Sample records for mase-marine stratus experiment-pt

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - 2005 MASE-MArine Stratus Experiment-Pt. Reyes, CA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [FacilityMission Under52 NEAQS (New England45

  2. arctic stratus clouds: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collaboration and standardization ac- tivities of the StratusLab project at the end of Project the project can make use, while in Year 2 more focus will be put on driving...

  3. Development of an objective method for forecasting "Gulf" stratus clouds at Bryan Air Base, Texas, in the summer season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenrette, James Prentiss

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    slopes in producing the stratus clouds, He also indicated that, in general, the presence of high clouds is fairly well correlated wtth nonexistence of stratus. Another important factor, ground ventilation, was discussed by Decker (32), In a study... radiation, up- slope movement of the prevailing wind, ground ventilation, and high cloud cover are factors that must be considered in solving the stratus problem. Obviously it would be difficulty if not impossible, to incor- porate parameters...

  4. MARINE STRATUS CLOUD LIFECYCLE MODULATED BY LATENT HEAT FLUX IN A COASTAL OCEAN UPWELLING REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARINE STRATUS CLOUD LIFECYCLE MODULATED BY LATENT HEAT FLUX IN A COASTAL OCEAN UPWELLING REGION, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark

  5. Radiative and microphysical properties of Arctic stratus clouds from multiangle downwelling infrared radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    climate is strongly influenced by an extensive and persistent pattern of cloud cover [Francis, 1997 properties can have significant effects on long- wave radiation, which dominates the radiation energy budgetRadiative and microphysical properties of Arctic stratus clouds from multiangle downwelling

  6. The influence of stratus, stratocumulus, and altocumulus clouds on the spectral distribution of solar radiation over Antarctic waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettett, James Eugene

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    function of local solar time. 14 Stratus extinction of solar radiation in the infrared band, 700-2, 800 nm, as a function of local solar time. 15 Stratocumulus extinction of solar radiation in the infrared band, 700-2, 800 nm, as a function of local... solar time . . . ~ . . . . . ~ . ~ . ~ 53 16 Altocumulus extinction of Solar radiation in the infrared band, 700-2, 800 nm, as a function of local solar time 55 LIST OP TABLES Tab le Page Per cent of daily total flux contained in three spectral...

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Point Reyes, California for the Marine Stratus, Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Point Reyes National Seashore, on the California coast north of San Francisco, was the location of the first deployment of the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The ARM Program collaborated with the U.S. Office of Naval Research and DOE's Aerosol Science Program in the Marine Stratus, Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) project. Their objectives were to collect data from cloud/aerosol interactions and to improve understanding of cloud organization that is often associated with patches of drizzle. Between March and September 2005, the AMF and at least two research aircraft were used to collect data.

  8. Development and testing of an aerosol/stratus cloud parameterization scheme for middle and high latitudes. Year 3 technical progress report, November 1, 1996--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreidenweis, S.M.; Cotton, W.R.

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    At the present time, general circulation models (GCMs) poorly represent clouds, to the extent that they cannot be relied upon to simulate the climatic effects of increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, or of anthropogenic perturbations to concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN). The net radiative forcing of clouds varies strongly with latitude. Poleward of 30 degrees in both hemispheres, low-level clouds create a net cooling effect corresponding to radiative divergences of {minus}50 to {minus}100 W/m{sup 2}. It is likely that a combination of fogs, boundary-layer stratocumulus, and stratus clouds are the main contributors to this forcing. Models of the response of the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds to changes in aerosol abundance, for a variety of large-scale meteorological forcings, are important additions to GCMs used for the study of the role of Arctic systems in global climate. The overall objective of this research is the development of an aerosol/cloud microphysics parameterization of mixed-phase stratus and boundary-layer clouds which responds to variations in CCN and IN. The parameterization is to be designed for ultimate use in GCM simulations as a tool in understanding the role of CCN, IN, and Arctic clouds in radiation budgets. Several versions of the CSU RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) will be used during the course of this work. The parameterizations developed in this research are intended for application in a single-column cloud model, designed as an adaptive grid model which can interface into a GCM vertical grid through distinct layers of the troposphere where the presence of layer clouds is expected.

  9. Development and testing of an aerosol/stratus cloud parameterization scheme for middle and high latitudes. Final technical progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreidenweis, S.M.; Cotton, W.R.

    1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    At the present time, general circulation models (GCMs) poorly represent clouds, to the extent that they cannot be relied upon to simulate the climatic effects of increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, or of anthropogenic perturbations to concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN). The long-term objective of this research was the development of an aerosol/cloud microphysics parameterization of mixed-phase stratus and boundary-layer clouds which responds to variations in CCN and IN. The work plan was to perform simulations of these cloud systems to gain understanding of their dynamics and microphysics, especially how aerosols affect cloud development and properties, that cold then be used to guide parameterizations. Several versions of the CSU RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System), modified to treat Arctic clouds, have been used during the course of this work. The authors also developed a new modeling system, the Trajectory Ensemble Model, to perform detailed chemical and microphysical simulations off-line from the host LES model. The increased understanding of the cloud systems investigated in this research can be applied to a single-column cloud model, designed as an adaptive grid model which can interface into a GCM vertical grid through distinct layers of the troposphere where the presence of layer clouds is expected.

  10. sgp_stratus_poster_v1.0.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  11. ARM - Field Campaign - MArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution And Bylaws |Contact UsContactsContemplating

  13. Stratus Cloud Drizzle Retrieval During SHEBA from MMCR Doppler Moments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochasticPlanHigh-Level Radioactive

  14. Mechanical Engineering Student Access Machine Shop Stratus Dimensions Fused Deposition Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keaveny, Tony

    .00 percubicinchforthemodelmaterials. #12;Other useful information: OVERVIEW: FDM or 3D printing is a form of additive

  15. Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sednev, I.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parameterization in BRM scheme accounts for two general mech- anisms distinguishable according to the involvement of liquid phase in the ice

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol-stratus cloud parameterization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GCMs Clouds challenge both the grid resolution and physical parameterizations... (greenhouse effect dominates) - Low clouds cool (shading effect ... Source: Ackerman, Thomas P. -...

  17. Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

  18. Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - MASRAD: Pt. Reyes Stratus Cloud and Drizzle Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. Equations Governing Space-Time Variability of Liquid Water Path in Stratus Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. A Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. Analysis of Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta FeAuthorization|Energy Informationmethods

  3. The influence of stratus, stratocumulus, and altocumulus clouds on the spectral distribution of solar radiation over Antarctic waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettett, James Eugene

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CLOUD WAVEBANDS (per cent) Q s 0 COVER B G-R I (eel/cm day) 458/115E Nov 27 Nov 27-28 Nov 28 508/115E Dec 1 Nov 29-Dec 2 Nov 29 508/78E Jan 9 Jan 7-12 Jan 12 558/115E Dec 4 Dec 3-5 Dec 5 558/72E Jan 6 Jan 5-6 Jan 5 U X Sc(Brkn) A... DATES CLOUD WAVEBANDS(per cent) Q C COVER B G-R I (cal/cm day) 60S/1148 Dec 8 Dec 6-8 Dec 6 608/81E Dec 26 Dec 23-26 Dec 23 60S/74E Jan 2 Jan 2-4 Jan 3 65S/94E Dec 21 Dec 10-22 Dec 11 65S/75E Dec 30 Dec 27-31 Dec 27 U 23 X Ac...

  4. Cloud climatology at the Southern Great Plains and the layer structure, drizzle, and atmospheric modes of continental stratus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of cloud layers, an issue that is important in calculating both the radiative and the hydro- logic effects.5 years) cloud observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great in Global Climate Models (GCMs) remains a source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Cloud climatologies

  5. Stratus Cloud Structure from MM-Radar Transects and Satellite Images: Scaling Properties and Artifact Detection with Semi-...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochasticPlanHigh-Level RadioactiveStructure

  6. Stratus cloud structure from MM-radar transects and satellite images: scaling properties and artifact detection with semi-discrete wavelet analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, A. B. (Anthony B.); Petrov, N. P. (Nikola P.); Clothiaux, E. E. (Eugene E.); Marshak, A. (Alexander)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial and/or temporal variabilities of clouds is of paramount importance for at least two in tensely researched sub-problems in global and regional climate modeling: (1) cloud-radiation interaction where correlations can trigger 3D radiative transfer effects; and (2) dynamical cloud modeling where the goal is to realistically reproduce the said correlations. We propose wavelets as a simple yet powerful way of quantifying cloud variability. More precisely, we use 'semi-discrete' wavelet transforms which, at least in the present statistical applications, have advantages over both its continuous and discrete counterparts found in the bulk of the wavelet literature. With the particular choice of normalization we adopt, the scale-dependence of the variance of the wavelet coefficients (i.e,, the wavelet energy spectrum) is always a better discriminator of transition from 'stationary' to 'nonstationary' behavior than conventional methods based on auto-correlation analysis, second-order structure function (a.k.a. the semi-variogram), or Fourier analysis. Indeed, the classic statistics go at best from monotonically scale- or wavenumber-dependent to flat at such a transition; by contrast, the wavelet spectrum changes the sign of its derivative with respect to scale. We apply 1D and 2D semi-discrete wavelet transforms to remote sensing data on cloud structure from two sources: (1) an upward-looking milli-meter cloud radar (MMCR) at DOE's climate observation site in Oklahoma deployed as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Progrm; and (2) DOE's Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI), a high-resolution space-borne instrument in sunsynchronous orbit that is described in sufficient detail for our present purposes by Weber et al. (1999). For each type of data, we have at least one theoretical prediction - with empirical validation already in existence - for a power-law relation for wavelet statistics with respect to scale. This is what is expected in physical (i.e., finite scaling range) fractal phenomena. In particular, we find long-range correlations in cloud structure coming from the important nonstationary regime. More surprisingly, we also uncover artifacts the data that are traceable either to instrumental noise (in the satellite data) or to smoothing assumptions (in the MMCR data processing). Finally, we discuss the potentially damaging ramifications the smoothing artifact can have on both cloud-radiation and cloud-modeling studies using MMCR data.

  7. Subseasonal Variability of the Southeast Pacific Stratus Cloud Deck* International Pacific Research Center, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    on longwave radiation is rather small. As a result, Sc clouds have a net cooling effect on both the ocean adjustment that leads to cloud fluctuations and possible orographic effects of the Andes are also discussed reducing the down- ward solar radiation at the surface. Because of their low altitude, their effect

  8. Demand for health risk reductions: A cross-national comparison between the U.S. and Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Trudy Ann; DeShazo, J. R.; Stiffler, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    preference approach in Canada. Boulder: Stratus Consulting,the United States and Canada. Boulder: Stratus Consulting.between the U.S. and Canada Trudy Ann Cameron & J. R.

  9. DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    1 DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study Kristen Powers powers:................................................................................................................... 13 Calculation of Sensor Reaching Radiance Truth Values for Cloudless & Stratus Cloud Scenes and Atmospheric Database Creation for Stratus Cloud Scene & Calculation of Associated Sensor Reaching Radiance

  10. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol...

  11. arctic research station: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Rocky Mountain Research Sta- tion is one of five 19 Z .Atmospheric Research 51 1999 4575 Cloud resolving simulations of Arctic stratus Geosciences Websites Summary: Z...

  12. NOAA implements annual catch limits for all managed fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continental Shelf SEPT NOAA completes construction of supercomputers Stratus and Cirrus that improve weather NOAA releases Scientific Integrity Policy NOAA launches GOES-15 NOAA launches Suomi-NPP satellite NOAA

  13. activation enhances biliary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collaboration and standardization ac- tivities of the StratusLab project at the end of Project the project can make use, while in Year 2 more focus will be put on driving...

  14. activated platelets enhance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collaboration and standardization ac- tivities of the StratusLab project at the end of Project the project can make use, while in Year 2 more focus will be put on driving...

  15. activation enhances gastric: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collaboration and standardization ac- tivities of the StratusLab project at the end of Project the project can make use, while in Year 2 more focus will be put on driving...

  16. anticholinergic activity enhancement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collaboration and standardization ac- tivities of the StratusLab project at the end of Project the project can make use, while in Year 2 more focus will be put on driving...

  17. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Upper Ocean Processes Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind -1400 Meters of 300 lbs Spectra Line -Davit and Block -Mounting Pedestal -Power Supply -UCTD while underway between the SHOA DART buoy and the STRATUS IMET buoy. The probe was deployed every half buoys. Figure 6. Individual cast from SHOA DART and WHOI ORS buoys. Conclusion With proper training

  18. -c..-----LA Science Service Feature 7 3P'ily THE VPEATIER 't

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    t o H i g h in the air ride the beautiful white cirrus clouds of long filaments of slomly falling snow. Brooks of Clark University, -----THE NAMES OF CLOUDS To most people a cloud is a cloud, just as a tree is a tree. To the weather- mise, however, a cloud is a cumulus cloud, a cirrus cloud, a stratus cloud

  19. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT COMPENSATION CEC5002013114 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Stratus Consulting Inc. #12-04-025 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Joe O'Hagan Contract Manager Linda Spiegel Office Manager Energy

  20. Water vapor, cloud liquid water paths, and rain rates over northern high latitude open seas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    longwave radiation caused by differences in cloud cover can produce an JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL-level stratus con- tribute the most to the total Arctic cloud cover of any cloud type according to surface presence during summertime but otherwise the Wentz internal sea-ice screening appears effective

  1. Investigation of the first and second aerosol indirect effects using data from the May 2003 Intensive Operational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    effect (AIE) for a spring continental stratus cloud on the basis of data collected during the 17 May 2003. Introduction [2] Aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions are an integral and important part of the climate system, or on both. [3] The first AIE, or ``Twomey'' effect, refers to the modification of the cloud droplet number

  2. frisch-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., December 8,JohnResolving Modeling9 On Stratus

  3. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative Absorption andResolvingEvaluationComparison of Stratus Cloud

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative Absorption andResolvingEvaluationComparison of Stratus CloudCloud

  5. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative Absorption andResolvingEvaluationComparison of Stratus CloudCloudA

  6. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative Absorption andResolvingEvaluationComparison of Stratus

  7. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative Absorption andResolvingEvaluationComparison of StratusComparison of

  8. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative Absorption andResolvingEvaluationComparison of StratusComparison

  9. Austin(2)-RT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugust August 2015 Events August 2015 eventStratus

  10. Author Select

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugust August 2015 Events August 2015 eventStratus

  11. dong(3)-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ .-detonation7 Comparison of Stratus

  12. dong-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ .-detonation7 Comparison of Stratus1

  13. Pt Reyes 2005: MASRAD, MASE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITY AEROSOL INLET J.-L.Pseudogaps, Polarons,Stratus

  14. Final technical Report DE-FG02-06ER65187

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin Eloranta

    2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations from the University of Wisconsin Non-Hydrostatic Modeling System (UW-NMS) along with those from other models indicate a strong tendency to overproduce ice, resulting in a decimation of the liquid portion of mixed-phase stratus through the Bergeron-Findeissen process. Immersion freezing was illustrated to be a major contributor to ice production within these cloud layers, and aerosol properties were illustrated to be an important consideration in the simulation of this process. In particular, the soluble mass fraction and aerosol insoluble mass type were demonstrated to influence simulation of the immersion freezing process, Data collected by the Arctic High Spectral Resolution Lidar and Millimeter Cloud Radar during the M-PACE period was analyzed in order to provide a statistical dataset for validation of simulations of mixed-phase stratus. 270 hours of single-layer cases were reviewed, and mean values for cloud base height, cloud thickness, cloud optical thickness, cloud temperature, wind direction, and liquid and ice particle size, particle number density, and water content were derived.

  15. Final Report for "Improved Representations of Cloud Microphysics for Model and Remote Sensing Evaluation using Data Collected during ISDAC, TWP-ICE and RACORO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarquhar, Greg M. [University of Illinois] University of Illinois

    2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We were funded by ASR to use data collected during ISDAC and TWP-ICE to evaluate models with a variety of temporal and spatial scales, to evaluate ground-based remote sensing retrievals and to develop cloud parameterizations with the end goal of improving the modeling of cloud processes and properties and their impact on atmospheric radiation. In particular, we proposed to: 1) Calculate distributions of microphysical properties observed in arctic stratus during ISDAC for initializing and evaluating LES and GCMs, and for developing parameterizations of effective particle sizes, mean fall velocities, and mean single-scattering properties for such models; 2) Improve representations of particle sizes, fall velocities and scattering properties for tropical and arctic cirrus using TWP-ICE, ISDAC and M-PACE data, and to determine the contributions that small ice crystals, with maximum dimensions D less than 50 ?m, make to mass and radiative properties; 3) Study fundamental interactions between clouds and radiation by improving representations of small quasi-spherical particles and their scattering properties. We were additionally funded 1-year by ASR to use RACORO data to develop an integrated product of cloud microphysical properties. We accomplished all of our goals.

  16. Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations with the NCAR Single Column Climate Model (SCAM) and ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X; Ghan, SJ; Xie, S

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed-phase stratus clouds are ubiquitous in the Arctic and play an important role in climate in this region. However, climate models have generally proven unsuccessful at simulating the partitioning of condensed water into liquid droplets and ice crystals in these Arctic clouds, which affect modeled cloud phase, cloud lifetime and radiative properties. An ice nucleation parameterization and a vapor deposition scheme were developed that together provide a physically-consistent treatment of mixed-phase clouds in global climate models. These schemes have been implemented in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 (CAM3). This report documents the performance of these schemes against ARM Mixed-phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) observations using the CAM single column model version (SCAM). SCAM with our new schemes has a more realistic simulation of the cloud phase structure and the partitioning of condensed water into liquid droplets against observations during the M-PACE than the standard CAM simulations.

  17. Numerical simulation of coastal flows when solar radiation is blocked by smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molenkamp, C. R.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Smoke from fires ignited in a large-scale nuclear exchange would greatly reduce the flux of solar radiation at the ground and lead to rapid cooling over continental regions. Because of its large heat capacity, the ocean would cool more slowly so that a thermal gradient would tend to develop at the continental coastlines. In order to investigate the hypothesis that these thermal gradients would lead to zones of persistent precipitation along the coastlines, a modified version of the Colorado State University Mesoscale Model has been used to simulate the evolution of atmospheric flows for both West and East coasts assuming a moderate westerly synoptic flow of 5 m s/sup /minus/1/. In both cases a layer of fog forms over the ground, effectively limiting the rate of cooling over land. This fog layer grows in height as the atmosphere aloft cools, forming a stratus cloud. Moisture from the ocean surface, mixed vertically into a radiatively cooled atmosphere, causes a cloud layer to form over the ocean as well. With both land and sea covered by clouds, there is no differential cooling, anomalous flow fields, or enhanced precipitation. These simulations also demonstrate the important role of moisture in moderating the initial rate of atmospheric cooling when solar radiation is blocked by smoke.

  18. Final Technical Report for "Ice nuclei relation to aerosol properties: Data analysis and model parameterization for IN in mixed-phase clouds"Ă?Âť (DOE/SC00002354)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul J. DeMott, Anthony J. Prenni; Sonia M. Kreidenweis

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds play an important role in weather and climate. In addition to their key role in the hydrologic cycle, clouds scatter incoming solar radiation and trap infrared radiation from the surface and lower atmosphere. Despite their importance, feedbacks involving clouds remain as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate models. To better simulate cloud processes requires better characterization of cloud microphysical processes, which can affect the spatial extent, optical depth and lifetime of clouds. To this end, we developed a new parameterization to be used in numerical models that describes the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number concentrations active to form ice crystals in mixed-phase (water droplets and ice crystals co-existing) cloud conditions as these depend on existing aerosol properties and temperature. The parameterization is based on data collected using the Colorado State University continuous flow diffusion chamber in aircraft and ground-based campaigns over a 14-year period, including data from the DOE-supported Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The resulting relationship is shown to more accurately represent the variability of ice nuclei distributions in the atmosphere compared to currently used parameterizations based on temperature alone. When implemented in one global climate model, the new parameterization predicted more realistic annually averaged cloud water and ice distributions, and cloud radiative properties, especially for sensitive higher latitude mixed-phase cloud regions. As a test of the new global IN scheme, it was compared to independent data collected during the 2008 DOE-sponsored Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). Good agreement with this new data set suggests the broad applicability of the new scheme for describing general (non-chemically specific) aerosol influences on IN number concentrations feeding mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds. Finally, the parameterization was implemented into a regional cloud-resolving model to compare predictions of ice crystal concentrations and other cloud properties to those observed in two intensive case studies of Arctic stratus during ISDAC. Our implementation included development of a prognostic scheme of ice activation using the IN parameterization so that the most realistic treatment of ice nuclei, including their budget (gains and losses), was achieved. Many cloud microphysical properties and cloud persistence were faithfully reproduced, despite a tendency to under-predict (by a few to several times) ice crystal number concentrations and cloud ice mass, in agreement with some other studies. This work serves generally as the basis for improving predictive schemes for cloud ice crystal activation in cloud and climate models, and more specifically as the basis for such a scheme to be used in a Multi-scale Modeling Format (MMF) that utilizes a connected system of cloud-resolving models on a global grid in an effort to better resolve cloud processes and their influence on climate.

  19. Contribution to the development of DOE ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Data (CMBE) products: Satellite data over the ARM permanent and AMF sites: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, B; Dong, X; Xie, S

    2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    To support the LLNL ARM infrastructure team Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) data development, the University of North Dakota (UND)'s group will provide the LLNL team the NASA CERES and ISCCP satellite retrieved cloud and radiative properties for the periods when they are available over the ARM permanent research sites. The current available datasets, to date, are as follows: the CERES/TERRA during 200003-200812; the CERES/AQUA during 200207-200712; and the ISCCP during 199601-200806. The detailed parameters list below: (1) CERES Shortwave radiative fluxes (net and downwelling); (2) CERES Longwave radiative fluxes (upwelling) - (items 1 & 2 include both all-sky and clear-sky fluxes); (3) CERES Layered clouds (total, high, middle, and low); (4) CERES Cloud thickness; (5) CERES Effective cloud height; (6) CERES cloud microphysical/optical properties; (7) ISCCP optical depth cloud top pressure matrix; (8) ISCCP derived cloud types (r.g., cirrus, stratus, etc.); and (9) ISCCP infrared derived cloud top pressures. (10) The UND group shall apply necessary quality checks to the original CERES and ISCCP data to remove suspicious data points. The temporal resolution for CERES data should be all available satellite overpasses over the ARM sites; for ISCCP data, it should be 3-hourly. The spatial resolution is the closest satellite field of view observations to the ARM surface sites. All the provided satellite data should be in a format that is consistent with the current ARM CMBE dataset so that the satellite data can be easily merged into the CMBE dataset.

  20. Mesoscale Modeling During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avramov, A.; Harringston, J.Y.; Verlinde, J.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic (Curry et al. 2000) and through various feedback mechanisms exert a strong influence on the Arctic climate. Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. It has been hypothesized that mixed-phase clouds are maintained through a balance between liquid water condensation resulting from the cloud-top radiative cooling and ice removal by precipitation (Pinto 1998; Harrington et al. 1999). In their modeling study Harrington et al. (1999) found that the maintenance of this balance depends strongly on the ambient concentration of ice forming nucleus (IFN). In a follow-up study, Jiang et al. (2002), using only 30% of IFN concentration predicted by Meyers et al. (1992) IFN parameterization were able to obtain results similar to the observations reported by Pinto (1998). The IFN concentration measurements collected during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004 over the North Slope of Alaska and the Beaufort Sea (Verlinde et al. 2005), also showed much lower values then those predicted (Prenne, pers. comm.) by currently accepted ice nucleation parameterizations (e.g. Meyers et al. 1992). The goal of this study is to use the extensive IFN data taken during M-PACE to examine what effects low IFN concentrations have on mesoscale cloud structure and coastal dynamics.

  1. Reexamination of the State of the Art Cloud Modeling Shows Real Improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muehlbauer, Andreas D.; Grabowski, Wojciech W.; Malinowski, S. P.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Bryan, George; Lebo, Zachary; Milbrandt, Jason; Morrison, H.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Tessendorf, Sarah; Theriault, Julie M.; Thompson, Gregory

    2013-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Following up on an almost thirty year long history of International Cloud Modeling Workshops, that started out with a meeting in Irsee, Germany in 1985, the 8th International Cloud Modeling Workshop was held in July 2012 in Warsaw, Poland. The workshop, hosted by the Institute of Geophysics at the University of Warsaw, was organized by Szymon Malinowski and his local team of students and co-chaired by Wojciech Grabowski (NCAR/MMM) and Andreas Muhlbauer (University of Washington). International Cloud Modeling Workshops have been held traditionally every four years typically during the week before the International Conference on Clouds and Precipitation (ICCP) . Rooted in the World Meteorological Organization’s (WMO) weather modification program, the core objectives of the Cloud Modeling Workshop have been centered at the numerical modeling of clouds, cloud microphysics, and the interactions between cloud microphysics and cloud dynamics. In particular, the goal of the workshop is to provide insight into the pertinent problems of today’s state-of-the-art of cloud modeling and to identify key deficiencies in the microphysical representation of clouds in numerical models and cloud parameterizations. In recent years, the workshop has increasingly shifted the focus toward modeling the interactions between aerosols and clouds and provided case studies to investigate both the effects of aerosols on clouds and precipitation as well as the impact of cloud and precipitation processes on aerosols. This time, about 60 (?) scientists from about 10 (?) different countries participated in the workshop and contributed with discussions, oral and poster presentations to the workshop’s plenary and breakout sessions. Several case leaders contributed to the workshop by setting up five observationally-based case studies covering a wide range of cloud types, namely, marine stratocumulus, mid-latitude squall lines, mid-latitude cirrus clouds, Arctic stratus and winter-time orographic clouds and precipitation. Interested readers are encouraged to visit the workshop website at http://www.atmos.washington.edu/~andreasm/workshop2012/ and browse through the list of case studies. The web page also provides a detailed list of participants and the workshop agenda. Aside from contributed oral and poster presentations during the workshop’s plenary sessions, parallel breakout sessions focused on presentations and discussions of the individual cases. A short summary and science highlights from each of the cases is presented below.

  2. Chemical Composition and Sources of Coastal Marine Aerosol Particles during the 2008 VOCALS-REx Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.- N.; Springston, S.; Jayne, John T.; Wang, Jian; Hubbe, John M.; Senum, Gunnar I.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Daum, Peter H.

    2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical composition of aerosol particles (Dp 1.5 ?m) was measured over the southeast Pacific Ocean during the VAMOS (Variability of the American Monsoon Systems) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-Rex) between 16 October and 15 November 2008 using the US Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft. The objective of these flights was to gain an understanding of the sources and evolution of these aerosols, and of how they interact with the marine stratus cloud layer that prevails in this region of the globe. Our measurements showed that the marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol mass was dominated by non-sea-salt SO2?4, followed by Na+, Cl?, Org (total organics), NH+4 , and NO?3 , in decreasing order of importance; CH3SO?3 (MSA), Ca2+, and K+ rarely exceeded their limits of detection. Aerosols were strongly acidic with a NH+4 to SO2?4 equivalents ratio typically < 0.3. Sea-salt aerosol (SSA) particles, represented by NaCl, exhibited Cl? deficits caused by both HNO3 and H2SO4, but for the most part were externally mixed with particles, mainly SO2?4. SSA contributed only a small fraction of the total accumulation mode particle number concentration. It was inferred that all aerosol species (except SSA) were of predominantly continental origin because of their strong land-to-sea concentration gradient. Comparison of relative changes in median values suggests that (1) an oceanic source of NH3 is present between 72° W and 76° W, (2) additional organic aerosols from biomass burns or biogenic precursors were emitted from coastal regions south of 31° S, with possible cloud processing, and (3) free tropospheric (FT) contributions to MBL gas and aerosol concentrations were negligible. The very low levels of CH3SO?3 observed as well as the correlation between SO2?4 and NO?3 (which is thought primarily anthropogenic) suggest a limited contribution of DMS to SO2?4 aerosol production during VOCALS.

  3. A Seasonal Perspective on Regional Air Quality in CentralCalifornia - Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harley, Robert A.; Brown, Nancy J.; Tonse, Shaheen R.; Jin, Ling

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Central California spans a wide variety of urban, agricultural, and natural terrain, including the San Francisco Bay area, the Central Valley, and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Population within this region is growing rapidly, and there are persistent, serious air pollution problems including fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) and ozone. Summertime photochemical air pollution is the focus of the present study, which represents a first phase in the development and application of a modeling capability to assess formation and transport of ozone and its precursors within Central California over an entire summer season. This contrasts with past studies that have examined pollutant dynamics for a few selected high-ozone episodes each lasting 3-5 days. The Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) has been applied to predict air pollutant formation and transport in Central California for a 15-day period beginning on July 24, 2000. This period includes a 5-day intensive operating period (July 29 to August 2) from the Central California Ozone Study (CCOS). Day-specific meteorological conditions were modeled by research collaborators at NOAA using a mesoscale meteorological model (MM5). Pollutant emissions within the study domain were based on CARB emission inventory estimates, with additional efforts conducted as part of this research to capture relevant emissions variability including (1) temperature and sunlight-driven changes in biogenic VOC, (2) weekday/weekend and diurnal differences in light-duty (LD) and heavy-duty (HD) motor vehicle emissions, (3) effects of day-specific meteorological conditions on plume rise from point sources such as power plants. We also studied the effects of using cleaner pollutant inflow boundary conditions, lower than indicated during CCOS aircraft flights over the Pacific Ocean, but supported by other surface, ship-based, balloon and aircraft sampling studies along the west coast. Model predictions were compared with measured concentrations for O{sub 3}, NO{sub x}, NO{sub y}, and CO at about 100 ground observation stations within the CCOS domain. Comparisons were made both for time series and for statistically aggregated metrics, to assess model performance over the whole modeling domain and for the individual air basins within the domain. The model tends to over-predict ozone levels along the coast where observed levels are generally low. Inland performance in the San Joaquin Valley is generally better. Model-measurement agreement for night-time ozone is improved by evaluating the sum of predicted O{sub 3} + NO{sub 2} against observations; this removes from the comparison the effect of any ozone titration that may occur. A variety of diagnostic simulations were conducted to investigate the causes for differences between predictions and observations. These included (1) enhanced deposition of O{sub 3} to the ocean, (2) reduced vertical mixing over the ocean, (3) attenuation of sunlight by coastal stratus, (4) the influence of surface albedo on photochemistry, and (5) the effects of observation nudging on wind fields. Use of advanced model probing tools such as process analysis and sensitivity analysis is demonstrated by diagnosing model sensitivity to boundary conditions and to weekday-weekend emission changes.

  4. The Radiative Role of Free Tropospheric Aerosols and Marine Clouds over the Central North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzoleni, Claudio [Michigan Technological University; Kumar, Sumit [Michigan Technological University; Wright, Kendra [Michigan Technological University; Kramer, Louisa [Michigan Technological University; Mazzoleni, Lynn [Michigan Technological University; Owen, Robert [Michigan Technological University; Helmig, Detlev [University of Colorado at Boulder

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The scientific scope of the project was to exploit the unique location of the Pico Mountain Observatory (PMO) located in the summit caldera of the Pico Volcano in Pico Island in the Azores, for atmospheric studies. The observatory, located at 2225m a.s.l., typically samples free tropospheric aerosols laying above the marine low-level clouds and long-range transported from North America. The broad purpose of this research was to provide the scientific community with a better understanding of fundamental physical processes governing the effects of aerosols on radiative forcing and climate; with the ultimate goal of improving our abilities to understand past climate and to predict future changes through numerical models. The project was 'exploratory' in nature, with the plan to demonstrate the feasibility of deploying for the first time, an extensive aerosol research package at PMO. One of the primary activities was to test the deployment of these instruments at the site, to collect data during the 2012 summer season, and to further develop the infrastructure and the knowledge for performing novel research at PMO in follow-up longer-term aerosol-cloud studies. In the future, PMO could provide an elevated research outpost to support the renewed DOE effort in the Azores that was intensified in 2013 with the opening of the new sea-level ARM-DOE Eastern North Atlantic permanent facility at Graciosa Island. During the project period, extensive new data sets were collected for the planned 2012 season. Thanks to other synergistic activities and opportunities, data collection was then successfully extended to 2013 and 2014. Highlights of the scientific findings during this project include: a) biomass burning contribute significantly to the aerosol loading in the North Atlantic free troposphere; however, long-range transported black carbon concentrations decreased substantially in the last decade. b) Single black carbon particles – analyzed off-line at the electron microscope – were often very compacted, suggesting cloud processing and exhibiting different optical properties from fresh emissions. In addition, black carbon was found to be sometimes mixed with mineral dust, affecting its optical properties and potential forcing. c) Some aerosols collected at PMO acted as ice nuclei, potentially contributing to cirrus cloud formation during their transport in the upper free troposphere. Identified good ice nuclei were often mineral dust particles. d) The free tropospheric aerosols studied at PMO have relevance to low level marine clouds due, for example, to synoptic subsidence entraining free tropospheric aerosols into the marine boundary layer. This has potentially large consequences on cloud condensation nuclei concentrations and compositions in the marine boundary layer; therefore, having an effect on the marine stratus clouds, with potentially important repercussions on the radiative forcing. The scientific products of this project currently include contributions to two papers published in the Nature Publishing group (Nature Communications and Scientific Reports), one paper under revision for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, one in review in Geophysical Research Letters and one recently submitted to Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussion. In addition, four manuscripts are in advanced state of preparation. Finally, twenty-eight presentations were given at international conferences, workshops and seminars.

  5. Computing for Finance

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The finance sector is one of the driving forces for the use of distributed or Grid computing for business purposes. The speakers will review the state-of-the-art of high performance computing in the financial sector, and provide insight into how different types of Grid computing ? from local clusters to global networks - are being applied to financial applications. They will also describe the use of software and techniques from physics, such as Monte Carlo simulations, in the financial world. There will be four talks of 20min each. The talk abstracts and speaker bios are listed below. This will be followed by a Q&A; panel session with the speakers. From 19:00 onwards there will be a networking cocktail for audience and speakers. This is an EGEE / CERN openlab event organized in collaboration with the regional business network rezonance.ch. A webcast of the event will be made available for subsequent viewing, along with powerpoint material presented by the speakers. Attendance is free and open to all. Registration is mandatory via www.rezonance.ch, including for CERN staff. 1. Overview of High Performance Computing in the Financial Industry Michael Yoo, Managing Director, Head of the Technical Council, UBS Presentation will describe the key business challenges driving the need for HPC solutions, describe the means in which those challenges are being addressed within UBS (such as GRID) as well as the limitations of some of these solutions, and assess some of the newer HPC technologies which may also play a role in the Financial Industry in the future. Speaker Bio: Michael originally joined the former Swiss Bank Corporation in 1994 in New York as a developer on a large data warehouse project. In 1996 he left SBC and took a role with Fidelity Investments in Boston. Unable to stay away for long, he returned to SBC in 1997 while working for Perot Systems in Singapore. Finally, in 1998 he formally returned to UBS in Stamford following the merger with SBC and has remained with UBS for the past 9 years. During his tenure at UBS, he has had a number of leadership roles within IT in development, support and architecture. In 2006 Michael relocated to Switzerland to take up his current role as head of the UBS IB Technical Council, responsible for the overall technology strategy and vision of the Investment Bank. One of Michael's key responsibilities is to manage the UBS High Performance Computing Research Lab and he has been involved in a number of initiatives in the HPC space. 2. Grid in the Commercial WorldFred Gedling, Chief Technology Officer EMEA and Senior Vice President Global Services, DataSynapse Grid computing gets mentions in the press for community programs starting last decade with "Seti@Home". Government, national and supranational initiatives in grid receive some press. One of the IT-industries' best-kept secrets is the use of grid computing by commercial organizations with spectacular results. Grid Computing and its evolution into Application Virtualization is discussed and how this is key to the next generation data center. Speaker Bio: Fred Gedling holds the joint roles of Chief Technology Officer for EMEA and Senior Vice President of Global Services at DataSynapse, a global provider of application virtualisation software. Based in London and working closely with organisations seeking to optimise their IT infrastructures, Fred offers unique insights into the technology of virtualisation as well as the methodology of establishing ROI and rapid deployment to the immediate advantage of the business. Fred has more than fifteen years experience of enterprise middleware and high-performance infrastructures. Prior to DataSynapse he worked in high performance CRM middleware and was the CTO EMEA for New Era of Networks (NEON) during the rapid growth of Enterprise Application Integration. His 25-year career in technology also includes management positions at Goldman Sachs and Stratus Computer. Fred holds a First Class Bsc (Hons) degree in Physics with Astrophysics from the University of Leeds and had the privilege o

  6. Computing for Finance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The finance sector is one of the driving forces for the use of distributed or Grid computing for business purposes. The speakers will review the state-of-the-art of high performance computing in the financial sector, and provide insight into how different types of Grid computing – from local clusters to global networks - are being applied to financial applications. They will also describe the use of software and techniques from physics, such as Monte Carlo simulations, in the financial world. There will be four talks of 20min each. The talk abstracts and speaker bios are listed below. This will be followed by a Q&A; panel session with the speakers. From 19:00 onwards there will be a networking cocktail for audience and speakers. This is an EGEE / CERN openlab event organized in collaboration with the regional business network rezonance.ch. A webcast of the event will be made available for subsequent viewing, along with powerpoint material presented by the speakers. Attendance is free and open to all. Registration is mandatory via www.rezonance.ch, including for CERN staff. 1. Overview of High Performance Computing in the Financial Industry Michael Yoo, Managing Director, Head of the Technical Council, UBS Presentation will describe the key business challenges driving the need for HPC solutions, describe the means in which those challenges are being addressed within UBS (such as GRID) as well as the limitations of some of these solutions, and assess some of the newer HPC technologies which may also play a role in the Financial Industry in the future. Speaker Bio: Michael originally joined the former Swiss Bank Corporation in 1994 in New York as a developer on a large data warehouse project. In 1996 he left SBC and took a role with Fidelity Investments in Boston. Unable to stay away for long, he returned to SBC in 1997 while working for Perot Systems in Singapore. Finally, in 1998 he formally returned to UBS in Stamford following the merger with SBC and has remained with UBS for the past 9 years. During his tenure at UBS, he has had a number of leadership roles within IT in development, support and architecture. In 2006 Michael relocated to Switzerland to take up his current role as head of the UBS IB Technical Council, responsible for the overall technology strategy and vision of the Investment Bank. One of Michael's key responsibilities is to manage the UBS High Performance Computing Research Lab and he has been involved in a number of initiatives in the HPC space. 2. Grid in the Commercial WorldFred Gedling, Chief Technology Officer EMEA and Senior Vice President Global Services, DataSynapse Grid computing gets mentions in the press for community programs starting last decade with "Seti@Home". Government, national and supranational initiatives in grid receive some press. One of the IT-industries' best-kept secrets is the use of grid computing by commercial organizations with spectacular results. Grid Computing and its evolution into Application Virtualization is discussed and how this is key to the next generation data center. Speaker Bio: Fred Gedling holds the joint roles of Chief Technology Officer for EMEA and Senior Vice President of Global Services at DataSynapse, a global provider of application virtualisation software. Based in London and working closely with organisations seeking to optimise their IT infrastructures, Fred offers unique insights into the technology of virtualisation as well as the methodology of establishing ROI and rapid deployment to the immediate advantage of the business. Fred has more than fifteen years experience of enterprise middleware and high-performance infrastructures. Prior to DataSynapse he worked in high performance CRM middleware and was the CTO EMEA for New Era of Networks (NEON) during the rapid growth of Enterprise Application Integration. His 25-year career in technology also includes management positions at Goldman Sachs and Stratus Computer. Fred holds a First Class Bsc (Hons) degree in Physics with Astrophysics from the University of Leeds and had the privilege