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1

ARM - Field Campaign - 2005 MASE-MArine Stratus Experiment-Pt...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(CAS) Order Data Senum Cloud Aerosol Precip Spectrometer(CAPS)Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP) Order Data Wang Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter Order Data Wang Tandem Differential...

2

ARM - Field Campaign - MArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsMArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP govCampaignsMArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP Campaign Links Science Plan AMF Point Reyes Website AMF Point Reyes Data Plots Related Campaigns MASRAD: Pt. Reyes Stratus Cloud and Drizzle Study 2005.07.07, Coulter, AMF MASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry Measurements 2005.07.01, Berkowitz, AMF MASRAD - Aerosol Optical Properties 2005.06.29, Strawa, AMF MASRAD:Sub-Micron Aerosol Measurements 2005.06.20, Wang, AMF MASRAD: Cloud Study from the 2NFOV at Pt. Reyes Field Campaign 2005.06.02, Wiscombe, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : MArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP 2005.03.14 - 2005.09.14 Website : http://www.arm.gov/sites/amf/pye/ Lead Scientist : Mark Miller

3

Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences and Relationship to Adiabacity Kim, Byung-Gon Kangnung National University Schwartz, Stephen Brookhaven National Laboratory Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Category: Cloud Properties The microphysical properties of continental stratus clouds observed over SGP appear to be substantially influenced by micrometeorological conditions, such as static stability and updraft velocity. These influences may contribute to the observed weak correlation of aerosol light scattering coefficient with cloud-drop effective radius [Kim et al., JGR, 2003], although aerosol light scattering coefficient is not necessarily the most suitable surrogate aerosol property for number concentration of cloud

4

Upper-Ocean Processes under the Stratus Cloud Deck in the Southeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The annual mean heat budget of the upper ocean beneath the stratocumulus/stratus cloud deck in the southeast Pacific is estimated using Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) and an eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). Both are ...

Yangxing Zheng; George N. Kiladis; Toshiaki Shinoda; E. Joseph Metzger; Harley E. Hurlburt; Jialin Lin; Benjamin S. Giese

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

A Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Gijs de Boer, Edwin W. Eloranta, Tempei Hashino, and Gregory J. Tripoli The University of Wisconsin - Madison (1) Introduction Ice formation appears to a dominant factor controlling the lifecycle of Arctic mixed-phase clouds. To date, our understanding of ice formation in these long-lasting cloud structures does not explain the formation of observed ice amounts. Particularly puzzling are observa-

6

Radiative Impacts on the Growth of a Population of Drops within Simulated Summertime Arctic Stratus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of solar heating and infrared cooling on the growth of a population of drops is studied with two numerical modeling frameworks. An eddy-resolving model (ERM) simulation of Arctic stratus clouds is used to generate a dataset of 500 ...

Jerry Y. Harrington; Graham Feingold; William R. Cotton

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Analysis of Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis of Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog Analysis of Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National Laboratory Bartholomew, Mary Jane Brookhaven National Laboratory Daum, Peter Brookhaven National Laboratory Dunn, Maureen Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Liu, Yangang Brookhaven National Laboratory Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory Andrews, Betsy NOAA/CMDL Ogren, John NOAA/CMDL Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Field Campaigns Impacts of aerosol indirect effects are considered too uncertain for inclusion in reports issued by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. A major reason for this uncertainty is an insufficient physical

8

Effects of aerosol and horizontal inhomogeneity on the broadband albedo of marine stratus: Numerical simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent estimates of the effect of increasing of anthropogenic sulfate aerosol on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere have indicated that its impact may be comparable in magnitude to the effect from increases in CO{sub 2}. Much of this impact is expected from the effects of the aerosol on cloud microphysics and the subsequent impact on cloud albedo. A solar broadband version of a 2D radiative transfer model was used to quantify the impact of enhanced aerosol concentrations and horizontal inhomogeneity on the solar broadband albedo of marine stratus. The results of the radiative transfer calculations indicated that in unbroken marine stratus clouds the net horizontal transport of photons over a domain of a few kilometers was nearly zero, and the domain-average broadband albedo computed in a 2D cross section was nearly identical to the domain average calculated from a series of independent pixel approximation (IPA) calculations of the same cross section. However, the horizontal inhomogeneity does affect the cloud albedo compared to plane-parallel approximation (PPA) computations due to the nonlinear relationship between albedo and optical depth. The reduction in cloud albedo could be related to the variability of the distribution of log (cloud optical depth). These results extend the finding of Cahalan et al. to broadband solar albedos in a more realistic cloud model and suggest that accurate computation of domain-averaged broadband albedos in unbroken (or nearly unbroken) marine stratus can be made using IPA calculations with 1D radiative transfer models. Computations of the mean albedo over portions of the 3D RAMS domain show the relative increase in cloud albedo due to a 67% increase in the boundary-layer average CCN concentration was between 6% and 9%. The effects of cloud inhomogeneity on the broadband albedo as measured from the PPA bias ranged from 3% to 5%. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Duda, D.P.; Stephens, G.L.; Stevens, B.; Cotton, W.R. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)] [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1996-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Equations Governing Space-Time Variability of Liquid Water Path in Stratus Clouds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Equations Governing Space-Time Variability of Equations Governing Space-Time Variability of Liquid Water Path in Stratus Clouds K. Ivanova Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington M. Ausloos University of Liège B-4000 Liège, Belgium Abstract We present a method on how to derive an underlying mathematical (statistical or model free) equation for a liquid water path (LWP) signal directly from empirical data. The evolution of the probability density functions (PDFs) from small to large time scales is explicitly derived in the framework of Fokker-Planck equation. A drift and a diffusion term describing the deterministic and stochastic influences on the non-Gaussian fat tails of the liquid water probability distributions are obtained from

10

Forecast-Based Decision Support for San Francisco International Airport: A NextGen Prototype System That Improves Operations during Summer Stratus Season  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During summer, marine stratus encroaches into the approach to San Francisco International Airport (SFO) bringing low ceilings. Low ceilings restrict landings and result in a high number of arrival delays, thus impacting ...

Reynolds, David W.

11

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Point Reyes, California for the Marine Stratus, Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) Project  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Point Reyes National Seashore, on the California coast north of San Francisco, was the location of the first deployment of the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The ARM Program collaborated with the U.S. Office of Naval Research and DOE's Aerosol Science Program in the Marine Stratus, Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) project. Their objectives were to collect data from cloud/aerosol interactions and to improve understanding of cloud organization that is often associated with patches of drizzle. Between March and September 2005, the AMF and at least two research aircraft were used to collect data.

12

A 25-month database of stratus cloud properties generated from ground-based measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 25-month database of the macrophysical, microphysical, and radiative properties of isolated and overcast low-level stratus clouds has been generated using a newly developed parameterization and surface measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement central facility in Oklahoma. The database (5-min resolution) includes two parts: measurements and retrievals. The former consist of cloud base and top heights, layer-mean temperature, cloud liquid water path, and solar transmission ratio measured by a ground-based lidar/ceilometer and radar pair, radiosondes, a microwave radiometer, and a standard Eppley precision spectral pyranometer, respectively. The retrievals include the cloud-droplet effective radius and number concentration and broadband shortwave optical depth and cloud and top-of-atmosphere albedos. Stratus without any overlying mid or high-level clouds occurred most frequently during winter and least often during summer. Mean cloud-layer altitudes and geometric thicknesses were higher and greater, respectively, in summer than in winter. Both quantities are positively correlated with the cloud-layer mean temperature. Mean cloud-droplet effective radii range from 8.1 {mu}m in winter to 9.7 {mu}m during summer, while cloud-droplet number concentrations during winter are nearly twice those in summer. Since cloud liquid water paths are almost the same in both seasons, cloud optical depth is higher during the winter, leading to greater cloud albedos and lower cloud transmittances. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

Dong, Xiquan [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)] [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States); Minnis, Patrick [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia (United States)] [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia (United States); Ackerman, Thomas P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, DOE, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, DOE, Richland, Washington (United States); Clothiaux, Eugene E. [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States)] [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States); Mace, Gerald G. [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)] [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States); Long, Charles N. [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States)] [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States); Liljegren, James C. [Ames Laboratory, DOE, Ames, Iowa (United States)] [Ames Laboratory, DOE, Ames, Iowa (United States)

2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

13

Stratus Cloud Drizzle Retrieval During SHEBA from MMCR Doppler...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

when the updrafts and downdrafts are averaged out. The second contribution is the effect of turbulence on the spread of the Doppler spectrum. Both of these contributions...

14

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

15

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

Mechanical Engineering Student Access Machine Shop Stratus Dimensions Fused Deposition Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.00 percubicinchforthemodelmaterials. #12;Other useful information: OVERVIEW: FDM or 3D printing is a form of additive

Keaveny, Tony

17

Z .Atmospheric Research 51 1999 4575 Cloud resolving simulations of Arctic stratus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the evolution of the simulated mixed-phase ASC layer are studied. Cloud layers either collapse through rapid glaciation and ice precipitation from the cloud layer or maintain a quasi-steady state. Sensitivity studies show that the stability of the mixed-phase cloud layer is dependent upon the temperature, ice

Harrington, Jerry Y.

18

CONTINENTAL LIQUID-PHASE STRATUS CLOUDS AT SGP: METEOROLOGICAL INFLUENCES AND RELATIONSHIP TO ADIABACITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of New York at Albany For Presentation at the ARM Science Team Meeting, Albuquerque, NM March 27-31, 2006, such as static stability and updraft velocity. These influences may contribute to the observed weak correlation with entrainment processes around cloud top. These processes would be expected to decrease the amount of column

19

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol-stratus cloud parameterization...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GCMs Clouds challenge both the grid resolution and physical parameterizations... (greenhouse effect dominates) - Low clouds cool (shading effect ... Source: Ackerman, Thomas P. -...

20

Cloud climatology at the Southern Great Plains and the layer structure, drizzle, and atmospheric modes of continental stratus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with other data sets, climate-scale relation- ships between cloud properties and dynamical or micro- physical of cloud layers, an issue that is important in calculating both the radiative and the hydro- logic effects

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mase-marine stratus experiment-pt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud and aerosol data acquired by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Convair-580 aircraft in, above, and below single-layer arctic stratocumulus cloud during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 were used to test three aerosol indirect effects hypothesized to act in mixed-phase clouds: the riming indirect effect, the glaciation indirect effect, and the cold second indirect effect. The data showed a correlation of R= 0.75 between liquid drop number concentration, Nliq, inside cloud and ambient aerosol number concentration NPCASP below cloud. This, combined with increasing liquid water content LWC with height above cloud base and the nearly constant profile of Nliq, suggested that liquid drops were nucleated from aerosol at cloud base. No strong evidence of a riming indirect effect was observed, but a strong correlation of R = 0.69 between ice crystal number concentration Ni and NPCASP above cloud was noted. Increases in ice nuclei (IN) concentration with NPCASP above cloud combined with the subadiabatic LWC profiles suggest possible mixing of IN from cloud top consistent with the glaciation indirect effect. The higher Nice and lower effective radius rel for the more polluted ISDAC cases compared to data collected in cleaner single-layer stratocumulus conditions during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment is consistent with the operation of the cold second indirect effect. However, more data in a wider variety of meteorological and surface conditions, with greater variations in aerosol forcing, are required to identify the dominant aerosol forcing mechanisms in mixed-phase arctic clouds.

Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg; Korolev, Alexei; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Lawson, R. P.; Brooks, Sarah D.; Wolde, Mengistu; Laskin, Alexander; Freer, Matthew

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

22

DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study Kristen Powers powers:................................................................................................................... 13 Calculation of Sensor Reaching Radiance Truth Values for Cloudless & Stratus Cloud Scenes and Atmospheric Database Creation for Stratus Cloud Scene & Calculation of Associated Sensor Reaching Radiance

Salvaggio, Carl

23

Surface Heat Flux Response to SST Anomalies: CCSM3.5+ vs Observation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macrophysics · Update cloud fraction after macrophysics Reduce high-latitude LCA and land temperature biases Stratus · Overlap · In-cumulus LWC = In-stratus LWC · Non-overlap · In-cumulus LWC In-stratus LWC #12;LCA. CAM Macro LCA. CAM ­ Obs. LCA. Observation LCA. Revised ­ CAM The revised macrophysics exactly offsets

24

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(Nb), cumulus (Cu), stratocumulus (Sc) and stratus (St). Operational Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models now routinely use explicit deep convection, so that all...

25

Microsoft PowerPoint - ARM08_hguo_080229.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface Turbulence * near Point Reyes, CA * on 19 July, 2005, a stratus deck over Pacific Ocean * comprehensive airborne observations available 7. Power spectra 6. Time series 4....

26

Microsoft PowerPoint - poster for ARM 2007 5  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

process in single-layer arctic stratus during MPACE process in single-layer arctic stratus during MPACE Gong Zhang 1 , Greg McFarquhar 1 , Johannes Verlinde 2 , Michael Poellot 3 , Greg Kok 4 , Edwin Eloranta 5 , Paul DeMott 6 , Tony Prenni 6 and Andrew Heymsfield 7 1 University of Illinois 2 Pennsylvania State University 3 University of North Dakota 4 Droplet Measurement Technologies 5 University of Wisconsin 6 Colorado State University 7 National Center for Atmospheric Research 1 Arctic boundary single-layer stratus 2 Vertical cloud structure 5. Acknowledgments This research was supported by DOE ARM under contract number DE-FG02-00ER62913. FIG 1 Backscatter intensity and depolarization ratio measured by Wisconsin HSRL Lidar in Barrow, AK. During MPACE, single- layer arctic stratus was observed from Oct 09 2004 to Oct 12 2004.

27

Austin(2)-RT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stratus Sensing in the CloudSat Antecedent Stratus Sensing in the CloudSat Antecedent Validation Experiment (CAVEX99) R. T. Austin, G. L. Stephens, R. F. McCoy, Jr., R. B. McCoy, and S. D. Miller Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado S. M. Sekelsky Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts Introduction The CloudSat Antecedent Validation Experiment (CAVEX99) was one component of the Monterey Coastal Stratus Experiment (MCSE), a multi-experiment study of maritime stratus conducted off the Pacific coast near Monterey, California, in June and July 1999. MCSE was proposed and organized by Professor Bruce Albrecht of the University of Miami and Professor Qing Wang of the Naval Postgraduate School; it was supported by the Office of Naval Research. CAVEX was proposed as an

28

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

December 3, 2004 [Facility News] December 3, 2004 [Facility News] First Deployment of ARM Mobile Facility to Occur on California Coast Bookmark and Share Image - Point Reyes Beach Image - Point Reyes Beach Point Reyes National Seashore, on the California coast north of San Francisco, has been identified as the official location for the first deployment of the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). As part of a 6-month field campaign beginning in March 2005 to study the microphysical characteristics of marine stratus and, in particular, marine stratus drizzle processes, the AMF will provide a mature instrument system to help fill information gaps in the existing limited surveys of marine stratus microphysical structure. Marine stratus clouds are known to be susceptible to the byproducts of fossil fuel consumption, a

29

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stratus Microphysical Parameters Using Radar and Visible Stratus Microphysical Parameters Using Radar and Visible Optical Depth Austin, R.T. and Stephens, G.L., Colorado State University, Fort Collins Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting A new algorithm for the retrieval of stratus cloud microphysical parameters was introduced last year and applied to measurements of maritime stratus clouds off the coast of California. The retrieval has been refined and applied to data from the Southern Great Plains CART site, as well as to the original California marine measurements. The poster will describe these refined results, discuss error analysis of the algorithm, show how the retrieval compares with analogous radar-only retrievals, and discuss other products and benefits of the algorithm's estimation theory formulation

30

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climatology of Stratus Clouds at the SGP: A Radiation Based Study Sengupta, M.(a), Ackerman, T.P.(a), and Clothiaux, E.E.(b), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (a), The...

31

Large-Eddy Observation of Post-Cold-Frontal Continental Stratocumulus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

More studies on the dynamics of marine stratus and stratocumulus clouds have been performed than comparable studies on continental stratocumulus. Therefore, to increase the number of observations of continental stratocumulus ...

Mechem, David B.; Kogan, Yefim L.; Schultz, David M.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

PowerPoint Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog SUMMARY Data from the AMF deployment during MASRAD can be used to directly test the performance of existing cloud droplet nucleation parameterizations in coastal stratus clouds. The example below is a test of Twomey's 1959 parameterization. More sophisticated parameterizations have been formulated and will be tested in a similar manner. 3. Air Mass Source Analysis The HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model (HYSPLIT) was used to identify aerosol source areas and paths taken by aerosols reaching the Pt. Reyes site. A 10-day back trajectory was computed for each radiosonde launch at two starting heights: one 25 meters below the lowest inversion and the second 25 meters above.

33

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of Stratus on Solar Radiation: A Study Using Effect of Stratus on Solar Radiation: A Study Using Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar and Microwave Radiometer Data From the Southern Great Plains M. Sengupta and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington E. E. Clothiaux The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Clouds are important players in the global radiation budget with low-level water clouds being one of the most influential types. Classified as stratocumulus and stratus, these water clouds cover 34% of oceans and 18% of land at any given time (Considine et al. 1997). A 50% plus global coverage, a high albedo when compared to the ocean, and temperatures comparable to the surface causes the low stratiform clouds to provide about 60% of the annually averaged net cloud radiative forcing (Hartmann et al.

34

gottschalck(1)-99  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Macroscopic Cloud and Boundary Layer Properties for Macroscopic Cloud and Boundary Layer Properties for Continental Stratus at the SGP CART Site During 1997 J. C. Gottschalck and B. A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida Introduction Stratus and stratocumulus clouds are important in the regulation of the earth's radiation budget and thus play an important role in climate over both the land and ocean (Ramanathan et al. 1989). Consequently, there is a great need for accurate boundary layer cloud parameterizations in climate models (Slingo 1990). Therefore, it is necessary that adequate observational data bases exist for both continental and maritime boundary layer clouds. Currently our observational and modeling understanding for marine stratus is much more advanced than that for continental clouds (Albrecht et al. 1988; Albrecht et al.

35

Charge  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM-0501 ARM-0501 Marine Stratus Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) Science Plan June 2005 M.A. Miller Brookhaven National Laboratory Earth System Science Division Upton, New York A. Bucholtz Naval Research Laboratory Monterey, California B. Albrecht and P. Kollias Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Miami, Florida Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research M.A. Miller et al., June 2005, DOE/ER-ARM-0501 Abstract Marine stratus is one of the most prevalent and under sampled cloud types on earth and is an important component of the earth's climate system. Marine stratus is thought to be susceptible to infusions of anthropogenic aerosols that alter in-cloud microphysical processes and is known to

36

frisch-98.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 On Stratus Cloud Liquid Water Profiles from a Cloud Radar and Microwave Radiometer A. S. Frisch and G. Feingold Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere Colorado State University and NOAA-Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado C. W. Fairall NOAA-Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado J. B. Snider Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere Colorado State University Boulder, Colorado Introduction Stratus clouds are important in boundary-layer dynamics and global climate. Most measurements of stratus clouds have been made with aircraft (Slingo et al. 1982a, Slingo et al. 1982b, Nicholls 1987). However, aircraft measure- ments are expensive, and cannot be used for long-term monitoring at a single location. The development of the

37

dong-99.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

25-Month Data Base of Stratus Cloud Properties 25-Month Data Base of Stratus Cloud Properties Generated from Ground-Based Measurements at the ARM SGP Site X. Dong Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis Atmospheric Sciences Division National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T. P. Ackerman, E. E. Clothiaux, and C. N. Long Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania G. G. Mace Meteorology Department University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah J. C. Liljegren Ames Laboratory Ames, Iowa Introduction Boundary layer stratiform clouds are important in the regulation of the earth's radiation budget and play an important role in climate over both land and ocean (Ramanathan et al. 1989). Boundary layer stratus

38

Enhancing Grid Infrastructures with Virtualization and Cloud Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhancing Grid Infrastructures with Virtualization and Cloud Technologies Final Report on Stratus of the distribution for a turnkey private cloud solution aimed at SMEs and a large public deployment by Atos within and Technology Network S.A., SixSq S`arl, Telef´onica In- vestigaci´on y Desarrollo SA, and The Provost Fellows

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

39

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 49254942, 2006 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/6/4925/2006/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bunkering, 2004). During the last 50 years, the world's ocean-going fleet and the ships' total fuel. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Impact of ship emissions on the microphysical, optical and radiative properties of marine stratus: a case study M. Schreier

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

40

Marine cloud brightening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...will not be as effective in marine stratocumulus clouds that are...Engineering steps to implement marine cloud brightening (a) Introduction...brightening by increasing the CCN of marine stratus clouds (by way of...vessel and the optimum means of propulsion. In fact, both these aspects...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mase-marine stratus experiment-pt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT COMPENSATION CEC5002013114 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Stratus Consulting Inc. #12-04-025 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Joe O'Hagan Contract Manager Linda Spiegel Office Manager Energy

42

SIO 217a Atmospheric and Climate Sciences I: Atmospheric Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Radiant Energy. Radiative Transfer. Transport.) 10-Oct W 3 More Transfer Processes 15-Oct M 4 4 Gas. Equation of State. Hydrostatic Equilibrium.) 3-Oct W 2 2.11 First and Second Laws and Characteristics. Precipitation Processes. Radiative Transfer in a Cloudy Atmosphere. Fogs, Stratus

Russell, Lynn

43

Cent. Eur. J. Geosci. 1(4) 2009 443-455 DOI: 10.2478/v10085-009-0031-6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for applications such as estimating offshore wind power and ocean surface fluxes and for offshore wind risk Stratus and Stratocumulus regions Research Article Yanping He School of Earth and Ocean Science assessments. Ocean surface wind speed probability distribution (PDF) is characterized using three-year Quik

He, Yanping

44

zhang(1)-98.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 The Influence of Radiation and Large-Scale Vertical Motion on the Persistence of Arctic Stratus Clouds Q. Zhang and K. Stamnes Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska D. K. Lilly Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies University of Oklahoma Boulder, Oklahoma Introduction Arctic Stratus Clouds (ASCs) are important modulators of local climate, and perhaps even global climate. One of the most significant features of ASC is that they can persist for several days. Nevertheless, the mechanism responsible for their persistence still remains unknown. Several studies have been undertaken to understand the mechanism of the maintenance of the multiple cloud layers. With a one- dimensional (1-D) second-order turbulence closure model,

45

liesvend-98.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Simple, Yet Realistic Model for the Formation of Arctic A Simple, Yet Realistic Model for the Formation of Arctic Stratus Clouds-A Case Study O. Lie-Svendsen Norwegian Defense Research Establishment Kjeller, Norway Q. Zhang, J. Simmons, and K. Stamnes Geophysical Institute University of Alaska, Fairbanks Introduction We have developed a one-dimensional radiative-convective model with detailed cloud microphysics, and used it to study the formation of Arctic Stratus clouds (ASC). The model contains detailed radiative and microphysical modules, and it provides a self-consistent treatment of the interaction between radiative and cloud microphysical processes important for cloud formation. The radiative transfer code is coupled to the microphysics module that has been devel- oped to simulate the detailed cloud droplet activation and

46

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mobile Facility Beta Testing Complete; System Headed to California Seashore Mobile Facility Beta Testing Complete; System Headed to California Seashore Bookmark and Share A key addition to the ARM Climate Research Facility scientific infrastructure is ready to roll...literally. In February, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is being packed up and shipped from Richland, Washington, to the Point Reyes National Seashore north of San Francisco, California. There, it will be reassembled in preparation for its first deployment as part of a 6-month experiment to study the microphysical characteristics of marine stratus clouds, and in particular, marine stratus drizzle processes. Throughout the deployment, the AMF will accommodate aerosol observing equipment for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) researchers co-sponsored by ARM and the DOE Aerosol Science Program.

47

PowerPoint Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coupling Between Oceanic Upwelling and Cloud Coupling Between Oceanic Upwelling and Cloud Coupling Between Oceanic Upwelling and Cloud - - Aerosol Properties Aerosol Properties at the AMF Point Reyes Site at the AMF Point Reyes Site Maureen Dunn , Mike Jensen , Pavlos Kollias , Mark Miller , Peter Daum Mary Jane Bartholomew , David Turner , Elisabeth Andrews and Anne Jefferson Introduction Ground based observations from the MASRAD, Pt. Reyes AMF July 1-Sept 15, 2005 indicate a relationship between coastal marine stratus cloud properties, boundary layer cloud condensation nuclei and the upwelling of cool oceanic waters measured at an offshore NOAA buoy. Cloud Drizzle to CCN Atmosphere to Cloud Upwelling SST to Atmosphere Conclusion Coastal marine stratus clouds increase in thickness as the underlying sea surface

48

X:\ARM_19~1\P225-243.WPD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 Development and Testing of an Aerosol-Stratus Cloud Parameterization Scheme for Middle and High Latitudes P. Q. Olsson, M. P. Meyers, S. Kreidenweis, and W. R. Cotton Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Introduction The aim of this new project is to develop an aerosol/cloud microphysics parameterization of mixed-phase stratus and boundary layer clouds. Our approach is to create, test, and implement a bulk-microphysics/aerosol model using data from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites and large-eddy simulation (LES) explicit bin-resolving aerosol/micro- physics models. The primary objectives of this work are twofold. First, we need the prediction of number con- centrations of activated aerosol which are transferred to the

49

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contrasting Properties of Single-Layer and Multi-Layer Contrasting Properties of Single-Layer and Multi-Layer Arctic Stratus Sampled During the Mixed-Phase Cloud Experiment G. Zhang and G.M. McFarquhar University of Illinois Urbana, Illinois J. Verlinde The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania M. Poellot University of North Dakota Grand Forks, North Dakota A. Heymsfield National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Introduction The microphysical properties of both single-layer and multi-layer Arctic boundary layer stratus sampled during Mixed-Phase Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) are studied. In situ measurements are used to determine how cloud properties, such as phase, size distribution and shape of cloud particles, vary as a function of normalized cloud altitude (Z

50

Microsoft PowerPoint - ARMST2007_mp.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Motions in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Motions in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Matthew D. Shupe a , Pavlos Kollias b , Ola Persson a , Ed Luke b Greg McFarquhar c , Michael Poellot d , Edwin Eloranta e a CIRES - University of Colorado and NOAA/ESRL/PSD, b Brookhaven National Laboratory, c University of Illinois, d University of North Dakota, e University of Wisonsin Mixed-Phase Cloud Properties Air Motions from Doppler Spectra Funded by: ARM Grant DE-FG02-05ER63965 Summary A Conceptual Model relating air motions and microphysics A Doppler Spectrum Small liquid droplets trace vertical air motions Liquid Droplets Ice Particles Correction for spectral broadening W Aircraft comparisons during M-PACE Vertical velocity (W) and turbulent dissipation rates (ε). Retrieval data are mean (symbol) and middle 90% of data (line)

51

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Radiative Properties of Uniform and Broken Stratus: An Observational The Radiative Properties of Uniform and Broken Stratus: An Observational and Modelling Study Utilizing the Independent Column Approximation for Solar Radiative Transfer Clothiaux, E.E., The Pennsylvania State University; Barker, H.W., Atmospheric Environment Service of Canada; Kato, S., Hampton University; Dong, X., Analytical Service and Materials, Inc. Ackerman, T.P., The Pennsylvania State University; Liljegren, J.C., Ames Laboratory Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The Millimeter-Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) has operated continuously at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site since November 11, 1996. As yet, much of the early data has not been calibrated correctly and insect contamination in the boundary layer is

52

zhang(2)-98.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Formation of Arctic Stratus Clouds: Comparison of Model Predictions with Observed Cloud Structure Q. Zhang and K. Stamnes Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska O. Lie-Svendsen Norwegian Defense Research Establishment Kjeller, Norway Introduction The importance of the Arctic region to global climate has been highlighted by the climate modeling results in recent years (e.g., Manabe et al. 1991). Arctic stratus clouds (ASC) are not only one of the most significant regional climate features in the Arctic region, but also have an important influence on global climate. They play an impor- tant role in the vertical transfer of heat, moisture and momen- tum in the Arctic boundary layer. Due to lack of observation, the mechanism for the formation

53

Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds Harrington, Jerry The Pennsylvania State University Category: Modeling Mixed-phase stratus clouds are dominant in the Arctic during much of the year. These clouds typically have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Time scales for the complete glaciation of such clouds (the Bergeron process) are typically computed using the classical mass growth equations for crystals and liquid drops. However, mixed phase arctic stratus have significant infrared cooling and solar heating (during the warm season) rates that can affect the growth of water drops and ice crystals, and therefore the strength of the Bergeron process. To examine the influence of radiative heating and cooling on the Bergeron process, we incorporate a

54

The influence of ice nucleation mode and ice vapor growth on simulation of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The influence of ice nucleation mode and ice vapor growth on simulation of The influence of ice nucleation mode and ice vapor growth on simulation of arctic mixed-phase clouds Avramov, Alexander The Pennsylvania State University Category: Modeling Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic . Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. Previous studies have suggested that this longevity may be due to a paucity of ice nucleating aerosols (ice nuclei, or IN) in the Arctic. Such studies have shown that small changes in IN concentrations can cause large changes in the amount of liquid water within a mixed-phase stratus deck. We use the Regional

55

kollias-98.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 High Resolution Doppler Radar Observations in Continental Stratus Clouds P. Kollias and B. A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida Introduction Vertical mixing is a key factor in determining the macroscopic and microscopic structure of stratus clouds. The vertical velocities resolved from millimeter-wavelength radars can be used to define the turbulence structure within such clouds (Frisch et al. 1995). To illustrate the utility of such radar measurements for studying the turbulence structure of continental stratocumulus clouds, eight continuous hours of 2-second observations from the Doppler Pennsylvania State University (PSU) 94-GHz radar are analyzed. These observations are used to study the temporal evolution of the turbulence structure of the cloud

56

Section 77  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Figure 1. Potential temperature, equivalent Figure 1. Potential temperature, equivalent potential temperature, and saturation equiva- lent potential temperature for a) the decou- pled boundary-layer observed over the ARM SGP site and b) the well-mixed boundary- layer observed over central Pennsylvania. Observational Studies of Continental Stratus-Implications for Modeling B. A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah H. Verlinde and T. P. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site have tremendous potential for providing statistical descriptions of cloud and boundary layer properties associated with continental stratus.

57

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparison of Stratus Cloud Optical Depths Retrieved from Surface and GOES Comparison of Stratus Cloud Optical Depths Retrieved from Surface and GOES Measurements over the SGP ARM Central Facility Dong, X., and Smith, W.L. Jr., Analytical Services and Materials, Inc.; Minnis, P., NASA Langley Research Center Eighth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting For reliable application of satellite datasets in cloud process and single column models, it is important to have a reasonable estimate of the errors in the observed cloud properties. When properly used, ground-based instruments can provide a cloud truth dataset for estimating errors in the satellite products. Data taken during the spring 1994 ARM Intensive Observation Period (IOP), ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE), and SUbsonic Aircraft Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) are

58

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lidar-Based Retrievals of the Microphysical Properties of Lidar-Based Retrievals of the Microphysical Properties of Mixed-Phase Arctic Stratus Clouds and Precipitation G. de Boer and E. Eloranta The University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin Abstract The University of Wisconsin Arctic High Spectral Resolution Lidar has acquired months of continuous measurements in two high Arctic locations. These measurements have been combined with those taken by a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Environmental Technological Laboratory millimeter wave cloud radar to establish a long-range data set of cloud microphysical property retrievals. These properties include effective particle size, number density, and water content. Examples from this data set for arctic stratus are reviewed here, along with the methodology used in the retrievals.

59

frisch(2)-99.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radar/Radiometer Retrievals of Stratus Radar/Radiometer Retrievals of Stratus Cloud Liquid Water Content Profiles with In Situ Measurements by Aircraft A. S. Frisch Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere Colorado State University Boulder, Colorado B. E. Martner National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado I. Djalalova Science Technology Corporation Albuquerque, New Mexico M. R. Poellot Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of North Dakota Grand Forks, North Dakota Introduction Although most meteorological radars lack the sensitivity to detect small cloud droplets, recent advances in millimeter-wave cloud radars provide new opportunities for monitoring the properties of non-precipitating clouds by remote sensing. The problem of retrieving the microphysical features of

60

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January 31, 2005 [Facility News] January 31, 2005 [Facility News] Mobile Facility Beta Testing Complete; System Headed to California Seashore Bookmark and Share A key addition to the ARM Climate Research Facility scientific infrastructure is ready to roll...literally. In February, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is being packed up and shipped from Richland, Washington, to the Point Reyes National Seashore north of San Francisco, California. There, it will be reassembled in preparation for its first deployment as part of a 6-month experiment to study the microphysical characteristics of marine stratus clouds, and in particular, marine stratus drizzle processes. Throughout the deployment, the AMF will accommodate aerosol observing equipment for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mase-marine stratus experiment-pt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation D. Westphal, B. Toon, E. Jensen, S. Kinne, A. Ackerman,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D. Westphal, B. Toon, E. Jensen, S. Kinne, A. Ackerman, D. Westphal, B. Toon, E. Jensen, S. Kinne, A. Ackerman, R. Bergstrom, and A. Walker National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA 94035 Introduction Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program research at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) includes radiative transfer modeling, cirrus cloud microphysics, and stratus cloud modeling. These efforts are designed to provide the basis for improving cloud and radiation parameterizations in our main effort: mesoscale cloud modeling. Radiative transfer modeling is described by Kinne et al. (this meeting); stratus and cirrus cloud modeling efforts are described by Toon et al. (this meeting); and mesoscale modeling is described in this abstract. Cloud Models for ARM optical properties. The last class of model listed in the table

62

Ship-produced cloud line of 13 July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steaming ships can produce long linear cloud lines in regions of fog and broken stratus as well as in marine stratus layers. The lines are not always detected in 0.63 {mu}m satellite images, but are often detected in the corresponding 3.7 {mu}m images because the lines contain smaller and more numerous droplets than the stratus in which they are embedded as deduced by Coakley, et al. and measured by Radke, et al. They postulate cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) from steaming ships produced the more numerous and, hence, smaller cloud droplets. The ship-produced clouds are not always detected in 0.63 {mu}m images because this wavelength is not as sensitive to changes in droplet size as is 3.7 {mu}m. On 13 July 1991 a dramatic, ship-produced cloud line formed offshore of Baja California. The authors present satellite images of the line and corresponding photographs from the R/V EGABRAG III which passed under the line. The images and photos reveal the structure of the line. The EGABRAG was a source of CCN but did not produce a cloud line; they attempt to explain this important finding.

Hindman, E.E. [City Coll. of New York, NY (US); Porch, W.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Hudson, J.G. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (US); Durkee, P.A. [Navel Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (US)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Ship-produced cloud line of 13 July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steaming ships can produce long linear cloud lines in regions of fog and broken stratus as well as in marine stratus layers. The lines are not always detected in 0.63 [mu]m satellite images, but are often detected in the corresponding 3.7 [mu]m images because the lines contain smaller and more numerous droplets than the stratus in which they are embedded as deduced by Coakley, et al. and measured by Radke, et al. They postulate cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) from steaming ships produced the more numerous and, hence, smaller cloud droplets. The ship-produced clouds are not always detected in 0.63 [mu]m images because this wavelength is not as sensitive to changes in droplet size as is 3.7 [mu]m. On 13 July 1991 a dramatic, ship-produced cloud line formed offshore of Baja California. The authors present satellite images of the line and corresponding photographs from the R/V EGABRAG III which passed under the line. The images and photos reveal the structure of the line. The EGABRAG was a source of CCN but did not produce a cloud line; they attempt to explain this important finding.

Hindman, E.E. (City Coll. of New York, NY (United States)); Porch, W.M. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Hudson, J.G. (Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States)); Durkee, P.A. (Navel Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

EAC Meeting Summary October 16, 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Capital Hilton Hotel Capital Hilton Hotel Washington, DC October 16, 2012 Summary of Meeting EAC Members in Attendance: WILLIAM BALL, Southern Company LINDA BLAIR, ITC Holdings Corp RICK BOWEN, Alcoa MERWIN BROWN, California Institute for Energy and Environment PAUL CENTOLELLA, former commissioner, Ohio, now with The Analysis Group RICHARD COWART, Chair of the EAC, Regulatory Assistance Project ROBERT CURRY, former commissioner, New York, now with Curry Energy CLARK GELLINGS, Electric Power Research Institute DIAN GRUENEICH, former commissioner, California, now with Grueneich Consulting MICHAEL HEYECK, American Electric Power PAUL HUDSON, former commissioner, Texas; now with Stratus Energy Group SUSAN KELLY, American Public Power Association BARRY LAWSON, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association

65

EAC Meeting Summary October 15, 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Capital Hilton Hotel Washington, DC October 15, 2012 Summary of Meeting EAC Members in Attendance: WILLIAM BALL, Southern Company LINDA BLAIR, ITC Holdings Corp RICK BOWEN, Alcoa MERWIN BROWN, California Institute for Energy and Environment PAUL CENTOLELLA, former commissioner, Ohio, now with The Analysis Group RICHARD COWART, Chair of the EAC, Regulatory Assistance Project ROBERT CURRY, former commissioner, New York, now with Curry Energy CLARK GELLINGS, Electric Power Research Institute DIAN GRUENEICH, former commissioner, California, now with Grueneich Consulting MICHAEL HEYECK, American Electric Power PAUL HUDSON, former commissioner, Texas; now with Stratus Energy Group SUSAN KELLY, American Public Power Association

66

U.S. Department of Energy Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Meeting Meeting NRECA Conference Center Arlington, VA June 5, 2013 Summary of Meeting 2 PARTICIPANTS EAC: BILLY BALL Southern Company LINDA BLAIR Executive Vice President, ITC Holdings MERWIN BROWN California Institute for Energy & Environment PAUL CENTOLELLA Vice President, Analysis Group BOB CURRY Commissioner Emeritus, NY; Charles River Associates CLARK GELLINGS Electric Power Research Institute DIAN GREUNICH Dian Greunich Consulting PAUL HUDSON Stratus Energy Group, Austin SUE KELLY American Public Power Association RALPH MASIELLO DNV KEMA RICH MEYER (for BARRY LAWSON) National Rural Electric Cooperative Association CLAIR MOELLER Midcontinent Independent System Operator GRANGER MORGAN Carnegie Mellon, Engineering & Public Policy

67

ACARS Aerodynamic (Research Incorporated) Communication and Recording System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ix ix Acrononyms and Abbreviations Acronyms and Abbreviations ACARS Aerodynamic (Research Incorporated) Communication and Recording System ACSYS Arctic Climate System Study AER Atmospheric Environmental Research, Inc. AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer AFOSR Air Force Office of Scientific Research AGARD Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development ALFA AER Local Forecast and Assimilation (model) AMIP Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project ARCS Atmosphere Radiation and Cloud Stations ARCSS Arctic System Science (NSF) ARCSYM Arctic Regional Climate System Model ARINC Aerodynamic Research Incorporated Communication ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program AS anvil stratus ASTER Atmosphere-Surface Turbulent Exchange Research ASTEX Altantic Stratocumulus Transition EXperiment

68

Shipboard measurements of the cloud-capped marine boundary layer during FIRE/ASTEX. Technical progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ASTEX is a large multi-agency program to investigate all aspects of marine stratus clouds because of their overall importance in regulating the earth`s climate system. The program focused on clouds in the Eastern Atlantic during the month of June, 1992 because of the expected frequency of low clouds in that area. The experiment was based on the islands of Santa Maria in the Azores and Porto Santo about 800 km away in the Madeira Archipelago with large complements of remote sensors operated from both islands. To form an equilateral triangle of remote sensors, a ship was used as the third platform.

Kropfil, R.A.

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

2012-2013 EAC Membership Roster  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 3, 2012 August 3, 2012 Electricity Advisory Committee 2012/2013 Membership Roster Richard Cowart Regulatory Assistance Project CHAIR Irwin Popowsky Pennsylvania Consumer Advocate VICE CHAIR William Ball Southern Company Linda Blair ITC Holdings Corporation Rick Bowen Alcoa Merwin Brown California Institute for Energy and Environment Ralph Cavanagh Natural Resources Defense Council The Honorable Paul Centolella Public Utilities Commission of Ohio David Crane NRG Energy, Inc. The Honorable Robert Curry New York State Public Service Commission Clark Gellings Electric Power Research Institute Dian Grueneich Dian Grueneich Consulting, LLC. Michael Heyeck American Electric Power Paul Hudson Stratus Energy Group Val Jensen Commonwealth Edison

70

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 20, 2012 December 20, 2012 Electricity Advisory Committee 2012 Membership Roster Richard Cowart Regulatory Assistance Project CHAIR Irwin Popowsky Pennsylvania Consumer Advocate (Ret.) VICE CHAIR William Ball Southern Company Linda Blair ITC Holdings Corporation Rick Bowen Alcoa Merwin Brown California Institute for Energy and Environment Ralph Cavanagh Natural Resources Defense Council Paul Centolella Analysis Group The Honorable Robert Curry New York State Public Service Commission Clark Gellings Electric Power Research Institute Dian Grueneich Dian Grueneich Consulting, LLC. Michael Heyeck American Electric Power Paul Hudson Stratus Energy Group Val Jensen Commonwealth Edison Susan Kelly American Public Power Association Barry Lawson

71

Data/model integration for vertical mixing in the stable Arctic boundary layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a short Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Data on atmospheric trace constituents and the vertical structure of stratus clouds from a 1996 expedition to the central Arctic reveal mechanisms of vertical mixing that have not been observed in mid-latitudes. Time series of the altitude and thickness of summer arctic stratus have been observed using an elastic backscatter lidar aboard an icebreaker. With the ship moored to the pack ice during 14 data collection stations and the lidar staring vertically, the time series represent advected cloud fields. The lidar data reveal a significant amount of vertical undulation in the clouds, strongly suggestive of traveling waves in the buoyantly damped atmosphere that predominates in the high Arctic. Concurrent observations of trace gases associated with the natural sulfur cycle (dimethyl sulfide, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and aerosols show evidence of vertical mixing events that coincide with a characteristic signature in the cloud field that may be called dropout or lift out. A segment of a cloud deck appears to be relocated from the otherwise quasicontinuous layer to another altitude a few hundred meters lower or higher. Atmospheric models have been applied to identify the mechanism that cause the dropout phenomenon and connect it dynamically to the surface layer mixing.

Barr, S.; ReVelle, D.O.; Kao, C.Y.J.; Bigg, E.K.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Final technical Report DE-FG02-06ER65187  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulations from the University of Wisconsin Non-Hydrostatic Modeling System (UW-NMS) along with those from other models indicate a strong tendency to overproduce ice, resulting in a decimation of the liquid portion of mixed-phase stratus through the Bergeron-Findeissen process. Immersion freezing was illustrated to be a major contributor to ice production within these cloud layers, and aerosol properties were illustrated to be an important consideration in the simulation of this process. In particular, the soluble mass fraction and aerosol insoluble mass type were demonstrated to influence simulation of the immersion freezing process, Data collected by the Arctic High Spectral Resolution Lidar and Millimeter Cloud Radar during the M-PACE period was analyzed in order to provide a statistical dataset for validation of simulations of mixed-phase stratus. 270 hours of single-layer cases were reviewed, and mean values for cloud base height, cloud thickness, cloud optical thickness, cloud temperature, wind direction, and liquid and ice particle size, particle number density, and water content were derived.

Edwin Eloranta

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

73

Hierarchical Diagnosis R. A. Kropfli, S. Y. Matrosov, T. Uttal, and B. W. Orr  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R. A. Kropfli, S. Y. Matrosov, T. Uttal, and B. W. Orr R. A. Kropfli, S. Y. Matrosov, T. Uttal, and B. W. Orr National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environmental Research Laboratories Wave Propagation Laboratory Boulder, CO 80303 I ntrod uction The WPL 8-mm wavelength radar was designed with good sensitivity and resolution to observe the small-scale structure and microphysical properties of clouds. DuringASTEX, for example, it observed, with 37-m resolution, all marine boundary layer (MBL) stratus and stratocumulus clouds within 5 km of the radar. More dense nonprecipitating clouds and very light drizzle were routinely observed to ranges exceeding 35 km. Characteristics of the radar are summarized in Table 1. A new offset Cassegrain antenna with good polarization performance is now being developed for this radar to study

74

Posters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Posters Stratus Cloud Measurements with a K α -Band Doppler Radar and a Microwave Radiometer A. S. Frisch, C. W. Fairall, and J. B. Snider National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. H. Lenschow National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado The goal of the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) held in the North Atlantic during June 1992 was to determine the physical reasons for the transition from stratocumulus to broken clouds. Some possible reasons for this transition were such things as cloud top entrainment instability (Randall 1980; Betts and Ridgway 1989) and the decoupling effects of drizzle (Albrecht 1989). As part of this experiment, the Environmental Technology Laboratory's cloud sensing Doppler radar and

75

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Sednev, I., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Menon, S., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: I Sednev, S Menon, and G McFarquhar. 2008. "Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussion 8: 11755-11819. The vertical structure and radiative properties of persistent low-level Arctic clouds depend on their microphysics, and thus, estimation of the relative significance of the microphysical processes that occur in these

76

X:\ARM_19~1\PG93-112.WPD  

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Figure 1. Drizzle parameters. The data for these measurements were taken on Figure 1. Drizzle parameters. The data for these measurements were taken on June 6, 1992, at 6 am. The first three Doppler moments from the vertically pointing radar were used in a log-normal three parameter cloud droplet model to determine the vertical profiles of modal radius, the standard deviation, and the number of droplets. Island Based Radar and Microwave Radiometer Measurements of Stratus Cloud Parameters During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) A. S. Frisch C. W. Fairall and J. B. Snider CIRA Colorado State University NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory Fort Collins, Colorado Boulder, Colorado D. H. Lenshow and S. D. Mayer National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Introduction During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment

77

ARM - Field Campaign - MASRAD: Cloud Study from the 2NFOV at Pt. Reyes  

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govCampaignsMASRAD: Cloud Study from the 2NFOV at Pt. Reyes Field govCampaignsMASRAD: Cloud Study from the 2NFOV at Pt. Reyes Field Campaign Campaign Links AMF Point Reyes Website Related Campaigns MArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP 2005.03.14, Miller, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : MASRAD: Cloud Study from the 2NFOV at Pt. Reyes Field Campaign 2005.06.02 - 2005.09.30 Lead Scientist : Warren Wiscombe For data sets, see below. Description Cloud optical depth is one of the most important cloud optical properties, and vital for any cloud-radiation parameterization. Our ARM Science Team project has pioneered an algorithm to retrieve cloud optical depth in a fully three-dimensional cloud situation using zenith radiances from the ARM

78

arm_poster_eitzen.ppt  

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Spearman Rank Correlations Between Boundary-layer Cloud Properties Spearman Rank Correlations Between Boundary-layer Cloud Properties Zachary A. Eitzen, SSAI and Kuan-Man Xu, NASA-LaRC 1. Cloud Object Data The cloud object data were taken from CERES-TRMM, over Jan-Aug 1998. Each boundary-layer cloud object is a contiguous region of CERES footprints that have cloud tops below 3 km, and a cloud fraction of: 99-100% (stratus), 40- 99% (stratocumulus), or 10-40% (shallow cumulus). The cloud objects in this work were all observed over the ocean, and within 30 degrees of the Equator. 2. Joint PDFs and Correlations We are not only interested in 1-D distributions of cloud properties (see Xu et al. 2007), but also how they change with one another. One way to examine this is with 2-D (joint) PDFs. However, with a large number of cloud properties, a

79

BNL | RACORO  

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RACORO Field Campaign RACORO Field Campaign Boundary layer clouds include stratus, stratocumulus, and fair-weather cumulus. Such clouds are ubiquitous over many parts of the globe and strongly influence the Earth's radiative energy balance. Our understanding of these clouds is insufficient to solve pressing scientific problems. The need for a better understanding of boundary layer clouds can only be achieved by acquiring high-quality in situ data that can be applied to process studies, fine-scale model evaluation, and the refinement of retrieval algorithms. A first-of-a-kind, extended-term cloud aircraft campaign was conducted to obtain an in situ statistical characterization of continental boundary-layer clouds. Coordinated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility (AAF), the Routine AAF Clouds with Low

80

Research Highlight  

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Validation of CERES-MODIS Cloud Properties Using ARM Data Validation of CERES-MODIS Cloud Properties Using ARM Data Submitter: Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Dong, X., P. Minnis, B. Xi, S. Sun-Mack, and Y. Chen, 2007: Validation of CERES-MODIS stratus cloud properties using ground-based measurements at the DOE ARM SGP site. Accepted by J. Geophys. Res. Wielicki, B. A. and Co-authors (2000), CERES Validation Plan Overview, Release 4, 10/20/00, 58 pp. (Available at http://asd-www.larc.nasa.gov/ceres/validation/ ceresval_r4.0_over.pdf) Figure 1. Time series of surface-derived cloud-base and -top heights and temperatures (1-hour average) and matched MODIS-derived effective cloud heights and temperatures (30-km x 30-km box) for daytime single-layer and

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81

1  

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Further Estimates of the Error in the Retrieval Further Estimates of the Error in the Retrieval of Cloud Radar Effective Radius A. S. Frisch National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Colorado State University Boulder, Colorado M. D. Shupe and I. Djalalova Science Technology Corporation Boulder, Colorado M. R. Poellot Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of North Dakota Grand Forks, North Dakota Introduction We use aircraft Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) data taken near the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site and during the ISCCP (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) Regional Experiment-Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE) program in the Arctic to estimate a radar reflectivity retrieval of a stratus cloud effective radius (r

82

Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation O. B. Toon, A. Ackerman, and E. Jensen  

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O. B. Toon, A. Ackerman, and E. Jensen O. B. Toon, A. Ackerman, and E. Jensen National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA 94035 Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) mesoscale dynamical model and used to simulated cirrus clouds during the First ISCCpCa) Regional Experiment (FIRE) project. One of our goals in performing one-dimensional studies is to develop the microphysics for these three-dimensional simulations. However, since the microphysics itself is computationally very demanding, the one-dimensional simulations are often useful for cloud simulations of microphysics in situations in which dynamics either is not important or can be parameterized. Here we discuss only one-dimensional simulations. Marine stratus are the only clouds for which there are significant data showing effects of aerosols on cloud

83

ARM - Field Campaign - MASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry  

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govCampaignsMASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry Measurements govCampaignsMASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry Measurements Campaign Links AMF Point Reyes Website Related Campaigns MArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP 2005.03.14, Miller, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : MASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry Measurements 2005.07.01 - 2005.07.30 Lead Scientist : Carl Berkowitz For data sets, see below. Description Principal Investigators: J. Ogren, C. Berkowitz, R. Halthore, A. Laskin, A. Strawa, J. Wang, A. Wexler As part of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment to Point Reyes, CA in the spring and summer of 2005, a suite of instrumentation was installed to measure the chemical, physical and optical properties of aerosol particles

84

Posters A One-Dimensional Radiative Convective Model with Detailed Cloud Microphysics  

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5 5 Posters A One-Dimensional Radiative Convective Model with Detailed Cloud Microphysics J. Simmons, O. Lie-Svendsen, and K. Stamnes Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska The Arctic is a key element in determining the radiation budget of the earth. Within the polar regions, the net radiation (incoming solar radiation minus outgoing infrared radiation) is negative. To understand the role this energy deficit plays in the overall radiation budget, one must examine the prevalent atmospheric features of the Arctic. One such feature is a persistent layer of low-altitude, stratiform clouds found over the central Arctic predominantly from April to September (Tsay et al. 1984). These Arctic stratus clouds (ASC) modulate the earth's radiation budget

85

X:\ARM_19~1\P317-334.WPD  

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Figure 1. Plot of the time of maximum wind speed (UTC) from the low-level jets Figure 1. Plot of the time of maximum wind speed (UTC) from the low-level jets observed using the ARM program 915-MHZ radar wind profiler vs. the height of this maximum wind speed (m). Summertime Low-Level Jets Over the Great Plains D. J. Stensrud NOAA/ERL/National Severe Storms Laboratory Norman, Oklahoma S. Pfeifer University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Introduction The sky over the southern Great Plains Cloud and Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (CART) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program during the predawn and early morning hours often is partially obstructed by stratocumulus, stratus fractus, or cumulus fractus that are moving rapidly to the north, even though the surface winds are weak. This cloud movement is evidence of the low-level jet (LLJ), a wind speed

86

Hierarchical Diagnosis  

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Development of a Rad iative Cloud Development of a Rad iative Cloud Parameterization Scheme of Stratocumulus and Stratus Clouds Which Includes the Impact of Cloud Condensation Nucleus on Cloud Albedo W. R. Cotton, G. L. Stephens, D. Duda, B. Stevens, and R. L. Walko Colorado State University Department of Atmospheric Science Fort Collins, CO G. Feingold Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado, Boulder Boulder. CO 80309-0049 A three-dimensional (3-D) model for simulating the effect of enhanced cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) concentrations on stratocumulus clouds is presented. Results of two-dimensional (2-D) tests are discussed for a control run and a sensitivity run where CCN spectra were taken to be typical of clean marine conditions or mildly continental air, respectively. For a fivefold increase in

87

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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Meeting Meeting 2003 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Science Team Meeting Proceedings Cover image Proceedings of the Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM-CONF-2003, April 2003 Broomsfield, Colorado For proper viewing, extended abstracts should be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the latest version from the Adobe Reader website. View session papers by Author or Title. * Poster abstract only; an extended abstract was not provided by the author(s). A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Abdou, W.A. Intercomparison of MISR Aerosol Retrievals with Sunphotometer and MODIS Results* Ackerman, T.P. Comparison of Observed and Modelled Liquid Water Path for Stratus and Stratocumulus Clouds at the SGP*

88

Radiosonde observations at Pt. Reyes and cloud properties retrieved from  

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Radiosonde observations at Pt. Reyes and cloud properties retrieved from Radiosonde observations at Pt. Reyes and cloud properties retrieved from GOES-WEST Inoue, Toshiro MRI/JMA Category: Field Campaigns Low-level cloud formed off the west coast of continents plays an important role in general circulation and climate. Marine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) was conducted at the ARM mobile site deployed at Pt Reyes, California during April to September. Here, we studied the relationship between meteorological parameters observed by GPS sonde and cloud properties observed from GOES-WEST during the MASRAD intensive operational period. Cloud properties are retrieved from VISST (Visible Infrared Solar-infrared Split window Technique). The vertical profile of stability, relative humidity (RH) and wind speed observed by GPS sonde are

89

ARM2007_STM_poster_v1  

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Liquid Stratiform Clouds-Aerosol Interaction Liquid Stratiform Clouds-Aerosol Interaction The consistently steady and thin maritime stratus clouds observed at Pt. Reyes are much closer to adiabatic, mostly in uenced by the stronger static stability and drier condition above the cloud. These clouds shows the better e cacy of aerosol-cloud interactions since they form in a much more homogeneous meteorological (low variability in LWP) and less entrainment-driven environment than those at the continental site. There are still some limitations on observation artifacts and uncertainty in estimating adiabaticity based on the remote sensing. Conclusions This Study Suppression of LWP Variability E cacy of Aerosol - Cloud Interactions under Varying Meteorological Conditions Byung-Gon Kim @

90

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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Meeting Meeting 1999 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Science Team Meeting Proceedings Cover image Proceedings of the Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM-CONF-1999, March 1999 San Antonio, Texas For proper viewing, many of these proceedings should be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the latest version from the Adobe Reader website. View session papers by Author or Title. * Poster abstract only; an extended abstract was not provided by the author(s). A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Abshire, J.B. Development of a Compact Lidar to Profile Water Vapor in the Lower Troposphere Ackerman, T.P. A 25-Month Database of Stratus Cloud Properties Generated from Ground-Based Measurements at the ARM SGP Site

91

This Study  

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This Study Several studies demonstrated aerosol indirect e ect such as modi cations of cloud properties due to aerosols and corresponding changes in shortwave and longwave radiative uxes. Some recent studies indicated aerosol indirect e ects may not be the primary modulator of cloud optical properties in certain situations. They implied other processes were impacting the cloud optical properties (Kim et al., JGR 2003). To study these other impacts, we extend a previous study to investigate the role of adiabaticity facilitated by mixing in modulating cloud optical properties. We quantify the e ects of mixing by measuring the ratio of the observed cloud water path to its adiabatic value, (adiabaticity, α). The screening criteria for relatively homogeneous stratus

92

ARM - Facility News Article  

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30, 2005 [Facility News] 30, 2005 [Facility News] Coastal Clouds Field Campaign Takes Off in July Bookmark and Share The 2-channel NFOV gets careful attention as it joins the suite of instruments collecting data for the ARM Mobile Facility field campaign at Point Reyes National Seashore. The 2-channel NFOV gets careful attention as it joins the suite of instruments collecting data for the ARM Mobile Facility field campaign at Point Reyes National Seashore. Since March 2005, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) has been at Point Reyes National Seashore in northern California for the Marine Stratus Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle Intensive Operational Period. The goals of this 6-month field campaign are to collect data from cloud/aerosol interactions and to improve understanding of cloud organization that is often associated

93

Research Highlight  

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Profiling Capability of High-Resolution Oxygen A-band Spectroscopy for Profiling Capability of High-Resolution Oxygen A-band Spectroscopy for Stratus Cloud Cover Submitter: Davis, A. B., Jet Propulsion Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Davis AB, IN Polonsky, and A Marshak. 2009. Space-Time Green Functions for Diffusive Radiation Transport, in Application to Active and Passive Cloud Probing. In Light Scattering Reviews, Volume 4, pp. 169-292. Ed. by A.A. Kohkanovsky, Heidelberg, Germany: Springer. Transmission: (a) Ratio of mean path Τ to cloud thickness Η times (1-g)τ plotted versus cosine of SZA μ0 and cloud optical depth τ; asymmetry factor g was set to 0.85, then delta-rescaled to 0.46. Given this ratio (>1/2) and Η or τ, one can infer the other cloud parameter.

94

Research Highlight  

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Buffering of Ice Crystal Number Concentration to Ice Nucleus Abundance Buffering of Ice Crystal Number Concentration to Ice Nucleus Abundance Above Arctic Stratus Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Ackerman, A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Fridlind AM, B van Diedenhoven, AS Ackerman, A Avramov, A Mrowiec, H Morrison, P Zuidema, and MD Shupe. 2012. "A FIRE-ACE/SHEBA case study of mixed-phase Arctic boundary-layer clouds: Entrainment rate limitations on rapid primary ice nucleation processes." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 69(1), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-11-052.1. Observed and simulated histograms of MMCR radar reflectivity (left) and

95

ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud IOP  

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govCampaignsCloud IOP govCampaignsCloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Cloud IOP 1998.04.27 - 1998.05.17 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary Monday, April 27, 1998 IOP Opening Activities: Heavy rain (nearly 2.5" since 12Z 4/26/98) at the central facility (CF) dominated the first day of the Cloud Physics/Single Column Model IOP and limited the daily activities. A 1430 GMT sonde launch commenced the 3-hour sonde launch schedule at the CF and 4 boundary facilities (BFs). Scientists/Instrumentation on Site: Citation: Has arrived and is located at the Ponca City Airport. No flights are currently planned. Flights are tentatively planned for stratus sampling when precipitation ends.

96

ARM - Facility News Article  

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Guest Instruments to Collect Aerosol Data During Coastal Field Campaign Guest Instruments to Collect Aerosol Data During Coastal Field Campaign Bookmark and Share The counter-flow virtual impactor (inset), which can characterize aerosol particles in cloud droplets, joins a number of other guest instruments at the ARM Mobile Facility deployment site at Point Reyes National Seashore in California. The counter-flow virtual impactor (inset), which can characterize aerosol particles in cloud droplets, joins a number of other guest instruments at the ARM Mobile Facility deployment site at Point Reyes National Seashore in California. The ARM Mobile Facility's (AMF's) inaugural field campaign, the Marine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) Intensive Operational Period, is well underway at Point Reyes National Seashore on the northern

97

MotorWeek Video Transcript: Dodge Avenger FFV  

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Dodge Avenger FFV Dodge Avenger FFV The Avenger nameplate has dressed its share of metal over the years. Now, it finds it marquee on a midsize four-door that Dodge hopes will sway a meaningful slice of family sedan sales into their direction. But it will take more than powerfully carved curves and heady nameplate for this Avenger to become a hero. As Dodge aimed to build a replacement for its mid-size Stratus family sedan, they stepped forth with the same boldness that defines the rest of their line-up. Taking cues from tigers and boxing gloves, Dodge brings to fruition the all-new sport-infused 2008 Avenger sedan. Available in four trims, SE, SXT, our RT and RT AWD, the Avenger boasts the same Dodge "gotcha" attitude as the full-size Charger. Aggression oozes from the brand's signature crosshair grille and the

98

1  

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Factors Controlling the Properties of Multi-Phase Factors Controlling the Properties of Multi-Phase Arctic Stratocumulus Clouds A. Fridlind and A. Ackerman National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Ames Research Center Moffett Field, California S. Menon and I. Sednev Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California Introduction The October 2004 Multi-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) Intensive Operational Period (IOP) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's (ACRF's) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale focused on measuring the properties of autumn transition-season arctic stratus and the environmental conditions controlling them, including concentrations of heterogeneous ice nuclei. Our work aims to use a large-eddy simulation (LES) code with embedded size-resolved cloud

99

Using ARM data to correct plane-parallel satellite retrievals of cloud  

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Using ARM data to correct plane-parallel satellite retrievals of cloud Using ARM data to correct plane-parallel satellite retrievals of cloud properties Dong, Xiquan University of North Dakota Minnis, Patrick NASA Langley Research Center Xi, Baike University of North Dakota Khaiyer, Mandana Analytical Services and Material, Inc. Category: Cloud Properties The angular variations of cloud properties derived from GOES data are examined using simultaneously collocated ARM surface observations/retrievals at the DOE ARM SGP site during the 6-yr period from January 1997 to December 2002. The dependencies of GOES cloud retrievals on solar zenith angle (SZA), scattering angle (SCA), and relative azimuth angle (RZA) are investigated for single-layer and overcast low-level stratus clouds. The GOES-retrieved cloud-droplet effective radius (re),

100

Research Highlights Sorted by Submitter  

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Submitter Submitter A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Ackerman, A. Buffering of Ice Crystal Number Concentration to Ice Nucleus Abundance above Arctic Stratus ARM To Be or Not To Be Liquid? The Challenge of Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud Modeling ARM Tropical Rain Clouds Still a Challenge to Cloud-Resolving Models ARM ASR Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds During ISDAC ARM Ackerman, T. P. Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models ARM Quantifying the Magnitude of Anomalous Solar Absorption ARM Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds ARM Structure of Cirrus Properties and its Coupling with the State of the Large-Scale Atmosphere ARM The k-Distribution Method for a SW Radiative Transfer Model ARM Ahlgrimm, M.

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

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A Comparison of Surface Sensible Heat Flux at Atqasuk and Barrow A Comparison of Surface Sensible Heat Flux at Atqasuk and Barrow Shaw, W.J. (a), Doran, J.C. (b), and Hubbe, J.M. (c), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting As part of the effort to discover the feedbacks between low-level arctic stratus and surface fluxes, we have operated an acoustic anemometer near Barrow, Alaska and a dual wavelength scintillometer near Atqasuk, which is 100 km to the south, in order to measure the surface turbulence heat flux. The systems operated unattended during the spring melt period of 2000, and the data were logged via internet or telephone connections. The acoustic anemometer was mounted on a tower attached to a barge grounded on a low island on the northeast side of Elson Lagoon. The anemometer was 8.5 m

102

1  

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Dual Polarization Observations on an MMCR: Dual Polarization Observations on an MMCR: Implementation and First Results K. P. Moran, T. Ayers, B. E. Martner, and M. J. Post National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. B. Widener Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's millimeter-wavelength cloud radar (MMCR) is a super-sensitive device capable of measuring extremely weak signals backscattered from small ice crystals and water droplets. Its sensitivity allows the radar to observe thin high cirrus clouds containing small ice particles as well as low-altitude stratus clouds composed of tiny water droplets (Moran et al. 1998). Unfortunately, other particulates suspended in the atmosphere, such as insects, ash,

103

Research Highlight  

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How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Jackson RC, GM McFarquhar, AV Korolev, ME Earle, PS Liu, RP Lawson, S Brooks, M Wolde, A Laskin, and M Freer. 2012. "The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, D15207, doi:10.1029/2012JD017668. Cloud mean ice crystal concentration Nice(D ≥ 50 micrometers) versus mean aerosol concentration (NPCASP) above cloud for all 41 vertical profiles

104

kollias-99.PDF  

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Mass Flux Representations of Vertical Mass Flux Representations of Vertical Velocity Fluctuations in Continental Stratus Clouds Using a mm-Wavelength Doppler Radar P. Kollias and B. A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida Introduction A cloud mass flux representation of the vertical turbulent fluxes provides a physical framework for understanding the effects of shallow convection in maintaining the vertical structure of the boundary layer. This approach is based on the assumption that coherent updrafts and downdraft structures are responsible for most of the turbulent transport. Previous evaluations of mass flux parameterizations have been based on aircraft observations (e.g., Penc and Albrecht 1987) and results from Large Eddy Simulations (LESs) (e.g., Siebesma and Cuijpers 1995). In this study, mm-wavelength radar

105

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Comparisons with the Cloud Radar Retrievals Comparisons with the Cloud Radar Retrievals of Stratus Cloud Effective Radius A. S. Frisch and G. Feingold Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado M. D Shupe and I. Djalalova Science Technology Corporation National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado M. R. Poellot Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of North Dakota Grand Forks, North Dakota Abstract In situ sampling of cloud droplets by aircraft in Oklahoma in 1997, Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) - First ISCCP Regional Experiment Aerosol Characterization Experiment (FIRE ACE) in 1998, and a collection of droplet spectra measured from various locations around the world are used

106

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Continuous Flow Ice Thermal Diffusion Chamber Continuous Flow Ice Thermal Diffusion Chamber Measurements of Ice Nuclei in the Arctic A.J. Prenni, P.J. DeMott, and S.M. Kreidenweis Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado D.C. Rogers National Center for Atmospheric Research EOL/RAF Broomfield, Colorado Introduction Mixed-phase stratus clouds are ubiquitous in the Arctic and play an important role in climate in this region. However, climate and regional models have generally proven unsuccessful at simulating arctic cloudiness, particularly during the colder months. Specifically, models tend to under-predict the amount of liquid water in mixed-phase clouds. This is problematic because cloud phase can greatly impact the radiative budget. The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted from late

107

Research Highlight  

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CCN and Vertical Velocity Influences CCN and Vertical Velocity Influences Submitter: Hudson, J. G., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Hudson JG and S Noble. 2013. "CCN and vertical velocity influences on droplet concentrations and supersaturations in clean and polluted stratus clouds." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, , . ACCEPTED. Figure 1. Effective cloud supersaturation (Seff) against CCN concentration at 1% S (N1%) for horizontal cloud penetrations, 50 for MASE and 34 for POST. Seff is the S for which nearby below cloud CCN spectra, NCCN(S), equals mean droplet concentration (Nc). Figure 2. One second droplet concentration, Nc, and vertical velocity

108

ARM - Journal Articles 2003  

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3 3 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2003 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Dong Arctic stratus cloud properties and radiative forcing at the ARM NSA site (Citation) J. Climate ARM Zurovac-Jevtic Development and test of a cirrus parameterization scheme using NCAR CCM3 (Citation) Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences ARM

109

Research Highlight  

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Influence of Humidified Aerosols on Lidar Depolarization Below Influence of Humidified Aerosols on Lidar Depolarization Below Ice-Precipitating Arctic Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies van Diedenhoven, B., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: van Diedenhoven B, AM Fridlind, and AS Ackerman. 2011. "Influence of humidified aerosol on lidar depolarization measurements below ice-precipitating Arctic stratus." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 50(10), doi:10.1175/JAMC-D-11-037.1. Correlated MMCR radar reflectivities and DABUL lidar depolarizations below cloud base calculated with a reasonably low number of large, coarse-mode

110

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Preliminary Analysis of Horizontal Inhomogeneity for ARESE II Clouds Preliminary Analysis of Horizontal Inhomogeneity for ARESE II Clouds Marshak, A. (a), Wiscombe, W.J. (b), Davis, A.B. (c), and Pilewskie, P. (d), UMBC/JCET (a), NASA/GSFC (b), LANL (c), NASA/Ames (d) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) II was conducted at the SGP site from February 21 through April 15, 2000. The identical set of radiometers simultaneously measured the broadband and narrowband fluxes, as well as spectral fluxes and radiances from the aircraft flying above clouds and on the ground. To escape sampling problems with only one aircraft flying a daisy pattern over the central facility, the whole experiment was focused on optically thick stratocumulus clouds. However, even heavy stratus clouds

111

miles-99.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vertical Velocity Statistics as Derived from 94-GHz Vertical Velocity Statistics as Derived from 94-GHz Radar Measurements N. L. Miles, D. M. Babb, and J. Verlinde The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Profiles of millimeter-wavelength radar Doppler spectra contain information about both the mean vertical velocities and cloud microphysics. In order to obtain this information, it is necessary to remove the effects of turbulence. Stratocumulus clouds often contain various species of ice and liquid, including graupel, crystals, columns, plates, liquid droplets, and drizzle drops. Most of the previous work to remotely determine microphysics of stratus clouds has largely ignored the presence of drizzle and ice, restricting applicability to only liquid clouds with no drizzle, a relatively rare event. Since mixed phase

112

Microsoft Word - Poellot-MR.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurements of Cloud Liquid Water Over the SGP Site Measurements of Cloud Liquid Water Over the SGP Site M. R. Poellot University of North Dakota Grand Forks, North Dakota R. T. Marchand Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington C. Twohy Oregon State University Corvallis, Oregon Introduction The University of North Dakota Citation aircraft made in situ measurements of liquid water clouds on six flights in stratus clouds during the Spring 2000 Cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Four in situ instruments were used to measure cloud liquid water content (LWC): a particle measuring system (PMS) King liquid water sensor, a Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI), a PMS Forward Spectral Scattering Probe (FSSP) and a one-dimensional (1D) optical

113

Posters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Posters The Effects of Arctic Stratus Clouds on the Solar Energy Budget in the Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Ocean System Z. Jin and K. Stamnes Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska B. D. Zak Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico Radiative Transfer Model We have developed a comprehensive radiative transfer model pertinent to the atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system (Jin and Stamnes 1994; Jin et al., in press). The main features of the newly-developed radiative transfer model include: * The atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean each represented by a sufficient number of layers to resolve the change in the optical properties of each stratum. * An appropriate quadrature structure to take into account the refraction and the total reflection at the air-ice or air-

114

Kogan-ZN  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Drop Effective Radius for Drizzling Drop Effective Radius for Drizzling Marine Stratus in Global Circulation Models Z. N. Kogan and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Introduction The cloud drop effective radius, R e , is one of the most important parameters in calculations of cloud radiative properties. Numerous formulations of the effective radius have been developed for use in numerical models (see, e.g., review in Gultepe et al. 1996); however, to the best of our knowledge, they all were designed for non-drizzling clouds. The objective of this paper is to derive a parameterization of R e for precipitating boundary layer clouds. The R e parameterization is necessarily a function of cloud prognostic variables used in a specific numerical model. To this regard, we note that the majority of

115

DOE/SC-ARM-P-07-006 Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations with the NCAR Single Column Climate Model (SCAM) and ARM Observations Second Quarter 2007 ARM Metric Report April 2007 Xiaohong Liu and Steven J. Ghan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Shaocheng Xie Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research X. Lui, S.J. Ghan, and S. Xie, DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-006 Summary Mixed-phase stratus clouds are ubiquitous in the Arctic and play an important role in climate in this region. However, climate models have generally proven unsuccessful at simulating the partitioning of condensed water

116

X:\ARM_19~1\PGS1-8.WPD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Boundary-Layer Cloud Study Using Southern Great Boundary-Layer Cloud Study Using Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Data B. Albrecht, G. Mace, X. Dong, W. Syrett, and T. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University, Department of Meteorology University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Boundary layer clouds-stratus and fairweather cumulus- are closely coupled to the water and energy budgets of land surfaces. This coupling involves the radiative impact of the clouds on the surface energy budget and the strong dependence of cloud formation and maintenance on the turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture in the boundary layer. The continuous data collection at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site provides a unique opportunity to study components of the coupling processes associated with boundary layer clouds

117

wangz-98.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 Ozone Destruction in Continental Stratus Clouds: Experimental Evidence for Heterogeneous Chemistry Z. Wang and K. Sassen Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction There is considerable interest in studying tropospheric ozone because of its role as a greenhouse gas and as a key element in tropospheric chemistry. Heterogeneous chem- istry involving reactions with aerosols and cloud droplets can affect O 3 in a number of ways. The results of model studies show that aqueous phase chemistry is shown to decrease ozone concentrations significantly in the troposphere (Jacob 1986, 1997; Lelieveld and Crutzen 1990; Liang and Jacob 1997; and Matthijsenetal et al. 1997). Reichardt et al. (1996) and Sassen et al. (1998a) found pronounced O

118

kadygrov-98.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Potential Performance of Boundary Layer Temperature Potential Performance of Boundary Layer Temperature Profile Microwave Remote Sensing: Results of Field Testing at Various Latitude Zones E. N. Kadygrov and K. P. Gaikovich Central Aerological Observatory Russia E. R. Westwater and Y. Han Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado NOAA-Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. B. Widener Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Remote sensing of low-altitude temperature profiles is important for a variety of studies, including the interaction between the atmosphere and the earth's surface, air pollution, dissipation of fog and stratus clouds, forecasting of the distribution and dispersion of gases emitted from low level sources into the free atmosphere, and short-term

119

Chemical Speciation of Sulfur in Marine Cloud Droplets and Particles: Analysis of Individual Particles from Marine Boundary Layer over the California Current  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed chemical speciation of the dry residue particles from individual cloud droplets and interstitial aerosol collected during the Marine Stratus Experiment (MASE) was performed using a combination of complementary microanalysis techniques. Techniques include computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Samples were collected at the ground site located in Point Reyes National Seashore, approximately 1 km from the coast. This manuscript focuses on the analysis of individual particles sampled from air masses that originated over the open ocean and then passed through the area of the California current located along the northern California coast. Based on composition, morphology, and chemical bonding information, two externally mixed, distinct classes of sulfur containing particles were identified: chemically modified (aged) sea salt particles and secondary formed sulfate particles. The results indicate substantial heterogeneous replacement of chloride by methanesulfonate (CH3SO3-) and non-sea salt sulfate (nss-SO42-) in sea-salt particles with characteristic ratios of nss-S/Na>0.10 and CH3SO3-/nss-SO42->0.6.

William R. Wiley Environmental Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Gilles, Mary K; Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Desyaterik, Yury; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

120

Final Report of Research Conducted For DE-AI02-08ER64546  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research was conducted for 3-4 years to use ARM data to validate satellite cloud retrievals and help the development of improved techniques for remotely sensing clouds and radiative fluxes from space to complement the ARM surface measurement program. This final report summarizes the results and publications during the last 2 years of the studies. Since our last report covering the 2009 period, we published four papers that were accepted during the previous reporting period and revised and published a fifth one. Our efforts to intercalibrate selected channels on several polar orbiting and geostationary satellite imagers, which are funded in part by ASR, resulted in methods that were accepted as part of the international Global Space-based Intercalibration System (GSICS) calibration algorithms. We developed a new empirical method for correcting the spectral differences between comparable channels on various imagers that will be used to correct the calibrations of the satellite data used for ARM. We documented our cloud retrievals for the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-Rex; ARM participated with an AAF contribution) in context of the entire experiment. We used our VOCALS satellite data along with the aircraft measurements to better understand the relationships between aerosols and liquid water path in marine stratus clouds. We continued or efforts to validate and improve the satellite cloud retrievals for ARM and using ARM data to validate retrievals for other purposes.

Patrick Minnis

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Contribution to the development of DOE ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Data (CMBE) products: Satellite data over the ARM permanent and AMF sites: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support the LLNL ARM infrastructure team Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) data development, the University of North Dakota (UND)'s group will provide the LLNL team the NASA CERES and ISCCP satellite retrieved cloud and radiative properties for the periods when they are available over the ARM permanent research sites. The current available datasets, to date, are as follows: the CERES/TERRA during 200003-200812; the CERES/AQUA during 200207-200712; and the ISCCP during 199601-200806. The detailed parameters list below: (1) CERES Shortwave radiative fluxes (net and downwelling); (2) CERES Longwave radiative fluxes (upwelling) - (items 1 & 2 include both all-sky and clear-sky fluxes); (3) CERES Layered clouds (total, high, middle, and low); (4) CERES Cloud thickness; (5) CERES Effective cloud height; (6) CERES cloud microphysical/optical properties; (7) ISCCP optical depth cloud top pressure matrix; (8) ISCCP derived cloud types (r.g., cirrus, stratus, etc.); and (9) ISCCP infrared derived cloud top pressures. (10) The UND group shall apply necessary quality checks to the original CERES and ISCCP data to remove suspicious data points. The temporal resolution for CERES data should be all available satellite overpasses over the ARM sites; for ISCCP data, it should be 3-hourly. The spatial resolution is the closest satellite field of view observations to the ARM surface sites. All the provided satellite data should be in a format that is consistent with the current ARM CMBE dataset so that the satellite data can be easily merged into the CMBE dataset.

Xie, B; Dong, X; Xie, S

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

122

Chemical Composition and Sources of Coastal Marine Aerosol Particles during the 2008 VOCALS-REx Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical composition of aerosol particles (Dp 1.5 ?m) was measured over the southeast Pacific Ocean during the VAMOS (Variability of the American Monsoon Systems) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-Rex) between 16 October and 15 November 2008 using the US Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft. The objective of these flights was to gain an understanding of the sources and evolution of these aerosols, and of how they interact with the marine stratus cloud layer that prevails in this region of the globe. Our measurements showed that the marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol mass was dominated by non-sea-salt SO2?4, followed by Na+, Cl?, Org (total organics), NH+4 , and NO?3 , in decreasing order of importance; CH3SO?3 (MSA), Ca2+, and K+ rarely exceeded their limits of detection. Aerosols were strongly acidic with a NH+4 to SO2?4 equivalents ratio typically < 0.3. Sea-salt aerosol (SSA) particles, represented by NaCl, exhibited Cl? deficits caused by both HNO3 and H2SO4, but for the most part were externally mixed with particles, mainly SO2?4. SSA contributed only a small fraction of the total accumulation mode particle number concentration. It was inferred that all aerosol species (except SSA) were of predominantly continental origin because of their strong land-to-sea concentration gradient. Comparison of relative changes in median values suggests that (1) an oceanic source of NH3 is present between 72 W and 76 W, (2) additional organic aerosols from biomass burns or biogenic precursors were emitted from coastal regions south of 31 S, with possible cloud processing, and (3) free tropospheric (FT) contributions to MBL gas and aerosol concentrations were negligible. The very low levels of CH3SO?3 observed as well as the correlation between SO2?4 and NO?3 (which is thought primarily anthropogenic) suggest a limited contribution of DMS to SO2?4 aerosol production during VOCALS.

Lee, Y.- N.; Springston, S.; Jayne, John T.; Wang, Jian; Hubbe, John M.; Senum, Gunnar I.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Daum, Peter H.

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

123

A Study to Investigate Cloud Feedback Processes and Evaluate GCM Cloud Variations Using Statistical Cloud Property Composites From ARM Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The representation of clouds in Global Climate Models (GCMs) remains a major source of uncertainty in climate change simulations. Cloud climatologies have been widely used to either evaluate climate model cloud fields or examine, in combination with other data sets, climate-scale relationships between cloud properties and dynamical or microphysical parameters. Major cloud climatologies have been based either on satellite observations of cloud properties or on surface observers views of cloud type and amount. Such data sets provide either the top-down view of column-integrated cloud properties (satellites) or the bottom-up view of the cloud field morphology (surface observers). Both satellite-based and surface cloud climatologies have been successfully used to examine cloud properties, to support process studies, and to evaluate climate and weather models. However, they also present certain limitations, since the satellite cloud types are defined using radiative cloud boundaries and surface observations are based on cloud boundaries visible to human observers. As a result, these data sets do not resolve the vertical distribution of cloud layers, an issue that is important in calculating both the radiative and the hydrologic effects of the cloud field. Ground-based cloud radar observations, on the other hand, resolve with good accuracy the vertical distribution of cloud layers and could be used to produce cloud type climatologies with vertical layering information. However, these observations provide point measurements only and it is not immediately clear to what extent they are representative of larger regimes. There are different methods that can be applied to minimize this problem and to produce cloud layering climatologies useful for both cloud process and model evaluation studies. If a radar system is run continuously over a number of years, it eventually samples a large number of dynamical and microphysical regimes. If additional data sets are used to put the cloud layering information into the context of large-scale dynamical regimes, such information can be used to study interactions among cloud vertical distributions and dynamical and microphysical processes and to evaluate the ability of models to simulate those interactions. The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has established several Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) that provide continuous, long-term observations of clouds and radiation. ARM, with its overall goal of improving the treatment of radiation and clouds in climate models has provided unique observing systems for accelerating progress on the representation of cloud processes. In this project, six and a half years (January 1998 to June 2004) of cloud observations collected at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Oklahoma ACRF were used to produce a cloud-type climatology. The climatology provides cloud amounts for seven different cloud types as well as information on the detailed structure of multi-layer cloud occurrences. Furthermore, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model output was used to define the dynamic regimes present during the observations of the cloud conditions by the vertically pointing radars at the SGP ACRF. The cloud-type climatology and the ECMWF SGP data set were then analyzed to examine and map dynamical conditions that favor the creation of single-layer versus multi-layer cloud structures as well as dynamical conditions that favor the occurrence of drizzle in continental stratus clouds. In addition, output from the ECMWF weather model forecasts was analyzed with the objective to compare model and radar derived cloud type statistics, in order to identify the major model deficiencies in cloud vertical distribution and map their seasonal variations. The project included two primary goals. The first was to create a cloud type climatology over the Southern Great Planes site that will show how cloud vertical distribution varies with dynamic and thermodynamic regime and how these variations would affect cloud climate fe

George Tselioudis

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

124

Computing for Finance  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The finance sector is one of the driving forces for the use of distributed or Grid computing for business purposes. The speakers will review the state-of-the-art of high performance computing in the financial sector, and provide insight into how different types of Grid computing ? from local clusters to global networks - are being applied to financial applications. They will also describe the use of software and techniques from physics, such as Monte Carlo simulations, in the financial world. There will be four talks of 20min each. The talk abstracts and speaker bios are listed below. This will be followed by a Q&A; panel session with the speakers. From 19:00 onwards there will be a networking cocktail for audience and speakers. This is an EGEE / CERN openlab event organized in collaboration with the regional business network rezonance.ch. A webcast of the event will be made available for subsequent viewing, along with powerpoint material presented by the speakers. Attendance is free and open to all. Registration is mandatory via www.rezonance.ch, including for CERN staff. 1. Overview of High Performance Computing in the Financial Industry Michael Yoo, Managing Director, Head of the Technical Council, UBS Presentation will describe the key business challenges driving the need for HPC solutions, describe the means in which those challenges are being addressed within UBS (such as GRID) as well as the limitations of some of these solutions, and assess some of the newer HPC technologies which may also play a role in the Financial Industry in the future. Speaker Bio: Michael originally joined the former Swiss Bank Corporation in 1994 in New York as a developer on a large data warehouse project. In 1996 he left SBC and took a role with Fidelity Investments in Boston. Unable to stay away for long, he returned to SBC in 1997 while working for Perot Systems in Singapore. Finally, in 1998 he formally returned to UBS in Stamford following the merger with SBC and has remained with UBS for the past 9 years. During his tenure at UBS, he has had a number of leadership roles within IT in development, support and architecture. In 2006 Michael relocated to Switzerland to take up his current role as head of the UBS IB Technical Council, responsible for the overall technology strategy and vision of the Investment Bank. One of Michael's key responsibilities is to manage the UBS High Performance Computing Research Lab and he has been involved in a number of initiatives in the HPC space. 2. Grid in the Commercial WorldFred Gedling, Chief Technology Officer EMEA and Senior Vice President Global Services, DataSynapse Grid computing gets mentions in the press for community programs starting last decade with "Seti@Home". Government, national and supranational initiatives in grid receive some press. One of the IT-industries' best-kept secrets is the use of grid computing by commercial organizations with spectacular results. Grid Computing and its evolution into Application Virtualization is discussed and how this is key to the next generation data center. Speaker Bio: Fred Gedling holds the joint roles of Chief Technology Officer for EMEA and Senior Vice President of Global Services at DataSynapse, a global provider of application virtualisation software. Based in London and working closely with organisations seeking to optimise their IT infrastructures, Fred offers unique insights into the technology of virtualisation as well as the methodology of establishing ROI and rapid deployment to the immediate advantage of the business. Fred has more than fifteen years experience of enterprise middleware and high-performance infrastructures. Prior to DataSynapse he worked in high performance CRM middleware and was the CTO EMEA for New Era of Networks (NEON) during the rapid growth of Enterprise Application Integration. His 25-year career in technology also includes management positions at Goldman Sachs and Stratus Computer. Fred holds a First Class Bsc (Hons) degree in Physics with Astrophysics from the University of Leeds and had the privilege o

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z