In their modern form, mass evaluations can be traced back to 1955. Prior to 1955, several tables were established, the oldest one in 1935.

G. Audi

2006-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

PROPER MOTIONS OF THE ARCHES CLUSTER WITH KECK LASER GUIDE STAR ADAPTIVE OPTICS: THE FIRST KINEMATIC MASS MEASUREMENT OF THE ARCHES  

SciTech Connect

We report the first detection of the intrinsic velocity dispersion of the Arches cluster-a young ({approx}2 Myr), massive (10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }) starburst cluster located only 26 pc in projection from the Galactic center. This was accomplished using proper motion measurements within the central 10'' Multiplication-Sign 10'' of the cluster, obtained with the laser guide star adaptive optics system at Keck Observatory over a three-year time baseline (2006-2009). This uniform data set results in proper motion measurements that are improved by a factor {approx}5 over previous measurements from heterogeneous instruments. By careful, simultaneous accounting of the cluster and field contaminant distributions as well as the possible sources of measurement uncertainties, we estimate the internal velocity dispersion to be 0.15 {+-} 0.01 mas yr{sup -1}, which corresponds to 5.4 {+-} 0.4 km s{sup -1} at a distance of 8.4 kpc. Projecting a simple model for the cluster onto the sky to compare with our proper motion data set, in conjunction with surface density data, we estimate the total present-day mass of the cluster to be M(r < 1.0 pc) = 1.5{sup +0.74}{sub -0.60} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. The mass in stars observed within a cylinder of radius R (for comparison to photometric estimates) is found to be M(R < 0.4 pc) = 0.90{sup +0.40}{sub -0.35} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} at formal 3{sigma} confidence. This mass measurement is free from assumptions about the mass function of the cluster, and thus may be used to check mass estimates from photometry and simulation. Photometric mass estimates assuming an initially Salpeter mass function ({Gamma}{sub 0} = 1.35, or {Gamma} {approx} 1.0 at present, where dN/d(log M){proportional_to}M{sup {Gamma}}) suggest a total cluster mass M{sub cl} {approx} (4-6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} and projected mass ({approx} 2 {<=} M(R < 0.4 pc) {<=} 3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. Photometric mass estimates assuming a globally top-heavy or strongly truncated present-day mass function (PDMF; with {Gamma} {approx} 0.6) yield mass estimates closer to M(R < 0.4 pc) {approx} 1-1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. Consequently, our results support a PDMF that is either top-heavy or truncated at low mass, or both. Collateral benefits of our data and analysis include: (1) cluster membership probabilities, which may be used to extract a clean-cluster sample for future photometric work; (2) a refined estimate of the bulk motion of the Arches cluster with respect to the field, which we find to be 172 {+-} 15 km s{sup -1}, which is slightly slower than suggested by previous measurements using one epoch each with the Very Large Telescope and the Keck telescope; and (3) a velocity dispersion estimate for the field itself, which is likely dominated by the inner Galactic bulge and the nuclear disk.

Clarkson, W. I. [Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, Physics and Astronomy Building, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Ghez, A. M.; Morris, M. R.; Yelda, S. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, 727 East 3rd Street, Swain West 319, Bloomington, IN 47405-7105 (United States); Lu, J. R. [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822-1839 (United States); Stolte, A. [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); McCrady, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Montana, 32 Campus Drive, No. 1080, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States); Do, T., E-mail: wiclarks@indiana.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Extended measurement framework for analyzing e-governance situation in different countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper shows the results obtained by using a measurement framework to determine the level of eGovernance on municipalities' websites taking into account design and content aspects. This framework was applied in the evaluation of municipality web ... Keywords: accessibility, egovernance, friendliness, navigability, usability

Roco Andrea Rodrguez; Daniel Alberto Giulianelli; Pablo Martn Vera

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Regional differences of cerebral hemoglobin concentration in preterm infants measured by near infrared spectrophotometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near infrared spectrophotometry has been used to measure total cerebral hemoglobin concentration (\\mumol/l) as a major indicator of the oxygen transport capacity in neonates. The aim of this study was to find out how the position of the probe influences ... Keywords: cerebral hemoglobin concentration, infants, near infrared spectrophotometry, positioning, preterm, probe

Matthias Keel; Martin Wolf; Oskar Baenziger; Vera Dietz; Kurt von Siebenthal; Hans U. Bucher

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Measurements of the Transmission Loss of a Radome at Different Rain Intensities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results on the transmission loss of a dry and a wet C-band weather radar radome at different rain intensities are presented. Two methods were used in the study, both carried out under laboratory conditions. In the first method, the complex ...

Mikko Kurri; Asko Huuskonen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Assessing Long-Term Wind Conditions by Combining Different Measure-Correlate-Predict Algorithms: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper significantly advances the hybrid measure-correlate-predict (MCP) methodology, enabling it to account for variations of both wind speed and direction. The advanced hybrid MCP method uses the recorded data of multiple reference stations to estimate the long-term wind condition at a target wind plant site. The results show that the accuracy of the hybrid MCP method is highly sensitive to the combination of the individual MCP algorithms and reference stations. It was also found that the best combination of MCP algorithms varies based on the length of the correlation period.

Zhang, J.; Chowdhury, S.; Messac, A.; Hodge, B. M.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Measuring the Dark Matter Halo Mass of X-ray AGN at z~1 using photometric redshifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data from the AEGIS, COSMOS and ECDFS surveys are combined to infer the bias and dark matter halo mass of moderate luminosity [LX(2-10 keV) = 42.9 erg s-1] X-ray AGN at z~1 via their cross-correlation function with galaxies. In contrast to standard cross-correlation function estimators, we present a method that requires spectroscopy only for the AGN and uses photometric redshift probability distribution functions for galaxies to determine the projected real-space AGN/galaxy cross-correlation function. The estimated dark matter halo mass of X-ray AGN in the combined AEGIS, COSMOS and ECDFS fields is ~13h-1M_solar, in agreement with previous studies at similar redshift and luminosity ranges. Removing from the sample the 5 per cent of the AGN associated with X-ray selected groups results in a reduction by about 0.5 dex in the inferred AGN dark matter halo mass. The distribution of AGN in dark matter halo mass is therefore skewed and the bulk of the population lives in moderate mass haloes. This result favour col...

Mountrichas, G; Finoguenov, A; Erfanianfar, G; Cooper, M C; Coil, A L; Laird, E S; Nandra, K; Newman, J A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Measuring supersymmetric particle masses at the LHC in scenarios with baryon number R-parity violating couplings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the correct jets from the ?01 decay. Nearly all right-squarks decay via qR ? ?01q ? qqqq and one might therefore expect Njet = 8 for qRqR production. Gluon radiation by quarks, however, raises this to an average of 9.2 jets, in spite of the fact... uncertainty as m(?01). The statistical error in rescaling the 3-jet invariant mass to the fitted m(?01) peak in- troduces another 3 GeV systematic error into the lR and qR masses. The overall systematic error in m(lR) is therefore 3? 3 = 4.2 Ge...

Allanach, B C; Barr, Alan; Drage, L; Morgan, D; Parker, Michael A; Webber, Bryan R; Richardson, P

148

Drag-disc turbine transducer data evaluation methods for dynamic steam-water mass flow measurements. [PWR  

SciTech Connect

The mechanical design of a two-phase mass flow rate transducer for a highly corrosive, high temperature (651 K) hot water environment is presented. Performance data for transient steam-water flows are presented. Details of the applications of the device during loss-of-coolant experiments in a pressurized water reactor environment are discussed.

Winsel, C.E.; Fincke, J.R.; Deason, V.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Activation Measurements for Thermal Neutrons, U.S. Measurements of 36Cl in Mineral Samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and Measurement of 63 Ni in Copper Samples From Hiroshima by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The present paper presents the {sup 36}Cl measurement effort in the US. A large number of {sup 36}Cl measurements have been made in both granite and concrete samples obtained from various locations and distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These measurements employed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the number of atoms of {sup 36}Cl per atom of total Cl in the sample. Results from these measurements are presented here and discussed in the context of the DS02 dosimetry reevaluation effort for Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic-bomb survivors. The production of {sup 36}Cl by bomb neutrons in mineral samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki was primarily via the reaction {sup 35}Cl(n,{gamma}){sup 36}Cl. This reaction has a substantial thermal neutron cross-section (43.6 b at 0.025 eV) and the product has a long half-life (301,000 y). hence, it is well suited for neutron-activation detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki using AMS more than 50 years after the bombings. A less important reaction for bomb neutrons, {sup 39}K(n,{alpha}){sup 36}Cl, typically produces less than 10% of the {sup 36}Cl in mineral samples such as granite and concrete, which contain {approx} 2% potassium. In 1988, only a year after the publication of the DS86 final report (Roesch 1987), it was demonstrated experimentally that {sup 36}Cl measured using AMS should be able to detect the thermal neutron fluences at the large distances most relevant to the A-bomb survivor dosimetry. Subsequent measurements in mineral samples from both Hiroshima and Nagasaki validated the experimental findings. The potential utility of {sup 36}Cl as a thermal neutron detector in Hiroshima was first presented by Haberstock et al. who employed the Munich AMS facility to measure {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in a gravestone from near the hypocenter. That work subsequently resulted in an expanded {sup 36}Cl effort in Germany that paralleled the US work. More recently, there have also been {sup 36}Cl measurements made by a Japanese group. The impetus for the extensive {sup 36}Cl and other neutron activation measurements was the recognized need to validate the neutron component of the dose in Hiroshima. Although this was suggested at the time of the DS86 Final Report, where it was stated that the calculated neutron doses for survivors could possibly be wrong, the paucity of neutron validation measurements available at that time prevented adequate resolution of this matter. It was not until additional measurements and data evaluations were made that it became clear that more work was required to better understand the discrepancies observed for thermal neutrons in Hiroshima. This resulted in a large number of additional neutron activation measurements in Hiroshima and Nagasaki by scientists in the US, Japan, and Germany. The results presented here for {sup 36}Cl, together with measurements made by other scientists and for other isotopes, now provide a much improved measurement basis for the validation of neutrons in Hiroshima.

Tore Straume; Alfredo A. Marchetti; Stephen D. Egbert; James A. Roberts; Ping Men; Shoichiro Fujita; Kiyoshi Shizuma; Masaharu Hoshi; G. Rugel; W. Ruhm; G. Korschinek; J. E. McAninch; K. L. Carroll; T. Faestermann; K. Knie; R. E. Martinelli; A. Wallner; C. Wallner

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

150

Cross-check of different techniques for two-dimensional powerspectral density measurements of X-ray optics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The consistency of different instruments and methods for measuring two-dimensional (2D) power spectral density (PSD) distributions are investigated. The instruments are an interferometric microscope, an atomic force microscope (AFM) and the X-ray Reflectivity and Scattering experimental facility, all available at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The measurements were performed with a gold-coated mirror with a highly polished stainless steel substrate. It was shown that these three techniques provide essentially consistent results. For the stainless steel mirror, an envelope over all measured PSD distributions can be described with an inverse power-law PSD function. It is also shown that the measurements can be corrected for the specific spatial frequency dependent systematic errors of the instruments. The AFM and the X-ray scattering measurements were used to determine the modulation transfer function of the interferometric microscope. The corresponding correction procedure is discussed in detail. Lower frequency investigation of the 2D PSD distribution was also performed with a long trace profiler and a ZYGO GPI interferometer. These measurements are in some contradiction, suggesting that the reliability of the measurements has to be confirmed with additional investigation. Based on the crosscheck of the performance of all used methods, we discuss the ways for improving the 2D PSD characterization of X-ray optics.

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Irick, Steve C.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Salmassi, Farhad; Warwick, Tony

2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

151

Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and \\textit{in situ} Jet Energy Calibration  

SciTech Connect

A precision measurement of the top quark mass m{sub t} is obtained using a sample of t{bar t} events from p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter {Delta}{sub JES} used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events, a value of m{sub t} = 173.0 {+-} 1.2 GeV/c{sup 2} is measured.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass with the D0 Detector at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using the Matrix Element Method  

SciTech Connect

Using a data set of 158 and 169 pb{sup -1} of D0 Run-II data in the electron and muon plus jets channel, respectively, the top quark mass has been measured using the Matrix Element Method. The method and its implementation are described. Its performance is studied in Monte Carlo using ensemble tests and the method is applied to the Moriond 2004 data set.

Kroeninger, Kevin Alexander; /Bonn U.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Constraining the Bulk Properties of Dense Matter by Measuring Millisecond Pulsar Masses - A White Paper for the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey, CFP Panel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than four decades after the discovery of pulsars, the composition of matter at their cores is still a mystery. This white paper summarizes how recent high-precision measurements of millisecond pulsar masses have introduced new experimental constraints on the properties of super-dense matter, and how continued timing of intriguing new objects, coupled with radio telescope surveys to discover more pulsars, might introduce significantly more stringent constraints.

Freire, Paulo C; Lattimer, James; Stairs, Ingrid; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Cordes, James; Deneva, Julia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Measurement and modeling of energetic material mass transfer to soil pore water :project CP-1227 FY03 annual technical report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Military test and training ranges operate with live fire engagements to provide realism important to the maintenance of key tactical skills. Ordnance detonations during these operations typically produce minute residues of parent explosive chemical compounds. Occasional low order detonations also disperse solid phase energetic material onto the surface soil. These detonation remnants are implicated in chemical contamination impacts to groundwater on a limited set of ranges where environmental characterization projects have occurred. Key questions arise regarding how these residues and the environmental conditions (e.g., weather and geostratigraphy) contribute to groundwater pollution impacts. This report documents interim results of experimental work evaluating mass transfer processes from solid phase energetics to soil pore water. The experimental work is used as a basis to formulate a mass transfer numerical model, which has been incorporated into the porous media simulation code T2TNT. This report documents the results of the Phase III experimental effort, which evaluated the impacts of surface deposits versus buried deposits, energetic material particle size, and low order detonation debris. Next year, the energetic material mass transfer model will be refined and a 2-d screening model will be developed for initial site-specific applications. A technology development roadmap was created to show how specific R&D efforts are linked to technology and products for key customers.

Phelan, James M.; Barnett, James L.; Kerr, Dayle R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Measurement of the invariant mass distributions for the pp -> ppeta' reaction at excess energy of Q = 16.4 MeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proton-proton and proton-eta' invariant mass distributions have been determined for the pp -> ppeta' reaction at an excess energy of Q = 16.4 MeV. The measurement was carried out using the COSY-11 detector setup and the proton beam of the cooler synchrotron COSY. The shapes of the determined invariant mass distributions are similar to those of the pp -> ppeta reaction and reveal an enhancement for large relative proton-proton momenta. This result, together with the fact that the proton-eta interaction is much stronger that the proton-eta' interaction, excludes the hypothesis that the observed enhancement is caused by the interaction between the proton and the meson.

P. Klaja; P. Moskal; E. Czerwinski; R. Czyzykiewicz; A. Deloff; D. Gil; D. Grzonka; L. Jarczyk; B. Kamys; A. Khoukaz; J. Klaja; K. Nakayama; W. Oelert; J. Ritman; T. Sefzick; M. Siemaszko; M. Silarski; J. Smyrski; A. Taeschner; M. Wolke; J. Zdebik; M. Zielinski; W. Zipper

2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

156

Rock Joint Surfaces Measurement and Analysis of Aperture Distribution under Different Normal and Shear Loading Using GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geometry of the rock joint is a governing factor for joint mechanical and hydraulic behavior. A new method of evaluating aperture distribution based on measurement of joint surfaces and three dimensional characteristics of each surface is developed. Artificial joint of granite surfaces are measured,processed, analyzed and three dimensional approaches are carried out for surface characterization. Parameters such as asperity's heights, slope angles, and aspects distribution at micro scale,local concentration of elements and their spatial localization at local scale are determined by Geographic Information System (GIS). Changes of aperture distribution at different normal stresses and various shear displacements are visualized and interpreted. Increasing normal load causes negative changes in aperture frequency distribution which indicates high joint matching. However, increasing shear displacement causes a rapid increase in the aperture and positive changes in the aperture frequency distribution which could be ...

Sharifzadeh, Mostafa; Esaki, Tetsuro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Secondary ions mass spectroscopy measurements of dopant impurities in highly stressed InGaN laser diodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We performed a systematic secondary ions mass spectroscopy (SIMS) study of dopant impurities in life-time stressed InGaN laser devices in order to investigate the main degradation mechanism that is observed in nitride laser diodes. A continuous wave (cw) current density of 3 kA/cm{sup 2} was applied to InGaN laser diodes over an extended period of time and we observed the characteristic square root degradation of optical power. We compared the SIMS profiles of Mg, H, and Si impurities in the aged devices and observe that the impurities are remarkably stable over 10 000 h of cw operation. Nor is there any SIMS evidence of p-contact metals penetrating into the semiconductor material. Thus our SIMS results are contrary to what one would expect for impurity diffusion causing the observed square root degradation characteristic.

Marona, L.; Suski, T. [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland); Perlin, P.; Czernecki, R.; Leszczynski, M.; Bockowski, M. [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland); TopGaN Ltd., Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland); Jakiela, R. [Institute of Physics, al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Najda, S. P. [TopGaN Ltd., Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland)

2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

158

Applications of High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry to Measurements of Average Oxygen to Carbon Ratios in Secondary Organic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The applicability of high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS) to measurements of the average oxygen to carbon ratio (O/C) in organic aerosols was investigated. Solutions with known average O/C containing up to 10 standard compounds representative of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were analyzed and corresponding electrospray ionization efficiencies were quantified. The assumption of equal ionization efficiency commonly used in estimating O/C ratios of organic aerosols was found to be reasonably accurate. We found that the accuracy of the measured O/C ratios increases by averaging the values obtained from both (+) and (-) modes. A correlation was found between the ratio of the ionization efficiencies in the positive and negative ESI modes with the octanol-water partition constant, and more importantly, with the compound's O/C. To demonstrate the utility of this correlation for estimating average O/C values of unknown mixtures, we analyzed the ESI (+) and ESI (-) data for SOA produced by oxidation of limonene and isoprene and compared to online O/C measurements using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). This work demonstrates that the accuracy of the HR ESI-MS methods is comparable to that of the AMS, with the added benefit of molecular identification of the aerosol constituents.

Bateman, Adam P.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

159

Mass flow rate measurements in gas-liquid flows by means of a venturi or orifice plate coupled to a void fraction sensor  

SciTech Connect

Two-phase flow measurements were carried out using a resistive void fraction meter coupled to a venturi or orifice plate. The measurement system used to estimate the liquid and gas mass flow rates was evaluated using an air-water experimental facility. Experiments included upward vertical and horizontal flow, annular, bubbly, churn and slug patterns, void fraction ranging from 2% to 85%, water flow rate up to 4000 kg/h, air flow rate up to 50 kg/h, and quality up to almost 10%. The fractional root mean square (RMS) deviation of the two-phase mass flow rate in upward vertical flow through a venturi plate is 6.8% using the correlation of Chisholm (D. Chisholm, Pressure gradients during the flow of incompressible two-phase mixtures through pipes, venturis and orifice plates, British Chemical Engineering 12 (9) (1967) 454-457). For the orifice plate, the RMS deviation of the vertical flow is 5.5% using the correlation of Zhang et al. (H.J. Zhang, W.T. Yue, Z.Y. Huang, Investigation of oil-air two-phase mass flow rate measurement using venturi and void fraction sensor, Journal of Zhejiang University Science 6A (6) (2005) 601-606). The results show that the flow direction has no significant influence on the meters in relation to the pressure drop in the experimental operation range. Quality and slip ratio analyses were also performed. The results show a mean slip ratio lower than 1.1, when bubbly and slug flow patterns are encountered for mean void fractions lower than 70%. (author)

Oliveira, Jorge Luiz Goes; Passos, Julio Cesar [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica-LEPTEN/Boiling-UFSC, Campus Universitario, Trindade, 88.040-900 Florianopolis-SC (Brazil); Verschaeren, Ruud; Geld, Cees van der [Eindhoven University of Technology, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, W-hoog 2.135, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

A new experimental setup for high-pressure catalytic activity measurements on surface deposited mass-selected Pt clusters  

SciTech Connect

A new experimental setup to study catalytic and electronic properties of size-selected clusters on metal oxide substrates from the viewpoint of cluster-support interaction and to formulate a method for the development of heterogeneous catalysts such as automotive exhaust catalysts has been developed. The apparatus consists of a size-selected cluster source, a photoemission spectrometer, a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), and a high-pressure reaction cell. The high-pressure reaction cell measurements provided information on catalytic properties in conditions close to practical use. The authors investigated size-selected platinum clusters deposited on a TiO{sub 2}(110) surface using a reaction cell and STM. Catalytic activity measurements showed that the catalytic activities have a cluster-size dependency.

Watanabe, Yoshihide; Isomura, Noritake [Toyota Central R and D Labs. Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200 Mishuku Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193, Japan and Toyota Central R and D Labs. Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Reco level Smin and subsystem Smin: improved global inclusive variables for measuring the new physics mass scale in MET events at hadron colliders  

SciTech Connect

The variable {radical}s{sub min} was originally proposed in [1] as a model-independent, global and fully inclusive measure of the new physics mass scale in missing energy events at hadron colliders. In the original incarnation of {radical}s{sub min}, however, the connection to the new physics mass scale was blurred by the effects of the underlying event, most notably initial state radiation and multiple parton interactions. In this paper we advertize two improved variants of the {radical}s{sub min} variable, which overcome this problem. First we show that by evaluating the {radical}s{sub min} variable at the RECO level, in terms of the reconstructed objects in the event, the effects from the underlying event are significantly diminished and the nice correlation between the peak in the {radical}s{sub min}{sup (reco)} distribution and the new physics mass scale is restored. Secondly, the underlying event problem can be avoided altogether when the {radical}s{sub min} concept is applied to a subsystem of the event which does not involve any QCD jets. We supply an analytic formula for the resulting subsystem {radical}s{sub min}{sup (sub)} variable and show that its peak exhibits the usual correlation with the mass scale of the particles produced in the subsystem. Finally, we contrast {radical}s{sub min} to other popular inclusive variables such as H{sub T}, M{sub Tgen} and M{sub TTgen}. We illustrate our discussion with several examples from supersymmetry, and with dilepton events from top quark pair production.

Konar, Partha; /Florida U.; Kong, Kyoungchul; /SLAC; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun; /Florida U.

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

162

Decoy state method for measurement device independent quantum key distribution with different intensities in only one basis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the three-intensity protocol for measurement device independent quantum key distribution (MDI QKD) can be done with different light intensities in {\\em only one} basis. Given the fact that the exact values yields of single-photon pairs in the $X$ and $Z$ bases must be the same, if we have lower bound of the value in one basis, we can also use this as the lower bound in another basis. Since in the existing set-up for MDI-QKD, the yield of sources in different bases are normally different, therefore our method can improve the key rate drastically if we choose to only use the lower bound of yield of single-photon pairs in the advantageous basis. Moreover, since our proposal here uses fewer intensities of light, the probability of intensity mismatch will be smaller than the existing protocols do. This will further improve the advantage of our method. The advantage of using Z basis or X basis of our method is studied and significant improvement of key rates are numerically demonstrated.

Zong-Wen Yu; Yi-Heng Zhou; Xiang-bin Wang

2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

163

Measurement of {sup 63}Ni and {sup 59}Ni by accelerator mass spectrometry using characteristic projectile x-rays  

SciTech Connect

The long-lived isotopes of nickel ({sup 59}Ni, {sup 63}Ni) have current and potential use in a number of applications including cosmic radiation studies, biomedical tracing, characterization of low-level radioactive wastes, and neutron dosimetry. Methods are being developed at LLNL for the routine detection of these isotopes by AMS. One intended application is in Hiroshima dosimetry. The reaction {sup 63}Cu(n,p){sup 63}Ni has been identified as one of a small number of reactions which might be used for the direct determination of the fast neutron fluence emitted by the Hiroshima bomb. AMS measurement of {sup 63}Ni(t{sub 1/2} = 100 y) requires the chemical removal of {sup 63}Cu, which is a stable isobar of {sup 63}Ni. Following the electrochemical separation of Ni from gram-sized copper samples, the Cu concentration is further lowered to < 2 x 10{sup -8} (Cu/Ni) using the reaction of Ni with carbon monoxide to form the gas Ni(CO){sub 4}. The Ni(CO){sub 4} is thermally decomposed directly in sample holders for measurement by AMS. After analysis in the AMS spectrometer, the ions are identified using characteristic projectile x-rays, allowing further rejection of remaining {sup 63}Cu. In a demonstration experiment, {sup 63}Ni was measured in Cu wires (2-20 g) which had been exposed to neutrons from a {sup 252}Cf source. We successfully measured {sup 63}Ni at levels necessary for the measurement of Cu samples exposed near the Hiroshima hypocenter. For the demonstration samples, the Cu content was chemically reduced by a factor of 10{sup 12} with quantitative retention of {sup 63}Ni. Detection sensitivity (3{sigma}) was {approximately}20 fg {sup 63}Ni in 1 mg Ni carrier ({sup 63}Ni/Ni {approx} 2 x 10{sup -11}). Significant improvements in sensitivity are expected with planned incremental changes in the methods. Preliminary results indicate that a similar sensitivity is achievable for {sup 59}Ni (t{sub 1/2} = 10{sup 5} y).

McAninch, J.E.; Hainsworth, L.J.; Marchetti, A.A. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions Using a Novel Matrix Element Method  

SciTech Connect

A measurement of the top quark mass in t{bar t} {yields} l + jets candidate events, obtained from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix element techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for t{bar t} production and decay. However, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb{sup -1} data sample, using events with a high-p{sub T} lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find M{sub meas} = 169.8 {+-} 2.3(stat.) {+-} 1.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

CDF Collaboration; Freeman, John; Freeman, John

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

165

A measurement of the top quark mass in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions using a novel matrix element method  

SciTech Connect

A measurement of the top quark mass in t{bar t} {yields} l + jets candidate events, obtained from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix elements techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for tt production and decay. however, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb{sup -1} data sample, using events with a high-p{sub T} lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find M{sub meas} = 169.8 {+-} 2.3(stat.) {+-} 1.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

Freeman, John C.; /LBL, Berkeley

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A more accurate and penetrating method to measure the enrichment and mass of UF6 storage containers using passive neutron self-interrogation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an unattended mode neutron measurement that can provide the enrichment of the uranium in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The new passive neutron measurement provides better penetration into the uranium mass than prior gamma-ray enrichment measurement methods. The Passive Neutron Enrichment Monitor (PNEM) provides a new measurement technique that uses passive neutron totals and coincidence counting together with neutron self-interrogation to measure the enrichment in the cylinders. The measurement uses the neutron rates from two detector pods. One of the pods has a bare polyethylene surface next to the cylinder and the other polyethylene surface is covered with Cd to prevent thermal neutrons from returning to the cylinder. The primary neutron source from the enriched UF{sub 6} is the alpha-particle decay from the {sub 234}U that interacts with the fluorine to produce random neutrons. The singles neutron counting rate is dominated by the {sub 234}U neutrons with a minor contribution from the induced fissions in the {sub 235}U. However, the doubles counting rate comes primarily from the induced fissions (i.e., multiplication) in the {sub 235}U in enriched uranium. The PNEM concept makes use of the passive neutrons that are initially produced from the {sub 234}U reactions that track the {sub 235}U enrichment during the enrichment process. The induced fission reactions from the thermal-neutron albedo are all from the {sub 235}U and provide a measurement of the {sub 235}U. The Cd ratio has the desirable feature that all of the thermal-neutron-induced fissions in {sub 235}U are independent of the original neutron source. Thus, the ratio is independent of the uranium age, purity, and prior reactor history.

Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Test of the Conserved Vector Current Hypothesis by beta-ray Angular Distribution Measurement in the Mass-8 System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The beta-ray angular correlations for the spin alignments of 8Li and 8B have been observed in order to test the conserved vector current (CVC) hypothesis. The alignment correlation terms were combined with the known beta-alpha-angular correlation terms to determine all the matrix elements contributing to the correlation terms. The weak magnetism term, 7.5\\pm0.2, deduced from the beta-ray correlation terms was consistent with the CVC prediction 7.3\\pm0.2, deduced from the analog-gamma-decay measurement based on the CVC hypothesis. However, there was no consistent CVC prediction for the second-forbidden term associated with the weak vector current. The experimental value for the second-forbidden term was 1.0 \\pm 0.3, while the CVC prediction was 0.1 \\pm 0.4 or 2.1 \\pm 0.5.

T. Sumikama; K. Matsuta; T. Nagatomo; M. Ogura; T. Iwakoshi; Y. Nakashima; H. Fujiwara; M. Fukuda; M. Mihara; K. Minamisono; T. Yamaguchi; T. Minamisono

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

168

Measurement of {sup 63}Ni and {sup 59}Ni by accelerator mass spectrometry using characteristic projectile x-rays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-lived isotopes of nickel ({sup 59}Ni, {sup 63}Ni) have current and potential use in a number of applications including cosmic radiation studies, biomedical tracing, characterization of low-level radioactive wastes, and neutron dosimetry. Methods are being developed at LLNL for the routine detection of these isotopes by AMS. One intended application is in Hiroshima dosimetry. The reaction {sup 63}Cu(n,p){sup 63}Ni has been identified as one of a small number of reactions which might be used for the direct determination of the fast neutron fluence emitted by the Hiroshima bomb. AMS measurement of {sup 63}Ni(t{sub 1/2} = 100 y) requires the chemical removal of {sup 63}Cu, which is a stable isobar of {sup 63}Ni. Following the electrochemical separation of Ni from gram-sized copper samples, the Cu concentration is further lowered to Hiroshima hypocenter. For the demonstration samples, the Cu content was chemically reduced by a factor of 10{sup 12} with quantitative retention of {sup 63}Ni. Detection sensitivity (3{sigma}) was {approximately}20 fg {sup 63}Ni in 1 mg Ni carrier ({sup 63}Ni/Ni {approx} 2 x 10{sup -11}). Significant improvements in sensitivity are expected with planned incremental changes in the methods. Preliminary results indicate that a similar sensitivity is achievable for {sup 59}Ni (t{sub 1/2} = 10{sup 5} y).

McAninch, J.E.; Hainsworth, L.J.; Marchetti, A.A. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Properties of jets measured from tracks in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energy root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector  

SciTech Connect

Jets are identified and their properties studied in center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 7 TeV proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider using charged particles measured by the ATLAS inner detector. Events are selected using a minimum bias trigger, allowing jets at very low transverse momentum to be observed and their characteristics in the transition to high-momentum fully perturbative jets to be studied. Jets are reconstructed using the anti-k{sub t} algorithm applied to charged particles with two radius parameter choices, 0.4 and 0.6. An inclusive charged jet transverse momentum cross section measurement from 4 GeV to 100 GeV is shown for four ranges in rapidity extending to 1.9 and corrected to charged particle-level truth jets. The transverse momenta and longitudinal momentum fractions of charged particles within jets are measured, along with the charged particle multiplicity and the particle density as a function of radial distance from the jet axis. Comparison of the data with the theoretical models implemented in existing tunings of Monte Carlo event generators indicates reasonable overall agreement between data and Monte Carlo. These comparisons are sensitive to Monte Carlo parton showering, hadronization, and soft physics models.

Aad, G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, BS; Adams, DL; Addy, TN; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, JA

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

170

Method for calibrating mass spectrometers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method whereby a mass spectra generated by a mass spectrometer is calibrated by shifting the parameters used by the spectrometer to assign masses to the spectra in a manner which reconciles the signal of ions within the spectra having equal mass but differing charge states, or by reconciling ions having known differences in mass to relative values consistent with those known differences. In this manner, the mass spectrometer is calibrated without the need for standards while allowing the generation of a highly accurate mass spectra by the instrument.

Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Brands, Michael D [Richland, WA; Bruce, James E [Schwenksville, PA; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

2002-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

171

Estimation of Thermal Resistance from Room Temperature Electrical Resistance Measurements for Different LHC Beam Screen Support Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note the thermal resistance between the LHC beam screen and cold bore is estimated from room temperature electrical resistance measurements. The results indicate that the beam screen without supports should have a comparable, if not better, thermal performance than the one with the existing spring supports. This prediction from electrical resistance measurements is confirmed by recent preliminary thermal measurements.

Jenninger, B

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Nuclear medium cooling scenario in the light of new Cas A cooling data and the 2 M_sun pulsar mass measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, Elshamounty et al. performed a reanalysis of the surface temperature of the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A on the basis of Chandra data measured during last decade, and added a new data point. We show that all reliably known temperature data of neutron stars including those belonging to Cassiopea A can be comfortably explained in our "nuclear medium cooling" scenario of neutron stars. The cooling rates account for medium-modified one-pion exchange in dense matter, polarization effects in the pair-breaking-formation processes operating on superfluid neutrons and protons paired in the 1S_0 state, and other relevant processes. The emissivity of the pair-breaking-formation process in the 3P_2 state is a tiny quantity within our scenario. Crucial for a successful description of the Cassiopeia A cooling proves to be the thermal conductivity from both, the electrons and nucleons, being reduced by medium effects. Moreover, we exploit an EoS which stiffens at high densities due to an excluded volume effect and is capable of describing a maximum mass of 2.1 M_sun, thus including the recent measurements of PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0348+0432.

D. Blaschke; H. Grigorian; D. N. Voskresensky

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

173

"Gravitational mass" of information?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We hypothesize possible new types of forces that would be the result of new types of interactions, static and a slow transient, between objects with related information contents (pattern). Such mechanism could make material composition dependence claimed by Fishbach, et al in Eotvos type experiments plausible. We carried out experiments by using a high-resolution scale with the following memories: USB-2 flash drives (1-16GB), DVD and CD disks to determine if such an interaction exist/detectable with a scale resolution of 10 microgram with these test objects. We applied zero information, white noise and 1/f noise type data. Writing or deleting the information in any of these devices causes peculiar negative weight transients, up to milligrams (mass fraction around 10^-5), which is followed by various types of relaxation processes. These relaxations have significantly different dynamics compared to transients observed during cooling after stationary external heating. Interestingly, a USB-1 MP3 player has also developed comparable transient mass loss during playing music. A classical interpretation of the negative weight transients could be absorbed water in hygroscopic components however comparison of relaxation time constants with air humidity data does not support an obvious explanation. Another classical interpretation with certain contribution is the lifting Bernoulli force caused by the circulation due to convection of the warm air. However, in this case all observed time constants with a device should have been the same unless some hidden parameter causes the observed variations. Further studies are warranted to clarify if there is indeed a new force, which is showing up as negative mass at weight measurement when high-density structural information is changed or read out (measured).

Laszlo B. Kish

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

174

Cumulative mass approach for column testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cumulative mass approach for laboratory column testing using an analytical solution for miscible transport through soil is presented. The cumulative mass approach differs from the more traditional approach for column testing in that the analysis of the measured data is in terms of mass of solute instead of solute concentration. The potential advantages of the cumulative mass approach are: (1) The influence of increment in effluent sample volume on the measured concentrations is removed from consideration; (2) the effluent sampling procedure is less labor-intensive, and therefore potentially more cost-effective; and (3) the retardation factor and effective porosity can be evaluated directly from plots of the test results. A comparison of analyses of measured data based on the cumulative mass approach with the more traditional concentration-based approach indicates slight differences (less than 3%) in the regressed values of the dispersion coefficient and retardation factor. These differences are attributed to greater scatter in the data for the more traditional approach and to slight errors involved in the traditional approach due to plotting the average, incremental concentrations at the pore volumes of flow corresponding to the middle of the sampling interval.

Shackelford, C.D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)] [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Negative mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some physical aspects of negative mass are examined. Several unusual properties, such as the ability of negative mass to penetrate any armor, are analyzed. Other surprising effects include the bizarre system of negative mass chasing positive pass, naked singularities and the violation of cosmic censorship, wormholes, and quantum mechanical results as well. In addition, a brief look into the implications for strings is given.

Richard T Hammond

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

176

On the Usage of Spectral and Broadband Satellite Instrument Measurements to Differentiate Climate Models with Different Cloud Feedback Strengths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Top-of-atmosphere radiometric signals associated with different high- and low-cloudradiative feedbacks have been examined through the use of an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE). The OSSE simulates variations in the spectrally ...

Daniel R. Feldman; Daniel M. Coleman; William D. Collins

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

On the Usage of Spectral and Broadband Satellite Instrument Measurements to Differentiate Climate Models with Different Cloud Feedback Strengths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Top-of-atmosphere radiometric signals associated with different high- and low-cloud radiative feedbacks have been examined through the use of an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE). The OSSE simulates variations in the spectrally ...

Daniel R. Feldman; Daniel M. Coleman; William D. Collins

178

The $\\epem\\to?^+?^-?^+?^-$, $K^+K^-?^+?^-$, and $K^+K^- K^+K^- $ Cross Sections at Center-of-Mass Energies 0.5--4.5 \\gev Measured with Initial-State Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the process $e^+e^-\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-\\gamma$, with a hard photon radiated from the initial state. About 60,000 fully reconstructed events have been selected from 89 $fb^{-1}$ of BaBar data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective \\epem center-of-mass energy, so that these data can be compared with the corresponding direct $e^+e^-$ measurements. From the $4\\pi$-mass spectrum, the cross section for the process $e^+e^-\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ is measured for center-of-mass energies from 0.6 to 4.5 $GeV/c^2$. The uncertainty in the cross section measurement is typically 5%. We also measure the cross sections for the final states $K^+ K^- \\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $K^+ K^- K^+ K^-$. We observe the $J/\\psi$ in all three final states and measure the corresponding branching fractions. We search for X(3872) in $J/\\psi (\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-) \\pi^+\\pi^-$ and obtain an upper limit on the product of the $e^+e^-$ width of the X(3872) and the branching fraction for $X(3872) \\to J/\\psi\\pi^+\\pi^-$.

B. Aubert; BABAR Collaboration

2005-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

Stopping Power of Different Ions in Si Measured with a Bulk Sample Method and Bayesian Inference Data Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The accuracy of ion beam analysis experiments depends critically on the stopping power values available. While for H and He ions accuracies normally better than 5% are achieved by usual interpolative schemes such as SRIM, for heavier ions the accuracy is worse. One of the main reasons is that the experimental data bases are very sparse, even for important materials such as Si. New measurements are therefore needed. Measurement of stopping power is often made with transmission in thin films, with the usual problems of film thickness homogeneity. We have previously developed an alternative method based on measuring bulk spectra, and fitting the yield by treating the stopping power as a fit parameter in a Bayesian inference Markov chain Monte Carlo procedure included in the standard IBA code NDF. We report on improvements of the method and on its application to the determination of the stopping power of {sup 7}Li in Si. To validate the method, we also apply it to the stopping of {sup 4}He in Si, which is known with 2% accuracy.

Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, Sacavem 2686-953 (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, Lisboa (Portugal); Siketic, Z.; Radovic, I. Bogdanovic [Ruder Boskovic Institute, P.O. Box 180, Zagreb 10002 (Croatia)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

180

fehlende Masse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

beim radioaktiven Zerfall mit der fehlenden Masse?" Zur Erinnerung: wenn Uran in Thorium und ein alpha Teilchen zerfllt, dann gehen 0.0046 u (Masseneinheiten) der...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

THE INFLUENCE OF DARK MATTER HALOS ON DYNAMICAL ESTIMATES OF BLACK HOLE MASS: 10 NEW MEASUREMENTS FOR HIGH-{sigma} EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

Adaptive optics assisted SINFONI observations of the central regions of 10 early-type galaxies are presented. Based primarily on the SINFONI kinematics, 10 black hole (BH) masses occupying the high-mass regime of the M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation are derived using three-integral Schwarzschild models. The effect of dark matter (DM) inclusion on the BH mass is explored. The omission of a DM halo in the model results in a higher stellar mass-to-light ratio, especially when extensive kinematic data are used in the model. However, when the diameter of the sphere of influence-computed using the BH mass derived without a dark halo-is at least 10 times the point-spread function FWHM during the observations, it is safe to exclude a DM component in the dynamical modeling, i.e., the change in BH mass is negligible. When the spatial resolution is marginal, restricting the mass-to-light ratio to the right value returns the correct M{sub BH} although a dark halo is not present in the model. Compared to the M{sub BH}-{sigma} and M{sub BH}-L relations of McConnell et al., the 10 BHs are all more massive than expected from the luminosities and 7 BH masses are higher than expected from the stellar velocity dispersions of the host bulges. Using new fitted relations, which include the 10 galaxies, we find that the space density of the most massive BHs (M{sub BH} {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) estimated from the M{sub BH}-L relation is higher than the estimate based on the M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation and the latter is higher than model predictions based on quasar counts, each by about an order of magnitude.

Rusli, S. P.; Thomas, J.; Saglia, R. P.; Fabricius, M.; Erwin, P.; Bender, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Nowak, N. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Muenchen (Germany); Lee, C. H.; Riffeser, A. [Universitaets-Sternwarte Muenchen, Scheinerstrasse 1, D-81679 Muenchen (Germany); Sharp, R. [Anglo-Australian Observatory, P.O. Box 296, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Linear electric field mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Nordholt, Jane E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Linear electric field mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Does Information Have Mass?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does information have mass? This question has been asked many times and there are many answers even on the Internet, including on Yahoo Answers. Usually the answer is "no". Attempts have been made to assess the physical mass of information by estimating the mass of electrons feeding the power-guzzling computers and devices making up the Internet, the result being around 50 gram. Other efforts to calculate the mass of information have assumed that each electron involved in signal transfer carries one bit of information, which makes the corresponding mass to be about 10^-5 gram. We address the fundamental question of minimum mass related to a bit of information from the angles of quantum physics and special relativity. Our results indicate that there are different answers depending on the physical situation, and sometimes the mass can even be negative. We tend to be skeptical about the earlier mass estimations, mentioned above, because our results indicate that the electron's mass does not play a role in any on...

Kish, Laszlo B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Multidetector calibration for mass spectrometers  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency`s Safeguards Analytical Laboratory has performed calibration experiments to measure the different efficiencies among multi-Faraday detectors for a Finnigan-MAT 261 mass spectrometer. Two types of calibration experiments were performed: (1) peak-shift experiments and (2) peak-jump experiments. For peak-shift experiments, the ion intensities were measured for all isotopes of an element in different Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by shifting the isotopes to various Faraday detectors. Two different peak-shifting schemes were used to measure plutonium (UK Pu5/92138) samples. For peak-jump experiments, ion intensities were measured in a reference Faraday detector for a single isotope and compared with those measured in the other Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by switching back-and-forth between the reference Faraday detector and a selected Faraday detector. This switching procedure is repeated for all Faraday detectors. Peak-jump experiments were performed with replicate measurements of {sup 239}Pu, {sup 187}Re, and {sup 238}U. Detector efficiency factors were estimated for both peak-jump and peak-shift experiments using a flexible calibration model to statistically analyze both types of multidetector calibration experiments. Calculated detector efficiency factors were shown to depend on both the material analyzed and the experimental conditions. A single detector efficiency factor is not recommended for each detector that would be used to correct routine sample analyses. An alternative three-run peak-shift sample analysis should be considered. A statistical analysis of the data from this peak-shift experiment can adjust the isotopic ratio estimates for detector differences due to each sample analysis.

Bayne, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Donohue, D.L.; Fiedler, R. [IAEA, Seibersdorf (Austria). Safeguards Analytical Lab.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Gas mass transfer for stratified flows  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrum integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi}) Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geophysical and chemical engineering literature.

Duffey, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hughes, E.D. [CSA Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Gas mass transfer for stratified flows  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrium integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi})Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geo-physical and chemical engineering literature.

Duffey, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hughes, E.D. [CSA, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Characterization of condenser microphones under different environmental conditions for accurate speed of sound measurements with acoustic resonators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condenser microphones are more commonly used and have been extensively modeled and characterized in air at ambient temperature and static pressure. However, several applications of interest for metrology and physical acoustics require to use these transducers in significantly different environmental conditions. Particularly, the extremely accurate determination of the speed of sound in monoatomic gases, which is pursued for a determination of the Boltzmann constant k by an acoustic method, entails the use of condenser microphones mounted within a spherical cavity, over a wide range of static pressures, at the temperature of the triple point of water (273.16 K). To further increase the accuracy achievable in this application, the microphone frequency response and its acoustic input impedance need to be precisely determined over the same static pressure and temperature range. Few previous works examined the influence of static pressure, temperature, and gas composition on the microphone's sensitivity. In this work, the results of relative calibrations of 1/4 in. condenser microphones obtained using an electrostatic actuator technique are presented. The calibrations are performed in pure helium and argon gas at temperatures near 273 K and in the pressure range between 10 and 600 kPa. These experimental results are compared with the predictions of a realistic model available in the literature, finding a remarkable good agreement. The model provides an estimate of the acoustic impedance of 1/4 in. condenser microphones as a function of frequency and static pressure and is used to calculate the corresponding frequency perturbations induced on the normal modes of a spherical cavity when this is filled with helium or argon gas.

Guianvarc'h, Cecile; Pitre, Laurent [Laboratoire Commun de Metrologie LNE/Cnam, 61 rue du Landy, 93210 La Plaine Saint Denis (France); Gavioso, Roberto M.; Benedetto, Giuliana [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Turin (Italy); Bruneau, Michel [Laboratoire d'Acoustique de l'Universite du Maine UMR CNRS 6613, av. Olivier Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans Cedex 9 (France)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

W Transverse Mass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Some Data Analysis Some Data Analysis The Tevatron produces millions of collisions each second in CDF and DZero. The detectors have hardware triggers to decide if a collision is "interesting," that is it contains a candidate event for any one of a number studies. Our dataset contains 48,844 candidate events for a W mass study. There are other datasets to study Z mass, top and b quarks, QCD, etc. Why don't all the W decays give exactly the same mass? Are all these candidates really Ws? What if we chose only some of these data. How would our choice effect the value of the transverse mass? Work with your classmates. Test the data to see what you can learn. Help with data analysis. Record the best estimate of the W transverse mass from your data analysis. Explain which data you used and why. Check with your classmates and explain any differences between your estimate and theirs.

190

W Boson Mass Working Group Report  

SciTech Connect

The W boson mass working group discussed the current status of the W boson mass measurement and the prospects for improving on LEP and Tevatron measurements at the LHC.

Kilgore, W.; Kilgore, W.

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

191

Measurement of the difference of CP--violating asymmetries in $D^0 \\to K^+K^-$ and $D^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays at CDF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a measurement of the difference (D/Acp) between time-integrated-violating asymmetries in D{sup 0} K{sup +}K{sup -} and D{sup 0} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays reconstructed in the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab, corresponding to 9.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The strong decay D*{sup +} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} is used to identify the charm meson at production as D{sup 0} or ['D]{sup 0}. We measure D/Acp = (-0.62 0.21 /stat 0.10 /syst)%, which differs from zero by 2.7 Gaussian standard deviations. This result supports similar evidence for violation in charm-quark obtained in proton-proton collisions.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Measurement of Event Shapes in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at Center-of-Mass Energy 1.96 TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of event shape observables in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The data for this analysis were recorded by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. The variables studied are the transverse thrust and thrust minor, both defined in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction. The observables are measured using energies from unclustered calorimeter cells. In addition to studies of the differential distributions, we present the dependence of event shape mean values on the leading jet transverse energy. Data are compared with pythia Tune A and to resummed parton level predictions that were matched to fixed order results at NLO accuracy (NLO+NLL). Predictions from pythia Tune A agree fairly well with the data. However, the underlying event contributes significantly to these observables, making it difficult to make direct comparisons to the NLO+NLL predictions, which do not account for the underlying event. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a new observable, a weighted difference of the mean values of the thrust and thrust minor, which is less sensitive to the underlying event, allowing for a comparison with NLO+NLL. Both pythia Tune A and the NLO+NLL calculations agree well within the 20% theoretical uncertainty with the data for this observable, indicating that perturbative QCD successfully describes shapes of the hadronic final states.

Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Correlations of experimental isotope shifts with spectroscopic and mass observables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental differential observables relating to mean square charge radii, spectroscopic, and mass observables of even-even nuclei are presented for different regions in the nuclear chart. They exhibit remarkable correlations, not heretofore recognized, that provide a new perspective on structural evolution, especially in exotic nuclei. This can also be a guide for future measurements of charge radii, spectroscopic observables, and masses, as well as for future theoretical approaches.

Cakirli, R. B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Istanbul, Istanbul (Turkey); Casten, R. F. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Algorithm for Screening Phasor Measurement Unit Data for Power System Events and Categories and Common Characteristics for Events Seen in Phasor Measurement Unit Relative Phase-Angle Differences and Frequency Signals  

SciTech Connect

A network of multiple phasor measurement units (PMU) was created, set up, and maintained at the University of Texas at Austin to obtain actual power system measurements for power system analysis. Power system analysis in this report covers a variety of time ranges, such as short- term analysis for power system disturbances and their effects on power system behavior and long- term power system behavior using modal analysis. The first objective of this report is to screen the PMU data for events. The second objective of the report is to identify and describe common characteristics extracted from power system events as measured by PMUs. The numerical characteristics for each category and how these characteristics are used to create selection rules for the algorithm are also described. Trends in PMU data related to different levels and fluctuations in wind power output are also examined.

Allen, A.; Santoso, S.; Muljadi, E.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Apparatus and method for quantitative measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity between two samples using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for the measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity of weakly absorbing solutions using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect have been developed. Two sample cells are placed in each arm of an interferometer and are traversed by colinear probe and heating laser beams. The interrogation probe beams are recombined forming a fringe pattern, the intensity of which can be related to changes in optical path length of these laser beams through the cells. This in turn can be related to small differences in optical absorptivity which results in different amounts of sample heating when the heating laser beams are turned on, by the fact that the index of refraction of a liquid is temperature dependent. A critical feature of this invention is the stabilization of the optical path of the probe beams against drift. Background (solvent) absorption can then be suppressed by a factor of approximately 400. Solute absorptivities of about 10[sup [minus]5] cm[sup [minus]1] can then be determined in the presence of background absorptions in excess of 10[sup [minus]3] cm[sup [minus]1]. In addition, the smallest absorption measured with the instant apparatus and method is about 5 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] cm[sup [minus]1]. 6 figs.

Cremers, D.A.; Keller, R.A.

1984-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

196

Algorithms Used in Heterogeneous Dose Calculations Show Systematic Differences as Measured With the Radiological Physics Center's Anthropomorphic Thorax Phantom Used for RTOG Credentialing  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the impact of treatment planning algorithm on the accuracy of heterogeneous dose calculations in the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) thorax phantom. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the results of 304 irradiations of the RPC thorax phantom at 221 different institutions as part of credentialing for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group clinical trials; the irradiations were all done using 6-MV beams. Treatment plans included those for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as well as 3-dimensional conformal therapy (3D-CRT). Heterogeneous plans were developed using Monte Carlo (MC), convolution/superposition (CS), and the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), as well as pencil beam (PB) algorithms. For each plan and delivery, the absolute dose measured in the center of a lung target was compared to the calculated dose, as was the planar dose in 3 orthogonal planes. The difference between measured and calculated dose was examined as a function of planning algorithm as well as use of IMRT. Results: PB algorithms overestimated the dose delivered to the center of the target by 4.9% on average. Surprisingly, CS algorithms and AAA also showed a systematic overestimation of the dose to the center of the target, by 3.7% on average. In contrast, the MC algorithm dose calculations agreed with measurement within 0.6% on average. There was no difference observed between IMRT and 3D CRT calculation accuracy. Conclusion: Unexpectedly, advanced treatment planning systems (those using CS and AAA algorithms) overestimated the dose that was delivered to the lung target. This issue requires attention in terms of heterogeneity calculations and potentially in terms of clinical practice.

Kry, Stephen F., E-mail: sfkry@mdanderson.org [Radiological Physics Center, Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Alvarez, Paola; Molineu, Andrea; Amador, Carrie [Radiological Physics Center, Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Radiological Physics Center, Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Galvin, James [American College of Radiology/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [American College of Radiology/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Followill, David S. [Radiological Physics Center, Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Radiological Physics Center, Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Measurement of Hadronic Event Shapes and Jet Substructure in Proton-Proton Collisions at 7.0 TeV Center-of-Mass Energy with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider  

SciTech Connect

This thesis presents the first measurement of 6 hadronic event shapes in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Results are presented at the particle-level, permitting comparisons to multiple Monte Carlo event generator tools. Numerous tools and techniques that enable detailed analysis of the hadronic final state at high luminosity are described. The approaches presented utilize the dual strengths of the ATLAS calorimeter and tracking systems to provide high resolution and robust measurements of the hadronic jets that constitute both a background and a signal throughout ATLAS physics analyses. The study of the hadronic final state is then extended to jet substructure, where the energy flow and topology within individual jets is studied at the detector level and techniques for estimating systematic uncertainties for such measurements are commissioned in the first data. These first substructure measurements in ATLAS include the jet mass and sub-jet multiplicity as well as those concerned with multi-body hadronic decays and color flow within jets. Finally, the first boosted hadronic object observed at the LHC - the decay of the top quark to a single jet - is presented.

Miller, David Wilkins

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

198

Commissioning Measurements and Experience Obtained from the Installation of a Fissile Mass Flow monitor in the URAL Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) in Novouralsk  

SciTech Connect

The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) equipment sent earlier to the Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) at Novouralsk, Russia, was installed and implemented successfully on February 2, 1999. The BDMS installation supports the highly enriched uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program for material subject to monitoring under the HEU purchase agreement between the United States of America (USA) and the Russian Federation (RF). The BDMS consists of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile (uranium-235) Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Enrichment Monitor (EM). Two BDMS?s for monitoring the Main and Reserve HEU blending process lines were installed at UEIP. Independent operation of the FMFM Main and FMFM Reserve was successfully demonstrated for monitoring the fissile mass flow as well as the traceability of HEU to the product low enriched uranium. The FMFM systems failed when both systems were activated during the calibration phase due to a synchronization problem between the systems. This operational failure was caused by the presence of strong electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the blend point. The source-modulator shutter motion of the two FMFM systems was not being properly synchronized because of EMI producing a spurious signal on the synchronization cable connecting the two FMFM cabinets. The signature of this failure was successfully reproduced at ORNL after the visit. This unexpected problem was eliminated by a hardware modification and software improvements during a recent visit (June 9-11, 1999) to UEIP, and both systems are now operating as expected.

March-Leuba, J.; Mastal, E.; Powell, D.; Sumner, J.; Uckan, T.; Vines, V.

1999-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

199

W Transverse Mass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transverse Mass Histogram Transverse Mass Histogram Data for 49,844 candidate W events are in an Excel spreadsheet with the following data as shown in the table below: A B C D 1 Run No Event No W TMass GeV/c2 Bins 2 55237 19588 68.71732 3 55237 30799 72.19464 Get the data. Sort the data by ascending mass. Be sure to sort all the data in the first three columns! Make a histogram of the data. Rather than graphing the data as individual points, physicists group the data by mass. They consider the full range of the data and divide it into "bins" of equal range size. A histogram is a graph of the number of events in each bin vs. the bin range. They are looking for a peak in the data where most of the masses fall. This will be the value of the mass as detemined by that dataset, and the width of the distribution is a reflection of the errors in the measurements.

200

Constrained Variational Analysis of Sounding Data Based on Column-Integrated Budgets of Mass, Heat, Moisture, and Momentum: Approach and Application to ARM Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the purpose of deriving grid-scale vertical velocity and advective tendencies from sounding measurements, an objective scheme is developed to process atmospheric soundings of winds, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio over a network of ...

M. H. Zhang; J. L. Lin

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Mass Finishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8 Operating conditions for mass finishing...Brass screw-machine parts Aluminum oxide or granite 6.4-19 0.25-0.75 [MathExpression] -6 Light matte or bright Light cutting (a) Brass stampings or screws (b) Limestone 3.2-13 0.13-0.50 2-6 Bright (a) Submerged tumbling is used for fragile and precision parts. (b) Screw-machine parts...

202

Measurement of the top quark mass with the dynamical likelihood method using lepton plus jets events with b-tags in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a measurement of the top quark mass, M{sub top}, with the dynamical likelihood method (DLM) using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Tevatron produces top/anti-top (t{bar t}) pairs in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data sample used in this analysis was accumulated from March 2002 through August 2004, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 318 pb{sup -1}. They use the t{bar t} candidates in the ''lepton+jets'' decay channel, requiring at least one jet identified as a b quark by finding an displaced secondary vertex. The DLM defines a likelihood for each event based on the differential cross section as a function of M{sub top} per unit phase space volume of the final partons, multiplied by the transfer functions from jet to parton energies. The method takes into account all possible jet combinations in an event, and the likelihood is multiplied event by event to derive the top quark mass by the maximum likelihood method. Using 63 t{bar t} candidates observed in the data, with 9.2 events expected from background, they measure the top quark mass to be 173.2{sub -2.4}{sup +2.6}(stat.) {+-} 3.2(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, or 173.2{sub -4.0}{sup +4.1} GeV/c{sup 2}.

Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Neutrino mass, a status report  

SciTech Connect

Experimental approaches to neutrino mass include kinematic mass measurements, neutrino oscillation searches at rectors and accelerators, solar neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and single and double beta decay. The solar neutrino results yield fairly strong and consistent indications that neutrino oscillations are occurring. Other evidence for new physics is less consistent and convincing.

Robertson, R.G.H.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Linear electric field mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer is described having a low weight and low power requirement, for use in space. It can be used to analyze the ionized particles in the region of the spacecraft on which it is mounted. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically sysmetric linear electric field.

McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

205

Mass and Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last few years heat recovery was under spot and in air conditioning fields usually we use heat recovery by different types of heat exchangers. The heat exchanging between the exhaust air from the building with the fresh air to the building (air to air heat exchanger). In my papers I use (water to air heat exchanger) as a heat recovery and I use the water as a mass recovery. The source of mass and heat recovery is the condensate water which we were dispose and connect it to the drain lines.

Hindawai, S. M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Static-light meson masses from twisted mass lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the static-light meson spectrum using two-flavor Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD. We have considered five different values for the light quark mass corresponding to 300 MeV < m_PS < 600 MeV. We have extrapolated our results, to make predictions regarding the spectrum of B and B_s mesons.

ETM Collaboration; Karl Jansen; Chris Michael; Andrea Shindler; Marc Wagner

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Neutrino Mass and Flavour Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We survey some of the recent promising developments in the search for the theory behind neutrino mass and tri-bimaximal mixing, and indeed all fermion masses and mixing. We focus in particular on models with discrete family symmetry and unification, and show how such models can also solve the SUSY flavour and CP problems. We also discuss the theoretical implications of the measurement of a non-zero reactor angle, as hinted at by recent experimental measurements.

King, Stephen F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Neutrino Mass and Flavour Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We survey some of the recent promising developments in the search for the theory behind neutrino mass and tri-bimaximal mixing, and indeed all fermion masses and mixing. We focus in particular on models with discrete family symmetry and unification, and show how such models can also solve the SUSY flavour and CP problems. We also discuss the theoretical implications of the measurement of a non-zero reactor angle, as hinted at by recent experimental measurements.

Stephen F King

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

209

Measurement of d sigma/dy of Drell-Yan e+ e- pairs in the Z Mass Region from p anti-p Collisions at s88(1/2) = 1.96-TeV  

SciTech Connect

We report on a CDF measurement of the total cross section and rapidity distribution, d{sigma}/dy, for q{bar q} {yields} {gamma}*/Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} events in the Z boson mass region (66 < M{sub ee} < 116 GeV/c{sup 2}) produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with 2.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The measured cross section of 256 {+-} 16 pb and d{sigma}/dy distribution are compared with Next-to-Leading-Order and Next-to-Next-to-Leading-Order QCD theory predictions with CTEQ and MRST parton distribution functions (PDFs). There is good agreement between data and theory except at large rapidity for which further tuning of PDF models may be needed.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

ON THE MASS DISTRIBUTION AND BIRTH MASSES OF NEUTRON STARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the distribution of neutron star masses in different populations of binaries, employing Bayesian statistical techniques. In particular, we explore the differences in neutron star masses between sources that have experienced distinct evolutionary paths and accretion episodes. We find that the distribution of neutron star masses in non-recycled eclipsing high-mass binaries as well as of slow pulsars, which are all believed to be near their birth masses, has a mean of 1.28 M{sub Sun} and a dispersion of 0.24 M{sub Sun }. These values are consistent with expectations for neutron star formation in core-collapse supernovae. On the other hand, double neutron stars, which are also believed to be near their birth masses, have a much narrower mass distribution, peaking at 1.33 M{sub Sun }, but with a dispersion of only 0.05 M{sub Sun }. Such a small dispersion cannot easily be understood and perhaps points to a particular and rare formation channel. The mass distribution of neutron stars that have been recycled has a mean of 1.48 M{sub Sun} and a dispersion of 0.2 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the expectation that they have experienced extended mass accretion episodes. The fact that only a very small fraction of recycled neutron stars in the inferred distribution have masses that exceed {approx}2 M{sub Sun} suggests that only a few of these neutron stars cross the mass threshold to form low-mass black holes.

Oezel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Santos Villarreal, Antonio [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Narayan, Ramesh [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138,USA (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

211

A variable for measuring masses at hadron colliders when missing energy is expected; mT2: the truth behind the glamour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: the truth behind the glamour Alan Barr, Christopher Lester and Phil Stephens Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HE, UK E-mail: barr@hep.phy.cam.ac.uk, lester@hep.phy.cam.ac.uk and stephens... -slepton edge at S5, and the right-slepton edge at O1) and in both sets of cuts. The hard cuts are able to suppress 2360 A Barr et al Table 1. Parameters of the four AMSB-like points studied. The parameter was adjusted so that different values of #7;M?1 could...

Barr, Alan; Lester, Christopher G; Stephens, Phil

212

Measurement of gas species, temperatures, coal burnout, and wall heat fluxes in a 200 MWe lignite-fired boiler with different overfire air damper openings  

SciTech Connect

Measurements were performed on a 200 MWe, wall-fired, lignite utility boiler. For different overfire air (OFA) damper openings, the gas temperature, gas species concentration, coal burnout, release rates of components (C, H, and N), furnace temperature, and heat flux and boiler efficiency were measured. Cold air experiments for a single burner were conducted in the laboratory. The double-swirl flow pulverized-coal burner has two ring recirculation zones starting in the secondary air region in the burner. As the secondary air flow increases, the axial velocity of air flow increases, the maxima of radial velocity, tangential velocity and turbulence intensity all increase, and the swirl intensity of air flow and the size of recirculation zones increase slightly. In the central region of the burner, as the OFA damper opening widens, the gas temperature and CO concentration increase, while the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and coal particles ignite earlier. In the secondary air region of the burner, the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and the gas temperature and CO concentration vary slightly. In the sidewall region, the gas temperature, O{sub 2} concentration, and NOx concentration decrease, while the CO concentration increases and the gas temperature varies slightly. The furnace temperature and heat flux in the main burning region decrease appreciably, but increase slightly in the burnout region. The NOx emission decreases from 1203.6 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 0% to 511.7 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 80% and the boiler efficiency decreases from 92.59 to 91.9%. 15 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Jianping Jing; Zhengqi Li; Guangkui Liu; Zhichao Chen; Chunlong Liu [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Energy Science and Engineering

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis & Institut Universitaire de France UPV/EHU Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;Transport maps Let µ0 and µ1 be probability measures on M. We

Rifford, Ludovic

214

A measurement of. Delta. sigma. sub L (np), the difference between neutron-proton total cross sections in pure longitudinal spin states  

SciTech Connect

A measurement off {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(np), the difference between neutron-proton total cross sections in pure longitudinal spin states, is described. The results will help determine the isospin-zero (I = 0) scattering amplitudes, which are not well known above laboratory energies of 500 MeV, whereas the isospin-one (I = 1) amplitudes are fairly well-determined to 1 GeV. Data points were taken at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) at Los Alamos, New Mexico, for five neutron beam energies: 484, 568, 634,720 and 788 MeV; they are the first in this energy range. Polarized neutrons were produced by charge-exchange of polarized protons on a liquid deuterium target (LD{sub 2}). Large-volume neutron counters detected the neutrons that passed through a polarized proton target. The counters subtended a range of solid angles large enough to allow extrapolation of the scattered neutrons to 0{degree}. Two modifications to the LAMPF accelerator system which were made for this work are described. They included a beam buncher,'' which modified the normal rf-time structure of the proton beam and allowed for the selection of peak-energy neutrons by time-of-flight means, and a computerized beam steering program, which reduced systematic effects due to beam motion at the LD{sub 2} target. The experimental values of {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(np) are found to be consistent with other np data, including preliminary data from SIN and Saclay, but not with some results from Argonne which used a polarized proton beam and a polarized deuteron target. The I = 0 component was extracted from {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(np) using existing pp data (I = 1), with the unexpected result that {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(I = 0) was found to be essentially identical in shape to {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(I = 1). The significance of this is not yet understood.

Beddo, M.E.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Mass Transportation on surfaces Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass Transportation on surfaces Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on surfaces #12;Monge quadratic transport in Rn Let µ0 and µ1 be probability measures with compact support in Rn . We call transport map from µ0 to µ1 any measurable map T : Rn Rn

Rifford, Ludovic

216

Side-by-Side Comparison of Particle Count and Mass Concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Side-by-Side Comparison of Particle Count and Mass Concentration Side-by-Side Comparison of Particle Count and Mass Concentration Measurements in a Residence Title Side-by-Side Comparison of Particle Count and Mass Concentration Measurements in a Residence Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Chan, Wanyu R., and Federico Noris Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Particulate matter (PM) is a contaminant of concern in many indoor environments, including residential and commercial buildings. Health guidelines for exposure to particles are in units of mass concentrations. Relative to time-integrated mass measurements collected on filters, real-time particle counters are less time-consuming to operate. Studies found reasonable correlation between these two measurement techniques, but agreement may vary in different sampling environments, and depends on the instruments used. We performed a side-by-side comparison of particle counts and mass concentrations estimated by three types of real-time instruments: MetOne BT-637 optical particle counter (OPC), TSI DustTrak aerosol monitor, and TSI aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) spectrometer. In addition to these real-time instruments, time-integrated particle mass was also collected using PM2.5 and PM10 Personal Environmental Monitors (PEMs) manufactured by SKC. Sampling was conducted for two consecutive days in an occupied single-family house in Berkeley, California. Concentration profiles had similar trends, with DustTraks reporting higher particle mass concentrations, partially explained by the density value assumed in the calibration. We made assumptions for particle size and density to calculate the PM2.5 and PM10 mass concentrations for the MetOne and APS, and compared with the filter-based measurements. Despite uncertainties and assumptions, there was generally good agreement for the different methods.

217

Mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfabricated mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator actively measures the mass of a sample on an acoustic microbalance during the collection process. The microbalance comprises a chemically sensitive interface for collecting the sample thereon and an acoustic-based physical transducer that provides an electrical output that is proportional to the mass of the collected sample. The acoustic microbalance preferably comprises a pivot plate resonator. A resistive heating element can be disposed on the chemically sensitive interface to rapidly heat and release the collected sample for further analysis. Therefore, the mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

Neutrino Mass and Grand Unification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seesaw mechanism appears to be the simplest and most appealing way to understand small neutrino masses observed in recent experiments. It introduces three right handed neutrinos with heavy masses to the standard model, with at least one mass required by data to be close to the scale of conventional grand unified theories. This may be a hint that the new physics scale implied by neutrino masses and grand unification of forces are one and the same. Taking this point of view seriously, I explore different ways to resolve the puzzle of large neutrino mixings in grand unified theories such as SO(10) and models based on its subgroup $SU(2)_L\\times SU(2)_R\\times SU(4)_c$.

R. N. Mohapatra

2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

219

Neutrino Mass and Mixing with Discrete Symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a review article about neutrino mass and mixing and flavour model building strategies based on discrete family symmetry. After a pedagogical introduction and overview of the whole of neutrino physics, we focus on the PMNS mixing matrix and the latest global fits following the Daya Bay and RENO experiments which measure the reactor angle. We then describe the simple bimaximal, tri-bimaximal and golden ratio patterns of lepton mixing and the deviations required for a non-zero reactor angle, with solar or atmospheric mixing sum rules resulting from charged lepton corrections or residual trimaximal mixing. The different types of see-saw mechanism are then reviewed as well as the sequential dominance mechanism. We then give a mini-review of finite group theory, which may be used as a discrete family symmetry broken by flavons either completely, or with different subgroups preserved in the neutrino and charged lepton sectors. These two approaches are then reviewed in detail in separate chapters including mechanisms for flavon vacuum alignment and different model building strategies that have been proposed to generate the reactor angle. We then briefly review grand unified theories (GUTs) and how they may be combined with discrete family symmetry to describe all quark and lepton masses and mixing. Finally we discuss three model examples which combine an SU(5) GUT with the discrete family symmetries A4, S4 and Delta(96).

Stephen F. King; Christoph Luhn

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

220

Mercury's Protoplanetary Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major element fractionation among chondrites has been discussed for decades as ratios relative to Si or Mg. Recently, by expressing ratios relative to Fe, I discovered a new relationship admitting the possibility that ordinary chondrite meteorites are derived from two components, a relatively oxidized and undifferentiated, primitive component and a somewhat differentiated, planetary component, with oxidation state like the highly reduced enstatite chondrites, which I suggested was identical to Mercury's complement of lost elements. Here, on the basis of that relationship, I derive expressions, as a function of the mass of planet Mercury and the mass of its core, to estimate the mass of Mercury's lost elements, the mass of Mercury's alloy and rock protoplanetary core, and the mass of Mercury's gaseous protoplanet. Although Mercury's mass is well known, its core mass is not, being widely believed to be in the range of 70-80 percent of the planet mass. For a core mass of 75 percent, the mass of Mercury's lost elements is about 1.32 times the mass of Mercury, the mass of the alloy and rock protoplanetary core is about 2.32 times the mass of Mercury, and the mass of the gaseous protoplanet of Mercury is about 700 times the mass of Mercury. Circumstantial evidence is presented in support of the supposition that Mercury's lost elements is identical to the planetary component of ordinary chondrite formation.

J. Marvin Herndon

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Spectral Corrections Based on Optical Air Mass: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the measurement of the photovoltaic (PV) performance with respect to reference conditions requires measuring the performance with respect to a reference spectrum. Procedures were developed in the mid 1980s to correct measurements for errors relating to the spectral irradiance of the light source being different from the standard and the responsivity of the irradiance detector being different from the device under test. In principle, these procedures are exact, but require the measurement of the spectral irradiance of the light source and responsivity of the test device. This is problematic for most facilities that measure module performance. It has been suggested that a polynomial fit of the short-circuit current (I sc ) measured under natural sunlight divided by the total broadband irradiance as a function of air mass provides an accurate spectral correction factor. The polynomial correction factor is normalized to unity at an absolute air mass of 1.5.The polynomial correction factor is compared with the spectral correction factor for a variety of devices at two locations.

Emery, K.; DelCueto, J.; Zaaiman, W.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Modelling II and Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... Modeling Cathode Cooling Due to Power Interruption: Marc Dupuis1; Alton ... Modeling the Mass and Energy Balance of Different Aluminium...

223

Higher-Order Mass Defect Analysis for Mass Spectra of Complex Organic Mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Higher-order mass defect analysis is introduced as a unique formula assignment and visualization method for the analysis of complex mass spectra. This approach is an extension of the concepts of Kendrick mass transformation widely used for identification of homologous compounds differing only by a number of base units (e.g., CH2, H2, O, CH2O, etc.) in complex mixtures. We present an iterative renormalization routine for defining higher order homologous series and multidimensional clustering of mass spectral features. This approach greatly simplifies visualization of complex mass spectra and increases the number of chemical formulae that can be confidently assigned for given mass accuracy. The potential for using higher-order mass defects for data reduction and visualization is shown. Higher-order mass defect analysis is described and demonstrated through third-order analysis of a de-isotoped high-resolution mass spectrum of crude oil containing nearly 13,000 peaks.

Roach, Patrick J.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Toward laser ablation Accelerator Mass Spectrometry of actinides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A project to measure neutron capture cross sections of a number of actinides in a reactor environment by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the ATLAS facility of Argonne National Laboratory is underway. This project will require the precise and accurate measurement of produced actinide isotopes in many (>30) samples irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory with neutron fluxes having different energy distributions. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highlycharged positive ions in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source followed by acceleration in the ATLAS linac and mass-to-charge (m/q) measurement at the focus of the Fragment Mass Analyzer. Laser ablation was selected as the method of feeding the actinide material into the ion source because we expect it will have higher efficiency and lower chamber contamination than either the oven or sputtering techniques, because of a much narrower angular distribution of emitted material. In addition, a new multi-sample holder/changer to allow quick change between samples and a computer-controlled routine allowing fast tuning of the accelerator for different beams, are being developed. An initial test run studying backgrounds, detector response, and accelerator scaling repeatability was conducted in December 2010. The project design, schedule, and results of the initial test run to study backgrounds are discussed.

R. C. Pardo; F. G. Kondev; S. Kondrashev; C. Nair; T. Palchan; R. Scott; D. Seweryniak; R. Vondrasek; M. Paul; P. Collon; C. Deibel; M. Salvatores; G. Palmiotti; J. Berg; J. Fonnesbeck; G. Imel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Lattice test of 1/N[subscript c] baryon mass relations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1/N[subscript c] baryon mass relations are compared with lattice simulations of baryon masses using different values of the light-quark masses, and hence different values of SU(3) flavor-symmetry breaking. The lattice ...

Jenkins, Elizabeth E.

226

Measurement of Quantum Fluctuations in Geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A phenomenological calculation is presented of the effect of quantum fluctuations in the spacetime metric, or holographic noise, on interferometeric measurement of the relative positions of freely falling proof masses, in theories where spacetime satisfies covariant entropy bounds and can be represented as a quantum theory on 2+1D null surfaces. The quantum behavior of the 3+1D metric, represented by a commutation relation expressing quantum complementarity between orthogonal position operators, leads to a parameter-free prediction of quantum noise in orthogonal position measurements of freely falling masses. A particular quantum weirdness of this holographic noise is that it only appears in measurements that compare transverse positions, and does not appear at all in purely radial position measurements. The effect on phase signal in an interferometer that continuously measures the difference in the length of orthogonal arms resembles that of a classical random Brownian motion of the beamsplitter with a Planc...

Hogan, Craig J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Mass transport through polycrystalline microstructures  

SciTech Connect

Mass transport properties are important in polycrystalline materials used as protective films. Traditionally, such properties have been studied by examining model polycrystalline structures, such as a regular array of straight grain boundaries. However, these models do not account for a number of features of real grain ensembles, including the grain size distribution and variations in grain shape. In this study, a finite difference scheme is developed to study transient and steady-state mass transport through realistic two dimensional polycrystalline microstructures. Comparisons with the transport properties of traditional model microstructures provide regimes of applicability of such models. The effects of microstructural parameters such as average grain size are examined.

Swiler, T.P.; Holm, E.A.; Young, M.F.; Wright, S.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as measured by mass spectrometry provides an important method for the identification of proteins, which are usually identified by matching the measured and calculated m/z values of the proteolytic peptides. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as measured by mass spectrometry provides an important method for the identification of proteins, which are usually identified by matching the measured and calculated m/z values of the proteolytic peptides. A unique identification is, however, heavily

229

Reassessment of Net Surface Mass Balance in Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent in situ measurements of surface mass balance and improved calculation techniques are used to produce an updated assessment of net surface mass balance over Antarctica. A new elevation model of Antarctica derived from ERS-1 satellite ...

David G. Vaughan; Jonathan L. Bamber; Mario Giovinetto; Jonathan Russell; A. Paul R. Cooper

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Theoretical Mass Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mass spectrometry is an important technique in analytical chemistry, essential in areas including drug development, criminal ... Facilities/Tools Used: ...

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

231

Nuclear Mass Visualization and Analysis at nuclearmasses.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear masses play an important role in a wide variety of studies, motivating a tremendous surge in new precision mass measurements and global mass models. To handle this information, and to address inadequacies of existing text-based disseminations of nuclear masses, we have built a suite of codes--online at nuclearmasses.org--to manage, visualize, access, manipulate, share, compare, and analyze nuclear mass datasets. The services at this site are described, along with plans for future development.

Smith, Michael S.; Nesaraja, Caroline D. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Lingerfelt, Eric J. [Computational Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Koura, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan); Kondev, Filip G. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States)

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

232

Elbow mass flow meter  

SciTech Connect

Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Calorimetry of low mass Pu239 items  

SciTech Connect

Calorimetric assay has the reputation of providing the highest precision and accuracy of all nondestructive assay measurements. Unfortunately, non-destructive assay practitioners and measurement consumers often extend, inappropriately, the high precision and accuracy of calorimetric assay to very low mass items. One purpose of this document is to present more realistic expectations for the random uncertainties associated with calorimetric assay for weapons grade plutonium items with masses of 200 grams or less.

Cremers, Teresa L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sampson, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Mass Transport within Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

McKone, Thomas E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Photon and graviton mass limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review past and current studies of possible long-distance, low-frequency deviations from Maxwell electrodynamics and Einstein gravity. Both have passed through three phases: (1) Testing the inverse-square laws of Newton and Coulomb, (2) Seeking a nonzero value for the rest mass of photon or graviton, and (3) Considering more degrees of freedom, allowing mass while preserving gauge or general-coordinate invariance. For electrodynamics there continues to be no sign of any deviation. Since our previous review the lower limit on the photon Compton wavelength (associated with weakening of electromagnetic fields in vacuum over large distance scale) has improved by four orders of magnitude, to about one astronomical unit. Rapid current progress in astronomical observations makes it likely that there will be further advances. These ultimately could yield a bound exceeding galactic dimensions, as has long been contemplated. Meanwhile, for gravity there have been strong arguments about even the concept of a graviton rest mass. At the same time there are striking observations, commonly labeled 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' that some argue imply modified gravity. This makes the questions for gravity much more interesting. For dark matter, which involves increased attraction at large distances, any explanation by modified gravity would be qualitatively different from graviton mass. Because dark energy is associated with reduced attraction at large distances, it might be explained by a graviton-mass-like effect.

Nieto, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goldhaber Scharff, Alfred [SUNY

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a time-of-flight mass spectrometer developed for measuring the parameters of a pulsed hydrogen beam. The duration of an electron-beam current pulse in the ionizer of the mass spectrometer can be varied within 2-20 usec, the pulse electron current is 0.6 mA, and the electron energy is 250 eV. The time resolution of the mass spectrometer is determined by the repetition period of the electron-beam current pulses and is 40 usec. The mass spectrometer has 100% transmission in the direction of motion of molecular-beam particles. The dimension of the mass spectrometer is 7 cm in this direction. The mass resolution is sufficient for determination of the composition of the hydrogen beam.

Belov, A.S.; Kubalov, S.A.; Kuzik, V.F.; Yakushev, V.P.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Reconciling Change in Oi-Horizon Carbon-14 with Mass Loss for an Oak Forest  

SciTech Connect

First-year litter decomposition was estimated for an upland-oak forest ecosystem using enrichment or dilution of the 14C-signature of the Oi-horizon. These isotopically-based mass-loss estimates were contrasted with measured mass-loss rates from past litterbag studies. Mass-loss derived from changes in the 14C-signature of the Oi-horizon suggested mean mass loss over 9 months of 45% which was higher than the corresponding 9-month rate extrapolated from litterbag studies (~35%). Greater mass loss was expected from the isotopic approach because litterbags are known to limit mass loss processes driven by soil macrofauna (e.g., fragmentation and comminution). Although the 14C-isotope approach offers the advantage of being a non-invasive method, it exhibited high variability that undermined its utility as an alternative to routine litterbag mass loss methods. However, the 14C approach measures the residence time of C in the leaf litter, rather than the time it takes for leaves to disappear; hence radiocarbon measures reflect C immobilization and recycling in the microbial pool, and do not necessarily replicate results from litterbag mass loss. The commonly applied two-compartment isotopic mixing model was appropriate for estimating decomposition from isotopic enrichment of near-background soils, but it produced divergent results for isotopic dilution of a multi-layered system with litter cohorts having independent 14C-signatures. This discrepancy suggests that cohort-based models are needed to adequately capture the complex processes involved in carbon transport associated with litter mass-loss. Such models will be crucial for predicting intra- and interannual differences in organic horizon decomposition driven by scenarios of climatic change.

Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Swanston, Christopher W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL; Trumbore, Susan E. [University of California, Irvine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Reconciling Change in Oi-Horizon 14C With Mass Loss for an Oak Forest  

SciTech Connect

First-year litter decomposition was estimated for an upland-oak forest ecosystem using enrichment or dilution of the {sup 14}C-signature of the Oi-horizon. These isotopically-based mass-loss estimates were contrasted with measured mass-loss rates from past litterbag studies. Mass-loss derived from changes in the {sup 14}C-signature of the Oi-horizon suggested mean mass loss over 9 months of 45% which was higher than the corresponding 9-month rate extrapolated from litterbag studies ({approx}35%). Greater mass loss was expected from the isotopic approach because litterbags are known to limit mass loss processes driven by soil macrofauna (e.g., fragmentation and comminution). Although the {sup 14}C-isotope approach offers the advantage of being a non-invasive method, it exhibited high variability that undermined its utility as an alternative to routine litterbag mass loss methods. However, the {sup 14}C approach measures the residence time of C in the leaf litter, rather than the time it takes for leaves to disappear; hence radiocarbon measures are subject to C immobilization and recycling in the microbial pool, and do not necessarily reflect results from litterbag mass loss. The commonly applied two-compartment isotopic mixing model was appropriate for estimating decomposition from isotopic enrichment of near-background soils, but it produced divergent results for isotopic dilution of a multi-layered system with litter cohorts having independent {sup 14}C-signatures. This discrepancy suggests that cohort-based models are needed to adequately capture the complex processes involved in carbon transport associated with litter mass-loss. Such models will be crucial for predicting intra- and interannual differences in organic horizon decomposition driven by scenarios of climatic change.

Hanson, P J; Swanston, C W; Garten, Jr., C T; Todd, D E; Trumbore, S E

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

Comparison of nuclear mass models at nuclearmasses.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear masses are crucial in many astrophysics studies, as well as other areas of basic and applied nuclear science. There are now many different global theoretical models of nuclear masses - but choosing the best model for a given application can be challenging. The suite of codes online at nuclearmasses.org greatly facilitates the comparison of nuclear models with evaluated masses as well as the intercomparison of theoretical models. We demonstrate the utility of this suite by comparing the RMS deviations of 13 different theoretical mass models from the AME2003 evaluated masses over mass ranges appropriate for astrophysics.

Smith, Michael S.; Nesaraja, Caroline D.; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Koura, Hiroyuki; Kondev, Filip G. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States) and Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan); Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

240

Nuclear Masses in Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of N and Z and the data obtained apply to a variety of physics topics. One of the most crucial questions to be addressed in mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides is the one of understanding the processes of element formation in the Universe. To this end, accurate atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations. In this paper, a review on the latest achievements in mass spectrometry for nuclear astrophysics is given.

Christine Weber; Klaus Blaum; Hendrik Schatz

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mass-Loaded Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A key process within astronomy is the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between diffuse plasmas in many types of astronomical sources (including planetary nebulae, wind-blown bubbles, supernova remnants, starburst superwinds, and the intracluster medium) and dense, embedded clouds or clumps. This transfer affects the large scale flows of the diffuse plasmas as well as the evolution of the clumps. I review our current understanding of mass-injection processes, and examine intermediate-scale structure and the global effect of mass-loading on a flow. I then discuss mass-loading in a variety of diffuse sources.

J. M. Pittard

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

242

Mensky's path integral and photon mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is commonly assumed that zero and non-zero photon mass would lead to qualitatively different physics. For example, massless photon has two polarization degrees of freedom, while massive photon at least three. This feature seems counter-intuitive. In this paper we will show that if we change propagator by setting $i \\epsilon$ (needed to avoid poles) to a finite value, and also introduce it in a way that breaks Lawrentz symmetry, then we would obtain the continuous transition we desire once the speed of the photons is "large enough" with respect to "preferred" frame. The two transverse polarization degrees of freedom will be long lived, while longitudinal will be short lived. Their lifetime will be near-zero if $m \\ll \\sqrt{\\epsilon}$, which is where the properties of two circular polarizations arize. The $i \\epsilon$ corresponds to the intensity of Mensky's "continuous measurement" and the short lifetime of the longitudinal photons can be understood as the "conversion" of quantum degrees of freedom (photons) into "classical" ones by the measurement device (thus getting rid of the former). While the "classical" trajectory of the longitudinal photons does arize, it plays no physical role due to quantum Zeno effect: intuitively, it is similar to an electron being kept at a ground state due to continuous measurement.

Roman Sverdlov

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

243

Size, effect of flexible proof mass on the mechanical behavior of micron-scale cantilevers for energy harvesting appications.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanical behavior of micron-scale cantilevers with a distributed, flexible proof mass is investigated to understand proof mass size effects on the performance of microelectromechanical system energy harvesters. Single-crystal silicon beams with proof masses of various lengths were fabricated using focused ion beam milling and tested using atomic force microscopy. Comparison of three different modeling results with measured data reveals that a 'two-beam' method has the most accurate predictive capability in terms of both resonant frequency and strain. Accurate strain prediction is essential because energy harvested scales with strain squared and maximum strain will be a design limit in fatigue.

Kim, M.; Hong, S.; Miller, D. J.; Dugundji, J.; Wardle, B. L. (Materials Science Division); (MIT)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Modeling the Mass and Energy Balance of Different Aluminium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depth Analysis and Potentiality Exploitation on Energy-Saving and Consumption -Reduction of Aluminum Reduction Pot Development and Application of...

245

The Initial-Final Mass Relation: First Constraints at the Low Mass End  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The initial-final mass relation represents a mapping between the mass of a white dwarf remnant and the mass that the hydrogen burning main-sequence star that created it once had. The relation thus far has been constrained using a sample of ~40 stars in young open clusters, ranging in initial mass from ~2.75 -- 7 Msun, and shows a general trend that connects larger mass main-sequence stars with larger mass white dwarfs. In this paper, we present CFHT/CFH12K photometric and Keck/LRIS multiobject spectroscopic observations of a sample of 22 white dwarfs in two old open clusters, NGC 7789 (t = 1.4 Gyr) and NGC 6819 (t = 2.5 Gyr). We measure masses for the highest signal-to-noise spectra by fitting the Balmer lines to atmosphere models and place the first constraints on the low mass end of the initial-final mass relation. Our results indicate that the observed trend at higher masses continues down to very low masses, with M_initial = 1.6 Msun main-sequence stars forming M_final = 0.54 Msun white dwarfs. When added...

Kalirai, Jasonjot S; Kelson, Daniel D; Reitzel, David B; Rich, R Michael; Richer, Harvey B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Development of a portable grain mass flow sensor test rig  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable grain mass flow sensor test rig was built to measure the accuracy of a mass flow sensor with dual use in the field as well as in the lab. Concurrently, a synchronization method was developed that employs GPS timing data to synchronize the ... Keywords: Mass flow sensor, Test rig, Yield monitor accuracy, Yield monitor error

M. Loghavi; R. Ehsani; R. Reeder

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

On the Photon Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the case for the photon having a tiny mass compatible with the experimental limits. We go over some possible experimental tests for such a photon mass including the violation of Lorentz symmetry. We point out that such violations may already have been witnessed in tests involving high energy gamma rays from outer space as also ultra high energy cosmic rays.

Burra G. Sidharth

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

248

Thermal masses in leptogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the validity of using thermal masses in the kinematics of final states in the decay rate of heavy neutrinos in leptogenesis calculations. We find that using thermal masses this way is a reasonable approximation, but corrections arise through quantum statistical distribution functions and leptonic quasiparticles.

Kiessig, Clemens P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Elbow mass flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

250

The origin of mass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The origin of mass is one of the deepest mysteries in science. Neutrons and protons, which account for almost all visible mass in the Universe, emerged from a primordial plasma through a cataclysmic phase transition microseconds after the Big Bang. However, ... Keywords: Gordon Bell Prize categories: scalability and time to solution, SC13 proceedings

Peter Boyle, Michael I. Buchoff, Norman Christ, Taku Izubuchi, Chulwoo Jung, Thomas C. Luu, Robert Mawhinney, Chris Schroeder, Ron Soltz, Pavlos Vranas, Joseph Wasem

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

CORONAL MASS EJECTION MASS, ENERGY, AND FORCE ESTIMATES USING STEREO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding coronal mass ejection (CME) energetics and dynamics has been a long-standing problem, and although previous observational estimates have been made, such studies have been hindered by large uncertainties in CME mass. Here, the two vantage points of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) COR1 and COR2 coronagraphs were used to accurately estimate the mass of the 2008 December 12 CME. Acceleration estimates derived from the position of the CME front in three dimensions were combined with the mass estimates to calculate the magnitude of the kinetic energy and driving force at different stages of the CME evolution. The CME asymptotically approaches a mass of 3.4 {+-} 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} g beyond {approx}10 R{sub Sun }. The kinetic energy shows an initial rise toward 6.3 {+-} 3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 29} erg at {approx}3 R{sub Sun }, beyond which it rises steadily to 4.2 {+-} 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg at {approx}18 R{sub Sun }. The dynamics are described by an early phase of strong acceleration, dominated by a force of peak magnitude of 3.4 {+-} 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} N at {approx}3 R{sub Sun }, after which a force of 3.8 {+-} 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} N takes effect between {approx}7 and 18 R{sub Sun }. These results are consistent with magnetic (Lorentz) forces acting at heliocentric distances of {approx}Sun }, while solar wind drag forces dominate at larger distances ({approx}>7 R{sub Sun }).

Carley, Eoin P.; Gallagher, Peter T. [Astrophysics Research Group, School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); McAteer, R. T. James [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

MassMass transfer andtransfer and arationstearationste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, temperature, T, and energy, E, are scalars and their gradient is a vector dc/dx or arationste scalars diffusion coefficient D; for species A in medium B : D = DAB 4 erföringo dx dc D dt.A dm m Massöve c cSepa dx dc )DD(m th Irreversible Thermodynamics considers Thermo-diffusion 4 erföringo T T Thermo

Zevenhoven, Ron

253

Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Scime, Earl E. (Morgantown, WV)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Variability in properties of Salado Mass Concrete  

SciTech Connect

Salado Mass Concrete (SMC) has been developed for use as a seal component in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This concrete is intended to be mixed from pre-bagged materials, have an initial slump of 10 in., and remain pumpable and placeable for two hours after mixing. It is a mass concrete because it will be placed in monoliths large enough that the heat generated during cement hydration has the potential to cause thermal expansion and subsequent cracking, a phenomenon to avoid in the seal system. This report describes effects on concrete properties of changes in ratio of water to cement, batch size, and variations in characteristics of different lots of individual components of the concrete. The research demonstrates that the concrete can be prepared from laboratory-batched or pre-bagged dry materials in batches from 1.5 ft{sup 3} to 5.0 yd{sup 3}, with no chemical admixtures other than the sodium chloride added to improve bonding with the host rock, at a water-to-cement ratio ranging from 0.36 to 0.42. All batches prepared according to established procedures had adequate workability for at least 1.5 hours, and achieved or exceeded the target compressive strength of 4500 psi at 180 days after casting. Portland cement and fly ash from different lots or sources did not have a measurable effect on concrete properties, but variations in a shrinkage-compensating cement used as a component of the concrete did appear to affect workability. A low initial temperature and the water-reducing and set-retarding functions of the salt are critical to meeting target properties.

Wakeley, L.D.; Harrington, P.T. [US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Hansen, F.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Closing the Low-mass Axigluon Window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this report, I will present the current status of the low-mass axigluon. The axigluon is a massive, color octet, axial vector boson, predicted in, e.g., chiral color models and some technicolor models, with a mass of order the electroweak scale. Axigluons with a mass larger than about 125 GeV to nearly 1 TeV can be eliminated by di-jet production at hadron colliders like the TEVATRON, but a low-mass window exists that the di-jet search can not probe. Upsilon decays can rule out axigluons with a mass up to 25 GeV, and low energy e^+ e^- (PEP and PETRA) can rule out axigluons with a mass up to 50 GeV using a measurement of R. Top production at the TEVATRON disfavors a light axigluon. A measurement of R at LEP strongly disfavors a light axigluon, and rules out an axigluon with mass < 365 GeV.

Michael A. Doncheski

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

256

On the stellar and baryonic mass fractions of central blue and red galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By means of the abundance matching technique, we infer the local stellar and baryonic mass-halo mass (Ms-Mh and Mb-Mh) relation for central blue and red galaxies separately in the mass range Ms~10^8.5-10^12.0 Msun. The observational inputs are the SDSS central blue and red Galaxy Stellar Mass Functions reported in Yang et al. 2009, and the measured local gas mass-Ms relations for blue and red galaxies. For the Halo Mass Function associated to central blue galaxies, the distinct LCDM one is used and set up to exclude: (i) the observed group/cluster mass function (blue galaxies are rare as centers of groups/clusters), and (ii) halos with a central major merger at resdshifts z10^11.5 Msun, the Ms's of red galaxies tend to be higher than those of blue ones for a given Mh, the difference not being larger than 1.7. For Mh<10^11.5 Msun, this trend is inverted. For blue (red) galaxies: (a) the maximum value of fs=Ms/Mh is 0.021^{+0.016}_{-0.009} (0.034{+0.026}_{-0.015}) and it is attained atlog(Mh/Msun)~12.0 (log(...

Rodriguez-Puebla, A; Firmani, C; Colin, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Higgs Mass Calculations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

this sheet now. Help with data analysis Higgs Mass Plot Project Contact: Thomas Jordan - jordant@fnal.gov Web Maintainer: qnet-webmaster@fnal.gov Last Update: August 22,...

258

Towards Scalable Benchmarks for Mass Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While mass storage systems have been used for several decades to store large quantities of scientific data, there has been little work on devising standard ways of measuring them. Each system is hand-tuned using parameters that seem to work best, but it is difficult to gauge the potential effect of similar changes on other systems. The proliferation of storage management software and policies has made it difficult for users to make the best choices for their own systems. The introduction of benchmarks will make it possible to gather standard performance measurements across disparate systems, allowing users to make intelligent choices of hardware, software, and algorithms for their mass storage system. This paper presents guidelines for the design of a mass storage system benchmark suite, along with preliminary suggestions for programs to be included. The benchmarks will measure both peak and sustained performance of the system as well as predicting both short-term and long-term behav...

Ethan L. Miller

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Solids mass flow determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

Macko, Joseph E. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and .sup.3 He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

Roberts, Mark L. (Livermore, CA); Davis, Jay C. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and [sup 3]He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

262

Neutrino Mass and Mixing with Discrete Symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a review article about neutrino mass and mixing and flavour model building strategies based on discrete family symmetry. After a pedagogical introduction and overview of the whole of neutrino physics, we focus on the PMNS mixing matrix and the latest global fits following the Daya Bay and RENO experiments which measure the reactor angle. We then describe the simple bimaximal, tri-bimaximal and golden ratio patterns of lepton mixing and the deviations required for a non-zero reactor angle, with solar or atmospheric mixing sum rules resulting from charged lepton corrections or residual trimaximal mixing. The different types of seesaw mechanism are then reviewed as well as the sequential dominance mechanism. We then give a mini-review of finite group theory, which may be used as a discrete family symmetry broken by flavons either completely, or with different subgroups preserved in the neutrino and charged lepton sectors. These two approaches are then reviewed in detail in separate chapters including mec...

King, Stephen F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and {sup 3}He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Measurable Maximal Energy and Minimal Time Interval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibility of finding the measurable maximal energy and the minimal time interval is discussed in different quantum aspects. It is found that the linear generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) approach gives a non-physical result. Based on large scale Schwarzshild solution, the quadratic GUP approach is utilized. The calculations are performed at the shortest distance, at which the general relativity is assumed to be a good approximation for the quantum gravity and at larger distances, as well. It is found that both maximal energy and minimal time have the order of the Planck time. Then, the uncertainties in both quantities are accordingly bounded. Some physical insights are addressed. Also, the implications on the physics of early Universe and on quantized mass are outlined. The results are related to the existence of finite cosmological constant and minimum mass (mass quanta).

Eiman Abou El Dahab; Abdel Nasser Tawfik

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

Giga-Dalton Mass Spectrometry  

Current techniques to study large bio?molecules using mass spectrometer require fragmentation for the mass?to?charge ratios to be within the working range of the mass spectrometer. Analysis of the data is complex and often requires simulation ...

266

EMSL: Capabilities: Mass Spectrometry Experts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related EMSL User Projects Mass Spectrometry Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Research Resource for Integrative Biology...

267

Dynamic effective mass of granular media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report an experimental and theoretical investigation of the frequency-dependent effective mass, $\\tilde{M}(\\omega)$, of loose granular particles which occupy a rigid cavity to a given filling fraction, the remaining volume being air of differing humidities. This allow us to study the mechanisms of elastic response and attenuation of acoustic modes in granular media. We demonstrate that this is a sensitive and direct way to measure those properties of the granular medium that are the cause of the changes in acoustic properties of structures containing grain-filled cavities. Specifically, we apply this understanding to the case of the flexural resonances of a rectangular bar with a grain-filled cavity within it. The dominant features of $\\tilde{M}(\\omega)$ are a sharp resonance and a broad background, which we analyze within the context of simple models. We find that: a) These systems may be understood in terms of a height-dependent and diameter-dependent effective sound speed ($\\sim 100-300$ m/s) and an effective viscosity ($\\sim 5\\times 10^4$ Poise). b) There is a dynamic Janssen effect in the sense that, at any frequency, and depending on the method of sample preparation, approximately one-half of the effective mass is borne by the side walls of the cavity and one-half by the bottom. c) By performing experiments under varying humidity conditions we conclude that, on a fundamental level, damping of acoustic modes is dominated by adsorbed films of water at grain-grain contacts in our experiments, not by global viscous dampening. d) There is a monotonically increasing effect of humidity on the dampening of the fundamental resonance within the granular medium which translates to a non-monotonic, but predictable, variation of dampening within the grain-loaded bar.

John Valenza; Chaur-Jian Hsu; Rohit Ingale; Nicolas Gland; Hernn A. Makse; David Linton Johnson

2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

268

Probing the Absolute Mass Scale of Neutrinos  

SciTech Connect

The experimental efforts of the Neutrino Physics Group at MIT center primarily around the exploration of neutrino mass and its significance within the context of nuclear physics, particle physics, and cosmology. The group has played a prominent role in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, a neutrino experiment dedicated to measure neutrino oscillations from 8B neutrinos created in the sun. The group is now focusing its efforts in the measurement of the neutrino mass directly via the use of tritium beta decay. The MIT group has primary responsibilities in the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino mass experiment, expected to begin data taking by 2013. Specifically, the MIT group is responsible for the design and development of the global Monte Carlo framework to be used by the KATRIN collaboration, as well as responsibilities directly associated with the construction of the focal plane detector. In addition, the MIT group is sponsoring a new research endeavor for neutrino mass measurements, known as Project 8, to push beyond the limitations of current neutrino mass experiments.

Prof. Joseph A. Formaggio

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

269

Photon: history, mass, charge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The talk consists of three parts. ``History'' briefly describes the emergence and evolution of the concept of photon during the first two decades of the 20th century. ``Mass'' gives a short review of the literature on the upper limit of the photon's mass. ``Charge'' is a critical discussion of the existing interpretation of searches for photon charge. Schemes, in which all photons are charged, are grossly inconsistent. A model with three kinds of photons (positive, negative and neutral) seems at first sight to be more consistent, but turns out to have its own serious problems.

L. B. Okun

2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Ramsey method in high-precision mass spectrometry with Penning traps: Experimental results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The highest precision in direct mass measurements is obtained with Penning trap mass spectrometry. Most experiments use the interconversion of the magnetron and cyclotron motional modes of the stored ion due to excitation by external radiofrequency-quadrupole fields. In this work a new excitation scheme, Ramsey's method of time-separated oscillatory fields, has been successfully tested. It has been shown to reduce significantly the uncertainty in the determination of the cyclotron frequency and thus of the ion mass of interest. The theoretical description of the ion motion excited with Ramsey's method in a Penning trap and subsequently the calculation of the resonance line shapes for different excitation times, pulse structures, and detunings of the quadrupole field has been carried out in a quantum mechanical framework and is discussed in detail in the preceding article in this journal by M. Kretzschmar. Here, the new excitation technique has been applied with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN for mass measurements on stable as well as short-lived nuclides. The experimental resonances are in agreement with the theoretical predictions and a precision gain close to a factor of four was achieved compared to the use of the conventional excitation technique.

S. George; K. Blaum; F. Herfurth; A. Herlert; M. Kretzschmar; S. Nagy; S. Schwarz; L. Schweikhard; C. Yazidjian

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

271

Warm Water Mass Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poleward heat transport by the own implies warm Water mass formation, i.e., the retention by the tropical and subtropical ocean of some of its net radiant heat gain. Under what condition net heat retention becomes comparable to latent heat ...

G. T. Csanady

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Twisted mass finite volume effects  

SciTech Connect

We calculate finite-volume effects on the pion masses and decay constant in twisted mass lattice QCD at finite lattice spacing. We show that the lighter neutral pion in twisted mass lattice QCD gives rise to finite-volume effects that are exponentially enhanced when compared to those arising from the heavier charged pions. We demonstrate that the recent two flavor twisted mass lattice data can be better fitted when twisted mass effects in finite-volume corrections are taken into account.

Colangelo, Gilberto; Wenger, Urs; Wu, Jackson M. S. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Uncertainty Measurement for Trace Element Analysis of Uranium and Plutonium Samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The measurement uncertainty estimatino associated with trace element analysis of impurities in U and Pu was evaluated using the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty Measurement (GUM). I this evalution the uncertainty sources were identified and standard uncertainties for the components were categorized as either Type A or B. The combined standard uncertainty was calculated and a coverage factor k = 2 was applied to obtain the expanded uncertainty, U. The ICP-AES and ICP-MS methods used were deveoped for the multi-element analysis of U and Pu samples. A typical analytical run consists of standards, process blanks, samples, matrix spiked samples, post digestion spiked samples and independent calibration verification standards. The uncertainty estimation was performed on U and Pu samples that have been analyzed previously as part of the U and Pu Sample Exchange Programs. Control chart results and data from the U and Pu metal exchange programs were combined with the GUM into a concentration dependent estimate of the expanded uncertainty. Comparison of trace element uncertainties obtained using this model was compared to those obtained for trace element results as part of the Exchange programs. This process was completed for all trace elements that were determined to be above the detection limit for the U and Pu samples.

Gallimore, David L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

274

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

275

Single event mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

Conzemius, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

1990-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

276

John Day Tailrace MASS2 Hydraulic Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent biological results for the Juvenile Bypass System at John Jay Lock and Dam have raised concerns about the hydraulic conditions that are created in the tailrace under different project operations. This Memorandum for Record discusses the development and application of a truncated MASS2 model in the John Day tailrace.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

277

Light Hadron Masses and Decay Constants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extraction of the light hadron spectrum from a first-principle Quantum Chromodynamics approach is a profound application for lattice simulations of Quantum Chromodynamics. This review will cover recent lattice results for the masses and decay constants of the light hadrons. In particular, the applicability of different approaches for the extrapolation towards the physical point will be discussed.

Enno E. Scholz

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

278

Solar mass-varying neutrino oscillations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose that the solar neutrino deficit may be due to oscillations of mass-varying neutrinos (MaVaNs). This scenario elucidates solar neutrino data beautifully while remaining comfortably compatible with atmospheric neutrino and K2K data and with reactor antineutrino data at short and long baselines (from CHOOZ and KamLAND). We find that the survival probability of solar MaVaNs is independent of how the suppression of neutrino mass caused by the acceleron-matter couplings varies with density. Measurements of MeV and lower energy solar neutrinos will provide a rigorous test of the idea.

V. Barger; Patrick Huber; Danny Marfatia

2005-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

279

Strange and charm meson masses from twisted mass lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present first results of a 2+1+1 flavor twisted mass lattice QCD computation of strange and charm meson masses. We focus on D and D_s mesons with spin J = 0,1 and parity P = -,+.

Martin Kalinowski; Marc Wagner

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

280

EMSL: Capabilities: Mass Spectrometry: Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Additional Information Meet the Mass Spectrometry Experts Related EMSL User Projects Mass Spectrometry Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Research Resource for Integrative Biology Biological and Environmental Research - PNNL Proteomics PNNL's Biological MS Data and Software Distribution Center Mass Spectrometry brochure EMSL is committed to offering state-of-the-art instruments to its users. At a workshop in January of 2008, EMSL mass spectrometry experts joined experts from many universities, private companies, and government institutions and laboratories at a conference held at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee Florida. Workshop participants reviewed the state of the art of high-performance mass spectrometers,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

MASS TRANSFER COEFFICIENTS FOR A NON-NEWTONIAN FLUID AND WATER WITH AND WITHOUT ANTI-FOAM AGENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mass transfer rates were measured in a large scale system, which consisted of an 8.4 meter tall by 0.76 meter diameter column containing one of three fluids: water with an anti-foam agent, water without an anti-foam agent, and AZ101 simulant, which simulated a non-Newtonian nuclear waste. The testing contributed to the evaluation of large scale mass transfer of hydrogen in nuclear waste tanks. Due to its radioactivity, the waste was chemically simulated, and due to flammability concerns oxygen was used in lieu of hydrogen. Different liquids were used to better understand the mass transfer processes, where each of the fluids was saturated with oxygen, and the oxygen was then removed from solution as air bubbled up, or sparged, through the solution from the bottom of the column. Air sparging was supplied by a single tube which was co-axial to the column, the decrease in oxygen concentration was recorded, and oxygen measurements were then used to determine the mass transfer coefficients to describe the rate of oxygen transfer from solution. Superficial, average, sparging velocities of 2, 5, and 10 mm/second were applied to each of the liquids at three different column fill levels, and mass transfer coefficient test results are presented here for combinations of superficial velocities and fluid levels.

Leishear, R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

282

Characterizing the atomic mass surface beyond the proton drip line via a-decay measurements of the s1/2 ground state of 165Re and the h11/2 isomer in 161Ta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The a-decay chains originating from the s1/2 and h11/2 states in 173Au have been investigated following fusion-evaporation reactions. Four generations of a radioactivities have been correlated with 173Aum leading to a measurement of the a decay of 161Tam. It has been found that the known a decay of 161Ta, which was previously associated with the decay of the ground state, is in fact the decay of an isomeric state. This work also reports on the first observation of prompt g rays feeding the ground state of 173Au. This prompt radiation was used to aid the study of the a-decay chain originating from the s1/2 state in 173Au. Three generations of a decays have been correlated with this state leading to the observation of a previously unreported activity which is assigned as the decay of 165Reg. This work also reports the excitation energy of an a-decaying isomer in 161Ta and the Q-value of the decay of 161Tag.

D. O'Donnell; R. D. Page; C. Scholey; L. Bianco; L. Capponi; R. J. Carroll; I. G. Darby; L. Donosa; M. Drummond; F. Ertugral; P. T. Greenlees; T. Grahn; K. Hauschild; A. Herzan; U. Jakobsson; P. Jones; D. T. Joss; R. Julin; S. Juutinen; S. Ketelhut; M. Labiche; M. Leino; A. Lopez-Martens; K. Mullholland; P. Nieminen; P. Peura; P. Rahkila; S. Rinta-Antila; P. Ruotsalainen; M. Sandzelius; J. Saren; B. Saygi; J. Simpson; J. Sorri; A. Thornthwaite; J. Uusitalo

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

283

A search for close-mass lepton doublet  

SciTech Connect

Described is a search for a heavy charged lepton with an associated neutrino of nearly the same mass, together known as a close-mass lepton doublet. The search is conducted in e/sup +/e/sup/minus// annihilation data taken with the Mark II detector at a center-of-mass energy of 29 GeV. In order to suppress contamination from conventional two-photon reactions, the search applies a novel, radiative-tagging technique. Requiring the presence of an isolated, energetic photon allows exploration for lepton doublets with a mass splitting smaller than that previously accessible to experiment. No evidence for such a new lepton has been found, enabling limits to be placed on allowed mass combinations. Mass differences as low as 250-300 MeV are excluded for charged lepton masses up to 10 GeV. 78 refs., 64 figs., 8 tabs.

Riles, J.K.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Evaluation of Steam Generator Level Measurement Model for OPR1000 Using RETRAN-3D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam generator level measurement is important factor for plant transient analyses using best estimate thermal hydraulic computer codes since the value of steam generator level is used for steam generator level control system and plant protection system. Because steam generator is in the saturation condition which includes steam and liquid together and is the place that heat exchange occurs from primary side to secondary side, computer codes are hard to calculate steam generator level realistically without appropriate level measurement model. In this paper, we prepare the steam generator models using RETRAN-3D that include geometry models, full range feedwater control system and five types of steam generator level measurement model. Five types of steam generator level measurement model consist of level measurement model using elevation difference in downcomer, 1D level measurement model using fluid mass, 1D level measurement model using fluid volume, 2D level measurement model using power and fluid mass, and 2D level measurement model using power and fluid volume. And we perform the evaluation of the capability of each steam generator level measurement model by simulating the real plant transient condition, the title is 'Reactor Trip by The Failure of The Deaerator Level Control Card of Ulchin Unit 3'. The comparison results between real plant data and RETRAN-3D analyses for each steam generator level measurement model show that 2D level measurement model using power and fluid mass or fluid volume has more realistic prediction capability compared with other level measurement models. (authors)

Doo Yong Lee; Soon Joon Hong; Byung Chul Lee [FNC Technology Co., SNU Research Park Innovation Center 516, San4-2, Bongchun-7 dong, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Heok Soon Lim [KHNP Nuclear Environment Technology Institute, Munji-dong 103-16, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

MassMass transfer andtransfer and separation technologyseparation technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Driving force Apparatus Heat exchange Energy T Heat exchanger Gas absorption Mass G L c y-y* Packed towerGas absorption Mass G L c, y-y* Packed tower, or tray column Gas desorption Mass L G c, y*-y Packed tower tower, or tray column and B from a mix Vaporisation cooling Energy, water h (enthalpy) Spray tower

Zevenhoven, Ron

286

Testing Mass Varying Neutrino With Short Gamma Ray Burst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the possibility of probing for the absolute neutrino mass and its variation with short Gamma Ray Burst (GRB). We have calculated the flight time difference between a massive neutrino and a photon in two different approaches to mass varying neutrinos. Firstly we parametrize the neutrino mass as a function of redshift in a model independent way, then we consider two specific models where the neutrino mass varies during the evolution of the Quintessence fields. Our calculations show in general the value of the time delay is changed substantially relative to a constant neutrino mass. Furthermore our numerical results show that the flight time delay in these models is expected to be larger than the duration time of the short GRB, which opens a possibility of testing the scenario of mass varying neutrino with the short GRB.

Hong Li; Zigao Dai; Xinmin Zhang

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

287

ON DARK PEAKS AND MISSING MASS: A WEAK-LENSING MASS RECONSTRUCTION OF THE MERGING CLUSTER SYSTEM A520 ,  

SciTech Connect

Merging clusters of galaxies are unique in their power to directly probe and place limits on the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter. Detailed observations of several merging clusters have shown the intracluster gas to be displaced from the centroids of dark matter and galaxy density by ram pressure, while the latter components are spatially coincident, consistent with collisionless dark matter. This has been used to place upper limits on the dark matter particle self-interaction cross-section of order 1 cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}. The cluster A520 has been seen as a possible exception. We revisit A520 presenting new Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys mosaic images and a Magellan image set. We perform a detailed weak-lensing analysis and show that the weak-lensing mass measurements and morphologies of the core galaxy-filled structures are mostly in good agreement with previous works. There is, however, one significant difference: We do not detect the previously claimed 'dark core' that contains excess mass with no significant galaxy overdensity at the location of the X-ray plasma. This peak has been suggested to be indicative of a large self-interaction cross-section for dark matter (at least {approx}5{sigma} larger than the upper limit of 0.7 cm{sup 2} g{sup -1} determined by observations of the Bullet Cluster). We find no such indication and instead find that the mass distribution of A520, after subtraction of the X-ray plasma mass, is in good agreement with the luminosity distribution of the cluster galaxies. We conclude that A520 shows no evidence to contradict the collisionless dark matter scenario.

Clowe, Douglas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, 251B Clippinger Labs, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Markevitch, Maxim [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20706 (United States); Bradac, Marusa [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Chung, Sun Mi [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Massey, Richard [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Zaritsky, Dennis, E-mail: clowe@ohio.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

288

MASS SPECTROMETER LEAK  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved valve is described for precisely regulating the flow of a sample fluid to be analyzed, such as in a mass spectrometer, where a gas sample is allowed to "leak" into an evacuated region at a very low, controlled rate. The flow regulating valve controls minute flow of gases by allowing the gas to diffuse between two mating surfaces. The structure of the valve is such as to prevent the corrosive feed gas from contacting the bellows which is employed in the operation of the valve, thus preventing deterioration of the bellows.

Shields, W.R.

1960-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

289

HIGEE Mass Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distillation, absorption, and gas stripping have traditionally been performed in tall columns utilizing trays or packing. Columns perform satisfactorily, but have characteristics which may be disadvantages in some applications: Large size, particularly height; high weight; high cost of installation; difficulty in modularization; foaming for certain systems; must be vertical, especially for trayed towers; large liquid inventory; difficulty in modifying column internals once installed; start up time to reach steady state conditions in excessive. Many of these disadvantages can be overcome by use of HIGEE, an innovative vapor-liquid mass transfer system which utilizes a rotating bed of packing to achieve high efficiency separations, and consequent reduction in size and weight.

Mohr, R. J.; Fowler, R.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Heat and mass exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

291

Laser desorption mass spectrometry for fast DNA analysis  

SciTech Connect

During the past few years, major effort has been directed toward developing mass spectrometry to measure biopolymers because of the great potential benefit to biomedical research. Hellenkamp and his co-workers were the first to report that large polypeptide molecules can be ionized and detected without significant fragmentation when a greater number of nicotinic acid molecules are used as a matrix. This method is now well known as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Since then, various groups have reported measurements of very large proteins by MALDI. Reliable protein analysis by MALDI is more or less well established. However, the application of MALDI to nucleic acids analysis has been found to be much more difficult. Most research on the measurement of nucleic acid by MALDI were stimulated by the Human Genome Project. Up to now, the only method for reliable routine analysis of nucleic acid is gel electrophoresis. Different sizes of nucleic acids can be separated in gel medium when a high electric field is applied to the gel. However, the time needed to separate different sizes of DNA segments usually takes from several minutes to several hours. If MALDI can be successfully used for nucleic acids analysis, the analysis time can be reduced to less than I millisecond. In addition, no tagging with radioactive materials or chemical dyes is needed. In this work, we will review recent progress related to MALDI for DNA analysis.

Chen, C.H.; Ch`ang, L.Y.; Taranenko, N.I.; Allman, S.L.; Tang, K.; Matteson, K.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Method and system for measuring multiphase flow using multiple pressure differentials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and system for measuring a multiphase flow in a pressure flow meter. An extended throat venturi is used and pressure of the multiphase flow is measured at three or more positions in the venturi, which define two or more pressure differentials in the flow conduit. The differential pressures are then used to calculate the mass flow of the gas phase, the total mass flow, and the liquid phase. The method for determining the mass flow of the high void fraction fluid flow and the gas flow includes certain steps. The first step is calculating a gas density for the gas flow. The next two steps are finding a normalized gas mass flow rate through the venturi and computing a gas mass flow rate. The following step is estimating the gas velocity in the venturi tube throat. The next step is calculating the pressure drop experienced by the gas-phase due to work performed by the gas phase in accelerating the liquid phase between the upstream pressure measuring point and the pressure measuring point in the venturi throat. Another step is estimating the liquid velocity in the venturi throat using the calculated pressure drop experienced by the gas-phase due to work performed by the gas phase. Then the friction is computed between the liquid phase and a wall in the venturi tube. Finally, the total mass flow rate based on measured pressure in the venturi throat is calculated, and the mass flow rate of the liquid phase is calculated from the difference of the total mass flow rate and the gas mass flow rate.

Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Mass and Momentum Balance in the Brush Creek Drainage Flow Determined from Single-Profile Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluxes and flux-divergences of mass and momentum in Brush Creek Valley, computed from measurements taken by Tethersondes and Doppler sodars in the 1984 ASCOT experiment, are presented. Estimates of mass influx from open sidewalls in Brush Creek, ...

Ronald J. Dobosy; K. Shankar Rao; John W. Przybylowicz; Richard M. Eckman; Rayford P. Hosker Jr.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this proceedings I review the physics that future experiments will use to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Hierarchical Neutrino Masses and Leptogenesis in Type I+II Seesaw Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The baryon to photon ratio in the present Universe is very accurately measured to be $6.19 \\times 10^{-10}$. We study the possible origin of this baryon asymmetry in the neutrino sector through the generic mechanism of baryogenesis through leptogenesis. We consider both type I and type II seesaw origin of neutrino masses within the framework of left right symmetric models (LRSM). Using the latest best fit global neutrino oscillation data and assuming the Dirac neutrino mass matrix to be either charged lepton (CL) or up quark (UQ) type, we compute the predictions for baryon to photon ratio keeping the lightest active neutrino mass eigenstate a free parameter for both normal and inverted hierarchical cases. We show that in inverted hierarchical scenario with type I seesaw, observed baryon asymmetry can not be generated for both CL and UQ type Dirac neutrino mass matrices. We also study the predictions for baryon asymmetry when the neutrino masses arise from a combination of both type I and type II seesaw (with one of them dominant at a time) as well as different combinations of Majorana neutrino phases and show that the observed baryon asymmetry can be generated within these models upto certain exceptions.

Debasish Borah; Mrinal Kumar Das

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

296

First Gogny-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov Nuclear Mass Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the first Gogny-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) model which reproduces nuclear masses with an accuracy comparable with the best mass formulas. In contrast with the Skyrme-HFB nuclear-mass models, an explicit and self-consistent account of all the quadrupole correlation energies are included within the 5D collective Hamiltonian approach. The final rms deviation with respect to the 2149 measured masses is 798 keV. In addition, the new Gogny force is shown to predict nuclear and neutron matter properties in agreement with microscopic calculations based on realistic two- and three-body forces.

Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Girod, M.; Peru, S. [Institut d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique, CP-226, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297, Arpajon (France)

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

297

Measuring Cluster Relaxedness  

SciTech Connect

When is a dark matter halo 'relaxed'? In our efforts to understand the structure of the universe, dark matter simulations have provided essential grounds for theoretical predictions. These simulations provide a wealth of ways of parameterizing and measuring the features of astronomical objects. It is these measurements on which we base comparisons of our world and our attempts to re-create it. One of the essential questions dark matter simulations help address is how dark matter halos evolve. How does one characterize different states of that evolution? The focus of this project is identifying cluster relaxedness and how it relates to the internal structure of the halo. A dark matter simulation consists of an N-body simulation which takes an initial set of positions and velocities of the dark matter particles and evolves them under the influence of gravity [6]. Though scientists have so far not been able to detect dark matter particles, the information from these simulations is still valuable especially given the relationship between dark matter halos and galaxy clusters. Galaxies sit within dark matter halos and recent evidence points to filaments of dark matter forming the framework on which galaxy clusters grow [7]. A dark matter halo is a collapsed group of gravitationally bound dark matter particles. Subsets of bound particles form subhalos or substructures. The dark matter simulation is carried out over time - with decreasing redshift (z) or increasing scale factor (a = 1/1+z ). (Thus, z = 0 or a = 1.0 is present-day.) The merger history of a halo can be represented pictorally by a merger tree. A major merger event occurs when a structure joins the main halo with the mass ratio between it and the main halo being above a certain threshold. These events mark important points in the halo's evolution. And it is at these events that one hopes, and perhaps is more likely, to relate measures of relaxedness to this mass accretion. Cluster relaxedness is not a well-defined concept. Rather a set of qualities are defined that one expects a 'relaxed' cluster to have. One expects a relaxed halo to have a roughly isotropic density distribution. Most of the particles should be part of the main halo rather than bound in substructures. Taking into account kinematic information of the halo, one does not expect a proportion of the particles energy in kinetic energy that goes far beyond virial equilibrium. With our measures of cluster relaxedness, we want to investigate its relationship to these major merger events. We'll first look at how measurements of different aspects of relaxedness relate to each other and to other aspects of a halo's internal structure. We'll then look at how these measurements behave in response to major mergers.

Moreland, Blythe; /Michigan U. /SLAC

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

298

Comparison of HEU Measurements Using Measured and Simulated Data  

SciTech Connect

Correlated neutron data analyzed using the Feynman Variance-to-Mean method are can be used to assess the multiplication and mass of special nuclear material (SNM) systems. After list-mode data are acquired, the multiplication and mass can be determined using detector parameters. This work compares data sets that were measured to simulated data using recent MCNP list-mode modifications. In addition, both sets of data are analyzed using both measured and simulated parameters to infer the system multiplication.

Hutchinson, Jesson D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sood, Avneet [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith-Nelson, Mark A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dinwiddie, Derek R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Myers, William L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

299

Onset of dry-wall heat transfer in low-mass-flux spray cooling  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on an experimental investigation that was performed to study a low-mass-flux, spray nucleate boiling phenomenon termed dry wall during which all the impinging liquid is immediately vaporized upon contact with the heated surface. Measurements of wall heat flux and spray coolant mass flux were performed together with a characterization of spray parameters (such as local droplet size and velocity), using a laser-based diagnostic technique. Two different atomizing nozzles were used, and the effect of liquid subcooling on the transition was also studied. The transition to the dry-wall heat transfer regime was found to correlate well with the average global concentration of the spray obtained by the ratio of the spray mass flux to the average global concentration of the spray obtained by the ratio of the spray mass flux to the average spray velocity. The experimental results showed that above a concentration of approximately 0.20 kg/m{sup 3}, no evidence was seen of transition to dry wall. This concentration corresponding to transition was found to be independent of the two different nozzle types used in this study.

Webb, B.W.; Queiroz, M.; Oliphant, K.N.; Bonin, M.P. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (US))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Baryon Mass Extrapolation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consideration of the analytical properties of pion-induced baryon self-energies leads to new functional forms for the extrapolation of light baryon masses. These functional forms reproduce the leading non-analytic behavior of chiral perturbation theory, the correct heavy-quark limit and have the advantage of containing information on the extended structure of hadrons. The forms involve only three unknown parameters which may be optimized by fitting to present lattice data. Recent dynamical fermion results from CP-PACS and UK-QCD are extrapolated using these new functional forms. We also use these functions to probe the limit of the chiral perturbative regime and shed light on the applicability of chiral perturbation theory to the extrapolation of present lattice QCD results.

Derek B. Leinweber; Anthony W. Thomas; Kazuo Tsushima; Stewart V. Wright

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods are disclosed for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector. 7 figs.

Tuszewski, M.G.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

302

Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector.

Tuszewski, Michel G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Type-II seesaw mass models and baryon asymmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute and also compare the contributions of canonical and noncanonical mass terms towards baryon asymmetry by considering type-II seesaw mass models of neutrinos: Degenerare(3 varieties), Normal hierarchical and Inverted hierarchical(2 varieties). We have shown that for particular choices of parameter '$\\gamma$'(the so-called discriminator) for different neutrino mass models, the baryon asymmetry is largely dominated by canonical term. Within such type-II seesaw scenario, we find normal hierarchical mass model as the most favourable choice of nature.

Amal Kr. Sarma; H. Zeen Devi; N. Nimai Singh

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

304

Topological Summation of Observables Measured with Dynamical Overlap Fermions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HMC histories for light dynamical overlap fermions tend to stay in a fixed topological sector for many trajectories, so that the different sectors are not sampled properly. Therefore the suitable summation of observables, which have been measured in separate sectors, is a major challenge. We explore several techniques for this issue, based on data for the chiral condensate and the (analogue of the) pion mass in the 2-flavour Schwinger model with dynamical overlap-hypercube fermions.

Wolfgang Bietenholz; Ivan Hip

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

305

OBT Measurement of Vegetation by Mass Spectrometry and Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and Organically Bound Tritium / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

T. Tamari; H. Kakiuchi; N. Momoshima; N. Baglan; S. Sugihara; T. Uda

306

Questions and Answers - What do we use to measure mass?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

There are a couple of other neat tricks, but they only really work perfectly in no-gravity, no-friction environments. For example imagine a big rock floating in space. Give it...

307

BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It didn't find the Higgs boson as we all but predicted it would, but the aging atom smasher at Fermi

308

Density Dependence of the Mass Function of Globular Star Clusters in the Sombrero Galaxy and its Dynamical Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have constructed the mass function of globular star clusters in the Sombrero galaxy in bins of different internal half-mass density rho_h and projected galactocentric distance R. This is based on the published measurements of the magnitudes and effective radii of the clusters by Spitler et al. (2006) in BVR images taken with the ACS on HST. We find that the peak of the mass function M_p increases with rho_h by a factor of about 4 but remains nearly constant with R. Our results are almost identical to those presented recently by McLaughlin & Fall (2007) for globular clusters in the Milky Way. The mass functions in both galaxies agree with a simple, approximate model in which the clusters form with a Schechter initial mass function and evolve subsequently by stellar escape driven by internal two-body relaxation. These findings therefore undermine recent claims that the present peak of the mass function of globular clusters must have been built into the initial conditions.

Rupali Chandar; S. Michael Fall; Dean E. McLaughlin

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

Proteomics by FTICR Mass Spectrometry: Top Down and Bottom Up  

SciTech Connect

This review offers a broad overview of recent FTICR applications and technological developments in the field of proteomics, directed to a variety of people with different expertise and interests. Both the ''bottom-up'' (peptide level) and ''top-down'' (intact protein level) approaches will be covered and various related aspects will be discussed and illustrated with examples that are among the best available references in the literature. ''Bottom-up topics include peptide fragmentation, the AMT approach and DREAMS technology, quantitative proteomics, post-translational modifications, and special FTICR software focused on peptide and protein identification. Topics in the ''top-down'' part include various aspects of high-mass measurements, protein tandem mass spectrometry, protein confirmations, protein-protein complexes, as well as some esoteric applications that may become more practical in the coming years. Finally, examples of integrating both approaches and medical proteomics applications using FTICR will be provided, closing with an outlook of what may be coming our way sooner than later.

Bogdanov, Bogdan; Smith, Richard D.

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Resolving Emissions Dynamics via Mass Spectrometry: Time Resolved Measurements of Emission Transients by Mass Spectrometry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transient emissions occur throughout normal engine operation and can significantly contribute to overall system emissions. Such transient emissions may originate from various sources including cold start, varying load and exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR) rates; all of which are dynamic processes in the majority of engine operation applications (1). Alternatively, there are systems which are inherently dynamic even at steady-state engine-operation conditions. Such systems include catalytic exhaust-emissions treatment devices with self-initiated and sustained oscillations (2) and NOX adsorber systems (3,4,5). High-speed diagnostics, capable of temporally resolving such emissions transients, are required to characterize the process, verify calculated system inputs, and optimize the system.

Partridge, William P.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

311

Cluster mass function in mixed models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the cluster mass function in mixed dark matter (MDM) models, using two COBE normalized simulations with Omega_h = 0.26 and n=1.2, and Omega_h = 0.14 and n = 1.05, both with 2 massive nu's (MDM1 and MDM2, respectively). For the sake of comparison, we also simulate a CDM model with spectral index n=0.8 (TCDM), also COBE normalized. We argue that, in our non--hydro simulations, where CDM particles describe both actual CDM and baryons, the galaxy distribution traces CDM particles. Therefore, we use them to define clusters and their velocities to work out cluster masses. As CDM particles are more clustered than HDM and therefore have, in average, greater velocities, this leads to significant differences from PS predictions. Such predictions agree with simulations if both HDM and CDM are used to define clusters. Clusters defined through CDM in MDM models, instead, are less numerous than PS estimates, by a factor ~0.3, at the low mass end; the factor becomes \\~0.6-0.8, depending on the mix, on intermediate mass scales (~4-5, h^-1 10^14 Msun) and almost vanishes on the high mass end. Therefore: (i) MDM models expected to overproduce clusters over intermediate scales are viable; (ii) the greater reduction factor at small scales agrees with the observational data dependence on the cluster mass M (which, however, may be partially due to sample incompleteness); (iii) the higher spectral normalization is felt at large scales, where MDM models produce more objects (hence, large clusters) than CDM. MDM1 even exceeds Donahue et al. (1998) findings, while MDM2 is consistent with them. (abridged)

A. Gardini; S. A. Bonometto; G. Murante

1999-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Energy Functional for Nuclear Masses.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An energy functional is formulated for mass calculations of nuclei across the nuclear chart with major-shell occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom. The functional (more)

Bertolli, Michael Giovanni

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Physics at the 100 GeV mass scale: Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the following papers: heavy quarks--experimental; the theory of heavy flavour production; precision experiments in electroweak interactions; theory of precision electroweak measurements; applications of QCD to hadron-hadron collisions; W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} interactions and the search for the Higgs Boson; electroweak symmetry breaking: Higgs/Whatever; electron-positron storage rings as heavy quark factories; prospects for next-generation e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders; current prospects for hadron colliders; hadron colliders beyond the SSC; recent results on weak decays of charmed mesons from the Mark 3 experiment; recent CLEO results on bottom and charm; recent results on B-decays from ARGUE; a review of recent results on the hadron and photoproduction of charm; search for the top quark at UA1; recent results from the UA2 experiment at the CERN {bar p}p collider; selected preliminary results from CDF; new measurement of the phase difference {Phi}{sub 00} {minus} {Phi}{sub {plus minus}} in CP--violating K{sup 0} decays; a recent result on CP violation by E731 at Fermilab; rare kaon decay experiments; CP violation; inverse muon decay, neutrino dimuon production, and a search for neutral heavy leptons at the tevatron; first results from MACRO; a superstring theory underview; recent results from TRISTAN ; measurements of the Z boson resonance parameters at SLC; decays of the Z boson; and theory--weak neutral currents and the Z mass after the SLC.

Brennan, E.C. (ed.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Measurement of Trace Uranium Isotopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extent to which thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) can measure trace quantities of 233U and 236U in the presence of a huge excess of natural uranium is evaluated. This is an important nuclear non-proliferation measurement. Four ion production methods were evaluated with three mass spectrometer combinations. The most favorable combinations are not limited by abundance sensitivity; rather, the limitations are the ability to generate a uranium ion beam of sufficient intensity to obtain the required number of counts on the minor isotopes in relationship to detector background. The most favorable situations can measure isotope ratios in the range of E10 if sufficient sample intensity is available. These are the triple sector mass spectrometer with porous ion emitters (PIE) and the single sector mass spectrometer with energy filtering.

Matthew G. Watrous; James E. Delmore

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Bio-electrical impedance analysis for estimation of fat-free mass and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

arm muscle circumference were determined by anthro- pometry and skinfold measurements. Fat-free mass was calculated taking into account the body density.

316

The critical mass  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses in detail the historical background leading to different lines of scientific thinking in the Allied and in the German scientific communities around the feasibility and development of an atomic bomb. An extensive, parallel time table is given along with discussions of the basic theories of the major players during the conception and development of a nuclear program in both arenas. 35 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

Logan, J.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A Natural Mass Unit Hidden in the Planck Action Quantum Bernd Binder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Natural Mass Unit Hidden in the Planck Action Quantum Bernd Binder binder@quanics.com c 2003 baryon mass a natural mass unit µ can be identified by extrapolating dimensionless Planck units h = c = 1 to the System of Units (SI). Similar to quantum measurements that determine h it is only necessary to relate

Binder, Bernd

318

A Natural Mass Unit Hidden in the Planck Action Quantum Bernd Binder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Natural Mass Unit Hidden in the Planck Action Quantum Bernd Binder binder@quanics.com c #2003 baryon mass a natural mass unit µ can be identified by extrapolating dimensionless Planck units h = c = 1 to the System of Units (SI). Similar to quantum measurements that determine h it is only necessary to relate

Binder, Bernd

319

Gravity and the Fermion Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that gravity generates mass for the fermion. It does so by coupling directly with the spinor field. The coupling term is invariant with respect to the electroweak gauge group $ U(1) \\otimes SU(2)_L. $ It replaces the fermion mass term $ m\\bar{\\psi} \\psi $.

Kenneth Dalton

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

320

Neutrino mass sensitivity by MAC-E-Filter based time-of-flight spectroscopy with the example of KATRIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The KATRIN experiment aims at a measurement of the neutrino mass with a 90 % C.L. sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c$^2$ by measuring the endpoint region of the tritium $\\beta$ decay spectrum from a windowless gaseous molecular tritium source using an integrating spectrometer of the MAC-E-Filter type. We discuss the idea of using the MAC-E-Filter in a time-of-flight mode (MAC-E-TOF) in which the neutrino mass is determined by a measurement of the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrum that depends on the neutrino mass. MAC-E-TOF spectroscopy here is a very sensitive method since the $\\beta$-electrons are slowed down to distinguishable velocities by the MAC-E-Filter. Their velocity depends strongly on their surplus energy above the electric retarding potential. Using MAC-E-TOF, a statistical sensitivity gain is expected. Because a small number of retarding-potential settings is sufficient for a complete measurement, in contrast to about 40 different retarding potentials used in the standard MAC-E-Filter mode, there is a gain in measurement time and hence statistical power. The improvement of the statistical uncertainty of the squared neutrino mass has been determined by Monte Carlo simulation to be a factor 5 for an ideal case neglecting background and timing uncertainty. Additionally, two scenarios to determine the time-of-flight of the $\\beta$-electrons are discussed, which use the KATRIN detector for creating the stop signal and different methods for obtaining a start signal. These comprise the hypothetical case of an `electron tagger' which detects passing electrons with minimal interference and the more realistic case of `gated filtering', where the electron flux is periodically cut off by pulsing the pre-spectrometer potential.

Nicholas Steinbrink; Volker Hannen; Eric L. Martin; R. G. Hamish Robertson; Michael Zacher; Christian Weinheimer

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Neutrino mass sensitivity by MAC-E-Filter based time-of-flight spectroscopy with the example of KATRIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment aims at a measurement of the neutrino mass with a 90 % confidence limit (C.L.) sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c$^2$ by measuring the endpoint region of the tritium $\\beta$ decay spectrum from a windowless gaseous molecular tritium source using an integrating spectrometer of the MAC-E-Filter type. We discuss the idea of using the MAC-E-Filter in a time-of-flight mode (MAC-E-TOF) in which the neutrino mass is determined by a measurement of the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrum that depends on the neutrino mass. MAC-E-TOF spectroscopy here is a very sensitive method since the $\\beta$-electrons are slowed down to distinguishable velocities by the MAC-E-Filter. Their velocity depends strongly on their surplus energy above the electric retarding potential. Using MAC-E-TOF, a statistical sensitivity gain is expected. Because a small number of retarding-potential settings is sufficient for a complete measurement, in contrast to about 40 different retarding potentials used in the standard MAC-E-Filter mode, there is a gain in measurement time and hence statistical power. The improvement of the statistical uncertainty of the squared neutrino mass has been determined by Monte Carlo simulation to be a factor 5 for an ideal case neglecting background and timing uncertainty. Additionally, two scenarios to determine the time-of-flight of the $\\beta$-electrons are discussed, which use the KATRIN detector for creating the stop signal and different methods for obtaining a start signal. These comprise the hypothetical case of an `electron tagger' which detects passing electrons with minimal interference and the more realistic case of `gated filtering', where the electron flux is periodically cut off by pulsing the pre-spectrometer potential.

Nicholas Steinbrink; Volker Hannen; Eric L. Martin; R. G. Hamish Robertson; Michael Zacher; Christian Weinheimer

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

322

ARM - Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select below to highlight measurements in specified measurement categories. Aerosols The effect of aerosols is measured by instrument systems and lidars that provide data...

323

Macroscopic coherence between quantum condensates formed at different times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate macroscopic coherence between quantum condensates generated at different times, separated by more than the particle dephasing time. This is possible due to the dressed light-matter nature of exciton-polaritons, which can be injected resonantly by optical excitation at well-defined momenta. We show that the build-up of coherence between condensates depends on the interaction between the particles, particle density, as well as temperature despite the non-equilibrium nature of the condensate, whereas the mass of the particles plays no role in the condensation of resonantly injected polaritons. This experiment also makes it possible for us to measure directly the large nonlinear phase shift resulting from the polariton-polariton interaction energy. Our results provide direct evidence for coherence between different condensates and demonstrate a new approach for probing their ultrafast dynamics, opening new directions in the study of matter coherence as well as in practical applications such as quantum information and ultrafast logic.

Alex Hayat; Christoph Lange; Lee A. Rozema; Rockson Chang; Shreyas Potnis; Henry M. van Driel; Aephraim M. Steinberg; Mark Steger; David W. Snoke; Loren N. Pfeiffer; Kenneth W. West

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Evolution of Stellar Mass Density and its Implied Star Formation History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a compilation of measurements of the stellar mass density as a function of redshift we can infer the cosmic star formation history. For z histories. At higher redshifts the instantaneous indicators suggest star formation rates larger than that implied by the evolution of the stellar mass density. This discrepancy peaks at z = 3 where instantaneous indicators suggest a star formation rate around 0.6 dex higher than those of the best fit to the stellar mass history. We discuss a variety of explanations for this inconsistency, such as inaccurate dust extinction corrections, incorrect measurements of stellar masses and a possible evolution of the stellar initial mass function.

S. M. Wilkins; N. Trentham; A. M. Hopkins

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

325

Geometric gravitational origin of neutrino oscillations and mass-energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mass-energy scale for neutrinos was calculated from the null cone curvature using geometric concepts. The scale is variable depending on the gravitational potential and the trajectory inclination with respect to the field direction. The mass-energy at the Earth surface varies from a horizontal value 0.402 eV to a vertical value 0.569 eV. Earth spinor waves with winding numbers n show squared energy differences within ranges from 2.05 x 10*(-3) to 4.10 x 10*(-3) eV*2 for n=0,1 neutrinos and from 3.89 x 10*(-5) to 7.79 x 10*(-5) eV*2 for n=1,2 neutrinos. These waves interfere and the different phase velocities produce neutrino-like oscillations. The experimental results for atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation mass parameters respectivelly fall within these theoretical ranges. Neutrinos in outer space, where interactions may be neglected, appear as particles travelling with zero mass on null geodesics. These gravitational curvature energies are consistent with neutrino oscillations, zero neutrino rest masses and Einstein's General Relativity and energy mass equivalence principle. When analyzing or averaging experimental neutrino mass-energy results of different experiments on the Earth it is of interest to consider the possible influence of the trajectory inclination angle.

Gustavo R. Gonzalez-Martin

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

326

Geometric gravitational origin of neutrino oscillations and mass-energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mass-energy scale for neutrinos was calculated from the null cone curvature using geometric concepts. The scale is variable depending on the gravitational potential and the trajectory inclination with respect to the field direction. The proposed neutrino covariant equation provides the adequate curvature. The mass-energy at the Earth surface varies from a horizontal value 0.402 eV to a vertical value 0.569 eV. Earth spinor waves with winding numbers n show squared energy differences within ranges from 2.05 x 10*(-3) to 4.10 x 10*(-3) eV*2 for n=0,1 neutrinos and from 3.89 x 10*(-5) to 7.79 x 10*(-5) eV*2 for n=1,2 neutrinos. These waves interfere and the different phase velocities produce neutrino-like oscillations. The experimental results for atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation mass parameters respectivelly fall within these theoretical ranges. Neutrinos in outer space, where interactions may be neglected, appear as particles travelling with zero mass on null geodesics. These gravitational curvature energies are consistent with neutrino oscillations, zero neutrino rest masses and Einstein's General Relativity and energy mass equivalence principle. When analyzing or averaging experimental neutrino mass-energy results of different experiments on the Earth it is of interest to consider the possible influence of the trajectory inclination angle.

Gustavo R. Gonzalez-Martin

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

327

Variability of the proton-to-electron mass ratio on cosmological scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

So far the only seemingly significant indication of a cosmological variation exists for the proton-to-electron mass ratio as stated by Reinhold et al. (2006). The measured indication of variation is based on the combined analysis of H2 absorption systems in the spectra of Q0405-443 and Q0347-383 at z=2.595 and z=3.025, respectively. The high resolution data of the latter is reanalyzed in this work to examine the influence of different fitting procedures and further potential nonconformities. This analysis cannot reproduce the significance achieved by the previous detection.

Martin Wendt; Dieter Reimers

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

328

MASS TRANSFER TO ROTATING DISKS AND ROTATING RINGS IN LAMINAR, TRANSITION, AND FULLY DEVELOPED TURBULENT FLOW  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data and theoretical calculations are presented for the mass-transfer rate to rotating disks and rotating rings when laminar, transition, and fully developed turbulent flow exist upon different portions of the surface. Good agreement of data and the model is obtained for rotating disks and relatively thick rotating rings. Results of the calculations for thin rings generally exceed the experimental data measured in transition and turbulent flow. A y{sup +{sup 3}} form for the eddy diffusivity is used to fit the data. No improvement is noticed with a form involving both y{sup +{sup 3}} and y{sup +{sup 3}}.

Law Jr., C.G.; Pierini, P.; Newman, J.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure the evolution of chemical composition for two distinct organic aerosol types as they are passed through a thermodenuder at different temperatures. The two organic aerosol types considered are primary lubricating oil (LO) aerosol and secondary aerosol from the alpha-pinene + O3 reaction (alphaP). The evolution of the VUV mass spectra for the two aerosol types with temperature are observed to differ dramatically. For LO particles, the spectra exhibit distinct changes with temperature in which the lower m/z peaks, corresponding to compounds with higher vapor pressures, disappear more rapidly than the high m/z peaks. In contrast, the alphaP aerosol spectrum is essentially unchanged by temperature even though the particles experience significant mass loss due to evaporation. The variations in the LO spectra are found to be quantitatively in agreement with expectations from absorptive partitioning theory whereas the alphaP spectra suggest that the evaporation of alphaP derived aerosol appears to not be governed by partitioning theory. We postulate that this difference arises from the alphaP particles existing as in a glassy state instead of having the expected liquid-like behavior. To reconcile these observations with decades of aerosol growth measurements, which indicate that OA formation is described by equilibrium partitioning, we present a conceptual model wherein the secondary OA is formed and then rapidly converted from an absorbing form to a non-absorbing form. The results suggest that although OA growth may be describable by equilibrium partitioning theory, the properties of organic aerosol once formed may differ significantly from the properties determined in the equilibrium framework.

UC Davis; Cappa, Christopher D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

Precision Electroweak Measurements on the Z Presonance  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on the final electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the Z resonance by the experiments operating at the electron-positron colliders SLC and LEP. the data consist of 17 million Z decays accumulated by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP, and 600 thousand Z decays by the SLD experiment using a polarized beam at SLC. The measurements include cross-sections, forward-backward asymmetries and polarized asymmetries. The mass and width of the Z boson, m{sub Z} and {Lambda}{sub Z}, and its couplings to fermions, for example the {rho} parameter and the effective electroweak mixing angle for leptons, are precisely measured: m{sub Z} = 91.1875 {+-} 0.0021 GeV; {Lambda}{sub Z} = 2.4952 {+-} 0.0023 GeV; {rho}{sub {ell}} = 1.0050 {+-} 0.0010; sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup lept} = 0.23153 {+-} 0.00016. The number of light neutrino species is determined to be 2.9840 {+-} 0.0082, in agreement with the three observed generations of fundamental fermions. The results are compared to the predictions of the Standard Model. At the Z-pole, electroweak radiative corrections beyond the running of the QED and QCD coupling constants are observed with a significance of five standard deviations, and in agreement with the Standard Model. of the many Z-pole measurements, the forward-backward asymmetry in b-quark production shows the largest difference with respect to its Standard Model expectation, at the level of 2.8 standard deviations. Through radiative corrections evaluated in the framework of the Standard Model, the Z-pole data are also used to predict the mass of the top quark, m{sub t} = 173{sub -10}{sup +13} GeV, and the mass of the W boson, m{sub W} = 80.363 {+-} 0.032 GeV. These indirect constraints are compared to the direct measurements, providing a stringent test of the Standard Model. Using in addition the direct measurements of m{sub t} and m{sub W}, the mass of the as yet unobserved Standard Model Higgs boson is predicted with a relative uncertainty of about 50% and found to be less than 285 GeV at 95% confidence level.

Aleph,Delphi,L3,Opal,SLD , Collaborations

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

331

Measuring Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Compressed Natural Gas Retail Motor-Fuel Dispensers; Hydrogen Measuring Devices; Liquefied Petroleum Gas Liquid-Measuring Devices; Loading ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

332

Chip-Scale Quadrupole Mass Filters for Portable Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new class of chip-scale quadrupole mass filter (QMF). The devices are completely batch fabricated using a wafer-scale process that integrates the quadrupole ...

Cheung, Kerry

333

Cosmological mass limits on neutrinos, axions, and other light particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The small-scale power spectrum of the cosmological matter distribution together with other cosmological data provides a sensitive measure of the hot dark matter fraction, leading to restrictive neutrino mass limits. We extend this argument to generic cases of low-mass thermal relics. We vary the cosmic epoch of thermal decoupling, the radiation content of the universe, and the new particle's spin degrees of freedom. Our treatment covers various scenarios of active plus sterile neutrinos or axion-like particles. For three degenerate massive neutrinos, we reproduce the well-known limit of m_nu solar eV-mass axions to be discovered by the CAST experiment.

Steen Hannestad; Georg Raffelt

2003-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

334

J. Plasma Fusion Res. SERIES, Vol. 8 (2009) Geomagnetic Storms In Relation With Halo and Partial Halo Coronal Mass Ejections and Disturbances in Solar Wind Plasma Parameters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coronal mass ejections are most energetic solar events that eject huge amount of mass and magnetic fields into the heliosphere and are widely recognized as being responsible to generate measure disturbances in solar wind plasma parameters and geomagnetic storms in the magnetosphere of the earth. We have studied geomagnetic storms Dst solar flares of different categories. We have found that 74.61 % geomagnetic storms are associated with halo and partial halo coronal mass ejections. The association rate of geomagnetic storms with halo and partial halo coronal mass ejections are found 34.73 % and 65.27% respectively. We have further determined that halo and partial halo coronal mass ejections, which are related to geomagnetic storms, majority of them are associated with M and C, class X-ray solar flares (77%). From the study of geomagnetic storms with disturbances in solar wind plasma parameters, we have determined weak positive correlation between maximum jump amplitude in solar wind plasma density and magnitude of geomagnetic storms and medium positive correlation between maximum jump amplitude in solar wind plasma temperature and magnitude of geomagnetic storms and maximum jump amplitude in solar wind plasma velocity and magnitude of geomagnetic storms. Keywords: Geomagnetic storms. Halo coronal mass ejections. Partial halo coronal mass ejections. Disturbances in solar wind plasma temperature, density and velocity. 1.

P. L. Verma; A. K. Tripathi; Sushil Sharma

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

AN EVALUATION OF THE VARIABILITY OF AIR MASS CHARACTER BETWEEN URBAN AND RURAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of occurrence of air masses at Washington DC National Airport (DCA), along with the temperature differences air mass characteristics is performed for four two-week "windows" throughout the year; programs then select days which meet all of these criteria for each air mass during each window. Routines

Sheridan, Scott

336

Predicting enhanced mass flow rates in gas microchannels using nonkinetic models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Different nonkinetic approaches are adopted in this paper towards theoretically predicting the experimentally observed phenomenon of enhanced mass flow rates accompanying pressure-driven rarefied gas flows through ...

Dadzie, S. Kokou

337

Thermal Mass and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Mass and Demand Response Speaker(s): Gregor Henze Phil C. Bomrad Date: November 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Janie Page The topic of...

338

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques NGSI Research Overview and Update on NDA Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Non-CN-184/137 Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel withthe Direct Measurement of Plutonium in Spent LWR Fuels by

A., V. Mozin, S.J. Tobin, L.W. Cambell, J.R. Cheatham, C.R. Freeman, C.J. Gesh,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Gravitational field energy contribution to the neutron star mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron stars are discussed as laboratories of physics of strong gravitational fields. The mass of a neutron star is split into matter energy and gravitational field energy contributions. The energy of the gravitational field of neutron stars is calculated with three different approaches which give the same result. It is found that up to one half of the gravitational mass of maximum mass neutron stars is comprised by the gravitational field energy. Results are shown for a number of realistic equations of state of neutron star matter.

M. Dyrda; B. Kinasiewicz; M. Kutschera; A. Szmaglinski

2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

340

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Light and Heavy Mass Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effort to understand pre-cooling thermal mass as a Demandof Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEKey words: Pre-cooling, demand response, thermal mass

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Neutron emission effects on fragment mass and kinetic energy distribution from fission of 239{sup Pu} induced by thermal neutrons  

SciTech Connect

The average of fragment kinetic energy (E-bar sign*) and the multiplicity of prompt neutrons ({nu}(bar sign)) as a function of fragment mass (m*), as well as the fragment mass yield (Y(m*)) from thermal neutron-induced fission of {sup 239}Pu have been measured by Tsuchiya et al.. In that work the mass and kinetic energy are calculated from the measured kinetic energy of one fragment and the difference of time of flight of the two complementary fragments. However they do not present their results about the standard deviation {sigma}{sub E}*(m*). In this work we have made a numerical simulation of that experiment which reproduces its results, assuming an initial distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy (E(A)) with a constant value of the standard deviation as function of fragment mass ({sigma}{sub E}(A)). As a result of the simulation we obtain the dependence {sigma}{sub E}*(m*) which presents an enhancement between m* = 92 and m* = 110, and a peak at m* = 121.

Montoya, M. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Apartado 31-139, Lima (Peru); Rojas, J. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Av. Venezuela Cdra 34, Apartado Postal 14-0149, Lima 1 (Peru); Lobato, I. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Apartado 31-139, Lima (Peru)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

342

Quantization of Atomic and Nuclear Rest Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We were able to quantize phenomenologically the first time the atomic and nuclear rest masses. Note that this quantization rule is justified for atoms and nuclei with different A, N and Z and the nuclei and atoms represent a coherent synchronized systems - a complex of coupled oscillators (resonators). The cooperative resonance synchronization mechanisms are responsible for explanation of how the electron volt world can influence the nuclear mega electron volt world. It means that we created new possibilities for inducing and controlling nuclear reactions by atomic processes.

F. A. Gareev; G. F. Gareeva; I. E. Zhidkova

2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

343

Efficiency Measures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

recommended steam system energy efficiency measures Based on analyses implementation of steam system energy efficiency measures is driven primarily by cost metrics payback period...

344

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

concentration concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol concentration A measure of the amount of aerosol particles (e.g. number, mass, volume) per unit volume of air. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer CPC : Condensation Particle Counter IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights) TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer

345

QLC relation and neutrino mass hierarchy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

neutrino mass matrix is generated at high energies, s 12 = cneutrino mass matrix is generated at low energy scales. Ontrino mass matrix is generated at some high energy scale. We

Ferrandis, Javier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has seen increased application for high spatial chemical imaging of complex biological surfaces. The advent and commercial availability of cluster and polyatomic primary ion sources (e.g. Au and Bi cluster and buckminsterfullerene (C60)) provide improved secondary ion yield and decreased fragmentation of surface species, thus accessibility to intact molecular ions. Despite developments in primary ion sources, development of mass spectrometers to fully exploit their advantages has been limited. Tandem mass spectrometry for identification of secondary ions is highly desirable, but implementation has proven to be difficult. Similarly, high mass resolution and high mass measurement accuracy would greatly improve the chemical specificity of SIMS. Here we combine, for the first time, the advantages of a C60 primary ion source with the ultra-high mass resolving power and high mass measurement accuracy of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Mass resolving power in excess of 100,000 (m/?m50%) is demonstrated, with mass measurement accuracies below 3 parts-per-million. Imaging of mouse brain tissue at 40 ?m pixel size is shown. Tandem mass spectrometry of ions from biological tissue is demonstrated and molecular formulae can be assigned to fragment ions.

Smith, Donald F.; Robinson, Errol W.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Energy or Mass and Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A review. Problems: 1-Many empirical parameters and large dimension number; 2-Gravitation and Electrodynamics are challenged by dark matter and energy. Energy and nonlinear electrodynamics are fundamental in a unified nonlinear interaction. Nuclear energy appears as nonlinear SU(2) magnetic energy. Gravitation and electromagnetism are unified giving Einstein's equation and a geometric energy momentum tensor. A solution energy in the newtonian limit gives the gravitational constant G. Outside of this limit G is variable. May be interpreted as dark matter or energy. In vacuum, known gravitational solutions are obtained. Electromagnetism is an SU(2) subgroup. A U(1) limit gives Maxwell's equations. Geometric fields determine a generalized Dirac equation and are the germ of quantum physics. Planck's h and of Einstein's c are given by the potential and the metric. Excitations have quanta of charge, flux and spin determining the FQHE. There are only three stable 1/2 spin fermions. Mass is a form of energy. The rest energies of the fermions give the proton/electron mass ratio. Potential excitations have energies equal to the weak boson masses allowing a geometric interpretation of Weinberg's angle. SU(2) gives the anomalous magnetic moments of proton, electron, neutron and generates nuclear range attractive potentials strong enough to produce the binding energies of the deuteron and other nuclides. Lepton and meson masses are due to topological excitations. The geometric mass spectrum is satisfactory. The proton has a triple structure. The alpha constant is a geometric number.

Gustavo R Gonzalez-Martin

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

A confirmatory measurement technique for highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a confirmatory measurement technique for measuring uranium items in their shipping containers. The measurement consists of a weight verification and the detection of three gamma rays. The weight can be determined very precisely, thus it severely constrains the options of the diverter who might want to imitate the gamma signal with a bogus item. The 185.7-keV gamma ray originates from /sup 235/U, the 1001 keV originates from a daughter of /sup 238/U, and the 2614 keV originates from a daughter of /sup 232/U. These three gamma rays exhibit widely different attenuation properties, they correlate with enrichment and total uranium mass, and they rigorously discriminate against a likely diversion scenario (low-enriched uranium substitution). These four measured quantities, when combined, provide a signature that is very difficult to counterfeit.

Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

On the mass formula and Wigner and curvature energy terms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The efficiency of different mass formulas derived from the liquid drop model including or not the curvature energy, the Wigner term and different powers of the relative neutron excess $I$ has been determined by a least square fitting procedure to the experimental atomic masses assuming a constant R$_{0,charge}$/A$^{1/3}$ ratio. The Wigner term and the curvature energy can be used independently to improve the accuracy of the mass formula. The different fits lead to a surface energy coefficient of around 17-18 MeV, a relative sharp charge radius r$_0$ of 1.22-1.23 fm and a proton form-factor correction to the Coulomb energy of around 0.9 MeV.

G. Royer

2007-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

350

Cranking mass parameters for fission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A formalism for semi-adiabatic cranking mass parameters is presented. For the fission process of 234U, the time-dependent pairing equations of motion were used to calculate the excitation energy and to extract values of the cranking inertia. A fission barrier is determined by minimizing the action trajectory in a five dimensional configuration space spanned by elongation, necking, deformations of fragments and mass-asymmetry. The deformation energy is computed in the the frame of the microscopic-macroscopic model. The two center shell model with Woods-Saxon potentials is used in this context. Values of the inertia for excited fissioning systems are reported. A dependence between the cranking mass parameters and the intrinsic excitation energy is evidenced.

M. Mirea; R. C. Bobulescu

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

351

Humidity Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Quantities. Humidity Measurements. Rate our Services. Technical ... Special Tests of Humidity (36070S). Tests ...

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

352

High-Speed Optical and Electrical Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-Speed Optical and Electrical Measurements. The Optoelectronics Division provides three different services related ...

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mass Transit to Mass Transit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mass Transit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Ridesharing Mass Transit Active Transit Multi-Modal Transportation Telework Mass Transit Passenger-Miles per Gallon Passenger-miles per gallon (pmpg) is a metric for comparing mass transit and rideshare with typical passenger vehicle travel. Transportation system

354

Jet Mass Spectra in Higgs + One Jet at NNLL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The invariant mass of a jet is a benchmark variable describing the structure of jets at the LHC. We calculate the jet mass spectrum for Higgs plus one jet at the LHC at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) order using a factorization formula. At this order, the cross section becomes sensitive to perturbation theory at the soft m_jet^2/p_T^jet scale. Our calculation is exclusive and uses the 1-jettiness global event shape to implement a veto on additional jets. The dominant dependence on the jet veto is removed by normalizing the spectrum, leaving residual dependence from non-global logarithms depending on the ratio of the jet mass and jet veto variables. For our exclusive jet cross section these non-global logarithms are parametrically smaller than in the inclusive case, allowing us to obtain a complete NNLL result. Results for the dependence of the jet mass spectrum on the kinematics, jet algorithm, and jet size R are given. Using individual partonic channels we illustrate the difference between the jet mass spectra for quark and gluon jets. We also study the effect of hadronization and underlying event on the jet mass in PYTHIA. To highlight the similarity of inclusive and exclusive jet mass spectra, a comparison to LHC data is presented.

Teppo T. Jouttenus; Iain W. Stewart; Frank J. Tackmann; Wouter J. Waalewijn

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

355

Adaptive higher order numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer in fluidized beds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptive higher order numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer in fluidized beds Ch. Nagaiah1 adaptive numerical results of heat and mass transfer in fluidized beds using higher order time stepping injection. The numerical results are tested with different time stepping methods for different spatial grid

Magdeburg, Universität

356

Investigation of the role of shell structure in quasi-fission mass distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systematic measurements of mass-ratio distributions for fission following collisions of $^{48}$Ti projectiles with even-even target nuclei from $^{144}$Sm to $^{208}$Pb have been made at sub-barrier energies. They show the presence of quasifission, and depend strongly on target nucleus deformation and the fissility of the composite nucleus. A new framework to analyse systematic mass-ratio measurements allows direct comparison with the trends expected from shell structure, independent of assumptions or fits. This indicates that quasi-fission mass distributions show trends consistent with low energy mass-asymmetric fission of the same actinide elements.

D. J. Hinde; R. du Rietz; R. G. Thomas; M. Dasgupta; C. Simenel; M. L. Brown; M. Evers; D. H. Luong; L. R. Gasques; R. Rafiei; A. Wakhle

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

357

Higgs Recoil Mass and Higgs-Strahlung Cross-Section Study for the ILD LOI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This proceeding summarizes the Higgs recoil mass and Higgs-strahlung cross-section study done for the Letter of Intent (LOI) of the International Large Detector (ILD) Concept. Assuming a Higgs mass of 120 GeV, working at 250 GeV center of mass energy with beam parameters RDR250 and beam polarization, this full simulation study predicts that, the ILD detector can achieve 37 MeV precision on the Higgs mass measurement and 3.3% on the cross-section measurement from the muon channel, while 83 MeV and 4.9% from the electron channel, if we have 250 inverse fb integrated luminosity.

Hengne Li

2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

358

Ab-initio Determination of Light Hadron Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than 99% of the mass of the visible universe is made up of protons and neutrons. Both particles are much heavier than their quark and gluon constituents, and the Standard Model of particle physics should explain this difference. We present a full ab-initio calculation of the masses of protons, neutrons and other light hadrons, using lattice quantum chromodynamics. Pion masses down to 190 mega electronvolts are used to extrapolate to the physical point with lattice sizes of approximately four times the inverse pion mass. Three lattice spacings are used for a continuum extrapolation. Our results completely agree with experimental observations and represent a quantitative confirmation of this aspect of the Standard Model with fully controlled uncertainties.

S. Durr; Z. Fodor; J. Frison; C. Hoelbling; R. Hoffmann; S. D. Katz; S. Krieg; T. Kurth; L. Lellouch; T. Lippert; K. K. Szabo; G. Vulvert

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

359

Characterization of compounds by time-of-flight measurement utilizing random fast ions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for characterizing the mass of sample and daughter particles, comprising a source for providing sample ions; a fragmentation region wherein a fraction of the sample ions may fragment to produce daughter ion particles; an electrostatic field region held at a voltage level sufficient to effect ion-neutral separation and ion-ion separation of fragments from the same sample ion and to separate ions of different kinetic energy; a detector system for measuring the relative arrival times of particles; and processing means operatively connected to the detector system to receive and store the relative arrival times and operable to compare the arrival times with times detected at the detector when the electrostatic field region is held at a different voltage level and to thereafter characterize the particles. Sample and daughter particles are characterized with respect to mass and other characteristics by detecting at a particle detector the relative time of arrival for fragments of a sample ion at two different electrostatic voltage levels. The two sets of particle arrival times are used in conjunction with the known altered voltage levels to mathematically characterize the sample and daughter fragments. In an alternative embodiment the present invention may be used as a detector for a conventional mass spectrometer. In this embodiment, conventional mass spectrometry analysis is enhanced due to further mass resolving of the detected ions. 8 figs.

Conzemius, R.J.

1989-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

360

Characterization of compounds by time-of-flight measurement utilizing random fast ions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for characterizing the mass of sample and daughter particles, comprising a source for providing sample ions; a fragmentation region wherein a fraction of the sample ions may fragment to produce daughter ion particles; an electrostatic field region held at a voltage level sufficient to effect ion-neutral separation and ion-ion separation of fragments from the same sample ion and to separate ions of different kinetic energy; a detector system for measuring the relative arrival times of particles; and processing means operatively connected to the detector system to receive and store the relative arrival times and operable to compare the arrival times with times detected at the detector when the electrostatic field region is held at a different voltage level and to thereafter characterize the particles. Sample and daughter particles are characterized with respect to mass and other characteristics by detecting at a particle detector the relative time of arrival for fragments of a sample ion at two different electrostatic voltage levels. The two sets of particle arrival times are used in conjunction with the known altered voltage levels to mathematically characterize the sample and daughter fragments. In an alternative embodiment the present invention may be used as a detector for a conventional mass spectrometer. In this embodiment, conventional mass spectrometry analysis is enhanced due to further mass resolving of the detected ions.

Conzemius, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Time of flight mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

Ulbricht, Jr., William H. (Arvada, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Mass modification experiment definition study  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes an attempt to find an experiment that would test the Haisch, Rueda, and Puthoff (HRP) conjecture that the mass and inertia of a body are induced effects brought about by changes in the quantum-fluctuation energy of the vacuum. It was not possible, however, to identify a definitive experiment. But, it was possible to identify an experiment that might be able to prove or disprove that the inertial mass of a body can be altered by making changes in the vacuum surrounding the body. Other experiments, which do not involve mass modification, but which teach something about the vacuum, were also defined and included in a ranked list of experiments. This report also contains an annotated bibliography. An interesting point raised by this paper is this: We can estimate the `vacuum energy density` to be 10{sup 108} J/cc, and the vacuum mass density to be 10{sup 94} g/cc, much higher numbers than those associated with nuclear energy. Although the field of `electromagnetic fluctuation energy of the vacuum` is admittedly an esoteric, little-understood field, it does seem to have definite potential as an energy source. 47 refs.

Forward, R.L. [Forward Unlimited, Malibu, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Impact of Body Mass Index on Heterotopic Ossification  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze the impact of different body mass index (BMI) as a surrogate marker for heterotopic ossification (HO) in patients who underwent surgical repair (SR) for displaced acetabular fractures (DAF) followed by radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution retrospective study of 395 patients. All patients underwent SR for DAF followed by RT {+-} indomethacin. All patients received postoperative RT, 7 Gy, within 72 h. The patients were separated into four groups based on their BMI: <18.5, 18.5-24.9, 25-29.9, and >30. The end point of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of RT {+-} indomethacin in preventing HO in patients with different BMI. Results: Analysis of BMI showed an increasing incidence of HO with increasing BMI: <18.5, (0%) 0/6 patients; 18.5-24.9 (6%), 6 of 105 patients developed HO; 25-29.9 (19%), 22 of 117; >30 (31%), 51 of 167. Chi-square and multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the correlation between odds of HO and BMI is significant, p < 0.0001. As the BMI increased, the risk of HO and Brooker Classes 3, 4 HO increased. The risk of developing HO is 1.0 Multiplication-Sign (10%) more likely among those with higher BMI compared with those with lower BMI. For a one-unit increase in BMI the log odds of HO increases by 1.0, 95% CI (1.06-1.14). Chi-square test shows no significant difference among all other factors and HO (e.g., indomethacin, race, gender). Conclusions: Despite similar surgical treatment and prophylactic measures (RT {+-} indomethacin), the risk of HO appears to significantly increase in patients with higher BMI after DAF. Higher single-fraction doses or multiple fractions and/or combination therapy with nonsteroidal inflammatory drugs may be of greater benefit to these patients.

Mourad, Waleed Fouad, E-mail: Waleed246@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (Israel); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY (United States); Packianathan, Satya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Shourbaji, Rania A. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS (United States); Zhang Zhen; Graves, Mathew [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Khan, Majid A. [Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Baird, Michael C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Russell, George [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Vijayakumar, Srinivasan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

CAST search for sub-eV mass solar axions with 3He buffer gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) has extended its search for solar axions by using 3He as a buffer gas. At T=1.8 K this allows for larger pressure settings and hence sensitivity to higher axion masses than our previous measurements with 4He. With about 1 h of data taking at each of 252 different pressure settings we have scanned the axion mass range 0.39 eV < m_a < 0.64 eV. From the absence of excess X-rays when the magnet was pointing to the Sun we set a typical upper limit on the axion-photon coupling of g_ag < 2.3 x 10^{-10} GeV^{-1} at 95% CL, the exact value depending on the pressure setting. KSVZ axions are excluded at the upper end of our mass range, the first time ever for any solar axion search. In future we will extend our search to m_a < 1.15 eV, comfortably overlapping with cosmological hot dark matter bounds.

M. Arik; S. Aune; K. Barth; A. Belov; S. Borghi; H. Bruninger; G. Cantatore; J. M. Carmona; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; C. Ezer; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; P. Friedrich; J. Galn; J. A. Garca; A. Gardikiotis; E. N. Gazis; T. Geralis; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gmez; E. Gruber; T. Guthrl; R. Hartmann; F. Haug; M. D. Hasinoff; D. H. H. Hoffmann; F. J. Iguaz; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakov?i?; M. Karuza; K. Knigsmann; R. Kotthaus; M. Kr?mar; M. Kuster; B. Laki?; J. M. Laurent; A. Liolios; A. Ljubi?i?; V. Lozza; G. Lutz; G. Luzn; J. Morales; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; G. Raffelt; T. Rashba; H. Riege; A. Rodrguez; M. Rosu; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; P. S. Silva; S. K. Solanki; L. Stewart; A. Toms; M. Tsagri; K. van Bibber; T. Vafeiadis; J. Villar; J. K. Vogel; S. C. Yildiz; K. Zioutas

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

365

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30percent using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Parrish, Kristen

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

366

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques -- Preliminary Modeling Results Emphasizing Integration among Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL- Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel withSwinhoe. Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent FuelS. Tobin, Measurement of Plutonium in Spent Nuclear Fuel by

Tobin, S. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Comments on the mass of the Photon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

De Broglie believed that the photon has a mass, a view shared by a few others. Quite recently, the author has argued that the photon has a mass which is consistent with the latest experimental limits. In the present paper we point out that there is experimental evidence for this mass and also give a theoretical demonstration of the photon mass.

Burra G. Sidharth

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

368

Measuring droplet impact with piezoelectric film  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to develop a measurement system for determining droplet impact in the field with piezoelectric film. The piezoelectric film generates an output signal when it is deformed. The signals are analyzed with a data acquisition system (a computer with two high speed boards). Eight piezoelectric films were calibrated in the laboratory. Each film was calibrated by releasing various water droplet sizes from different heights. The signal output of film was then related to the kinetic energy of the droplet. The maximum droplet diameter generated was 5.6 mm, and the maximum height used was 4.59 m. To simulate a kinetic energy for larger droplets and higher elevations, a solid particle with 9.9 mm diameter and 0.5 gram mass was used. The results show that, in general, the output of piezoelectfic film responds linearly to kinetic energy. However, due to the size of the film used and deformation of large droplets upon impact, the output become non-linear and may be represented by Y=ax1 +bx2 +cx1cx2+dx12x2+ex13x2 + where, y = sensor output a, b, c, d, e = constants which depend on the characteristics of the film X1 = the kinetic energy X2 = I for the solid particle X2= 0 for water drops The measurement system was tested in the field. The results showed that this system could be used to measure droplet impact force at different places on plants.

Basahi, Jalal M. Al-Badry M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Detecting Free-Mass Common-Mode Motion Induced by Incident Gravitational Waves: Testing General Relativity and Source Direction via Fox-Smith and Michelson Interferometers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we show that information on both the differential and common mode free-mass response to a gravitational wave can provide important information on discriminating the direction of the gravitational wave source and between different theories of gravitation. The conventional Michelson interferometer scheme only measures the differential free-mass response. By changing the orientation of the beam splitter, it is possible to configure the detector so it is sensitive to the common-mode of the free-mass motion. The proposed interferometer is an adaptation of the Fox-Smith interferometer. A major limitation to the new scheme is its enhanced sensitivity to laser frequency fluctuations over the conventional, and we propose a method of canceling these fluctuations. The configuration could be used in parallel to the conventional differential detection scheme with a significant sensitivity and bandwidth.

Michael Edmund Tobar; Toshikazu Suzuki; Kazuaki Kuroda

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

370

Evolution of massive stars losing mass and angular momentum supergiants  

SciTech Connect

Evolutionary sequences have been computed to central helium exhaustion for massive Population I star models with initial masses of 40, 60, 80, and 100 M/sub sun/. Mass loss occurs through radiatively driven winds and through the effects of nonthermal winds generated both by rotational shear turbulence during the mainsequence (MS) phase and by the acoustic energy flux from the convective envelope during the red supergiant phase. The size of the convective envelope in the red supergiant phase is found to depend on the mass loss history of the star, through the effect of mass loss on the position of the hydrogen shell source (HSS) and on the opacity of the envelope above the HSS. Previous evolutionary calculations have shown that, for low mass loss rates, a blue loop forms when the HSS contacts the discontinuity at the base of the convective envelope. In contrast, the higher mass loss rates considered here produce a blue loop only if sufficient mass loss occurs during the red supergiant phase to eliminate the convective envelope entirely. On the other hand, sufficiently high mass loss rates during the MS phase can remove most of the hydrogen-rich envelope, and then the red supergiant phase does not occur. In these models the mass loss and evolutionary patterns for a star depend on its initial rotational speed, which in actual stars is expected to vary from star to star. The observed blue-to-red supergiant ratios are then interpreted as weighted means of different evolutionary patterns resulting from a spread of initial rotational speeds. The same interpretation may extend to Wolf-Rayet stars.

Sreenivasan, S.R.; Wilson, W.J.F.

1985-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

MassMass transfer andtransfer and separation technologyseparation technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) i fl id t b Massöve small units are needed (H 1 m); 2) corrosive fluids must be handledRaschig ringring packingpacking For Raschig rings with a 1" (inch) di t d h i ht l l t th Picture: WK92 diameter Laboratory tel. 3223 ; ron.zevenhoven@abo.fi RoNz eknikarationste 24302 ochSepa 13.1 Principle of operation

Zevenhoven, Ron

372

MassMass transfer andtransfer and separation technologyseparation technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, spray columns (a) ­ Columns with mechanical agitators or centrifugal effects, for example see section 9.2 24302 ochSepa g g , f p rotating disc contactors (RDC) (b), Kühni columns (c) a b c 4 erföringo a b c-thermal, continuous, steady-state) can be presented as a series of N equilibrium stage contactors Massöve N

Zevenhoven, Ron

373

Constant-Pressure Measurement of Steam-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SGP-TR-169 Constant-Pressure Measurement of Steam- Water Relative Permeability Peter A. O by measuring in-situ steam saturation more directly. Mobile steam mass fraction was established by separate steam and water inlets or by correlating with previous results. The measured steam-water relative

Stanford University

374

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

375

Measuring circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automatic gain control circuit functions to adjust the magnitude of an input signal supplied to a measuring circuit to a level within the dynamic range of the measuring circuit while a log-ratio circuit adjusts the magnitude of the output signal from the measuring circuit to the level of the input signal and optimizes the signal-to-noise ratio performance of the measuring circuit.

Sun, Shan C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Chaprnka, Anthony G. (Cockeysville, MD)

1977-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

376

Nanocalorimetry Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Establishing feedback controlled instrumentation should provide for greater accuracy in the thermodynamic measurements. The new control system ...

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Virtual Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... measurements, in some applications. The dollar value of computational predictions will be greatly enhanced. Goals. In the near ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

378

Surface Ocean Mixing Inferred from Different Multisatellite Altimetry Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sea surface height (SSH) anomaly fields distributed by Archiving, Validation, and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic (AVISO) Altimetry are evaluated in terms of the effects that they produce on mixing. One SSH anomaly field, tagged REF,...

Francisco J. Beron-Vera; Mara J. Olascoaga; Gustavo J. Goni

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Higgs boson mass bounds separate models of electroweak symmetry breaking  

SciTech Connect

Vacuum stability and metastability imply lower limits on the mass of the Higgs boson in the standard model (SM). In contrast, we present an improved calculation of the lightest Higgs boson mass in supersymmetric (SUSY) models, by summing to all orders in perturbation theory the leading and next-to-leading logarithms with a renormalization group equation technique, and by including finite two-loop QCD corrections. We believe our result to be the most accurate available in the literature. The mass calculation leads to an upper bound on the Higgs boson mass when the SUSY-breaking scale is sensibly restricted to {approx_lt}1 TeV. In particular, our improvements to the SUSY Higgs boson mass calculation lower the minimal SUSY standard model (MSSM) upper limit by about 10 GeV. We study the possibility that these SM and MSSM bounds do not overlap, in which case a single Higgs boson mass measurement will distinguish between the two models. (Abstract Truncated)

Diaz, M.A. [Physics Department, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); ter Veldhuis, T.A.; Weiler, T.J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Towards the optimal window for the 2MASS dipole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison of the 2MASS flux dipole to the CMB dipole can serve as a method to constrain a combination of the cosmological parameter Omega_m and the luminosity bias of the 2MASS survey. For this constraint to be as tight as possible, it is necessary to maximize the correlation between the two dipoles. This can be achieved by optimizing the survey window through which the flux dipole is measured. Here we explicitly construct such a window for the 2MASS survey. The optimization in essence reduces to excluding from the calculation of the flux dipole galaxies brighter than some limiting magnitude K_min of the near-infrared K_s band. This exclusion mitigates nonlinear effects and shot noise from small scales, which decorrelate the 2MASS dipole from the CMB dipole. Under the assumption of negligible shot noise we find that the optimal value of K_min is about five. Inclusion of shot noise shifts the optimal K_min to larger values. We present an analytical formula for shot noise for the 2MASS flux dipole, to be used in follow-up work with 2MASS data. The misalignment angle between the two dipoles is a sensitive measure of their correlation: the higher the correlation, the smaller the expectation value of the angle. A minimum of the misalignment is thus a sign of the optimal gravity window. We model analytically the distribution function for the misalignment angle and show that the misalignment estimated by Maller et al. is consistent with the assumed underlying model (though it is greater than the expectation value). We predict with about 90% confidence that the misalignment will decrease if 2MASS galaxies brighter than K_min = 5 mag are excluded from the calculation of the flux dipole. This prediction has been indirectly confirmed by the results of Erdogdu et al. (ABRIDGED)

Michal Chodorowski; Jean-Baptiste Coiffard; Maciej Bilicki; Stephane Colombi; Pawel Ciecielag

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hybrid quadrupole mass filter/quadrupole ion trap/time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a laboratory-constructed mass spectrometer optimized for recording infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectra of mass-selected ions using a benchtop tunable infrared optical parametric oscillator/amplifier (OPO/A). The instrument is equipped with two ionization sources, an electrospray ionization source, as well as an electron ionization source for troubleshooting. This hybrid mass spectrometer is composed of a quadrupole mass filter for mass selection, a reduced pressure ({approx}10{sup -5} Torr) quadrupole ion trap (QIT) for OPO irradiation, and a reflectron time-of-flight drift tube for detecting the remaining precursor and photofragment ions. A helium gas pulse is introduced into the QIT to temporarily increase the pressure and hence enhance the trapping efficiency of axially injected ions. After a brief pump-down delay, the compact ion cloud is subjected to the focused output from the continuous wave OPO. In a recent study, we implemented this setup in the study of protonated tryptophan, TrpH{sup +}, as well as collision-induced dissociation products of this protonated amino acid [W. K. Mino, Jr., K. Gulyuz, D. Wang, C. N. Stedwell, and N. C. Polfer, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2, 299 (2011)]. Here, we give a more detailed account on the figures of merit of such IRMPD experiments. The appreciable photodissociation yields in these measurements demonstrate that IRMPD spectroscopy of covalently bound ions can be routinely carried out using benchtop OPO setups.

Gulyuz, Kerim; Stedwell, Corey N.; Wang Da; Polfer, Nick C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, P.O. Box 117200, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Evolution of Stellar Mass and the Implied Star Formation History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a compilation of measurements of the stellar mass density as a function of redshift. Using this stellar mass history we obtain a star formation history and compare it to the instantaneous star formation history. For zhistories. At higher redshifts the instantaneous indicators suggest star formation rates larger than that implied by the evolution of the stellar mass density. This discrepancy peaks at z=3 where instantaneous indicators suggest a star formation rate around 0.6 dex higher than those of the best fit to the stellar mass history. We discuss a variety of explanations for this inconsistency, such as inaccurate dust extinction corrections, incorrect measurements of stellar masses and a possible evolution of the stellar initial mass function.

Stephen M. Wilkins; Neil Trentham; Andrew M. Hopkins

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

Exposing the dressed quark's mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This snapshot of recent progress in hadron physics made in connection with QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations includes: a perspective on confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB); a pre'cis on the physics of in-hadron condensates; results on the hadron spectrum, including dressed-quark-core masses for the nucleon and Delta, their first radial excitations, and the parity-partners of these states; an illustration of the impact of DCSB on the electromagnetic pion form factor, thereby exemplifying how data can be used to chart the momentum-dependence of the dressed-quark mass function; and a prediction that F_1^{p,d}/F_1^{p,u} passes through zero at Q^2\\approx 5m_N^2 owing to the presence of nonpointlike scalar and axial-vector diquark correlations in the nucleon.

Roberts, H L L; Cloet, I C; Roberts, C D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Graphene, neutrino mass and oscillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A resolution of the Abraham-Minkowski dilemma is presented that other constant velocities can play the role of c in the theory of relativity. For example, in 2005 electrons of graphene were discovered to behave as if the coefficient is a Fermi velocity. Then we propose a conjecture for neutrinos to avoid the contradiction among two-component theory, negative rest mass-square and oscillation.

Z. Y. Wang

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

Analysis of different methods to calculate electrochemical noise resistance using a three-electrode cell  

SciTech Connect

In a theoretical approach, the noise resistance parameter (R{sub n}) (in time domain) was deduced from an electric equivalent model proposed by Bertocci and coworkers for a cell with three identical electrodes. The voltage and current were measured. The R{sub n} and resistance of spectral noise (R{sub sn} and R{sub snO} [defined elsewhere]) were estimated for mild steel (MS) and stainless steel (SS) Type 304L (UNS S30403) electrodes immersed in four different solutions. The obtained results were converted into corrosion rate and finally compared with data measured with linear polarization resistance (LRP) and mass loss techniques. Electrochemical noise (EN) techniques had better agreement with other techniques in high corrosion rates. Furthermore, dispersed results were measured in low-activity systems.

Brusamarello, V.; Lago, A.; Franco, C.V.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Bounding the mass of the graviton using binary pulsar observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The close agreement between the predictions of dynamical general relativity for the radiated power of a compact binary system and the observed orbital decay of the binary pulsars PSR B1913+16 and PSR B1534+12 allows us to bound the graviton mass to be less than 7.6 x 10^{-20} eV with 90% confidence. This bound is the first to be obtained from dynamic, as opposed to static-field, relativity. The resulting limit on the graviton mass is within two orders of magnitude of that from solar system measurements, and can be expected to improve with further observations.

Lee Samuel Finn; Patrick J. Sutton

2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

387

A search for an additional neutrino mass eigenstate in 2 to 100 eV region from "Troitsk nu-mass" data - detailed analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present the details of our previously published results for a search for an additional neutrino mass state in $\\beta$-electron spectrum from the Troitsk nu-mass experiment. Here we present steps of the analysis, show a set of likelihood functions obtained for each additional heavy mass value. We demonstrate how systematic errors were estimated. We also compare our results with those published recently for a similar analysis for Mainz data and try to explain why there is a factor of 2-3 difference in the sensitivity for an additional heavy mass.

A. I. Belesev; A. I. Berlev; E. V. Geraskin; A. A. Golubev; N. A. Likhovid; A. A. Nozik; V. S. Pantuev; V. I. Parfenov; A. K. Skasyrskaya

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

388

Convergent ablator performance measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile {rho}(r) and effective backlighter profile I{sub 0}(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that {rho}(r) is localized in radius space and I{sub 0}(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of {rho}(r) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Olson, R. E. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Neutrino mass hierarchy determination and other physics potential of medium-baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medium-baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiments (MBRO) have been proposed to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH) and to make precise measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters. With sufficient statistics, better than ~3%/\\sqrt{E} energy resolution and well understood energy non-linearity, MH can be determined by analyzing oscillation signals driven by the atmospheric mass-squared difference in the survival spectrum of reactor antineutrinos. With such high performance MBRO detectors, oscillation parameters, such as \\sin^22\\theta_{12}, \\Delta m^2_{21}, and \\Delta m^2_{32}, can be measured to sub-percent level, which enables a future test of the PMNS matrix unitarity to ~1% level and helps the forthcoming neutrinoless double beta decay experiments to constrain the allowed values. Combined with results from the next generation long-baseline beam neutrino and atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments, the MH determination sensitivity can reach higher levels. In addition to the neutrino oscillation physics, MBRO detectors can also be utilized to study geoneutrinos, astrophysical neutrinos and proton decay. We propose to start a U.S. R&D program to identify, quantify and fulfill the key challenges essential for the success of MBRO experiments.

A. B. Balantekin; H. Band; R. Betts; J. J. Cherwinka; J. A. Detwiler; S. Dye; K. M. Heeger; R. Johnson; S. H. Kettell; K. Lau; J. G. Learned; C. J. Lin; J. J. Ling; B. Littlejohn; D. W. Liu; K. B. Luk; J. Maricic; K. McDonald; R. D. McKeown; J. Napolitano; J. C. Peng; X. Qian; N. Tolich; W. Wang; C. White; M. Yeh; C. Zhang; T. Zhao

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

Electrical resistance measurements of highly inhibited SiC coated carbon-carbon laminates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of oxidation damage at 900'C of highly inhibited, SiC coated carbon-carbon laminates on shear modulus, mass loss, and electrical resistance are studied. The approach taken enabled the interpretation of the shear modulus and electrical resistance values to the mass loss. In-situ electrical resistance measurements are taken at 900'C and shear modulus measurements are obtained at room temperature prior to and following oxidation. Initial oxidation damage is incurred preferentially along both transverse and longitudinal fiber bundles as well as creating some matrix cracks. Mass loss results revealed that the oxidation reaction is diffusion controlled at this temperature. The shear modulus decreased whereas the electrical resistance increased with increasing exposure time. Electrical resistance calculations based on the experimental results showed that the electrical resistance is a matrix dominated property. The analytical simulations used in conjunction with experimental data provided the relationships between shear modulus, electrical resistance, and mass loss. Examples are given which show the correlation of mass loss to both the electrical resistance and the shear modulus. Analytical predictions from the electrical resistance simulations are shown to predict the shear modulus for different oxidation times within 5% of experimental values.

Parker, Paul Albert

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

length measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A greased steel surface coming in contact with newspaper, wrapping paper ... on Measurement and Inspection in Industry by Computer Aided Laser ...

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

392

Impedance measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... no means of measuring or monitoring the oven's ... Services at ambient conditions outside these limits are ... Service for Voltage Transformers and High ...

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

393

Hadron Mass Extraction from Lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extraction of quantities from lattice QCD calculations at realistic quark masses is of considerable importance. Whilst physical quark masses are some way off, the recent advances in the calculation of hadron masses within full QCD now invite improved extrapolation methods. We show that, provided the correct chiral behaviour of QCD is respected in the extrapolation to realistic quark masses, one can indeed obtain a fairly reliable determination of masses, the sigma commutator and the J parameter. We summarise these findings by presenting the nonanalytic behaviour of nucleon and rho masses in the standard Edinburgh plot.

S. V. Wright; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; K. Tsushima

2001-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

394

Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical characterizations of atmospheric aerosols is a serious analytical challenge because of the complexity of particulate matter analyte composed of a large number of compounds with a wide range of molecular structures, physico-chemical properties, and reactivity. In this study chemical composition of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) samples is characterized by high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). Accurate mass measurement combined with Kendrick analysis allowed us to assign elemental composition for hundreds of compounds in the range of m/z values of 50-1000. ESI/MS spectra of different BBOA samples contain a variety of distinct, sample specific, characteristic peaks that can be used as unique markers for different types of biofuels. Our results indicate that a significant number of high-MW organic compounds in BBOA samples are highly oxidized polar species that can be efficiently detected using ESI/MS but are difficult to observe using the conventional GCMS analysis of aerosol samples. The average O:C ratios obtained for each of the BBOA samples studied in this work are in a strikingly good agreement with the previously reported values obtained using STXM/NEXAFS. The degree of unsaturation of detected organic compounds shows a clear decrease with increase in the molecular weight of the anyalyte molecules. The decrease is particularly pronounced for the samples containing a large number of CH2-based homologous series.

Smith, Jeffrey S.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

395

2012 Update of the Combination of CDF and D0 Results for the Mass of the W Boson  

SciTech Connect

We summarize and combine the results on the direct measurements of the mass of the W boson in data collected by the Tevatron experiments CDF and D0 at Fermilab. Earlier results from CDF Run-0 (1988-1989), D0 and CDF Run-I (1992-1995) and D0 results from 1 fb{sup -1} (2002-2006) of Run-II data are now combined with two new, high statistics Run-II measurements: a CDF measurement in both electron and muon channels using 2.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected between 2002 and 2007, and a D0 measurement in the electron channel using 4.3 fb{sup -1} collected between 2006 and 2009. As in previous combinations, the results are corrected for inconsistencies in parton distribution functions and assumptions about electroweak parameters used in the different analyses. The resulting Tevatron average for the mass of the W boson is M{sub W} = 80,387 {+-} 16 MeV and a new world average including data from LEP II is M{sub W} = 80,385 {+-} 15 MeV.

Tevatron Electroweak Working Group,

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF THE LOW-MASS ECLIPSING BINARY NSVS 02502726  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NSVS 02502726 has been known as a double-lined, detached eclipsing binary that consists of two low-mass stars. We obtained BVRI photometric follow-up observations in 2009 and 2011 to measure improved physical properties of the binary star. Each set of light curves, including the 2008 data given by Cakirli et al., was simultaneously analyzed with the previously published radial velocity curves using the Wilson-Devinney binary code. The conspicuous seasonal light variations of the system are satisfactorily modeled by a two-spot model with one starspot on each component and by changes of the spot parameters with time. Based on 23 eclipse timings calculated from the synthetic model and one ephemeris epoch, an orbital period study of NSVS 02502726 reveals that the period has experienced a continuous decrease of -5.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} day yr{sup -1} or a sinusoidal variation with a period and semi-amplitude of 2.51 yr and 0.0011 days, respectively. The timing variations could be interpreted as either the light-travel-time effect due to the presence of an unseen third body, or as the combination of this effect and angular momentum loss via magnetic stellar wind braking. Individual masses and radii of both components are determined to be M{sub 1} = 0.689 {+-} 0.016 M{sub Sun }, M{sub 2} = 0.341 {+-} 0.009 M{sub Sun }, R{sub 1} = 0.707 {+-} 0.007 R{sub Sun }, and R{sub 2} = 0.657 {+-} 0.008 R{sub Sun }. The results are very different from those of Cakirli et al. with the primary's radius (0.674 {+-} 0.006 R{sub Sun }) smaller the secondary's (0.763 {+-} 0.007 R{sub Sun }). We compared the physical parameters presented in this paper with current low-mass stellar models and found that the measured values of the primary star are best fitted to a 79 Myr isochrone. The primary is in good agreement with the empirical mass-radius relation from low-mass binaries, but the secondary is oversized by about 85%.

Lee, Jae Woo; Youn, Jae-Hyuck; Kim, Seung-Lee; Lee, Chung-Uk, E-mail: jwlee@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: jhyoon@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: slkim@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: leecu@kasi.re.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Electromagnetic Nature of Thermo-Mechanical Mass-Energy Transfer Due to Photon Diffusive Re-Emission and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mass-transfer trough material systems involved, from a mass-energy source to a sink system. Otherwise- contact" diffusive re-emission and propagation) and commensurate mass-transfer trough material systems conduction theory (parabolic difference equation), allowing infinite speed of thermal energy propagation (i

Kostic, Milivoje M.

398

Single Cell Analysis Using Microfluidics Coupled to Ultrasensitive Mass Spectrometry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cell Analysis Using Microfluidics Coupled to Ultrasensitive Mass Cell Analysis Using Microfluidics Coupled to Ultrasensitive Mass Spectrometry PI Ryan Kelly, EMSL Co-investigators Xuefei Sun, FCSD, Bryan Linggi, EMSL, Keqi Tang, FCSD Proteomics and metabolomics measurements in their present form require large populations of cells and thus average over and obscure important heterogeneity that is present even in clonal populations cultivated under highly controlled conditions. For "real world" samples, this means that important but rare events go undetected, and the effects of stochastic expression and the microenvironment are blurred. The objective of this proposal is to combine microfluidic sample preparation and separations with the ultrasensitive mass spectrometry (MS) capability located in the EMSL to extend proteomic and

399

Quark mass variation constraints from Big Bang nucleosynthesis  

SciTech Connect

We study the impact on the primordial abundances of light elements created of a variation of the quark masses at the time of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). In order to navigate through the particle and nuclear physics required to connect quark masses to binding energies and reaction rates in a model-independent way we use lattice QCD data and an hierarchy of effective field theories. We find that the measured {sup 4}He abundances put a bound of {delta}-1% {approx}< m{sub q}/m{sub 1} {approx}< 0.7%. The effect of quark mass variations on the deuterium abundances can be largely compensated by changes of the baryon-to-photon ratio {eta}. Including the bounds on the variation of {eta} coming from WMAP results and some additional assumptions narrows the range of allowed values of {delta}m{sub q}/m{sub q} somewhat.

Bedaque, P; Luu, T; Platter, L

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

400

Heat and mass transfer analysis of a desiccant dehumidifier matrix  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the SERI Single-Blow Test Facility's design, fabrication, and testing for characterizing desiccant dehumidifiers for solar cooling applications. The first test article, a silica-gel parallel-plate dehumidifier with highly uniform passages, was designed and fabricated. Transient heat and mass transfer data and pressure drop data across the dehumidifier were obtained. Available heat and mass transfer models were extended to the parallel-place geometry, and the experimental data were compared with model predictions. Pressure drop measurements were also compared with model predictions of the fully developed laminar flow theory. The comparisons between the lumped-capacitance model and the experimental data were satisfactory. The pressure drop data compared satisfactorily with the theory (within 15%). A solid-side resistance model that is more detailed and does not assume symmetrical diffusion in particles was recommended for performance. This study has increased our understanding of the heat and mass transfer in silica gel parallel-plate dehumidifiers.

Pesaran, A.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Quantitative and qualitative measures of decomposition: Is there a link?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decomposition rates of loblolly pine coarse woody debris (CWD) were determined by mass loss and wood density changes for trees that differed in source of mortality (natural, girdle-poison, and felling). Specifically, three treatments were examined: (1) control (CON): natural mortality; (2) CD: 5-fold increase in CWD compared with the CON; and (3) CS: 12-fold increase in snags compared with the CON. The additional CWD in the CD treatment plots and the additional snags in the CS plots were achieved by felling (for the CD plots) or girdling followed by herbicide injection (for the CS plots) select trees in these plots. Consequently,mortality on the CD plots is due to natural causes and felling. Likewise, mortality on the CS plots is due to natural causes and girdle-poison. In each treatment plot, mortality due to natural causes was inventoried since 1997, whereas mortality due to girdle-poison and felling were inventoried since 2001. No significant difference was detected between the rates of decomposition for the CWD on these treatment plots, indicating that source of the tree mortality did not influence rates of decomposition once the tree fell. These experimental measures of decomposition were compared with two decay classification systems (three- and five-unit classifications) to determine linkages. Changes in wood density did not correlate to any decay classification, whereas mass loss had a weak correlation with decay class. However, the large degree of variation limits the utility of decay classification systems in estimating mass loss.

Eaton, Robert, J.; Sanchez, Felipe, G.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Discrete symmetries and neutrino masses  

SciTech Connect

We constructed a model of neutrino masses using Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism with U(1)xZ{sub 3}xZ{sub 2} flavor symmetry. The model predicts that (2/3)m{sub 2}/m{sub 3}{approx}{radical}(2)sin{theta}{sub 13} at lepton number violating scale M{sub 1}. It is shown that the small values for m{sub 2}/m{sub 3} and sin{theta}{sub 13} are consequences of breaking discrete symmetries.

Siyeon, Kim [Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Quark masses : an environmental impact statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how the requirement that organic chemistry be possible constrains the values of the quark masses. Specifically, we choose a slice through the parameter space of the Standard Model in which quark masses vary ...

Kimchi, Itamar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A Global Diagnostic of Interocean Mass Transfers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective and quantitative estimate of all mean annual interocean mass transfers together with a picture of the associated mean pathways is presented. The global ocean circulation transfers mass, heat, and salinity between the various ocean ...

B. Blanke; S. Speich; G. Madec; K. Ds

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

What are the exact relative masses of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to one another, it doesn't tell you what the actual masses of these particles are. In kilograms, the masses are: Neutron 1.6749286*10-27 kg Proton 1.6726231*10-27 kg Electron ...

406

Nuclear mass systematics by complementing the Finite Range Droplet Model with neural networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A neural-network model is developed to reproduce the differences between experimental nuclear mass-excess values and the theoretical values given by the Finite Range Droplet Model. The results point to the existence of subtle regularities of nuclear structure not yet contained in the best microscopic/phenomenological models of atomic masses. Combining the FRDM and the neural-network model, we create a hybrid model with improved predictive performance on nuclear-mass systematics and related quantities.

S. Athanassopoulos; E. Mavrommatis; K. A. Gernoth; J. W. Clark

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

Coefficients and terms of the liquid drop model and mass formula  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coefficients of different combinations of terms of the liquid drop model have been determined by a least square fitting procedure to the experimental atomic masses. The nuclear masses can also be reproduced using a Coulomb radius taking into account the increase of the ratio $R\\_0/A^{1/3}$ with increasing mass, the fitted surface energy coefficient remaining around 18 MeV.

G. Royer; C. Gautier

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

408

EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES WELDON SPRING SITE February 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management FINAL: ESD Weldon Spring Site February 2005 1 EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES WELDON SPRING SITE I Introduction This document is an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) for three Records of Decision (RODs) for the Weldon Spring site located in St. Charles County, Missouri. These RODs were signed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RODs addressed by this ESD are the following: * Chemical Plant Operable Unit (CPOU) ROD, signed in September 1993. This ROD

409

AC-DC Difference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The NIST ac-dc Difference Project provides US industry with the essential link between ac ... Facilities/Tools Used: ... NIST CNST Nanofabrication facility. ...

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

410

Experimental Requirements to Determine the Neutrino Mass Hierarchy Using Reactor Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents experimental requirements to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy using reactor neutrinos. The detector shall be located at a baseline around 58 km from the reactor(s) to measure the energy spectrum of electron antineutrinos ($\\bar{\

Liang Zhan; Yifang Wang; Jun Cao; Liangjian Wen

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

411

A study of the formation of cluster ions from metal acetates using plasma desorption mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel application of desorption/ionization methods of mass spectrometry, e. g. plasma desorption mass spectrometry (PDMS), is the analysis of both the composition and structure of solid materials in one experiment. Cluster ions emitted from the impact of a 252Cf fission fragment on a surface may represent a "view" of the solid construction over atomic distances if composed of atoms from adjacent sites in the surface. A clearer understanding of the mechanism of secondary cluster ion formation is necessary to evaluate the usefulness of PDMS as a surface characterization technique. The aim of this research was to use metal acetate samples to study secondary cluster ion formation in PDMS. In two sets of experiments, metal acetates from period IV and group IIB of the periodic table were used to measure the influence on cluster formation by the ground state electronic configuration and the ionic size, respectively, of the metal constituent. Relative yields for homologous negative and positive secondary cluster ions were determined and compared to thermochemical properties of the metal ion or the metal acetate molecule (AHf and lattice energy). Secondary ions in negative PDMS mass spectra attributable to a gas phase recombination formation mechanism follow trends predicted by these thermochemical properties. Another series of cluster ions, however, with the composition [M(Ac)2]Ac-(where Ac = acetate) does not follow the same trends, indicating possible formation via intact emission from the solid surface. Positive secondary cluster ions showed differences from the negative ions both in the relative yield distribution and the types of ions observed. Positive cluster ions from metal acetates from the fourth period of the periodic table were mainly metal oxides. On the other hand, positive clusters ions from the group IIB of the periodic table were mainly mirror images of the negative spectra. These differences suggest that the bonding characteristics of the metal ion play an important role in the secondary cluster ion formation process.

Mendez Silvagnoli, Winston Reinaldo

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: Extreme Sensitivity in Biological ...  

THE LLNL TECHNOLOGY COMPANY PRODUCT 24 Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: Extreme Sensitivity in Biological Research

413

MEASURING PROJECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiautomatic measuring projector particularly adapted for measurement of the coordinates of photographic images of particle tracks as prcduced in a bubble or cloud chamber is presented. A viewing screen aids the operator in selecting a particle track for measurement. After approximate manual alignment, an image scanning system coupled to a servo control provides automatic exact alignment of a track image with a reference point. The apparatus can follow along a track with a continuous motion while recording coordinate data at various selected points along the track. The coordinate data is recorded on punched cards for subsequent computer calculation of particle trajectory, momentum, etc.

Franck, J.V.; Broadhead, P.S.; Skiff, E.W.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

In situ measurement system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

Lord, D.E.

1980-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

415

The conservation of mass-moment parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study a concept of mass-moment parameter which is the generalization of the mass and the moments of inertia of a continuous media. We shall present some interesting kinematical results in the hypothesis that a set of mass-moment parameters are conserved in a motion of a continuous media.

Dan Comanescu

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

416

Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

Chastagner, P.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e Nice - Sophia Antipolis & Institut Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M be a smooth connected compact surface in Rn of the lengths of the curves (drawn on M) joining x to y. Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12

Rifford, Ludovic

418

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M be a smooth connected compact surface), as the minimum of the lengths of the curves (drawn on M) joining x to y. Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation

Rifford, Ludovic

419

Eliminating the low-mass axigluon window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using recent collider data, especially on the hadronic width the Z0, we exclude axigluons in the currently allowed low-mass window, namely axigluons in the mass range 50 GeV < M_A < 120 GeV. Combined with hadron collider data from di-jet production, axigluons with masses below roughly 1 TeV are now completely excluded.

M. A. Doncheski; R. W. Robinett

1998-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

420

Age and mass of solar twins constrained by lithium abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims. We analyze the non-standard mixing history of the solar twins HIP 55459, HIP 79672, HIP 56948, HIP 73815 and HIP 100963, in order to determine as precisely as possible their mass and age. Methods. We computed a grid of evolutionary models with non-standard mixing at given metallicities with the Toulouse-Geneva code for a range of stellar masses assuming an error bar of +- 50K in Teff. We choose the evolutionary model that best fit the observed low lithium abundances observed in the solar twins. Results. Our best model for each solar twin provides a mass and age solution constrained by their Li content and Teff determination. HIP 56948 is the best solar twin at the present time and our analysis gives a mass of 0.994 +- 0.004 Msun and an age of 4.71 +- 1.39 Gyr. Conclusions. Non-standard mixing is required to explain the low Li abundances observed in solar-twins. Li depletion due to the additional mixing in solar-twins is strongly mass dependent. An accurate lithium abundance measurement connected with no...

Nascimento, J D do; Melendez, J; Bazot, M; Thado, S; de Mello, G F Porto; De Medeiros, J R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass difference measurements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.