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Sample records for mars blend west

  1. Stratigraphy and structure of interior layered deposits in west Candor Chasma, Mars, from High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) stereo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Stratigraphy and structure of interior layered deposits in west Candor Chasma, Mars, from High the stratigraphy of two adjacent mounds. Layering tends to dip in the same direction as the local topographic slope rotations. The stratigraphy of two adjacent mounds correlates, but the thicknesses of the units differ. Most

  2. Origin of upper Bell Canyon Reservoir Sandstones (Guadalupian), El Mar and Paduca Fields, Southeast New Mexico and West Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinmeister, Marcus Paul

    1978-01-01

    and into the Delaware Basin. A turbidite origin is supported by the ordered sequence of sedimentary structures of the sandstones and stratigraphic evidence which shows that Upper Bell Canyon sedimentation occurred in a water depth of at least 1500 ft. Texture... units, Paduca field. 32 Frequency of bed divisions in Ramsey Sandstone cores. 43 ix LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Regional map of Delaware Basin showing structure on top of Bell Canyon Formation and locations of Paduca and El Mar fields. North...

  3. THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01 LANDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    THE MARS ENVIRONMENTAL COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT (MECA) WET CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT ON THE MARS '01 of Chemistry, TuftsUniversity, Medford, MA, 02155 4 Mineral Processing Department, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26507 Introduction. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) is an instrument

  4. West African crude production diversifies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aalund, L.

    1983-06-01

    Nigeria, with its seven crude-oil export streams, dominated West African production and accounted for over 70% of the depressed 1.8 million b/d output from the region last year. However, during the 1970s a flurry of new producing fields, primarily off the African coast, diversified production among a number of countries and touched off a wave of oil activity. The Journal takes a close look at the quality of West African oil in this installment of assays on world export crudes. This issue covers, in alphabetical order, Bonny Light (Nigeria) to Espoir (Ivory Coast). A following issue will wrap up West Africa by presenting assays on crudes from Forcados Blend (Nigeria) to Zaire Crude (Zaire).

  5. BLENDED AND ONLINE LEARNING IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Randy

    ) "Flipped classroom" - focus on active learning and enhanced student engagement in the classroom #12;First dissatisfied with student learning experience #12;Blended Learning Initiative Large, first-year courses student engagement improve student learning outcomes improve knowledge retention #12;Framework for Blended

  6. Decomposition method for the Multiperiod Blending Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    for many applications 4 · Gasoline and crude oil blending · Raw material feed scheduling · StorageDecomposition method for the Multiperiod Blending Problem Irene Lotero, Francisco Trespalacios algorithm #12;Supply Tanks (s) Blending Tanks (b) Demand Tanks (d) Multiperiod blending problem is defined

  7. Water for future Mars astronauts?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water for future Mars astronauts? Water for future Mars astronauts? Within its first three months on Mars, NASA's Curiosity Rover saw a surprising diversity of soils and sediments...

  8. Method to blend separator powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guidotti, Ronald A. (Albuquerque, NM); Andazola, Arthur H. (Albuquerque, NM); Reinhardt, Frederick W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-12-04

    A method for making a blended powder mixture, whereby two or more powders are mixed in a container with a liquid selected from nitrogen or short-chain alcohols, where at least one of the powders has an angle of repose greater than approximately 50 degrees. The method is useful in preparing blended powders of Li halides and MgO for use in the preparation of thermal battery separators.

  9. Prediction of metallurgical coke strength from the petrographic composition of coal blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutcu, H.; Toroglu, I.; Piskin, S. [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2009-07-01

    Turkey, especially Zonguldak on the West Coast of Black Sea region, has large reserves of bituminous coal that can be used either directly or in blends with other coals for metallurgical coke production. It is possible to predict the coking properties of these coals by petrographic analysis. In this study, semi- and non-coking coals were blended with coking bituminous coals in varying proportions and an estimation was made as to their stability factors through petrographic techniques. It was established that semi- and non-coking bituminous coals could be used in the production of metallurgical coke.

  10. Intrinsically safe moisture blending system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hallman Jr., Russell L.; Vanatta, Paul D.

    2012-09-11

    A system for providing an adjustable blend of fluids to an application process is disclosed. The system uses a source of a first fluid flowing through at least one tube that is permeable to a second fluid and that is disposed in a source of the second fluid to provide the adjustable blend. The temperature of the second fluid is not regulated, and at least one calibration curve is used to predict the volumetric mixture ratio of the second fluid with the first fluid from the permeable tube. The system typically includes a differential pressure valve and a backpressure control valve to set the flow rate through the system.

  11. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

  12. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen–50% CNG fuel.

  13. Controlling the Morphology of Polymer and Fullerene Blends in Organic Photovoltaics Through Sequential Processing and Self-Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Jordan C.

    2015-01-01

    Blend Casting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Blend Casting 41 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .and tra- ditional blend casting: Nanoscale structure and

  14. The Planet Mars Mars is noticeable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    Evidence for Water Sedimentary layerings with salt residues #12;Sedi- mentary Rocks #12;Ingredients Mars has (or had): ·Running water on the surface ·Tectonic activity Could it have supported life? #12;The

  15. Table S1. Fuel Properties. JP-8 Blend-1 FT-1 Blend-2 FT-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    1 Table S1. Fuel Properties. JP-8 Blend-1 FT-1 Blend-2 FT-2 Feedstock Petroleum Petroleum & Natural Gas Natural Gas Petroleum & Coal Coal Sulfur (ppm by mass) 1148 699 19 658 22 Alkanes (% vol.) 50

  16. Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology New Opportunities Making the world incorporate a broad range of biological systems as components, and emphasize mutual improvement of both human

  17. Performance of Biofuels and Biofuel Blends

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    study (over 140 samples) to examine effects of several variables on Cloud Point (CP): Saturated Monoglyceride (SMG) Effects on Biodiesel Blend Low-Temperature Performance...

  18. West Windsor Grad College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PTS Apartments West Windsor Campus MarketFair Princeton Station PTS Main Campus & Grad College Friend Center Woodrow Wilson PTS Main Campus & Grad College Princeton Station PTS Apartments West Windsor

  19. Volatility of Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blends for Supercritical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blends for Supercritical Fuel Injection Volatility of Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blends for Supercritical Fuel Injection Supercritical dieseline could be...

  20. CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior Presentation given by Jay...

  1. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 Updated Feb 2009 Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

  2. Impact of Ethanol Blending on U.S. Gasoline Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-11-01

    This study assesses the impact of ethanol blending on gasoline prices in the US today and the potential impact of ethanol on gasoline prices at higher blending concentrations.

  3. Sandia Energy - Biofuels Blend Right In: Researchers Show Ionic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels Blend Right In: Researchers Show Ionic Liquids Effective for Pretreating Mixed Blends of Biofuel Feedstocks Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels...

  4. Green emitting phosphors and blends thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Setlur, Anant Achyut (Niskayuna, NY); Siclovan, Oltea Puica (Rexford, NY); Nammalwar, Prasanth Kumar (Bangalore, IN); Sathyanarayan, Ramesh Rao (Bangalore, IN); Porob, Digamber G. (Goa, IN); Chandran, Ramachandran Gopi (Bangalore, IN); Heward, William Jordan (Saratoga Springs, NY); Radkov, Emil Vergilov (Euclid, OH); Briel, Linda Jane Valyou (Niskayuna, NY)

    2010-12-28

    Phosphor compositions, blends thereof and light emitting devices including white light emitting LED based devices, and backlights, based on such phosphor compositions. The devices include a light source and a phosphor material as described. Also disclosed are phosphor blends including such a phosphor and devices made therefrom.

  5. Decomposition method for the Multiperiod Blending Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Decomposition method for the Multiperiod Blending Problem Francisco Trespalacios, Irene Lotero Engineering Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 #12;2 Motivation and goals Multiperiod blending problem is a general model for many applications, and it is difficult to solve · Gasoline and crude oil

  6. PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA, P.J.

    2006-02-22

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

  7. Viscoelastic properties of bidisperse homopolymer blends 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juliani

    2000-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear stress relaxation dynamics of well entangled polymer liquids were studied using a series of entangled, bidisperse 1,4-polybutadiene blends. Blend systems comprising high-(M[L]) and low-(M[S]) molecular weight components with M...

  8. MARS OBSERVER Mission Failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    of Mars Observer Mission Failure.. ................... D-12 a. Most Probable Cause: Leakage of NT0 Through Check Valves .................................................................. D-14 b. Potential Cause: Pressure Regulator Failure....................... D-28 c. Potential Cause: Failure of a Pyro Valve Charge

  9. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen-50% CNG fuel.

  10. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

  11. Mars mission safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buden, D. (EG G Idaho, Idaho Falls (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Precautions that need to be taken to assure safety on a manned Mars mission with nuclear thermal propulsion are briefly considered. What has been learned from the 1955 SNAP-10A operation of a nuclear reactor in space and from the Rover/NERVA project is reviewed. The ways that radiation hazards can be dealt with at various stages of a Mars mission are examined.

  12. Emissions with butane/propane blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    This article reports on various aspects of exhaust emissions from a light-duty car converted to operate on liquefied petroleum gas and equipped with an electrically heated catalyst. Butane and butane/propane blends have recently received attention as potentially useful alternative fuels. Butane has a road octane number of 92, a high blending vapor pressure, and has been used to upgrade octane levels of gasoline blends and improve winter cold starts. Due to reformulated gasoline requirements for fuel vapor pressure, however, industry has had to remove increasing amounts of butane form the gasoline pool. Paradoxically, butane is one of the cleanest burning components of gasoline.

  13. Two glass transitions in miscible polymer blends?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2014-06-28

    In contrast to mixtures of two small molecule fluids, miscible binary polymer blends often exhibit two structural relaxation times and two glass transition temperatures. Qualitative explanations postulate phenomenological models of local concentration enhancements due to chain connectivity in ideal, fully miscible systems. We develop a quantitative theory that explains qualitative trends in the dynamics of real miscible polymer blends which are never ideal mixtures. The theory is a synthesis of the lattice cluster theory of blend thermodynamics, the generalized entropy theory for glass-formation in polymer materials, and the Kirkwood-Buff theory for concentration fluctuations in binary mixtures.

  14. BLENDING PROBLEM A refinery blends four petroleum components into three grades of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shier, Douglas R.

    BLENDING PROBLEM A refinery blends four petroleum components into three grades of gasoline/day $/barrel #1 5,000 $9.00 #2 2,400 7.00 #3 4,000 12.00 #4 1,500 6.00 Blending formulas and selling price 4,000 x4R + x4P + x4L 1,500 #12;blending: (1) x1R / (x1R + x2R + x3R + x4R) .40 or x1R .40(x1R

  15. Continuous blending of dry pharmaceutical powders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pernenkil, Lakshman

    2008-01-01

    Conventional batch blending of pharmaceutical powders coupled with long quality analysis times increases the production cycle time leading to strained cash flows. Also, scale-up issues faced in process development causes ...

  16. Carnegie Mellon Multiperiod Blend Scheduling Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Department of Chemical Engineering Center for Advanced Process Decision-making Carnegie Mellon University frequently in the petrochemical industry. -Large cost savings can be achieved if the correct blending

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ethanol can be combined with gasoline in blends ranging from E10 (10% or less ethanol, 90% gasoline) up to E85 (up to 85% ethanol, 15% gasoline). The Renewable Fuels Standard (under the Energy...

  18. WI Biodiesel Blending Progream Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redmond, Maria E; Levy, Megan M

    2013-04-01

    The Wisconsin State Energy Office�¢����s (SEO) primary mission is to implement cost�¢���effective, reliable, balanced, and environmentally�¢���friendly clean energy projects. To support this mission the Wisconsin Biodiesel Blending Program was created to financially support the installation infrastructure necessary to directly sustain biodiesel blending and distribution at petroleum terminal facilities throughout Wisconsin. The SEO secured a federal directed award of $600,000 over 2.25 years. With these funds, the SEO supported the construction of inline biodiesel blending facilities at two petroleum terminals in Wisconsin. The Federal funding provided through the state provided a little less than half of the necessary investment to construct the terminals, with the balance put forth by the partners. Wisconsin is now home to two new biodiesel blending terminals. Fusion Renewables on Jones Island (in the City of Milwaukee) will offer a B100 blend to both bulk and retail customers. CITGO is currently providing a B5 blend to all customers at their Granville, WI terminal north of the City of Milwaukee.

  19. Blending World MapBlending World Map ProjectionsProjections Bernhard Jenny, Oregon State University, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Keith

    Blending World MapBlending World Map ProjectionsProjections Bernhard Jenny, Oregon State University via combination of two projections is well established. Some of the most popular world map projections Tripel projection). These two methods for creating new world map projections are included in the latest

  20. Charleston folio, West Virginia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Marius R. (Marius Robinson), 1858-1940.

    1901-01-01

    The Virginia Military Institute, along with other Southern military colleges, is almost always historically viewed within the context of their contributions during the Civil War. VMI, and other "West Points of the Confederacy," were founded long...

  1. Water in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlund, Andrew; Choy, Min L. Janny; Szeptycki, Leon

    2014-01-01

    faced with the imperative that water is vital to all life onChoy* and Leon Szeptycki Water in the West Keywords: climategreen infrastructure; water; water-energy; water governance;

  2. Buckhannon folio, West Virginia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taff, Joseph A. (Joseph Alexander), b. 1862.; Brooks, Alfred H. (Alfred Hulse), 1871-1924.

    1896-01-01

    of spiders throughout the state. Misumenops spp. were most abundant in West and Northwest Texas, with M. celer (Hentz) the most common species in these areas. Oxyopes saiticus was the most abundant spider in all areas of the state except West, Northwest... could then be eliminated as an important factor in predicting the dynamics of other arthropods. The cotton fleahopper (Pseudatomoscelis seriatus [Reuter]) model (Hartstack and Sterling 1986) uses numbers of six spider species to predict fleahopper...

  3. Phase Segregation in Polystyrene?Polylactide Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Bonnie; Hitchcock, Adam; Brash, John; Scholl, Andreas; Doran, Andrew

    2010-06-09

    Spun-cast films of polystyrene (PS) blended with polylactide (PLA) were visualized and characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and synchrotron-based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM). The composition of the two polymers in these systems was determined by quantitative chemical analysis of near-edge X-ray absorption signals recorded with X-PEEM. The surface morphology depends on the ratio of the two components, the total polymer concentration, and the temperature of vacuum annealing. For most of the blends examined, PS is the continuous phase with PLA existing in discrete domains or segregated to the air?polymer interface. Phase segregation was improved with further annealing. A phase inversion occurred when films of a 40:60 PS:PLA blend (0.7 wt percent loading) were annealed above the glass transition temperature (Tg) of PLA.

  4. Blending of diblock and triblock copolypeptide amphiphiles yields cell penetrating vesicles with low toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    vesicles by blending of different component amphiphilescomponents. [9] In these studies, an important requirement for successful blending

  5. Quality Assessment of Biodiesel and Biodiesel Blends | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quality Assessment of Biodiesel and Biodiesel Blends Quality Assessment of Biodiesel and Biodiesel Blends The results of a quality survey of B20 fuel in the United States were...

  6. Exploration of parameters for the continuous blending of pharmaceutical powders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Ben Chien Pang

    2011-01-01

    The transition from traditional batch blending to continuous blending is an opportunity for the pharmaceutical industry to reduce costs and improve quality control. This operational shift necessitates a deeper understanding ...

  7. Powering Mars Rovers

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Stewert, Robin;

    2013-05-28

    INL scientists are doing their best to help solve our energy problems here on Earth. But did you know the lab is playing a key role in the exploration of other worlds, too? Meet INL Engineer Robin Stewart helps build and test generators that power NASA missions to Pluto and Mars. You can learn more about INL projects at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  8. Blended Shelf: Reality-based Presentation and Exploration of Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    Blended library; shelf browsing; digital library ACM Classification Keywords H.5.2. [InformationBlended Shelf: Reality-based Presentation and Exploration of Library Collections Abstract We location of the library. Blended Shelf offers a 3D visualization of library collections

  9. FOREST ENTOMOLOGY Blending Synthetic Pheromones of Cerambycid Beetles to Develop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    (F.),Neoclytusmucronatus(F.),andXylotrechuscolonus(F.).Beetlesofthesespecieswere signiÞcantly attracted to synthetic blends that contained their pheromone components (isomers of 3FOREST ENTOMOLOGY Blending Synthetic Pheromones of Cerambycid Beetles to Develop Trap Lures.1603/EC11434 ABSTRACT We evaluated attraction of cerambycid beetle species to blends of known cerambycid

  10. A Novel Global Optimization Approach to the Multiperiod Blending Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    ­ Overall Flows ­ Individual Components (Blending) · Flow/Inventory Bounds · Operational ConstraintsA Novel Global Optimization Approach to the Multiperiod Blending Problem Scott Kolodziej Advisor · Maximum total profit of blending operation Fs3,t Cs3 Fs2,t Cs2 Fd1,t CL d1-CU d1 Fd2,t CL d2-CU d2 Fd3,t

  11. The viscoelastic properties of linear-star blends 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jung Hun

    2000-01-01

    prediction for linear-star blend than the existing blend model. Due to the simplified scaling for constraint release, the generality of the linear-star blend model of present work is limited only for the high ML and low [Ø]S. Even though such restriction...

  12. What to Pack for Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Weck, Olivier L.

    De Weck, O.L. “What to Pack for Mars.” Spectrum, IEEE 46.6 (2009): 39. © 2009 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

  13. Nitrate Salt Surrogate Blending Scoping Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anast, Kurt Roy

    2015-11-13

    Test blending equipment identified in the “Engineering Options Assessment Report: Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing”. Determine if the equipment will provide adequate mixing of zeolite and surrogate salt/Swheat stream; optimize equipment type and operational sequencing; impact of baffles and inserts on mixing performance; and means of validating mixing performance

  14. BIODIESEL BLENDS IN SPACE HEATING EQUIPMENT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRISHNA,C.R.

    2001-12-01

    Biodiesel is a diesel-like fuel that is derived from processing vegetable oils from various sources, such as soy oil, rapeseed or canola oil, and also waste vegetable oils resulting from cooking use. Brookhaven National laboratory initiated an evaluation of the performance of blends of biodiesel and home heating oil in space heating applications under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This report is a result of this work performed in the laboratory. A number of blends of varying amounts of a biodiesel in home heating fuel were tested in both a residential heating system and a commercial size boiler. The results demonstrate that blends of biodiesel and heating oil can be used with few or no modifications to the equipment or operating practices in space heating. The results also showed that there were environmental benefits from the biodiesel addition in terms of reductions in smoke and in Nitrogen Oxides (NOx). The latter result was particularly surprising and of course welcome, in view of the previous results in diesel engines where no changes had been seen. Residential size combustion equipment is presently not subject to NOx regulation. If reductions in NOx similar to those observed here hold up in larger size (commercial and industrial) boilers, a significant increase in the use of biodiesel-like fuel blends could become possible.

  15. Independent Activity Report, West Valley Demonstration Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    West Valley Demonstration Project - July 2012 Independent Activity Report, West Valley Demonstration Project - July 2012 July 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the West...

  16. MAR Background Report MAR Background Report: Indigenous Protest in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milchberg, Howard

    MAR Background Report MAR Background Report: Indigenous Protest in Brazil Hundreds of indigenous people demonstrated at the National Congress in Brasilia, capital of Brazil, following the announcement in the 1990s in the midst of extensive protests in Brazil and around the world. On February 8, an indigenous

  17. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  18. New Mexico to Mars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarship supports returningNew Mexico to Mars Community

  19. West Virginia University 1 Governance and Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 Governance and Administration In this Section: · Governor of West · West Virginia University Administration · Senior Administration · Deans · Directors Governor of West, religion, sexual orientation, color, or national origin in the administration of any of its educational

  20. San Angelo- West Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    is measured by National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis 100 hPa temperatures and 50-200 hPa zonal wind shear, respectively. When partitioned by QBO east and west phases, zonal monthly mean anomalies and anomalous monthly mean difference...

  1. Independent Oversight Review, West Valley Demonstration Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Oversight Review, West Valley Demonstration Project Transportation - September 2000 Independent Oversight Review, West Valley Demonstration Project Transportation -...

  2. Independent Oversight Review, West Valley Demonstration Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    West Valley Demonstration Project Transportation - September 2000 Independent Oversight Review, West Valley Demonstration Project Transportation - September 2000 September 2000...

  3. Tough Blends of Polylactide and Castor Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Megan L.; Paxton, Jessica M.; Hillmyer, Marc A. (UMM)

    2012-10-10

    Poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) is a renewable resource polymer derived from plant sugars with several commercial applications. Broader implementation of the material is limited due to its inherent brittleness. We show that the addition of 5 wt % castor oil to PLLA significantly enhances the overall tensile toughness with minimal reductions in the modulus and no plasticization of the PLLA matrix. In addition, we used poly(ricinoleic acid)-PLLA diblock copolymers, synthesized entirely from renewable resources, as compatibilizers for the PLLA/castor oil blends. Ricinoleic acid, the majority fatty acid comprising castor oil, was polymerized through a lipase-catalyzed condensation reaction. The resulting polymers contained a hydroxyl end-group that was subsequently used to initiate the ring-opening polymerization of L-lactide. The binary PLLA/castor oil blend exhibited a tensile toughness seven times greater than neat PLLA. The addition of block copolymer allowed for control over the morphology of the blends, and even further improvement in the tensile toughness was realized - an order of magnitude larger than that of neat PLLA.

  4. West Texas Rain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2006-01-01

    Commission, Culberson County Underground Water District and county officials to install a 2,500-gallon rainwater harvesting tank at the Culberson County Courthouse. West Texas Rain Rainwater harvesting demonstration sites save water and money (Above... Left) One of the three rainwater harvesting demonstrations is located at the Culberson County Courthouse in Van Horn. This 2,500-gallon tank has been installed to catch and store the rainwater. (Above Right) Landscape irrigation using the harvested...

  5. West Berkeley Public Library

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Berkeley, CA The West Berkeley Public Library, first opened in December 2013, is the first publicly funded Zero Net Energy public library in California. The library takes advantage of many innovative technologies and passive design strategies to achieve its Zero Net Energy goals. The project's Building Team, led by Harley Ellis Deveraux, partnered with PG&E's Savings By Design program to perform early-stage design analyses including climate modeling, computational fluid dynamics, daylighting, solar modeling, and energy simulations.

  6. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: A sensor Department of Chemistry, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts, USA Michael H. Hecht, Sabrina M. Grannan] The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified

  7. Effect of Biodiesel Blends on Diesel Particulate Filter Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.; McCormick, R. L.; Hayes, R. R.; Ireland, J.; Fang, H. L.

    2006-11-01

    Presents results of tests of ultra-low sulfur diesel blended with soy-biodiesel at 5 percent using a Cummins ISB engine with a diesel particulate filter.

  8. Process for blending coal with water immiscible liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heavin, Leonard J. (Olympia, WA); King, Edward E. (Gig Harbor, WA); Milliron, Dennis L. (Lacey, WA)

    1982-10-26

    A continuous process for blending coal with a water immiscible liquid produces a uniform, pumpable slurry. Pulverized raw feed coal and preferably a coal derived, water immiscible liquid are continuously fed to a blending zone (12 and 18) in which coal particles and liquid are intimately admixed and advanced in substantially plug flow to form a first slurry. The first slurry is withdrawn from the blending zone (12 and 18) and fed to a mixing zone (24) where it is mixed with a hot slurry to form the pumpable slurry. A portion of the pumpable slurry is continuously recycled to the blending zone (12 and 18) for mixing with the feed coal.

  9. Effect of Biodiesel Blends on NOx Emissions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Using Ethanol-Diesel Blends Lean NOx Trap Formulation Effect on Performance with In-Cylinder Regeneration Strategies Diesel Injection Shear-Stress Advanced Nozzle (DISSAN)...

  10. Purification Testing for HEU Blend Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Pierce, R.A.

    1998-06-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is working to dispose of the inventory of enriched uranium (EU) formerly used to make fuel for production reactors. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has agreed to take the material after blending the EU with either natural or depleted uranium to give a {sup 235}U concentration of 4.8 percent low-enriched uranium will be fabricated by a vendor into reactor fuel for use in TVA reactors. SRS prefers to blend the EU with existing depleted uranium (DU) solutions, however, the impurity concentrations in the DU and EU are so high that the blended material may not meet specifications agreed to with TVA. The principal non-radioactive impurities of concern are carbon, iron, phosphorus and sulfur. Neptunium and plutonium contamination levels are about 40 times greater than the desired specification. Tests of solvent extraction and fuel preparation with solutions of SRS uranium demonstrate that the UO{sub 2} prepared from these solutions will meet specifications for Fe, P and S, but may not meet the specifications for carbon. The reasons for carbon remaining in the oxide at such high levels is not fully understood, but may be overcome either by treatment of the solutions with activated carbon or heating the UO{sub 3} in air for a longer time during the calcination step of fuel preparation.Calculations of the expected removal of Np and Pu from the solutions show that the specification cannot be met with a single cycle of solvent extraction. The only way to ensure meeting the specification is dilution with natural U which contains no Np or Pu. Estimations of the decontamination from fission products and daughter products in the decay chains for the U isotopes show that the specification of 110 MEV Bq/g U can be met as long as the activities of the daughters of U- 235 and U-238 are excluded from the specification.

  11. TANK 21 AND TANK 24 BLEND AND FEED STUDY: BLENDING TIMES, SETTLING TIMES, AND TRANSFERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.

    2012-05-31

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where salt solutions of up to 1.2 million gallons will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. In particular, Tanks 21 and 24 are planned to be used for blending and transferring to the SDI feed tank. These tanks were evaluated here to determine blending times, to determine a range of settling times for disturbed sludge, and to determine that the SWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria that less than 1200 mg/liter of solids will be entrained in salt solutions during transfers from the Tank 21 and Tank 24 will be met. Overall conclusions for Tank 21 and Tank 24 operations include: (1) Experimental correction factors were applied to CFD (computational fluid dynamics) models to establish blending times between approximately two and five hours. As shown in Phase 2 research, blending times may be as much as ten times greater, or more, if lighter fluids are added to heavier fluids (i.e., water added to salt solution). As the densities of two salt solutions converge this effect may be minimized, but additional confirmatory research was not performed. (2) At the current sludge levels and the presently planned operating heights of the transfer pumps, solids entrainment will be less than 1200 mg/liter, assuming a conservative, slow settling sludge simulant. (3) Based on theoretical calculations, particles in the density range of 2.5 to 5.0 g/mL must be greater than 2-4 {micro}m in diameter to ensure they settle adequately in 30-60 days to meet the SWPF feed criterion (<1200 mg/l). (4) Experimental tests with sludge batch 6 simulant and field turbidity data from a recent Tank 21 mixing evolution suggest the solid particles have higher density and/or larger size than indicated by previous analysis of SRS sludge and sludge simulants. (5) Tank 21 waste characterization, laboratory settling tests, and additional field turbidity measurements during mixing evolutions are recommended to better understand potential risk for extended (> 60 days) settling times in Tank 21.

  12. West Gate - 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30

    to Asian nations: a Philippine paper company installing a second-hand newsprint paper mill relocated from Quebec Canada; an Indian mill in West Bengal with plans to purchase a used de-inking line from a UK printer; an Indian company in Maharashtra... and Paper." October 1996. World Wide Web: http://www.oit.doe.gov. 15. Payne, Pulp Paper International. June I, 1994. 16. Reuters European Business Report. August 29, 1996. 17. Reuters Financial Service. November 3, 1992. 18. Salmon-Cox, Peter...

  13. Key Benefits in Using Ethanol-Diesel Blends | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benefits in Using Ethanol-Diesel Blends Key Benefits in Using Ethanol-Diesel Blends Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER...

  14. The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85" Engine Optimization The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85" Engine Optimization...

  15. Achieving High Chilled Water Delta T Without Blending Station 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z.; Wang, G.; Xu, K.; Yu, Y.; Liu, M.

    2007-01-01

    Typically a blending station is designed to ensure that its user is able to avoid low chilled water return temperature in the district cooling system. When the chilled water return temperature drops to a low limit, building return water is blended...

  16. Does blending of chlorophyll data bias temporal trend?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Ransom A.

    Does blending of chlorophyll data bias temporal trend? ARISING FROM D. G. Boyce, M. R. Lewis & B of the bias component. To obtain a larger and longer data set, Boyce et al.1 pooled estimates of local, CT 5 457 D22.37 . Blending of data types can introduce error unless their expected values E(CT) and E

  17. Tribological Properties of Blends of Melamine-Formaldehyde Resin With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Tribological Properties of Blends of Melamine-Formaldehyde Resin With Low Density Polyethylene the miscibility behavior and thermal properties of LDPE þ melamine-formaldehyde resin (MFR) blends containing 1, 5 LDPE was supplied by Aldrich Chemicals. Melamine, C3H6N6 (2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine); formaldehyde

  18. Earth plus Mars: Los Alamos National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plus Mars: Los Alamos National Lab partners with Spain and France June 26, 2015 Earth plus Mars: Los Alamos National Lab partners with Spain and France New Mexico's role in the...

  19. Gulf of Mexico -West Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulf of Mexico - Alabama - West Florida - Louisiana - Mississippi - Texas #12;Regional Summary Gulf of Mexico Region Management Context The Gulf of Mexico Region includes Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas, and West Florida. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery

  20. West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 7-SA-O1 West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Supplement Analysis Revised Final U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration...

  1. Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Provides 640 Turkeys to People in Need Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive...

  2. COOLING COIL EFFECTS ON BLENDING IN A PILOT SCALE TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Fowley, M.; Steeper, T.

    2010-08-26

    Blending, or mixing, processes in 1.3 million gallon nuclear waste tanks are complicated by the fact that miles of serpentine, vertical, cooling coils are installed in the tanks. As a step toward investigating blending interference due to coils in this type of tank, a 1/10.85 scale tank and pump model were constructed for pilot scale testing. A series of tests were performed in this scaled tank by adding blue dye to visualize blending, and by adding acid or base tracers to solution to quantify the time required to effectively blend the tank contents. The acid and base tests were monitored with pH probes, which were located in the pilot scale tank to ensure that representative samples were obtained. Using the probes, the hydronium ion concentration [H{sup +}] was measured to ensure that a uniform concentration was obtained throughout the tank. As a result of pilot scale testing, a significantly improved understanding of mixing, or blending, in nuclear waste tanks has been achieved. Evaluation of test data showed that cooling coils in the waste tank model increased pilot scale blending times by 200% in the recommended operating range, compared to previous theoretical estimates of a 10-50% increase. Below the planned operating range, pilot scale blending times were increased by as much as 700% in a tank with coils installed. One pump, rather than two or more, was shown to effectively blend the tank contents, and dual pump nozzles installed parallel to the tank wall were shown to provide optimal blending. In short, experimental results varied significantly from expectations.

  3. Heavy Alcohols as a Fuel Blending Agent for Compression Ignition Engine Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Blends of Phytol and diesel (by volume) were compared against baseline diesel experiments and simulations

  4. Differences in the Physical Characteristics of Diesel PM with Increasing Biofuel Blend Level

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Measure physical characteristics, carbon state, and surface bound oxygen of soot from biodiesel blends.

  5. A flow-induced phase inversion in immiscible polymer blends containing a liquid-crystalline polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2 , 3 with being the viscosity ratio of the blend components at the blending shear rate. Luciani etA flow-induced phase inversion in immiscible polymer blends containing a liquid-crystalline polymer0148-6055 00 01504-2 I. INTRODUCTION The increasing application of polymer blends for the elaboration

  6. Robust real-time optimization for the linear oil blending Stefan Janaqia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    blending process. The blending process consists in determining the optimal mix of components so. The feedback is based on measures of the blends' and components' properties gathered by online analyzers1 Robust real-time optimization for the linear oil blending Stefan Janaqia , Jorge Aguileraa

  7. Phosphor blends for high-CRI fluorescent lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Setlur, Anant Achyut (Niskayuna, NY); Srivastava, Alok Mani (Niskayuna, NY); Comanzo, Holly Ann (Niskayuna, NY); Manivannan, Venkatesan (Clifton Park, NY); Beers, William Winder (Chesterland, OH); Toth, Katalin (Pomaz, HU); Balazs, Laszlo D. (Budapest, HU)

    2008-06-24

    A phosphor blend comprises at least two phosphors each selected from one of the groups of phosphors that absorb UV electromagnetic radiation and emit in a region of visible light. The phosphor blend can be applied to a discharge gas radiation source to produce light sources having high color rendering index. A phosphor blend is advantageously includes the phosphor (Tb,Y,LuLa,Gd).sub.x(Al,Ga).sub.yO.sub.12:Ce.sup.3+, wherein x is in the range from about 2.8 to and including 3 and y is in the range from about 4 to and including 5.

  8. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT MISSION ANALYSIS WASTE BLENDING STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHUFORD DH; STEGEN G

    2010-04-19

    Preliminary evaluation for blending Hanford site waste with the objective of minimizing the amount of high-level waste (HLW) glass volumes without major changes to the overall waste retrieval and processing sequences currently planned. The evaluation utilizes simplified spreadsheet models developed to allow screening type comparisons of blending options without the need to use the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model. The blending scenarios evaluated are expected to increase tank farm operation costs due to increased waste transfers. Benefit would be derived from shorter operating time period for tank waste processing facilities, reduced onsite storage of immobilized HLW, and reduced offsite transportation and disposal costs for the immobilized HLW.

  9. Mars `Curiosity' has ORNL tech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    thermoelectric generator, the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator." ORNL's iridium alloy clad Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator were produced at ORNL. (Image courtesy of NASA.) Table of Contents Mars involved with the development of this generator for several years." Key components of the probe's Multi-Mission

  10. European Space Agency European Mars Science and Exploration Conference: Mars Express & ExoMars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    flares (and/or plumes), seismic shaking and crater excavation [7]. These effects have been modelled between the different instruments, require no hardware modification or space qualification of "soft-landing; and seismic detection of impact event clusters correlated with Mars' passage through low- speed meteoroid

  11. Unique Spectroscopy and Imaging of Mars with JWST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villanueva, Geronimo L; Clancy, Todd R; Encrenaz, Therese; Fouchet, Thierry; Hartogh, Paul; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel A; Mumma, Michael J; Novak, Robert E; Smith, Michael D; Vandaele, Ann-Carine; Wolff, Michael J; Ferruit, Pierre; Milam, Stefanie N

    2015-01-01

    In this document, we summarize the main capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for performing observations of Mars. The distinctive vantage point of JWST at the Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L2) will allow sampling the full observable disk, permitting the study of short-term phenomena, diurnal processes (across the East-West axis) and latitudinal processes between the hemispheres (including seasonal effects) with excellent spatial resolutions (0.07 arcsec at 2 {\\mu}m). Spectroscopic observations will be achievable in the 0.7-5 {\\mu}m spectral region with NIRSpec at a maximum resolving power of 2700, and with 8000 in the 1-1.25 {\\mu}m range. Imaging will be attainable with NIRCam at 4.3 {\\mu}m and with two narrow filters near 2 {\\mu}m, while the nightside will be accessible with several filters in the 0.5 to 2 {\\mu}m. Such a powerful suite of instruments will be a major asset for the exploration and characterization of Mars. Some science cases include the mapping of the water D/H ratio, investigatio...

  12. Photonic polymer-blend structures and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnes, Michael D.

    2004-06-29

    The present invention comprises the formation of photonic polymer-blend structures having tunable optical and mechanical properties. The photonic polymer-blend structures comprise monomer units of spherical microparticles of a polymer-blend material wherein the spherical microparticles have surfaces partially merged with one another in a robust inter-particle bond having a tunable inter-particle separation or bond length sequentially attached in a desired and programmable architecture. The photonic polymer-blend structures of the present invention can be linked by several hundred individual particles sequentially linked to form complex three-dimensional structures or highly ordered two-dimensional arrays of 3D columns with 2D spacing.

  13. Time phased alternate blending of feed coals for liquefaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schweigharett, Frank (Allentown, PA); Hoover, David S. (New Tripoli, PA); Garg, Diwaker (Macungie, PA)

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for reducing process performance excursions during feed coal or process solvent changeover in a coal hydroliquefaction process by blending of feedstocks or solvents over time. ,

  14. Disease resistance and performance of blended populations of creepi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abernathy, Scott David

    1999-01-01

    Plant diseases are a major problem on creeping bentgrass greens and can significantly decrease putting quality. Blended populations comprised of two or more cultivars within the same species have been utilized to decrease disease development...

  15. Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues M. W. Melaina, O. Antonia, and M. Penev Technical Report NRELTP-5600-51995 March 2013 NREL is a...

  16. Microsoft Word - Int_blends_Rpt1_Updated.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NRELTP-540-43543 ORNLTM-2008117 Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 - Updated February 2009 Prepared by Keith Knoll...

  17. GeoPowering the West

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-02-01

    Summary brochure of GeoPowering the West (GPW) activities, and areas of technology transfer and market transformation. It also provides current contact information for key DOE and national laboratory staff representing the GPW program.

  18. BLENDING ANALYSIS FOR RADIOACTIVE SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2012-05-10

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated methods to mix and blend the contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank such as Tank 21 and Tank 24 to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The tank contents consist of three forms: dissolved salt solution, other waste salt solutions, and sludge containing settled solids. This paper focuses on developing the computational model and estimating the operation time of submersible slurry pump when the tank contents are adequately blended prior to their transfer to the SWPF facility. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach was taken by using the full scale configuration of SRS Type-IV tank, Tank 21H. Major solid obstructions such as the tank wall boundary, the transfer pump column, and three slurry pump housings including one active and two inactive pumps were included in the mixing performance model. Basic flow pattern results predicted by the computational model were benchmarked against the SRNL test results and literature data. Tank 21 is a waste tank that is used to prepare batches of salt feed for SWPF. The salt feed must be a homogeneous solution satisfying the acceptance criterion of the solids entrainment during transfer operation. The work scope described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the steady state flow pattern calculations before the addition of acid solution for tank blending operation and the transient mixing analysis during miscible liquid blending operation. The transient blending calculations were performed by using the 95% homogeneity criterion for the entire liquid domain of the tank. The initial conditions for the entire modeling domain were based on the steady-state flow pattern results with zero second phase concentration. The performance model was also benchmarked against the SRNL test results and literature data.

  19. Morphological studies on block copolymer modified PA 6 blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poindl, M., E-mail: marcus.poindl@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de, E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de; Bonten, C., E-mail: marcus.poindl@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de, E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Kunststofftechnik, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Recent studies show that compounding polyamide 6 (PA 6) with a PA 6 polyether block copolymers made by reaction injection molding (RIM) or continuous anionic polymerization in a reactive extrusion process (REX) result in blends with high impact strength and high stiffness compared to conventional rubber blends. In this paper, different high impact PA 6 blends were prepared using a twin screw extruder. The different impact modifiers were an ethylene propylene copolymer, a PA PA 6 polyether block copolymer made by reaction injection molding and one made by reactive extrusion. To ensure good particle matrix bonding, the ethylene propylene copolymer was grafted with maleic anhydride (EPR-g-MA). Due to the molecular structure of the two block copolymers, a coupling agent was not necessary. The block copolymers are semi-crystalline and partially cross-linked in contrast to commonly used amorphous rubbers which are usually uncured. The combination of different analysis methods like atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) gave a detailed view in the structure of the blends. Due to the partial cross-linking, the particles of the block copolymers in the blends are not spherical like the ones of ethylene propylene copolymer. The differences in molecular structure, miscibility and grafting of the impact modifiers result in different mechanical properties and different blend morphologies.

  20. Comparing matched polymer:Fullerene solar cells made by solution-sequential processing and traditional blend casting: Nanoscale structure and device performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    and Traditional Blend Casting: Nanoscale Structure andby traditional blend casting (BC), where the components aresuch networks is the blend-casting (BC) method, wherein the

  1. Computer Architecture (13 Mar 2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Seung-Jong "Jay"

    1 Computer Architecture (CSC-3501) Lecture 15 1 Lecture 15 (13 Mar 2008) Seung-Jong Park (Jay) http://www.csc.lsu.edu/~sjpark CSC3501 - S.J. Park Announcement 2 CSC3501 - S.J. Park 4.14 Real World Architectures MARIE shares many features with modern architectur es but it is not an accurate depiction of them. In the following slides

  2. West Valley Site History, Cleanup Status, and Role of the West...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Site History, Cleanup Status, and Role of the West Valley Citizen Task Force West Valley Site History, Cleanup Status, and Role of the West Valley Citizen Task Force Presentation...

  3. Nuclear technologies for Moon and Mars exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear technologies are essential to successful Moon and Mars exploration and settlements. Applications can take the form of nuclear propulsion for transport of crews and cargo to Mars and the Moon; surface power for habitats and base power; power for human spacecraft to Mars; shielding and life science understanding for protection against natural solar and cosmic radiations; radioisotopes for sterilization, medicine, testing, and power; and resources for the benefits of Earth. 5 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Blending of Radioactive Salt Solutions in Million Gallon Tanks - 13002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken. S.C., 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken. S.C., 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 - 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, 'One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory'. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks. (authors)

  5. Blending Of Radioactive Salt Solutions In Million Gallon Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R.

    2012-12-10

    Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 ? 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, ?One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory?. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks.

  6. MAVEN overview MAVEN is a NASA Mars Scout mission designed to orbit Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    MAVEN overview MAVEN is a NASA Mars Scout mission designed to orbit Mars and explore the state-Boulder professor and LASP research scientist, leads the project on behalf of NASA. Jakosky worked with a national of primary mission Mission description: MAVEN is a NASA Mars Scout mission carrying eight instruments

  7. 2011 MARS Refresher Presentation (2 of 3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Information sessions that shall outline the general principles of the 2011 annual Merit, Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS). Presentation will be given in English.

  8. 2010 MARS Refresher Presentation (3 of 3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Information sessions that shall outline the general principles of the 2010 annual Merit, Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS). Presentation will be given in English.

  9. Veteran's Affairs Health Care System, West Haven, Connecticut...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Veteran's Affairs Health Care System, West Haven, Connecticut Veteran's Affairs Health Care System, West Haven, Connecticut Overview The West Haven (Connecticut) Campus of the...

  10. NASA agreements advance Mars exploration, Los Alamos Rover instrument...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NASA agreements advance Mars exploration NASA agreements advance Mars exploration, Los Alamos Rover instrument a key component Los Alamos National Laboratory is coordinating with...

  11. Los Alamos laser selected for 2020 Mars mission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos laser selected for 2020 Mars mission Los Alamos laser selected for 2020 Mars mission SuperCam builds upon the successful capabilities demonstrated aboard the Curiosity...

  12. Controlled differential pressure system for an enhanced fluid blending apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis (Knoxville, TN)

    2009-02-24

    A system and method for producing a controlled blend of two or more fluids. Thermally-induced permeation through a permeable tube is used to mix a first fluid from outside the tube with a second fluid flowing through the tube. Mixture ratios may be controlled by adjusting the temperature of the first fluid or by adjusting the pressure drop through the permeable tube. The combination of a back pressure control valve and a differential regulator is used to control the output pressure of the blended fluid. The combination of the back pressure control valve and differential regulator provides superior flow control of the second dry gas. A valve manifold system may be used to mix multiple fluids, and to adjust the volume of blended fluid produced, and to further modify the mixture ratio.

  13. West Virginia University -Main Campus Headcount Enrollment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University - Main Campus Headcount Enrollment Comparison of Fall 2013 to Fall 2014's Student files submission *FTE includes courses taken by Main Campus Students at PSC West Virginia

  14. The 2013 MAVEN Mission To Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Of Martian Atmosphere Turn-off of the Martian magnetic field allowed turn-on of solar-EUV and solar · Spacecraft Dry Mass: 903 kg max · Power: 1135 W at Mars Aphelion MAG (2) "Gull-Wing" Solar Arrays LPW (2 latitude and local solar time · One-Earth-year mission allows thorough coverage of near-Mars space #12

  15. Certification of alternative aviation fuels and blend components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson III, George R. ); Edwards, Tim; Corporan, Edwin ); Freerks, Robert L. )

    2013-01-15

    Aviation turbine engine fuel specifications are governed by ASTM International, formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International, and the British Ministry of Defence (MOD). ASTM D1655 Standard Specification for Aviation Turbine Fuels and MOD Defence Standard 91-91 are the guiding specifications for this fuel throughout most of the world. Both of these documents rely heavily on the vast amount of experience in production and use of turbine engine fuels from conventional sources, such as crude oil, natural gas condensates, heavy oil, shale oil, and oil sands. Turbine engine fuel derived from these resources and meeting the above specifications has properties that are generally considered acceptable for fuels to be used in turbine engines. Alternative and synthetic fuel components are approved for use to blend with conventional turbine engine fuels after considerable testing. ASTM has established a specification for fuels containing synthesized hydrocarbons under D7566, and the MOD has included additional requirements for fuels containing synthetic components under Annex D of DS91-91. New turbine engine fuel additives and blend components need to be evaluated using ASTM D4054, Standard Practice for Qualification and Approval of New Aviation Turbine Fuels and Fuel Additives. This paper discusses these specifications and testing requirements in light of recent literature claiming that some biomass-derived blend components, which have been used to blend in conventional aviation fuel, meet the requirements for aviation turbine fuels as specified by ASTM and the MOD. The 'Table 1' requirements listed in both D1655 and DS91-91 are predicated on the assumption that the feedstocks used to make fuels meeting these requirements are from approved sources. Recent papers have implied that commercial jet fuel can be blended with renewable components that are not hydrocarbons (such as fatty acid methyl esters). These are not allowed blend components for turbine engine fuels as discussed in this paper.

  16. Theoretical and experimental investigation of particle interactions in pharmaceutical powder blending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Yu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    In pharmaceutical manufacturing practices, blending of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) with excipients is a crucial step in that homogeneity of active ingredient after blending is a key issue for the quality assurance ...

  17. Evaluation of Ethanol Blends for PHEVs using Simulation andEngine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ethanol Blends for PHEVs using Simulation and Engine-in-the-Loop Evaluation of Ethanol Blends for PHEVs using Simulation and Engine-in-the-Loop 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  18. Mid-Level Ethanol Blends | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPAEnergy6-09.doc Microsoft WordBlends Mid-Level Ethanol Blends

  19. Characterization of Particulate Emissions from GDI Engine Combustion with Alcohol-blended Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Analysis showed that gasoline direct injection engine particulates from alcohol-blended fuels are significantly different in morphology and nanostructures

  20. Vapour Phase Hydration of Blended Oxide Magnox Waste Glasses Neil C. Hyatt,1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    level waste (HLW) arising from the reprocessing of spent Oxide (UO2) and Magnox nuclear fuels is blended

  1. Weaving Versus Blending: a quantitative assessment of the information carrying capacities of two alternative methods for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healey, Christopher G.

    as the number of components increases from 4 to 6. We found no significant advantages, in either color blendingWeaving Versus Blending: a quantitative assessment of the information carrying capacities of two: color blending and color weaving. We begin with a baseline experiment in which we assess participants

  2. Segmental Dynamics of Head-to-Head Polypropylene and Polyisobutylene in Their Blend and Pure Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colby, Ralph H.

    to determine the local motion of each component in the blend through isotopic labeling. The spin in the component dynamics upon blending, but the shift becomes larger at lower temperatures. One factor in predicting the changes in component dynamics upon blending for hhPP, while it describes the temperature

  3. Feedback control and optimization for the production of commercial fuels by blending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    propose can be used in various situations where non-reactive components are blended and linearly impactFeedback control and optimization for the production of commercial fuels by blending M. Ch`ebre, Y presents a control algorithm for blending systems. Such systems are used in refining to produce mixtures

  4. Motivating effective use of online components by students in flipped/blended learning formats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Motivating effective use of online components by students in flipped/blended learning formats Tom the online components of a course, particularly in use with flipped/blended course formats. What I present's my take on flipped/blended formats exclusively: The Challenge In my experience, the most challenging

  5. PLA-PHA BLENDS: MORPHOLOGY, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL T. Grard, T. Budtova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the pure components. The physical and mechanical properties of blends can be tuned by choosing the properPLA-PHA BLENDS: MORPHOLOGY, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES T. Gérard, T. Budtova Mines Paris polymers. One is poor mechanical properties which limit their practical applications. Blending of polymers

  6. Handling parameter ranking, equalities and bounds in adaptive control of blending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be formulated in various applications where non- reactive components are blended and linearly impactHandling parameter ranking, equalities and bounds in adaptive control of blending systems Mériam in the production of com- mercial fuels by blending. The control problem under consideration is a multi

  7. A Novel Global Op-miza-on Approach to the Mul-period Blending Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    ­ Overall Flows ­ Individual Components (Blending) · Flow/Inventory Bounds · OperaA Novel Global Op-miza-on Approach to the Mul-period Blending Problem Sco · Minimize total cost of blending opera-on Fs3,t Cs3 Fs2,t Cs2 Fd1,t CL d1-CU d1

  8. Mar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Livermore, CA 94550, USA 10 Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA 11 Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technol- ogy,...

  9. The MAVEN mission to Mars and my role in it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    of the environmental requirements for the occurrence of life: · Liquid water · Access to the biogenic elements · Source With Mars #12;Overarching Question: Did Mars Ever Have Life? Mars appears to meet or have met all of energy to drive metabolism Did Mars ever have life? How did any life interact with its planetary

  10. Inconspicuous Lizards Evolved To Blend In Jeff Mitton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitton, Jeffry B.

    on and digging in sand. It grows to a length of about six inches and it is prey to a variety of visual predators predators, such as kestrels, hunt them as well. If avoidance of predators is a matter of blending in, prey

  11. Fuel and fuel blending components from biomass derived pyrolysis oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCall, Michael J.; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2012-12-11

    A process for the conversion of biomass derived pyrolysis oil to liquid fuel components is presented. The process includes the production of diesel, aviation, and naphtha boiling point range fuels or fuel blending components by two-stage deoxygenation of the pyrolysis oil and separation of the products.

  12. NOx, SOx & CO{sub 2} mitigation using blended coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labbe, D.

    2009-11-15

    Estimates of potential CO{sub 2} reduction achievable through the use of a mixture of bituminous and subbituminous (PRB) coals, whilst attaining NOx and SOx compliance are presented. The optimization considerations to provide satisfactory furnace, boiler and unit performance with blended coal supplies to make such operation feasible are discussed. 6 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. IBM Research @ ACM DEV 2014 Conference Enabling Blended Learning in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    IBM Research @ ACM DEV 2014 Conference 1 EduPaL: Enabling Blended Learning in Resource Constrained Ramrao Wagh IBM Research India Myntra India IBM Research India IBM Research India IBM Research India University of Southern California University of Goa India #12;IBM Research @ ACM DEV 2014 Conference Problem

  14. Blending world map projections with Flex Projector Bernhard Jennya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenny, Bernhard

    Blending world map projections with Flex Projector Bernhard Jennya * and Tom Pattersonb a College projections is well established. Some of the most popular world map projections in use today were devised method calculates the arithmetic means of two projections. These two methods for creating new world map

  15. Lyapunov-based Optimizing Control of Nonlinear Blending Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    1 Lyapunov-based Optimizing Control of Nonlinear Blending Process Tor A. Johansen£ , Daniel Sb processes consisting of linear dynamics and a static nonlinearity are considered. We propose a control law that optimizes the equilibrium point of the process and regulates the output to the corresponding equilibrium

  16. Lyapunov-based Optimizing Control of Nonlinear Blending Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    1 Lyapunov-based Optimizing Control of Nonlinear Blending Processes Tor A. Johansen , Daniel Sb processes consisting of linear dynamics and a static nonlinearity are considered. We propose a control law that optimizes the equilibrium point of the process and regulates the output to the corresponding equilibrium

  17. 02/02 NASA JSC Astrobiology: Fingerprints of Life Searching for Life: Mars Critters 1 Mars Critters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    to handle the constant radiation on the surface of Mars. Also the dominant gas in the Mars atmosphere Destination: Mars. In groups or as individuals, students will use their knowledge of Mars and living organisms up various art supplies at each table for either individual work or small group work. This activity

  18. U.S. transparency monitoring of HEU oxide conversion and blending to LEU hexafluoride at three Russian blending plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leich, D., LLNL

    1998-07-27

    The down-blending of Russian highly enriched uranium (HEU) takes place at three Russian gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants. The fluorination of HEU oxide and down-blending of HEU hexafluoride began in 1994, and shipments of low enriched uranium (LEU) hexafluoride product to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) began in 1995 US transparency monitoring under the HEU Purchase Agreement began in 1996 and includes a permanent monitoring presence US transparency monitoring at these facilities is intended to provide confidence that HEU is received and down-blended to LEU for shipment to USEC The monitoring begins with observation of the receipt of HEU oxide shipments, including confirmation of enrichment using US nondestructive assay equipment The feeding of HEU oxide to the fluorination process and the withdrawal of HEU hexafluoride are monitored Monitoring is also conducted where the blending takes place and where shipping cylinders are filled with LEU product. A series of process and material accountancy documents are provided to US monitors.

  19. Polymer blends for use in photoelectrochemical cells for conversion of solar energy to electricity and methods for manufacturing such blends

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, Terje (East Patchogue, NY)

    1984-01-01

    There is disclosed a polymer blend of a highly conductive polymer and a solid polymer electrolyte that is designed to achieve better charge transfer across the conductive film/polymer electrolyte interface of the electrochemical photovoltaic cell. The highly conductive polymer is preferably polypyrrole or poly-N-p-nitrophenylpyrrole and the solid polymer electrolyte is preferably polyethylene oxide or polypropylene oxide.

  20. Solar discrepancies : Mars exploration and the curious problem of inter-planetary time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirmalek, Zara Lenora

    2008-01-01

    Monterey, California. Solar Discrepancies: Mars explorationCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Solar discrepancies: Mars explorationOF THE DISSERTATION Solar discrepancies: Mars exploration

  1. Mars Rover's ChemCam Instrument gets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    last week to install the new software on Mars. "We think we will actually have better quality images and analyses with this new software than the original," said Wiens. The...

  2. The Mission of the Mars Exploration Rovers

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Grant, John [Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., United States

    2010-01-08

    The Mars Exploration Rover mission was expected to last 3 months, but has continued for more than 4 years. The major science results from both rovers will be summarized.

  3. The surface of Mars : morphology and process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aharonson, Oded, 1973-

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this work is a quantitative description of the morphology of the surface of Mars, in order to constrain the nature of processes acting during the ancient past through today. Emphasis is placed on linking geometric ...

  4. Adaptive control for Mars atmospheric flight 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo, Carolina Isabel

    2009-05-15

    The new vision for space exploration will focus on sending humans to the moon and eventually to Mars. This endeavor presents new challenges that are critically di?erent from the past experience with robotic missions to ...

  5. Microbial iron reduction on Earth and Mars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Sophie Louise

    2014-11-27

    The search for life beyond Earth is the driving force behind several future missions to Mars. An essential task in the lead-up to these missions is a critical assessment of the habitability for, and feasibility of, life. ...

  6. Review Of Rheology Models For Hanford Waste Blending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D. C.; Stone, M.

    2013-09-26

    The area of rheological property prediction was identified as a technology need in the Hanford Tank Waste - waste feed acceptance initiative area during a series of technical meetings among the national laboratories, Department of Energy-Office of River Protection, and Hanford site contractors. Meacham et al. delivered a technical report in June 2012, RPP-RPT-51652 ''One System Evaluation of Waste Transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant'' that included estimating of single shell tank waste Bingham plastic rheological model constants along with a discussion of the issues inherent in predicting the rheological properties of blended wastes. This report was selected as the basis for moving forward during the technical meetings. The report does not provide an equation for predicting rheological properties of blended waste slurries. The attached technical report gives an independent review of the provided Hanford rheological data, Hanford rheological models for single tank wastes, and Hanford rheology after blending provided in the Meacham report. The attached report also compares Hanford to SRS waste rheology and discusses some SRS rheological model equations for single tank wastes, as well as discussing SRS experience with the blending of waste sludges with aqueous material, other waste sludges, and frit slurries. Some observations of note: Savannah River Site (SRS) waste samples from slurried tanks typically have yield stress >1 Pa at 10 wt.% undissolved solids (UDS), while core samples largely have little or no yield stress at 10 wt.% UDS. This could be due to how the waste has been processed, stored, retrieved, and sampled or simply in the differences in the speciation of the wastes. The equations described in Meacham's report are not recommended for extrapolation to wt.% UDS beyond the available data for several reasons; weak technical basis, insufficient data, and large data scatter. When limited data are available, for example two to three points, the equations are not necessarily satisfactory (justified) for interpolations, due to the number of unknown variables equal the number of known data points, resulting in a coefficient of determination of one. SRS has had some success predicting the rheology of waste blends for similar waste types using rheological properties of the individual wastes and empirical blending viscosity equations. Both the Kendall-Monroe and Olney-Carlson equations were used. High accuracy was not obtained, but predictions were reasonable compared to measured flow curves. Blending SRS processed waste with frit slurry (much larger particles and the source of SRS glass formers) is a different sort of problem than that of two similar slurries of precipitated waste particles. A different approach to rheology prediction has had some success describing the incorporation of large frit particles into waste than the one used for blending two wastes. In this case, the Guth-Simha equation was used. If Hanford waste is found to have significant particles in the >100 ?m diameter range, then it might be necessary to handle those particles differently from broadly distributed waste particles that are primarily <30 ?m in diameter. The following are recommendations for the Hanford tank farms: Investigate the impact of large-scale mixing operations on yield stress for one or more Hanford tanks to see if Hanford waste rheological properties change to become more like SRS waste during both tank retrieval and tank qualification operations; Determine rheological properties of mobilized waste slurries by direct measurement rather than by prediction; Collect and characterize samples during the waste feed qualification process for each campaign; o From single source tanks that feed the qualification tanks; o Blends from the qualification tanks; Predictive rheological models must be used with caution, due to the lack of data to support such models and the utilization of the results that come from these models in making process decisions (e.g. the lack of actual operation experience). As experience is ga

  7. Remote sensing of surface pressure on Mars with the Mars Express/OMEGA spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    - surement of surface pressure from orbit, as is done for temperature or water vapor [Smith, 2006]. [4Remote sensing of surface pressure on Mars with the Mars Express/OMEGA spectrometer: 2 November 2006; revised 6 July 2007; accepted 7 August 2007; published 30 August 2007. [1] Surface pressure

  8. West Virginia University -Main Campus Program Accreditations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University - Main Campus Program Accreditations Updated 2013-14 School, College University - Main Campus Program Accreditations Updated 2013-14 School, College, or Program Accreditation

  9. Enterprise Assessments Review, West Valley Demonstration Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Security (HSS). This independent review of the emergency management program at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) was conducted prior to the creation of EA. HSS...

  10. West Valley Demonstration Project Administrative Consent Order...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Adminstrative Consent Order, August 27, 1996 State New York Agreement Type Consent Order Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Establish...

  11. West Virginia University | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE. regulatorsEnergy InformationWest CoastWestWest ValleyWest

  12. Development of By-Pass Blending Station System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Barnes, D.; Bunz, K.; Rosenberry, N.

    2003-01-01

    Temperature 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Ambient Temeprature Ra ti o Load Ratio Power Savings Ratio W/O DP Reset Differential Pressure Ratio Power Savings With DP Reset ICEBO 2003, Development of By-pass Blending...

  13. Utilization of Renewable Oxygenates as Gasoline Blending Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanowitz, J.; Christensen, E.; McCormick, R. L.

    2011-08-01

    This report reviews the use of higher alcohols and several cellulose-derived oxygenates as blend components in gasoline. Material compatibility issues are expected to be less severe for neat higher alcohols than for fuel-grade ethanol. Very little data exist on how blending higher alcohols or other oxygenates with gasoline affects ASTM Standard D4814 properties. Under the Clean Air Act, fuels used in the United States must be 'substantially similar' to fuels used in certification of cars for emission compliance. Waivers for the addition of higher alcohols at concentrations up to 3.7 wt% oxygen have been granted. Limited emission testing on pre-Tier 1 vehicles and research engines suggests that higher alcohols will reduce emissions of CO and organics, while NOx emissions will stay the same or increase. Most oxygenates can be used as octane improvers for standard gasoline stocks. The properties of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, dimethylfuran, 2-methylfuran, methyl pentanoate and ethyl pentanoate suggest that they may function well as low-concentration blends with gasoline in standard vehicles and in higher concentrations in flex fuel vehicles.

  14. A Specific Plan for The Development of Downtown West Sacramento A Specific Plan for The Development of Downtown West Sacramento

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    A Specific Plan for The Development of Downtown West Sacramento VOLUME 1 West Sacramento Triangle #12;West Sacramento Triangle A Specific Plan for The Development of Downtown West Sacramento Adopted written consent from Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership as agents of the City of West Sacramento. #12

  15. Conversion and Blending Facility Highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    This report describes the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) which will have two missions: (1) convert surplus HEU materials to pure HEU UF{sub 6} and a (2) blend the pure HEU UF{sub 6} with diluent UF{sub 6} to produce LWR grade LEU-UF{sub 6}. The primary emphasis of this blending be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The chemical and isotopic concentrations of the blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. The blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry.

  16. Localized precipitation and runoff on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kite, Edwin S; Rafkin, Scot; Manga, Michael; Dietrich, William E

    2010-01-01

    We use the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) to simulate lake storms on Mars, finding that intense localized precipitation will occur for lake size >=10^3 km^2. Mars has a low-density atmosphere, so deep convection can be triggered by small amounts of latent heat release. In our reference simulation, the buoyant plume lifts vapor above condensation level, forming a 20km-high optically-thick cloud. Ice grains grow to 200 microns radius and fall near (or in) the lake at mean rates up to 1.5 mm/hr water equivalent (maximum rates up to 6 mm/hr water equivalent). Because atmospheric temperatures outside the surface layer are always well below 273K, supersaturation and condensation begin at low altitudes above lakes on Mars. In contrast to Earth lake-effect storms, lake storms on Mars involve continuous precipitation, and their vertical velocities and plume heights exceed those of tropical thunderstorms on Earth. Convection does not reach above the planetary boundary layer for lakes O(10^2) mbar. In...

  17. West Virginia University Undergraduate Catalog 2001-2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    1 West Virginia University Undergraduate Catalog 2001-2003 College of Agriculture, Forestry Catalog 2001-2003 is a general source of information about course offerings, academic programs Virginia University. Copyright © West Virginia University, 2001. West Virginia University (ISSN 0362

  18. West Africa & the New European Common Fisheries Policy: Impacts & Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seto, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    West Africa & the New European Common Fisheries Policy:affected fisheries in West Africa, and how recently enactedWorld War II. 6 West Africa’s close proximity to Europe, its

  19. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Review, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility - April 2014 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility - April 2014 April 2014 Review of the Hanford Site K-West...

  20. Process simulation, integration and optimization of blending of petrodiesel with biodiesel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ting

    2009-05-15

    of payback period (PP) for the three options????????100 5.15 Comparison of net CO2 life-cycle emissions for petroleum diesel and biodiesel blends???????...????????????.102 5.16 Net CO2 emission vs. blend price of biodiesel blend... quantities significantly rely on enhanced hydrotreating technology, which is the major method to produce ULSD at this time (EIA, 2001). 4 Conventional hydrotreating is a commercially proven refining process that inputs feedstock together with hydrogen...

  1. Determining the Impact of MSW as a Feedstock Blending Agent Presentati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    screen additional MSW blends with other terrestrial feedstocks, specifically pulp and paper mill residuals and dedicated energy crops, that meet the 80ton cost targets -...

  2. Multi-scale analysis and simulation of powder blending in pharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngai, Samuel S. H

    2005-01-01

    A Multi-Scale Analysis methodology was developed and carried out for gaining fundamental understanding of the pharmaceutical powder blending process. Through experiment, analysis and computer simulations, microscopic ...

  3. BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Use of Advanced Biofuel Blends...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    engines to improve compatibility when operated with high-octane biofuel blends The market impact of increasing the consumption of biofuels in the small engine market Mechanisms...

  4. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    written consent of the publisher #12;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 280: 261­273, 2004 cific mesoscale oceanographic

  5. BLENDING STUDY FOR SRR SALT DISPOSITION INTEGRATION: TANK 50H SCALE-MODELING AND COMPUTER-MODELING FOR BLENDING PUMP DESIGN, PHASE 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Fowley, M.

    2011-05-26

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where 300,000-800,000 gallons of salt solution will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. Blending requires the miscible salt solutions from potentially multiple source tanks per batch to be well mixed without disturbing settled sludge solids that may be present in a Blend Tank. Disturbing solids may be problematic both from a feed quality perspective as well as from a process safety perspective where hydrogen release from the sludge is a potential flammability concern. To develop the necessary technical basis for the design and operation of blending equipment, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) completed scaled blending and transfer pump tests and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. A 94 inch diameter pilot-scale blending tank, including tank internals such as the blending pump, transfer pump, removable cooling coils, and center column, were used in this research. The test tank represents a 1/10.85 scaled version of an 85 foot diameter, Type IIIA, nuclear waste tank that may be typical of Blend Tanks used in SDI. Specifically, Tank 50 was selected as the tank to be modeled per the SRR, Project Engineering Manager. SRNL blending tests investigated various fixed position, non-rotating, dual nozzle pump designs, including a blending pump model provided by the blend pump vendor, Curtiss Wright (CW). Primary research goals were to assess blending times and to evaluate incipient sludge disturbance for waste tanks. Incipient sludge disturbance was defined by SRR and SRNL as minor blending of settled sludge from the tank bottom into suspension due to blending pump operation, where the sludge level was shown to remain constant. To experimentally model the sludge layer, a very thin, pourable, sludge simulant was conservatively used for all testing. To experimentally model the liquid, supernate layer above the sludge in waste tanks, two salt solution simulants were used, which provided a bounding range of supernate properties. One solution was water (H{sub 2}O + NaOH), and the other was an inhibited, more viscous salt solution. The research performed and data obtained significantly advances the understanding of fluid mechanics, mixing theory and CFD modeling for nuclear waste tanks by benchmarking CFD results to actual experimental data. This research significantly bridges the gap between previous CFD models and actual field experiences in real waste tanks. A finding of the 2009, DOE, Slurry Retrieval, Pipeline Transport and Plugging, and Mixing Workshop was that CFD models were inadequate to assess blending processes in nuclear waste tanks. One recommendation from that Workshop was that a validation, or bench marking program be performed for CFD modeling versus experiment. This research provided experimental data to validate and correct CFD models as they apply to mixing and blending in nuclear waste tanks. Extensive SDI research was a significant step toward bench marking and applying CFD modeling. This research showed that CFD models not only agreed with experiment, but demonstrated that the large variance in actual experimental data accounts for misunderstood discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. Having documented this finding, SRNL was able to provide correction factors to be used with CFD models to statistically bound full scale CFD results. Through the use of pilot scale tests performed for both types of pumps and available engineering literature, SRNL demonstrated how to effectively apply CFD results to salt batch mixing in full scale waste tanks. In other words, CFD models were in error prior to development of experimental correction factors determined during this research, which provided a technique to use CFD models fo

  6. Proposed Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy corridor...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Proposed Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy corridor programmatic EIS, Draft Corridors - September 2007. Proposed Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy corridor...

  7. Waste-Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste-Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Melter Waste-Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley...

  8. Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility Construction Quality - January 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility Construction Quality - January 2015 January,...

  9. Most Comprehensive Projections for West Antarctica's Future Revealed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Most Comprehensive Projections for West Antarctica's Future Revealed Ice Sheet Model Reveals Most Comprehensive Projections for West Antarctica's Future BISICLES Simulations Run at...

  10. West Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for West Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume V – Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  11. Mars mission laser tool heads to JPL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudget ||EnergyMark Holecek |MarkMarsMars

  12. Tuesday, March 24, 2009 MARS: GROUND ICE AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Tuesday, March 24, 2009 MARS: GROUND ICE AND CLIMATE CHANGE 1:30 p.m. Waterway Ballroom 1 Chairs.-B. Fastook J. L. Deciphering the Late Amazonian Climate History of Mars: Assessing Obliquity Predictions climate history of Mars; extended periods of consistently high or low obliquity are unlikely during

  13. Humans to Mars Fifty Years of Mission Planning,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Humans to Mars Fifty Years of Mission Planning, 1950--2000 David S. F. Portree Monographs in Aerospace History #21 NASA SP-2001-4521 Humans to Mars Fifty Years of Mission Planning, 1950--2000 David S. F. Portree #12;Humans to Mars Fifty Years of Mission Planning, 1950­2000 by David S. F. Portree NASA

  14. Recent MARS15 Developments, New Features and Event Generator Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Recent MARS15 Developments, New Features and Event Generator Modes Fermilab Accelerator Physics-28, 2013 Nikolai Mokhov 8 MARS15 EXCLUSIVE EVENT GENERATORS Improved Cascade-Exciton Model code, CEM03. Mokhov, "CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 Event Generators for the MCNP6, MCNPX and MARS15 Transport Codes", LANL

  15. Interior Structure and Seasonal Mass Redistribution of Mars from Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Interior Structure and Seasonal Mass Redistribution of Mars from Radio Tracking of Mars Pathfinder. Analysis of radio tracking measurements from the Vi- king landers has determined the normal- ized polar. The precession is driven by the gravita- tional torque of the sun acting on Mars' oblate figure

  16. Thursday, March 16, 2006 MARS: SEDIMENTS AND GEOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Thursday, March 16, 2006 MARS: SEDIMENTS AND GEOCHEMISTRY 8:30 a.m. Crystal Ballroom A Chairs: N. J of the Proposed Hypotheses for the Origin of Sediments at the Opportunity Landing Site on Mars [#1869] The MER Athena Team interpretation that sediments at the Opportunity Landing Site on Mars are altered eolian

  17. Lidar on the Phoenix mission to Mars James Whiteway,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duck, Thomas J.

    Lidar on the Phoenix mission to Mars James Whiteway,1 Michael Daly,2 Allan Carswell,3 Thomas Duck,4 from the surface of Mars as part of the Phoenix mission. This will measure the height profile, and C. Cook (2008), Lidar on the Phoenix mission to Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E00A08, doi:10

  18. Electrical Conductivity in Polymer Blends/ Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Ajit R.; Bose, Suryasarathi; Bhattacharyya, Arup R. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai-400076 (India)

    2008-10-23

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) based polymer composites have emerged as the future multifunctional materials in view of its exceptional mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. One of the major interests is to develop conductive polymer composites preferably at low concentration of CNT utilizing their high aspect ratio (L/D) for numerous applications, which include antistatic devices, capacitors and materials for EMI shielding. In this context, polymer blends have emerged as a potential candidate in lowering the percolation thresholds further by the utilization of 'double-percolation' which arises from the synergistic improvements in blend properties associated with the co-continuous morphology. Due to strong inter-tube van der Waals' forces, they often tend to aggregate and uniform dispersion remains a challenge. To overcome this challenge, we exploited sodium salt of 6-aminohexanoic acid (Na-AHA) which was able to assist in debundlling the multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) through 'cation-{pi}' interactions during melt-mixing leading to percolative 'network-like' structure of MWNT within polyamide6 (PA6) phase in co-continuous PA6/acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) blends. The composite exhibited low electrical percolation thresholds of 0.25 wt% of MWNT, the lowest reported value in this system so far. Retention of 'network-like structure' in the solid state with significant refinement was observed even at lower MWNT concentration in presence Na-AHA, which was assessed through AC electrical conductivity measurements. Reactive coupling was found to be a dominant factor besides 'cation-{pi}' interactions in achieving low electrical percolation in PA6/ABS+MWNT composites.

  19. Single Stage Contactor Testing Of The Next Generation Solvent Blend

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D. T.; Peters, T. B.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Poirier, M. R.; Brass, E. A.; Garrison, A. G.; Ketusky, E. T.

    2014-01-06

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent to increase the cesium decontamination factor. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facility the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing utilized a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the new extractant, MaxCalix, as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 liquid-to-liquid centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. The results indicate that hydraulically, the NGS solvent performed hydraulically similar to the current solvent which was expected. For the organic carryover 93% of the solvent is predicted to be recovered from the stripping operation and 96% from the extraction operation. As for the mass transfer, the NGS solvent significantly improved the cesium DF by at least an order of magnitude when extrapolating the One-stage results to actual Seven-stage extraction operation with a stage efficiency of 95%.

  20. Hydrogen effects on materials for CNG/H2 blends.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farese, David (Air Products, USA); Keller, Jay O.; Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-09-01

    No concerns for Hydrogen-Enriched Compressed Natural gas (HCNG) in steel storage tanks if material strength is < 950 MPa. Recommend evaluating H{sub 2}-assisted fatigue cracking in higher strength steels at H{sub 2} partial pressure in blend. Limited fatigue testing on higher strength steel cylinders in H{sub 2} shows promising results. Impurities in Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) (e.g., CO) may provide extrinsic mechanism for mitigating H{sub 2}-assisted fatigue cracking in steel tanks.

  1. INVESTIGATION ON THE FLAME EXTINCTION LIMIT OF FUEL BLENDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahsan R. Choudhuri

    2005-02-01

    Lean flame extinction limits of binary fuel mixtures of methane (CH{sub 4}), propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}), and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) were measured using a twin-flame counter-flow burner. Experiments were conducted to generate an extinction equivalence ratio vs. global stretch rate plot and an extrapolation method was used to calculate the equivalence ratio corresponding to an experimentally unattainable zero-stretch condition. The foregoing gases were selected because they are the primary constitutes of natural gas, which is the primary focus of the present study. To validate the experimental setup and methodology, the flame extinction limit of pure fuels at zero stretch conditions were also estimated and compared with published values. The lean flame extinction limits of methane (f{sub ext} = 4.6%) and propane (f{sub ext} = 2.25%) flames measured in the present study agreed with the values reported in the literature. It was observed that the flame extinction limit of fuel blends have a polynomial relation with the concentration of component fuels in the mixture. This behavior contradicts with the commonly used linear Le Chatelier's approximation. The experimentally determined polynomial relations between the flame extinction limits of fuel blends (i.e. methane-propane and methane-ethane) and methane concentration are as follows: (1) Methane-Propane--%f{sub ext} = (1.05 x 10{sup -9}) f{sup 5}-(1.3644 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(6.40299 x 10{sup -6}) f{sup 3}-(1.2108459 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2}+(2.87305329 x 10{sup -3}) f+2.2483; (2) Methane-Ethane--%f{sub ext} = (2.1 x 10{sup -9})f{sup 5}-(3.5752 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(2.095425 x 10{sup -5}) f{sup 3}-(5.037353 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2} + 6.08980409 f + 2.8923. Where f{sub ext} is the extinction limits of methane-propane and methane-ethane fuel blends, and f is the concentration (% volume) of methane in the fuel mixture. The relations were obtained by fitting fifth order curve (polynomial regression) to experimentally measured extinction limits at different mixture conditions. To extend the study to a commercial fuel, the flame extinction limit for Birmingham natural gas (a blend of 95% methane, 5% ethane and 5% nitrogen) was experimentally determined and was found to be 3.62% fuel in the air-fuel mixture.

  2. Emissions mitigation of blended coals through systems optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Labbe [IOM Invensys Operations Management (United States)

    2009-10-15

    For coal fired power stations, such as those located in the US, that have installed NOx and SOx emissions abatement equipment substantial carbon dioxide reduction could be achieved by shifting from pure PRB coal to blended coals with local bituminous coal. Don Labbe explains how. The article is based on a presentation at Power-Gen Asia 2009, which takes place 7-9 October in Bangkok, Thailand and an ISA POWID 2009 paper (19th Annual Joint ISA POWID/EPRI Controlls and Instrumentation Conference, Chicago, Illinois, May 2009). 4 refs., 3 figs.

  3. West Valley Demonstration Project | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE. regulatorsEnergy InformationWest CoastWest ValleyWest

  4. Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management Conditions of Volunteer Service (Please send completed form to the Office of Risk Management) riskmanagement@uoregon.edu Fax: 541-346-7008 As a volunteer Tort Claims Act, ORS 30.260-300, and Oregon Department of Administrative Services Risk Management

  5. Project Management in NASA Mars Climate Orbiter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    by the Mars Climate Orbiter Mishap Investigation Board F. Recurring Themes From Failure Investigations and Control Center Navigation and Control Center Goddard Space Flight Center Goddard Space Flight Center Merwarth NASA/GSFC-retired Expert in ground operations & flight software development Moshe F. Rubinstein

  6. The MAVEN Mission: Exploring Mars' Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    at launch ·Spacecraft Dry Mass: 810 kg at launch ·Power: 1135 W at Mars Aphelion MAG (2) "Gull-Wing" Solar Us to Understand Escape of Atmospheric Gases to Space #12;The Solar Wind is Able to Strip Off Gas-Related Proper1es and Processes LPW MAG STATIC Sun, Solar Wind, Solar Storms SWIA EUV

  7. Product specification Supersedes data 1998 Mar 24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ida, Nathan

    DATA SHEET Product specification Supersedes data 1998 Mar 24 2000 Jun 13 DISCRETE SEMICONDUCTORS KMZ51 Magnetic field sensor M3D495 #12;2000 Jun 13 2 Philips Semiconductors Product specification output voltage 8 -Iflip flip coil handbook, halfpage 41 58 MGD827 pin 1 index Hext Fig.1 Simplified

  8. Probing Water Phases in Cement Blends using 1 Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    Probing Water Phases in Cement Blends using 1 H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry Jean)114 222 5973 Fax: +44 (0)114 222 5943 E-Mail: j.gorce@sheffield.ac.uk Extended Abstract: Cement and Concrete Science, Warwick, 16th + 17th September 2004 Introduction The nuclear industry uses blended cement

  9. Characterization of Polymer Blends: Optical Microscopy (*Polarized, Interference and Phase Contrast Microscopy*) and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan [ORNL; Darling, Seth B. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 15 surveys the characterization of macro, micro and meso morphologies of polymer blends by optical microscopy. Confocal Microscopy offers the ability to view the three dimensional morphology of polymer blends, popular in characterization of biological systems. Confocal microscopy uses point illumination and a spatial pinhole to eliminate out-of focus light in samples that are thicker than the focal plane.

  10. Optimization of Crude-Oil Blending Operations Sylvain Mouret Ignacio E. Grossmann Pierre Pestiaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Optimization of Crude-Oil Blending Operations Sylvain Mouret Ignacio E. Grossmann Pierre Pestiaux Optimize the schedule of operations for the crude-oil prob- lem using a MINLP scheduling model Tools MINLP Sylvain Mouret, Ignacio E. Grossmann, Pierre Pestiaux Optimization of Crude-Oil Blending Operations #12

  11. Scheduling of large scale crude oil blending Felipe Diaz-Alvarado1, Francisco Trespalacios2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Scheduling of large scale crude oil blending Felipe D´iaz-Alvarado1, Francisco Trespalacios2, 30 (4): 614-634. D´iaz-Alvarado, Trespalacios, Grossmann Scheduling of large scale crude oil blending, P. A Novel Priority-Slot Based Continuous-Time Formulation for Crude-Oil Scheduling Problems

  12. Implications of LDPE Branching and Mw on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of PP/LDPE Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

    polyethylene; molecular weight; polypropylene; short chain branching Introduction Polymer blending polymers with different molecular characteristics.[1­3] Even though blends of polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE) are common espe- cially in waste recycling due to large volume consumption of polyolefins,[4

  13. Creativity as Pastiche: A Computational Model of Dynamic Blending and Textual Collage,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veale, Tony

    Reference to the Use of Blending in Cinematic Narratives Tony Veale, School of Computer Applications, Dublin combination within a framework of interconnected mental spaces. Through an analysis of cinematic pastiche, as exemplified by its use in cinematic pastiche, a process in which two or more narratives are blended together

  14. X-ray Microscopy of Photovoltaic Polyfluorene Blends: Relating Nanomorphology to Device Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X-ray Microscopy of Photovoltaic Polyfluorene Blends: Relating Nanomorphology to Device Performance no features on the length scale of 50 nm or greater. Additionally, the performance of photovoltaic devices and the degree of nanoscale phase separation. Introduction Photovoltaic devices based on blends of donor

  15. Snow water equivalent in the Sierra Nevada: Blending snow sensor observations with snowmelt model simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Snow water equivalent in the Sierra Nevada: Blending snow sensor observations with snowmelt model 2013. [1] We estimate the spatial distribution of daily melt-season snow water equivalent (SWE) over snow cover images with a spatially distributed snowmelt model and a blended method in which

  16. Handbook for Handling, Storing, and Dispensing E85 and Other Ethanol-Gasoline Blends (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.

    2013-09-01

    This document serves as a guide for blenders, distributors, sellers, and users of E85 and other ethanol blends above E10. It provides basic information on the proper and safe use of E85 and other ethanol blends and includes supporting technical and policy references.

  17. Handbook for Handling, Storing, and Dispensing E85 and Other Ethanol-Gasoline Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-17

    This document serves as a guide for blenders, distributors, sellers, and users of E85 and other ethanol blends above E10. It provides basic information on the proper and safe use of E85 and other ethanol blends and includes supporting technical and policy references.

  18. TENSILE PROPERTIES OF PLA AND PHBV BLENDS: ANOMALOUS ELONGATION AND AGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    TENSILE PROPERTIES OF PLA AND PHBV BLENDS: ANOMALOUS ELONGATION AND AGING T. Gérard, T. Noto and T-based polymers, they still have some disadvantages such as poor (fragile) mechanical properties. Blending the drawbacks of the pure components. In this work, PLA and poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV

  19. Gaussian frequency blending algorithm with Matrix Inversion Tomosynthesis (MITS) and Filtered Back Projection (FBP) for better

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ying "Ada"

    Gaussian frequency blending algorithm with Matrix Inversion Tomosynthesis (MITS) and Filtered Back and applied to the FBP reconstructions. A frequency weighting parameter was studied to blend the high-passed MITS with low-passed FBP frequency components. Four different reconstruction methods were investigated

  20. Blending Modi...ed Gaussian Closure and Non-Gaussian Reduced Subspace Methods for Turbulent Dynamical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majda, Andrew J.

    Blending Modi...ed Gaussian Closure and Non-Gaussian Reduced Subspace Methods for Turbulent of uncertainty quanti...cation all dynamical components (unstable modes, nonlinear energy transfers, and stable. In this paper we derive a blended framework that links inexpensive second-order UQ schemes that model the full

  1. "Performance, Emission and Particle distribution of Diesel Engines Fueled with Diesel-Dimethoxymethane (DMM) Blends"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xibin Wang "Performance, Emission and Particle distribution of Diesel Engines Fueled with Diesel-Dimethoxymethane (DMM) Blends" Abstract : Combustion, performance and emission were studied for DI diesel engine fuelled with DMM/diesel fuel blends for DMM content from 0 to 50%. Results showed that, for diesel engine with fuel

  2. Synergistic Effect of coal blends on thermoplasticity evaluated using a temperature-variable dynamic viscoelastic measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toshimasa Takanohashi; Takahiro Shishido; Ikuo Saito; Kensuke Masaki; Atsushi Dobashi; Kiyoshi Fukada [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2006-12-15

    To maximize the conversion of low-quality coal into good coke, we investigated the thermoplasticity of various binary blends of caking coals with slightly or noncaking coals using a dynamic viscoelastic technique with a temperature-variable rheometer. Coal blend samples were prepared by mixing two coals (1:1 by weight), which were heated from room temperature to 600 C at a rate of 3-80{sup o}C/min. At the slow rate of 3{sup o}C/min, the blends had a tan {delta} that was generally lower than the calculated value, showing that a negative interaction caused a loss of thermoplasticity. In contrast, at the rapid heating rate of 80{sup o}C/min, the tan {delta} of some blends was higher than the calculated value, indicating a positive interaction that enhanced the thermoplasticity. With rapid heating, the thermoplasticity of each coal itself increased, and their thermoplastic temperature ranges widened with rapid heating. Therefore, rapid heating was effective at converting these coal blends into good cokes. Moreover, even with slow heating, when a combination of coals (Gregory:Enshu, 1:1) showing some thermoplasticity in nearly the same temperature range was blended, a desirable synergistic effect of the blend was obtained. This suggests that blending coal with an overlapping thermoplastic temperature range is important for the synergistic effect, regardless of the heating rate. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Effects of HyperCoal addition on coke strength and thermoplasticity of coal blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toshimasa Takanohashi; Takahiro Shishido; Ikuo Saito [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan). Energy Technology Research Institute

    2008-05-15

    Ashless coal, also known as HyperCoal (HPC), was produced by thermal extraction of three coals of different ranks (Gregory caking coal, Warkworth steam coal, and Pasir subbituminous coal) with 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) at 360, 380, and 400{sup o}C. The effects of blending these HPCs into standard coal blends were investigated. Blending HPCs as 5-10% of a standard blend (Kouryusho:Goonyella:K9) enhanced the thermoplasticity over a wide temperature range. For blends made with the Pasir-HPC, produced from a noncaking coal, increasing the extraction temperature from 360 to 400{sup o}C increased the thermoplasticity significantly. Blends containing Warkworth-HPC, produced from a slightly caking coal, had a higher tensile strength than the standard blend in semicoke strength tests. The addition of 10% Pasir-HPC, extracted at 400{sup o}C, increased the tensile strength of the semicokes to the same degree as those made with Gregory-HPC. Furthermore, all HPC blends had a higher tensile strength and smaller weight loss during carbonization. These results suggest that the HPC became integrated into the coke matrix, interacting strongly with the other raw coals. 14 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Enhanced Miscibility of Low-Molecular-Weight Polystyrene/Polyisoprene Blends in Supercritical CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    Enhanced Miscibility of Low-Molecular-Weight Polystyrene/Polyisoprene Blends in Supercritical CO2 solution temperature (UCST) polymer blend in the presence of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 been examined as a function of temperature in scCO2 by visual inspection, small-angle neutron

  5. NIST Handbook 112 (2015) EPO No. 22 Retail Motor-Fuel Dispensers Blended Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    NIST Handbook 112 (2015) EPO No. 22 ­ Retail Motor-Fuel Dispensers ­ Blended Products RMFD - Blenders (Rev 09/14) DRAFT Page 1 of 12 2015 NIST EPO No. 22 Examination Procedure Outline for Retail Motor-Fuel, and consoles. For non-blending single, dual, and multi-product dispensers, see EPO No. 21. Nonretroactive

  6. Puddle Dynamics and Air-to-Fuel Ratio Compensation for Gasoline-Ethanol Blends in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    1 Puddle Dynamics and Air-to-Fuel Ratio Compensation for Gasoline-Ethanol Blends in Flex-Fuel Engines* Kyung-ho Ahn, Anna G. Stefanopoulou, and Mrdjan Jankovic Abstract--Ethanol is being increasingly flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) can operate on a blend of gasoline and ethanol in any concentration of up

  7. Interface modification in an immiscible rod-coil polymer blend using functionalized copolymers and polyelectrolytes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passinault, Robbie J

    1996-01-01

    Blends of rod-like and flexible-coil polymers are attractive for synthesizing molecular composites. In this study, a blend of a rod-like polymer (Vectra B950) and a flexible polymer (polystyrene) is used to investigate the influence of polymer...

  8. The Impact of Ethanol Blending on U.S. Gasoline Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-11-01

    This study assesses the impact of ethanol blending on gasoline prices in the United States today and the potential impact of ethanol on gasoline prices at higher blending concentrations (10%, 15% and 20% of the total U.S. gasoline consumption).

  9. West Valley Demonstration Project Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-08-31

    The annual site environmental monitoring report for the West Valley Demonstration Project nuclear waste management facility.

  10. JV Task 112-Optimal Ethanol Blend-Level Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Shockey; Ted Aulich; Bruce Jones; Gary Mead; Paul Steevens

    2008-01-31

    Highway Fuel Economy Test (HWFET) and Federal Test Procedure 75 (FTP-75) tests were conducted on four 2007 model vehicles; a Chevrolet Impala flex-fuel and three non-flex-fuel vehicles: a Ford Fusion, a Toyota Camry, and a Chevrolet Impala. This investigation utilized a range of undenatured ethanol/Tier II gasoline blend levels from 0% to 85%. HWFET testing on ethanol blend levels of E20 in the flex fuel Chevrolet Impala and E30 in the non-flex-fuel Ford Fusion and Toyota Camry resulted in miles-per-gallon (mpg) fuel economy greater than Tier 2 gasoline, while E40 in the non-flex-fuel Chevrolet Impala resulted in an optimum mpg based on per-gallon fuel Btu content. Exhaust emission values for non-methane organic gases (NMOG), carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) obtained from both the FTP-75 and the HWFET driving cycles were at or below EPA Tier II, Light-Duty Vehicles, Bin 5 levels for all vehicles tested with one exception. The flex-fuel Chevrolet Impala exceeded the NMOG standard for the FTP-75 on E-20 and Tier II gasoline.

  11. Novel Vertimass Catalyst for Conversion of Ethanol and Other Alcohols into Fungible Gasoline, Jet, and Diesel Fuel Blend Stocks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel Vertimass Catalyst for Conversion of Ethanol and Other Alcohols into Fungible Gasoline, Jet, and Diesel Fuel Blend Stocks

  12. West Virginia Consumers Have Appliance Rebate 'Trifecta'

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    West Virginians didn’t waste any time in taking advantage of the Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program. Only three months in, and almost half of the available $1.7 million is already spoken for.

  13. Gravity Data for west-central Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-04-06

    West -108.366692 East -105.478847 North 40.932361 South 36.961606 Data from From University of Texas: Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies

  14. West Wide Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: West Wide Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision (BLM)Legal Published NA Year Signed or Took...

  15. Enterprise Assessments Review, West Valley Demonstration Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    review of activity-level implementation of the radiation protection program at the West Valley Demonstration Project. The onsite review was conducted during May 19-22 and June...

  16. The Way Ahead - West Valley Demonstration Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project Update Project Update The Way Ahead The Way Ahead West Valley Demonstration Project Not to be Considered as a Regulatory Submittal Pre-decisional Draft 198171 The Way...

  17. Gravity Data for west-central Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zehner, Richard

    West -108.366692 East -105.478847 North 40.932361 South 36.961606 Data from From University of Texas: Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies

  18. Campus Services 1951 East-West Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campus Services 1951 East-West Road Honolulu, Hawai`i 96822 Telephone: (808) 956-2980 Fax: (808 the current economic climate and the salary cuts that many of our employees are experiencing. We arrived

  19. West Virginia University 1 Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 Public Health Degrees Offered: Master of Public Health · Biostatistics · Epidemiology · Health Policy, Management and Leadership · Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences · Social and Behavioral Sciences Master of Public Health (Online) Master of Science · School Health

  20. Modeling the Auto-Ignition of Biodiesel Blends with a Multi-Step Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toulson, Dr. Elisa [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Allen, Casey M [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Miller, Dennis J [Michigan State University, East Lansing; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Schock, Harold [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Lee, Tonghun [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in using biodiesel in place of or in blends with petrodiesel in diesel engines; however, biodiesel oxidation chemistry is complicated to directly model and existing surrogate kinetic models are very large, making them computationally expensive. The present study describes a method for predicting the ignition behavior of blends of n-heptane and methyl butanoate, fuels whose blends have been used in the past as a surrogate for biodiesel. The autoignition is predicted using a multistep (8-step) model in order to reduce computational time and make this a viable tool for implementation into engine simulation codes. A detailed reaction mechanism for n-heptane-methyl butanoate blends was used as a basis for validating the multistep model results. The ignition delay trends predicted by the multistep model for the n-heptane-methyl butanoate blends matched well with that of the detailed CHEMKIN model for the majority of conditions tested.

  1. Local and chain dynamics in miscible polymer blends: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jutta Luettmer-Strathmann; Manjeera Mantina

    2005-11-07

    Local chain structure and local environment play an important role in the dynamics of polymer chains in miscible blends. In general, the friction coefficients that describe the segmental dynamics of the two components in a blend differ from each other and from those of the pure melts. In this work, we investigate polymer blend dynamics with Monte Carlo simulations of a generalized bond-fluctuation model, where differences in the interaction energies between non-bonded nearest neighbors distinguish the two components of a blend. Simulations employing only local moves and respecting a non-bond crossing condition were carried out for blends with a range of compositions, densities, and chain lengths. The blends investigated here have long-chain dynamics in the crossover region between Rouse and entangled behavior. In order to investigate the scaling of the self-diffusion coefficients, characteristic chain lengths $N_\\mathrm{c}$ are calculated from the packing length of the chains. These are combined with a local mobility $\\mu$ determined from the acceptance rate and the effective bond length to yield characteristic self-diffusion coefficients $D_\\mathrm{c}=\\mu/N_\\mathrm{c}$. We find that the data for both melts and blends collapse onto a common line in a graph of reduced diffusion coefficients $D/D_\\mathrm{c}$ as a function of reduced chain length $N/N_\\mathrm{c}$. The composition dependence of dynamic properties is investigated in detail for melts and blends with chains of length twenty at three different densities. For these blends, we calculate friction coefficients from the local mobilities and consider their composition and pressure dependence. The friction coefficients determined in this way show many of the characteristics observed in experiments on miscible blends.

  2. Insight into the Molecular Arrangement of High-Density Polyethylene Polymer Chains in Blends of Polystyrene/High-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Insight into the Molecular Arrangement of High-Density Polyethylene Polymer Chains in Blends of Polystyrene/High- Density Polyethylene from Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Raman Techniques JAYANT/high-density polyethylene (PS/HDPE) blends were synthe- sized by melt blending in a single screw extruder. Co

  3. QER- Comment of Brian West

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, Thanks for the invitation to the QER workshop. Here are a couple of comments that I was probably unable to fully articulate in the main session, although I did try to make some of these points in the breakout session: When considering alternatives and policy that drives alternative fuel use, it is important to learn from Policy successes and failures. Policy drivers put in place in Thailand, Brazil, and Sweden have been successful in transitions to greater alternative fuel use. US policy for Flex Fuel Vehicles has been largely unsuccessful at encouraging alternative fuel use. The fuel economy credit for the OEMs to build FFVs was generous but encouraged only modest production; nonetheless there are over 15M FFVs on the road. However, they use very little ethanol fuel due to cost ($/mile), range, etc. Natural Gas has a very real value proposition (lower $/gge) so fleet owners have good financial incentive to make the switch, even if investments are required. One participant commented that infrastructure costs are small compared to costs of imported oil. I agree with this statement. One presenter mentioned (a city?) with a law that requires infrastructure to support future EV charging be installed in any new parking garage. Great idea. (Better to have and not need than need and not have, especially when cost differential is small on the front end and very large on the back end). In the US we install about 20,000-40,000 new fuel dispensers per year (according to Gilbarco/Wayne). It would be a horrible missed opportunity to not put policy in place that encourages/requires E25 or E85-compatible dispensers. With a successful policy driver, in the next five years the nation could have over 100,000 ethanol-compatible dispensers in place, ready for a new High Octane Fuel (that could very likely contain more than 10 or 15% ethanol). Thanks Brian H. West Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory http://www.ornl.gov/ http://feerc.ornl.gov/ http://www.fueleconomy.gov/ From: Tillemann, Levi Sent: Thursday, July 03, 2014 3:52 PM To: West, Brian H. Subject: AMR/QER Technical Workshop Dear Brian: On behalf of the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis (EPSA) I want to thank you for your participation at the June 20th AMR/QER Alternative Transportation Refueling Infrastructure technical workshop. Your contribution in the breakout sessions and general discussion sessions provided valuable insight that will help inform EPSA during the QER process going forward. During the course of the workshop, detailed notes were taken. These have been anonymized and will be made publically available to you and the general public in the coming weeks. Once they are posted, we will provide you with a link for accessing them online. We encourage you to submit additional comments regarding infrastructure for transmission, storage or distribution of alternative transportation fuels to qercomments@hq.doe.gov. For more information about the QER's stakeholder meeting locations, areas of analysis and public comments you can visit the QER website at: http://energy.gov/epsa/initiatives/quadrennial-energy-review-qer. Please feel free to contact me or Sallie Gilbert (sallie.gilbert@hq.doe.gov) if you have additional questions. I will be leaving the DOE August 1, thereafter you may contact Renee Picket (adonica.pickett@hq.doe.gov) or Carla Frisch (carla.frisch@hq.doe.gov) with questions or comments. Thank you again for making the workshop a great success. I look forward to working together with all of you on these issues in the future. Best regards, Levi Tillemann, Ph.D. Special Advisor, EPSA US Department of Energy

  4. Conducting polymer blends: Polypyrrole and polythiophene blends with polystyrene, polycarbonate resin, poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinyl methyl ketone)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H.L.

    1992-01-01

    Various aromatic compounds can be polymerized by electrochemical oxidation in solution containing a supporting electrolyte. Most studies have been devoted to polypyrrole and polythiophene. In situ doping during electrochemical polymerization yields free standing conductive polymer film. One major approach to making conducting polymer blends is electrochemical synthesis after coating the host polymer on a platinum electrode. In the electrolysis of pyrrole or thiophene monomer, using (t-Bu[sub 4]N)BF[sub 4] as supporting electrolyte, and acetonitrile as solvent, monomer can diffuse through the polymer film, to produce a polypyrrole or polythiophene blend in the film. Doping occurs along with polymerization to form a conducting polymer alloy. The strongest molecular interaction in polymers, and one that is central to phase behavior, is hydrogen bonding. This mixing at the molecular level enhances the degree of miscibility between two polymers and results in macroscopic properties indicative of single phase behavior. In this dissertation, the authors describes the syntheses of conducting polymer blends: polypyrrole and polythiophene blends with polystyrene, poly(bisphenol-A-carbonate), polyvinyl alcohol and poly(vinyl methyl ketone). The syntheses are performed both electrochemically and chemically. Characterization of these blends was carried out by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Percolating threshold conductivities occur from 7% to 20% for different polymer blends. The low threshold conductivity is attributed to blend homogeneity enhanced by hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl group in the insulating polymer and the N-H group in polypyrrole. Thermal stability, environmental stability, mechanical properties, crystallinity and morphological structure are also discussed. The authors have also engaged in the polymerization of imidazoles.

  5. Influence of Substrate on Crystallization in Polythiophene/fullerene Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C He; D Germack; J Kline; D Delongchamp; D Fischer; C Snyder; M Toney; J Kushmerick; L Richter

    2011-12-31

    The nanoscale morphology of the active layer in organic, bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells is crucial to device performance. Often a combination of casting conditions and post deposition thermal treatment is used to optimize the morphology. In general, the development of microscopic crystals is deleterious, as the exciton diffusion length is {approx}10 nm. We find that the microscopic crystallization behavior in polythiophene/fullerene blends is strongly influenced by the substrate on which the BHJ is cast. With a silicon oxide substrate, the crystal nucleation density is high and significant crystallization occurs at a temperature of 140 C. On more hydrophobic substrates, significantly higher temperatures are required for observable crystallization. This difference is attributed to the interfacial segregation of the PCBM, controlled by the substrate surface energy. The substrate dependence of crystallization has significant implications on the fullerene crystal growth mechanisms and practical implications for device studies.

  6. Enhanced phase segregation induced by dipolar interactions in polymer blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajeev Kumar; Bobby G. Sumpter; M. Muthukumar

    2014-11-03

    We present a generalized theory for studying phase separation in blends of polymers containing dipoles on their backbone. The theory is used to construct co-existence curves and to study the effects of dipolar interactions on interfacial tension for a planar interface between the coexisting phases. We show that a mismatch in monomeric dipole moments, or equivalently a mismatch in the dielectric constant of the pure components, leads to destabilization of the homogeneous phase. Corrections to the Flory-Huggins phase diagram are predicted using the theory. Furthermore, we show that the interfacial tension increases with an increase in the mismatch of the dipole moments of the components. Density profiles and interfacial tensions are constructed for diffuse and sharp polymer-polymer interfaces by extending the formalisms of Cahn-Hilliard and Helfand-Tagami-Sapse, respectively.

  7. Identification and quantification of organic chemicals in supplemental fuel blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salter, F.

    1996-12-31

    Continental Cement Company, Inc. (Continental) burns waste fuels to supplement coal in firing the kiln. It is to be expected that federal and state agencies want an accounting of the chemicals burned. As rules and regulations become more plentiful, a company such as Continental must demonstrate that it has made a reasonable attempt to identify and quantify many specific organic compounds. The chemicals on the SARA 313 list can change frequently. Also the number and concentrations of compounds that can disqualify a material from consideration as a supplemental fuel at Continental continues to change. A quick and reliable method of identifying and quantifying organics in waste fuel blends is therefore crucial. Using a Hewlett-Packard 5972 GC/MS system Continental has developed a method of generating values for the total weight of compounds burned. A similar procedure is used to verify that waste streams meet Continental`s acceptance criteria.

  8. Rheological properties of peanut oil-diesel fuel blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrum, J.W.; Law, S.E.

    1982-07-01

    Basic physical properties of peanut oil-diesel fuel blends were experimentally determined to help establish suitability for use in compression-ignition engines. For volumetric proportions of peanut oil ranging in 20 percent increments from 0 percent to 100 percent, the continuously varying properties at 21/sup 0/C were found to range as follows: heating value - 45.8 to 40.3 MJ/kg; specific gravity - 0.848 to 0.915; surface tension - 28.3 to 35.6 mN/m; and kinematic viscosity - 3.8 to 7.0 cSt. Dynamic viscosity measured as a function of shear rate over a 0/sup 0/C to 80/sup 0/C temperature range indicated nonNewtonian flow properties at shear rates less than 3/s.

  9. Cathodic disbondment resistance with reactive ethylene terpolymer blends and composite coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, Corey T.

    2008-01-01

    for Tensile Properties of Plastics (ASTM, West Conshohocken,for Tensile Properties of Plastics (ASTM, West Conshohocken,properties reported. The stress-strain behavior for all materials was elastic-plastic and

  10. Microsoft Word - ex1b-ITER-mar07.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PATENT RIGHTS - ACQUISITION BY THE GOVERNMENT - ITER (Mar 2007) (a) Definitions. (1) "Invention", as used in this clause, means any invention or discovery which is or may be...

  11. Benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude assayed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1994-08-15

    The paper gives an assay of West Texas Intermediate, one of the world's market crudes. The price of this crude, known as WTI, is followed by market analysts, investors, traders, and industry managers around the world. WTI price is used as a benchmark for pricing all other US crude oils. The 41[degree] API < 0.34 wt % sulfur crude is gathered in West Texas and moved to Cushing, Okla., for distribution. The WTI posted prices is the price paid for the crude at the wellhead in West Texas and is the true benchmark on which other US crudes are priced. The spot price is the negotiated price for short-term trades of the crude. And the New York Mercantile Exchange, or Nymex, price is a futures price for barrels delivered at Cushing.

  12. West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland:EnergyWeVirginia University JumpWestWestLoading

  13. West Valley Demonstration Project | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE. regulatorsEnergy InformationWest CoastWest Valley

  14. HEU to LEU Conversion and Blending Facility: UF{sub 6} blending alternative to produce LEU UF{sub 6} for commercial use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials; the nuclear material will be converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. Five technologies for blending HEU will be assessed; blending as UF{sub 6} to produce a UF{sub 6} product for commercial use is one of them. This document provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the UF{sub 6} blending HEU disposition option. Resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards, accident scenarios, and intersite transportation are discussed.

  15. Impacts of Biodiesel Fuel Blends Oil Dilution on Light-Duty Diesel Engine Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, M. J.; Alleman, T. L.; Luecke, J.; McCormick, R. L.

    2009-08-01

    Assesses oil dilution impacts on a diesel engine operating with a diesel particle filter, NOx storage, a selective catalytic reduction emission control system, and a soy-based 20% biodiesel fuel blend.

  16. Knock limits in spark ignited direct injected engines using gasoline/ethanol blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasseris, Emmanuel P

    2011-01-01

    Direct Fuel Injection (DI) extends engine knock limits compared to Port Fuel Injection (PFI) by utilizing the in-cylinder charge cooling effect due to fuel evaporation. The use of gasoline/ethanol blends in DI is therefore ...

  17. Polymer blend containing a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer and a matrix polymer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hedstrand, D.M.; Tomalia, D.A.

    1995-02-28

    Dense star polymers or dendrimers, modified by capping with a hydrophobic group capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell, act as molecular nucleating agents in forming a polymer blend.

  18. The effect of block copolymer on the phase behavior of a polymer blend

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung, L.; Jackson, C.L.; Hess, D.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of an interfacial modifier on the phase behavior of a blend has been investigated using time-resolved fight scattering and small angle neutron scattering techniques. A low molecular weight binary blend of deuterated polystyrene/polybutadiene (PSD/PB) with PSD-PB diblock copolymer as the added interfacial modifier was studied. We observed that the critical temperature of the blend decreases with increasing copolymer content and the kinetics of the phase separation (via spinodal decomposition) slows down in the presence of the copolymer. The transition from early to late stage spinodal decomposition in a near critical mixture of the binary blend was analyzed and compared to available theories. In addition, transmission electron microscopy and optical microscopy studies were used to examine the morphology of the system under various temperature quench conditions.

  19. Optimal handling of Highly Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients during milling and blending operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setty, Prashant (Prashant Neelappanavara)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates best practices for Highly Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (HAPI) milling and blending. We utilize a qualitative analysis centering on a benchmarking study and quantitative analyses using a ...

  20. GDNF blended chitosan nerve guides: An in vivo study Minal Patel,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VandeVord, Pamela

    ,9 There are numerous methods to chemically process chitosan and it can be easily molded into many sizes and shapes defects. Studies by Tanaka et al.15­17 have evaluated chitosan tendon nerve guides blended with laminin

  1. Solvent Blending Strategy to Upgrade MCU CSSX Solvent to Equivalent Next-Generation CSSX Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-12-01

    The results of the present study have validated an equal-volume blending strategy for upgrading freshly prepared CSSX solvent to a blended solvent functionally equivalent to NG-CSSX solvent. It is shown that blending fresh CSSX solvent as currently used in MCU with an equal volume of an NG-CSSX solvent concentrate of appropriate composition yields a blended solvent composition (46.5 mM of MaxCalix, 3.5 mM of BOBCalixC6, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, 3 mM of guanidine suppressor, and 1.5 mM of TOA in Isopar L) that exhibits equivalent batch ESS performance to that of the NG-CSSX solvent containing 50 mM of MaxCalix, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, and 3 mM of guanidine suppressor in Isopar L. The solvent blend composition is robust to third-phase formation. Results also show that a blend containing up to 60% v/v of CSSX solvent could be accommodated with minimal risk. Extraction and density data for the effect of solvent concentration mimicking diluent evaporation or over-dilution of the equal-volume blended solvent are also given, providing input for setting operational limits. Given that the experiments employed all pristine chemicals, the results do not qualify a blended solvent starting with actual used MCU solvent, which can be expected to have undergone some degree of degradation. Consequently, further work should be considered to evaluate this risk and implement appropriate remediation if needed.

  2. Empirical Study of the Stability of Biodiesel and Biodiesel Blends: Milestone Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R. L.; Westbrook, S. R.

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a database that supports specific proposals for a stability test and specification for biodiesel and biodiesel blends. B100 samples from 19 biodiesel producers were obtained in December of 2005 and January of 2006 and tested for stability. Eight of these samples were then selected for additional study, including long-term storage tests and blending at 5% and 20% with a number of ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels.

  3. West Lothian Biodiversity Action Plan: Oil Shale Bings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvie, Barbra

    2005-01-01

    This report establishes the importance of the West Lothian oil-shale bings at both a national (UK) and local (West Lothian) scale, for their contribution to local biodiversity, their historical importance, their education ...

  4. Scott Runnels of Computational Physics to teach at West Point

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at West Point Runnels has been selected for a two-year faculty post in the Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering at West Point. March 19, 2013 Scott Runnels Scott Runnels...

  5. Exploring the context : a small hotel in Key West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanBeuzekom, Edrick

    1984-01-01

    This thesis develops a personal method and approach for designing in a delicate context such as the Key West Historic District. This thesis is composed of two parts. The first part presents observations of Key West, focusing ...

  6. West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resources. Energy generation, mineral extraction, agricultural production and other industrial activities Virginia Water Research Institute is dedicated to the preservation and restoration of the natural from the following: West Virginia Department of Natural Resources West Virginia Department of Health

  7. West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resources. Energy generation, mineral extraction, agricultural production and other industrial activities Virginia Water Research Institute is dedicated to the preservation and restoration of the natural from the following: West Virginia Department of Natural Resources West Virginia Bureau for Public

  8. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL B&W West...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CH2M HILL B&W West Valley LLC, West Valley Demonstration Project - October 2013 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL B&W West Valley LLC, West Valley Demonstration...

  9. Resistance of fly ash-Portland cement blends to thermal shock

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pyatina, Tatiana; Sugama, Toshifumi

    2015-09-11

    Thermal-shock resistance of high-content fly ash-Portland cement blends was tested in the following ways. Activated and non-activated blends with 80-90 % fly ash F (FAF) were left to set at room temperature, then hydrated for 24 hours at 85°C and 24-more hours at 300°C and tested in five thermal-shock cycles (600°C heat - 25°C water quenching). XRD, and thermal gravimetric analyses, along with calorimetric measurements and SEM-EDX tests demonstrated that the activated blends form more hydrates after 24 hours at 300°C, and achieve a higher short-term compressive strength than do non-activated ones. Sodium meta-silicate and sodaash engendered the concomitant hydrationmore »of OPC and FAF, with the formation of mixed crystalline FAF-OPC hydrates and FAF hydrates, such as garranite, analcime, and wairakite, along with the amorphous FAF hydration products. In SS-activated and non-activated blends separate OPC (tobermorite) and FAF (amorphous gel) hydrates with no mixed crystalline products formed. The compressive strength of all tested blends decreased by nearly 50% after 5 thermal-shock test cycles. These changes in the compressive strength were accompanied by a marked decrease in the intensities of XRD patterns of the crystalline hydrates after the thermalshock. As a result, there was no significant difference in the performance of the blends with different activators« less

  10. Mars Rover finds changing rocks, surprising scientists

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudget ||EnergyMark Holecek |MarkMars Rover

  11. Mars Curiosity rover talks in May

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergyApril 25,4MarioMarkMars Curiosity

  12. Mars Rover's ChemCam Instrument gets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergyApril 25,4MarioMarkMars

  13. WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CALENDARY YEAR 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-09-30

    THE ANNUAL (CALENDAR YEAR 2001) SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT NUCLEAR WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITY.

  14. West Virginia University 1 Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 Electrical Engineering Degrees Offered · Masters of Science, Electrical Engineering (M.S.E.E.) · Doctor of Philosophy, Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) Program Description The Masters of Science in Electrical Engineering (M.S.E.E.) degree program is intended for students who have

  15. West Virginia University 1 Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 Computer Science Degrees Offered · Master of Science in Computer Science · Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science Program Description The Masters of Science in Computer Science Objectives & Outcomes The objective of the Masters of Science in Computer Science (M.S.C.S.) degree program

  16. West Virginia University 1 Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 Computer Science Nature of Program Computer science is a discipline Educational Objectives The Program Educational Objectives (PEO) of the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science goal that by the time they graduate, B.S. computer science students will achieve the following learning

  17. History of the Canadian West History 393

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    1 History of the Canadian West History 393 Consider Resources Primary Resources: letters, speeches), theses, the Web Check subject guide under: Research by Subject History By Region Canadian Aboriginal American Indians (Online) Oxford Companion to Canadian History (Online) For more resources on Canada, check

  18. Book Review Sex Allocation. Stuart West.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Stuart

    of sex allocation (i.e., the allocation of resources to male and female reproductive function in sexualBook Review Sex Allocation. Stuart West. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009. xii þ 466, however, the explosion of research on sex allocation (ever since Charnov's [1982] landmark contribution

  19. West Virginia University 1 Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    at the School often focus on the health of rural communities, consistent with our West Virginia roots. Students truly believe in learning by doing. Students remain engaged in community health throughout of Public Health alumni continue to improve the health of individuals and communities throughout the U

  20. West Virginia University 1 School of Nursing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    roles in rural primary health care. These roles include family nurse practitioner, pediatric nurseWest Virginia University 1 School of Nursing Degrees Offered · Bachelor of Science in Nursing · Master of Science in Nursing · Doctor of Nursing Practice · Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing Introduction

  1. West Virginia University 1 School of Nursing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    practice roles in rural primary health care. These roles include family nurse practitioner, pediatric nurseWest Virginia University 1 School of Nursing Degrees Offered · Bachelor of Science in Nursing · Master of Science in Nursing · Doctor of Nursing Practice · Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing Introduction

  2. West Virginia University 1 Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 Software Engineering Degrees Offered · Masters of Science, Software offers professionally oriented Masters of Science in Software Engineering (M.S.S.E) degree program, as well as a graduate Certificate in Software Engineering. The M.S.S.E. provides graduate educational

  3. West Virginia University 1 Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 Computer Science Nature of Program Computer science is a discipline that involves the understanding and design of computational processes. The discipline ranges from a theoretical included, that separate theoretical underpinnings of the science from applications within it. The computer

  4. West Virginia University 1 Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 Computer Science Degrees Offered · Master of Science in Computer Science (M.S.C.S) · Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science (Ph.D.) Program Description The Masters of Science in Computer Science (M.S.C.S.) degree program qualifies a student to assume a professional role

  5. West Virginia University 1 Computer Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 Computer Engineering Degree Offered · Doctor of Philosophy, Computer interested in the Ph.D. program in computer engineering should see our web page at http://www.csee.wvu.edu for information. If additional information is needed, contact the graduate coordinator of electrical and computer

  6. West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine Degrees Offered · M.D., Doctor of Medicine · M.D./Ph.D., Joint Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy · Ph.D., in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology · Ph.D., Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences · M.D./M.P.H., Doctor of Medicine and Master of Public Health · M

  7. West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine Degrees Offered · M.D., Doctor of Medicine · M.D. /Ph.D., Joint Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy · Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology · Ph of Physical Therapy · Ph.D., Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences · M.D. /M.P.H., Doctor of Medicine

  8. West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine Other Content Degrees Offered · M.D., Doctor of Medicine · M.D. /Ph.D., Joint Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy · Ph.D., in Biochemistry of Physical Therapy · Ph.D., Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences · M.D./M.P.H., Doctor of Medicine

  9. West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 School of Medicine Degrees Offered · M.D., Doctor of Medicine · M.D. /Ph.D., Joint Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy · Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology · Ph.D., Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences · M.D. /M.P.H., Doctor of Medicine and Master of Public Health · Ph

  10. UNDERGRADUATE FINANCIAL AID 220 West College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    UNDERGRADUATE FINANCIAL AID 220 West College REQUEST FOR SUMMER SAVINGS REPLACEMENT Do not mail _________ I was unable to meet my summer savings expectation for the reason(s) listed below and request __________________________________________ Date ____________ I worked but did not save the amount expected. Total Earnings $__________ Summer

  11. Reaching Wider South West Wales Partnership Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    1 Reaching Wider South West Wales Partnership Strategy 2011-14 #12;2 `Poverty is when someone patterns, customs and activities.' Joseph Rowntree Foundation Monitoring poverty and social exclusion in Communities First areas of high relative poverty. It interlocks with higher education strategic approaches

  12. West Virginia University 1 Biometric Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 Biometric Systems Nature of Program Biometric systems are composed this matching process. Uses of biometric systems for positive personal identification are experiencing rapid and administrative systems. In an even broader application context, biometric systems are having a revolutionary

  13. Communiqu de presse Lyon, le 20 mars 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellandréa, Emmanuel

    Communiqué de presse Lyon, le 20 mars 2014 3 000 étudiants pour la 32ème édition du Challenge Centrale Lyon Ce weekend du 22 et 23 mars 2014, l'école Centrale Lyon (Ecully) accueille sur son campus

  14. EWO Meeting, Mar. 2008, Pittsburgh, PA Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    EWO Meeting, Mar. 2008, Pittsburgh, PA Risk Management Risk Management for Chemical Supply Chain, PA Risk Management Chemical Supply chain: an integrated network of business units for the supply #12;Page 3EWO Meeting, Mar. 2008, Pittsburgh, PA Risk Management Motivation Introduction · Objective

  15. Selection and Technology Evaluation of Moon/Mars Transportation Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Selection and Technology Evaluation of Moon/Mars Transportation Architectures Gergana A. Bounova of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 Our purpose is to evaluate and select from a large family of Moon-Mars transportation architectures by integrating a general architecture network model with vehicle computa- tional

  16. Oceanography Vol.18, No.1, Mar. 2005 65 OCEANOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, Jeannette

    Oceanography Vol.18, No.1, Mar. 2005 65 WOMEN IN OCEANOGRAPHY AU TO B I O G R A PH I C A L S K E TC H E S O F Oceanography Vol.18, No.1, Mar. 2005 65 This article has been published in Oceanography, Volume 18, Number 1, a quarterly journal of The Oceanography Society. Copyright 2005 by The Oceanography

  17. The Global Topography of Mars and Implications for Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hauck II, Steven A.

    The Global Topography of Mars and Implications for Surface Evolution David E. Smith,1 * Maria T- accuracy global map of the topography of Mars. Dominant features include the low northern hemisphere-wavelength effect that has been shaped by an internal mechanism. The topography of Tharsis consists of two broad

  18. Simulations of the Mars ionosphere during a solar flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    .05.23 08:00-10:00 Spring AGU Meeting 2006, Acapulco, Mexico #12;Increased fluxes of X-rays during solarSimulations of the Mars ionosphere during a solar flare Paul Withers, Joei Wroten, Michael Mendillo simulations of the Mars ionosphere driven by temporally-varying solar fluxes, concentrating on 15 and 26 April

  19. CRISM: Exploring the Geology of Mars Tech Splash Open Music

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CRISM: Exploring the Geology of Mars Tech Splash Open Music Exploring the geology of Mars Marineris simply pulled apart, we would expect the geology on the North and South side of the canyon that make up the rocks. Using the CRISM data we can put together a very simplistic geologic profile

  20. Regionally compartmented groundwater flow on Mars Keith P. Harrison1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Keith

    Regionally compartmented groundwater flow on Mars Keith P. Harrison1 and Robert E. Grimm1 Received] Groundwater flow on Mars likely contributed to the formation of several types of morphologic and mineralogic of groundwater flow required for their formation. For groundwater simulation purposes, a global Martian aquifer

  1. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grutter, Alexandra "Lexa"

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser 1 Published January 11 Parasite removal rates is dependent on the rates at which par- asites are removed by cleaner fish and added through colonization-Research 1996 Resale of full article not permitted #12;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 130:61-70, 1996 of daily consumption

  2. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krug, Patrick J.

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 312: 149­159, 2006 Published April 24 therefore have limited time to locate and colonize a suitable adult habitat. Domi- nant spatial competitors consent of the publisher #12;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 312: 149­159, 2006 energy reserves, they became `desperate

  3. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 522: 127­143, 2015 doi: 10.3354/meps11117 on experimental plates colonized by natural microalgae. Limpet species found higher on the shore had lower peak without written consent of the publisher #12;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 522: 127­143, 2015 In the rocky intertidal

  4. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlik, Joseph

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 368: 137­143, 2008 doi: 10.3354/meps07615 and reproduction, thereby also enhancing their ability to colonize open space. As for some plant communities without written consent of the publisher #12;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 368: 137­143, 2008 primary limiting

  5. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shima, Jeff

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 472: 239­248, 2013 doi: 10.3354/meps10015 in the system via a range of mechanisms, including competition-colonization tradeoffs (Levins & Culver 1971 holder(s). It may be distributed to interested individuals on request. #12;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 472: 239

  6. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stachowicz, Jay

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 398: 69­80, 2010 doi: 10.3354/meps08341 surfaces for colonization that adequately compensate for the primary substrate it exploits, its high consent of the publisher #12;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 398: 69­80, 2010 Rodriguez 2006, Heiman et al. 2008

  7. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 262: 19­25, 2003 Published November 7 blocked access to ice-free terrain for breeding. The first colonization of Ross Island in East Mc;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 262: 19­25, 2003 guins (Baroni &

  8. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlik, Joseph

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 465: 111­117, 2012 doi: 10.3354/meps09904. laevis neither affected the frequency of colonization of Montastraea annularis by boring sponges, nor individuals on request. #12;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 465: 111­117, 2012 tem are altered. These context

  9. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, Milton

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 344: 245­256, 2007 doi: 10.3354/meps06929 findings suggest that trophic pathways on other types of artificial structures colonized by exotic species · Artificial reef Resale or republication not permitted without written consent of the publisher #12;Mar Ecol

  10. Real-time graphic displays in Mars. [AVLIS process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treadway, T.

    1985-12-01

    Real-time diagnostic data of the AVLIS process is displayed in the form of a two-dimensional plot on selected monitors in the Mars Control Room. Each Mars workstation contains a HP2622 terminal for computer interface to the experiment and a Raster Technologies graphic controller driving a Conrac high resolution color monitor for graphics output.

  11. North West Shelf pipeline. Part 2 (conclusion). Laying Australia's North West Shelf pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, E.V.; Craze, D.J.; Ruinen, W.

    1984-05-14

    Details of the construction of Australia's North West Shelf gas pipeline cover the pipelaying operation, trunkline-to-riser tie-in, posttrenching, backfilling, slugcatcher construction, connection with the shore terminal, and hydrostatic testing.

  12. West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Exhibit D #12;Summary: West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer Primary Credi90023!! #12;Sttmma1·y: West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer Credit Profile US$16.STANDARDANDPOORS.COM/RATJNGSDJRECT MAY31 2013 2 I126639 I 301008236 #12;Summary: West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer

  13. Blending of processed pitches for the production of roofing asphalts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M.A.; Sawatzky, H.

    1987-01-01

    Asphalt is a natural constituent of crude oils and is presently produced from the distillation residues of refining feedstocks. The asphalt market is saturated at this time and it appears that in the near future refineries will upgrade bitumens/heavy oils and vacuum residues via technologies such as hydrocracking, H-Oil and LC-Fining to produce more transportation fuels. Therefore, there will be economic pressure for the utilization of the resulting processed residues as road and roofing asphalts rather than low grade fuels. In this work the use of processed residues for the production of roofing asphalts has been investigated. Results show that 28-30 wt% of processed residue can be blended with 150-200 penetration asphalt cement to produce Type I roofing asphalt. The physical properties of the roofing asphalts were examined in terms of the composition (saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes) as well as average molecular weight of the maltenes and asphaltenes determined by gel permeation chromatography. The results are compared with two roofing asphalts obtained from petroleum refineries.

  14. Hybrid Dynamic Density Functional Theory for Polymer Melts and Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Honda; Toshihiro Kawakatsu

    2006-09-05

    We propose a high-speed and accurate hybrid dynamic density functional theory for the computer simulations of the phase separation processes of polymer melts and blends. The proposed theory is a combination of the dynamic self-consistent field (SCF) theory and a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau type theory with the random phase approximation (GRPA). The SCF theory is known to be accurate in evaluating the free energy of the polymer systems in both weak and strong segregation regions although it has a disadvantage of the requirement of a considerable amount of computational cost. On the other hand, the GRPA theory has an advantage of much smaller amount of required computational cost than the SCF theory while its applicability is limited to the weak segregation region. To make the accuracy of the SCF theory and the high-performance of the GRPA theory compatible, we adjust the chemical potential of the GRPA theory by using the SCF theory every constant time steps in the dynamic simulations. The performance of the GRPA and the hybrid theories is tested by using several systems composed of an A/B homopolymer, an AB diblock copolymer, or an ABC triblock copolymer. Using the hybrid theory, we succeeded in reproducing the metastable complex phase-separated domain structures of an ABC triblock copolymer observed by experiments.

  15. High Performance Laminates Using Blended Urethane Resin Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Jones, George G.; Walsh, Sean P.; Wood, Geoff M.

    2005-03-24

    Hybrid blended resin systems have the potential to provide excellent impact performance in structured laminates. Although mostly under development for sheet molding compound (SMC) applications using glass fiber with high levels of fillers, the resins have been found to be useful in liquid molding applications with other high-performance fiber systems. A research pro-gram to develop the molding capability, property data, and capability to model the composites using newly de-veloped codes and modeling techniques was initiated through the Department of Energy’s Office of Freedom-Car and Vehicle Technologies. Results have shown ex-cellent adhesion to different fiber systems as evidenced by mechanical properties, and a capability to develop very good impact results – thereby allowing thin panel structures to be developed. Comparison to predicted me-chanical properties has been achieved and mechanisms for the development of observed high energy absorption under impact loadings are being investigated. Scale ef-fects based on panel thickness, fiber type loading, and position in laminate are being investigated. DOE pro-gram sponsorship was provided by Dr. Sidney Diamond, Technical Area Development Manager for High-Strength Weight-Reduction Materials.

  16. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    García-Maté, M.; De la Torre, A.G.; León-Reina, L.; Aranda, M.A.G.; CELLS-Alba synchrotron, Carretera BP 1413, Km. 3.3, E-08290 Cerdanyola, Barcelona ; Santacruz, I.

    2013-12-15

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 months of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 ± 2 and 72 ± 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits.

  17. Depositional environment and hydrodynamic flow in Guadalupian Cherry Canyon sandstone, West Ford and West Geraldine fields, Delaware Basin, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linn, Anne Marie

    1985-01-01

    DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND HYDRODYNAMIC FLOW IN GUADALUPIAN CHERRY CANYON SANDSTONE, WEST FORD AND WEST GERALDINE FIELDS, DELAWARE BASIN, TEXAS A Thesis by Anne Marie Linn Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM Univer sity... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Sub)cot: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND HYDRODYNAMIC FLOW IN GUADALUPIAN CHERRY CANYON SANDSTONE, WEST FORD AND WEST GERALDINE FIELDS, DELAWARE BASIN...

  18. Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars coordinating the logistics and resupply of far-flung planetary bases. A number of logistics methods have been terrestrial logistics methods were tested in the context of (analog) planetary exploration. A comprehensive

  19. Fermilab Cultural Events in Chicago's Far West Side

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I carry daily and those I experience in the present, blend to create a rich infusion of memory and desire. It is an alchemy that compels me to express them in images. My...

  20. A Study of the Use of Jatropha Oil Blends in Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, C.R.

    2010-10-01

    Executive Summary: This project investigated the combustion performance of blends of unrefined Jatropha oil and its blends in laboratory boilers. Although a very limited amount of testing blends in distillate oil, ASTM No. 2 oil or heating oil was conducted, the primary interest was in testing the performance of blends with residual ASTM No. 6 oil. The basic idea is to provide a renewable fuel option to residual oil used in space heating and in industrial applications. The intent also was to explore the use of non-edible plant oil and one that might be potentially cheaper than biodiesel. The characteristics of No. 6 oil, such as high viscosity at ambient temperature, which requires it to be kept heated, make the blending with such oils feasible. Jatropha oil is one such oil and there is currently considerable interest building up in its use as a source for making biodiesel and jet fuel. A 10% blend of Jatropha oil with heating oil was burned using a standard burner in a residential boiler. Combustion performance was shown to be comparable with that of burning heating oil by itself with some noticeable differences. Typical heating oil has about 2000 ppm of sulfur, while the Jatropha oil has about 50 ppm leading to lower levels of sulphur dioxide emissions. Stack measurements also showed that the NOx emission was lower with the blend. We have previously reported similar reductions in NOx with blends of biodiesel in heating oil as well as slight reductions in PM2.5, particulates below 2.5 microns in size. Long term tests were not part of this project and hence deleterious effects on pumps, seals etc., if any, were not measured. The majority of the work involved testing blends of Jatropha oil with residual oil in a 1.5 million Btu/hr boiler with a burner modified to burn residual oil. Blends of 20 and 60% Jatropha oil and 100% Jatropha oil were burned in the combustion performance tests. The residual oil used had a sulfur content of over 2000 ppm and hence dramatic reductions in sulfur dioxide emissions are measured with the blends. Again, consistent with our past experience with biodiesel blends, significant reductions in nitrogen oxide emissions nearing 50% with 100% Jatropha oil, were also measured. This is in contrast with the use of biodiesel in diesel engines, where the NOx has a tendency to increase. In addition to the gaseous emission measurements, particulate emissions were measured using an EPA CTM-39 system to obtain both particulates, of sizes below 2.5 microns, so-called PM2.5, and of sizes larger than 2.5 microns. The results show that the particulate emissions are lower with the blending of Jatropha oil. Overall, one can conclude that the blending of Jatropha oil with residual oil is a feasible approach to using non-edible plant oil to provide a renewable content to residual oil, with significant benefits in the reduction of pollutant emissions such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and particulates.

  1. Physical and chemical characteristics of an interesterified blend of butterfat and cottonseed oil with possible industrial applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashidi, Nabil

    1988-01-01

    OF TABLES Table Composition of the lipid in bovine milk Page Typical fatty acid composition of butterfat and cottonseed oil Free fatty acids and acid degree values for cottonseed oil (C), butterfat (B), regular blend of butterfat and cottonseed oil... (BtC), the interesterified blend I(B+C), and the interesterified blend with BHA I(B+C)/BHA 36 Percent transmittance (532 nm) and absorbance values of five fats as a function of time . . . . . . . 39 Concentration of malonaldehyde (micromolars...

  2. COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS TO CFD MODELS FOR BLENDING IN A TANK USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.

    2011-08-07

    Research has been completed in a pilot scale, eight foot diameter tank to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets. The jets re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. Different jet diameters and different horizontal and vertical orientations of the jets were investigated. In all, eighty five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of several miles of two inch diameter, serpentine, vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, 1.3 million gallon, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Two types of tests were performed. One type of test used a tracer fluid, which was homogeneously blended into solution. Data were statistically evaluated to determine blending times for solutions of different density and viscosity, and the blending times were successfully compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. The other type of test blended solutions of different viscosity. For example, in one test a half tank of water was added to a half tank of a more viscous, concentrated salt solution. In this case, the fluid mechanics of the blending process was noted to significantly change due to stratification of fluids. CFD models for stratification were not investigated. This paper is the fourth in a series of papers resulting from this research (Leishear, et.al. [1- 4]), and this paper documents final test results, statistical analysis of the data, a comparison of experimental results to CFD models, and scale-up of the results to a full scale tank.

  3. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Donald L.

    , Barbados ABSTRACT: Studies of coral reef fish recruitment have focused more on factors influencing settlement units in Barbados (West Indies). We collected concurrent data on 3 settlement- associated

  4. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

    2011-01-12

    This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be released. Installation requirements were also determined for a transfer pump which will remove tank contents, and which is also required to not disturb sludge. Testing techniques and test results for both types of pumps are presented.

  5. WEST COAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Myer; Terry Surles; Kelly Birkinshaw

    2004-01-01

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership is one of seven partnerships which have been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon dioxide capture, transport and sequestration (CT&S) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and the North Slope of Alaska. Led by the California Energy Commission, the West Coast Partnership is a consortium of over thirty five organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national labs and universities; private companies working on CO{sub 2} capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. In an eighteen month Phase I project, the Partnership will evaluate both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options. Work will focus on five major objectives: (1) Collect data to characterize major CO{sub 2} point sources, the transportation options, and the terrestrial and geologic sinks in the region, and compile and organize this data via a geographic information system (GIS) database; (2) Address key issues affecting deployment of CT&S technologies, including storage site permitting and monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks (3) Conduct public outreach and maintain an open dialogue with stakeholders in CT&S technologies through public meetings, joint research, and education work (4) Integrate and analyze data and information from the above tasks in order to develop supply curves and cost effective, environmentally acceptable sequestration options, both near- and long-term (5) Identify appropriate terrestrial and geologic demonstration projects consistent with the options defined above, and create action plans for their safe and effective implementation A kickoff meeting for the West Coast Partnership was held on Sept 30-Oct.1. Contracts were then put into place with twelve organizations which will carry out the technical work required to meet Partnership objectives.

  6. West Central Texas Regional Transportation Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Central Texas Council of Governments

    2006-01-01

    incorporated work conducted in 2005 by the Central Texas Rural Transit District (CARR) and WCTCOG including a survey of transportation providers and stakeholders. Development of a regional inventory of transit providers, evaluation of the abilities... and capabilities of existing transit providers, and community outreach through a series of pubic meetings were conducted in April and May of 2006. West Central Texas is unique among the 24 Texas regions having four public transit providers, three rural...

  7. Static and dynamic contributions to anomalous chain dynamics in polymer blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Bernabei; Angel J. Moreno; Juan Colmenero

    2010-11-10

    By means of computer simulations, we investigate the relaxation of the Rouse modes in a simple bead-spring model for non-entangled polymer blends. Two different models are used for the fast component, namely fully-flexible and semiflexible chains. The latter are semiflexible in the meaning that static intrachain correlations are strongly non-gaussian at all length scales. The dynamic asymmetry in the blend is strongly enhanced by decreasing temperature, inducing confinement effects on the fast component. The dynamics of the Rouse modes show very different trends for the two models of the fast component. For the fully-flexible case, the relaxation times exhibit a progressive deviation from Rouse scaling on increasing the dynamic asymmetry. This anomalous effect has a dynamic origin. It is not related to particular static features of the Rouse modes, which indeed are identical to those of the fully-flexible homopolymer, and are not modified by the dynamic asymmetry in the blend. On the contrary, in the semiflexible case the relaxation times exhibit approximately the same scaling behaviour as the amplitudes of the modes. This suggests that the origin of the anomalous dynamic scaling for semiflexible chains confined in the blend is esentially of static nature. We discuss implications of these observations for the applicability of theoretical approaches to chain dynamics in polymer blends.

  8. Biodegradation test of SPS-LS blends as polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putri, Zufira, E-mail: zufira.putri@gmail.com, E-mail: arcana@chem.itb.ac.id; Arcana, I Made, E-mail: zufira.putri@gmail.com, E-mail: arcana@chem.itb.ac.id [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Research Groups, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    Sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) can be applied as a proton exchange membrane fuel cell due to its fairly good chemical stability. In order to be applied as polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), membrane polymer should have a good ionic conductivity, high proton conductivity, and high mechanical strength. Lignosulfonate (LS) is a complex biopolymer which has crosslinks and sulfonate groups. SPS-LS blends with addition of SiO{sub 2} are used to increase the proton conductivity and to improve the mechanical properties and thermal stability. However, the biodegradation test of SPS-LS blends is required to determine whether the application of these membranes to be applied as an environmentally friendly membrane. In this study, had been done the synthesis of SPS, biodegradability test of SPS-LS blends with variations of LS and SiO{sub 2} compositions. The biodegradation test was carried out in solid medium of Luria Bertani (LB) with an activated sludge used as a source of microorganism at incubation temperature of 37°C. Based on the results obtained indicated that SPS-LS-SiO{sub 2} blends are more decomposed by microorganism than SPS-LS blends. This result is supported by analysis of weight reduction percentage, functional groups with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, and morphological surface with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM)

  9. Widespread Excess Ice in Arcadia Planitia, Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bramson, Ali M; Putzig, Nathaniel E; Sutton, Sarah; Plaut, Jeffrey J; Brothers, T Charles; Holt, John W

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of subsurface water ice on Mars is a key constraint on past climate, while the volumetric concentration of buried ice (pore-filling versus excess) provides information about the process that led to its deposition. We investigate the subsurface of Arcadia Planitia by measuring the depth of terraces in simple impact craters and mapping a widespread subsurface reflection in radar sounding data. Assuming that the contrast in material strengths responsible for the terracing is the same dielectric interface that causes the radar reflection, we can combine these data to estimate the dielectric constant of the overlying material. We compare these results to a three-component dielectric mixing model to constrain composition. Our results indicate a widespread, decameters-thick layer that is excess water ice ~10^4 km^3 in volume. The accumulation and long-term preservation of this ice is a challenge for current Martian climate models.

  10. High-performance ternary blend polymer solar cells involving both energy transfer and hole relay processes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Luyao; Chen, Wei; Xu, Tao; Yu, Luping

    2015-06-04

    The integration of multiple materials with complementary absorptions into a single junction device is regarded as an efficient way to enhance the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of organic solar cells (OSCs). However, because of increased complexity with one more component, only limited high-performance ternary systems have been demonstrated previously. Here we report an efficient ternary blend OSC with a PCE of 9.2%. We show that the third component can reduce surface trap densities in the ternary blend. Detailed studies unravel that the improved performance results from synergistic effects of enlarged open circuit voltage, suppressed trap-assisted recombination, enhanced light absorption, increasedmore »hole extraction, efficient energy transfer and better morphology. The working mechanism and high device performance demonstrate new insights and design guidelines for high-performance ternary blend solar cells and suggest that ternary structure is a promising platform to boost the efficiency of OSCs.« less

  11. Drive cycle analysis of butanol/diesel blends in a light-duty vehicle.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miers, S. A.; Carlson, R. W.; McConnell, S. S.; Ng, H. K.; Wallner, T.; LeFeber, J.; Energy Systems; Esper Images Video & Multimedia

    2008-10-01

    The potential exists to displace a portion of the petroleum diesel demand with butanol and positively impact engine-out particulate matter. As a preliminary investigation, 20% and 40% by volume blends of butanol with ultra low sulfur diesel fuel were operated in a 1999 Mercedes Benz C220 turbo diesel vehicle (Euro III compliant). Cold and hot start urban as well as highway drive cycle tests were performed for the two blends of butanol and compared to diesel fuel. In addition, 35 MPH and 55 MPH steady-state tests were conducted under varying road loads for the two fuel blends. Exhaust gas emissions, fuel consumption, and intake and exhaust temperatures were acquired for each test condition. Filter smoke numbers were also acquired during the steady-state tests.

  12. The relationship between the thermoplastic behavior of blends and their component coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakurovs, R.

    1999-07-01

    The thermoplastic behaviors of a number of coking coal blends were measured using proton magnetic resonance thermal analysis (PMRTA) to determine to what extent they were affected by interactions between the component coals. Most blends showed evidence that at temperatures near their temperatures of maximum fluidity the extent to which they fused was different to that expected if the coals did not interact. Only blends of coking coals of different rank fused to a greater extent than expected in the absence of interactions. Semi-anthracite, low rank coals and charcoal reduced the extent of fusion of coking coals to values below those expected if they were acting as inert diluents. These interactions are interpreted as being mediated by transfer of volatile material between the coals on heating.

  13. Mixed convection and heat management in the Mars gravity biosatellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, Jesse B. (Jesse Benjamin)

    2007-01-01

    The Mars Gravity Biosatellite will house fifteen mice in a low Earth orbit satellite spinning about its longitudinal axis. The satellite's payload thermal control system will reject heat through the base of the payload ...

  14. Infrared Brightness Temperature of Mars, 1983-2103

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Wright

    2007-03-25

    The predicted infrared brightness temperature of Mars using the 1976 model of Wright is tabulated here for the period 1983 to 2103. This model was developed for far-infrared calibration, and is still being used for JCMT calibration.

  15. Geomorphometric analysis of Hebes Chasma, Mars, using the GRASS GIS. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Samantha

    This research addressed the local scale geomorphometric analysis of the Hebes Chasma region on Mars, utilising a new 50 m/pixel digital terrain model derived from stereo imagery. A secondary aspect of the research addressed the role of GIS...

  16. Design of spacecraft for exploration of the Moon and Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epps, Brenden P

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, I develop the conceptual design of the spacecraft required for human-Lunar and human-Mars exploration. The requirements for these vehicles are derived in the context of the NASA Concept Exploration & ...

  17. First phase beamlines at CLS PROPOSED & UNDER REVIEW (Mar 2001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    First phase beamlines at CLS PROPOSED & UNDER REVIEW (Mar 2001) X-ray Emission Alex Moewes (U. Sask 27 June 2000 27 June 2000 27-Feb 2001 27-Feb 2001 27-Feb 2001 #12;

  18. Integrated navigation architecture analysis for Moon and Mars exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chabot, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The new solar system exploration objectives announced in January 2004 have the goal of sending humans back to the Moon by the year 2020 in preparation for human exploration of Mars. Advanced, but cost effective, surface ...

  19. A Mars-back approach to lunar surface operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinwaks, Howard Neil

    2005-01-01

    The Vision for Space Exploration initiated a new space exploration program and called for a long term national commitment to space exploration starting with a return to the Moon and continuing with the exploration of Mars ...

  20. SpiritMars Exploration Rovers National Aeronautics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murdo" panorama, captured by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. From April, exposed bright underlying material. This bright material is evidence of sulfur-rich salty minerals

  1. Geophysical evolution of planetary interiors and surfaces : Moon & Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Alexander Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The interiors and surfaces of the terrestrial planetary bodies provide us a unique opportunity to gain insight into planetary evolution, particularly in the early stages subsequent to accretion. Both Mars and the Moon are ...

  2. Sample Results From The Extraction, Scrub, And Strip Test For The Blended NGS Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.

    2014-03-03

    This report summarizes the results of the extraction, scrub, and strip testing for the September 2013 sampling of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Blended solvent from the Modular Caustic Side-Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Solvent Hold Tank. MCU is in the process of transitioning from the BOBCalixC6 solvent to the NGS Blend solvent. As part of that transition, MCU has intentionally created a blended solvent to be processed using the Salt Batch program. This sample represents the first sample received from that blended solvent. There were two ESS tests performed where NGS blended solvent performance was assessed using either the Tank 21 material utilized in the Salt Batch 7 analyses or a simulant waste material used in the V-5/V-10 contactor testing. This report tabulates the temperature corrected cesium distribution, or DCs values, step recovery percentage, and actual temperatures recorded during the experiment. This report also identifies the sample receipt date, preparation method, and analysis performed in the accumulation of the listed values. The calculated extraction DCs values using the Tank 21H material and simulant are 59.4 and 53.8, respectively. The DCs values for two scrub and three strip processes for the Tank 21 material are 4.58, 2.91, 0.00184, 0.0252, and 0.00575, respectively. The D-values for two scrub and three strip processes for the simulant are 3.47, 2.18, 0.00468, 0.00057, and 0.00572, respectively. These values are similar to previous measurements of Salt Batch 7 feed with lab-prepared blended solvent. These numbers are considered compatible to allow simulant testing to be completed in place of actual waste due to the limited availability of feed material.

  3. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Donald L.

    patterns in the recruitment of coral-reef fishes in Barbados Henri Vallès1,*, Donald L. Kramer1 , Wayne Campus, University Drive, Cave Hill, St. Michael, Barbados (West Indies) ABSTRACT: We monitored of the west coast of Barbados, using benthic standard monitoring units of recruitment of fishes (SMURFs

  4. Amon Millner draft short paper submitted to the Interaction Design and Children 2011 conference Modkit: Blending and Extending Approachable Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modkit: Blending and Extending Approachable Platforms for Creating Computer Programs and Interactive programming environment and the Arduino platform. The demonstration will feature the current Modkit components, activities, and projects that illustrate how the toolkit blends Scratch and Arduino platforms to extend what

  5. Numerical Model Investigation for Potential Methane Explosion and Benzene Vapor Intrusion Associated with High-Ethanol Blend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Associated with High-Ethanol Blend Releases Jie Ma, Hong Luo, George E. DeVaull,§ William G. Rixey, and Pedro ABSTRACT: Ethanol-blended fuel releases usually stimulate methanogenesis in the subsurface, which could conditions exist. Ethanol- derived methane may also increase the vapor intrusion potential of toxic fuel

  6. Modeling the natural attenuation of benzene in groundwater impacted by ethanol-blended fuels: Effect of ethanol content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    -source simulations imply that high-ethanol blends (e.g., E85) pose a lower risk of benzene reaching a receptor via gasoline, 15 years for E10, 9 years for E50, and 3 years for E85), indicating greater natural attenuationModeling the natural attenuation of benzene in groundwater impacted by ethanol-blended fuels

  7. Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region (Williams ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Exploration Activity Details...

  8. USFS West Wide Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: USFS West Wide...

  9. Henderson County North Middle School wins 2015 DOE West Kentucky...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    http:www.science.energy.govwdtsnsb. Addthis Related Articles Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science won the 2015 West Kentucky Regional High School Science Bowl...

  10. DOE Issues RFP for West Valley Demonstration Project Probabilistic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    that will provide support to the DOE, West Valley Demonstration Project, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority in performing a probabilistic...

  11. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West...

  12. ,"West Virginia Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West...

  13. West Africa Emerges as Leading Region in Africa for Renewable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    West Africa Emerges as Leading Region in Africa for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Home > Groups > Clean and Renewable Energy Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(266) Contributor...

  14. West Coast Port Closure Enforcement Policy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enforcement Policy Statement: West Coast Port Closures More Documents & Publications Central Air Conditioner Enforcement Policy Statement Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge...

  15. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, West Valley Demonstration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 2008 Evaluation to determine whether West Valley Demonstration Project is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition. The Team conducted its review...

  16. Probabilistic Modeling and Phase 2 Decision Making at the West...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Phase 2 Decision Making at the West Valley Demonstration Project and the Western New York Nuclear Service Center Probabilistic Modeling and Phase 2 Decision Making at the...

  17. DOE Awards Contract for the West Valley Demonstration Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) in performing a...

  18. Border-Crossings between East and West Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redford , Renata

    2015-01-01

    BETWEEN EAST AND WEST EUROPE BY RENATA REDFORD “People? … [Belonging in Contemporary Europe. Oxford: Brghahn, 2007, p.4Belonging in Contemporary Europe. Oxford: Brghahn, 2007. 15.

  19. Effects of blending a heavy alcohol (C20H40O with diesel in a heavy-duty compression-ignition engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    Effects of blending a heavy alcohol (C20H40O with diesel in a heavy-duty compression phytol (C20H40O) with diesel in 5%, 10%, and 20% by volume blends. 3-D, transient, turbulent nozzle flow and emissions experiments of the different phytol/diesel blends. Combustion event depicted by high

  20. Gateway West Transmission Line | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: Energy ResourcesMaui Area (DOEMauiWest Transmission Line

  1. Far West Rice | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville,PowerEvaporative||NewFale-Safe,Maine:Texas:West Rice

  2. Mid West Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickeyWest Energy Jump to: navigation,

  3. New West Technologies LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures LtdNeville, Ohio:ArchaeologicalSuffolk, New York:Mexico JumpWest

  4. AMF Deployment, Niamey, Niger, West Africa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 NewsUsers' Executive Azores Azores AntarcticaWest

  5. TransWest | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown of Skiatook,1993)Trane JumpTransCanadaTransWest

  6. West Virginia/Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland:EnergyWeVirginia University JumpWest

  7. WestStart CALSTART | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland:EnergyWeVirginia UniversityWestStart CALSTART

  8. Asia West LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A SOpenAshley, Ohio: Energy ResourcesInformationPowerWest

  9. West Point Utility System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company)Idaho)VosslohWest Plains Electric Coop Inc Place:

  10. Gravity Data for west-central Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-04-06

    Modeled Bouger Gravity data was extracted from the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies Gravity Database of the U.S. at http://irpsrvgis08.utep.edu/viewers/Flex/GravityMagnetic/GravityMagnetic_CyberShare/ on 2/29/2012. The downloaded text file was opened in an Excel spreadsheet. This spreadsheet data was then converted into an ESRI point shapefile in UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection, showing location and gravity (in milligals). This data was then converted to grid and then contoured using ESRI Spatial Analyst. This dataset contains the original spreadsheet data, a point shapefile showing gravity station locations and Bouger gravity, and a line shapefile showing 1 milligal contours. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Gravity Contour Shapefile Extent: West -108.366690 East -105.478730 North 40.932318 South 36.961606 Gravity Point Shapefile Extent: West -108.366692 East -105.478847 North 40.932361 South 36.961606 Data from From University of Texas: Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies

  11. Hydrocarbon habitat of the west Netherlands basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jager, J. (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Assen (Netherlands)); Doyle, M. (Petroleum Development Oman, Muscat (Oman)); Grantham, P. (KSEPL/Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Mabillard, J. (Shell Nigeria, Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01

    The complex West Netherlands Basin contains oil and gas in Triassic and Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous clastic reservoir sequences. The understanding has always been that the Carboniferous coal measures have generated only gas and the Jurassic marine Posidonia Shale only oil. However, detailed geochemical analyses show that both source rocks have generated oil and gas. Geochemical fingerprinting established a correlation of the hydrocarbons with the main source rocks. The occurrence of these different hydrocarbons is consistent with migration routes. Map-based charge modeling shows that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred prior to the Late Cretaceous inversion of the West Netherlands Basin. However, along the southwest flank of the basin and in lows between the inversion highs, significant charge continued during the Tertiary. Biodegradation of oils in Jurassic and Cretaceous reservoirs occurred during the earliest Tertiary, but only in reservoirs that were at that time at temperatures of less then 70 to 80[degrees]C, where bacteria could survive. This study shows that also in a mature hydrocarbon province an integrated hydrocarbon habitat study with modern analyses and state-of-the-art technology can lead to a much improved understanding of the distribution of oil and gas in the subsurface. The results of this study will allow a better risk assessment for remaining prospects, and an improved prediction of the type of trapped hydrocarbons in terms of gas, oil, and biodegraded oil.

  12. Influence of electron beam irradiation on mechanical and thermal properties of polypropylene/polyamide blend

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Shigeya, E-mail: shi-nakamura@hitachi-chem.co.jp [Hitachi Chemical Co., Ltd., 1150 Goshomiya, Chikusei, Ibaraki 308-8524, Japan and Department of Materials Science, School of Engineering, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka-cho, Hikone, 522-8533, Shiga (Japan); Tokumitsu, Katsuhisa [Department of Materials Science, School of Engineering, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka-cho, Hikone, 522-8533, Shiga (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    The effects of electron beam irradiation on the mechanical and thermal properties of polypropylene (PP) and polyamide6 (PA6) blends-with talc 20 wt% as filler, SEBS-g-MAH as compatibilizer, and triallyl isocyanurate as crosslinking agent-were investigated. Although the tensile and flexural moduli and strengths of the PP/PA6 blends with talc, SEBS-g-MAH, and TAIC could be increased by the application of electron beam irradiation, the impact strength was decreased. Ddifferential scanning calorimetryer measurements showed that the melting temperatures of all PP/PA6 blends were decreased with increases in the electron beam irradiationdose. From dynamic mechanical analyzer results, a storage modulus curve in the plateau region was observed only in the PP/PA6 blends with talc, SEBS-g-MAH, and TAIC; the storage modulus increased with increasing electron beam irradiation dose, indicating that the three-dimensional network developed gradually in the more amorphous PA6. As a result, the most significant improvement observed in heat distortion tests under high load (1.8 MPa) occurred at 200 kGy.

  13. Blended Taint Analysis Results! Static Taint+: JavaScript library + application code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryder, Barbara G.

    (); delete v[`p']; //v.p is undefined v.p = new C(); ! Our Solution for Dynamic Object Behavior:! StateSite Modified Browser Trace Extractor Static Infrastructure Code Collector Static Taint Analysis Solution analyzed timed out Taint analysis time! References: [1] Shiyi Wei and Barbara G. Ryder. Practical blended

  14. Fuel Puddle Model and AFR Compensator for Gasoline-Ethanol Blends in Flex-Fuel Engines*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Fuel Puddle Model and AFR Compensator for Gasoline-Ethanol Blends in Flex-Fuel Engines* Kyung as an alternative fuel to petroleum-based gasoline and diesel derivatives. Currently available flexible fuel the closed-loop air-to-fuel ratio (AFR) control which maintains automatically operation around

  15. Lauric Acid/Wood Fiber Blends for Shape Stable Phase Change Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Lauric Acid/Wood Fiber Blends for Shape Stable Phase Change Material Krista Stancombe, Fang Chen in preparing wood fiber (WF) composites. The goal in developing this material is to produce a shape stabilized (DSC) and polarized optical microscopy (POM). References Conclusion LA crystals LA crystals Wood Fiber

  16. The Blend Down Monitoring System Demonstration at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benton, J.; Close, D.; Johnson, W., Jr.; Kerr, P.; March-Leuba, J.; Mastal, E.; Moss, C.; Powell, D.; Sumner, J.; Uckan, T.; Vines, R.; Wright, P.D.

    1999-07-25

    Agreements between the governments of the US and the Russian Federation for the US purchase of low enriched uranium (LEU) derived from highly enriched uranium (HEU) from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons calls for the establishment of transparency measures to provide confidence that nuclear nonproliferation goals are being met. To meet these transparency goals, the agreements call for the installation of nonintrusive US instruments to monitor the down blending of HEU to LEU. The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) has been jointly developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to continuously monitor {sup 235}U enrichments and mass flow rates at Russian blending facilities. Prior to its installation in Russian facilities, the BDMS was installed and operated in a UF{sub 6} flow loop in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant simulating flow and enrichment conditions expected in a typical down-blending facility. A Russian delegation to the US witnessed the equipment demonstration in June, 1998. To conduct the demonstration in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), the BDMS was required to meet stringent Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing, safety and operational requirements. The Paducah demonstration was an important milestone in achieving the operational certification for the BDMS use in Russian facilities.

  17. Polymer blends for use in photoelectrochemical cells for conversion of solar energy to electricity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, T.

    1984-09-28

    There is disclosed a polymer blend of a highly conductive polymer and a solid polymer electrolyte that is designed to achieve better charge transfer across the conductive film/polymer electrolyte interface of the electrochemical photovoltaic cell. The highly conductive polymer is preferably polypyrrole or poly-N-p-nitrophenylpyrrole and the solid polymer electrolyte is preferably polyethylene oxide or polypropylene oxide.

  18. Polymer blends for use in photoelectrochemical cells for conversion of solar energy to electricity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, Terje (East Patchogue, NY)

    1986-01-01

    There is disclosed a polymer blend of a highly conductive polymer and a solid polymer electrolyte that is designed to achieve better charge transfer across the conductive film/polymer electrolyte interface of the electrochemical photovoltaic cell. The highly conductive polymer is preferably polypyrrole or poly-N-p-nitrophenylpyrrole and the solid polymer electrolyte is preferably polyethylene oxide or polypropylene oxide.

  19. THE EFFECT OF BIAXIAL ORIENTATION PROCESSING CONDITIONS ON IMMISCIBLE POLYMER BLENDED SHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is utilized to enhance certain properties of the material. For example, efficient gas separation membranes. Findings from this work will be applied to a future study of these blended sheet samples as gas separation. IMPB sheet specimens were simultaneously biaxially oriented in order to improve gas separation

  20. Relationship between MTBE-blended gasoline properties and warm-up driveability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzawa, Takumi; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Kashiwabara, Kimito [Mitsubishi Motors Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Fujisawa, Norihiro; Matsubara, Michiro

    1995-12-31

    The relationship between MBE-blended gasoline properties and warm-up driveability is investigated by focusing on the transient combustion air-fuel ratio that strongly relates to the combustion state of the engine. As a result, although warm-up driveability of MTBE-free gasoline has a high correlation with 50% distillation temperature (T50) and a high correlation with 100 C distillation volume (E100), the correlation is found to be low when blended with MTBE. Various formulas that improve correlation with peak excess air ratio ({lambda}) by correcting T50 and E100 for the amount of MTBE blended are examined. The formula for which the highest determination coefficient is obtained is proposed as a new driveability index (DI) that can also be applied to MTBE-blended gasoline. In addition, the effect on driveability by gasoline base materials using this new DI also is investigated. The results indicate that the new DI worsen when heavy reformate containing large amounts of aromatics or MTBE, an oxygen-containing compound, is used for the octane improver, leaving the balance of the volatility out of consideration.

  1. HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BLEND DOWN PROGRAM AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE PRESENT AND FUTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, V; Charles Goergen, C; Ronald Oprea, R

    2008-06-05

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) entered into an Interagency Agreement to transfer approximately 40 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to TVA for conversion to fuel for the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant. Savannah River Site (SRS) inventories included a significant amount of this material, which resulted from processing spent fuel and surplus materials. The HEU is blended with natural uranium (NU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) with a 4.95% 235U isotopic content and shipped as solution to the TVA vendor. The HEU Blend Down Project provided the upgrades needed to achieve the product throughput and purity required and provided loading facilities. The first blending to low enriched uranium (LEU) took place in March 2003 with the initial shipment to the TVA vendor in July 2003. The SRS Shipments have continued on a regular schedule without any major issues for the past 5 years and are due to complete in September 2008. The HEU Blend program is now looking to continue its success by dispositioning an additional approximately 21 MTU of HEU material as part of the SRS Enriched Uranium Disposition Project.

  2. Molecular Packing and Solar Cell Performance in Blends of Polymers with a Bisadduct Fullerene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    Molecular Packing and Solar Cell Performance in Blends of Polymers with a Bisadduct Fullerene States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: We compare the solar cell performance of several polymers the efficiency of the solar cells only when they do not intercalate between the polymer side chains. When

  3. Aerodynamically Optimal Regional Aircraft Concepts: Conventional and Blended Wing-Body Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zingg, David W.

    prices and concern about both the exhaustion of fossil fuels and their contribution to climate change. Both the conventional and blended wing-body regional jets are optimized for a 500nmi mission at Mach 0, the need for more fuel efficient aircraft is becoming more pronounced for both economic and environmental

  4. A Thermoplastic/Thermoset Blend Exhibiting Thermal Mending and Reversible Adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    A Thermoplastic/Thermoset Blend Exhibiting Thermal Mending and Reversible Adhesion Xiaofan Luo that the DEB phenomenon enables strong and facile adhesion of the same material to itself and to a variety separation · epoxy · self-healing · fracture · adhesion INTRODUCTION P olymeric materials, such as high

  5. TURBULENT COMBUSTION MODELING OF COAL:BIOMASS BLENDS IN A SWIRL BURNER I -PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daripa, Prabir

    coal or by ex- haust clean up technology. For the power plants, the simplest solution is the preventive- ity well into the 21st century. This dependency on coal calls for better technologies to reduceTURBULENT COMBUSTION MODELING OF COAL:BIOMASS BLENDS IN A SWIRL BURNER I - PRELIMINARY RESULTS

  6. Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks. A Review of Key Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; Antonia, O.; Penev, M.

    2013-03-01

    This study assesses the potential to deliver hydrogen through the existing natural gas pipeline network as a hydrogen and natural gas mixture to defray the cost of building dedicated hydrogen pipelines. Blending hydrogen into the existing natural gas pipeline network has also been proposed as a means of increasing the output of renewable energy systems such as large wind farms.

  7. Developing a Multi-Agent system for a Blended Learning application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegler, Günter M.

    in the traditional learning. Among the technologies to use in a blended learning session we can find blogs, wikis, on, usable and sustainable multimedia technology for collaborative learning. 1.1 Introduction Actually, teaching is supported by multimedia technologies at different levels; videlicet, the technology used

  8. Local and chain dynamics in miscible polymer blends: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    44325-4001 Received 7 November 2005; accepted 1 March 2006; published online 5 May 2006 Local chain of the chains. These are combined with a local mobility determined from the acceptance rate and the effectiveLocal and chain dynamics in miscible polymer blends: A Monte Carlo simulation study Jutta Luettmer

  9. Interfacial properties of elastomer blends as studied by neutron reectivity Yimin Zhanga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the compatibility and interfacial characteristics. We also studied the effect of styrene butadiene random copolymers on the miscibility of the PB/ BIMS blends. The results showed that styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) was not fully structure of the polymer or mixtures of polymers in each layer, e.g. butyl rubber, styrene-butadiene rubber

  10. Co-firing of coal and biomass fuel blends M. Sami, K. Annamalai*, M. Wooldridge1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Margaret S.

    Co-firing of coal and biomass fuel blends M. Sami, K. Annamalai*, M. Wooldridge1 Department; accepted 6 June 2000 Abstract This paper reviews literature on co-firing of coal with biomass fuels. Here of coal and biomass fuels are presented. Different classes of co-firing methods are identified

  11. Morphological effects on glass transition behavior in selected immiscible blends of amorphous and semicrystalline polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and semicrystalline polymers Vivek Thirtha, Richard Lehman *, Thomas Nosker Department of Materials Science and Engineering, AMIPP Advanced Polymer Center, Rutgers University, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA uncompatibilized immiscible polymer blend compositions on the Tg of the amorphous polymer were studied

  12. Propulsion engineering study for small-scale Mars missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, J.

    1995-09-12

    Rocket propulsion options for small-scale Mars missions are presented and compared, particularly for the terminal landing maneuver and for sample return. Mars landing has a low propulsive {Delta}v requirement on a {approximately}1-minute time scale, but at a high acceleration. High thrust/weight liquid rocket technologies, or advanced pulse-capable solids, developed during the past decade for missile defense, are therefore more appropriate for small Mars landers than are conventional space propulsion technologies. The advanced liquid systems are characterize by compact lightweight thrusters having high chamber pressures and short lifetimes. Blowdown or regulated pressure-fed operation can satisfy the Mars landing requirement, but hardware mass can be reduced by using pumps. Aggressive terminal landing propulsion designs can enable post-landing hop maneuvers for some surface mobility. The Mars sample return mission requires a small high performance launcher having either solid motors or miniature pump-fed engines. Terminal propulsion for 100 kg Mars landers is within the realm of flight-proven thruster designs, but custom tankage is desirable. Landers on a 10 kg scale also are feasible, using technology that has been demonstrated but not previously flown in space. The number of sources and the selection of components are extremely limited on this smallest scale, so some customized hardware is required. A key characteristic of kilogram-scale propulsion is that gas jets are much lighter than liquid thrusters for reaction control. The mass and volume of tanks for inert gas can be eliminated by systems which generate gas as needed from a liquid or a solid, but these have virtually no space flight history. Mars return propulsion is a major engineering challenge; earth launch is the only previously-solved propulsion problem requiring similar or greater performance.

  13. Economic Development Benefits of the Mars Hill Wind Farm, Wind Powering America Rural Economic Development, Case Study (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-06-01

    This case study summarizes the economic development benefits of the Mars Hill Wind Farm to the community of Mars Hill, Maine. The Mars Hill Wind Farm is New England's first utility-scale wind farm.

  14. The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on Ethanol Engine Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P; West, Brian H

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is a very attractive fuel from an end-use perspective because it has a high chemical octane number and a high latent heat of vaporization. When an engine is optimized to take advantage of these fuel properties, both efficiency and power can be increased through higher compression ratio, direct fuel injection, higher levels of boost, and a reduced need for enrichment to mitigate knock or protect the engine and aftertreatment system from overheating. The ASTM D5798 specification for high level ethanol blends, commonly called E85, underwent a major revision in 2011. The minimum ethanol content was revised downward from 68 vol% to 51 vol%, which combined with the use of low octane blending streams such as natural gasoline introduces the possibility of a lower octane E85 fuel. While this fuel is suitable for current ethanol tolerant flex fuel vehicles, this study experimentally examines whether engines can still be aggressively optimized for the resultant fuel from the revised ASTM D5798 specification. The performance of six ethanol fuel blends, ranging from 51-85% ethanol, is compared to a premium-grade certification gasoline (UTG-96) in a single-cylinder direct-injection (DI) engine with a compression ratio of 12.9:1 at knock-prone engine conditions. UTG-96 (RON = 96.1), light straight run gasoline (RON = 63.6), and n-heptane (RON = 0) are used as the hydrocarbon blending streams for the ethanol-containing fuels in an effort to establish a broad range of knock resistance for high ethanol fuels. Results show that nearly all ethanol-containing fuels are more resistant to engine knock than UTG-96 (the only exception being the ethanol blend with 49% n-heptane). This knock resistance allows ethanol blends made with 33 and 49% light straight run gasoline, and 33% n-heptane to be operated at significantly more advanced combustion phasing for higher efficiency, as well as at higher engine loads. While experimental results show that the octane number of the hydrocarbon blend stock does impact engine performance, there remains a significant opportunity for engine optimization when considering even the lowest octane fuels that are in compliance with the current revision of ASTM D5798 compared to premium-grade gasoline.

  15. NUCLEAR ISOTOPIC DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BY DRY BLENDING VIA THE RM-2 MILL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raj K. Rajamani; Sanjeeva Latchireddi; Vikas Devrani; Harappan Sethi; Roger Henry; Nate Chipman

    2003-08-01

    DOE has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies to disposition various excess fissile materials. In particular the INEEL has stored 1,700 Kg of offspec HEU at INTEC in CPP-651 vault facility. Currently, the proposed strategies for dispositioning are (a) aqueous dissolution and down blending to LEU via facilities at SRS followed by shipment of the liquid LEU to NFS for fabrication into LWR fuel for the TVA reactors and (b) dilution of the HEU to 0.9% for discard as a waste stream that would no longer have a criticality or proliferation risk without being processed through some type of enrichment system. Dispositioning this inventory as a waste stream via aqueous processing at SRS has been determined to be too costly. Thus, dry blending is the only proposed disposal process for the uranium oxide materials in the CPP-651 vault. Isotopic dilution of HEU to typically less than 20% by dry blending is the key to solving the dispositioning issue (i.e., proliferation) posed by HEU stored at INEEL. RM-2 mill is a technology developed and successfully tested for producing ultra-fine particles by dry grinding. Grinding action in RM-2 mill produces a two million-fold increase in the number of particles being blended in a centrifugal field. In a previous study, the concept of achieving complete and adequate blending and mixing (i.e., no methods were identified to easily separate and concentrate one titanium compound from the other) in remarkably short processing times was successfully tested with surrogate materials (titanium dioxide and titanium mono-oxide) with different particle sizes, hardness and densities. In the current project, the RM-2 milling technology was thoroughly tested with mixtures of natural uranium oxide (NU) and depleted uranium oxide (DU) stock to prove its performance. The effects of mill operating and design variables on the blending of NU/DU oxides were evaluated. First, NU and DU both made of the same oxide, UO{sub 3}, was used in the testing. Next, NU made up of UO{sub 3} and DU made up of UO{sub 2} was used in the test work. In every test, the blend achieved was characterized by spatial sampling of the ground product and analyzing for {sup 235}U concentration. The test work proved that these uranium oxide materials can be blended successfully. The spatial concentration was found to be uniform. Next, sintered thorium oxide pellets were used as surrogate for light water breeder reactor pellets (LWBR). To simulate LWBR pellet dispositioning, the thorium oxide pellets were first ground to a powder form and then the powder was blended with NU. In these tests also the concentration of {sup 235}U and {sup 232}Th in blended products fell within established limits proving the success of RM-2 milling technology. RM-2 milling technology is applicable to any dry radioactive waste, especially brittle solids that can be ground up and mixed with the non-radioactive stock.

  16. Avian Roosting Behavior and Vector-Host Contact Rates for West Nile Virus Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janousek, William M.

    2012-01-01

    amplification of West Nile virus: the role of hatch-yearDaszak, P. 2005. West Nile virus risk assessment and theof American Robins for West Nile Virus Transmission. Vector-

  17. When Emergency Rooms Close: Ambulance Diversion in the West San Fernando Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natasha Mihal; Renee Moilanen

    2005-01-01

    of diversion on the West Valley, identifies major problemsa working group of the five West Valley hospitals to exposehigh diversion rates in the West Valley and proposed ways to

  18. PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THE WEST COAST OF FLORIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THE WEST COAST OF FLORIDA Marine Biological Laboratory WOODS PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THF WEST COAST OF FLORIDA Herbert Wo Graham, Fishery Biologist, John Mo of T richodesmium floating on the surface over water of very low phosphorus content. #12;CONTENTS Page Methods

  19. Wildland Fire Risk and Management on West and South Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;Wildland Fire Risk and Management on West and South Ranges Schofield Barracks, Oahu March) Intermountain Fire Science Lab, Missoula, MT CEMML TPS01-11 #12;#12;Wildland Fire Risk and Management on West .................................................................................................................................. 1 Fire Characteristics of Common Species

  20. West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -thirds of the Institute is directly engaged in research projects. Research Priorities The WVWRI issued a request Committee for Water Research. Energy production impacts on water resources (oil and gas drillingWest Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 West Virginia

  1. Course Enrollment by College -Census West Lafayette -Spring 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    Course Enrollment by College - Census West Lafayette - Spring 2009 Freeze Date: Jan 28, 2009 Enrollment by College - Census West Lafayette - Spring 2009 Freeze Date: Jan 28, 2009 College Enrollment 01 & Meat Mrkt 6 2 15 4 8 35 AGEC42200 Technical Price Anly 6 2 15 3 8 34 AGEC42600 Mkt Mgt Agr Bus 3 7 23 4

  2. Course Enrollment by College -Census West Lafayette -Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Course Enrollment by College - Census West Lafayette - Spring 2011 Freeze Date: Jan 25, 2011 Enrollment by College - Census West Lafayette - Spring 2011 Freeze Date: Jan 25, 2011 College Enrollment 01 & Meat Mrkt 1 4 13 6 17 41 AGEC42200 Technical Price Anly 1 3 10 4 16 34 AGEC42400 Finan Mgt Agr Bus 9 27

  3. Course Enrollment by College -Census West Lafayette -Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    Course Enrollment by College - Census West Lafayette - Spring 2010 Freeze Date: Jan 26, 2010 by College - Census West Lafayette - Spring 2010 Freeze Date: Jan 26, 2010 College Enrollment 01 02 03 04 05 7 3 16 13 21 63 AGEC41200 Farm Business Mgmt 3 8 11 AGEC42100 Livestock & Meat Mrkt 1 1 3 15 7 15 42

  4. HEPC Peer Institutions West Virginia University -Main Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    HEPC Peer Institutions West Virginia University - Main Campus 2008-09 Data HEPC Peer Institutions of Massachusetts-Amherst Univ of Missouri-Columbia University of Nevada-Reno Univ of New Mexico-Main Campus College Navigator #12;HEPC Peer Institutions West Virginia University - Main Campus 2010-11 Data HEPC Peer

  5. Final Independent External Peer Review Report West Sacramento Project, California,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report West Sacramento Project, California, General Baltimore District Contract No. W912HQ-10-D-0002 Task Order: 0072 October 6, 2014 #12;West Sacramento GRR Sacramento GRR IEPR | Final IEPR Report BATTELLE | October 6, 2014 i CONTRACT NO. W912HQ-10-D-0002 Task Order

  6. Determining Mountaintop Mining Locations in West Virginia Using Elevation Datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowland, Danny

    2009-11-18

    NED Orthoimagry downloaded from http://datagateway.nrcs.usda.gov/GatewayHome.html Orthoimagery of Area West Virginia Valley Fills & Forested Area ... NED Orthoimagry downloaded from http://datagateway.nrcs.usda.gov/GatewayHome.html Orthoimagery of Area West Virginia Valley Fills & Forested Area ...

  7. VWA-0033- In the Matter of Gretencord v. West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This decision considers a Complaint filed by John L. Gretencord (Gretencord) against West Valley Nuclear Services, Inc. (West Valley) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee...

  8. The West and the Rest: The Science of the Great Divergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turchin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    of the West" and the Industrial Revolution. Journal of WorldWest (or why the Industrial Revolution originated in Greatthe beginning of the Industrial Revolution in Great Britain.

  9. An Independent Assessment of the Technical Feasibility of the Mars One Mission Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Sydney

    In mid-2012, the Mars One program was announced, aiming to build the first human settlement on the surface of Mars. Following a series of precursor missions to develop and deploy key technologies, the first crewed mission ...

  10. The Asymmetric TimeVariable Rings of Mars Douglas P. Hamilton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    from along Mars' vernal equinox (the intersection between Mars' orbital and equatorial planes­fated Phobos­2 mission, noted that strong solar wind disturbances in the plasma and magnetic fields

  11. Preservation of Martian Organic and Environmental Records: Final Report of the Mars Biosignature Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summons, Roger Everett

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) has an instrument package capable of making measurements of past and present environmental conditions. The data generated may tell us if Mars is, or ever was, able to support life. However, ...

  12. Engine placement for manned descent at Mars considering single engine failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Stephen P. (Stephen Patrick)

    2006-01-01

    Previous missions to Mars have landed masses of approximately I metric ton on the surface. Vehicles large enough to support humans on the flight to Mars and land them safely on the surface are closer to 100 metric tons, a ...

  13. Amino acid biosignatures : implications for the detection of extinct or extant microbial communities on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubrey, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    colonization in impact- generated hydrothermal sulphate deposits, Haughton impact structure, and implications for sulphates on Mars.colonization in impact- generated hydrothermal sulphate deposits, Haughton impact structure, and implications for sulphates on Mars.

  14. Amino Acid Biosignatures - Implications for the Detection of Extinct or Extant Microbial Communities on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubrey, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    colonization in impact- generated hydrothermal sulphate deposits, Haughton impact structure, and implications for sulphates on Mars.colonization in impact- generated hydrothermal sulphate deposits, Haughton impact structure, and implications for sulphates on Mars.

  15. North polar stratigraphy and the paleo-erg of Mars Shane Byrne and Bruce C. Murray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Shane

    North polar stratigraphy and the paleo-erg of Mars Shane Byrne and Bruce C. Murray Division: Surface materials and properties; KEYWORDS: Mars, polar, geology, history, stratigraphy, dune 1

  16. Space weather effects on the Mars ionosphere due to solar flares and meteors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    Space weather effects on the Mars ionosphere due to solar flares and meteors P. Withers (1), M observed two aspects of space weather at Mars. Following solar flares of both moderate to strong magnitude

  17. North Slope action holds West Coast spotlight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, H.M.

    1981-05-25

    The first oil from a North Slope reservoir outside Prudhoe Bay will begin flowing next year at rate of 80,000 bpd from Kuparuk field now under development by Atlantic Richfield Co. west of Prudhoe Bay. Just north of the Kuparuk development, Conoco Inc. has found a commercial reservoir in the Milne Point unit and will be drilling confirmation and delineation wells later this year and in 1982. Another area which very likely will be developed for production is located northeast of Prudhoe Bay, where Sohio Alaska Petroleum Co. has announced discoveries in 2 Sag Delta wells. In California's San Joaquin Valley, 3 Kern County fields - South Belridge, Elk Hills, and Lost Hills - are the sites of intensive drilling. Seven rigs are working in the Santa Barbara Channel, 3 of them developing known fields from permanent platforms.

  18. Gone with the Wind ON_Mars (GOWON): A Wind-Driven Networked System of Mobile Sensors on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davoodi, Faranak; Murphy, Neil; Mischna, Michael; Nesnas, Issa; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2012-01-01

    We propose a revolutionary way of studying the surface of Mars using a wind-driven network of mobile sensors- Gone with the Wind ON_Mars (GOWON). GOWON is a scalable architecture that will allow in-situ mapping of a wide range of phenomena, exploiting existing capabilities, but radically improving our ability to study Mars. GOWON has the following characteristics: 1.it consists of a dynamic wireless network of many compact mobile sensors. 2.the mobile sensors (called moballs) are spherically-shaped and wind-driven; they are lightweight and bouncy. 3. moballs communicate with each other and earth through a satellite system orbiting Mars. There is also peer-to-peer communication between the moballs, creating a network of shared data, computing, and tasks. Motivation and Rationale Thanks to earlier exploration missions to Mars we now have a much better understanding of many of the natural characteristics of the red planet. We now know that there is an abundance of wind (with average speeds of 10 m/s and much hig...

  19. Chemical study of secondary metabolites from selected strains of the actinomycete clade MAR 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espindola, Ana Paula Domingues de Mello

    2008-01-01

    pathways present in all member of the group makes the MAR 4 group unusual among both marine and terrestrial

  20. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS): executive summary and overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, B.G.; Perkins, L.J.; Gordon, J.D.

    1984-07-01

    Two self-consistent MARS configurations are discussed - a 1200-MWe commercial electricity-generating plant and a synguels-generating plant that produces hydrogen with an energy equivalent to 26,000 barrels of oil per day. The MARS machine emphasizes the attractive features of the tandem mirror concept, including steady-state operation, a small-diameter high-beta plasma, a linear central cell with simple low-maintenance blankets, low first-wall heat fluxes (<10 W/cm/sup 2/), no driven plasma currents or associated disruptions, natural halo impurity diversion, and direct conversion of end-loss charged-particle power. The MARS electric plant produces 2600 MW of fusion power in a 130-m-long central cell. Advanced tandem-mirror plasma-engineering concepts, a high-efficiency liquid lithium-lead (Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/) blanket, and efficient direct electrical conversion of end loss power combine to produce a high net plant efficiency of 36%. With a total capital cost of $2.9 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the MARS electric plant produces busbar electricity at approx. 7 cents/kW-hour. The MARS synfuels plant produces 3500 MW of fusion power in a 150-m-long central cell. A helium-gas-cooled silicon carbide pebble-bed blanket provides high-temperature (1000/sup 0/C) heat to a thermochemical water-splitting cycle and the resulting hydrogen is catalytically converted to methanol for distribution. With a total capital cost of $3.6 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the synfuels plant produces methanol fuel at about $1.7/gal. The major features of the MARS reactor include sloshing-ion thermal barrier plugs for efficient plasma confinement, a high efficiency blanket, high-field (24-T) choke cells, drift pumping for trapped plasma species, quasi-optical electron-cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) systems, and a component gridless direct converter.

  1. Mars Rover's ChemCam Instrument gets sharper vision

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergyApril 25,4MarioMarkMarsMars Rover's

  2. Mars Science Laboratory on Saturday, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergyApril 25,4MarioMarkMarsMars

  3. Thursday, March 26, 2009 POSTER SESSION II: MARS: DUNES, DUST, AND WIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    mainly from the experimental work are presented. Segura T. L. Colaprete A. Global Modeling of Impact-induced Greenhouse Warming on Early Mars [#1056] We have modeled the climate effects of impacts on early Mars. Aeolian Dunes as Ground Truth for GCM and Mesoscale Modeling on Mars [#1212] Aeolian dunes preserve

  4. Assessment of architectural options for surface power generation and energy storage on human Mars missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Assessment of architectural options for surface power generation and energy storage on human Mars power Nuclear Solar power Architectures a b s t r a c t The provision of power for human Mars surface analysis of surface power generation and energy storage architectures for human Mars surface missions

  5. Localized gravity/topography admittance and correlation spectra on Mars: Implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Mark

    Localized gravity/topography admittance and correlation spectra on Mars: Implications for regional] From gravity and topography data collected by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft we calculate gravity/topography of an elastic/plastic shell. In regions of high topography on Mars (e.g., the Tharsis rise and associated shield

  6. 23 mars 2015CNRS I INSIS I Muriel Ilous La communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    23 mars 2015CNRS I INSIS I Muriel Ilous La communication à l'INSIS 1 #12;23 mars 2015CNRS I INSIS I Muriel Ilous Muriel Ilous, responsable communication Valérie Pierre, chargée de la communication workshops 2 Le service communication de l'INSIS #12;23 mars 2015CNRS I INSIS I Muriel Ilous La Direction de

  7. TTF/VUV-FEL meeting, 21. Mar 06 SaseFelPhotonDiagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TTF/VUV-FEL meeting, 21. Mar 06 SaseFelPhotonDiagnostics Gas Monitor Detector Electronics from charged particles to digital value Fini Jastrow, TTF/VUV-FEL meeting, 21. Mar 06 #12;TTF/VUV-FEL meeting, 21. Mar 06 SaseFelPhotonDiagnostics The Detector Ion Current Measurement Electron Pulse Measurement

  8. Surface runoff features on Mars: Testing the carbon dioxide formation hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    materials and properties; KEYWORDS: Mars, gullies, seepage, runoff, carbon dioxide, water Citation: StewartSurface runoff features on Mars: Testing the carbon dioxide formation hypothesis Sarah T. Stewart1, S. T., and F. Nimmo, Surface runoff features on Mars: Testing the carbon dioxide formation

  9. Results from the Mars Phoenix Lander Robotic Arm experiment R. E. Arvidson,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volpe, Richard

    Results from the Mars Phoenix Lander Robotic Arm experiment R. E. Arvidson,1 R. G. Bonitz,2 M. L; revised 8 June 2009; accepted 24 June 2009; published 2 October 2009. [1] The Mars Phoenix Lander. (2009), Results from the Mars Phoenix Lander Robotic Arm experiment, J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00E02, doi

  10. The MECA Wet Chemistry Laboratory on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    The MECA Wet Chemistry Laboratory on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander Samuel P. Kounaves,1] To analyze and interpret the chemical record, the 2007 Phoenix Mars Lander includes four wet chemistry cells on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander, J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00A19, doi:10.1029/2008JE003084. 1

  11. Localized precipitation and runoff on Mars Edwin S. Kite,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Localized precipitation and runoff on Mars Edwin S. Kite,1,2 Timothy I. Michaels,3 Scot Rafkin,3) to simulate lake storms on Mars, finding that intense localized precipitation will occur for lake size 103 km2 on Mars involve continuous precipitation, and their vertical velocities and plume heights exceed those

  12. Application and modeling of near-infrared frequency domain photon migration for monitoring pharmaceutical powder blending operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Tianshu

    2006-10-30

    ) Monte Carlo simulation for tracking photon trajectories within the powder bed. The simulation of photon migration in powder blend revealed that while both the isotropic scattering and absorption coefficients increased with the solid-volume fraction...

  13. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 - Updated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, K.; West, B.; Clark, W.; Graves, R.; Orban, J.; Przesmitzki, S.; Theiss, T.

    2009-02-01

    Intended for policymakers and others who make decisions about, and set guidelines for, the proper use of intermediate ethanol blends such as E20 in both vehicle engines and other engine types.

  14. Organic gas emissions from a stoichiometric direct injection spark ignition engine operating on ethanol/gasoline blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kar, Kenneth

    The organic gas emissions from a stoichiometric direct injection spark ignition engine operating on ethanol/gasoline blends have been assessed under warmed-up and cold idle conditions. The speciated emissions show that the ...

  15. Particulate Matter Emissions from a Direct Injection Spark Ignition Engine under Cold Fast Idle Conditions for Ethanol-Gasoline Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimou, Iason

    The engine out particular matter number (PN) distributions at engine coolant temperature (ECT) of 0° C to 40° C for ethanol/ gasoline blends (E0 to E85) have been measured for a direct-injection spark ignition engine under ...

  16. Sequential Processing for Organic Photovoltaics: Design Rules for Morphology Control by Tailored Semi-Orthogonal Solvent Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    solvents for the fullerene-casting solution. By tuning thecan be used: blend casting (BC) [ 18,19 ] and sequentialchoice of the fullerene casting co-solvent yields well-

  17. Modeling The NOx Emissions In A Low NOx Burner While Fired With Pulverized Coal And Dairy Biomass Blends 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uggini, Hari

    2012-07-16

    by themselves already require cleanup technology; newer regulations will require development of new and economical technologies. Using a blend of traditional fuels & biomass is a promising technology to reduce NOX emissions. Experiments conducted previously...

  18. Viscoelastic Properties and Phase Behavior of 12-tert-Butyl Ester Dendrimer/Poly(methyl methacrylate) Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Julie P.

    with bis- phenol A polycarbonate (PC), resulting in an in- crease in free volume with increasing dendrimer hyperbranched polyester/bisphenol A PC blends with respect to pure PC. Studies were conducted by Carr et al.24

  19. The Mars Hopper: a radioisotope powered, impulse driven, long-range, long-lived mobile platform for exploration of Mars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven D. Howe; Robert C. O'Brien; William Taitano; Doug Crawford; Nathan Jerred; Spencer Cooley; John Crapeau; Steve Hansen; Andrew Klein; James Werner

    2011-02-01

    Planetary exploration mission requirements are becoming more demanding. Due to the increasing cost, the missions that provide mobile platforms that can acquire data at multiple locations are becoming more attractive. Wheeled vehicles such as the MER rovers have proven extremely capable but have very limited range and cannot traverse rugged terrain. Flying vehicles such as balloons and airplanes have been proposed but are problematic due to the very thin atmospheric pressure and the strong, dusty winds present on Mars. The Center for Space Nuclear Research has designed an instrumented platform that can acquire detailed data at hundreds of locations during its lifetime - a Mars Hopper. The Mars Hopper concept utilizes energy from radioisotopic decay in a manner different from any existing radioisotopic power sources—as a thermal capacitor. By accumulating the heat from radioisotopic decay for long periods, the power of the source can be dramatically increased for short periods. The platform will be able to "hop" from one location to the next every 5-7 days with a separation of 5-10 km per hop. Preliminary designs show a platform that weighs around 52 kgs unfueled which is the condition at deployment. Consequently, several platforms may be deployed on a single launch from Earth. With sufficient lifetime, the entire surface of Mars can be mapped in detail by a couple dozen platforms. In addition, Hoppers can collect samples from all over the planet, including gorges, mountains and crevasses, and deliver them to a central location for eventual pick-up by a Mars Sample Return mission. The status of the Mars Hopper development project at the CSNR is discussed.

  20. Effects of Mid-Level Ethanol Blends on Conventional Vehicle Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, K.; West, B.; Huff, S.; Thomas, J.; Orban, J.; Cooper, C.

    2010-06-01

    Tests were conducted in 2008 on 16 late-model conventional vehicles (1999-2007) to determine short-term effects of mid-level ethanol blends on performance and emissions. Vehicle odometer readings ranged from 10,000 to 100,000 miles, and all vehicles conformed to federal emissions requirements for their federal certification level. The LA92 drive cycle, also known as the Unified Cycle, was used for testing because it more accurately represents real-world acceleration rates and speeds than the Federal Test Procedure. Test fuels were splash-blends of up to 20 volume percent ethanol with federal certification gasoline. Both regulated and unregulated air-toxic emissions were measured. For the 16-vehicle fleet, increasing ethanol content resulted in reductions in average composite emissions of both nonmethane hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide and increases in average emissions of ethanol and aldehydes.

  1. Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Indirect Liquefaction of Blended Biomass to Produce High Octane Gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Hao; Canter, Christina E.; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Tan, Eric; Biddy, Mary; Talmadge, Michael; Hartley, Damon S.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley

    2015-09-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) aims at developing and deploying technologies to transform renewable biomass resources into commercially viable, high-performance biofuels, bioproducts and biopower through public and private partnerships (DOE, 2015). BETO also performs a supply chain sustainability analysis (SCSA). This report describes the SCSA of the production of renewable high octane gasoline (HOG) via indirect liquefaction (IDL) of lignocellulosic biomass. This SCSA was developed for the 2017 design case for feedstock logistics (INL, 2014) and for the 2022 target case for HOG production via IDL (Tan et al., 2015). The design includes advancements that are likely and targeted to be achieved by 2017 for the feedstock logistics and 2022 for the IDL conversion process. The 2017 design case for feedstock logistics demonstrated a delivered feedstock cost of $80 per dry U.S. short ton by the year 2017 (INL, 2014). The 2022 design case for the conversion process, as modeled in Tan et al. (2015), uses the feedstock 2017 design case blend of biomass feedstocks consisting of pulpwood, wood residue, switchgrass, and construction and demolition waste (C&D) with performance properties consistent with a sole woody feedstock type (e.g., pine or poplar). The HOG SCSA case considers the 2017 feedstock design case (the blend) as well as individual feedstock cases separately as alternative scenarios when the feedstock blend ratio varies as a result of a change in feedstock availability. These scenarios could be viewed as bounding SCSA results because of distinctive requirements for energy and chemical inputs for the production and logistics of different components of the blend feedstocks.

  2. Biomaterials 23 (2002) 44834492 A novel porous cells scaffold made of polylactidedextran blend by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jian

    2002-01-01

    was developed by blending polylactide (PLA) with natural biodegradable dextran, and a novel sponge-like scaffold of cartilage [7,8], bone [9,10], tendon [11], skin [12,13], liver [14] and heart valve [15]. Cell scaffolds-casting and particle-leaching [19,20], phase-separation [21], emulsion freeze dry- ing [22], gas-foaming [23] and 3D

  3. Novel Characterization of GDI Engine Exhaust for Gasoline and Mid-Level Gasoline-Alcohol Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storey, John Morse; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Szybist, James P; Thomas, John F; Barone, Teresa L; Eibl, Mary A; Nafziger, Eric J; Kaul, Brian C

    2014-01-01

    Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines can offer improved fuel economy and higher performance over their port fuel-injected (PFI) counterparts, and are now appearing in increasingly more U.S. and European vehicles. Small displacement, turbocharged GDI engines are replacing large displacement engines, particularly in light-duty trucks and sport utility vehicles, in order for manufacturers to meet more stringent fuel economy standards. GDI engines typically emit the most particulate matter (PM) during periods of rich operation such as start-up and acceleration, and emissions of air toxics are also more likely during this condition. A 2.0 L GDI engine was operated at lambda of 0.91 at typical loads for acceleration (2600 rpm, 8 bar BMEP) on three different fuels; an 87 anti-knock index (AKI) gasoline (E0), 30% ethanol blended with the 87 AKI fuel (E30), and 48% isobutanol blended with the 87 AKI fuel. E30 was chosen to maximize octane enhancement while minimizing ethanol-blend level and iBu48 was chosen to match the same fuel oxygen level as E30. Particle size and number, organic carbon and elemental carbon (OC/EC), soot HC speciation, and aldehydes and ketones were all analyzed during the experiment. A new method for soot HC speciation is introduced using a direct, thermal desorption/pyrolysis inlet for the gas chromatograph (GC). Results showed high levels of aromatic compounds were present in the PM, including downstream of the catalyst, and the aldehydes were dominated by the alcohol blending.

  4. Strategies for autonomous rovers at Mars Martha S. Gilmore1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mjolsness, Eric

    , characterize the landing site and test geological hypothesis autonomously. Future missions to Mars will contain history, 3) the identification of resources and 4) the geological and geophysical history of the planet is the characterize the selected sites in detail using lander and mobile systems as is planned for the 2003

  5. Voyage de presse 26 et 27 mars 2015 -Lyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    Voyage de presse 26 et 27 mars 2015 - Lyon DOSSIER DE PRESSE Année internationale de la lumière nanotechnologies de Lyon 5 > Nanophotonique > Photovoltaïque Photosynthèse, micro-algues et biocarburants 9 L'Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l'environnement de Lyon 10 > Photochimie atmosphérique L

  6. Wednesday, March 14, 2007 MARS TECTONICS AND CRUSTAL DICHOTOMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    . * Murray J. B. van Wyk de Vries B. Troll V. R. Flank Terrace Architecture of Martian Shield Volcanoes and regional stresses can influence terrace architecture. 10:00 a.m. Searls M. L. * Phillips R. J. Tectonics of Utopia Basin, Mars: Results from Finite Element Loading Models [#1965] We use a finite element model

  7. Periodic bedrock ridges on Mars David R. Montgomery,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Periodic bedrock ridges on Mars David R. Montgomery,1 Joshua L. Bandfield,1 and Scott K. Becker1 to be widespread [Carr, 1981; Greeley et al., 1992; Malin and Edgett, 2001]. Although wind-streamlined yardangs interpreted as sedimentary forms [McCauley et al., 1972; Cutts and Smith, 1973; Carr, 1981; Greeley et al

  8. NASA/TP--2006214196 Haughton-Mars Project Expedition 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    NASA/TP--2006­214196 Haughton-Mars Project Expedition 2005 Final Report Prof. Olivier de Weck: Press F1 key (Windows) or Help key (Mac) for help January 2006 #12;NASA STI Program ... in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA

  9. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sponaugle, Su

    of 28.5°C) or the interference of mesoscale advection processes. When 4 cohorts that settled during the passage of mesoscale eddies were omitted from the analysis, 61% of the varia- tion in recruitment due to mesoscale oceanographic circulation. Photos: Evan D'Alessandro OPENPEN ACCESSCCESS #12;Mar Ecol

  10. Mar./Apr. 2002 Winter Losses, Again Organic Beekeeping Conf.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Mar./Apr. 2002 Winter Losses, Again Organic Beekeeping Conf. Diagnosing and Treating Nosema is extremely hard to see, because the bees look OK while the stored food reserves in their bodies just aren of the honey bee midgut stimulate germination. The organism penetrates a midgut cell and grows by absorbing

  11. The Mars Microphone: Ready to Go by Greg Delory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    and David Juergens of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, who proposed to the Planetary Society that a sound mass, power, volume, or data­rate adjustments on the lander. Friedman and Society President Carl Sagan Sciences Laboratory. Are There Sounds on Mars? Given that sound waves need an atmospheric medium through

  12. The Mars Microphone: Ready to Go by Greg Delory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    and David Juergens of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, who proposed to the Planetary Society that a sound mass, power, volume, or data-rate adjustments on the lander. Friedman and Society President Carl Sagan Sciences Laboratory. Are There Sounds on Mars? Given that sound waves need an atmospheric medium through

  13. Friday, March 27, 2009 MARS: DUNES, DUST, AND WIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Friday, March 27, 2009 MARS: DUNES, DUST, AND WIND 8:30 a.m. Waterway Ballroom 1 Chairs: Lori Fenton Steve Metzger 8:30 a.m. Chojnacki M. * Moersch J. E. Valles Marineris Dune Fields: Thermophysical Properties, Morphology, and Provenance [#2486] We examined 25 dune fields in Valles Marineris to identify

  14. Mars Exploration Rover Mobility and Robotic Arm Operational Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mars Exploration Rover Mobility and Robotic Arm Operational Performance Edward Tunstel, Mark California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA, 91109 USA tunstel@robotics.jpl.nasa.gov Abstract - Increased they should operate. The purpose of this paper is to describe an actual instance of a practical human-robot

  15. Science Results from the Mars Exploration Rover Mission

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Squyres, Steven [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States

    2010-09-01

    One of the most important scientific goals of the mission was to find and identify a variety of rocks and soils that provide evidence of the past presence of water on the planet. To obtain this information, Squyres is studying the data obtained on Mars by several sophisticated scientific instruments.

  16. DU 27 AU 29 MARS SYMPOSIUM Innovation for the management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeanjean, Louis

    DU 27 AU 29 MARS SYMPOSIUM Innovation for the management of echinococcosis-2014 (ImE-2014) Nouveaux hospitalier universitaire de Besançon) ; Centre national de référence échinococcose alvéolaire, Centre hospitalier régional universitaire de Besançon LIEU Chambre de commerce et d'industrie du Doubs, 46 avenue

  17. VOL. 35, NO. 1 SOUTHWESTERN ENTOMOLOGIST MAR. 2009 SCIENTIFIC NOTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeff

    VOL. 35, NO. 1 SOUTHWESTERN ENTOMOLOGIST MAR. 2009 SCIENTIFIC NOTE Observations on the Oriental and is restricted to the southern U.S. We observed the arrival and colonization of blow flies on a decaying domestic to colonize decomposing remains in the U.S. (Byrd and Butler 1996). The first flies attracted to the chickens

  18. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehl, Mimi

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 479: 47­62, 2013 doi: 10.3354/meps10193 larvae, which are trans- ported by ambient currents and colonize new sur- faces. The recruitment. 1994, Schiel 2004, Edwards & Stachowicz 2011). To colonize a surface, a larva must be transported

  19. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlik, Joseph

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 224: 103­114, 2001 Published December 19 process: solitary larvae first colonize a suitable but previously uninhabited sub- stratum; gregarious the conditions under which larvae of a gregarious species colonize new habitats. We first confirmed

  20. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlik, Joseph

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 224: 115­131, 2001 Published December 19 substrata. Previous investigations with barnacles and polychaetes have suggested that the colonization for the initiation of monospecific aggregations of fouling marine invertebrates. KEY WORDS: Colonization · Gregarious

  1. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlik, Joseph

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Published November 2 Defenses of Caribbean sponges.Pawlik* Biological Sciences and Center for Marine Science Research. University of North Carolina at Wilmington. Analyses of ash content, tensile strength, protein, carbohydrate, and lipid content, and total energy

  2. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 382: 211­219, 2009 doi: 10.3354/meps07997 Published April 30 INTRODUCTION Seabirds play critical roles in the transfer of energy and nutrients within marine ecosystems and also between marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Despite decades of intensive study

  3. Radio tracking of Phoenix during its landing on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    Radio tracking of Phoenix during its landing on Mars Paul Withers Center for Space Physics, Boston University (withers@bu.edu) MEX/VEX Radio Science Meeting 2010.03.18-19 Bonn, Germany #12;Phoenix atmospheric for a-aero using known quantities Re-arrange: #12;Next steps · Find f(t) for Phoenix direct

  4. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 311: 273­283, 2006 Published April 13 scales in biodiversity-based research: challenges and solutions for marine systems Shahid Naeem York, New York 10027, USA ABSTRACT: As in terrestrial biodiversity, human influences over marine

  5. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 295: 201­213, 2005 Published June 23 INTRODUCTION Due to the ongoing direct depletion of the world's marine resources as well as the indirect effects of fish- ing, no-take marine reserves are being promoted as an ecosystem-level management tool. No

  6. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camassa, Roberto

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 487: 185­200, 2013 doi: 10.3354/meps10387 Published July 30 INTRODUCTION Marine snow plays a critical role in the marine car- bon cycle, as a dominant, Kiørboe 2011). Knowledge of the vertical distribution of marine aggregates in the water column, as well

  7. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morel, François M. M.

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 236: 37­43, 2002 Published July 3 the CO2 responses of marine phytoplankton despite the established importance of these organisms poten- tially limit the growth of large marine diatoms (Riebe- sell et al. 1993), while recent field

  8. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolán-Alvarez, Emilio

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 357: 175­184, 2008 doi: 10.3354/meps07278 will affect only some regions of the genome. An additional difficulty in the marine environment variation in the marine environment remains insufficiently understood (Avise 2004). Natural populations

  9. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 253: 25­38, 2003 Published May 15 INTRODUCTION Marine protected areas are riding the wave of ocean governance reform (Kelleher 1997, Allison et component for the ecologically sustainable use of marine resources. Where such reform processes are grounded

  10. LOCALIZED PRECIPITATION, LAKE-EFFECT STORMS, AND EROSION ON MARS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LOCALIZED PRECIPITATION, LAKE-EFFECT STORMS, AND EROSION ON MARS. Edwin. S. Kite*, Earth], this hypothesis has never been modeled. We report numerical tests of localized precipitation using MRAMS ephemeral lakes. For a given vapor injection rate or lake surface temperature, localized precipitation

  11. Combustion characteristics of indolene-methanol blends in a CFR spark ignition engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, K.S.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the combustion characteristics of indolene, methanol and indolene-methanol blends has been completed. The investigation included theoretical and experimental parts. In the theoretical part, turbulent burning velocity, laminar burning velocity, and mass burning velocity are computed. The experimental part was completed on a CFR spark ignition engine using indolene, methanol, and indolene-methanol blends. Methanol concentration was varied from 0 to 100 vol.%. For each blend, compression ratio was varied from 5.0 to KLCR (Knock Limited Compression Ratio). The results of theoretical analysis showed that the laminar burning velocity increased as the vol.% of methanol increased. The experimental results indicated that adding methanol to indolene, MBT (Minimum advanced for Best Torque) spark advance, volumetric efficiency, brake mean effective pressure are decreased while break specific fuel consumption, brake thermal efficiency an KLCR are increased. The theoretical and experimental results showed that adding methanol to indolene, apparent flame speed, turbulent burning velocity and the ratio of turbulent to laminar burning velocity increased. Pure methanol produced the highest turbulent burning velocity. It is concluded that methanol has considerable effect on the combustion characteristics of spark ignition engine.

  12. Use of ethyl-t-butyl ether (ETBE) as a gasoline blending component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiblom, C.M.; Schoonveld, G.A.; Riley, R.K.; Pahl, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Treasury Department recently ruled that the ethanol blenders tax credit applies to ethanol used to make ETBE for blending with gasoline. As a result, ETBE may soon become a popular gasoline blending component. Like MTBE ETBE adds oxygen to the fuel while contributing to other performance properties of the gasoline. Phillips Petroleum Company has completed limited driveability and material compatibility studies on gasolines containing ETBE and has determined the effect on various performance parameters such as octane, volatility, and distillation of ETBE in gasoline. Levels of ETBE ranging from 0.0 to 23.5 volume percent (3.7 weight percent oxygen) in gasoline were included in the investigation. Use in gasoline is currently limited to only 12.7 volume percent (2.0 weight percent oxygen) by the gasoline substantially similar rule. No detrimental effects of the ETBE on metal or elastomeric parts common to gasoline delivery and fueling system were found. Also, several favorable blending properties of eTBE in gasoline are apparent as compared to either MTBE or ethanol. This paper presents details of these results.

  13. Recovery and Blend-Down Uranium for Beneficial use in Commercial Reactors - 13373

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, Virginia [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In April 2001 the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) signed an Interagency Agreement to transfer approximately 33 MT of off-specification (off-spec) highly enriched uranium (HEU) from DOE to TVA for conversion to commercial reactor fuel. Since that time additional surplus off-spec HEU material has been added to the program, making the total approximately 46 MT off-spec HEU. The disposition path for approximately half (23 MT) of this 46 MT of surplus HEU material, was down blending through the H-canyon facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The HEU is purified through the H-canyon processes, and then blended with natural uranium (NU) to form low enriched uranium (LEU) solution with a 4.95% U-235 isotopic content. This material was then transported to a TVA subcontractor who converted the solution to uranium oxide and then fabricated into commercial light water reactor (LWR) fuel. This fuel is now powering TVA reactors and supplying electricity to approximately 1 million households in the TVA region. There is still in excess of approximately 10 to 14 MT of off-spec HEU throughout the DOE complex or future foreign and domestic research reactor returns that could be recovered and down blended for use in either currently designed light water reactors, ?5% enriched LEU, or be made available for use in subsequent advanced 'fast' reactor fuel designs, ?19% LEU. (authors)

  14. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: RECOVERY AND DOWN BLEND URANIUM FOR BENEFICIAL USE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, V.

    2013-05-27

    For over fifty years, the H Canyon facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has performed remotely operated radiochemical separations of irradiated targets to produce materials for national defense. Although the materials production mission has ended, the facility continues to play an important role in the stabilization and safe disposition of proliferable nuclear materials. As part of the US HEU Disposition Program, SRS has been down blending off-specification (off-spec) HEU to produce LEU since 2003. Off-spec HEU contains fission products not amenable to meeting the American Society for Testing and Material (ASTM) commercial fuel standards prior to purification. This down blended HEU material produced 301 MT of ~5% enriched LEU which has been fabricated into light water reactor fuel being utilized in Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) reactors in Tennessee and Alabama producing economic power. There is still in excess of ~10 MT of off-spec HEU throughout the DOE complex or future foreign and domestic research reactor returns that could be recovered and down blended for beneficial use as either ~5% enriched LEU, or for use in subsequent LEU reactors requiring ~19.75% enriched LEU fuel.

  15. Intermediate Alcohol-Gasoline Blends, Fuels for Enabling Increased Engine Efficiency and Powertrain Possibilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Splitter, Derek A; Szybist, James P

    2014-01-01

    The present study experimentally investigates spark-ignited combustion with 87 AKI E0 gasoline in its neat form and in mid-level alcohol-gasoline blends with 24% vol./vol. iso-butanol-gasoline (IB24) and 30% vol./vol. ethanol-gasoline (E30). A single-cylinder research engine is used with a low and high compression ratio of 9.2:1 and 11.85:1 respectively. The engine is equipped with hydraulically actuated valves, laboratory intake air, and is capable of external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). All fuels are operated to full-load conditions with =1, using both 0% and 15% external cooled EGR. The results demonstrate that higher octane number bio-fuels better utilize higher compression ratios with high stoichiometric torque capability. Specifically, the unique properties of ethanol enabled a doubling of the stoichiometric torque capability with the 11.85:1 compression ratio using E30 as compared to 87 AKI, up to 20 bar IMEPg at =1 (with 15% EGR, 18.5 bar with 0% EGR). EGR was shown to provide thermodynamic advantages with all fuels. The results demonstrate that E30 may further the downsizing and downspeeding of engines by achieving increased low speed torque, even with high compression ratios. The results suggest that at mid-level alcohol-gasoline blends, engine and vehicle optimization can offset the reduced fuel energy content of alcohol-gasoline blends, and likely reduce vehicle fuel consumption and tailpipe CO2 emissions.

  16. Methylal and Methylal-Diesel Blended Fuels from Use In Compression-Ignition Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keith D. Vertin; James M. Ohi; David W. Naegeli; Kenneth H. Childress; Gary P. Hagen; Chris I. McCarthy; Adelbert S. Cheng; Robert W. Dibble

    1999-05-05

    Gas-to-liquids catalytic conversion technologies show promise for liberating stranded natural gas reserves and for achieving energy diversity worldwide. Some gas-to-liquids products are used as transportation fuels and as blendstocks for upgrading crude derived fuels. Methylal (CH{sub 3}-O-CH{sub 2}-O-CH{sub 3}) also known as dimethoxymethane or DMM, is a gas-to-liquid chemical that has been evaluated for use as a diesel fuel component. Methylal contains 42% oxygen by weight and is soluble in diesel fuel. The physical and chemical properties of neat methylal and for blends of methylal in conventional diesel fuel are presented. Methylal was found to be more volatile than diesel fuel, and special precautions for distribution and fuel tank storage are discussed. Steady state engine tests were also performed using an unmodified Cummins 85.9 turbocharged diesel engine to examine the effect of methylal blend concentration on performance and emissions. Substantial reductions of particulate matter emissions h ave been demonstrated 3r IO to 30% blends of methylal in diesel fuel. This research indicates that methylal may be an effective blendstock for diesel fuel provided design changes are made to vehicle fuel handling systems.

  17. U.S. West: The Next Energy Nexus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Sandra K.; Kear, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    U.S. West: The Next Energy Nexus 149 Eldridge, M. , B.S. Nadel (2007) The State Energy Efficiency Scorecard forAmerican Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy. Retrieved

  18. GeoPowering the West: Hawaii; Why Geothermal?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-04-01

    This fact sheets provides a summary of geothermal potential, issues, and current development in Hawaii. This fact sheet was developed as part of DOE's GeoPowering the West initiative, part of the Geothermal Technologies Program.

  19. New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Acquisitions...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Acquisitions (Million Barrels) New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Acquisitions (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  20. New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decreases (Million Barrels) New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Decreases (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  1. New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Extensions...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Extensions (Million Barrels) New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Extensions (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  2. New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales (Million Barrels) New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Sales (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  3. New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Increases (Million Barrels) New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Increases (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  4. New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Adjustments...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Adjustments (Million Barrels) New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Adjustments (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  5. West Virginia University 1 Perley Isaac Reed School of Journalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 Perley Isaac Reed School of Journalism Degree Offered · Bachelor of Science in Journalism Majors: · Journalism · Strategic Communications (for students entering a major Fall 2013 and beyond) Areas of Emphasis: Journalism · Print Journalism · Television Journalism · Visual

  6. West Virginia University 1 School of Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 School of Public Health Degrees Offered ON CAMPUS: Master of Public Health (MPH): · Biostatistics · Epidemiology · Health Policy · Occupational and Environmental Health in Biostatistics Ph.D. in Public Health Sciences · Epidemiology · Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences

  7. Energy Efficiency Programs in West Virginia: A Partnership Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cullen, K. A.; Crowe, E.; Gopalakrishnan, B.; Chaudhari, S.

    2011-01-01

    laboratories. This range of services creates a synergistic relationship that allows the WV team to obtain competitive awards that benefit the stakeholders. This paper will focus on how West Virginia has a successful industrial energy efficiency program...

  8. West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the most important sources for data on the consumer perspective of the current electric power grid in West Virginia would be the WV Public Service Commission (WV PSC). Thus, an...

  9. Allen West gets significant support from Indian River County donors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Executive Committee chairman. Indian River's haul for West tops the $13,260 that Democratic-leaning St campaign has cost almost $8 million. John Brehmer, a retired Illinois manufacturing director who moved

  10. Training Changing Face of West Virginia's Workforce | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    colleges are eager to meet. West Virginia's stimulus funding is expected to spur green jobs and build skills for the future in a state that relies on a nonrenewable energy...

  11. MAR flow mapping of Analytical Chemistry Operations (Preliminary Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-13

    The recently released Supplemental Directive, NA-1 SD 1027, updates the radionuclide threshold values in DOE-STD-1027-92 CN1 to reflect the use of modern parameters for dose conversion factors and breathing rates. The directive also corrects several arithmetic errors within the original standard. The result is a roughly four-fold increase in the amount of weapons-grade nuclear material allowed within a designated radiological facility. Radiological laboratory space within the recently constructed Radiological Laboratory Office and Utility Building (RLUOB) is slated to house selected analytical chemistry support activities in addition to small-scale actinide R&D activities. RLUOB is within the same facility operations envelope as TA-55. Consolidation of analytical chemistry activities to RLUOB and PF-4 offers operational efficiency improvements relative to the current pre-CMRR plans of dividing these activities between RLUOB, PF-4, and CMR. RLUOB is considered a Radiological Facility under STD-1027 - 'Facilities that do not meet or exceed Category 3 threshold criteria but still possess some amount of radioactive material may be considered Radiological Facilities.' The supplemental directive essentially increases the allowable material-at-risk (MAR) within radiological facilities from 8.4 g to 38.6 g for {sup 239}Pu. This increase in allowable MAR provides a unique opportunity to establish additional analytical chemistry support functions in RLUOB without negatively impacting either R&D activities or facility operations. Individual radiological facilities are tasked to determine MAR limits (up to the Category 3 thresholds) appropriate to their operational conditions. This study presents parameters that impact establishing MAR limits for RLUOB and an assessment of how various analytical chemistry support functions could operate within the established MAR limits.

  12. Economics of Cattle Feeding Systems for West Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, W. F.; Fisher, C. E.; Marion, P. T.; Magee, A. C.

    1957-01-01

    ~ '6 $9 "4; ,p*, d Economics of Cattle Feeding Systems for West Texas ,,5~'* ,LI~~ 3 TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS, DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS SUMMARY The purpose of the study reported here is to assist West Texas.... - Rations high in grain and low in roughage were the most profitable with cheap grain, but the comparative position of high-forage rations is enhanced when grain prices are high. Satisfactory results have been obtained with cottonseed hulls...

  13. Coatesville-West Chester folio, Pennsylvania-Delaware 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bascom, F. (Florence), 1862-1945.; Stose, George Willis, 1869-1960.

    1932-01-01

    AUTHIGENIC CLAY MINERALS IN SANDSTONES OF THE DELAWARE MOUNTAIN GROUP: BELL CANYON AND CHERRY CANYON FORMATIONS, WAHA FIELD, WEST TEXAS A Thesis by SUZETTE DENISE WALLING Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Geology AUTHIGENIC CLAY MINERALS IN SANDSTONES OF THE DELAWARE MOUNTAIN GROUP: BELL CANYON AND CHERRY CANYON FORMATIONS, WAHA FIELD, WEST TEXAS...

  14. Chitinozoans in the subsurface Lower Paleozoic of West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kauffman, A. E.

    1971-10-22

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS October 22, 1971 Paper 54 CHITINOZOANS IN THE SUBSURFACE LOWER PALEOZOIC OF WEST TEXAS A. E. KAUFFMAN Humble Oil & Refining Company, Midland, Texas ABSTRACT Studies based on both comprehensive... are found throughout the West Texas area. As generally accepted by operational petroleum geologists, the Simpson Group comprises the Joins Formation (limestone and dolomite); Oil Creek Formation (sandstone, shale, and limestone); McLish Formation (sand...

  15. Low-Temperature Biodiesel Research Reveals Potential Key to Successful Blend Performance (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01

    Relatively low-cost solutions could improve reliability while making biodiesel blends an affordable option. While biodiesel has very low production costs and the potential to displace up to 10% of petroleum diesel, until now, issues with cold weather performance have prevented biodiesel blends from being widely adopted. Some biodiesel blends have exhibited unexplained low-temperature performance problems even at blend levels as low as 2% by volume. The most common low-temperature performance issue is vehicle stalling caused by fuel filter clogging, which prevents fuel from reaching the engine. Research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) reveals the properties responsible for these problems, clearing a path for the development of solutions and expanded use of energy-conserving and low-emissions alternative fuel. NREL researchers set out to study the unpredictable nature of biodiesel crystallization, the condition that impedes the flow of fuel in cold weather. Their research revealed for the first time that saturated monoglyceride impurities common to the biodiesel manufacturing process create crystals that can cause fuel filter clogging and other problems when cooling at slow rates. Biodiesel low-temperature operational problems are commonly referred to as 'precipitates above the cloud point (CP).' NREL's Advanced Biofuels team spiked distilled soy and animal fat-derived B100, as well as B20, B10, and B5 biodiesel blends with three saturated monoglycerides (SMGs) at concentration levels comparable to those of real-world fuels. Above a threshold or eutectic concentration, the SMGs (monomyristin, monopalmitin, and monostearin) were shown to significantly raise the biodiesel CP, and had an even greater impact on the final melting temperature. Researchers discovered that upon cooling, monoglyceride initially precipitates as a metastable crystal, but it transforms over time or upon slight heating into a more stable crystal with a much lower solubility and higher melting temperature - and with increased potential to cause vehicle performance issues. This explains why fuel-filter clogging typically occurs over the course of long, repeated diurnal cooling cycles. The elevated final melting points mean that restarting vehicles with clogged filters can be difficult even after ambient temperatures have warmed to well above CP. By examining how biodiesel impurities affect filtration and crystallization during warming and cooling cycles, NREL researchers uncovered an explanation for poor biodiesel performance at low temperatures. The observation of a eutectic point, or a concentration below which SMGs have no effect, indicates that SMGs do not have to be completely removed from biodiesel to solve low-temperature performance problems.

  16. NMOG Emissions Characterizations and Estimation for Vehicles Using Ethanol-Blended Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sluder, Scott; West, Brian H

    2011-10-01

    Ethanol is a biofuel commonly used in gasoline blends to displace petroleum consumption; its utilization is on the rise in the United States, spurred by the biofuel utilization mandates put in place by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the statutory responsibility to implement the EISA mandates through the promulgation of the Renewable Fuel Standard. EPA has historically mandated an emissions certification fuel specification that calls for ethanol-free fuel, except for the certification of flex-fuel vehicles. However, since the U.S. gasoline marketplace is now virtually saturated with E10, some organizations have suggested that inclusion of ethanol in emissions certification fuels would be appropriate. The test methodologies and calculations contained in the Code of Federal Regulations for gasoline-fueled vehicles have been developed with the presumption that the certification fuel does not contain ethanol; thus, a number of technical issues would require resolution before such a change could be accomplished. This report makes use of the considerable data gathered during the mid-level blends testing program to investigate one such issue: estimation of non-methane organic gas (NMOG) emissions. The data reported in this paper were gathered from over 600 cold-start Federal Test Procedure (FTP) tests conducted on 68 vehicles representing 21 models from model year 2000 to 2009. Most of the vehicles were certified to the Tier-2 emissions standard, but several older Tier-1 and national low emissions vehicle program (NLEV) vehicles were also included in the study. Exhaust speciation shows that ethanol, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde dominate the oxygenated species emissions when ethanol is blended into the test fuel. A set of correlations were developed that are derived from the measured non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions and the ethanol blend level in the fuel. These correlations were applied to the measured NMHC emissions from the mid-level ethanol blends testing program and the results compared against the measured NMOG emissions. The results show that the composite FTP NMOG emissions estimate has an error of 0.0015 g/mile {+-}0.0074 for 95% of the test results. Estimates for the individual phases of the FTP are also presented with similar error levels. A limited number of tests conducted using the LA92, US06, and highway fuel economy test cycles show that the FTP correlation also holds reasonably well for these cycles, though the error level relative to the measured NMOG value increases for NMOG emissions less than 0.010 g/mile.

  17. A Regional Approach to Market Monitoring in the West

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barmack, Matthew; Kahn, Edward; Tierney, Susan; Goldman, Charles

    2006-10-01

    Market monitoring involves the systematic analysis of pricesand behavior in wholesale power markets to determine when and whetherpotentially anti-competitive behavior is occurring. Regional TransmissionOrganizations (RTOs) typically have a market monitoring function. Becausethe West does not have active RTOs outside of California, it does nothave the market monitoring that RTOs have. In addition, because the Westoutside of California does not have RTOs that perform centralized unitcommitment and dispatch, the rich data that are typically available tomarket monitors in RTO markets are not available in the West outside ofCalifornia. This paper examines the feasibility of market monitoring inthe West outside of California given readily available data. We developsimple econometric models of wholesale power prices in the West thatmight be used for market monitoring. In addition, we examine whetherproduction cost simulations that have been developed for long-runplanning might be useful for market monitoring. We find that simpleeconometric models go a long ways towards explaining wholesale powerprices in the West and might be used to identify potentially anomalousprices. In contrast, we find that the simulated prices from a specificset of production cost simulations exhibit characteristics that aresufficiently different from observed prices that we question theirusefulness for explaining price formation in the West and hence theirusefulness as a market monitoring tool.

  18. Quaternary depositional history of Providenciales and West Caicos, Turks and Caicos Islands, British West Indies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouke, B.W.; Glenister, B.F.; Ressmeyer, P.F.; Prezbindowski, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Turks and Caicos Islands represent the SE limit of emergent portions of the Bahamian Platform. Providenciales and West Caicos are low-lying islands, composed of Quaternary marine and eolian carbonates, that lie near the NW margin of the Caicos Bank. Highest elevations of marine skeletal-peletal grainstones on Providenciales are 6m above present s.l.; reefs associated with marine grainstones on West Caicos are 3-4m above s.l., and allowing for growth in several meters water depth support interpretation of maximum s.l. as +6m. Marine sediments are dated as approximately 50,000 C14 Years B.P. This suggests correlation with the mid-Wisconsin s.l. maximum and implies tectonic instability. Eolian dunes achieve an elevation of 48 m on Providenciales, where they are differentiated into five systems based on geomorphology and grain composition. Oolites, now generated exclusively in the narrow swash-zone, predominate on the Bank side whereas coated pellets and skeletal grains characterize calcarenites formed in the seaward reef tract. Fall in s.l. to the late Wisconsin minimum (17,000 years, perhaps -120m) generated successively lower arcs of dunes as carbonate productivity decreased, and resulted in subaerial diagenesis as the entire Bank emerged. Spectacular karst formation during the late Wisconsin as well as earlier s.l. lows provided conduits that allow restricted marine faunas to flourish in inland lakes and sink holes.

  19. Sequestration Options for the West Coast States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Larry

    2006-04-30

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) is one of seven partnerships that have been established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and British Columbia. Led by the California Energy Commission, WESTCARB is a consortium of about 70 organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national laboratories and universities; private companies working on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. Both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options were evaluated in the Region during the 18-month Phase I project. A centralized Geographic Information System (GIS) database of stationary source, geologic and terrestrial sink data was developed. The GIS layer of source locations was attributed with CO{sub 2} emissions and other data and a spreadsheet was developed to estimate capture costs for the sources in the region. Phase I characterization of regional geological sinks shows that geologic storage opportunities exist in the WESTCARB region in each of the major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery. The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, the potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, and the cumulative production from gas reservoirs suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. A GIS-based method for source-sink matching was implemented and preliminary marginal cost curves developed, which showed that 20, 40, or 80 Mega tonnes (Mt) of CO{sub 2} per year could be sequestered in California at a cost of $31/tonne (t), $35/t, or $50/t, respectively. Phase I also addressed key issues affecting deployment of CCS technologies, including storage-site monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks. A framework for screening and ranking candidate sites for geologic CO{sub 2} storage on the basis of HSE risk was developed. A webbased, state-by-state compilation of current regulations for injection wells, and permits/contracts for land use changes, was developed, and modeling studies were carried out to assess the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration. Public outreach activities resulted in heightened awareness of sequestration among state, community and industry leaders in the Region. Assessment of the changes in carbon stocks in agricultural lands showed that Washington, Oregon and Arizona were CO{sub 2} sources for the period from 1987 to 1997. Over the same period, forest carbon stocks decreased in Washington, but increased in Oregon and Arizona. Results of the terrestrial supply curve analyses showed that afforestation of rangelands and crop lands offer major sequestration opportunities; at a price of $20 per t CO{sub 2}, more than 1,233 MMT could be sequestered over 40-years in Washington and more than 1,813 MMT could be sequestered in Oregon.

  20. Combining quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics with QM/MM and QM/QM techniques: Implementation blending ONIOM and empirical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    : Implementation blending ONIOM and empirical valence bond theory Isaiah Sumner and Srinivasan S. Iyengara. All components of the methodology, namely, quantum dynamics and ONIOM molecular dynamics

  1. www.westlothianonline.infoWEST LOTHIAN COUNCIL DELIVERS www.westlothian.gov.ukWEST LOTHIAN COUNCIL DELIVERS EXCELLENCE IN PUBLIC SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Industry Park, Bellsquarry, Livingston www.westlothianonline.infoWEST LOTHIAN COUNCIL DELIVERS Brucefield Industry Park #12;www.westlothianonline.infoWEST LOTHIAN COUNCIL DELIVERS The problem Polluted discharge & flash flooding from Brucefield Industry Park www.westlothianonline.infoWEST LOTHIAN COUNCIL DELIVERS

  2. Piloted Mars mission planning: NEP technology and power levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, J.A.; Hack, K.J.; Dudzinski, L.A.; Gefert, L.P. (NASA Lewis Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Rd., M.S. AAC-2, Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States)); Gilland, J.H. (Sverdrup Technology, Inc., NASA Lewis Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Rd., M.S. AAC-2, Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States))

    1993-01-10

    This paper examines the strong interrelationship between assumed technology and mission performance requirements for NEP. Recent systems analysis efforts by NASA, DOE, and various contractors are used to project achievable system performance as a function of technological sophistication for two piloted Mars mission applications. Specific mass regimes for each collection of technologies are presented as a function of power level for piloted applications. Low thrust mission analyses are presented which relate these system performance projections to achievable mission performance. Mission performance maps'' are constructed which link prime mission figures-of-merit of time and initial mass with system requirements on power level and specific mass, and hence technology. Both opposition and conjunction class piloted Mars missions are presented for the 2016 opportunity, analogous to those proposed in the 90-Day Study'' and Synthesis'' architecture studies. Mass and time breakdowns are presented for 10 MWe piloted and 5 MWe cargo point designs.

  3. Reducing the risk to Mars: The gas core nuclear rocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, S.D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1998-12-31

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas-core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. The authors have completed a comparative study of the potential impact that a GCNR could have on a manned Mars mission. The total IMLEO, transit times, and accumulated radiation dose to the crew will be compared with the NASA Design Reference Missions.

  4. Technical Issues Associated With the Use of Intermediate Ethanol Blends (>E10) in the U.S. Legacy Fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich, Bechtold; Thomas, John F; Huff, Shean P; Szybist, James P; West, Brian H; Theiss, Timothy J; Timbario, Tom; Goodman, Marc

    2007-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in assessing the impact of using intermediate ethanol blends (E10 to E30) in the legacy fleet of vehicles in the U.S. fleet. The purpose of this report is to: (1) identify the issues associated with intermediate ethanol blends with an emphasis on the end-use or vehicle impacts of increased ethanol levels; (2) assess the likely severity of the issues and whether they will become more severe with higher ethanol blend levels, or identify where the issue is most severe; (3) identify where gaps in knowledge exist and what might be required to fill those knowledge gaps; and (4) compile a current and complete bibliography of key references on intermediate ethanol blends. This effort is chiefly a critical review and assessment of available studies. Subject matter experts (authors and selected expert contacts) were consulted to help with interpretation and assessment. The scope of this report is limited to technical issues. Additional issues associated with consumer, vehicle manufacturer, and regulatory acceptance of ethanol blends greater than E10 are not considered. The key findings from this study are given.

  5. Nuclear Design of the HOMER-15 Mars Surface Fission Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poston, David I.

    2002-07-01

    The next generation of robotic missions to Mars will most likely require robust power sources in the range of 3 to 20 kWe. Fission systems are well suited to provide safe, reliable, and economic power within this range. The goal of this study is to design a compact, low-mass fission system that meets Mars surface power requirements, while maintaining a high level of safety and reliability at a relatively low cost. The Heat pipe Power System (HPS) is one possible approach for producing near-term, low-cost, space fission power. The goal of the HPS project is to devise an attractive space fission system that can be developed quickly and affordably. The primary ways of doing this are by using existing technology and by designing the system for inexpensive testing. If the system can be designed to allow highly prototypic testing with electrical heating, then an exhaustive test program can be carried out quickly and inexpensively, and thorough testing of the actual flight unit can be performed - which is a major benefit to reliability. Over the past 4 years, three small HPS proof-of-concept technology demonstrations have been conducted, and each has been highly successful. The Heat pipe-Operated Mars Exploration Reactor (HOMER) is a derivative of the HPS designed especially for producing power on the surface of Mars. The HOMER-15 is a 15-kWt reactor that couples with a 3-kWe Stirling engine power system. The reactor contains stainless-steel (SS)-clad uranium nitride (UN) fuel pins that are structurally and thermally bonded to SS/sodium heat pipes. Fission energy is conducted from the fuel pins to the heat pipes, which then carry the heat to the Stirling engine. This paper describes conceptual design and nuclear performance the HOMER-15 reactor. (author)

  6. Numerical study of the effect of oxygenated blending compounds on soot formation in shock tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehm, H.; Braun-Unkhoff, M.

    2008-04-15

    This numerical study deals with the influence of blends on the amount of soot formed in shock tubes, which were simulated by assuming a homogeneous plug flow reactor model. For this purpose, first, the reaction model used here was validated against experimental results previously obtained in the literature. Then, the soot volume fractions of various mixtures of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-benzene, isobutene-benzene, methanol-benzene, and ethanol-benzene diluted in argon were simulated and compared to the results of benzene-argon pyrolysis at 1721 K and 5.4 MPa. For MTBE, isobutene, methanol, and ethanol, small amounts of additives to benzene-argon mixtures promoted soot formation, for the shock tube model assumed, while higher concentrations of these additives led to smaller soot volume fractions in comparison to pure benzene-argon pyrolysis. The most significant soot promotion effect was found for the additives MTBE and isobutene. The channel for MTBE decomposition producing isobutene and methanol is very effective at temperatures beyond 1200 K. Thus, both MTBE-benzene and isobutene-benzene mixtures diluted in argon showed rather similar behavior in regard to soot formation. Special emphasis was directed toward the causes for the concentration-dependent influence of the blends on the amount of soot formed. Aromatic hydrocarbons and acetylene were identified as key gas-phase species that determine the trends in the formation of soot of various mixtures. From reaction flux analysis for phenanthrene, it was deduced that the combinative routes including phenyl species play a major role in forming PAHs, especially at early reaction times. It is found that the additives play an important role in providing material to grow side chains, such as by reaction channels including phenylacetylene or benzyl, which are confirmed to form aromatic hydrocarbons and thus to influence the amount of soot formed, particularly when the concentrations of the blends are increased. (author)

  7. IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elana M. Chapman; Andre L. Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

    2002-07-01

    The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. This project complements another ongoing project titled ''Development of a Dimethyl Ether (DME)-Fueled Shuttle Bus Demonstration Project''. The objectives of that research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, they have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. To date, the activities have covered two areas: development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. This report provides summaries of the progress toward completion of both experimental systems and a summary of the plan for completion of the project objectives.

  8. IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elana M. Chapman; Andre Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

    2003-06-01

    The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, we have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Our strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, we have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. To date, our activities have covered three areas: examination of the impact of lubricity additives on the viscosity of DME, development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. This report provides summaries of the progress toward evaluation of the viscosity impacts of lubricity additives, completion of both experimental systems and a summary of the plan for completion of the project objectives.

  9. ChemCam Rock Laser for the Mars Science Laboratory

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LANL

    2009-09-01

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instr... Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components are concurrently being assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France, and will be delivered to JPL in July. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2009. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  10. ChemCam rock laser for Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity"

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wiens, Roger

    2014-08-12

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. The Flight Model was shipped in August, 2010 for installation on the rover at JPL. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components were concurrently assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2011. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  11. The Use of Triangular-Shaped PV Arrays to Better Blend into Historical Structures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When considering the installation of a solar PV array on a designated historical structure, placement of each solar panel requires extra attention to aesthetic considerations. If the solar array cannot be installed behind the structure or “hidden” on a roof plane that is not visible from the public street or sidewalk, it can sometimes be installed as an architectural feature that blends into the historical structure. One way to do this is to utilize triangular-shaped PV panels that conform with the building’s roof lines.

  12. Preliminary report on blending strategies for inert-matrix fuel recycling in LWRs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2005-04-29

    Various recycle strategies have been proposed to manage the inventory of transuranics in commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), with a particular goal of increasing the loading capacity of spent fuel and reprocessing wastes in the Yucca Mountain repository. Transuranic recycling in commercial LWRs can be seen as a viable means of slowing the accumulation of transuranics in the nationwide CSNF stockpile. Furthermore, this type of approach is an important first step in demonstrating the benefits of a nuclear fuel cycle which incorporates recycling, such as envisioned for Generation-IV reactor systems under development. Recycling strategies of this sort are not proposed as an attempt to eliminate the need of a geologic nuclear waste repository, but as a means to enhance the usefulness of the repository currently under construction in the U.S., perhaps circumventing the need for a second facility. A US-DOE Secretarial recommendation on the need for the construction of a second geologic repository is required by 2010. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) has supported a breadth of work to evaluate the ideal transuranic separation and recycle strategy. Previous AFCI studies of LWR-based transmutation have considered the benefits of homogeneously recycling plutonium, plutonium and neptunium, and all transuranic (TRU) species. A study of a wide range of hypothetical separation schemes (Pu, Pu+Np, Pu+Np+Am, etc.) with multi-recycling has also been performed, focusing on the proliferation resistance of the various fuel cycles and fuel handling issues. The direct recycle of the recovered TRU from spent inert-matrix fuel (IMF) into new IMF was found to be quite limited due to the rapid burndown of the fissile plutonium. The IMF is very effective at destroying the fissile fraction of the TRU with destruction rates in excess of 80% of the fissile material without recycling the IMF. Blending strategies have been proposed to mitigate the rapid burndown of the fissile plutonium by mixing high fissile feed from new sources (e.g., spent UO{sub 2} pins) with the low fissile material recovered from the recycled transmutation fuel. The blending of the fuels is anticipated to aid the multi-recycle of the transuranics. A systematic study of blending strategies (for both IMF and MOX) has been initiated and is currently ongoing. This work extends the previous study that considered separation strategies for plutonium, neptunium, and americium recycling in MOX, CORAIL, and IMF{sub 6} by considering blending schemes and approach to continuous recycle. Plutonium and americium are recycled in order to reduce the intermediate term (100 to 1500 years after spent fuel irradiation) decay heat of the disposed waste which accounts for the bulk of the repository heating. Since the long-term released dose from the repository is dominated by neptunium, it is sensible to consume it by transmutation in a reactor, as well. Curium accounts for {approx}0.6% of the TRU mass in spent UO{sub 2} fuel ({approx}0.008% of the heavy metal), but does constitute significantly higher fractions in spent transmutation fuels. This initial evaluation will focus on blending strategies for the multirecycling of Pu+Np+Am. The impact of curium recycle will be investigated as part of the systematic study of blending strategies. The initial study focuses on understanding a simple strategy for IMF recycle and blending. More complex strategies (i.e., heterogeneous assemblies) will be evaluated later in the year, including enriched uranium support options. Currently, a preliminary study of a serial blending strategy has been performed in order to evaluate the impact of blending on the performance of the IMF recycle and to evaluate the potential for continuous or infinite recycle. The continuous recycle of Pu+Np+Am in IMF would allow for complete destruction of all heat contributing actinides in the same LWRs that originally produced them. The only transuranics sent to the repository would be those lost in reprocessing and curium if it is not eventually recycled.

  13. Powertrain Component Inspection from Mid-Level Blends Vehicle Aging Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoffner, Brent; Johnson, Ryan; Heimrich, Martin J.; Lochte, Michael

    2010-11-01

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 calls on the nation to significantly increase its use of renewable fuels to meet its transportation energy needs. The law expands the renewable fuel standard to require use of 36 billion gallons of renewable fuel by 2022. Given that ethanol is the most widely used renewable fuel in the U.S. market, ethanol will likely make up a significant portion of the 36-billion-gallon requirement. The vast majority of ethanol used in the United States is blended with gasoline to create E10-gasoline with up to 10% ethanol. The remaining ethanol is sold in the form of E85 - a gasoline blend with as much as 85% ethanol that can only be used in flexible-fuel vehicles (FFVs). Consumption of E85 is at present limited by both the size of the FFV fleet and the number of E85 fueling stations. Gasoline consumption in the United States is currently about 140 billion gallons per year; thus the maximum use of ethanol as E10 is only about 14 billion gallons. While the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) remains committed to expanding the E85 infrastructure, that market represented less than 1% of the ethanol consumed in 2010 and will not be able to absorb projected volumes of ethanol in the near term. Because of these factors, DOE and others have been assessing the viability of using mid-level ethanol blends (E15 or E20) as a way to accommodate growing volumes of ethanol. The DOE Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Test Program has been under way since 2007, supported jointly by the Office of the Biomass Program and the Vehicle Technologies Program. One of the larger projects, the Catalyst Durability Study, or Vehicle Aging Study, will be completed early in calendar year 2011. The following report describes a subproject of the Vehicle Aging Study in which powertrain components from 18 of the vehicles were examined at Southwest Research Institute under contract to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  14. Tests of mode coupling theory in a simple model for two-component miscible polymer blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Moreno; J. Colmenero

    2007-09-26

    We present molecular dynamics simulations on the structural relaxation of a simple bead-spring model for polymer blends. The introduction of a different monomer size induces a large time scale separation for the dynamics of the two components. Simulation results for a large set of observables probing density correlations, Rouse modes, and orientations of bond and chain end-to-end vectors, are analyzed within the framework of the Mode Coupling Theory (MCT). An unusually large value of the exponent parameter is obtained. This feature suggests the possibility of an underlying higher-order MCT scenario for dynamic arrest.

  15. Exhaust particle characterization for lean and stoichiometric DI vehicles operating on ethanol-gasoline blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storey, John Morse; Barone, Teresa L; Thomas, John F; Huff, Shean P

    2012-01-01

    Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines can offer better fuel economy and higher performance over their port fuel-injected (PFI) counterparts, and are now appearing in increasingly more U.S. and European vehicles. Small displacement, turbocharged GDI engines are replacing large displacement engines, particularly in light-duty trucks and sport utility vehicles, in order for manufacturers to meet the U.S. fuel economy standards for 2016. Furthermore, lean-burn GDI engines can offer even higher fuel economy than stoichiometric GDI engines and have overcome challenges associated with cost-effective aftertreatment for NOx control. Along with changes in gasoline engine technology, fuel composition may increase in ethanol content beyond the current 10% due to the recent EPA waiver allowing 15% ethanol. In addition, the Renewable Fuels Standard passed as part of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) mandates the use of biofuels in upcoming years. GDI engines are of environmental concern due to their high particulate matter (PM) emissions relative to port-fuel injected (PFI) gasoline vehicles; widespread market penetration of GDI vehicles may result in additional PM from mobile sources at a time when the diesel contribution is declining. In this study, we characterized particulate emissions from a European certified lean-burn GDI vehicle operating on ethanol-gasoline blends. Particle mass and particle number concentration emissions were measured for the Federal Test Procedure urban driving cycle (FTP 75) and the more aggressive US06 driving cycle. Particle number-size distributions and organic to elemental carbon ratios (OC/EC) were measured for 30 MPH and 80 MPH steady-state operation. In addition, particle number concentration was measured during wide open throttle accelerations (WOTs) and gradual accelerations representative of the FTP 75. Fuels included certification gasoline and 10% (E10) and 20% (E20) ethanol blends from the same supplier. The particle mass emissions were approximately 3 and 7 mg/mile for the FTP75 and US06, respectively, with lower emissions for the ethanol blends. The data are compared to a previous study on a U.S.-legal stoichiometric GDI vehicle operating on the same ethanol blends. The lean-burn GDI vehicle emitted a higher number of particles, but had an overall smaller average size. Particle number per mile decreased with increasing ethanol content for the transient tests. For the 30 and 80 mph tests, particle number concentration decreased with increasing ethanol content, although the shape of the particle size distribution remained the same. Engine-out OC/EC ratios were highest for the stoichiometric GDI vehicle with E20, but tailpipe OC/EC ratios were similar for all vehicles.

  16. IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elana M. Chapman; Andre Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

    2004-04-01

    The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, we have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Our strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, we have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. Our activities have covered three areas: examination of the impact of lubricity additives on the viscosity of DME, development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. The first two of these areas have resulted in valuable information about the limitations of lubricity and viscosity additives that are presently available in terms of their impact on the viscosity of DME and on wear rates on injector hardware. The third area, that of development of an injector durability test stand, has not resulted in a functioning experiment. Some information is provided in this report to identify the remaining tasks that need to be performed to make the injector stand operational. The key observations from the work are that when blended at 25 wt.% in either diesel fuel or Biodiesel fuel, DME requires more than 5 wt.% additive of all viscosity and lubricity additives tested here to even approach the lower limit of the ASTM diesel fuel viscosity requirement. To treat neat DME sufficiently to make DME comply with the ASTM diesel fuel viscosity requirement would require a viscosity additive with 10{sup 45} cSt viscosity, which is not possible with current additive technologies.

  17. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE MOBILE ARM RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (MARS) - 12187

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BURKE CA; LANDON MR; HANSON CE

    2011-11-08

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are beinglhave been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan [1]. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012.

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE MOBILE ARM RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (MARS) - 12187

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BURKE CA; LANDON MR; HANSON CE

    2012-01-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are being/have been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012.

  19. Development and Deployment of the Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) - 12187

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, Christopher A.; Landon, Matthew R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Hanson, Carl E. [AREVA Federal Services, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are being/have been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan [1]. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012. (authors)

  20. Fluid Core Size of Mars from Detection of the Solar Tide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Lovenumber,hasbeen obtained from an analysis of Mars Global Surveyor radio tracking. The observed k2 of 0.153 0.017 is large) tracking data, Smith et al. (5, 6) reported a solution for the tidal Love number k2 of 0.055 0.008, which deformation of the figure of Mars by the gravitational pull of the Sun and hence a less rigid Mars (7). We