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1

DEPENDENT CHILD NAME (LAST) (FIRST) (M.I.) SUFFIX SEX MALE FEMALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or their account to any unaffiliated company, group, or individual without our Customer's permission. Our SecurityDEPENDENT CHILD NAME (LAST) (FIRST) (M.I.) SUFFIX SEX MALE FEMALE SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER BIRTH DATE SECURITY NUMBER BIRTH DATE FULL-TIME HIRE DATE COVERAGE EFFECTIVE DATE STATUS Active COBRA Retiree

Reynolds, Albert C.

2

Married with Tcl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Writing and maintaining a Tcl C extension for several years is an experience which can be compared to a long lasting relationship between a man and a woman. At the beginning, there is great excitement and you enjoy a real good time. However, once the relationship settles, you will find out that being married is sometimes straining and you start to look at things from a slightly different perspective. This paper documents some of the experiences and lessons learned during seven years of writing and maintaining the scotty package. The scotty package contains the Tnm network management extension for Tcl, which is used at many sites world-wide to automate network management tasks or to drive test-suites for network devices. This paper is an experience report and does not introduce new concepts to enhance Tcl or Tnm. However, some of the issues raised in this paper may prevent others from repeating some of the mistakes made by the author. Experience reports like this one may also help others to make realistic estimations about the amount of effort needed to keep an extension alive.

J. Schönwälder

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Medical Waiver Male participants over 45 years of age and female participants over 55 years of age are required  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Waiver Male participants over 45 years of age and female participants over 55 years of age are required to submit a Medical Waiver signed by their physician before participation in the Recreation of heart disease) are required to submit the Medical Waiver signed by their physician regardless

Spence, Harlan Ernest

4

Male 6Female Interaction for a Pre-Copulatory Trait, but Not a Post-Copulatory Trait, among Cosmopolitan Populations of Drosophila melanogaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sexual coevolution occurs when changes in the phenotype of one sex select for changes in the other sex. We can identify the ‘‘footprint’ ’ of this coevolution by mating males and females from different populations and testing for a male-female genotype interaction for a trait associated with male (or female) performance. Here we mated male Drosophila melanogaster from five different continents with females from their own and different continents to test for a male-female interaction for mating speed, a pre-copulatory trait, and female reproductive investment, a post-copulatory trait. We found a strong malefemale interaction for mating speed, consistent with previous studies using different populations, suggesting that the potential for sexual coevolution for this trait is present in this species. In contrast, we did not detect a male-female interaction for female reproductive investment. Although a male-female interaction for mating speed is compatible with the hypothesis of ongoing sexual coevolution, the nature of our experimental design is unable to exclude alternate explanations. Thus, the evolutionary mechanisms promoting male-female genotype interactions for pre-copulatory mating

Alison Pischedda; Andrew D. Stewart; Monica K. Little

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 19 Effect of Flaxseed Consumption on Male and Female Reproductive Function and Fetal Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 19 Effect of Flaxseed Consumption on Male and Female Reproductive Function and Fetal Development Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - N

6

Elizondo 'marries' Laboratory technologies to U.S. industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Elizondo 'marries' Laboratory technologies to U.S. industry Stephen P Wampler, LLNL, (925) 423-3107, wampler1@llnl.gov High Resolution Image Catherine Elizondo is a...

7

Are Virtual Teams More Just? An Investigation of How Reducing Social Categorization Can Increase Female Participation in Male-Dominated Teams.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizations use work teams to solve complex problems in innovative ways. As such, an abundance of diverse ideas, suggestions, and information should help organizations generate quality products and remain competitive. Yet, there is research which shows that women do not participate as much as men in face-to-face team interactions. Women often get fewer speaking turns than men, they speak for shorter lengths of time, and they are interrupted more often than men. As a result, women?s ideas may often be overlooked in work settings. This is problematic, because women make up 46 percent of the United States workforce, and not being active participants in meetings could results in underutilization of roughly half of the firm?s human capital. This study investigated whether the order of face-to-face and virtual communication used by virtual teams could be used as one means of increasing inclusion and participation of women in male-dominated teams. Results from 82 teams confirmed that women felt more included in the team when they communicated virtually first and then face-to-face as opposed to face-to-face first and then virtually. Findings supported a four-stage model where the medium of communication influences feelings of inclusion which influences participation (both self-reported and objective). Participation, in turn, influences perceptions of interpersonal justice, satisfaction with the team, and ratings received from team members. An objective measure of participation and team performance ratings from five independent raters also show that the more equally team members participate and the higher the team?s total communication volume, in both total speaking turns and words spoken, the higher the team?s ratings and the more creative the team?s output was judged to be.

Triana, Mary C.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Family Structure, Marital Fertility and Premarital Sex among Married and Never-Married Women in Contemporary China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to Chinese traditions, patrilocal residence is believed to be linked with early and high marital fertility. However, despite the rapid fertility decline and the enormous social and economic changes that have occurred in recent years in China, research still shows that family structure in China is relatively stable compared to western countries. This dissertation investigates the effects of family structure on fertility in contemporary China. This dissertation had two main objectives: first, to examine the effects of family structure on the marital fertility of married women; and second, to better understand the effects of family structure on the premarital fertility by examining the effects of family structure on premarital sex of never-married women. This dissertation utilizes data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey and the Chinese Health and Family Life Survey. Logistic regression model and Cox proportional hazards model are used to to estimate the the effects of family structure on marital fertility and premarital sex. The major finding in this dissertation shows that patrilocal residence has been well preserved in contemporary china. After controlling for relevant factors, co-residence or quasi-coresidence with parents-in-law significantly accelerates the transition from marriage to first birth, and promotes a desire for more children. However, second births are significantly impacted by factors associated with socioeconomic status and family planning policy other than family structure. This dissertation also confirmed the effects of family structure on premarital sex in terms of behavior, but not in terms of attitudes. After controlling for relevant factors, co-residence with parents significantly decreased the odds of engaging in premarital sex.

He, Lei 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Laying Eggs without Males  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laying Eggs without Males Laying Eggs without Males Name: brian Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I have two fenches one is a spice the other is a social. I have them in a pretty big cage were they can fly around. I thought the pet store gave me two girls. But in thier nest is two eggs. Can a girl lay eggs without a male? And if there is a chance one is a male how long should I wait for the babies? If there is no babies how long should I wait to threw out the egg so they don't smell. And if i move them to diiiferent cages will they die because they are alone? Replies: Females of many species are known to lay eggs without copulation. However, you may have a pair [I'm not familiar with this species]. See if the female is sitting on the eggs. If so, it probably means that the eggs are fertile or at least could be. When the nesting behavior stops, that is a good indication that the eggs are not viable. Remove them at that time.

10

Mothers' perceptions of housing space : an analysis of 3 married student housing sites: Eastgate, Westgate and Peabody Terrace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is a good housing environment for nurturing, a place where the physical environment reinforces the lives of both parents and child? This thesis looks at three married student housing sites in Cambridge, Massachusetts, ...

Racki, Reena

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

A novel mutation in the putative DNA helicase XH2 is responsible for male-to-female sex reversal associated with an atypical form of the ATR-X syndrome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a pedigree presenting X-linked severe mental retardation associated with multiple congenital abnormalities and 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis, leading in one family member to female gender assignment. Female carriers are unaffected. The dysmorphic features are similar to those described in the {alpha}-thalassemia and mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome, although there is no clinical evidence of {alpha}-thalassemia in this family. In addition, the family had other clinical features not previously observed in the ATR-X syndrome, including partial optic-nerve atrophy and partial ocular albinism. Mutations in a putative DNA helicase, termed XH2, have been reported to give rise to the ATR-X syndrome. We screened the YCH2 gene for mutations in affected members of the family and identified a 4-bp deletion at an intron/exon boundary that removes an invariant 3{prime} splice-acceptor site. The mutation cosegregates with the syndrome. The genomic deletion causes missplicing of the pre-mRNA, which results in the loss of 8 bp of coding sequence, thereby generating a frameshift and a downstream premature stop codon. Our finding increases the range of clinical features associated with mutations in the XH2 gene. 17 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Ion, A.; Telvi, L.; Galacteros, F.; McElreavey, K. [Institut Pasteur, Paris (France)] [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Are Female Workers Less Productive Than Male Workers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Only a within-job analysis can establish whether women andestablishment or job level at which our analysis isjobs, which is what we have provided, in contrast to the between- establishment analyses

Petersen, Trond; Snartland, Vermund; Meyersson Milgrom, Eva M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

ORIGINAL PAPER Males, but not females, contribute to sexual isolation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a combination of brine shrimp Artemia spp., daphnia Daphnia spp., bloodworms Chironomus spp., spirulina Natural- ist 15:459­464. Morgan, I. J., D. G. McDonald, and C. M. Wood. 2001. The cost of living

Gabor, Caitlin - Department of Biology, Texas State University

14

Male Weaponry in a Fighting Cricket  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sexually selected male weaponry is widespread in nature. Despite being model systems for the study of male aggression in Western science and for cricket fights in Chinese culture, field crickets (Orthoptera, Gryllidae, Gryllinae) are not known to possess sexually dimorphic weaponry. In a wild population of the fall field cricket, Gryllus pennsylvanicus, we report sexual dimorphism in head size as well as the size of mouthparts, both of which are used when aggressive contests between males escalate to physical combat. Male G. pennsylvanicus have larger heads, maxillae and mandibles than females when controlling for pronotum length. We conducted two experiments to test the hypothesis that relatively larger weaponry conveys an advantage to males in aggressive contests. Pairs of males were selected for differences in head size and consequently were different in the size of maxillae and mandibles. In the first experiment, males were closely matched for body size (pronotum length), and in the second, they were matched for body mass. Males with proportionately larger weaponry won more fights and increasing differences in weaponry size between males increased the fighting success of the male with the larger weaponry. This was particularly true when contests escalated to grappling, the most intense level of aggression. However, neither contest duration nor intensity was related to weaponry size as predicted by models of contest settlement. These results are the first evidence that the size of the head capsule and mouthparts are under positive

Kevin A. Judge; Vanessa L. Bonanno

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Differential Sperm Priming by Male Sailfin Mollies (Poecilia latipinna): Effects of Female and Male Size  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ing 0�30 g of powdered Spirulina (a blue-green alga, 10�16% N and 44�96% C, JEHM Co., Inc, 87, 185­190. Walls, M., Caswell, H. & Ketola, M. (1991) Demographic costs of Chaoborus- induced

Gabor, Caitlin - Department of Biology, Texas State University

16

Impaired fertility in T-stock female mice after superovulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superovulation of female mice with exogenous gonadotrophins is routinely used for increasing the number of eggs ovulated by each female in reproductive and developmental studies. We report an unusual effect of superovulation on fertilization in mice. In vivo matings of superovulated T-stock females with B6C3F1 males resulted in a 2-fold reduction (Pstock females had reached the metaphase stage of the first cleavage division versus 87% in B6C3F1 females (P stock males did not improve the reproductive performance of T-stock females. To investigate the possible cause(s) for the impaired fertilization and zygotic development, the experiments were repeated using in vitro fertilization. Under these conditions, the frequencies of fertilized eggs were not different in superovulated T-stock and B6C3F1 females (51.7% {+-} 6.0 and 64.5% {+-}3.8, P=0.10). There was a 7-fold increase in the frequencies of fertilized T-stock eggs that completed the first cell cycle of development after in vitro versus in vivo fertilization. These results rule out an intrinsic deficiency of the T-stock oocyte as the main reason for the impaired fertility after in vivo matings and suggest that superovulation of T-stock females induces a hostile oviductal and uterine environment with dramatic effects on fertilization and zygotic development.

Wyrobek, A J; Bishop, J B; Marchetti, F; Zudova, D

2003-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

17

Individual Variation in Male Size and Behavioral Repertoire in the Sailfin Molly Poecilia latipinna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Freshwater Flake (60%) with Brine Shrimp Flake (38%) and Spirulina Flake (2%) mixture, Ocean Star harassment as a cost for molly females: bigger males cost less. Behaviour 138, 277--286. Shuster, S. M

Childress, Michael J.

18

Impaired fertility in T-stock female mice after superovulation  

SciTech Connect

Superovulation of female mice with exogenous gonadotrophins is routinely used for increasing the number of eggs ovulated by each female in reproductive and developmental studies. We report an unusual effect of superovulation on fertilization in mice. In vivo matings of superovulated T-stock females with B6C3F1 males resulted in a 2-fold reduction (P<0.001) in the frequencies of fertilized eggs compared to control B6C3F1 matings. In addition, {approx}22 hr after mating only 15% of fertilized eggs recovered in T-stock females had reached the metaphase stage of the first cleavage division versus 87% in B6C3F1 females (P < 0.0001). Matings with T-stock males did not improve the reproductive performance of T-stock females. To investigate the possible cause(s) for the impaired fertilization and zygotic development, the experiments were repeated using in vitro fertilization. Under these conditions, the frequencies of fertilized eggs were not different in superovulated T-stock and B6C3F1 females (51.7% {+-} 6.0 and 64.5% {+-}3.8, P=0.10). There was a 7-fold increase in the frequencies of fertilized T-stock eggs that completed the first cell cycle of development after in vitro versus in vivo fertilization. These results rule out an intrinsic deficiency of the T-stock oocyte as the main reason for the impaired fertility after in vivo matings and suggest that superovulation of T-stock females induces a hostile oviductal and uterine environment with dramatic effects on fertilization and zygotic development.

Wyrobek, A J; Bishop, J B; Marchetti, F; Zudova, D

2003-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

19

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book gives the reader an up-to-date view of several aspects of male fertility in relation to lipid and fatty acid metabolism. Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents diet

20

Perspective for Female Medical Physicists  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to cultural and religious reasons, Pakistani women can be reluctant to seek medical attention for disorders affecting their genitals or breasts. As a result, in the case of cervical and breast cancers, oncological treatment is often not received until the diseases are in the late stages. Once a cancer is classified and the tumor marked, the role of the medical physicist begins. Medical physicists' responsibilities include treatment planning, supervising treatment through radiation, dosimetry, contouring, training, equipment selection, education, research, and supervising radiotherapy facilities. In brachytherapy, isotopes are placed at the tumor site in the form of wires or seeds. There are very few female medical physicists in Pakistan. This leads to further hesitation on the part of many women to seek treatment. To help female patients obtain needed medical care, female physics students should be encouraged to pursue the emerging field of medical physics. This would provide a new professional opportunity for female physics students and give comfort to female patients.

Naqvi, Syed Mansoor [Department of Radiology, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi (Pakistan); Hasnain, Aziz Fatima [Center for Physics Education, Karachi (Pakistan)

2009-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Invited Article Aging male  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Now a day, tremendous development of medicine, change of living environment, housing accommodation computer have led to extension of human life expectancy. The population of 60 years old up will increase from 328 millions in years 1990 to 828 millions by years 2020 (united nation, 2001). In Thailand, the aged population will reach 7.6 millions by the year 2010 (11.4 % of total population). In aging male, the incidence of many non communicable diseases is increasing such as metabolic syndrome (DM, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity), coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease and disease of endothelial dysfunction. At the same time, the gradual decrease of several hormones, for instance, growth hormone, sex hormone, thyroid hormone; etc, also lead to hormonal imbalance which contributes to

Assoc Prof; Dr. Chanvit Kotheeranurak

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Reduced Metabolsim in Brain 'Control Networks' Following Cocaine-Cues Exposure in Female Cocaine Abusers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gender differences in vulnerability for cocaine addiction have been reported. Though the mechanisms are not understood, here we hypothesize that gender differences in reactivity to conditioned-cues, which contributes to relapse, are involved. To test this we compared brain metabolism (using PET and {sup 18}FDG) between female (n = 10) and male (n = 16) active cocaine abusers when they watched a neutral video (nature scenes) versus a cocaine-cues video. Self-reports of craving increased with the cocaine-cue video but responses did not differ between genders. In contrast, changes in whole brain metabolism with cocaine-cues differed by gender (p<0.05); females significantly decreased metabolism (-8.6% {+-} 10) whereas males tended to increase it (+5.5% {+-} 18). SPM analysis (Cocaine-cues vs Neutral) in females revealed decreases in frontal, cingulate and parietal cortices, thalamus and midbrain (p<0.001) whereas males showed increases in right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45) (only at p<0.005). The gender-cue interaction showed greater decrements with Cocaine-cues in females than males (p<0.001) in frontal (BA 8, 9, 10), anterior cingulate (BA 24, 32), posterior cingulate (BA 23, 31), inferior parietal (BA 40) and thalamus (dorsomedial nucleus). Females showed greater brain reactivity to cocaine-cues than males but no differences in craving, suggesting that there may be gender differences in response to cues that are not linked with craving but could affect subsequent drug use. Specifically deactivation of brain regions from 'control networks' (prefrontal, cingulate, inferior parietal, thalamus) in females could increase their vulnerability to relapse since it would interfere with executive function (cognitive inhibition). This highlights the importance of gender tailored interventions for cocaine addiction.

Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Telang, F.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Alia-Klein, N.; Wong, C.T.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

ORIGINAL PAPER Soft song in song sparrows: response of males and females  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), whereas in others, such as white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) and redwings (Turdus iliacus

Anderson, Rindy C.

24

ORIGINAL PAPER Variation in male sailfin molly, preference for female size  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost of assessing multiple cues (Pfennig 2000). Individuals may not only evaluate multiple traits- land, OH, USA)). Fishes were fed spirulina and fresh- water flake food (Ocean Star International Inc

Gabor, Caitlin - Department of Biology, Texas State University

25

No. of Markers, Genetic Lengths, and Female:Male Length Ratio, for Each Chromosome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) LDmap(LDU) ANT ASH AZO CAU CR ERF FIC FIK FIP NFL SAF SAR Geneticmap(cM) #12;Haploview ­ Ben Fry #12 269 331 209 1.6 3 529 228 270 190 1.4 4 457 212 264 160 1.6 5 480 198 245 151 1.6 6 465 193 254 131 1

Sabatti, Chiara

26

Discriminating males alter sperm production between species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, recent studies suggest that spermatogenesis can be energetically costly, and therefore limit male. Fish were fed O.S.I. Spirulina Flake mixed with O.S.I. Freshwater Flake food (Ocean Start International that sperm is costly and may be more costly for smaller males. Relative to larger males, smaller males have

Gabor, Caitlin - Department of Biology, Texas State University

27

Do Males Always Like War? A Critique on Francis Fukuyama and His Hyper Masculine Assertions on Feminization of World Politics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Ehrenreich, 1999). If male are really "hard-wired" it is not necessarily because of biology, but because of socialization. There are widespread taboos on female handling of weapons, but at the same time, male are encouraged to do so cross-culturally right... that male are really aggressive and violent, is there anything that their aggression and violence have contributed for human progress, other than wars, struggles, inter-tribal conflicts, and most importantly nuclear threats? May be, Y.R. LUINTEL: Do Males...

Luintel, Youba Raj

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Male-killing Wolbachia do not protect Drosophila bifasciata against viral infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. Since then (>140 generations) they have since been maintained by back- crossing infected females to males from an isofemale uninfected line present in the lab for 20 years. The two lines therefore have the same nuclear genetic back- ground. Because... , Bergen JE, Kozuch A, Kelly SE, Tabashnik BE, Chiel E, Duckworth VE, Dennehy TJ, Zchori-Fein E, Hunter MS: Rapid spread of a bacterial symbiont in an invasive whitefly is driven by fitness benefits and female bias. Science 2011, 332:254-256. 25. Caspari E...

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

29

Gender Equality and Female Empowerment Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GENDER EQUALITY GENDER EQUALITY AND FEMALE EMPOWERMENT POLICY USAID POLICY MARCH 2012 "Achieving our objectives for global development will demand accelerated efforts to achieve gender equality and women's empowerment. Otherwise, peace and prosperity will have their own glass ceiling." Hillary Clinton JANUARY 2012 USAID GENDER EQUALITY AND FEMALE EMPOWERMENT POLICY MARCH 2012 WASHINGTON, DC i Photo credits: Cover (clockwise from top left): Erwin Rose/USAID;The Hunger Project; Unilever Tea Tanzania, Limited (UTTL); page 5,The Hunger Project; page 18, Erwwin Rose/USAID; page 20, Karen Homer/AWARD. ii USAID Policy on Gender Equality and Female Empowerment Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS Message from the Administrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv

30

Deep Frames, White Men's Discourse, and Black Female Bodies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this qualitative study, I examine the persistent trend of black women as an excluded relationship partner for white men. Integral to understanding the exclusion of black women as relationship partners is the construction of black female bodies, by influential white men historically and contemporarily, as the abject opposite of hegemonic femininity, which holds "middle-class, heterosexual, [w]hite femininity" as the norm (Collins 2005:193). This construction essentially places black women outside the bounds of hegemonic femininity, beauty, sexuality, and womanhood. Using the theoretical concept deep frame, which is the "conceptual infrastructure of the mind" (Lakoff 2006a:12) and representative of one's commonsense world view, I argue that the ways in which influential white men have constructed black female bodies is a critical component of the raced, gendered, and classed deep frame of white men. This deep frame undergirds how many white men perceive, interpret, understand, emote, and engage in actions where black women are concerned. Hence in this study, I qualitatively examine, through analyzing and interpreting the in-depth online questionnaires of 134 white male respondents, how the deep frame of white men affects how they perceive black women and ultimately the relationships they seek with black women. The results of the study show that many white male respondents, despite most having very limited or no personal interactions with black women, viewed black women through the one-dimensional lens of the raced, gendered, and classed deep frame. Many respondents perceived black women as unattractive unless capable of a white normative standard, as possessing a negative "black" culture, and as possessing negative and "unfeminine" attributes that make them complicit in their own rejection. These findings show how the deep frame disciplines white men to view black women as "out of bounds" as legitimate relationship partners, and disciplines the types of relationships they seek with black women. The results of this study also reveal that the conceptual approach of deep frame rooted in an understanding of the power of influential white men to control and construct society provides a theoretical alternative to the outmoded interracial marriage theories of caste and exchange.

Slatton, Brittany C.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Refined understanding of sulfur amino acid nutrition in hybrid striped bass, Morone chrysops (male symbol) x M. saxatilis (female symbol)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous studies have indicated the level of total sulfur amino acids (TSAA) (methionine + cystine) is most limiting in practical diet formulations for hybrid striped bass (HSB), especially if animal feedstuffs are replaced with plant feedstuffs. Reduction of costly animal feedstuffs such as fish meal while maintaining adequate dietary levels of TSAA may enhance cost effectiveness of production. Therefore, this study, consisting of four separate feeding trials, investigated three different aspects of sulfur amino acid nutrition of HSB including: (1) the efficacy of crystalline methionine hydroxy analog (MHA) and liquid MHA (AlimetTM) relative to L-methionine in meeting the requirement for TSAA; (2) the cystine sparing value for methionine; and, (3) the influence of various sulfur amino acid supplements on ammonia excretion. During the feeding trials, juvenile HSB were fed various diets including a basal diet deficient in TSAA (0.33 or 0.51% of diet), and experimental diets supplemented on an equalsulfur basis with different levels of either L-methionine, AlimetTM or crystalline MHA. Diets containing TSAA at 1% of diet and different ratios of cystine to methionine (60:40, 55:45, 50:50, and 45:55) also were fed to re-evaluate sparing effects of cystine on methionine. During the ammonia excretion trial, HSB were fed diets containing either L-methionine,AlimetTM or crystalline MHA after which total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) excretion was determined 4 h postprandial. In trial 1, AlimetTM was 73% as effective in promoting growth as L-methionine at the same concentration while MHA was 83% as effective. In trial 3, fish fed AlimetTM at 1.25% of diet displayed similar growth performance as those fed TSAA at 1.0% of diet while weight gain of fish fed AlimetTM at 1% was only 58% of that displayed by fish fed TSAA at 1.0%. No significant differences in weight gain, feed utilization or survival were observed among fish fed diets containing various ratios of cystine to methionine although the diet with 60:40 cystine to methionine supported the lowest responses. Inclusion of MHA or AlimetTM did not affect TAN excretion of HSB. These findings will aid in refining diet formulations for HSB to ensure adequate sulfur amino acid nutrition.

Kelly, Mark Christopher

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

O Que Não Dá Chupa: The Male-to-Female ‘Homosexual’ As Star of Brazil’s Economic Boom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homosexual” As The Star of Brazil’s Economic Boom (earlyof Southern California Two of Brazil’s most re-occurringabout itself are that Brazil is the country of the future,

Costa, Diego

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Hormone-Behavior Correlates among Male and Female Psychopathic Participants: Relationship to Gray's Model of Behavioral Inhibition and Activation Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study aimed to identify the role of hormonal substrates in relation to Gray’s (1987) model of the behavioral inhibition (BIS) and activation (BAS) systems—constructs… (more)

Ghebrial, Marian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 11 Physiological and Biophysical Properties of Male Germ CellSulfogalactosylglycerolipid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 11 Physiological and Biophysical Properties of Male Germ CellSulfogalactosylglycerolipid Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloa

35

A Case Study of Gender Bias at the Postdoctoral Level in Physics, and its Resulting Impact on the Academic Career Advancement of Females  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This case study of a typical U.S. particle physics experiment explores the issues of gender bias and how it affects the academic career advancement prospects of women in the field of physics beyond the postdoctoral level; we use public databases to study the career paths of the full cohort of 57 former postdoctoral researchers on the Run II Dzero experiment to examine if males and females were treated in a gender-blind fashion on the experiment. The study finds that the female researchers were on average significantly more productive compared to their male peers, yet were allocated only 1/3 the amount of conference presentations based on their productivity. The study also finds that the dramatic gender bias in allocation of conference presentations appeared to have significant negative impact on the academic career advancement of the females.

Towers, S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Not a One-Way Street: Exploring the Role of Intersectional Representation on African American Male Students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Representation is an enduring area of research in Political Science. While there has been an extensive amount of research in the area of minority representation, there is substantially less work considering multiple identities. Using the concept of intersectionality, this dissertation explores the role of multiple identities in representation. I argue that intersectional representation, that is, representation based on multiple identities provides a thorough interpretation of real world phenomena. To test my arguments, I utilize quantitative methods to empirically assess the role of intersectional representation on public policy outcomes. The goal of this dissertation is three-fold. First, I incorporate the concept of intersectionality of race and gender into the public policy and public management literature. Second, I explore intersectionality and representation with gender from a perspective that has not been extensively addressed in the political science literature—namely, a concentration on males, instead of females. Third, I develop a theory of intersectional representation which links to public policy outcomes. In order to test my theory, I explore the role of Black male representation in the bureaucracy and in local political bodies on Black male student outcomes. I find that representation based on both race and gender is associated with both positive and negative public policy outcomes for Black male students. Specifically, in Chapter I, the results indicate that Black male teachers are associated with a decreased presence of Black male students in low tracked courses and upper level honors courses. The following chapter shows that intersectional political representation, that is, Black male school board representation, is also associated with positive outcomes for Black male students. The last empirical chapter indicates that intersectional stability is associated with an increase of Black male students in low track courses. In general, the findings indicate that intersectional representation is consequential for public policy outcomes, both in negative and positive ways. The dissertation challenges the way representation is conceptualized, as to capture the simultaneous effect of both race and gender on public policy outcomes of represented groups.

Walker, Meredith Brooke Loudd

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 13 Significance of Oxidative Stress and Sperm Chromatin Damagein Male Infertility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 13 Significance of Oxidative Stress and Sperm Chromatin Damagein Male Infertility Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable p

38

NATIONAL CIVILIAN DATA  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Civilian Labor Force (2000) Black Female Black Male Hispanic Female Hispanic Male Asian Female Asian Male American Indian Female American Indian Male White Female White Male...

39

Female Scientists, Engineers Open Students' Eyes to Career Options |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Female Scientists, Engineers Open Students' Eyes to Career Options Female Scientists, Engineers Open Students' Eyes to Career Options Female Scientists, Engineers Open Students' Eyes to Career Options June 12, 2012 - 3:43pm Addthis Students practice hooking out -- or removing -- DNA from a strawberry sample at Idaho National Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of INL. Students practice hooking out -- or removing -- DNA from a strawberry sample at Idaho National Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of INL. Kortny Rolston INL Communications & Governmental Affairs What are the key facts? 76 female students from Idaho Falls and Twin Falls attended the annual event. The event was organized by Idaho Women in Nuclear (IWIN). Portage, Inc., the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and several other groups support the event. Editor's note: This article was cross-posted from Idaho National

40

487 SEX CHROMATIN POSITIVE METASTATIC MELANOMA 1N A MALE WITH A FAVOURABLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY.-The presence of sex chromatin in a metastatic malignant melanoma from a male patient aged 26 who showed no evidence of any constitutional chromosome anomaly is described. A possible association between the apparently " female " origin of the tumour and the good response to therapy is considered. TU.'%1OTJRS of males, apart from teratomas, do not generally show sex chromatin (Tavares,.11.466; Atkin, 1967). We found only one chromatin-positive tumour among 311 non-teratomatous malignant tumours studied by a squash techiiique; this was an oesophageal carcinoma in a patient aged 71 who proved to be an unsuspected case of Klinefelter's syndrome with a 47,XXY karyotype (Atkin and Baker, 1965). The present tumour shows the appearances of sex chromatin in the tumour cells, but studies on the patient's normal cells have revealed no evidence of a constitutional chromosome anomaly. The case is also notable for the good outcome of treatment; the patient is well 41 years after removal of the primary tumour

N. B. Atkin

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ORIGINAL PAPER Differential sperm expenditure by male sailfin mollies,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction It is increasingly evident that sperm production is costly to males (Dewsbury 1982; Nakatsuru expected outcome of costly sperm production is differential control of sperm production and expenditure strategies that reduce costs associated with spermatogenesis. This is especially true when males

Gabor, Caitlin - Department of Biology, Texas State University

42

Influence of Bull Traits and Bull to Female Ratio on Reproductive Perfromance in Beef Females and of Nutrition During Gestation on Calving Difficulty in Primiparous Beef Females  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current study involved two experiments that were conducted at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Uvalde, TX (semi-arid environment) from 2006 to 2008. In experiment one, Bonsmara bulls ( n = 39; 20-24 mo of age) were joined with multiparous Bonsmara and Bonsmara-influenced females (n = 1013) during a 90-day breeding season in 2006, 2007, and 2008 to quantify the effects of a reduction in bull to female ratio on reproductive performance. Bulls were also placed with primiparous beef females ( n = 142). Bulls were allotted by selected physical traits, social rank, serving capacity, and seminal traits to one of two bull to female (BFR) treatments: Low (1:30-1:45; n = 10 pastures) or Conventional (1:16-1:26; n = 12 pastures) BFR. Pregnancy rate (P = 0.36), calving date (P = 0.24), and calving rate (P = 0.25) did not differ between Conventional and Low BFR treatments. The current experiment demonstrates that Low BFR can be utilized in breeding pastures of up to 2,090 ha without negatively affecting reproductive performance. In experiment two, Bonsmara heifers (3/4, 7/8, and full bloods) were exposed to Bonsmara bulls from April 15 to July 15 during each of the two years. Heifers were weighed, rectally palpated for pregnancy, and scored for BCS (1 thin - 9 fat) and frame score (1 short - 9 tall) in December (end of second trimester) during years 1 and 2. Heifers were stratified on expected calving date and randomly allotted to one of two levels of nutrition for the remainder of gestation. In year 1, heifers were allotted to range forage (n=31, low nutrition, LN) or to non-irrigated oat pasture (n=31, high nutrition, HN). In year 2, heifers were placed onto the same range environment as in year 1 (n=31, LN) or onto irrigated ryegrass pasture (n=31,HN). Heifers in the LN groups were supplemented with 20% CP cubes at the rate of 0.9 kg/heifer/day from January 2 until calving while HN heifers were not supplemented. Within 4 hr of birth, calves were weighed, and calf vigor and calving difficulty scores were recorded. Heifers were weighed within 72 hours of parturition. From treatment initiation through calving, HN heifers gained 48.6 kg whereas the LN females lost 15 kg. Twice as many HN heifers required major assistance at calving as compared to LN heifers. Calves born to the HN females weighed 3.7 kg more at birth than those born to LN females. These differences resulted in HN heifers having (P = 0.005) more calving difficulty than LN heifers (mean calving difficutly of 2.3 for HN and 1.6 for LN). The calves of the HN females were also less vigorous (P = 0.005) after birth than the calves from LN females (calf vigor score of 2.2 for HN and 3.3 for LN). Consequently, the level of nutrition during the third trimester of gestation can affect calving difficulty, calf vigor, and female weight.

Bloomberg, Blake David

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Hunter College Black Male Initiative-"Brothers for Excellence"-Summer Pipeline Programs Hunter College Black Male Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hunter College Black Male Initiative-"Brothers for Excellence"- Summer Pipeline Programs 1 Hunter College Black Male Initiative "Brothers for Excellence" Summer Pipeline Programs Table of Contents Page 11 Law Pipeline Programs 1 11 Graduate School, Earning a Ph.D., Conduct Research Pipeline Programs 24 16

Qiu, Weigang

44

Optimism, psychological well-being, and quality of life in females with Fibromyalgia Syndrome.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This study explored the relationship between optimism, psychological well-being and quality of life in a sample of females with Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS). Adult females… (more)

Belcher, Joseph T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Liberty Deprived: The Social and Political Determinants of Female Incarceration Rates, 1979-2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

female incarceration rate increase by 604 percent, while thethe female incarceration rate increase, on average, by 5 perof threat; incarceration rates increase in response to this

McAnnally, Linda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A Case Study of Gender Bias at the Postdoctoral Level in Physics, and its Resulting Impact on the Academic Career Advancement of Females  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This case study of a typical U.S. particle physics experiment explores the issues of gender bias and how it affects the academic career advancement prospects of women in the field of physics beyond the postdoctoral level; we use public databases to study the career paths of the full cohort of 57 former postdoctoral researchers on the Run II Dzero experiment to examine if males and females were treated in a gender-blind fashion on the experiment. The study finds that the female researchers were on average significantly more productive compared to their male peers, yet were allocated only 1/3 the amount of conference presentations based on their productivity. The study also finds that the dramatic gender bias in allocation of conference presentations appeared to have significant negative impact on the academic career advancement of the females. The author has a PhD in particle physics and worked for six years as a postdoctoral research scientist, five of which were spent collaborating at Fermilab. She is currently completing a graduate degree in statistics.

S. Towers

2008-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

47

Women & early-stage entrepreneurship : examining the impact of the venture funding crisis on male and female-led technology start-ups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Women in technology have always been a minority and the number of women who are founders of venture backed start-ups is even lower. This research empirically investigates venture capital funding received by entrepreneurs ...

Swaminathan, Shuba

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Quantitative genetics of growth, carcass-quality traits, and disease resistance in hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops [female] x Morone saxatilis [male])  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 10 x 10 factorial mating design and a ‘common-garden’ rearing approach were employed to examine genetic effects and heritability of growth, carcass-quality traits, and disease resistance, important production traits in the aquaculture of hybrid striped bass (? white bass, Morone chrysops, crossed with ?striped bass, Morone saxatilis). Genotypes at four to ten nuclear-encoded microsatellites were used for parentage assignment and a general, linear-mixed model and a Restricted Maximum Likelihood (REML) algorithm were used to estimate variance components associated with dam, sire, and dam x sire interaction effects. Dam and sire effect on juvenile growth (weight, length and growth rates) were significant, whereas dam by sire interaction effect was not. Estimates of broad-sense heritability for growth, based on family means (h2 f), in dams ranged from 0.60 ± 0.20 to 0.82 ± 0.10 and in sires ranged from 0.43 ± 0.20 to 0.75 ± 0.18. High correlations were found between growth rates measured at two time intervals. Estimates of general combining ability for growth rates differed significantly among dams and among sires, whereas estimates of specific combining ability for each dam × sire combination did not differ significantly from zero. These results suggest that additive-effect genes contributed to the differences in juvenile growth. Dam and sire effect on fillet weight were significant; dam effect on liver weight and sire effect on total viscera weight were also significant. Dam and sire effect on hepatosomatic index and viscerasomatic index were significant, as was dam and sire interaction effect on viscerasomatic index. Phenotypic and genetics correlations between body weight and carcass-quality traits were high (0.85 - 1.00). Phenotypic correlations between body weight and standardized carcass-quality traits were positive but low, ranging from 0.07 to 0.19. Resistance to S. iniae was assessed in a challenge experiment, using the 10 dam x 10 sire factorial mating design. A significant effect of sire on resistance to S. iniae was found, and offspring from one sire had a 2.4 times higher probability of dying than offspring from the ‘average’ sire. Genetic effects on the immune-response parameters and on stress-response parameters assessed were non-significant.

Wang, Xiaoxue

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Female mating preferences for male traits used in species and mate recognition in the Mexican sailfin mollies, Poecilia velifera and P. petenensis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

%) with Brine Shrimp Flake (38%) and Spirulina132 Flake (2%) mixture) (Burlingame, California, U.S.A.) (Clemson or reversed (Wiens 2001). Reversal of preferences may, for example,573 occur if choice incurs a high cost

Ptacek, Margaret B.

50

Temperature, but Not Available Energy, Affects the Expression of a Sexually Selected Ultraviolet (UV) Colour Trait in Male European Green Lizards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Colour signals are widely used in intraspecific communication and often linked to individual fitness. The development of some pigment-based (e.g. carotenoids) colours is often environment-dependent and costly for the signaller, however, for structural colours (e.g. ultraviolet [UV]) this topic is poorly understood, especially in terrestrial ectothermic vertebrates. Methodology/Principal Findings: In a factorial experiment, we studied how available energy and time at elevated body temperature affects the annual expression of the nuptial throat colour patch in male European green lizards (Lacerta viridis) after hibernation and before mating season. In this species, there is a female preference for males with high throat UV reflectance, and males with high UV reflectance are more likely to win fights. We found that (i) while food shortage decreased lizards ’ body condition, it did not affect colour development, and (ii) the available time for maintaining high body temperature affected the development of UV colour without affecting body condition or other colour traits. Conclusions/Significance: Our results demonstrate that the expression of a sexually selected structural colour signal depends on the time at elevated body temperature affecting physiological performance but not on available energy gained from food per se in an ectothermic vertebrate. We suggest that the effect of high ambient temperature on UV colour in male L. viridis makes it an honest signal, because success in acquiring thermally favourable territories and/or effective behavioural

Katalin Bajer; Orsolya Molnár; János Török; Gábor Herczeg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Holy Mother of Chiri Mountain: A Female Mountain Spirit in Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Female Mountain Spirit in Korea by Maya Stiller UCLA Centera Female Mountain Spirit in Korea by Maya Stiller I n hisfemale mountain spirits in Korea, James Grayson argues that

Stiller, Maya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Assessment of High Rates of Precocious Male Maturation in a Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Hatchery Program, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yakima River Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project in Washington State is currently one of the most ambitious efforts to enhance a natural salmon population in the United States. Over the past five years we have conducted research to characterize the developmental physiology of naturally- and hatchery-reared wild progeny spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Yakima River basin. Fish were sampled at the main hatchery in Cle Elum, at remote acclimation sites and, during smolt migration, at downstream dams. Throughout these studies the maturational state of all fish was characterized using combinations of visual and histological analysis of testes, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and measurement of plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). We established that a plasma 11-KT threshold of 0.8 ng/ml could be used to designate male fish as either immature or precociously maturing approximately 8 months prior to final maturation (1-2 months prior to release as 'smolts'). Our analyses revealed that 37-49% of the hatchery-reared males from this program undergo precocious maturation at 2 years of age and a proportion of these fish appear to residualize in the upper Yakima River basin throughout the summer. An unnaturally high incidence of precocious male maturation may result in loss of potential returning anadromous adults, skewing of female: male sex ratios, ecological, and genetic impacts on wild populations and other native species. Precocious male maturation is significantly influenced by growth rate at specific times of year and future studies will be conducted to alter maturation rates through seasonal growth rate manipulations.

Larsen, Donald; Beckman, Brian; Cooper, Kathleen

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Diet composition and performance of female collegiate soccer players  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal nutrition for soccer athletes facilitates adaptation to the metabolic and energy demands of training and competition. Limited data have examined habitual dietary practices of female players, especially at the intercollegiate level. The purpose of this investigation was: 1) To establish baseline dietary analysis, anthropometrics, and performance data; 2) To compare values between rigorous pre-season training (2 sessions/day) to that of the post-competitive season; and 3) To examine correlations between performance and nutritional parameters. Members of a NCAA, Division I soccer squad completed a 3-day diet record in combination with physical tests, including VO?[], both pre- and post-season. No significant pre- to post differences were found for body weight or body fatness (62.0 ± 4.8 kg vs. 61.6 ± 4.7 kg; 16.4 ± 2.4% vs. 16.1 ± 2.8%). Total energy, carbohydrate, protein, and fat intakes were significantly greater during the pre-season (2290 ± 312 kcal vs.1866 ± 530 kcal; 320 ± 70 g (55%) vs. 263 ± 71 g (57%); 86.5 ± 18.7 g (15%) vs. 58.2 ± 16.8 g (13%); 75.2 ± 3.3 g (29%) vs. 65.9 ± 28.7 g (31%)) compared to post-season. Pre-season energy intake met the RDA for moderate levels of activity (37 kcal/kg). While CHO intake failed to meet minimum recommendations to promote glycogen repletion (7-10 g/kg), protein and fat intakes were above the minimum recommendations. Pre-season intakes of vitamin D, vitamin E, folate, biotin, pantothenic acid, copper, and magnesium were marginal (fat, in addition to foods with low nutrient value may displace CHO-rich and nutrient-dense foods within athletes' energy requirements and satiety limits. Sport nutrition counseling may benefit female soccer athletes to enhance dietary practices, thus encouraging optimal intake of nutrients during periods of increased and decreased food intake.

Clark, Mandy Michele

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Women & early-stage entrepreneurship : examining the impact of the venture funding crisis on male and female-led technology start-ups; Women and early-stage entrepreneurship; Examining the impact of the venture funding crisis on male and female-led technology start-ups.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Women in technology have always been a minority and the number of women who are founders of venture backed start-ups is even lower. This research… (more)

Swaminathan, Shuba

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Photo Identification, Summer Activity Pattern, Estimated Field Metabolic Rate and Territory Quality of Adult Male Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris) in Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project describes a portion of a long-term study of the behavioral ecology of sea otters. Sub-studies of this project include the development of an individual recognition program for sea otters, the construction of male sea otter activity and energy budgets, and the assessment of male sea otter territory quality. The Sea Otter Nose Matching Program, or "SONMaP", was developed to identify individual sea otters in Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska, using a blotch-pattern recognition algorithm based on the shape and location of nose scars. The performance of the SONMaP program was tested using images of otters collected during the 2002-03 field seasons, and previously matched by visually comparing every image in a catalog of 1,638 animals. In 48.9% of the visually matched images, the program accurately selected the correct image in the first 10% of the catalog. Individual follows and instantaneous sampling were used during the summers of 2004-06, to observe male sea otter behavior. Six behaviors (foraging, grooming, interacting with other otters, patrolling, resting, and surface swimming) were observed during four time periods (dawn, day, dusk, night) to create 24-hr activity budgets. Male sea otters spent 27% of their time resting, 26% swimming, 19% grooming, 14% foraging, 9% patrolling and 5% interacting with other otters. Field Metabolic Rate (FMR) was estimated by combining the energetic costs for foraging, grooming, resting, and swimming behaviors of captive otters from Yeates et al. (2007) with these activity budgets. "Swimming" accounted for the greatest percentage (43%) of energy expended each day followed by grooming (23%), resting (15%), feeding (13%) and other (5%). With a peak summer sea otter density of 5.6 otters km-2, the low percentage of time spent foraging indicates that Simpson Bay is below equilibrium density. Territory quality was assessed for male sea otters using four attributes: territory size, shoreline enclosure, accessibility, and number of females observed feeding in each territory. Each attribute was coded with a score of 0-2, and total quality scores ranged from 0.14-1.96 (0.9 + 0.61 SD). High quality territories had large areas, moderate shoreline enclosure, high accessibility, and many foraging females.

Finerty, Shannon E.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Female community leaders in Houston, Texas: a study of the education of Ima Hogg and Christia Daniels Adair  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Houston, Texas, the fourth largest metropolitan area in the United States, has several structures named after historically male leaders of the city?George R. Brown Convention Center, Mickey Leland Federal Building, William P. Hobby Airport, and Jesse H. Jones Hall. However, Houston women have also had a history that included positions of leadership in the community. Not only were women instrumental in creating the city’s cultural institutions such as the Houston Symphony, Alley Theater, and Houston Public Library, but female community leaders were also responsible for social and political reforms including the integration of public facilities in Houston and the campaign for women’s suffrage. These women leaders have not been recognized, and there are no public buildings in Houston that bear the names of women. This study seeks, in part, to make known the achievements of two women?one white, one black?who played an integral part in the political and cultural fabric of twentieth century Houston. The purpose of this dissertation was to analyze the relationship between educational experience and community leadership in the lives of two female community leaders in Houston, Texas, Ima Hogg and Christia Daniels Adair. Utilizing published interviews, government records, and manuscript collections, I detail the beliefs and values taught and modeled by parents and reinforced by church, school, and community, as well as the knowledge and skills developed through organizational work and self-directed study. Upon initial observation, the lives of Ima Hogg and Christia Adair seemed quite different, separated by issues of race and class. However, by examining both the formal and informal educational experiences of these two women, common patterns or themes emerged. The themes were identified as service to community, expectations of success and leadership, a belief in the value of education and lifelong learning, and the development of leadership skills. The informal educational experience, in particular, proved to be especially significant in the development of leadership skills for these women and in their eventual roles as community leaders. Using these themes, this study analyzes the education of two female community leaders as a way of understanding the relationship between women’s education and women’s achievement.

Black, Linda L.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

How to write like Tina and Mindy: constructing persona in female celebrity memoir .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The primary goal for this project was to demonstrate that celebrity memoir, specifically female comedian memoir, examines the self in a similar manner as memoirs… (more)

Neuroth, Sarah

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Frequency and duration of low back pain in female hockey players compared to two other populations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??To compare the frequency and duration of low back pain (LBP) in the past 2 years in female hockey players , with two other groups… (more)

Edwards, Fiona

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A Real Reflection of How I Write: Young Adult Female Authors Seizing Agency Through Fan Fiction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research project examines ""fan fiction"" (stories based upon existing texts such as movies, books, and video games) written by a young adult female and… (more)

Coleman, Susanna

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Can Boosting Minority Car-Ownership Rates Narrow Inter-Racial Employment Gaps?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the 1990 5% PUMS and the Household Level Car- OwnershipVariable Black CarBlack*Car Female Married High School Graduate Some College

Raphael, Steven; Stoll, Michael

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

An Examination of Internet Pornography Usage Among Male Students at Evangelical Christian Colleges.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Internet pornography access among male students at Evangelical Christian colleges presents two dilemmas. First, Internet pornography access is institutionally prohibited based on a Biblical… (more)

Chelsen, Paul Olaf

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Marrying Poor: Women's Citizenship, Race, and TANF Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

programs is one study of eight ACF-funded "Building StrongAssistant Secretary for the ACF under President George W.for Children and Families (ACF) in- creased. 174 As of 2005,

Gallo, Cristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Marrying Poor: Women's Citizenship, Race, and TANF Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Children. I use "ADC" as shorthand for both AFDC and Aid toDependent Chil- dren (ADC), AFDC's predecessor; although theSome seventy-three percent of AFDC families include two

Gallo, Cristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Effects of controlled dog hunting on movements of female white-tailed deer.  

SciTech Connect

D'Angelo, Gino, J., John C. Kilgo, Christopher E. Comer, Cory D. Drennan, David A. Osborn, and Karl V. Miller. 2003. Effects of controlled dog hunting on movements of female white-tailed deer. In: Proceedings of the Annu. Conf. Southeast. Assoc. Fish and Wildl. Agencies. 57:317-325. This article explores the relationship between controlled dog hunting and the movements of female white tailed deer at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina. The data suggests that short term, controlled dog hunting has little long-term effect on adult, female white-tailed deer movement on the Savannah River Site.

D' Angelo, Gino, J.; Kilgo, John, C.; Comer, Christopher, E.; Drennan, Cory, D.; Osborn, David, A.; Miller, Karl, V.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

First Name Last Name EMPLOYEE INFORMATION FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Name First Name Last Name EMPLOYEE INFORMATION FORM Date of Birth SSN Married Not Married Male Female Current Home Address Line 1 Current Home Address Line 2 City State Zip Zip+4 Home Phone Number Department/Agency Operating Administration Office Position Title Grade Work Address Line 1 Work Address Line 2 City State Zip Zip+4 Office Phone Number Affidavit Date Appointment Date Apartment # Middle Name Use as Beneficiary Yes No U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington DC 20585 STANDARD FORM 144 (Rev. 10/95) Page 2 Office of Personnel Management The Guide to Processing Personnel Actions STATEMENT OF PRIOR FEDERAL SERVICE To be Completed by Employee NSN 7540-00-634-4101 Previous Edition Usable 144-114 1. Name (Last, First, Middle Initial) 2. Social Security Number 3. Date of Birth (Month, Day, Year)

66

First Name Last Name EMPLOYEE INFORMATION FORM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Name Name Last Name EMPLOYEE INFORMATION FORM Date of Birth SSN Married Not Married Male Female Current Home Address Line 1 Current Home Address Line 2 City State Zip Zip+4 Home Phone Number Department/Agency Operating Administration Office Position Title Grade Work Address Line 1 Work Address Line 2 City State Zip Zip+4 Office Phone Number Affidavit Date Appointment Date Apartment # Middle Name Use as Beneficiary Yes No U.S. Department of Energy 1955 Fremont Avenue Idaho Falls ID 83415 STANDARD FORM 144 (Rev. 10/95) Page 2 Office of Personnel Management The Guide to Processing Personnel Actions STATEMENT OF PRIOR FEDERAL SERVICE To be Completed by Employee NSN 7540-00-634-4101 Previous Edition Usable 144-114 1. Name (Last, First, Middle Initial) 2. Social Security Number 3. Date of Birth (Month, Day, Year)

67

Together We Will: Evidence from a Field Experiment on Female Voter Turnout in Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Together We Will: Evidence from a Field Experiment on Female Voter Turnout in Pakistan Xavier Giné Akbar at the Pakistan Poverty Alleviation Program (PPAF) in Islamabad for their support

68

Development projects in Pakistan are hiring increasing numbers of Pakistani female professionals to work on rural projects that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development projects in Pakistan are hiring increasing numbers of Pakistani female professionals. Policy message n Pakistan is a highly gender-segregated society, and more well-qualified female field for well-educat- ed Pakistani women Pakistan has one of the lowest female labour force

Richner, Heinz

69

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 8 Lipid Composition of Chicken Semen and Fertility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 8 Lipid Composition of Chicken Semen and Fertility Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Lipid

70

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 2 Asian Female 1 Hispanic Male 3 Hispanic Female 6 White Male 50 White Female 11 DIVERSITY GENDER Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Emergency Operations (NA-40)...

71

A study in engaging female students in computer science using role models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effective approach to engaging young women to take computing in higher education is to provide examples of successful female computer scientists. Can a print publication that combines core computing concepts with inspiring stories of women in the ... Keywords: cs4fn., diversity, gender issues, girls, k-12, outreach, public engagement, recruitment, representation, teachers

Jonathan Black; Paul Curzon; Chrystie Myketiak; Peter W. McOwan

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

When sex, drugs, and violence enter the classroom: Conversations between adolescents and a female pedagogical agent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, we investigate the discourse between a female conversational pedagogical agent and 59 adolescents in the context of a social studies lesson. We note that previous pedagogical agent research has focused on the positive effects of agents, ... Keywords: Agent abuse, Agent misuse, Computer-mediated discourse analysis, Conversational agents, Pedagogical agents, Social studies

George Veletsianos; Cassandra Scharber; Aaron Doering

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Segmentation of female pelvic organs in axial magnetic resonance images using coupled geometric deformable models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The segmentation of pelvic structures in magnetic resonance (MR) images of the female pelvic cavity is a challenging task. This paper proposes the use of three novel geometric deformable models to segment the bladder, vagina and rectum in axial MR images. ... Keywords: Bladder, Image segmentation, Imaging appearance, Level set, Prior shape knowledge, Rectum, Vagina

Zhen Ma; Renato M. Natal Jorge; Teresa Mascarenhas; JoãO Manuel R. S. Tavares

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Evolution of adult male oral tract shapes for close and open vowels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe an experiment to evolve oral tract (mouth) shapes for a set of vowels for two adult males. Target vowels were recorded in an acoustically anechoic room along with the output from an electrolaryngograph, which monitors vocal ... Keywords: bio-inspired, evolution, oral tract shape, vowel synthesis

David M. Howard; Andy M. Tyrrell; Crispin Cooper

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The neuromolecular mechanisms that coordinate food availability with C. elegans male sexual behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organisms must coordinate behavioral and physiological responses to changingenvironmental conditions. In the nematode C. elegans, the presence or absence of foodin the environment affects many metabolic and behavioral responses, including fathomeostasis, lifespan, and male mating. Specifically, male mating behavior normallyoccurs when a well-nourished male encounters a hermaphrodite, and is repressed if themale is under-nourished. To understand how environmental changes influence the driveto carry out specific behavioral tasks, I used C. elegans male mating as a model.Previously, mutants were isolated that display male mating behavior at inappropriatetimes, i.e. in the absence of mating cues. Loss of function mutations in the ERG K+channel, UNC-103, results in spontaneous seizures of the male sex muscles.Interestingly, I found that food deprivation can suppress unc-103(lf)-induced seizures,suggesting that pathways activated under this environmental condition can suppress theexcitability of the mating circuit.Using molecular, genetic, and behavioral assays, I identified sensory andmolecular mechanisms that reduce sex-muscle excitability under food-deprived conditions. I found that mutations that affect the muscular feeding organ, the pharynx,phenocopy the effects of food deprivation, and reduce sex-muscle excitability. Idemonstrated that mutations in the pharyngeal muscle protein, tropomyosin, cause thepharyngeal neurosecretory motor neurons (NSMs) to increase pharyngeal excitabilityand reduce sex-muscle excitability. Additionally, I found that olfactory neurons (AWCs)with sensory cilia exposed to the environment are up-regulated in the absence of foodstimuli, and also send inhibitory signals to the sex muscles. To determine howchemosensory and pharyngeal neurons in the head can signal to the genitalia, Ihypothesized that one mechanism could be via secretion of metabolic hormones. To testthis, I examined loss-of-function mutations in the insulin-like receptor, DAF-2, which isknown to regulate many behavioral and physiological responses to food. I demonstratedthat DAF-2 activity in the sex muscles is required for food-deprivation suppression ofunc-103(0)-induced seizures. I then identified components of a novel-insulin-like/DAF-2signaling pathway that reduces excitability. Specifically, I propose that ligand binding toDAF-2 activates PLC- and leads to increased cystolic Ca2+. This Ca2+ influx activatesCaMKII, which can phosphorylate/activate EAG-like K+ channels, thereby reducing cellexcitability.

Gruninger, Todd Ryan

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Melatonin secretion and puberty in female lambs exposed to environmental electric and magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

This study determined whether chronic exposure of female lambs to the electric and magnetic fields (EMF) of a high voltage transmission line can alter pineal secretion of melatonin and the normal occurrence of puberty. Twenty female Suffolk lambs were assigned randomly in equal numbers to a control and a treatment group. Treatment from 2 to 10 mo of age consisted of continuous exposure within the electrical environment of a 500-kV transmission line (mean electric field 6 kV/m, mean magnetic field 40 mG). Treated lambs were penned directly beneath the transmission line; control lambs were maintained in a pen of similar construction 229 m from the line where EMF were at ambient levels (mean electric field < 10 V/m, mean magnetic field < 0.3 mG). Melatonin was analyzed by RIA in serum of blood samples collected at 0.5-3-h intervals over eight 48-h periods. To assess attainment of puberty, serum concentrations of progesterone were determined by RIA from blood samples collected twice weekly beginning at 19 wk of age. Concentrations of circulating melatonin in control and treated lambs were low during daylight hours and increased during nighttime hours. The characteristic pattern of melatonin secretion during nighttime (amplitude, phase, and duration) did not differ between control and treatment groups. Age at puberty and number of subsequent estrous cycles also did not differ between groups. These data suggest that chronic exposure of developing female sheep to 60-Hz environmental EMF does not affect the mechanisms underlying the generation of the circadian pattern of melatonin secretion or the mechanisms involved in the onset of reproductive activity.

Lee, J.M. Jr.; Stormshak, F.; Thompson, J.M.; Thinesen, P.; Painter, L.J.; Olenchek, E.G.; Hess, D.L.; Forbes, R.; Foster, D.L. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

DIFFERENTIAL SENSITIVITY OF MALE GERM CELLS TO MAINSTREAM AND SIDESTREAM TOBACCO SMOKE IN THE MOUSE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cigarette smoking in men has been associated with increased chromosomal abnormalities in sperm and with increased risks for spontaneous abortions, birth defects and neonatal death. Little is known, however, about the reproductive consequences of paternal exposure to second-hand smoke. We used a mouse model to investigate the effects of paternal exposure to sidestream (SS) smoke, the main constituent of second-hand smoke, on the genetic integrity and function of sperm, and to determine whether male germ cells were equally sensitive to mainstream (MS) and SS smoke. A series of sperm DNA quality and reproductive endpoints were investigated after exposing male mice for two weeks to MS or SS smoke. Our results indicated that: (i) only SS smoke significantly affected sperm motility; (ii) only MS smoke induced DNA strand breaks in sperm; (iii) both MS and SS smoke increased sperm chromatin structure abnormalities; and (iv) MS smoke affected both fertilization and the rate of early embryonic development, while SS smoke affected fertilization only. These results show that MS and SS smoke have differential effects on the genetic integrity and function of sperm and provide further evidence that male exposure to second-hand smoke, as well as direct cigarette smoke, may diminish a couple's chance for a successful pregnancy and the birth of a healthy baby.

Polyzos, Aris; Schmid, Thomas Ernst; Pina-Guzman, Belem; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Marchetti, Francesco

2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

78

Anthropometry for WorldSID, a World-Harmonized Midsize Male Side Impact Crash Dummy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The WorldSID project is a global effort to design a new generation side impact crash test dummy under the direction of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The first WorldSID crash dummy will represent a world-harmonized mid-size adult male. This paper discusses the research and rationale undertaken to define the anthropometry of a world standard midsize male in the typical automotive seated posture. Various anthropometry databases are compared region by region and in terms of the key dimensions needed for crash dummy design. The Anthropometry for Motor Vehicle Occupants (AMVO) dataset, as established by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI), is selected as the basis for the WorldSID mid-size male, updated to include revisions to the pelvis bone location. The proposed mass of the dummy is 77.3kg with full arms. The rationale for the selected mass is discussed. The joint location and surface landmark database is appended to this paper.

S. Moss; Z. Wang; M. Salloum; M. Reed; M. Van Ratingen; D. Cesari; R. Scherer; T. Uchimura; M. Beusenberg

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

79

40 TRIPLE SEX CHROMATIN, AND OTHER SEX CHROMATIN ANOMALIES, IN TUMOURS OF FEMALES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN a previous study on sex chromatin in human tumours (Atkin, 1960), one tumour (a carcinoma of the colon in a female patient) was described in which the most frequently-occurring number of sex chromatin bodies per nucleus was three. One of a series of 328 carcinomas of the cervix in a later study (Atkin, 1964) was also characterised by the presence of triple sex chromatin. In the present paper, two further tumours with triple sex chromatin, a carcinoma of the colon and a carcinoma of the cervix, will be described, and sex chromatin data on all malignant tumours, except teratomas, studied in this laboratory will be summarised. The significance of triple sex chromatin and other sex chromatin anomalies (i.e. absence or duplication) in tumours of females will be discussed. MATERIALS AND METHODS For sex chromatin determination squash preparations of pieces of tumour, stained in 2 % aceto-orcein (G. T. Gurr Ltd.) following fixation in acetic alcohol, were used. The preparations were sealed with a mixture of equal parts of Canada balsam and paraffin wax applied with a hot wire (attempts to make the preparations

N. B. Atkin

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Dietary quercetin exacerbates the development of estrogen-induced breast tumors in female ACI rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that structurally mimic the endogenous estrogen 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}). Despite intense investigation, the net effect of phytoestrogen exposure on the breast remains unclear. The objective of the current study was to examine the effects of quercetin on E{sub 2}-induced breast cancer in vivo. Female ACI rats were given quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) for 8 months. Animals were monitored weekly for palpable tumors, and at the end of the experiment, rats were euthanized, breast tumor and different tissues excised so that they could be examined for histopathologic changes, estrogen metabolic activity and oxidant stress. Quercetin alone did not induce mammary tumors in female ACI rats. However, in rats implanted with E{sub 2} pellets, co-exposure to quercetin did not protect rats from E{sub 2}-induced breast tumor development with 100% of the animals developing breast tumors within 8 months of treatment. No changes in serum quercetin levels were observed in quercetin and quercetin + E{sub 2}-treated groups at the end of the experiment. Tumor latency was significantly decreased among rats from the quercetin + E{sub 2} group relative to those in the E{sub 2} group. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity was significantly downregulated in quercetin-exposed mammary tissue. Analysis of 8-isoprostane F{sub 2{alpha}} (8-iso-PGF{sub 2{alpha}}) levels as a marker of oxidant stress showed that quercetin did not decrease E{sub 2}-induced oxidant stress. These results indicate that quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) does not confer protection against breast cancer, does not inhibit E{sub 2}-induced oxidant stress and may exacerbate breast carcinogenesis in E{sub 2}-treated ACI rats. Inhibition of COMT activity by quercetin may expose breast cells chronically to E{sub 2} and catechol estrogens. This would permit longer exposure times to the carcinogenic metabolites of E{sub 2} and chronic exposure to oxidant stress as a result of metabolic redox cycling to estrogen metabolites, and thus quercetin may exacerbate E{sub 2}-induced breast tumors in female ACI rats.

Singh, Bhupendra [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Mense, Sarah M. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Bhat, Nimee K. [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Putty, Sandeep; Guthiel, William A. [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Remotti, Fabrizio [Department of Pathology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Bhat, Hari K., E-mail: bhath@umkc.ed [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

The Impact a Diversity Culture Has on the "Think Manager, Think Male" Stereotype: A Social Identity Theory of Leadership Perspective on Gender Stereotypes in Sport Organizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Women in intercollegiate athletics have faced numerous challenges in breaking through the "glass ceiling." This issue has received a plethora of attention in the literature; however, the impact of culture on leadership stereotypes has yet to be evaluated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the impact a diversity culture may or may not have on gendered leadership stereotypes. Utilizing the social identity theory of leadership and the expectations of gender stereotypes, I predicted men would be considered more prototypical of a sport organization than would women. Moving forward, I argued culture would moderate this relationship. Specifically, women would be considered more prototypical in a proactive culture (diversity viewed as an asset), whereas men would be perceived as more prototypical in compliant cultures (diversity viewed as a liability). Finally, when a leader was determined as prototypical, then (s)he would be rated as more effective than nonprototypical leaders. A 2 (culture: compliant, proactive) by 2 (leader's sex: male, female) design was employed to determine the relationship between culture, sex and leadership prototypicality. Respondents to this research experiment included students participating in activity classes at a major Southwest University (N = 278). Respondents were first asked to read through two scenarios: one describing culture and the other manipulating the leader. Next, they were asked to complete a series of items to measure prototypicality and leadership effectiveness. Results indicated the manipulation in the scenarios was successful. A majority of the respondents correctly identified the leader?s sex (N = 241), and a proactive culture was viewed as supporting diversity when compared to a compliant culture (F [1, 274] = 120.83, p .05, n2 =.001), and culture did not affect prototypicality ratings (b = -.04, p greater than .05). However, culture did have a significant positive relationship with leadership effectiveness (b = 21, p less than .01). Prototypicality was significantly positively related to leadership effectiveness (b = .54, p less than .001), thus supporting the third hypothesis.

Aicher, Thomas Joseph

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 2 Metabolism of Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids inTesticular Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 2 Metabolism of Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids inTesticular Cells Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

83

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 3 Fatty Acid Remodeling During Sperm Maturation: Variation of Docosahexaenoic Acid Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 3 Fatty Acid Remodeling During Sperm Maturation: Variation of Docosahexaenoic Acid Content Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downl

84

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 9 Regulation of Avian and Mammalian Sperm Production by Dietary Fatty Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 9 Regulation of Avian and Mammalian Sperm Production by Dietary Fatty Acids Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

85

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 12 Regulation of Oxytocinase Activity in the Testis by Dietary Lipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 12 Regulation of Oxytocinase Activity in the Testis by Dietary Lipids Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf

86

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 6 Docosahexaenoic Acid-Rich Marine Oils and Improved Reproductive Efficiency in Pigs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 6 Docosahexaenoic Acid-Rich Marine Oils and Improved Reproductive Efficiency in Pigs Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadabl

87

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 5 Phospholipid Composition of Human Sperm and Seminal Plasmain Relation to Sperm Fertility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 5 Phospholipid Composition of Human Sperm and Seminal Plasmain Relation to Sperm Fertility Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downl

88

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 23 Hispanic Female 24 White Male 36 White Female 35 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management...

89

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 7 Hispanic Female 18 White Male 40 White Female 28 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security, NA-70 As...

90

Estrogen effects on angiotensin receptors are modulated by pituitary in female rats  

SciTech Connect

The present studies were designed to test the hypothesis that changes in angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors might modulate the layered target tissue responsiveness accompanying estradiol administration. Estradiol was infused continuously in oophorectomized female rats. Aldosterone was also infused in control and experimental animals to avoid estrogen-induced changes in renin and ANG II. ANG II binding constants were determined in radioreceptor assays. Estradiol increased binding site concentration in adrenal glomerulosa by 76% and decreased binding sites of uterine myometrium and glomeruli by 45 and 24%, respectively. There was an accompanying increase in the affinity of ANG II binding to adrenal glomerulosa and uterine myometrium. Because estrogen is a potent stimulus of prolactin release from the pituitary of rodents, studies were also designed to test the hypothesis that prolactin may mediate some or all of the estrogen-induced effects observed. Hypophysectomy abolished estradiol stimulation of prolactin release and most ANG II receptor changes. Prolactin administration to pituitary intact rats was associated with a 50% increase in receptor density of adrenal glomerulosa simulating estradiol administration. However, the changes in glomeruli and uterine myometrium were opposite in that both tissues also increased receptor density, suggesting that prolactin was not the sole mediator of the estrogen-induced receptor changes. In conclusion, regulation of ANG II receptors in a number of diverse target tissues by estradiol is complex with contributions from estrogens and pituitary factors, which include but do not exclusively involve prolactin.

Douglas, J.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Home is where the heart is? Home-making by female Guatemalan migrants in the United States and across its borders.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores home-making in a context of movement and exclusion. I examine how Guatemalan female migrants make their home after migration to the United… (more)

Hattem, A. van

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Arecoline augments cellular proliferation in the prostate gland of male Wistar rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Areca nut chewing is the fourth most popular habit in the world due to its effects as a mild stimulant, causing a feeling of euphoria and slightly heightened alertness. Areca nuts contain several alkaloids and tannins, of which arecoline is the most abundant and known to have several adverse effects in humans, specially an increased risk of oral cancer. On evaluating the effects of arecoline on the male endocrine physiology in Wistar rats, it was found that arecoline treatment led to an overall enlargement and increase in the wet weight of the prostate gland, and a two-fold increase in serum gonadotropin and testosterone levels. Since the prostate is a major target for testosterone, the consequences of arecoline consumption were studied specifically in the prostate gland. Arecoline treatment led to an increase in the number of rough endoplasmic reticulum and reduction of secretory vesicles, signifying a hyperactive state of the prostate. Increased expression of androgen receptors in response to arecoline allowed for enhanced effect of testosterone in the prostate of treated animals, which augmented cell proliferation, subsequently confirmed by an increase in the expression of Ki-67 protein. Cellular proliferation was also the outcome of concomitant over expression of the G{sub 1}-to-S cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclin D1 and CDK4, both at the transcriptional and translational levels. Taken together, the findings provide the first evidence that regular use of arecoline may lead to prostatic hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and eventually to disorders associated with prostate enlargement. - Highlights: > Effect of arecoline was investigated on the endocrine physiology of male Wistar rats. > Increase observed in prostate size, wet weight, serum testosterone and gonadotropins. > Arecoline increased RER, expression of androgen receptor and cellular proliferation. > Upregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 seen at transcriptional and translational levels. > It may cause disorders associated with prostatic hyperplasia and hyperactivity.

Saha, Indraneel; Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Mondal, Anushree; Maiti, Bishwa Ranjan; Chatterji, Urmi, E-mail: urmichatterji@gmail.com

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Effect of cottonseed meal consumption on performance of female fallow deer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of gossypol ingestion on reproductive function and productivity of female fallow deer (Dama dama) by measuring endocrine function, pregnancy rates, and body weights of does and fawns. Sixty multiparous fallow does were randomly allotted into three groups corresponding to treatment diet that varied in respect to gossypol content. The does were then separated by treatment into pastures containing two fallow buck sires per pasture. The control group (SBMG), (containing no gossypol in diet) received 362 g soybean meal (SBM) ?animal-1?day-1. The low gossypol group (CSML) was fed 227 g cottonseed meal (CSM; 0.09% free gossypol; determined by HPLC) and 181 g SBM?animal-1?day-1. The high gossypol group (CSMH) received 454 g CSM?animal-1?day-1. Diets were fed daily from 6/16/2003 to 11/20/2003. Blood samples were collected weekly from 8/14/2003 to 11/20/2003 for progesterone and gossypol analysis. Fawns born in June and July of 2003 were weaned 9/18/2003. Bucks were fitted with marking harnesses for the duration of the breeding season and heat marks were recorded daily for estrus detection. Ultrasonography, for pregnancy detection, was performed on 11/20/2003 and 12/15/2003. All groups lost weight from 8/14/03 to 11/20/03. SBMG lost less (P.1) between treatments. The pregnancy rate for all groups was 100%. There was no difference (P>.01) in time from weaning to conception (23 d) between treatments. Does in CSMH exhibited decreased (P<.02) progesterone concentrations. Consumption of CSM (free gossypol in amounts up to 0.81 mg?kg-1BW; 0.41 g?animal-1?day-1).did not appear to affect reproductive performance of fallow deer.

Mapel, Steven Lee

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Head black woman in charge: An investigation of how black female athletic directors negotiate their race, gender, and class identities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Framed as an instrumental case study, the purpose of this investigation was to understand how a select group of women, Black female athletic directors, define and negotiate their race, gender, and class identities. Data was collected via a qualitative indepth semi-structured interview methodology. The women who were chosen for this research are Black female athletic directors of NCAA Division I, II, and III intercollegiate athletic departments. The data analysis consisted of coding the data at two levels: first-level coding and pattern coding, and following the coding process, the emergent findings were compared with the identity negotiation theory (i.e. selfverification and behavioral confirmation processes) in order to understand how the Black female athletic directors negotiated their race, gender, and class identities. This investigation found that Black women athletic directors used two different denotations (i.e. African American and Black) to reference their racial identity, and race was the most salient identity because of their upbringings, childhood experiences, and dealings with racism. All of the women are heterosexual, but insufficient data did not allow a full understanding how they define their gender identity. In describing their class status, the majority of the women came from a traditionally defined lower socioeconomic class background, but as a result of their athletic director appointment they now reside in the middle or upper middle economic class status. In understanding how Black female athletic directors negotiate their identities within and outside the athletic department, and what factors are associated with the negotiation of their identities, this investigation found that the Black women athletic directors had to establish, maintain, and change their race, gender, and class identities with the utilization of various self-verification and behavioral confirmation strategies. These negotiations were conducted in response to the expectations that ensued as a result of their role in a leadership position, lesbian, intra- and inter-racial interactions, and exposure to lesbian, Mammy, and Sapphire stereotypes.

McDowell, Jacqueline

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Feminization of male common tern embryos is not correlated with exposure to specific PCB congeners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent proposals that reproductive impairment in piscivorous wildlife may be caused by exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals present in the environment require further investigation to elucidate critical exposures and cause-effect linkages. Effects reported in some wildlife species include feminization of male embryos and other gonadal pathologies arising during embryonic development. The environmental contaminants cited as possible causative agents include polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and their phenolic metabolites (OH-PCBs). Among the more potent estrogenic agents are 4{prime}-hydroxy-2,4,6-trichlorobiphenyl (4{prime}-OH-PCB30) and 4{prime}-hydroxy-2,3,4,5-tetrachlorobiphenyl (r{prime}-Oh-PCB61). However, the parent compounds of these metabolites (PCB30 and PCB61) were not present in Aroclor mixtures, are rare in environmental samples, and have not been reported in wildlife tissues. This paper reports an exploratory study of wild common terns in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts. the authors sought to correlate gonadal pathology in embryos with tissue residues of selected chlorobiphenyls. 12 refs., 1 tab.

Nisbet, I.C.T. [I.C.T. Nisbet & Company, Inc., North Falmouth, MA (United States); Fry, D.M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Hatch, J.J. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States); Lynn, B. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Phytoestrogens are partial estrogen agonists in the adult male mouse, Environ. Health Perspect. 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intake, as well as serum and urinary concentrations, of phytoestrogens is high in countries where incidence of prostate cancer is low, suggesting a chemopreventive role for phytoestrogens. Their significance could be explained by the ability to antagonize the action of more potent endogenous estrogens in initiation or promotion of tumor formation. We have studied estrogenicity and antiestrogenicity of dietary soy and two phytoestrogens, coumestrol and daidzein, in our neoDES mouse model for the study of prostatic neoplasia. Soy was chosen because it is rich in phytoestrogens, is widely used in Oriental diets, and has antiestrogenic and anticarcinogenic properties in the neoDES mouse when given from fertilization onward. In short-term tests with adult animals, no evidence for estrogenicity or antiestrogenicity (capability to antagonize the action of 1 7,B-estradiol) of soy was found when development of epithelial metaplasia and expression of c-fos protooncogene in prostate were used as end points of estrogen action. Estrogenic activity of coumestrol and daidzein on c-fos expression was subtle. Coumestrol, either given alone or in combination with 17,B-estradiol, had no effect on development of epithelial metaplasia. These marginal or missing effects in adult males could be interpreted by assuming that the neonatal period is more critical for estrogenic or antiestrogenic action of soy and phytoestrogens. Once initiated, estrogen-related lesions would develop spontaneously. Alternatively, the chemopreventive action of soy is not due to antiestrogenicity of soyderived

Sari Makela; Risto Santti; Leena Salo; John A. Mclachlan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Recruiting African American Male Teachers in K-12 Schools: A Case Study in One Urban School District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A case study of the experiences of six African American male teachers in a southern K-12 school district is presented in this study. The purpose of this study was: 1) to hear the voices of African American male teachers in a selected urban school district; 2) to identify the factors that contribute to their job acceptance decisions; 3) to gain an in-depth understanding of why teachers chose teaching as a profession; 4) to determine and understand the nature of the professional lives of these teachers; and finally, 5) to advance our existing knowledge base in attracting African American males to our nation's classrooms. The data collection process consisted of one-on-one, open-ended interview questions with six highly qualified African American male public school teachers in a K-12 school district in the Southern region of the United States. The key themes which emerged through data analysis include: (1) nobility associated with the teaching profession; (2) compassion associated with the teaching profession; (3) stability associated with the teaching profession; (4) family and community influences; (5) life experiences and (6) I was not recruited: I chose this district. Ethic of Care and Critical Race theoretical frameworks were the foundation for the study.

Watson, Jesse

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Retrospective on the Experience of Parental Pressure and Support by Male Participants that Withdrew from Competitive Youth Hockey: A Phenomenological Investigation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to gain an in-depth understanding of the lived experiences of parental pressure and support for males who withdrew from… (more)

Schonewille, Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Web-based gis and public participation:an aid to widening female participation in revitalizing outdoor recreational facilities in saudi arabia. a case study in jeddah, saudi arabia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the last decade, the Internet and Geographic Information System (GIS) have made changes in the relationship between governments and citizens in many developed countries. Citizens, in such countries, have been given more chances to participate in the decision making process of the spatial issues relevant to them. Such participation has helping to make urban planning more democratic and to make planners plan with the public rather than plan for the public. In Saudi Arabia (a developing country), participation of citizens in spatial decision making is very limited. Such limitation is more severe when considering women due to the circumstance of gender segregation in the Saudi society. While males may somehow muddle through ways to express their views about spatial issues to the planning authority, females have no ways unless they behave against the local norms. There is a persistent need for implementing distance participation for women in Saudi Arabia. This research examines whether developing and employing an Internet / GIS participatory approach can facilitate (without conflicting with the local conservative cultural norms) women’s participation in the municipal decision making process of the neighborhood’s outdoor recreational facilities. The goal was primarily to adapt the technology to serve the society instead of necessitating the society to change its inherited norms to be able to advance. The research involved an exploratory ethnographic case study carried out in a selected residential community in the city of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The research was carried out in two phases where the current status of public participation in the Saudi community planning was investigated first, and then a prototype for an Internet/GIS system for female public participation was developed and evaluated. The research found that there is a legitimate enthusiasm amongst the public and officials of the research sample for adopting e-public participation. Such enthusiasm is supported by a number of political, economical, technological and religious reasons. However, the findings showed that adopting e-public participation is more promising in the near future than currently due to different reasons including the current relatively small number of Internet users in Saudi Arabia. Since such research is the first of its type to be conducted in the Saudi context, the findings can serve as a road map indicating that adopting e-public participation in Saudi Arabia is promising and worth researching.

Daghistani, Farouk

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The effects of concurrent training on performance variables in previously untrained males  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research has shown conflicting results involving interference of strength development with combined resistance and endurance training. Purpose: To examine if endurance training and resistance training performed concurrently would produce different performance and physiological results when compared to each type of training alone. Methods: Forty-five untrained males were recruited and randomly assigned to one of three 12 wk training groups. An endurance training (ET, N=12) group trained by running (2-3 days/week, 20-40 min, 65- 80% HRR), a resistance training (RT, N=13) group performed a resistance training program (2-3 days/week, 3 sets/8 exercises, 6-10 reps, 75-85% 1RM), and a concurrent training (CT, N=16) group performed both the endurance and resistance training programs (5 days/week, even # week 3 endurance/2 resistance workouts, odd # week 3 resistance/2 endurance workouts). All groups were tested for all the following variables prior to and following training: percent body fat, VO2max, isokinetic-maximal torque and avg. power at two speeds, 1RM leg press, 1 RM bench press, vertical jump, lower body power (as calculated by the Lewis formula) and 40-yard dash time. Results: Percent body fat was significantly (p?.05) decreased in both the ET and CT groups. Only the ET group significantly improved VO2max (+8.24%). Minimal changes were found for any of the isokinetic measurements. The ET, RT, and CT groups demonstrated significant improvements in leg press (20.4, 40.8, and 39.4%) and bench press (7.5, 30.5 and 21.2%) 1 RM. RT and CT 1 RM improvements were similar and significantly greater than the ET group. Only the RT group significantly increased power. No group showed a significant change in vertical jump or 40-yard dash time. Conclusions: Findings indicate that endurance training does not interfere with strength development, but resistance training appears to hinder development of maximal aerobic capacity.

Glowacki, Shawn Philip

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Understanding Food Stamp Program Participation Among Female-Headed Households: Has It Been Affected By Participation In The AFDC/TANF Program?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The caseloads of food stamp program and welfare program experienced sharp drops among non-metropolitan single female-headed families with children (SFHFwC) after welfare reform in 1996.… (more)

Shangguan, Zhaoyun

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

BRIEF REPORT Mate preferences of married persons in the newlywed year and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Shackelford Florida Atlantic University, Davie, FL, USA David P. Schmitt Bradley University, Peoria, IL, USA. Shackelford, Florida Atlantic University, Department of Psychology, 2912 College Avenue, Davie, Florida 33314 women more than men value good financial prospects in a long-term mate (Buss, 1989; Buss, Shackelford

Pillow, Jonathan

103

MUltlog and MUltseq Reanimated and Married C.G. Fermuller1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CNFs computed by MUltlog. Users of MUltlog can choose among different interfaces. One is written in Tcl/Tk

Preining, Norbert

104

The Impact on Iowa's Budget of Allowing Same-Sex Couples to Marry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

See Iowa Code. 2007. § 598. Vermont has recorded 7,800 civilof which 1,234 involved Vermont residents. In this same timeImpact on the State of Vermont of Allowing Same-Sex Couples

Badgett, M.V. Lee; Baumle, Amanda K; Romero, Adam P.; Sears, Brad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The Impact on Maine's Budget of Allowing Same-Sex Couples to Marry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact on the State of Vermont of Allowing Same-Sex CouplesCouncil. 2002. Report of the Vermont Domestic partnershipCouncil. 2002. Report of the Vermont Domestic partnership

Ramos, Christopher; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Steinberger, Michael D; Sears, Brad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The Impact of Washington's Budget of Allowing Same-Sex Couples to Marry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Act of 2003). 36 In Vermont, 1,933 same-sex coupleswere available. Based on Vermont’s experience with same-sexJersey, 5 New Mexico, 6 and Vermont. 7 The full methodology

Badgett, M.V. Lee; Sears, Brad; Kukura, Elizabeth; Lau, Holning S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Impact on New Hampshire's Budget of Allowing Same-Sex Couples to Marry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council, Report of the Vermont Civil Union ReviewConnecticut, New Jersey and Vermont. The full methodologyoffices in Connecticut and Vermont and by the Comptroller

Badgett, M.V. Lee; Sears, Brad; Kukura, Elizabeth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Impact on New Mexico's Budget of Allowing Same-Sex Coules to Marry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

civil unions may only be dissolved by Vermont residents). E-Office of Vital Records, Vermont Department of Health, to R.3 New Jersey, 4 and Vermont. 5 The full methodology for our

Badgett, M.V. Lee; Sears, Brad; Homer, Steven K; Curtis, Patrice; Kukura, Elizabeth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The Impact on Maryland's Budget of Allowing Same-Sex Couples to Marry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact on the State of Vermont of Allowing Same-Sex Couples2002. Report of the Vermont Civil Union Review Commission .of Legislative Council, Vermont, supra note 12. Office of

Badgett, M.V. Lee; Baumle, Amanda K; Kravich, Shawn; Romero, Adam P.; Sears, Brad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Impact on California's Budget of Allowing Same-Sex Couples to Marry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LaCroix and James Mak). For an analysis of Vermont: M. V.the State of May 2004 Vermont of Allowing Same-sex Coupleson the experience of Vermont’s civil union legislation,

Sears, Brad; Badgett, M.V. Lee

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Counting on Couples: Fiscal Savings From Allowing Same-Sex Couple to Marry in Connecticut  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were available. Based on Vermont’s experience with offeringto drop considerably. Vermont and California now offer veryrate 57 and the experience of Vermont under its civil union

Badgett, M.V. Lee; Sears, Brad; Curtis, Patrice; Kukura, Elizabeth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Earned Income Tax Credit and the Labor Supply of Married Couples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Participation Under the AFDC-UP Program", Econometrica 64(with Dependent Children (AFDC), is fixed at about 16 billionthat faced by welfare (AFDC/ TANF) recipients. In addition,

Eissa, Nada; Hoynes, Hilary Williamson

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Impact of Washington's Budget of Allowing Same-Sex Couples to Marry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.ncsconline.org/D_Research/CSP/CSP_Main_Page.html (lastavailable at http://www.ncsconline.org/D_Research/CSP/CSP_Main_Page.html. WILLIAMS INSTITUTE / IGLSS STUDY The

Badgett, M.V. Lee; Sears, Brad; Kukura, Elizabeth; Lau, Holning S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Impact on New Mexico's Budget of Allowing Same-Sex Coules to Marry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

available at http://www.ncsconline.org/D_Research/CSP/CSP_Main_Page.html (last visited December 7, 2005). 51www.ncsconline.org/D_Research/CSP/CSP_Main_Page.html. The

Badgett, M.V. Lee; Sears, Brad; Homer, Steven K; Curtis, Patrice; Kukura, Elizabeth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Impact on Maryland's Budget of Allowing Same-Sex Couples to Marry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Survey of Donors . Internal Revenue Service. “Estate Taxaccessed November 2007). Internal Revenue Service. “EstateStates is $6,500). Internal Revenue Service. “Estate Tax

Badgett, M.V. Lee; Baumle, Amanda K; Kravich, Shawn; Romero, Adam P.; Sears, Brad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Female Breast Cancer Feasibility Study: A Comparision of Magnetic Field Exposures in a Garment Manufacturing Facility and Electric U tility Work Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes research activities from the first phase of a proposed study of occupational magnetic field exposures and female breast cancer. Due to the small number of female employees in the utility industry with high magnetic field exposures, this project focused on the garment industry. Key activities included magnetic field measurement surveys at an electric utility and garment manufacturing facility, and a comparison of the exposures in these two industries. Additional activities evaluated...

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 8 White Female 3 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE 9 64.3% 5 35.7%...

118

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 14 White Female 8 DIVERSITY GENDER Workforce Diversity Savannah River Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN...

119

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 2 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 5 Hispanic Female 3 White Male 29 White Female 5 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Safety & Health, NA-SH As of Sep 24,...

120

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 3 Asian Female 1 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 76 White Female 22 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Deputy Administrator for Naval Reactors (NA-30) As of March 24,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 2 Asian Female 4 Hispanic Male 7 Hispanic Female 5 White Male 53 White Female 19 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Nevada Site Office As of September 25, 2010 PAY PLAN TOTAL...

122

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

29 Hispanic Male 220 Hispanic Female 202 White Male 1340 White Female 519 Workforce Diversity National Nuclear Security Administration As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL...

123

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 14 Scavenger Systems and Related Therapies AgainstLipoperoxidation Damage of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Spermatozoa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 14 Scavenger Systems and Related Therapies AgainstLipoperoxidation Damage of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Spermatozoa Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

124

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 16 The Effect of Antioxidants on Nicotine and Caffeine InducedChanges in Human Sperm? An in Vitro Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 16 The Effect of Antioxidants on Nicotine and Caffeine InducedChanges in Human Sperm? An in Vitro Study Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

125

Seasonal Patterns of Melatonin, Cortisol, and Progesterone Secretion in Female Lambs Raised Beneath a 500-kV Transmission Line.  

SciTech Connect

Although several kinds of biological effects of electric and magnetic fields have been reported from laboratory studies, few have been independently replicated. When this study was being planned, the suppression of nighttime melatonin in rodents was thought to represent one of the strongest known effects of these fields. The effect had been replicated by a single laboratory for 60-Hz electric fields, and by multiple laboratories for d-c magnetic fields. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the effect of electric and magnetic fields on melatonin would also occur in sheep exposed to a high voltage transmission line. The specific hypothesis tested by this experiment was as follows: The electrical environment produced by a 60-Hz, 500-kV transmission line causes a depression in nocturnal melatonin in chronically exposed female lambs. This may mimic effects of pinealectomy or constant long-day photoperiods, thus delaying the onset of reproductive cycles. Results of the study do not provide evidence to support the hypothesis. Melatonin concentrations in the sheep exposed to the transmission line showed the normal pattern of low daytime and high nighttime serum levels. As compared to the control group, there were no statistically significant group differences in the mean amplitude, phase, or duration of the nighttime melatonin elevation.

Lee, Jack M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Long-term mequindox treatment induced endocrine and reproductive toxicity via oxidative stress in male Wistar rats  

SciTech Connect

Mequindox (MEQ) is a synthetic antimicrobial chemical of quinoxaline 1, 4-dioxide group. This study was designed to investigate the hypothesis that MEQ exerts testicular toxicity by causing oxidative stress and steroidal gene expression profiles and determine mechanism of MEQ testicular toxicity. In this study, adult male Wistar rats were fed with MEQ for 180 days at five different doses as 0, 25, 55, 110 and 275 mg/kg, respectively. In comparison to control, superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH) and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels were elevated at 110 and 275 mg/kg MEQ, whereas the malondialdehyde (MDA) level was slightly increase at only 275 mg/kg. Furthermore, in LC/MS-IT-TOF analysis, one metabolite 2-isoethanol 4-desoxymequindox (M11) was found in the testis. There was significant decrease in body weight, testicular weight and testosterone at 275 mg/kg, serum follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) at 110 and 275 mg/kg, while lutinizing hormone (LH) levels were elevated at 110 mg/kg. Moreover, histopathology of testis exhibited germ cell depletion, contraction of seminiferous tubules and disorganization of the tubular contents of testis. Compared with control, mRNA expression of StAR, P450scc and 17{beta}-HSD in testis was significantly decreased after exposure of 275 mg/kg MEQ while AR and 3{beta}-HSD mRNA expression were significantly elevated at the 110 mg/kg MEQ group. Taken together, our findings provide the first and direct evidence in vivo for the formation of free radicals during the MEQ metabolism through N {yields} O group reduction, which may have implications to understand the possible mechanism of male infertility related to quinoxaline derivatives.

Ihsan, Awais, E-mail: awais.dr@gmail.com [National Reference Laboratory of Veterinary Drug Residues and MOA Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wang Xu [National Reference Laboratory of Veterinary Drug Residues and MOA Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Liu Zhaoying [National Reference Laboratory of Veterinary Drug Residues and MOA Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Veterinary Medicine, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, Hunan 410128 (China); Wang Yulian [National Reference Laboratory of Veterinary Drug Residues and MOA Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang Xianju [National Reference Laboratory of Veterinary Drug Residues and MOA Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Pharmacy, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu Yu; Yu Huan; Zhang Hongfei; Li Tingting; Yang Chunhui [National Reference Laboratory of Veterinary Drug Residues and MOA Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Yuan Zonghui, E-mail: yuan5802@mail.hzau.edu.cn [National Reference Laboratory of Veterinary Drug Residues and MOA Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The role of research evidence in school improvement : a case study of corrective action schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Publishing. Yin, R. K. (Male Years of Experience School/Total ILT female AcademicLeadership Team None None School Leader Female Male Female

Salas, Minerva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 0 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 28 White Female 6 Workforce Diversity Kansas City Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER...

129

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

7 Asian Female 6 Hispanic Male 8 Hispanic Female 7 White Male 128 White Female 83 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Immedidate Office of the Deputy Administrator (NA-20) As of...

130

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3 Asian Female 4 Hispanic Male 21 Hispanic Female 47 White Male 61 White Female 92 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Management & Budget, NA-MB As of Sep...

131

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 4 Hispanic Male 5 Hispanic Female 4 White Male 30 White Female 19 Workforce Diversity Livermore Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER DIVERSITY...

132

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 1 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 1 White Male 46 White Female 22 Workforce Diversity Y-12 Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE DIVERSITY GENDER 51...

133

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 0 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 3 White Male 9 White Female 1 Workforce Diversity Office of the Administrator (NA-1) As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE...

134

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 0 Hispanic Male 5 Hispanic Female 5 White Male 44 White Female 13 Workforce Diversity Pantex Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE DIVERSITY GENDER 57...

135

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 0 Hispanic Male 20 Hispanic Female 11 White Male 53 White Female 17 Workforce Diversity Los Alamos Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER...

136

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9 Asian Female 5 Hispanic Male 18 Hispanic Female 12 White Male 101 White Female 49 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Immediate Office of the Deputy Administrator (DP) (NA-10) As of...

137

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 3 Hispanic Male 7 Hispanic Female 5 White Male 52 White Female 20 Workforce Diversity Nevada Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER DIVERSITY 64...

138

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 7 Hispanic Female 18 White Male 40 White Female 25 DIVERSITY GENDER Workforce Diversity As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE Associate...

139

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 13 Hispanic Female 17 White Male 37 White Female 17 DIVERSITY GENDER Workforce Diversity Sandia Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL...

140

Sexual selection of co-operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advocates of sexual selection theory have argued that various male traits, such as male co-operative behavior towards females, can evolve through female preference for mating with those males who possess that trait. This paper reports on the results ...

M. Afzal Upal

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Characterization of the Bone Loss and Recovery Response at the Distal Femur Metaphysis of the Adult Male Hindlimb Unloaded Rat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extended periods of mechanical unloading are known to be detrimental to bone health. Astronauts who spend months in microgravity aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are at particular risk. It is anticipated that NASA will not drastically increase the size of the astronaut corps, and this will mean increased likelihood of repeat missions for more astronauts. Thus, it is important to better understand the effects that prolonged, multiple bouts of unloading have on bone. This study utilized the hindlimb unloaded (HU) rat model to examine bone loss and recovery for single and double unloading bouts. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 months old) were randomized into the following groups: baseline (sacrificed at 6 months), 1HU7 (unloaded for 1 month, weight-bearing recovery for 3 months), 2HU10 (unloaded for 1 month, recovered for 2 months, unloaded for another month, and then recovered 2 months), 1HU10 (normal cage activity until 1 month HU ending at month 10, 2 month recovery followed), and aging controls (remained ambulatory throughout experiment). Every month (28 days), animals were terminated and the left femurs were excised, resulting in n=15 per group for each time point. Mineral and geometric properties were measured using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) at the distal femur metaphysis, and quasi-static reduced platen compression (RPC) was used to estimate the mechanical properties of cancellous bone. Strength indices based on pQCT parameters were calculated as predictors of mechanical properties. Bone mass properties decreased due to HU and recovered within 2-3 months post-HU. A combination of increased periosteal apposition and endocortical resorption also occurred during HU. The initial HU bout suppressed normal age-related increases in mechanical properties and recovered within 1-2 months. Cancellous compressive strength index (CSI) most closely matched changes in mechanical properties. A second HU bout after two months recovery had a less detrimental effect on pQCT parameters but a greater negative impact on mechanical properties, when compared to pre-HU values. The opposite is true for mechanical properties if loss is characterized relative to aging controls. Recovery after the second HU period did not appear to be significantly affected by a previous bout of HU.

Davis, Joshua Morgan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

"We'll get married if it rains": Farm women, courtship, and marriage in 1950s west Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is a study of courtship and the development of dating in 1950s West Texas. But aside from simply looking at courtship, this project… (more)

Humphreys, Krystal Amanda

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Radiation for Hodgkin's Lymphoma in Young Female Patients: A New Technique to Avoid the Breasts and Decrease the Dose to the Heart  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To demonstrate how, in young female patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma, using an inclined board technique can further decrease the volume of breasts and heart in the treatment field. Methods and Materials: An inclined board was constructed with the ability to mount an Aquaplast face mask, a Vacu-Lock, and a hip stopper. Eight female patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma were planned and compared using the conventional flat position and the inclined board position. All patients on the inclined board were planned with 90{sup o} degree table position and 15{sup o} gantry angle rotation to compensate for the beam divergence resulting from the patient's position on the inclined board. Dose-volume histograms were generated, as well as the mean V30 and V5 of both breasts and heart using both treatment positions. Results: The mean value of V30 of the right breast, left breast, and heart decreased from 3%, 3%, and 13%, respectively, using the flat position to 0, 0.4%, and 5%, respectively, using the inclined board. The mean value of V5 of the right breast, left breast, and heart decreased from 6%, 13%, and 36%, respectively, using the flat position to 2%, 8%, and 29%, respectively, using the inclined board. Conclusions: Compared with conventional flat positioning, this simple device and technique allows better sparing of the breasts and the heart while maintaining comparable target coverage and total lung dose.

Dabaja, Bouthaina S., E-mail: bdabaja@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rebueno, Neal C.S.; Mazloom, Ali; Thorne, Scott; Perrin, Kelly J.; Tolani, Naresh; Das, Pragnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Iyengar, Puneeth; Reed, Valerie K.; Horace, Patrecia; Salehpour, Mohammad R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Architectural Design Factors Of Domestic Violence Shelters That Affect Outcomes For Female Domestic Violence Victims: A Naturalistic Inquiry To Establish Grounded Theory For Future Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing domestic violence shelters for women must be considered from a feminist perspective, inclusive of theories of embodiment, as the female victim's emotional state (mind) is a critical component in determining her overall state (i.e., level of distress). The primary objective of this study (Specific Aim 1) was to identify the mental and emotional state of female domestic violence victims upon entry into a shelter as a means of establishing specific user needs which should directly impact the design of the shelter. The primary hypothesis (Hypothesis 1) was that upon entry into a shelter environment, victims are experiencing high levels of distress compared to normative controls. The secondary objective of this study (Specific Aim 2) was to identify shelter users? perceptions of the current shelter environment in which they lived as a foundation for matching specific design criteria with the specific needs of the female domestic violence victim (i.e., stress reduction) in an attempt to understand the relationship between user needs and individual design characteristics of the shelter. The secondary exploratory hypothesis (Hypothesis 2) was that anxiety or stress is reduced over time; therefore, the architectural design of a shelter that promotes independence will result in less distress among domestic violence victims utilizing the shelter. Thirty-three domestic violence victims in Fort Worth, Texas participated in focus groups and interviews conducted over a four-month period of time in 2009. Qualitative analysis of this data yielded four emergent themes: (1) loss of independence and control: the second layer of fear; (2) the search for security; (3) reconnecting to self; and (4) expressions of humanity. Quantitative analysis was utilized to measure participant stress levels at three intervals during their thirty day shelter program: (1) within the first twenty-four hours of shelter entry; (2) seven to ten days after shelter entry; and (3) fourteen or more days after shelter entry. Findings of this researcher have been utilized to generate design objectives that can be extrapolated to apply to other locations of shelters and could impact the design of new facilities as well as the redesign of current shelters.

Prestwood, Laura E.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Effects of conventional or low bull to female ratio and utilization of reproductive tract scores in extensively-managed, natural mating breeding groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current study involved two experiments which were conducted at the Texas A&M Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Uvalde (semi-arid environment) from 2002 to 2004. In experiment one, Bonsmara bulls (n = 19; 20-24 mo of age) were joined with multiparous, crossbred females (n =586) for 90 d in 2003 and 2004. Bulls were allotted by selected physical traits, seminal traits, social rank, and serving capacity to one of two bull to female ratio (BFR) treatments: Conventional (1:21-1:29; n = 6 pastures) or Low (1:47-1:52; n = 2 pastures) BFR. Pregnancy rate (P = 0.33), calving rate (P = 0.26), and calving date (P = 0.22) did not differ between Conventional and Low BFR treatments. Post-breeding evaluation of bulls in 2002 (n = 16) indicated that social rank, but not seminal traits, was significantly correlated with pre-breeding values (P < 0.05). The current study demonstrates that Low BFR can be utilized in single- and multisire, 90-d breeding pastures of up to 2,090 ha without adversely affecting reproductive performance. In experiment two, yearling, one-half or three-quarter Bonsmara heifers (n = 106; 11-14 mo of age) were palpated per rectum and assigned a reproductive tract score (RTS) immediately prior to the beginning of the breeding season. Reproductive performance was measured in their two subsequent breeding years in order to estimate the value of the RTS system in extensively-managed, natural mating, 90-d breeding season programs. RTS was positively correlated (p < 0.01) with frame score (r = 0.25), age (r = 0.31), weaning weight (r = 0.47), and the weight of the heifer on the day of RTS exam (r = 0.56). The RTS means by dam parity also differed (P < 0.03). A lower (P < 0.01) percentage of females conceived during each of their first two breeding seasons for heifers of RTS 1 and 2 (65.2%) than for heifers of RTS 3, 4, and 5 (91.2%). Females with a RTS of 1 had a lower pregnancy rate over each of their first two breeding seasons, conceived later during their first breeding season, weaned lighter first calves, and remained lighter each year for fall body weight and body condition score than did heifers with RTS of 2 to 5 (P < 0.05). Collectively, the results of the current study indicate that heifers with a RTS of 1 immediately prior to a 90-d breeding season should be culled. Consideration should also be given to eliminating RTS 2 heifers, but further studies will be needed to confirm the potential economic advantage of this practice.

Rathmann, Ryan James

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Effects of 28 Days of Beta-Alanine and Creatine Monohydrate Supplementation on Muscle Carnosine, Body Composition and Exercise Performance in Recreationally Active Females  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early research with beta-alanine (beta-ALA) supplementation has shown increases in muscle carnosine as well as improvements in body composition, exercise performance and blood lactate levels. Creatine monohydrate supplementation has been extensively researched for its effects on anaerobic exercise performance. Recently, a new line of studies have examined the combined effects beta-ALA and creatine supplementation on anaerobic exercise performance and lactate threshold. The purpose of the present study is to examine the acute and chronic effects of beta-ALA supplementation with and without creatine monohydrate on body composition, aerobic and anaerobic exercise performance, and muscle carnosine and phosphagen levels in college-aged recreationally active females. Thirty-two females were randomized in a double-blind placebo controlled manner into one of four supplementation groups including beta-ALA only, creatine only, beta-ALA and creatine combined and placebo. Participants supplemented for four weeks and reported for testing at baseline, day 7 and day 28. Testing sessions consisted of a resting muscle biopsy of the vastus lateralis, body composition measurements, a graded exercise test on the cycle ergometer for VO2max and lactate threshold, and multiple Wingate tests for anaerobic exercise performance. Results showed all supplementation strategies increasing muscle carnosine levels over placebo after four weeks, but not between groups. Muscle creatine increased for all groups after four weeks, but not between groups. There were improvements for all groups with body composition after four weeks, despite the present study not including a specific training protocol. There were no group differences observed for aerobic exercise, blood lactate levels, lactate threshold, ventilatory threshold, peak power, mean power, total work or rate of fatigue. There were some trends for anaerobic exercise indicating groups supplementing with creatine may have greater improvements, however, these findings were not statistically significant. The present study failed to show any additive effects of beta-ALA and creatine supplementation for body composition, aerobic exercise, lactate threshold or anaerobic exercise measures. This could be due to the small sample size resulting in low power and effect sizes. Previous research has demonstrated that four weeks of beta-ALA and creatine supplementation was enough time to increase muscle carnosine and phosphagen levels. However, perhaps more time is needed for performance adaptations to occur, especially without the addition of an exercise training component.

Kresta, Julie Yong

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Author's personal copy Available online at www.sciencedirect.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.elsevier.com/locate/paid Male mate retention mediates the relationship between female sexual infidelity and female-directed violence

Farnaz Kaighobadi; Valerie G. Starratt; Todd K. Shackelford

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Standards Bottom Up Approach Use C ase --- C RISP 12,000 Competing Code Listsb Gender C ode L ist 1 M Male F Female U Unknown Gender C ode L ist 2 01 Male 02 Female 03...

149

Pronominal Reference in Sentences about Persons or Things: An Electrophysiological Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

German pronouns (erMALE/masculine, sieFEMALE/feminine) that refer to a person are determined by the biological gender (MALE/FEMALE) and/or syntactic gender (masculine/feminine) of the person. Pronouns (ermasculine, siefeminine) ...

Anke Hammer; Bernadette M. Jansma; Monique Lamers; Thomas F. Münte

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay for the measurement of urodilatin and. alpha. -hANP in the urine of healthy males  

SciTech Connect

Urodilatin (ANP-(95-126)), a natriuretic peptide in urine, and {alpha}-hANP (ANP-(99-126)) are crossreactive in the radioimmunoassay of {alpha}-hANP (ANP-RIA). The authors therefore developed a method to separate physiological amounts of urodilatin and {alpha}-hANP in urine by high-performance liquid chromatography followed by ANP-RIA of the separated fractions. They studied urine samples of 10 healthy adult males with a plasma {alpha}-hANP level of 41 {plus minus} 21 pg/ml (mean {plus minus} SD) and a total urinary ANP-RIA reactivity of 40 {plus minus} 21 pg/ml. In all urine samples they found three peaks of ANP-RIA reactivity, the first one coeluting with synthetic urodilatin, the second one with the retention time of {alpha}-hANP and a late eluting ANP-RIA-reactive peak, possibly containing degradation products. The ratio of urodilatin/{alpha}-hANP was 0.77 {plus minus} 0.17.

Solc, J.; Bauer, K.; Timnik, A.; Doehlemann, C.; Strom, T.M.; Weil, J. (Univ. of Munich, Muenchen (West Germany)); Solcova, A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

doi:10.1093/alcalc/agl085 THE GLYCINE REUPTAKE INHIBITOR ORG 25935 DECREASES ETHANOL INTAKE AND PREFERENCE IN MALE WISTAR RATS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — Previous findings from our group indicate that accumbal glycine receptors (GlyRs) are involved in mediating the dopamine (DA) activating effects of ethanol (EtOH), and that administration of glycine locally into the nucleus accumbens (nAc) reduces EtOH consumption in EtOH high-preferring rats. Aims: The present study examines the influence of a systemically administered glycine reuptake inhibitor, Org 25935, on EtOH preference and intake, in male Wistar rats with an EtOH preference>60 % (during continuous access to a bottle of EtOH, 6 % v/v, and a bottle of water), called EP>60 rats, as well as in animals with an EtOH preference 60 and EPwater. Results: Org 25935 decreased EtOH intake and EtOH preference, as compared with vehicle, whereas water intake was unaffected. This effect was dose-dependent, developed gradually and was sustained for up to 40 days, also after introduction of an alcohol deprivation period. Conclusion: It is suggested that Org 25935, and possibly also other GlyT1 inhibitors, can represent a new pharmacological treatment principle for alcohol dependence or abuse.

Anna Molander; Helga Höifödt Lidö; Elin Löf; Mia Ericson; Bo Söderpalm

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Pose-estimation and pose-invariant recognition with an extended hierarchical model of the ventral stream Heejung Kim, Joel Z Leibo, Tomaso Poggio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

features such as male/femaleness, fatness, muscularity, and limb proportion. We rendered each of the 40

Poggio, Tomaso

153

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

6 6 YEAR 2011 Males 7 Females 9 YEAR 2011 SES 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 GS 15 2 GS 13 2 GS 12 1 GS 11 1 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 3 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 4 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator of External Affairs, NA-EA As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 7 43.8% 9 56.3% Gender Males Females 6.3% 56.3% 12.5% 12.5% 6.3% 6.3% Pay Plan SES NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) GS 15 GS 13 GS 12 GS 11 0.0% 0.0% 6.3% 18.8% 6.3% 0.0% 6.3% 0.0% 25.0% 37.5% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male Hispanic Female White Male White Female FY11 Workforce Diversity

154

Human Nature, in press. Why Do the Karo Batak Prefer Women with Big Feet?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

human males and females judge attractiveness (Barber 1995; Buss 1994; Geary et al. 2004; Shackelford et on the attractiveness of potential female partners (Shackelford et al. 2005; Buss 1989). The emphasis on female

Kushnick, Geoff

155

Health Care Interventions for Gender-based Violence: Formative Research with Primary Care Physicians and Young Married Women in Southern India to Explore Feasibility and Specific Needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

San Francisco, and RTI International for managing the awardsof the St. Johns Research Institute and RTI International.public health analyst at RTI international and work closely

Chibber, Karuna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Same-Sex Couples and Marriage: Model Legislation for Allowing Same-Sex Couples to Marry or All Couples to Form a Civil Union  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D OM . R EL . L AW (2011)); Vermont: Act of Apr. 10, 2009,domestic partnerships); Vermont: Act of Apr. 26, 2000, 20002012) (recognizing a Vermont civil union under Massachusetts

Kuehl, Sheila James; Pizer, Jennifer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 1 YEAR 2011 Males 18 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 2 EJ/EK 2 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 35 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 9 Asian Male 0 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 2 Hispanic Female 6 White Male 12 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Information Management & Chief Information Officer, NA-IM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 18 43.9% 23 56.1% Gender Males Females 4.9% 4.9% 85.4% 4.9% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2.4% 4.9% 7.3% 22.0% 0.0% 0.0% 4.9% 14.6% 29.3% 14.6% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

158

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

4 4 YEAR 2011 Males 21 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 3 EJ/EK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 31 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 5 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 2 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 1 Hispanic Male 6 Hispanic Female 10 White Male 13 White Female 10 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Office of General Counsel, NA-GC As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 21 47.7% 23 52.3% Gender Males Females 6.8% 2.3% 2.3% 6.8% 70.5% 11.4% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK EN 03 NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.0% 0.0% 2.3% 4.5% 2.3% 2.3% 13.6% 22.7% 29.5% 22.7% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

159

Economy of Yak Herders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

yield) from male yaks is around I kg per year and in females around 0.3 kg from measurements made from hair shorn of 8 males and 22 females. The males are clipped of all the wool growing inside the outer layer of long hairs at the upper and lower...

Gyamtsho, Pema

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Project 2012: Increasing Female Representation in Government  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hungary Croatia Bosnia and Herzegovina Rep. of MoldovaBelize (Senate) Bosnia and Herzegovina (House of Peoples)

McLean, Lindsey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

40 40 YEAR 2011 Males 68 Females 72 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJ/EK 1 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 115 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 7 Asian Male 4 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 25 Hispanic Female 26 White Male 35 White Female 37 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management, NA-APM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 68 48.6% 72 51.4% Gender Males Females 3.6% 0.7% 11.4% 82.1% 2.1% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.7% 1.4% 2.1% 5.0% 2.9% 0.0% 17.9% 18.6% 25.0% 26.4% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male

162

Subsurface drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill string comprises a first drill string member having a male end; and a second drill string member having a female end configured to be joined to the male end of the first drill string member, the male end having a threaded portion including generally square threads, the male end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the threaded portion, and the male end further having a bearing surface, the female end having a female threaded portion having corresponding female threads, the female end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the female threaded portion, and the female end having a bearing surface. Installation methods, including methods of installing instrumented probes are also provided.

Casper, William L. (Rigby, ID); Clark, Don T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grover, Blair K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mathewson, Rodney O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seymour, Craig A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

Effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin administration and high-fat diet on the body weight and hepatic estrogen metabolism in female C3H/HeN mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We studied the effect of administration of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) by i.p. injection once every 2 weeks in combination with a high-fat (HF) diet for 8 or 16 weeks on the body and organ weight changes as well as on the hepatic enzyme activity for estrogen metabolism in C3H/HeN female mice. Administration of TCDD at 100 {mu}g/kg b.w. once every 2 weeks for 8 weeks increased the body weight by 46% in the HF diet-fed animals, but not in the regular diet-fed animals. This is the first observation suggesting that TCDD at a high dose (100 {mu}g/kg b.w.), but not at lower doses (1 or 10 {mu}g/kg b.w.), may have a strong obesity-inducing effect in C3H/HeN mice fed an HF diet. While TCDD increased liver weight and decreased thymus weight in animals, these effects were enhanced by feeding animals an HF diet. Metabolism studies showed that TCDD administration for 8 or 16 weeks increased the liver microsomal activity for the 2- and 4-hydroxylation of 17{beta}-estradiol in animals fed a control diet, but surprisingly not in animals fed an HF diet. Treatment with TCDD dose-dependently increased the hepatic activity for the O-methylation of catechol estrogens in both control and HF diet-fed animals, and it also decreased the levels of liver microsomal sulfatase activity for hydrolysis of estrone-3-sulfate. TCDD did not significantly affect the hepatic enzyme activity for the glucuronidation or esterification of endogenous estrogens. It is suggested that enhanced metabolic inactivation of endogenous estrogens by hepatic estrogen-metabolizing enzymes in TCDD-treated, control diet-fed animals contributes importantly to the reduced incidence of estrogen-associated tumors in animals treated with TCDD.

Zhu Baoting [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, School of Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Susan Lehman Cullman Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Chemical Biology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers-State University of New Jersey, 164 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: BTZhu@kumc.edu; Gallo, Michael A. [Department of Environmental and Community Medicine, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: magallo@eohsi.rutgers.edu; Burger, Conney W.; Meeker, Robert J. [Department of Environmental and Community Medicine, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Cai, May Xiaoxin; Xu Shiyao [Susan Lehman Cullman Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Chemical Biology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers-State University of New Jersey, 164 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Conney, Allan H. [Susan Lehman Cullman Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Chemical Biology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers-State University of New Jersey, 164 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: aconney@rci.rutgers.edu

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 5 Hispanic Female (H, F) 4 White Male (W, M) 25 White Female (W, F) 17 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Livermore Field Office As of March 23, 2013 1.2% 4.7% 3.5%...

165

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 74 Hispanic Female (H, F) 22 White Male (W, M) 393 White Female (W, F) 19 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation...

166

Transgenic Mice for Modeling Male Infertility  

u.s. department of energy • office of science • university of california. contact webmaster • comments • policy /privacy/security ...

167

(Molecular analysis of cytoplasmic male sterility)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have determined the actual RNA sequence of four mitochondrial genes: pcf, nad3, rps12, and coxII. Because plant mitochondrial proteins cannot be predicted from DNA sequences, the actual primary structures of the encoded proteins were unknown. We have gained information concerning the process of RNA editing. Editing can occur before splicing. Our data is consistent with the hypothesis that RNA editing is not simultaneous with transcription. Unlike other systems, the process of editing in plant does not exhibit a discernable direction. As a result of our RNA editing studies, we have produced a number of clones of the proper coding regions tube used for incorporating these mitochondrial genes into the nucleus. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Hanson, M.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Changing her tune : how a transsexual woman claims a new identity through voice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The human voice is an important indicator of a person's gender. For male-to-female transgender individuals (or transsexuals) the voice is one of the most difficult parts of the gender transition. Males have larger and ...

Gammon, Katharine Stoel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

TOTAL SES SL EJ//EK EN IV EN III  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

37 46.8% No Degrees 16 20.3% SUPERVISOR RATIO SUPERVISORS SUPERVISORS RATIO 5.6 TO 1 DIVERSITY American Indian Male 1 1.3% American Indian Female 0 0.0% African American Male 3...

170

JHU2012report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

were both male and female teachers representing Baltimore City and non- Baltimore City schools, public and private schools, single sex and regular schools, secular and religious...

171

Author Biography Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author Biography Form. Title: ? Dr. ? Prof. ? Mr. ? Mrs. ? Ms. Gender: ? Male ? Female. Name: First. M.I.. Last. Current Status: Position: Company: Address:.

172

Microsoft Word - 2010 Foreign Visit Request form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to submit a Foreign Visit Request. First Name Middle Initial or "NMI" Last Name Gender Date of Birth (MMDDYYYY) City of Birth Male Female Country of Birth Country...

173

Data Format for the Interchange of Fingerprint, Facial & SMT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 18. Male Face MFACE Cats & Cat Heads CAT Female Face FFACE Dogs & Dog Heads DOG ... Boats, Ships, and Other Vessels VESSEL ...

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

174

Pharmacokinetic analysis of trichloroethylene metabolism in male B6C3F1 mice: Formation and disposition of trichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine  

SciTech Connect

Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a well-known carcinogen in rodents and concerns exist regarding its potential carcinogenicity in humans. Oxidative metabolites of TCE, such as dichloroacetic acid (DCA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCA), are thought to be hepatotoxic and carcinogenic in mice. The reactive products of glutathione conjugation, such as S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl) glutathione (DCVG), are associated with renal toxicity in rats. Recently, we developed a new analytical method for simultaneous assessment of these TCE metabolites in small-volume biological samples. Since important gaps remain in our understanding of the pharmacokinetics of TCE and its metabolites, we studied a time-course of DCA, TCA, DCVG and DCVG formation and elimination after a single oral dose of 2100 mg/kg TCE in male B6C3F1 mice. Based on systemic concentration-time data, we constructed multi-compartment models to explore the kinetic properties of the formation and disposition of TCE metabolites, as well as the source of DCA formation. We conclude that TCE-oxide is the most likely source of DCA. According to the best-fit model, bioavailability of oral TCE was {approx} 74%, and the half-life and clearance of each metabolite in the mouse were as follows: DCA: 0.6 h, 0.081 ml/h; TCA: 12 h, 3.80 ml/h; DCVG: 1.4 h, 16.8 ml/h; DCVC: 1.2 h, 176 ml/h. In B6C3F1 mice, oxidative metabolites are formed in much greater quantities ({approx} 3600 fold difference) than glutathione-conjugative metabolites. In addition, DCA is produced to a very limited extent relative to TCA, while most of DCVG is converted into DCVC. These pharmacokinetic studies provide insight into the kinetic properties of four key biomarkers of TCE toxicity in the mouse, representing novel information that can be used in risk assessment.

Kim, Sungkyoon [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Kim, David [Syngenta Crop Protection Inc, Greensboro, NC 27419 (United States); Pollack, Gary M. [Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics, Eshelmann School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Collins, Leonard B. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Rusyn, Ivan [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)], E-mail: iir@unc.edu

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Robert Van Steenwyk Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) Recommendations for Sweet Cherry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robert Van Steenwyk Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) Recommendations for Sweet of male and female SWD flies in each trap. Male SWD have spots on the tip of the wings and females have produced. The preferred ovipositional color was dark red for Bing fruit and red for Black Tartarian

Hammock, Bruce D.

176

Impact of Gender, Partner Status, and Race on Locoregional Failure and Overall Survival in Head and Neck Cancer Patients in Three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We investigated the impact of race, in conjunction with gender and partner status, on locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) in three head and neck trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Methods and Materials: Patients from RTOG studies 9003, 9111, and 9703 were included. Patients were stratified by treatment arms. Covariates of interest were partner status (partnered vs. non-partnered), race (white vs. non-white), and sex (female vs. male). Chi-square testing demonstrated homogeneity across treatment arms. Hazards ratio (HR) was used to estimate time to event outcome. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were calculated for all covariates with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p values. Results: A total of 1,736 patients were analyzed. Unpartnered males had inferior OS rates compared to partnered females (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36), partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.28), and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.32). White females had superior OS compared with white males, non-white females, and non-white males. Non-white males had inferior OS compared to white males. Partnered whites had improved OS relative to partnered non-white, unpartnered white, and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered males had inferior LRC compared to partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.09-1.46) and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.30, 95% CI, 1.05-1.62). White females had LRC superior to non-white males and females. White males had improved LRC compared to non-white males. Partnered whites had improved LRC compared to partnered and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered whites had improved LRC compared to unpartnered non-whites. Conclusions: Race, gender, and partner status had impacts on both OS and locoregional failure, both singly and in combination.

Dilling, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Dilling@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa; Paulus, Rebecca [Department of Statistics, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Forastiere, Arlene [Departments of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kian Ang, K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Departmental Listings Organization Name  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Educational Leadership Marrie Held McLaughlin Educational Leadership rebecca S. Merhar Educational Leadership

Foroosh, Hassan

178

Masters Thesis Titles: From Present back to Fall of 1990  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Educational Leadership Marrie Held McLaughlin Educational Leadership rebecca S. Merhar Educational Leadership

New Hampshire, University of

179

A Content Analysis of Female Body Imagery in Video Games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 10, 2009 ... the 1998 data set is the most comprehensive and the most recent anthropometric data set available to the public. Wire framing. A graduate ...

180

Studies Shed Light on Retention of Female Engineers - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2011... career indicated they did so because of negative working conditions, too much travel, lack of advancement or low salary, the study shows.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Size, shape, and appearance of the normal female pituitary gland  

SciTech Connect

One hundred seven women 18-65 years old were studied who were referred for suspected central nervous system disease not related to the pituitary gland or hypothalamus. High-resolution, direct, coronal, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) was used to examine the size; shape, and density of the normal pituitary gland. There were three major conclusions: (1) the height of the normal gland can be as much as 9 mm; (2) the superior margin of the gland may bulge in normal patients; and (3) both large size and convex contour appear to be associated with younger age. It was also found that serum prolactin levels do not appear to correlate with the CT appearances. Noise artifacts inherent in high-detail, thin-section, soft-tissue scanning may be a limiting factor in defining reproducible patterns in different parts of the normal pituitary gland.

Wolpert, S.M.; Molitch, M.E.; Goldman, J.A.; Wood, J.B.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Research Note Survival of Female Harlequin Ducks During Wing Molt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.000) during the 37-day interval over which remiges were replaced and individuals were rendered flightless. Our demands of feather synthesis can be met without significant depletion of endogenous protein or fat

183

Female Gubernatorial Candidates: Strategies for Overcoming Gendered Perceptions of Viability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002. Television Zanobini 67 Fowler, Linda L. , and Jenniferseeking political office (Fowler and Lawless 2009, 521). TheSenate and the White House (Fowler and Lawless 2009, 519).

Zanobini, Annie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Bars That Bound Me: A Study of Female Parolees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. Mullins. 2006. “Taking Stock: The Status of FeministPp. 217-249 in Taking Stock: The Status of Criminological

D'Auria, Stephanie Chauntel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Brain Activation during Human Male Ejaculation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structures, including shale. Recent improvements with hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," a controversial

Cooper, Robin L.

186

The Russian Male Macho Register and Performances of Masculinity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intermediate phrases “a lithium-ion battery made from coffeea difference of “A lithium-ion battery” 36 Hz. It could be

Garey, Amy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The morbidity of urethral stricture disease among male Medicare beneficiaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Los Angeles, USA. 2 Department of Urology, Detroit MedicalCenter; Detroit, Michigan, USA. Authors’ contributions JA

Anger, Jennifer T; Santucci, Richard; Grossberg, Anna L; Saigal, Christopher S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

The morbidity of urethral stricture disease among male Medicare beneficiaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

review of complications]. Arch Esp Urol 2004, 57(5):485-511.urethral stenosis]. Actas Urol Esp 1996, 20(9):786-793. 5.urethral stenosis]. Rev Clin Esp 11. Litwin MS, Saigal CS,

Anger, Jennifer T; Santucci, Richard; Grossberg, Anna L; Saigal, Christopher S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Mechanism and Behavioral Context of Male Sex Pheromone ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

were excised from host puparia 1–2 days before eclosion ... at 70·eV. Helium (1 ml/min) was used as carrier gas. Initial oven temperature was 80°C, increased at

190

FAMILY ENVIRONMENT AND SUBSTANCE USE IN ADOLESCENT MALES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between several aspects of family environment and adolescent substance use. Participants included 372 (M =… (more)

Brechting, Emily H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Structural, histochemical, and protein analysis of male reproductive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Willow biomass can be used to generate electricity by co- firing it with coal; it can be burned directly or converted to gas or liquid fuel (McIlveen-Wright et al. 2001 ...

192

ORIGINAL PAPER The energetic costs of alternative male reproductive strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for monitoring total suspended matter in small and intermediate sized lakes and reservoirs. Water Resources, Jan. 4-18, 2003 (team taught). Part of ASU's MARC (Minority Access to Research Careers) program;Susanne Neuer, October 2010 3 Mentoring General Mentor, Obama fellowship program, FY 2009/10 Faculty

Cummings, Molly E.

193

A social demographic study of the likelihood of sustaining an occupational fatality resulting in death  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores occupational fatalities to American males for the years 1998 and 1999. The focus is on predicting the likelihood that the individual will sustain an occupational injury resulting in death based on an occupational status score. Demographic variables measuring Southern residence, race, ethnicity, marital status, education and age were also included in analyses. Research questions include whether or not individuals in higher status occupations are at a decreased risk of sustaining an occupational fatality, and how the demographic variables included effect occupational fatalities. Using data from death certificates allowed me to measure the individual’s occupational status based on their “usual occupation” and find out whether or not differences exist. The thesis involves two analyses, one with the sample comprised of only males between the ages of 25 and 55 and one including only married males between the ages of 25 and 55. Logistic regression is employed as the method of analysis to model the odds of the risk of sustaining an occupational fatality that results in death. The results of the first model found only marital status to be positively and significantly related to occupational fatalities. Black, Hispanic, South and education were found to be negatively related to occupational fatalities. The main hypothesis of this thesis was not supported, however because the regression shows that with each increase on the occupational status index, no significant increase or decrease occurred in sustaining an occupational injury that resulted in death. In the second regression that included only married males, many of the relationships no longer existed. Hispanic and the education variable both lost statistical significance. The only variables to maintain significance were black and South, which were both associated with a decreased risk of sustaining an occupational injury that resulted in death. Problems with the occupational status index as a predictor for the likelihood of sustaining an occupational fatality and restrictions of the data may be the main issue that resulted in a lack of findings.

Traut, Rachel Lynn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Sexual Vines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sexual Vines Sexual Vines Name: Terry Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I purchased two celastrus scanden vines two years ago; they have grown enormously but have not produced the berries I wanted for my winter garden. I have either two males or two females I suppose. Both produced very tiny tiny sprays of flowers ... how do I tell if these are male or female? I am trying to avoid the expense of buying another set of male and female plants. Your help will be appreciated. Replies: Dear Terry, Both male and female vines need to be grown if fruit is desired. The following may be helpful: http://www.msue.msu.edu/msue/imp/modop/00000311.html http://www.bbg.org/NYMF/encyclopedia/cel/cel0030a.htm http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/consumer/poison/Celassc.htm http://www.fw.vt.edu/dendro/dendrology/syllabus/celastrusspp.htm

195

VERTEBRATES OF FISH LAKE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VERTEBRATES OF FISH LAKE CAUTION! FISH LAKE SCAVANGER HUNT RED HEADED in large dead trees. Males and females both have the majestic red head the mound. Damselflies sit with their wings folded down, which differs them

Minnesota, University of

196

San Jose Scale Management in Peaches--Bill Shane, Michigan State Uni-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and entire trees if left uncon- trolled. A characteristic, red halo-like discoloration often forms around May to late June tiny 2- winged adult males emerge to mate with females still under its grey, circular

197

The Waxwings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from something not found in any other family of birds. Usually, on the tips of the inner wing feathers of both males and females, there are shiny red appendages like blobs of...

198

Costing Cairo: An Annotated Bibiliography of the Cost Literature on ICPD Programme of Action Components in Sub-Saharan Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effectiveness of Intergrating RTI/HIV Serices with Clinic-Female (Women) Male (Men) RTI STD STI CYP Reproductive TractZNFPC) on feasibility of adding RTI diagnosis & treatment to

Fraser, Ashley; Green, Russell; Dunbar, Megan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #390: September 19, 2005 Stretch...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7% 125-199 miles 6% 200+ miles 6% Mode Personal vehicle 96% Air travel 1% Other 3% Gender Male 84% Female 16% Household income Less than 25,000 13% 25,000 - 49,000 29% More...

200

Journal of Fish Biology (2011) 79, 194204 doi:10.1111/j.1095-8649.2011.03009.x, available online at wileyonlinelibrary.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Freshwater Flake mixed with Ocean Star International Spirulina Flake food twice daily until that by exhibiting a preference for the 38-mm females, males may decrease costs associated with mating with Amazon

Upchurch, Gary - Department of Biology, Texas State University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Cockroaches:Fact or Fiction? /// COCKROACH COntROl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:Can female cockroaches reproduce without males? A:Cockroaches, like many other ani- mals (e.g., chicken), can common associates of cockroaches? A:Symbiotic intracellular bacteroids within bacteriocytes (fat body

202

Identification of avian W-linked contigs by short-read sequencing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: The female-specific W chromosomes and male-specific Y chromosomes have proven difficult to assemble with whole-genome shotgun methods, creating a demand for new approaches to identify sequence contigs specific ...

Chen, Nancy

203

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

White Male (W,M) 29 26 -10.34% White Female (W,F) 19 16 -15.79% Change DIVERSITY Change Livermore Field Office As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change GENDER...

204

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

-8.33% White Male (W,M) 34 34 0.00% White Female (W,F) 17 16 -5.88% Change DIVERSITY Change Sandia Field Office As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change GENDER...

205

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0.00% White Male (W,M) 15 13 -13.33% White Female (W,F) 8 6 -25.00% Change DIVERSITY Change Savannah River Field Office As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change...

206

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0.00% White Male (W,M) 85 71 -16.47% White Female (W,F) 33 30 -9.09% Change DIVERSITY Change NNSA Production Office (NPO) As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change...

207

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

White Male (W,M) 389 400 2.83% White Female (W,F) 21 19 -9.52% Change DIVERSITY Change Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation (NA-15) As of...

208

Office of Civil Rights, NNSA, NA 1.2, Albuquerque Complex  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2 Snap-shot, changes from Fiscal Year 2009 to Fiscal Year 2010, 4 Personnel by Percentage, 6 Comparisons to Other Workforces and the Civilian Labor Force, 7 Male and Female...

209

Method of installing subsurface barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

Nickelson, Reva A. (Shelley, ID); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sloan, Paul A. (Rigby, ID)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

210

Cottony cushion scale, Icerya purchasi, can infest a number of woody orna-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of trees. The minute red-winged male is rarely seen, and females don't need to mate to reproduce young contains 600 to 800 red eggs and may become two to three times as long as the body of the female are red with black legs and antennae. They settle along leaf veins and begin to produce the white cottony

Hammock, Bruce D.

211

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 15 Hispanic Female (H, F) 11 White Male (W, M) 49 White Female (W, F) 12 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Los Alamos Field Office As of March 23, 2013 1.0% 9.4% 28.1%...

212

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 12 Hispanic Female (H, F) 11 White Male (W, M) 34 White Female (W, F) 16 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Sandia Field Office As of March 23, 2013 2.5% 8.8% 13.8% 1.3%...

213

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 6 Hispanic Female (H, F) 6 White Male (W, M) 51 White Female (W, F) 14 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Nevada Field Office As of March 23, 2013 1.1% 3.4% 1.1% 31.8%...

214

Running on the Web: Online Self-Presentation Strategies in Mixed-Gender Races  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Online self-presentation strategies are critical for female candidates to develop and deliver effectively. This is because the media appear to cover male and female candidates differently in news coverage, and research-based evidence continues to suggest ... Keywords: campaign websites, candidate self-presentation strategies, women candidates

Mary Christine Banwart, Kelly L. Winfrey

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

SETL for Internet Data Processing David Bacon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-accessing features: courtship, ornaments, and chasing. Female X. nigrensis prefer males of large or intermediate size.31 (Presens) and Loliresp (LoligoSystems) software control programs. The flush pump was used to remove. The courtship behaviors of large and intermediate sized males can include a number of behaviors including

Mohri, Mehryar

216

Communication behavior and relationship satisfaction among American and Chinese newlywed couples.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Norton. Buss, D. M. , Shackelford, T. K. , Kirkpatrick, L.to marry (e.g. , Buss, Shackelford, Kirkpatrick, & Larsen,

Williamson, Hannah C; Ju, Xiaoyan; Bradbury, Thomas N; Karney, Benjamin R; Fang, Xiaoyi; Liu, Xuanwen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Influence of Diet on Performance Parameters, Intestinal Lesion Development, and Oocyst Cycling in Live Oocyst Vaccinated Replacement Broiler Breeders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two consecutive experiments were conducted to evaluate the influence of dietary composition, specifically protein and amino acid profile, on performance parameters, oocyst output, and lesion development in male and female replacement broiler breeders of two different genetic lines vaccinated with a live coccidiosis vaccine. Dietary formulations were based on either breeder specific recommendations or formulations of a broiler integrator. On day 28, males of each genetic line were added to female pens to evaluate the effect of co-mingling on male performance. Lesion assessment was performed on three separate occasions per each experiment. Fecal material was collected to determine oocyst cycling patterns. During experiment 1, flock uniformity was improved (P less than/equal to 0.05) in Line A males fed the integrator diet. Increased body weight and improved uniformity of Line B females was observed with the breeder recommended diet. Co-mingling negatively impacted (P less than/equal to 0.05) male body weight. Multiple oocyst peaks were observed in both genetic lines, with the first peak occurring at approximately 16 to 18 days post placement. This first peak tended to have the highest observed magnitude and corresponded with the highest level of intestinal lesions observed during the experiment. In experiment 2, diet impacted (P less than/equal to 0.05) average body weight in Line A males, Line B males, and Line B females. Line A males fed the breeder recommended diet had increased (P less than/equal to 0.05) body weight at the termination of the experiment. Line B males and females fed the breeder recommended diet had increased (P less than/equal to 0.05) body weights throughout the experiment beginning on day 7. Negative effects (P less than/equal to 0.05) on male body weight resulting from co-mingling were observed. Oocyst peaks were delayed and at a lower magnitude in both genetic lines compared to peaks observed in experiment 1. Dietary interactions were observed in both experiments where magnitude of peak, duration of oocyst output, and severity of lesion development was influenced by diet in both male and female genetic lines. These data indicate that co-mingling negatively impacts male performance and dietary composition can impact male and female performance, oocyst cycling, and lesion development during coccidiosis vaccination in replacement broiler breeders and should be taken into consideration when rearing replacement broiler breeders.

Oden, Leslee Ann

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA); Culligan, Matthew (Berkeley, CA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

219

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

220

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Male Development Male Development Name: Kurt Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside U.S. Country: Brazil Date: Spring 2012 Question: I heard that the male fetus has to go through stages to definitely become a male - that all fetuses are initially female, and that only after 8 weeks does the male fetus develop testicles, and that after that, I understand there are 3 more stages of development for the fetus to go through before definitely becoming male. What are these stages? Replies: Embryos are male or female from the moment of conception because they have either XX or XY chromosomes. But they don't start to develop their sexual phenotypes for about 6-8 weeks. Embryos have two nonspecific gonads and two sets of nonspecific tubes. If there is a Y chromosome, a gene called SRY turns on around 6-8 weeks and starts male development. The nonspecific gonads become testes and the tubes become the vas deferens. It causes the second set of tubes to degenerate. It also causes the testes to begin secreting testosterone which also adds to the masculine phenotype. There is a step by step process that happens. If there is a block in the process everything stops there. So some parts could develop and others not.For instance, internal structures might develop but external not. This would result in an ambiguous phenotype which may be mistaken for a female.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fighting with Gender: Understanding the Contemporary Combat Experiences of Servicewomen and Servicemen in the United States Military  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the integration of women into the United States armed forces, servicemen have been expected to be the fighters while servicewomen largely occupied safe or nurturing support roles as dictated by American society at large. The ground combat exclusion policy, which officially barred women from all positions involving ground fighting, limited women to support units which, in theory, were strategically located in the rear and far removed from the dangers of the front lines. As we experienced in the recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the differentiation of gender roles became irrelevant in asymmetrical wars with no established front lines. Female soldiers found themselves in a variety of combat situations of indirect and direct nature, as I learned through the qualitative interviews that I conducted at Fort Hood, Texas, and Fort Bragg, North Carolina. In this dissertation, I examined the narratives of female and male soldiers who experienced combat in Afghanistan and Iraq, to discern: 1) whether females and males discussed their scenarios differently; 2) whether experiencing combat affected soldiers’ ideas about their various gender roles; 3) whether perceptions on servicewomen’s combat participation differed by sex; and 4) whether soldiers’ opinions on women’s inclusion in combat arms military occupation specialties differed by sex. What I found in my study was that: 1) female and male soldiers largely discussed their combat experiences in similar ways; 2) while familial gender roles were largely unchanged as a result of combat deployment, the majority of female and male soldiers perceived changes in their roles as women and men – where women often discussed feeling stronger, empowered, and independent, and men often identified their changes in terms of maturity and personal growth; 3) that exposure to women’s roles in combat deployments had a more positive effect on the perceptions of male soldiers than those of female soldiers; and 4) that both female and male participants largely disagreed with the ground combat exclusion policy for women.

Serrato, Margie

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Gender differences in methionine accumulation and metabolism in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes: Potential roles in toxicity  

SciTech Connect

L-Methionine (Met) is hepatotoxic at high concentrations. Because Met toxicity in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes is gender-dependent, the goal of this study was to assess the roles of Met accumulation and metabolism in the increased sensitivity of male hepatocytes to Met toxicity compared with female hepatocytes. Male hepatocytes incubated with Met (30 mM) at 37 {sup o}C exhibited higher levels of intracellular Met at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 h, respectively, compared to female hepatocytes. Conversely, female hepatocytes had higher levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine compared to male hepatocytes. Female hepatocytes also exhibited higher L-methionine-L-sulfoxide levels relative to control hepatocytes, whereas the increases in L-methionine-D-sulfoxide (Met-D-O) levels were similar in hepatocytes of both genders. Addition of aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), an inhibitor of Met transamination, significantly increased Met levels at 1.5 h and increased Met-D-O levels at 1.0 and 1.5 h only in Met-exposed male hepatocytes. No gender differences in cytosolic Met transamination activity by glutamine transaminase K were detected. However, female mouse liver cytosol exhibited higher methionine-DL-sulfoxide (MetO) reductase activity than male mouse liver cytosol at low (0.25 and 0.5 mM) MetO concentrations. Collectively, these results suggest that increased cellular Met accumulation, decreased Met transmethylation, and increased Met and MetO transamination in male mouse hepatocytes may be contributing to the higher sensitivity of the male mouse hepatocytes to Met toxicity in comparison with female mouse hepatocytes.

Dever, Joseph T. [Department of Comparative Biosciences and Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Elfarra, Adnan A. [Department of Comparative Biosciences and Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)], E-mail: aelfarra@wisc.edu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Stable isotope assessment of temporal and geographic differences in feeding ecology of northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feeding ecology of northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) and their primary prey was examined by analyzing their skin tissues for stable-carbon and nitrogen isotope content. The Pribilof Island northern fur seal population was designated as depleted in 1988 because their numbers were, and continue to be, below their optimum sustainable population. The primary cause for this decline is thought to be a decrease in their prey base in the eastern Bering Sea. Determination of fur seal feeding ecology is important so that disturbances in prey availability can be further studied. This study was able to augment current northern fur seal dietary knowledge using stable-carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis. Parturient and lactating female and juvenile male skin tissue and prey items were analyzed. Female and male tissues were collected in July, August and November, and July and August, 1997, respectively, from both St. Paul and St. George Islands. July/August samples represented spring migratory diet, while November samples illustrated breeding season diet. Females were found to be more enriched isotopically in ¹?N and ¹³C over juvenile males during their migration. November females on St. Paul island were enriched in ¹?N over July/August females, while St. George females were not significantly enriched. July/August females on St. George Island were more enriched in ¹³C over November females, while St. Paul females were not significantly enriched. There were no differences in ¹?N or ¹³C enrichment for migratory animals of the some sex traveling to either island, and there was no difference in ¹?N between islands for November females. There was a significant difference in ð¹³C values between islands for November females with St. Paul being more enriched. Prey analysis showed step-wise enrichments for two species and prey stable isotope values were compared to fur seal values for an estimation of dietary content. Females appear to be feeding at a higher trophic level and feeding more coastally than males during migration. Migratory females appear to be feeding more coastally than breeding season females.

Kurle, Carolyn Mary

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Effects of estrogen and gender on cataractogenesis induced by high-LET radiation  

SciTech Connect

Planning for long-duration manned lunar and interplanetary missions requires an understanding of radiation-induced cataractogenesis. Previously, it was demonstrated that low-linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation with 10 Gy of {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays resulted in an increased incidence of cataracts in male rats compared to female rats. This gender difference was not due to differences in estrogen, since male rats treated with the major secreted estrogen 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) showed an identical increase compared to untreated males. We now compare the incidence and rate of progression of cataracts induced by high-LET radiation in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats received a single dose of 1 Gy of 600 MeV {sup 56}Fe ions. Lens opacification was measured at 2-4 week intervals with a slit lamp. The incidence and rate of progression of radiation-induced cataracts was significantly increased in the animals in which estrogen was available from endogenous or exogenous sources. Male rats with E2 capsules implanted had significantly higher rates of progression compared to male rats with empty capsules implanted (P = 0.025) but not compared to the intact female rats. These results contrast with data obtained after low-LET irradiation and suggest the possibility that the different types of damage caused by high- and low-LET radiation may be influenced differentially by steroid sex hormones.

Henderson, M.A.; Rusek, A.; Valluri, S.; Garrett, J.; Lopez, J.; Caperell-Grant, A.; Mendonca, M.; Bigsby, R.; Dynlacht, J.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Holy Mother of Chiri Mountain: A Female Mountain Spirit in Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was highly popular with pilgrims throughout the Chos?n dy-su witnessed several groups of pilgrims travelling to theon the custom of local pilgrim- ages to Chiri Mountain and

Stiller, Maya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

I used to be gifted: case studies of lost potential among adolescent females  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This case study focuses on the influence of certain sociocultural factors on the ability of adolescent girls to fulfill their potentials. Specifically, the purpose of this research is to advance an alternative perspective on the relationship between the sociocultural influences of friendship, mother/daughter relationship, school experience, and body image and a loss of potential among adolescent girls from a historical, poststructural, postmodern-feminist perspective. The dissertation is presented in the form of narrative from both the authorÂ?s and girlsÂ? and womenÂ?s perspectives in order to seek a rich and thick description. Throughout the study, the author integrates moments from her own journey during adolescence with the young girls and their mothers or grandmothers encountering the oftentimes overwhelming negative sociocultural challenges existing today. The data consist of interviews with four girls and four women; interviews with two school personnel; and observations covering 7 weeks of guided discussion groups. Personal stories are closely examined with current and in-depth research to produce valuable insight and recommendations linking sociocultural factors and potentiality among adolescent girls. In general, these data contribute to an existing body of knowledge as well as advance educational theory regarding adolescent girls and potentiality. Moreover, these findings bolster the argument that, although realistic approaches to create necessary change require a certain resignation to the forces that exist within our culture, educational psychologists will increase the disciplineÂ?s impact on students by conducting comprehensive research that creates and supports genuine efforts to teach girls effective strategies on ways to not relinquish control to relentless, disingenuous sociocultural pressures. The case study indicates that, although many positive gains have been made to support young girls, there remain many obstacles as well.

McDonnell, Virginia Maurer

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Berries Bittersweet: Visual Representations of Black Female Sexuality in Contemporary American Pornography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

within the industry as the “big cock market” i.e. the blackanal series, How’s that Big Cock Gonna Fit in My Ass? “ [f]the market power of the “big cock market” of interracial

Cruz, Ariane Renee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Questions and Answers About Female Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the radiation from a mammogram? Should I worry about this? Data from the atomic bomb survivors and other groups. The single most effective way a woman can detect early breast cancer is through routine mammography medical history · Physical exam which includes palpation of the breast and nearby lymph nodes · Imaging

229

Berries Bittersweet: Visual Representations of Black Female Sexuality in Contemporary American Pornography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

so-called tube sites or DIY (do it yourself) tube sites (for amateur and do-it-yourself (DIY) pornographers enablingfor non-professional and/or DIY pornographers, while the

Cruz, Ariane Renee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Incidence of female breast cancer among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-1985  

SciTech Connect

An incidence survey among atomic bomb survivors identified 807 breast cancer cases, and 20 second breast cancers. As in earlier surveys of the Life Span Study population, a strongly linear radiation dose response was found, with the highest dose-specific excess relative risk (ERR) among survivors under 20 years old at the time of the bombings. Sixty-eight of the cases were under 10 years old at exposure, strengthening earlier reports of a marked excess risk associated with exposure during infancy and childhood. A much lower, but marginally significant, dose response was seen among women exposed at 40 years and older. It was not possible, however to discriminate statistically between age at exposure and age at observation for risk as the more important determinant of ERR per unit dose. A 13-fold ERR at 1 Sv was found for breast cancer occurring before age 35, compared to a 2-fold excess after age 35, among survivors exposed before age 20. This a posteriori finding, based on 27 exposed, known-dose, early-onset cases, suggests the possible existence of a susceptible genetics subgroup. Further studies, involving family histories of cancer and investigations at the molecular level, are suggested to determine whether such a subgroup exists. 41 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Tokunaga, Masayoshi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)]|[Kagoshima Municipal Hospital (Japan); Land, C.E. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Tokuoka, Shoji; Akiba, Suminori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Nishimori, Issei; Soda, Midori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A QTL analysis of female variation contributing to refractoriness and sperm competition in Drosophila melanogaster.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

single-marker analysis. CIM results indicate a contributionSecond chromosome Fig. 5. CIM linkage groups that containThird chromosome Fig. 4. CIM linkage groups containing

Lawniczak, Mara K N; Begun, David J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

of LaborMentoring and Segregation: Female-Led Firms and Gender Wage Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any opinions expressed here are those of the author(s) and not those of the institute. Research disseminated by IZA may include views on policy, but the institute itself takes no institutional policy positions. The Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn is a local and virtual international research center and a place of communication between science, politics and business. IZA is an independent nonprofit company supported by Deutsche Post World Net. The center is associated with the University of Bonn and offers a stimulating research environment through its research networks, research support, and visitors and doctoral programs. IZA engages in (i) original and internationally competitive research in all fields of labor economics, (ii) development of policy concepts, and (iii) dissemination of research results and concepts to the interested public. IZA Discussion Papers often represent preliminary work and are circulated to encourage discussion. Citation of such a paper should account for its provisional character. A revised version may be available directly from the author. IZA Discussion Paper No. 3210

Ana Rute Cardoso; Rudolf Winter-ebmer; Ana Rute Cardoso; Rudolf Winter-ebmer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Amphetamine effects on startle gating in normal women and female rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nucleus accumbens (NAC) catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT)low activity to the enzyme catechol-O-methyl transferase (

Talledo, Jo A.; Sutherland Owens, Ashley N.; Schortinghuis, Tijmen; Swerdlow, Neal R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

17?-Estradiol Prevents Early-Stage Atherosclerosis in Estrogen Receptor-Alpha Deficient Female Mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E 2 have been demonstrated for catechol estrogens (estrogensconverted to catechol estro- gens via oxidation) where

Villablanca, Amparo C.; Tenwolde, Amy; Lee, Michael; Huck, Melissa; Mumenthaler, Shannon; Rutledge, John C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

An updated catalogue of salivary gland transcripts in the adult female mosquito, Anopheles gambiae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1993). The salivary catechol oxidase/peroxidase activitiesof the salivary peroxidase/catechol oxidase of the mosquitoas a vasodilator by its catechol-oxidase activity (Ribeiro

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Death Penalty: How Newspaper Coverage Has Perpetuated Negative Stereotypes about Female Violence & Gender Roles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calmly…”(Hicks, 1989). Gender Stereotypes (12Total): A)3). Demeanor Total: 4). Gender Stereotypes a). Feminine b).System. ” Columbia Journal of Gender and the Law, 11, 38.

Kraybill, Jeanine E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Gender Identity in Action: Chinese Female Activists’ Gender Repertoires in a Globalizing Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sociology, UCSD 2008 Thinking Gender Conference ReferencesMarie Goetz. 1997. “Who Needs [Sex] When You have [Gender]?Conflicting Discourse on Gender in Beijing. ” Feminist

Han, Ling

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Berries Bittersweet: Visual Representations of Black Female Sexuality in Contemporary American Pornography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smith, Seth. The Big Book of Porn: A Penetrating Look at theUncensored Oral History of the Porn Film Industry. New York:Press, 1993. Alice Walker, “Porn” in You Can’t Keep a Good

Cruz, Ariane Renee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

An updated catalogue of salivary gland transcripts in the adult female mosquito, Anopheles gambiae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an epidemiologic tool in Lyme disease research. Am. J.in the saliva of the Lyme disease tick vector Ixodes

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Plant-based lipid blends can completely replace menhaden fish oil in female white  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

45 Flax Canola Corn100% Fish Dietary 18:2n-6 (% total FAME) Dietary 18:2n-6 (% total FAME) 33% Squid 66% Squid 100% Squid 0 15 30 45 0 15 30 45 Flax Canola Corn Dietary 18:2n-6 (% total FAME) Dietary 18

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Explaining Changes in Female Labour Supply in a Life-cycle Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

frqwuryhuvldo lv xqghuvwdqglqj wkh gdwd rq zdjh sur#31;ohv/ rq ghsuhfldwlrq ri kxpdq fdslwdo dqg rq wkh xqghuo|lqj txhvwlrq ri zk| sduwlflsdwlrq kdv fkdqjhg1 Plqfhu dqg Sroodfkhn +4<:7, dqg Plqfhu dqg Roihn +4<;5, glvfxvv wkh h{whqw ri kxpdq fdslwdo ghsuhfldwlrq... shulrgv1 Vhfrqg/ zdjh jurzwk vhhpv wr kdyh ehqh#31;whg wkrvh zkr kdyh zrunhg rqo| lqwhuplwwhqwo| dv zhoo dv wkrvh zkr kdyh zrunhg ixoo wlph1 Wkhuh lv qrz d vxevwdqwldo olwhudwxuh dgguhvvlqj wkh xqghuo|lqj txhvwlrq ri zk| sduwlflsdwlrq kdv fkdqjhg1 Iru h...

Attanasio, Orazio; Low, Hamish W; Sanchez-Marcos, Virginia

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

242

Girls in Computer Science: a Female Only Introduction Class in High School .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examined the impact of an all girls’ classroom environment in a high school introductory computer science class on the student’s attitudes towards computer… (more)

Drobnis, Ann W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

"A scribbling dame" Eliza Haywood's literary reputation and the Female Spectator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Eliza Haywood represents one of few women to sustain a long and successful career as an independent professional writer in eighteenth century London. Despite publishing… (more)

Fitzgerald, Paula Kay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Evolution of juvenile growth rates in female guppies (Poecilia reticulata): predator regime or resource level?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effect offlexible growth rates on optimal sizes and develop¬Adaptive intrinsic growth rates: an inte- gration acrossVariation in larval growth rate among striped bass stocks

Arendt, Jeffrey D.; Reznick, David N

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Liberty Deprived: The Social and Political Determinants of Female Incarceration Rates, 1979-2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White and nonwhite rates of imprisonment.   Social Problems of  Incarceration Rates.   Journal of Politics, 66(3): 925?Why Are U.S.  Incarceration Rates So High?   Crime and 

McAnnally, Linda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

THE COMBINED EFFECT OF RADIATION AND CHEMICAL CARCINOGENS IN FEMALE A x IF MICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary.-Groups of mice were exposed to various doses of ionizing radiation on one occasion. In two groups of animals the bladder carcinogens dibutylnitrosamine (DBNA) and 4-ethylsulphonyl-naphthalene-1-sulphonamide (ENS) were administered 48 hours after irradiation. Post mortem and histopathological examinations failed to show any significant lesion in the bladder of animals subjected to radiation per se. Furthermore, radiation did not influence the latent period or incidence of bladder tumours induced by DBNA and ENS. However, radiation shortened the latent period of mammary tumours and, in some groups, increased the incidence of such lesions. When radiation was combined with the chemical carcinogens there was a marked reduction in the incidence of mammary tumours. VARIOUS authors have shown that ionizing radiation, whether by accident or by intention, has been responsible for the induction of tumours (British Medical Bulletin, 1973). The present study was designed to examine firstly the acute and long-term effects of a single dose of ionizing radiation on the bladder and secondly the influence of radiation on the latent period and incidence of bladder tumours caused by two known bladder carcinogens, dibutylnitrosamine (DBNA) and 4-ethylsulphonylnaphthalene- 1- sulphonamide (ENS). DBNA has been reported to induce bladder tumours in the rat (Druckrey et al., 1962, 1964) and in the mouse

A. Flaks; J. M. Hamilton; D. B. Clayson; P. R. J. Burch

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The Influence of ADHD and Adolescent Romantic Relationships on Early Adult Psychopathology in Females  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soooo excited you're on facebook now! Can't wait to keep innetworking websites (Facebook, MySpace), including commentsof personal webpages (i.e. Facebook and MySpace pages) using

Stier, Andrea Lynne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Disciplinary Differences in Research Performance by Female Academicians: The Effect of the Proportion of Women  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

association at Western Kentucky University: testing theEd.D. Dissertation, University of Kentucky, 1976. Cited in

Rebne, Douglas

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Catalan vaulting in advanced material : new approaches to contemporary compressive form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The translation of traditional building methods to modern construction techniques offers unexplored opportunities for material and form in architecture. Recent innovations in cellular ceramics married with traditional ...

Ramage, Michael H. (Michael Hector)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Enhancing marital happiness: the effects of religious attendance on infidelity, religious congruence, and spousal supportiveness.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ninety percent of Americans marry at least once in their lifetime; 40 – 50% of first marriages are dissolved. Divorce affects not only the lives… (more)

Williams, Alta Jeppson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Personal Information and Education - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 23, 2001 ... Personal Information and Education. Born on March 14, 1957 in Lumsden, Southland, New Zealand. Canadian Citizen. Married to Stephenie ...

252

Alcohol and Marijuana Use Across the Transition to Marriage: Group Differences and Psychosocial Factors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??It has been well-established that alcohol and marijuana use levels tend to decline during the transition to marriage, or the transition from single to married… (more)

Auerbach, Karen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Stunt Doubles: Ultracold Atoms Could Replicate the Electron ' ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... married the principles of Einstein's relativity to the quantum property of electrons known as spin, famously predicted that the electron must have an ...

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

254

Functional genomics of the bacterial degradation of the emerging water contaminants: 1,4-dioxane and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

database: A comprehensive genomics resource on microbialtherefore functional genomics approaches that marry theFunctional genomics of the bacterial degradation of the

Sales, Christopher Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

ABILITY OF MALE KING CRAB, PARALITHODES CAMTSCHATICA, TO MATE REPEATEDLY, KODIAK, ALASKA, 1973  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Buss'). I Alaska Dept. of Fish & Game. Commercial Fisheries Diy.. Box 686. Kodiak. AK 99615. 2 Bio Dept. of Fish & Game. Commercial Fisheries Diy.. Box 234. Homer. AK 9960l 4 Powell. Guy C. Brian J

256

Recent cadmium exposure among male partners may affect oocyte fertilization during in vitro fertilization (IVF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University at Albany, State University of New York,University at Albany, State University of New York,Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, USA

Kim, Keewan; Fujimoto, Victor Y.; Parsons, Patrick J.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; Browne, Richard W.; Bloom, Michael S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Male reproductive traits, semen cryopreservation, and heterologous in vitro fertilization in the bobcat (Lynx rufus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Figure 2 Procedure for the preparation of the test assembly set up inside the wind tunnel. #12 Transactions EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE AND UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS All tests were conducted with the fin sample estimated through a series of in- situ calibration tests in our laboratory. The heat transfer rate

Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales

258

Prevalence and Correlates of Hepatitis C Infection among Male Injection Drug Users in Detention, Tehran, Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Brie?ng Paper Eight, Thedrug users (IDUS) in Mashhad, Iran. International Journal ofof Hammadan prison (Iran, 1998). Journal of Research in

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Breaking and entering the male domain. Women in the IT industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interviews with Australian IT professionals (twenty-two women and two men) working in technical areas are referenced to explore how the masculinity of the IT industry is perceived by women working as IT professionals. The skills the interviewees see ...

Liisa A. von Hellens; Sue H. Nielsen; Eileen M. Trauth

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Male Middle Managers' Perceptions of Non-Work Related Internet Use.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of the current qualitative phenomenological study, which employed the constant comparison model, was to investigate employees’ perceptions of the problems associated with… (more)

Grossenbacher-Fabsits, Dawn M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

yet to be clarified. Two groups of six Friesian x Holstein male calves, aged 15 d,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

containing beef tallow or coconut oil. B. Graulet, D. Gruffat, D.B. Graulet D. Gruffat, D. Durand, D containing beef tallow (T) or CO. Liver slices obtained from biopsies were incu- bated for 24 h (37 °C, 95

Recanati, Catherine

262

Disseminated Lyme Borreliosis preceded by hepatitis in an African American male  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment in disseminated Lyme borreliosis: a double-blind,Disseminated Lyme Borreliosis preceded by hepatitis in anNorth Carolina Abstract Lyme disease is the most common

Fathi, Ramin; Huang, William Wei-ting; Brown, Katherine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Trenches Under The Pipeline: The Educational Trajectories of Chicano Male Continuation High School Students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trenches Under The Pipeline: The Educational Trajectories ofnavigate the educational pipeline, continuation high school

Malagon, Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Disseminated Lyme Borreliosis preceded by hepatitis in an African American male  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cefuroxime axetil and doxycycline in the treatment of earlycefuroxime axetil and doxycycline in treatment of patientsthe patient was started on doxycycline 100 mg twice daily.

Fathi, Ramin; Huang, William Wei-ting; Brown, Katherine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

[Molecular analysis of cytoplasmic male sterility]. Progress report, June 1, 1989--June 15, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have determined the actual RNA sequence of four mitochondrial genes: pcf, nad3, rps12, and coxII. Because plant mitochondrial proteins cannot be predicted from DNA sequences, the actual primary structures of the encoded proteins were unknown. We have gained information concerning the process of RNA editing. Editing can occur before splicing. Our data is consistent with the hypothesis that RNA editing is not simultaneous with transcription. Unlike other systems, the process of editing in plant does not exhibit a discernable direction. As a result of our RNA editing studies, we have produced a number of clones of the proper coding regions tube used for incorporating these mitochondrial genes into the nucleus. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Hanson, M.R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Male Patient Visits to the Emergency Department Decline During the Play of Major Sporting Events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X, no . 2 : May 2009 Western Journal of Emergency MedicineAssociate Professor of Emergency Medicine, University oftelevised sporting event on emergency department census. J

Jerrard, David A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Male carriers of the FMR1 premutation show altered hippocampal-prefrontal function during memory encoding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous functional MRI (fMRI) studies have shown that fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) fragile X premutation allele carriers (FXPCs) exhibit decreased hippocampal activation during a recall task and lower inferior ...

Wang, John M.

268

Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery- and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reproductive success in wild- and first generation hatchery-origin spring Chinook males was examined by allowing the fish to compete for spawning opportunities in two sections of an observation stream. Behavioral observations were used to characterize the frequency of aggression and courting activities. Microsatellite DNA from each male and fry collected from the observation stream were used in pedigree analyses to estimate reproductive success. The coefficient of variation in male reproductive success equaled 116 and 86% in the two populations. No differences were detected in reproductive success due to hatchery or wild origin. Nor were any behavioral differences found between hatchery and wild males. Although statistical power was low due to intrinsic variation a great deal of overlap existed in the reproductive success values of hatchery and wild males. Significant disparities existed among the males on their ability to produce offspring. Males achieving high reproductive success mated with numerous females, were socially dominant, aggressive, and tended to stay in localized areas, courting and spawning with females that were adjacent to one another.

Schroder, S.L.; Pearsons, T.N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Professor of Wildlife Biology March 2012 Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.87 Demographics Females (22%) 13 Males 47 Asians 8 Blacks or African Americans 2 Native Americans 3 Multiracials 5/Latinos 6 Multiracials 9 Native Americans 1 Whites 145 Internationals 5 Georgia Residents 74 Out, Inc.), Future of Breast Care, Mammographic Screening; · Greg Cefus, Ben Cross, and Jeff Jay (Savannah

Wilson, Kenneth R.

270

Colorado State University Extension. 3/95. Reviewed 2/09.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and six pairs of red dots along their back (Figure 1). A mature larva is 1 1/2 to 2 inches long. Larval short distances. Males have a wing span of 1 1/2 inches; the wing spans on females can reach 2 inches

271

Intersexual Conflict and Group Size in Alouatta palliata: A 23-year ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

males is likely to enhance a group's competitive ability in terms of access to high .... year (Milton 1982); thus our treatment of the data allows time for females to enter a ..... L. Dew, & J. P. Boubli (Eds.) Tropical fruits and frugivores: The search for ...

272

Social impact in technologically-mediated communication: An examination of online influence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study used Social Impact Theory to explore sources and functions of interpersonal influence in Computer-Mediated Communication. Participants were 43 female and 17 male graduate students ranging from 25 to 60 years of age. In each of five distinct ... Keywords: Computer-Mediated Communication, Influence, Personality, Social impact, Technologically-mediated communication

Michael D. Miller; C. Cryss Brunner

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Effect of high doses of x rays on the neurosecretion of cat's hypothalamus  

SciTech Connect

The effect of high doses of x radiation upon the hypothalamohypophyseal system was studied in 15 adult cats, both male and female. It was observed that ionizing radiations accelerate the passing of neurosecreta from cells to axons and from posterior lobe of the pituitary body to the vascular system. (auth)

Kopaczyuk, F.; Kowalski, E.; Pawlaczyk, J.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

my ability. 4. I will be available to help you  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the exploration of the texts. What to expect from me: 1. I will put as much energy and enthusiasm into this course. The course will be ex- ploring world literature through the lenses of gender, sexuality, sex, relationships For 9/3: Please define the following terms: culture, sex, sexuality, gender, male, female, man, woman

Suzuki, Masatsugu

275

Gametic incompatibilities between races of Drosophila melanogaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

melanogaster from Zimbabwe, Africa, do not mate readily with cosmopolitan males. This polymorphism in mate melanogaster is currently known to have two behavioural races, i.e. the cosmopolitan (M for melanogaster-female lines Two races of D. melanogaster were used in this study; these were the cosmopolitan (M lines

Palumbi, Stephen

276

Literature Synthesis of the Effects of Roads and Vehicles on Amphibians and Reptiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; paulinaartacho@gmail.com Changes in Genetic Variation of Energy Metabolism and Life History Traits between Sexual forms, and males and sexual females) and energy metabolism (standard metabolic rate, SMR) in eight energy costs expressed only during sexuality, which could be associated to the sexual morphs production

Harmon, Luke

277

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Identification of ejaculated proteins in the house  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-derived proteins [53]. 15 N-enriched diets were prepared by combining 15 N- labeled Spirulina platensis (>99 atom-2164/12/306 Page 5 of 13 #12;samples of the uterine fluids, from two different male- female matings. The costs

Dean, Matthew D.

278

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with both conspecific and heterospecific females depending on the cost of maintaining a strong mate.aquafauna.com) and Spirulina Flakes mixed with Freshwater Flake food (Ocean Star International Inc.; www they do not incur the cost of pro- ducing males (Maynard Smith, 1968). In the present study

Gabor, Caitlin - Department of Biology, Texas State University

279

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

primarily based on your LDL number. Persons with a history of heart disease may be put on a very restricted-modifiable Risk Factors Age: Male 45 years or older; Female 55 years or older Family history of premature CHD. · Choose foods low in total fat. · Select soft or liquid margarines or spreads that list liquid oil

Liskiewicz, Maciej

280

Not to be cited without prior reference to the authors. ICES CM 2006 / H:12  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Not to be cited without prior reference to the authors. ICES CM 2006 / H:12 Theme session H the male phase and reproduce as females already in their first reproductive season) responds is parameterized for Epinephelus fuscoguttatus (common names: brown #12;marbled grouper or flowery cod

Heino, Mikko

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Model for estimating Venezuelan population with working age using artificial neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents the development of an Artificial Neural Networks model for estimating the female and male population with working age in Venezuela. For the creation of the model it is used the previous year values related to the employed, unemployed ... Keywords: artificial neural networks, labor force, regression analysis

Samaria Muñoz-Bravo; Anna Pérez-Méndez; Francklin Rivas-Echeverría

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

1. Units currently enrolled (Please refer to www.cdu.edu.au/studentportal for unit codes) 2. Units Enrolment for Overload (Please refer to www.cdu.edu.au/studentportal for unit codes)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Units currently enrolled (Please refer to www.cdu.edu.au/studentportal for unit codes) 2. Units Enrolment for Overload (Please refer to www.cdu.edu.au/studentportal for unit codes) 3. Reason.09NJ NoYes Other Mr Mrs Ms Miss Dr FemaleMale Postcode Unit Code Teaching Period Mode Unit Name Unit

283

TOTAL SES EK EN V EN IV EN III NN NQ NU ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE IMMEDIATELY  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

31 GRADES 1 4 1 4 RETIREMENT 2 6 12 1 GENDER AGE 48.9 YRS YEARS OF FEDERAL SERVICE DIVERSITY SPECIAL 19.8 YRS EDUCATION SUPERVISOR RATIO 6 GENDER Females 38.7% Males 61.3% AGE...

284

TOTAL SES EK EN V EN IV EN III  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

4 30 17 51.1 YRS RETIREMENT GENDER AGE SPECIAL 22.0 YRS EDUCATION SUPERVISOR RATIO 8 DIVERSITY Males 67.4% Females 32.6% GENDER 5.3% 6.3% 27.4% 41.1% 17.9% 2.1% UNDER 30 30-39...

285

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

32 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER NNSA Production Office (NPO) As of March 23, 2013 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY 1.5% 0.7% 21.9% 21.9% 1.5% 16.8% 32.8% 2.9% Pay Plan Males 65.7% Females 34.3%...

286

TOTAL SES EJ/EK EN V EN IV EN III  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

White Female 20 26.3% White Male 46 60.5% DISABILITY 4 5.3% VETERANS 21 27.6% SPECIAL DIVERSITY YEARS OF FEDERAL SERVICE AGE 20.6 YRS EDUCATION 7 49.3 YRS 17 SUPERVISOR RATIO 1 2 1...

287

TOTAL SES EK EN IV EN III  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

20.5% White Female 15 18.1% White Male 35 42.2% DISABILITY 2 2.4% VETERANS 18 21.7% DIVERSITY 26 48.5 YRS RETIREMENT GENDER AGE SPECIAL 20.8 YRS EDUCATION SUPERVISOR RATIO 10...

288

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

F) 6 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Kansas City Field Office As of March 23, 2013 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY 2.6% 2.6% 28.9% 21.1% 39.5% 5.3% Pay Plan Males 71.1% Females 28.9% Gender AIAN, M...

289

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

F) 7 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Savannah River Field Office As of March 23, 2013 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY 6.5% 12.9% 38.7% 38.7% 3.2% Pay Plan Males 64.5% Females 35.5% Gender AIAN, M AIAN,...

290

The e-Axle and Its Application to a Floating Windmill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe and analyze a magnetic bearing built using a permanent magnet assembly. The magnetic bearing comprises a conical female magnet assembly and a rotationally symmetric identically polarized male piece. The opposition of the two parts produces ... Keywords: $\\epsilon$-axle, floating windmill, magnetic levitation

Sanza Kazadi; Chan-Hee Koh; Kevin Kim; Kyle Jung; Brian Kim; Hubert Wang

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Heart. Author manuscript Cardiorespiratory risk factors as predictors of 40-year mortality in women  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart. Author manuscript Page /1 13 Cardiorespiratory risk factors as predictors of 40-year.7) mortality, while associations between 2-hour­ ­ glucose and all-cause 1.15 (1.1 1.2), coronary heart disease ; Cause of Death ; Cohort Studies ; Female ; Heart Diseases ; mortality ; physiopathology ; Humans ; Male

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

292

Dunham Lab Chemostat Manual Maitreya Dunham and Emily Mitchell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the carboy. Then insert the cork assembly into the top of the carboy, and give it a firm push in. Use with 1/4" tubing, with a clamp, and the male part of a `quick connector,' which will eventually connect to the female part of the quick connector on the media line running to the chemostat. Use of these connectors

Dunham, Maitreya

293

Assessment of the range of energy availabilities and the prevalence of low energy availability among female endurance athletes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research indicates that energy availability below 30 kcal•kg FFM-1•day-1 suppresses reproductive hormones and markers of bone formation while energy balance is hypothesized to occur at… (more)

Henderson, Kimberly A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Acculturation and Transformation among Female Immigrant Military Spouses in an ESL Learning Program at a Community College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was designed to explore the acculturation experiences of military-related immigrant wives enrolled in an ESL program in a selected community college. More specifically, the purpose of the study was to understand the personal and structural forces that facilitated or hindered their acculturation process into their community of residence and whether their participation and retention in ESL classes contributed to their acculturation. Using a qualitative design with the basic interpretive paradigm, data collection consisted of face-to-face interviews with 14 immigrant military wives from 10 differing countries who were either enrolled or had been enrolled in a community college ESL program. The site chosen served a multicultural population of military spouses who enrolled in educational programs that offered English language development. The nearest ESL program, located at a community college near the military base, became an information-rich site for the study. The findings from the study highlighted the role of English language as an essential element to adjustment into the society of the United States for military immigrant wives, leading to acculturation and subsequently personal transformation. The data revealed both external and internal forces that influenced the acculturation process. External (structural) forces included community, workforce, the military, and an educational institution. The secondary forces included racial discrimination, cultural differences, and social networks within the community. Internal forces included love and care and self-efficacy. Self-efficacy was manifested through their persistence, patience, and resilience.

Darnell, Patricia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Embryo production in a parthenogenetic snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) is negatively affected by the presence of other parthenogenetic females  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

three treatments. Food (5 mL/ container of 0.01 g Spirulina dissolved in 200 mL of water) was provided, however, because all tanks received the same concentration and total volume of Spirulina solution. Thus raises the possibility of a population-level cost to parthenogenesis. More specifically, it means

Neiman, Maurine

296

DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY 100, 365-373 (1983) Clonal Analysis of the Tissue Specificity of Recessive Female-Sterile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ray-induced mitotic recombination are capable of producing eggs. Such recombination events will render genes to processesoccurring in the ovary itself or in extraovarian tissue (e.g.,fat body). The other technique is to produce

Higgins, Darren

297

CAPITALISM, CONTRACEPTION AND CHEMICALS: A MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE PREMATURE SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT EPIDEMIC IN PUERTO RICAN FEMALES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An Investigation of Etiologies: The Biosocial Exploration of Premature Sexual Development in Puerto Rico Objective: The purpose of this study was to argue for an… (more)

Horan, Holly Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Medieval Female Spirituality and the Wound of Christ in Folio 331r of Bonne of Luxembourg’s Prayer Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roger S. Painted Prayers: The Book of Hours in Medieval andSt. Louis, MO: B. Herder Book Co. , 1928. Bonaventure. DeLand, William G. The Prayer Book of Bonne of Luxembourg: A

Walker, Paige M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Paper no. 1192-99 EITC, AFDC, and the Female Headship Decision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Policy Analysis and Management meetings provided valuable input. IRP publications (discussion papers, special reports, and the newsletter Focus) are now available on the Internet. The IRP Web site can be accessed at the following address:

Stacy Dickert-conlin; Scott Houser

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Home Is Where the Heart Is: Place Attachment, Social Change, and Young Female Migrants in Xalapa, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

remodeling of the family home. In this paper, social capitalon modifying the family home. In Xalapa, the primary userenovation their families’ homes, particularly the addition

Andrew, Meghan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 21 Number 2 : Full issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

union (maithuna) of the male and female principles thus depicted that the truth is effectively to be found The male divinity and his partner essentially are one another and can never be regarded apart; the static is the creative or productive power... , does deserve attention, not only within the Hindu-cum"Buddhist world but also in the lands beyond, is Wh:lt may fittingly be called "the Spirit of Tantra", our third category in the preamble to this essay. What then are the criteria wherewith...

Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

1985-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

302

Considerations on Tantrik Spirituality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) of the male and female principles thus depicted that the truth is effectively to be found The male divinity and his partner essentially are one another and can never be regarded apart; the static is the creative or productive power and vice versa... , does deserve attention, not only within the Hindu-cum"Buddhist world but also in the lands beyond, is Wh:lt may fittingly be called "the Spirit of Tantra", our third category in the preamble to this essay. What then are the criteria wherewith...

Tendzin, Thubten

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Differential Molecular Changes in the Lung after Low and High Carcinogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Differential Molecular Changes in the Lung after Low and High Carcinogen Differential Molecular Changes in the Lung after Low and High Carcinogen Doses and Implications for Designing Molecular Epidemiology and other Studies of Radiation-Induced Lung Cancer Bobby R. Scott Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute Abstract Lung Cancer Mortality Worldwide by Gender: Lung cancer was the most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide as well as the leading cause of cancer death in males in 2008 (Jemal et al. 2011). For females, it was the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death. Lung cancer accounted for 13% of the total cases and 18% of the cancer deaths. For males, the highest lung cancer incidence rates are in Central and Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, and Northern America. For females, the highest lung cancer incidence rates are in Northern America,

304

Males do not adjust feeding rate to egg colour in a Norwegian population of pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??According to the differential allocation hypothesis, an individual will invest more in an offspring when mated to a high than low qality mate. The blue/green… (more)

Vesterkjær, Kristin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A validation of the first genome-wide association study of calcaneus ultrasound parameters in the European Male Ageing Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

centre used the same machine model, which was calibrated daily with the physical phantom provided by the manufacturer. Out- puts included broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) (dB/MHz) and speed of sound (SOS) (m/s). Quality con- trol (QC) was performed... in each centre following the instructions of the manufacturer. All QC results were compiled and checked for stability throughout the study in Leuven. To ascertain the short-term precision of the method in this population, duplicate measurements were...

Roshandel, Delnaz; Thomson, Wendy; Pye, Stephen R; Boonen, Steven; Borghs, Herman; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T; Adams, Judith E; Ward, Kate A; Bartfai, Gyorgy; Casanueva, Felipe; Finn, Joseph D; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Silman, Alan J; Wu, Frederick C; Holliday, Kate L; O'Neill, Terence W; EMAS Study Group

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

306

World Catalog of the Family Tethinidae (Diptera)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specimens (10 males, 7 females) of C. herbacea from the area of Bcharré/Les Cedres at Mount Lebanon; "Zorkun, 1500-1600 m, Aksaray prov., Turkey). 5. C. herbacea ("Bcharré"; Bcharré/Les Cedres, Lebanon). 6. C pass, 2600 m, 19.7.1987, Heinz leg. (2MM, 2WW)*. Cicindela herbacea ­ Lebanon: Bcharré, Les Cedres, 6

Mathis, Wayne N.

307

Information bias and lifetime mortality risks of radiation-induced cancer: Low LET radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additive and multiplicative models of relative risk were used to measure the effect of cancer misclassification and DS86 random errors on lifetime risk projections in the Life Span Study (LSS) of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. The true number of cancer deaths in each stratum of the cancer mortality cross-classification was estimated using sufficient statistics from the EM algorithm. Average survivor doses in the strata were corrected for DS86 random error ({sigma}=0.45) by use of reduction factors. Poisson regression was used to model the corrected and uncorrected mortality rates with risks in RERF Report 11 (Part 2) and the BEIR-V Report. Bias due to DS86 random error typically ranged from {minus}15% to {minus}30% for both sexes, and all sites and models. The total bias, including diagnostic misclassification, of excess risk of nonleukemia for exposure to 1 Sv from age 18 to 65 under the non-constant relative project model was {minus}37.1% for males and {minus}23.3% for females. Total excess risks of leukemia under the relative projection model were biased {minus}27.1% for males and {minus}43.4% for females. Thus, nonleukemia risks for 1 Sv from ages 18 to 65 (DRREF=2) increased from 1.91%/Sv to 2.68%/Sv among males and from 3.23%/Sv to 4.92%/Sv among females. Leukemia excess risk increased from 0.87%/Sv to 1.10/Sv among males and from 0.73%/Sv to 1.04/Sv among females. Bias was dependent on the gender, site, correction method, exposure profile and projection model considered. Future studies that use LSS data for US nuclear workers may be downwardly biased if lifetime risk projections are not adjusted for random and systematic errors.

Peterson, L.E.; Schull, W.J.; Davis, B.R. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Health Science Center; Buffler, P.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). School of Public Health

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The relationship between the bone mineral density and urinary cadmium concentration of residents in an industrial complex  

SciTech Connect

Background: An association between cadmium exposure and bone mineral density (BMD) has been demonstrated in elderly women, but has not been well studied in youths and men. Some studies report either no or a weak association between cadmium exposure and bone damage. Objectives: This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the urinary cadmium (U-Cd) levels and BMD of females and males of all ages. Methods: A total of 804 residents near an industrial complex were surveyed in 2007. U-Cd and BMD on the heel (non-dominant calcaneus) were analyzed with AAS-GTA and Dual-Energy X-ray absorptiometry, respectively. Demographic characteristics were collected by structured questionnaires. Osteoporosis and osteopenia were defined by BMD cut-off values and T-scores set by the WHO; T score>-1, normal; -2.5females (0.64 {mu}g/g creatinine) were higher than those in males (0.48 {mu}g/g creatinine) (p<0.001). With the logistic regression model, osteopenia was associated with high U-Cd levels ({>=}1.0 {mu}g/g creatinine) in females (OR=2.92; 95% CI, 1.51-5.64) and in males (OR=3.37; 95% CI, 1.09-10.38). With the multiple linear regression model, the BMD of the adult group was negatively associated with U-Cd (<0.05), gender (female, p<0.001) and age (p<0.001). The BMD of participants who were {<=}19 years of age was negatively associated with gender (female, p<0.01), whereas it was positively associated with age and BMI (p<0.001). BMD was not associated with exercise, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, job or parental education. Conclusion: Results suggested that U-Cd might be associated with osteopenia as well as osteoporosis in both male and female adults. Age and female gender were negatively associated with BMD in the adult group, whereas age was positively associated with BMD in the youth group. Cadmium exposure may be a potential risk factor for lower-BMD and osteopenia symptoms as well as for osteoporosis symptoms. - Research Highlights: {yields} The relationship between the urinary cadmium levels and BMD was investigated. {yields} U-Cd was associated with osteopenia and osteoporosis in adults. {yields} Cadmium exposure may be a potential risk factor for lower-BMD and osteopenia.

Shin, Minah; Paek, Domyung [Institute of Health and Environment, Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Gwanak-599, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)] [Institute of Health and Environment, Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Gwanak-599, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Chungsik, E-mail: csyoon@snu.ac.kr [Institute of Health and Environment, Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Gwanak-599, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)] [Institute of Health and Environment, Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Gwanak-599, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to assess population biology and dynamics of the squat lobster Galathea intermedia. On the basis of nearly regular monthly samples taken with a 2-m beam trawl in the Helgoland trench (HTR) during the period of 1985 until 1992, sex ratio, length composition, relative growth and reproduction were studied. The overall sex ratio deviates significantly from 1:1 with 1(^:1.89 (P ^ 0.001). On average, sexes are equally large, but adult females attain a slightly larger size than adult males. No sex-specific differences in the length-weight relationship were found. Relative growth of the first abdominal segment is clearly of sexual-dimorphic character. On the basis of the length-frequency distributions, the life cycle of the HTR population lasts between one and two years. According to the appearance of ovigerous females and juveniles, reproduction and recruitment are clearly seasonal. Recruitment takes place between July and December. The main reproduction begins in April and ends in September, with a peak between June and August. A significant increase of specimens showing both male and female morphological characters, referred to as morphological hermaphrodites (P^0.001), and males (P^0.05) respectively, was detected.

Katrin Kronenberger; Michael Tiirkay

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Investigation of a bladder cancer cluster in northwestern Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Cancer maps from 1950 through 1979 revealed areas of high mortality from bladder cancer for both males and females in several northwestern Illinois counties. In order to further explore this excess, a bladder cancer incidence study was conducted in the eight counties comprising this region. Eligible cases were those first diagnosed with bladder cancer between 1978 and 1985. Age adjusted standardized incidence ratios were calculated for each county and for 97 zip codes within these counties. County results revealed no excesses. Zip code results indicated elevated risks in a few areas, but only two zip codes had significantly elevated results. One of these zip codes had a significant excess in males (standardized incidence ratio = 1.5) and females (standardized incidence ratio = 1.9). This excess was primarily confined to one town in this zip code, in which standardized incidence ratios were significantly elevated in males (1.7) and females (2.6). Further investigation revealed that one of four public drinking water wells in this town had been closed due to contamination; two wells were within a half mile (0.8 km) of a landfill site that had ceased operating in 1972. Tests of these two wells revealed traces of trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and other solvents. Further investigation of this cluster is discussed.

Mallin, K. (Illinois Cancer Council, Chicago (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Gender determination in populus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gender, the expression of maleness or femaleness, in dioecious plants has been associated with changes in morphology, physiology, ecological position, and commercial importance of several species, including members of the Salicaceae family. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the expression of gender in Salicaceae, including sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian genes, quantitative genes, environment, and genotype-by-environment interactions. Published reports would favor a genetic basis for gender. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers associated with gender in a segregating family of hybrid poplars. Bulked segregant analysis and chi-squared analysis were used to test for the occurrence of sex chromosomes, individual loci, and chromosome ratios (i.e., ploidy levels) as the mechanisms for gender determination. Examination of 2488 PCR based RAPD markers from 1219 primers revealed nine polymorphic bands between male and female bulked samples. However, linkage analysis indicated that none of these markers were significantly associated with gender. Chisquared results for difference in male-to-female ratios between diploid and triploid genotypes also revealed no significant differences. These findings suggest gender is not controlled via sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian loci or ratios of autosome to gender-determining loci. It is possible that gender is determined genetically by regions of the genome not sampled by the tested markers or by a complex of loci operating in an additive threshold manner or in an epistatic manner. It is also possible that gender is determined environmentally at an early zygote stage, canalizing gender expression.

McLetchie, D.N. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Tuskan, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Pesticide use knowledge and practices: A gender differences in Nepal  

SciTech Connect

It is important to understand gender difference on pesticide use knowledge, attitude and practices for identifying pesticide risks by gender and to recommend more gender-sensitive programs. However, very few studies have been conducted so far in Nepal. This study, thus, interviewed a total of 325 males and 109 females during 2005 to assess gender differences on pesticide use knowledge, attitude and practices. More than 50% females had never been to school and only <8% individuals were found trained in Integrated Pest Management (IPM). Almost all males and females did not smoke, drink and eat during pesticides application and also believed that pesticides are harmful to human health, livestock, plant diversity and their environment. However, there were gender differences on household decision on pesticides to be used (p<0.001), care of wind direction during spraying (p=0.032), prior knowledge on safety measures (p=0.016), reading and understanding of pesticides labels (p<0.001), awareness of the labels (p<0.001) and protective covers. Almost all respondents were aware of negative impacts of pesticide use on human health and environment irrespective of gender; however, females were at higher risk due to lower level of pesticide use safety and awareness. It is strongly recommended to initiate gender-sensitive educational and awareness activities, especially on pesticide use practices and safety precautions.

Atreya, Kishor [Alternative Development and Research Center (ADRC), GPO BOX 20078, Kathmandu (Nepal)]. E-mail: k.atreya@gmail.com

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

The Association of Inbreeding With Lung Fibrosis Incidence in Beagle Dogs That Inhaled 238PuO2 or 239PuO2.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of health effects in animals after exposure to internally deposited radionuclides were intended to supplement observational studies in humans. Both nuclear workers and Beagle dogs have exhibited plutonium associated lung fibrosis; however, the dogs smaller gene pool may limit the applicability of findings to humans. Data on Beagles that inhaled either plutonium-238 dioxide (238PuO2) or plutonium-239 dioxide (239PuO2) were analyzed. Wright's Coefficient of Inbreeding was used to measure genetic or familial susceptibility and was assessed as an explanatory variable when modeling the association between lung fibrosis incidence and plutonium exposure. Lung fibrosis was diagnosed in approximately 80% of the exposed dogs compared with 23.7% of the control dogs. The maximum degree of inbreeding was 9.4%. Regardless of isotope, the addition of inbreeding significantly improved the model in female dogs but not in males. In female dogs an increased inbreeding coefficient predicted decreased hazard of a lung fibrosis diagnosis. Lung fibrosis was common in these dogs with inbreeding affecting models of lung fibrosis incidence in females but not in males. The apparent protective effect in females predicted by these models of lung fibrosis incidence is likely to be minimal given the small degree of inbreeding in these groups.

Wilson, Dulaney A.; Brigantic, Andrea M.; Morgan, William F.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated male and female stylized phantoms. Results: For fully irradiated organs, average coefficients of variation (COV) ranged from 0.07 to 0.22 across the four male phantoms and from 0.06 to 0.18 across the four female phantoms; for partially irradiated organs, average COV ranged from 0.13 to 0.30 across the four male phantoms and from 0.15 to 0.30 across the four female phantoms. Doses to the testes, breasts, and esophagus showed large variations between phantoms. COV for gender-averaged effective dose and k factor ranged from 0.03 to 0.23 and from 0.06 to 0.30, respectively. COV for male risk index and q factor ranged from 0.06 to 0.30 and from 0.05 to 0.36, respectively; COV for female risk index and q factor ranged from 0.06 to 0.49 and from 0.07 to 0.54, respectively. Conclusions: Despite closely matched organ mass, total body weight, and height, large differences in organ dose exist due to variation in organ location, spatial distribution, and dose approximation method. Dose differences for fully irradiated radiosensitive organs were much smaller than those for partially irradiated organs. Weighted dosimetry quantities including effective dose, male risk indices, k factors, and male q factors agreed well across phantoms. The female risk indices and q factors varied considerably across phantoms.

Zhang Yakun; Li Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Publication No._________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DNA sequence data from male reproductive genes in numerous taxa have shown that these genes typically evolve more rapidly than other genes, often as a result of directional selection. In the genus Drosophila, the rapidly evolving male accessory gland protein genes (Acps) of melanogaster subgroup flies have contributed to this observation. Acps are small proteins that are transferred to females during mating as a major component of the seminal fluid and are considered agents of chemical communication between the sexes. Acps are known to contribute to normal ovulation and sperm storage, as well as increase oviposition rates and reduce female receptivity. Thus, Acps are considered likely targets of directional selection because of their potential roles in postcopulatory sexual selection and antagonistic coevolution between the sexes. iii Outside of melanogaster subgroup Acps, little is known about the evolutionary biology of male reproductive genes in Drosophila. For example, the male testis contains a richly diverse transcriptome but no studies have explored the evolutionary dynamics of a large set of testis-expressed genes. If clear differences in the evolutionary dynamics of

Craig R. Linder; Bradley Jon Wagstaff; Bradley Jon Wagstaff, Ph.D.; Supervisors Ulrich; G. Mueller; David J. Begun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

BRIEF OF AMICI CURIAE (for the California Supreme Court's Review of California's Marriage Exclusion Laws)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are more likely to be under five years old, disabled andin same-sex couples are disabled, 20% of individualsin married couples are disabled. 14 Table 2: Diversity of

Badgett, M V Lee; Gates, Gary

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Same-Sex Couples and Same-Sex Couples Raising Children in California: Data from Census 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

non-citizens, and/or disabled than parents in marriedin same-sex couples are disabled, 20% of individualsin married couples are disabled. 9 May 2004 Table 2:

Sears, Brad; Badgett, M.V. Lee

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Census Snapshot: Wisconsin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WISCONSIN Adam P. Romero, Public Policy Fellow Amanda K.couples raising children in Wisconsin. We compare same-sex “sex married couples in Wisconsin. 1 DECEMBER 2007 In many

Romero, Adam P.; Baumle, Amanda K; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Gates, Gary J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Paul Glowaski: Garden Director, Homeless Garden Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to find work. They moved to Detroit from—they were livinggot married, they moved, like I said, to Detroit. Mybecame a bus driver in Detroit in the fifties, I guess. He

Reti, Irene H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Wants, wishes, and wills: a medical and legal guide to protecting yourself and your family in sickness and in health, First edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Take Control of Your Medical Care, Your Estate Planning, and the Legacy You LeaveIncludes checklists, examples, definitions, ideas, and a plain- English glossary of the terms you need to understand “Whether you are single, married, old, young, ...

Wynne Whitman; Shawn Glisson

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Key Nationally Competitive Scholarship Awards Table of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

significant decision was his official visit to Damascus in late December 2009. Brokered by Saudi Arabia in a car accident in the USA in 1993. The couple divorced and in 1976, Hariri married Nazek Audi, who has

Jackman, Todd

322

Horizontal Inequity and Vertical Redistribution with Indirect Taxes: the Greek Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, unequal treatment of equals and hence horizontal inequity may arise because of the specific intention of treating distinct groups differently (married, single, homeowners, etc.) or different sources of income or categories of expenditure differently...

Kaplanoglou, G; Newbery, David

323

Computer animation via optical video disc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the notion of marrying two technologies: raster-scan computer animation and optical video discs. Animated sequences, generated at non real-time rates, then transfered to video disc, can be recalled under ...

Bender, Walter

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Contingency structures and concept analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formal Concept Analysis has found many uses in knowledge representation and data mining, but its penetration into established data-based research disciplines has been slower. Marrying application motivations, structures, and methods from epidemiology ...

Alex Pogel; David Ozonoff

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

"Such Daughters and Such a Mother": The Countess of Derby and her Three Daughters, 1560-1647  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frances married Edward Fortescue, and it is believed that atto her daughter Frances Fortescue, a black chain with gold,Frances Brydges m: Edward Fortescue Beatrice Brydges m: Sir

Wilkie, Vanessa Jean

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Barriers to the adoption and optimal use of savings and health technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies Kenyan households' use of savings accounts and malaria testing and treatment technologies. The first chapter studies whether or not married couples use savings accounts strategically. In the absence of ...

Schaner, Simone Gabrielle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Census Snapshot: Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO Adam P. Romero, Public Policy Fellow Clifford J.couples raising children in Colorado. We compare same-sex “sex married couples in Colorado. 1 APRIL 2008 In many ways,

Romero, Adam P; Rosky, Clifford J; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Gates, Gary J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

KENNETH INGVARD GREISEN, 19182007 Cornell University Emeritus Professor of Physics,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

old. Prof. Greisen was well-known for his participation in the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos married Betty Chase, a Cornell biology graduate student. Upon graduation, Ken joined the Manhattan Project

Greisen, Eric

329

Fission-fusion sociality in dusky dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obscurus), with comparisons to other dolphins and great apes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I examined fission-fusion sociality in dusky dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obscurus), and investigated aspects of social convergence between dolphins and great apes. I used boat-based group focal follows and photo-identification to collect data in Admiralty Bay, New Zealand during 2005-2006. I used generalized estimating equations to examine relationships between party (group) size, rate of party fission-fusion, activity, and location; and relationships between leaping frequency and behavior. Using photo-identification images from 2001-2006, I analyzed the strength and temporal patterning of associations, short- and long-term association patterns, preferred/avoided associations, and behaviorally-specific preferred associations. To analyze social convergence between dolphins and great apes, I compared female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops spp.) and chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) social strategies through literature review. I conducted 171 group focal follows, totaling 157 observation hours. Mean party size was 7.0±6.0 individuals. Party size changed every 5±.47.6 min on average. The most frequent activity was resting (37%), followed by traveling (29%), foraging (18%), and socializing (15%). Foraging was positively related to party size and rate of fission-fusion. Near mussel farms, foraging increased, traveling decreased, and rate of party fusion increased. "Clean" leaps were the most frequent leap type (84%) and were positively related to party size and foraging. Noisy and coordinated leaps were positively related to party size; noisy leaps were negatively related to foraging. Associations during 2001-2006 (N = 228 individuals) were nonrandom for 125 days; associations within one field season were nonrandom for 60 days. Individuals formed preferred/avoided associations during most years. The strongest associations occurred during foraging and socializing; the weakest associations occurred during traveling. Individuals formed preferred associations during foraging, resting, and socializing. Review of female bottlenose dolphin and chimpanzee sociality revealed that: 1) females form weaker bonds and are less social than males, 2) females associate mostly with other females, 3) mothers are often alone with their offspring, 4) mothers (vs. non-mothers) and non-cycling (vs. cycling) females associate less with males, and 5) non-cycling (vs. cycling) females occur in smaller parties. Female dolphins may be more social than female chimpanzees due to decreased scramble competition, increased predation risk, and decreased cost of transport for dolphins vs. chimpanzees.

Pearson, Heidi Christine

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Chronic low-level arsenic exposure causes gender-specific alterations in locomotor activity, dopaminergic systems, and thioredoxin expression in mice  

SciTech Connect

Arsenic (As) is a toxic metalloid widely present in the environment. Human exposure to As has been associated with the development of skin and internal organ cancers and cardiovascular disorders, among other diseases. A few studies report decreases in intelligence quotient (IQ), and sensory and motor alterations after chronic As exposure in humans. On the other hand, studies of rodents exposed to high doses of As have found alterations in locomotor activity, brain neurochemistry, behavioral tasks, and oxidative stress. In the present study both male and female C57Bl/6J mice were exposed to environmentally relevant doses of As such as 0.05, 0.5, 5.0, or 50 mg As/L of drinking water for 4 months, and locomotor activity was assessed every month. Male mice presented hyperactivity in the group exposed to 0.5 mg As/L and hypoactivity in the group exposed to 50 mg As/L after 4 months of As exposure, whereas female mice exposed to 0.05, 0.5, and 5.0 mg As/L exhibited hyperactivity in every monthly test during As exposure. Furthermore, striatal and hypothalamic dopamine content was decreased only in female mice. Also decreases in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and cytosolic thioredoxin (Trx-1) mRNA expression in striatum and nucleus accumbens were observed in male and female mice, respectively. These results indicate that chronic As exposure leads to gender-dependent alterations in dopaminergic markers and spontaneous locomotor activity, and down-regulation of the antioxidant capacity of the brain.

Bardullas, U.; Limon-Pacheco, J.H.; Giordano, M. [Departamento de Neurobiologia Conductual y Cognitiva, Instituto de Neurobiologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Queretaro, Queretaro, 76230 (Mexico); Carrizales, L. [Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Av. Venustiano Carranza 2405, Col. Lomas los Filtros, San Luis Potosi, 78210, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Mendoza-Trejo, M.S. [Departamento de Neurobiologia Conductual y Cognitiva, Instituto de Neurobiologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Queretaro, Queretaro, 76230 (Mexico); Rodriguez, V.M. [Departamento de Neurobiologia Conductual y Cognitiva, Instituto de Neurobiologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Queretaro, Queretaro, 76230 (Mexico)], E-mail: vermire@yahoo.com

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Quantification of total mercury in liver and heart tissue of Harbor Seals (Phoca vitulina) from Alaska USA  

SciTech Connect

This study quantified the Hg levels in the liver (n=98) and heart (n=43) tissues of Harbor Seals (Phoca vitulina) (n=102) harvested from Prince William Sound and Kodiak Island Alaska. Mercury tissue dry weight (dw) concentrations in the liver ranged from 1.7 to 393 ppm dw, and in the heart from 0.19 to 4.99 ppm dw. Results of this study indicate liver and heart tissues' Hg ppm dw concentrations significantly increase with age. Male Harbor Seals bioaccumulated Hg in both their liver and heart tissues at a significantly faster rate than females. The liver Hg bioaccumulation rates between the harvest locations Kodiak Island and Prince William Sound were not found to be significantly different. On adsorption Hg is transported throughout the Harbor Seal's body with the partition coefficient higher for the liver than the heart. No significant differences in the bio-distribution (liver:heart Hg ppm dw ratios (n=38)) values were found with respect to either age, sex or geographic harvest location. In this study the age at which Hg liver and heart bioaccumulation levels become significantly distinct in male and female Harbor Seals were identified through a Tukey's analysis. Of notably concern to human health was a male Harbor Seal's liver tissue harvested from Kodiak Island region. Mercury accumulation in this sample tissue was determined through a Q-test to be an outlier, having far higher Hg concentrarion (liver 392 Hg ppm dw) than the general population sampled. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury accumulation in the liver and heart of seals exceed food safety guidelines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Accumulation rate is greater in males than females with age. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Liver mercury accumulation is greater than in the heart tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury determination by USA EPA Method 7473 using thermal decomposition.

Marino, Kady B. [Department of Chemistry, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States); Hoover-Miller, Anne; Conlon, Suzanne; Prewitt, Jill [Alaska SeaLife Center, City of Seward, AK (United States)] [Alaska SeaLife Center, City of Seward, AK (United States); O'Shea, Stephen K., E-mail: soshea@rwu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Modeling aspects of the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of the endangered Houston toad  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of my dissertation was to describe the dynamics of a group of Houston toads located at the Griffith League Ranch (GLR), Bastrop County, Texas. My research included using statistical modeling to predict activity and abundance, mark-recapture techniques to estimate survivorship, and simulation modeling to explore the impacts of the difference in age at first reproduction and to project the future dynamics of the population at the GLR. From 2001 – 2005, 225 individual Houston toads (199 M : 26 F) were captured using two methods: breeding pond surveys and drift fences. Houston toads were neither caught equally among capture methods, nor across years. Toad activity was mostly confined within their breeding season, and activity was not continuous. A logistic regression indicated activity depended on time of year, mean precipitation, mean minimum daily temperature, and mean percent lunation as well as two-way interactions with moon-phase and other variables. Abundance depended on time of year, current precipitation, minimum temperature, and two-way interactions between time of year and the other two variables. Twenty-one of the 199 males (10.5%) and no females were recaptured among years. The probability of male survival was estimated using program MARK. Eight of 16 candidate models were supported and all but one contained precipitation as a covariate, indicating precipitation is important for Houston toad survival. Survivorship estimates varied from 0.1 to 0.41. The sex ratio was significantly male-biased. The odds of catching females in traps were 3.5 greater than capturing females in a pond, while the odds of capturing males in a trap were 0.28 compared to ponds. Results from a simulation model indicated the sex ratio is biased because of the difference in maturation times between males and females, coupled with high juvenile mortality. Results from an individual-based, spatially-explicit, stochastic simulation model, indicated a relatively low probability (~ 0.013) of B. houstonensis going extinct at the GLR within the next 10 years. Emergent properties of the model were similar to results observed in the field or reported in the literature. The model also identified that dispersal of Houston toads should be a future research priority.

Swannack, Todd Michael

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Executive summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NPFMC is considering action that would treat the eastern Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands separately for the purposes of Pacific cod management. This report is intended to summarize existing biological information on Pacific cod that may be useful in evaluating this action. The following conclusions may be useful and are described in greater detail in the report: 1) There is highly significant genetic isolation by distance in the Pacific cod stocks of North America (i.e. genetic differences among individuals increase with geographic distance; Fig. 1-2).This result, as well as several different genetic comparisons among regional groupings, suggest that Pacific cod stocks in the Aleutian Islands archipelago are distinct from those along the contiguous Alaska Peninsula. 2) In 2005, length at age was significantly higher in the AI than in the EBS for both female and male cod (Table 2-1, Figs. 2-2 & 2-3). This difference is present at all ages. 3) Commercial trawls in the AI catch bigger female and male cod than do trawls in the EBS (Figs. 3-1, 3-2 & 3-3). From 2004 to 2006, the mode for cod in the EBS occurred at 65-70 cm, while the mode for females in the AI occurred at 80-85 cm. Fish smaller than 50 cm were evident in EBS trawls, but were rare in the AI.

Olav A. Ormseth; Mike Canino; Liz Conners; I Neidetcher; Peter Munro; Sarah Gaichas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Packing assembly for use in a plunger bore  

SciTech Connect

A packing assembly is described which is adapted to be installed in a machine, such as a pump, the machine having a housing with a plunger bore and a plunger therin to provide a fluid-tight seal for the machine. The assembly consists of: a packing gland which fastens into one end of the plunger bore; a packing gland spacer positioned adjacent to and in contact with the packing gland; a lubrication gland positioned adjacent to and in contact with the packing gland spacer; a separate stack of packing rings, which includes at least two packing rings, each ring in the stack has a front face defining a concave shape, a rear face defining a convex shape, and a groove, defining a concave shape, in the front face; a female adaptor ring positioned between the lubrication gland and the packing ring stack, the female adaptor ring has a front face with a concave shape, the concave shape defines an angle which substantially conforms to the angle defined by the convex shape of the rear face of the last packing ring in the stack, such that the front face of the female adaptor ring can seat firmly against the rear face of the last packing ring; a male-female adaptor ring positioned between two packing rings in the stack, the male-female adaptor ring has a front face and rear face, the rear face has a convex shape and an integral rib member defining a convex shape, on the rear face, and the front face has a concave shape; the convex shape of the rear face of the male-female adaptor ring defines an angle which substantially conforms to the angle defined by the concave shape of the front face of the last packing ring in the stack and the convex shape of the face of the last packing ring in the stack and the convex shape of the rib member substantially conforms to the concave shape of the groove in the front face of the last packing ring.

Cameron, D.C.; Cobb, H.V.; Winn, F.M.

1986-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

335

Frogs that change sex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frogs that change sex Frogs that change sex Name: Mike A Smola Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why can frogs (some species) change sex? Replies: This is a complex subject. Several studies have exposed some of the answers to this question, but a definitive answer is yet to be made. It all boils down to the level of which genes are activated. Studies have shown that the sex chromosomes are not necessarily the determining factor. The traditional display of a female is when an individual has two X chromosomes present. When one of these genes is a Y, it is a male. This tends to be the case for most organisms that sport individuals that are different sexes. However, the Y chromosomes has been almost always a male determining chromosome, but with molecular biology and genetic engineering techniques, a male can be made from a XX combination and females have developed from XY combinations. These are extremely rare, but they have given insight to the fact that there are other factors beside X and Y chromosomes that determine sex, probably a gene found in both chromosomes.

336

Sexing Swans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sexing Swans Sexing Swans Name: RON Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We live on the chesapeake bay, For the past 3 weeks we have a beautiful white swan at or pier every nite. The largest bird I have ever been that close to. He waits for me to come out and feed him after dinner.We have raised a couple of baby ducks and releised them. My wife and I are fighting over a name. (male or female) I say he is a male because of his personalty. that really pis--- her off.can you tell me for real how we can tell. P.S. please excuse my spelling and launage. I am not a computer person ,just happen to have one and am trying to learn how to use it. I can,t type either. Replies: There is no easy way visually to tell male from female swans, behavior within the pair would be about the only clue you could get by observing the birds in the wild

337

How gender, age, and geography influence the utilization of radiation therapy in the management of malignant melanoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Comparing radiation therapy utilization rates (RTUR) to those predicted by best evidence is a useful measure of the equity and accessibility of service delivery. In this study the RTUR for melanoma was established for British Columbia, Canada, and compared with the rate suggested by the evidence. Demographic variables, specifically age, gender, and geography that influenced the RTUR were examined with a view to identifying methods of improving underutilization. Methods and Materials: The RTUR in the management of malignant melanoma was taken from British Columbia Cancer registry data for 1986 to 1998. Variations in utilization based on age, gender, health authority, stage of disease, and referral patterns were analyzed. Results: An RTUR of 11% was identified. This was consistent over time. Referral rates decreased between 1986 and 1998. RT is used mostly for later stage disease. Males were more likely to receive RT than females, related to later stage of disease in men. Referral rates decreased, but RTUR for referred cases increased, in health authorities that did not have a cancer center. Conclusions: Use of RT is influenced by age and by stage of disease. Overall RTUR in British Columbia is lower than suggested by best evidence. Referral patterns are influenced by geography. RTUR was higher in males, consistent with a different pattern of disease in males compared with females.

French, John [Radiation Therapy, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: jfrench@bccancer.bc.ca; McGahan, Colleen [Population and Preventive Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Duncan, Graeme [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Lengoc, Sonca [Radiation Therapy, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Soo, Jenny [Radiation Therapy, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Cannon, Jerry [Radiation Therapy, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Effects of egg incubation condition on the post-hatching growth and performance of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina  

SciTech Connect

The effect of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth and performance capacities of the common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina was investigated in the laboratory. Turtle eggs were collected from four sites in New York State and randomly assigned to four incubation temperature treatments to produce males (constant 26{degree}C and downshifted 30-26-30{degree}C) and females (constant 30{degree}C and upshifted 26-30-26{degree}C) under constant and altered temperature regimes. The incubation conditions resulted in 92% males from the constant 26{degree}C group and 93% males from the downshifted group. 100% females resulted from both the constant 30{degree}C group and the upshifted group. Turtles hatching from eggs incubated constantly at 26{degree}C were significantly larger than hatchlings from eggs incubated at a constant 30{degree}C or downshifted. Hatchlings were raised in individual aquaria at 25{degree}C and fed earthworms and fish. After a 9-month growth period, turtles which had been incubated at a constant 30{degree}C gained significantly more mass than did turtles from eggs which had been downshifted or upshifted. There was no extended effect of incubation condition on Post-hatching performance and learning ability as measured by righting and feeding responses. Thus, the mass gain differences seen in this study suggest that physiological differences do result as the consequence of incubation condition. However, these physiological differences are not reflected in normal locomotive or feeding behavior.

Ryan, K.M.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Effects of egg incubation condition on the post-hatching growth and performance of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina  

SciTech Connect

The effect of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth and performance capacities of the common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina was investigated in the laboratory. Turtle eggs were collected from four sites in New York State and randomly assigned to four incubation temperature treatments to produce males (constant 26[degree]C and downshifted 30-26-30[degree]C) and females (constant 30[degree]C and upshifted 26-30-26[degree]C) under constant and altered temperature regimes. The incubation conditions resulted in 92% males from the constant 26[degree]C group and 93% males from the downshifted group. 100% females resulted from both the constant 30[degree]C group and the upshifted group. Turtles hatching from eggs incubated constantly at 26[degree]C were significantly larger than hatchlings from eggs incubated at a constant 30[degree]C or downshifted. Hatchlings were raised in individual aquaria at 25[degree]C and fed earthworms and fish. After a 9-month growth period, turtles which had been incubated at a constant 30[degree]C gained significantly more mass than did turtles from eggs which had been downshifted or upshifted. There was no extended effect of incubation condition on Post-hatching performance and learning ability as measured by righting and feeding responses. Thus, the mass gain differences seen in this study suggest that physiological differences do result as the consequence of incubation condition. However, these physiological differences are not reflected in normal locomotive or feeding behavior.

Ryan, K.M.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

“I’m not brilliant, but I’m pretty smart”: Compromises and apologies in female college athletes’ constructions of ‘self’  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a case study from ice hockey. Gender and Society, 16(1), 93-men’s lacrosse and ice hockey because it is more physical.Checking is allowed in hockey and you can’t hit somebody

Pilver, Lindsey

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Job and home characteristics, negative work-home interaction and ill-health of employed females in South Africa / Zoe Roux.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last few years, many more women than before have entered the labour force. Consequently, employed women are confronted with demanding aspects at work… (more)

Roux, Zoe

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Monitoring the Reproductive Success of Naturally Spawning Hatchery and Natural Spring Chinook Salmon in the Wenatchee River, 2008-2009 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated differences in the statistical power to assign parentage between an artificially propagated and wild salmon population. The propagated fish were derived from the wild population, and are used to supplement its abundance. Levels of genetic variation were similar between the propagated and wild groups at 11 microsatellite loci, and exclusion probabilities were >0.999999 for both groups. The ability to unambiguously identify a pair of parents for each sampled progeny was much lower than expected, however. Simulations demonstrated that the proportion of cases the most likely pair of parents were the true parents was lower for propagated parents than for wild parents. There was a clear relationship between parentage assignment ability and the degree of linkage disequilibrium, the estimated effective number of breeders that produced the parents, and the size of the largest family within the potential parents. If a stringent threshold for parentage assignment was used, estimates of relative fitness were biased downward for the propagated fish. The bias appeared to be largely eliminated by either fractionally assigning progeny among parents in proportion to their likelihood of parentage, or by assigning progeny to the most likely set of parents without using a statistical threshold. We used a DNA-based parentage analysis to measure the relative reproductive success of hatchery- and natural-origin spring Chinook salmon in the natural environment. Both male and female hatchery-origin fish produced far fewer juvenile progeny per parent when spawning naturally than did natural origin fish. Differences in age structure, spawning location, weight and run timing were responsible for some of the difference in fitness. Male size and age had a large influence on fitness, with larger and older males producing more offspring than smaller or younger individuals. Female size had a significant effect on fitness, but the effect was much smaller than the effect of size on male fitness. For both sexes, run time had a smaller but still significant effect on fitness, with earlier returning fish favored. Spawning location within the river had a significant effect on fitness for both males and females, and for females explained most of the reduced fitness observed for hatchery fish in this population. While differences have been reported in the relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced salmonids Oncorhynchus spp., factors explaining the differences are often confounded. We examined the spawning site habitat and redd structure variables of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha of known size that spawned in two tributaries of the Wenatchee River. We controlled for variability in spawning habitat by limiting our analysis to redds found within four selected reaches. No difference in the instantaneous spawner density or location of the redd in the stream channel was detected between reaches. Within each reach, no difference in the fork length or weight of hatchery and naturally produced fish was detected. While most variables differed between reaches, we found no difference in redd characteristics within a reach between hatchery and naturally produced females. Correlation analysis of fish size and redd characteristics found several weak but significant relationships suggesting larger fish contract larger redds in deeper water. Spawner density was inversely related to several redd structure variables suggesting redd size may decrease as spawner density increases. Results should be considered preliminary until samples size and statistical power goals are reached in future years. Trends in relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Wenatchee Basins suggest females that spawn in the upper reaches of the tributaries produced a great number of offspring compared to females that spawn in the lower reaches of the tributaries. To better understand this trend, redd microhabitat data was collected from spring Chinook sa

Ford, Michael J.; Williamson, Kevin S. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Horns and Antlers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Horns and Antlers Horns and Antlers Nature Bulletin No. 730 November 2, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist HORNS AND ANTLERS A great many large grazing or browsing animals, the ones which have cloven hoofs and chew their cud, are armed with either horns or antlers. These weapons are used for defense against the attacks of bloodthirsty enemies and in duels between males for possession of a female or a harem of females. Although both horns and antlers are borne on the head and have similar uses, they are very different structures. Most of the world's cattle, sheep and goats -- both wild and domesticated -- have horns. In North America the only living horn- bearers are those noble beasts, the bison (usually called buffalo), the musk ox, the Rocky Mountain goat and the bighorn sheep.

344

Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O'Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

The male germ cell gene regulator CTCFL is functionally different from CTCF and binds CTCF-like consensus sites in a nucleosome composition-dependent manner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010, 3:19. 15. Nativio R, Wendt KS, Ito Y, Huddleston JE,2008, Page 20 of 21 17. Wendt KS, Yoshida K, Itoh T, Bando

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Cost-effectiveness of primary offer of IVF vs. primary offer of IUI followed by IVF (for IUI failures) in couples with unexplained or mild male factor subfertility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycles IUI ("primary" IVF) 1cycle IUI + IVF for failures 2 cycles IUI + IVF for failures 3 cycles IUI + IVF for failures 4 cycles IUI + IVF for failures 5cycles IUI + IVF for failures 6 cycles IUI + IVF for failures Tr ea tm en t c os t £0 £5,000 £10...

Pashayan, Nora; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Mathur, Raj

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

347

The testosterone-dependent and independent transcriptional networks in the hypothalamus of Gpr54 and Kiss1 knockout male mice are not fully equivalent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Testosterone implants were manually and asep- tically prepared in the laboratory using silicone tubing (0.058 inch ID/0.077 inch OD; Dow Corning) filled with crystalline testosterone (T-1500; Sigma Aldrich, UK), and sealed with adhesive silicone type A glue [45... phase lock tube to separate out the aqueous phase through centrifugation. RNA was precipitated out of the aqueous phase with an equal volume of isopropa- nol and pelletted by centrifugation. Seventy percent ethanol was used to wash the pellet...

Prentice, Leah M; d'Anglemont de Tassigny, Xavier; McKinney, Steven; Ruiz de Algara, Teresa; Yap, Damian; Turashvili, Gulisa; Poon, Steven; Sutcliffe, Margaret; Allard, Pat; Burleigh, Angela; Fee, John; Huntsman, David G; Colledge, William H; Aparicio, Samuel

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

348

Black Male Dancers and the Performance of Masculinity On- and Offstage: Bill T. Jones, Desmond Richardson, Dwight Rhoden, and Ronald K. Brown  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collins, Patricia Hill. Black Sexual Politics: AfricanDifference: Dominance, Strength, and Black Masculinities. ”Progressive Black Masculinities. Ed. Athena Mutua. New York:

Broomfield, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Nadya A. Fouad, Ph.D Romila Singh, Ph.D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nadya A. Fouad, Ph.D Nadya A. Fouad, Ph.D Romila Singh, Ph.D University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee WHY WOMEN LEAVE ENGINEERING " There is little to no RESPECT for women in male-dominated fields." " Still getting asked if I can handle being in a mostly male work environment in interviews in 2009 - I've been an engineer for 9 years, obviously I can. I know when I'm asked that question, I HAVE NO CHANCE AT THE JOB . It is nice they brought me in for equal opportunity survey points but don't waste my time if you don't take females seriously." " My current workplace is very WOMAN ENGINEER FRIENDLY. Women get promoted and paid at the same rate as men." " I have to get OUTSIDE OF THE CUBICLE . " " My work for many years at a US national laboratory has provided

350

geese_title.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vitrual Exhibit Vitrual Exhibit Canada Geese Prairie Resources - Exhibit Home What are Canada geese? The Canada goose (Branta canadensis) is a large waterfowl common at Fermilab. It is easily identified as a large, plump bird with a long black neck, white chin strap, buff and brown body, and black legs. It is the most common and best known goose in North America. The males and females look alike with the males being somewhat larger. These powerful long distance flyers range over the entire North American continent when migrating. Why are the geese attracted to Fermilab? The cooling ponds (which are used to cool the magnets in the accelerator) at Fermilab are less likely to freeze in the winter making it a desirable habitat for waterfowl, especially geese. In recent years the ponds here at

351

Fast-growing willow shrub named `Canastota`  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A distinct male cultivar of Salix sachalinensis.times.S. miyabeana named `Canastota`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 2.7-fold more woody biomass than its female parent (Salix sachalinensis `SX61`), 28% greater woody biomass yield than its male parent (Salix miyabeana `SX64`), and 20% greater woody biomass yield than a standard production cultivar, Salix dasyclados `SV1` when grown in the same field for the same length of time (two growing seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Canastota` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. `Canastota` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by willow sawfly.

Abrahamson, Lawrence P. (Marcellus, NY); Kopp, Richard F. (Marietta, NY); Smart, Lawrence B. (Geneva, NY); Volk, Timothy A. (Syracuse, NY)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Selection of respirator test panels representative of U.S. adult facial sizes  

SciTech Connect

As requested by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Respirator Research and Development Section, Industrial Hygiene Group, has prepared anthropometric specifications for subjects to test the fit of half-mask, quarter-mask, and full- facepiece respirators. A facial survey of 200 males was conducted, with results similar to those of a recent survey of some 4000 U. S. airmen. Subjects were selected on the basis of face length and face width to wear full-face masks in tests. For testing halfand quarter-masks, face length and lip length were used. Test panels containing 25 male-and-female subjects were used to represent a majority of the working population. A sequential sampling scheme was developed to reduce the amount of testing required to determine if a mask provides adequate protection for diffurent facial sizes. Examples of man test results are given. (auth)

Hack, A.; Hyatt, E.C.; Held, B.J.; Moore, T.O.; Richards, C.P.; McConville, J.T.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

The pathogen transmission avoidance theory of sexual selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current theory that sexual selection results from female preference for males with good genes suffers from several problems. An alternative explanation, the pathogen transmission avoidance hypothesis, argues that the primary function of showy traits is to provide a reliable signal of current disease status, so that sick individuals can be avoided during mating. This study shows that a significant risk of pathogen transmission occurs during mating and that showy traits are reliable indicators of current disease status. The origin of female choosiness is argued to lie in a general tendency to avoid sick individuals, even in the absence of showy traits, which originate as exaggerations of normal traits that are indicative of good health (bright feathers, vigorous movement, large size). Thus, in this new model the origins of both showy traits and female choosiness are not problematic and there is no threshold effect. This model predicts that when the possession of male showy traits does not help to reduce disease in the female, showy traits are unlikely to occur. This case corresponds to thorough exposure of every animal to all group pathogens, on average, in large groups. Such species are shown with a large data set on birds to be less likely to exhibit showy traits. The good-genes model does not make this prediction. The pathogen transmission avoidance model can also lead to the evolution of showy traits even when selection is not effective against a given pathogen (e.g., when there is no heritable variation for resistance), but can result in selection for resistance if such genes are present. Monogamy is argued to reduce selection pressures for showy traits; data show monogamous species to be both less parasitized and less showy. In the context of reduction of pathogen transmission rates in showy populations, selection pressure becomes inversely frequency-dependent, which makes showy traits likely to be self-limiting rather than runaway.

Loehle, C.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

EEO PRECOMPLAINT COUNSELING INTAKE FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NATIONAL ORIGIN (SPECIFY) NATIONAL ORIGIN (SPECIFY) SEX ( ) FEMALE ( ) MALE DISABILITY ( ) MENTAL ( ) PHYSICAL AGE (SPECIFY DATE OF BIRTH) REPRISAL (List prior EEO activity, case number if known, and date of activity) GENETIC INFORMATION PREGNANCY SEXUAL ORIENTATION STATUS AS A PARENT - 2 - ISSUE(S) IN THE COMPLAINT (CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX/BOXES) NONSELECTION AWARDS RETIREMENT DETAIL TIME AND ATTENDANCE SUSPENSION REASSIGNMENT SEPARATION/TERMINATION DUTY HOURS REPRIMAND PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL SEXUAL HARASSMENT ASSIGNMENT OF DUTIES WORK CONDITIONS OTHER (SPECIFY) PART 3. EVENT INFORMATION: PROVIDE A BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF EACH ALLEGED DISCRIMINATORY INCIDENT, INCLUDING THE SPECIFIC DATE OF THE INCIDENT,

355

EEO PRECOMPLAINT COUNSELING INTAKE FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NATIONAL ORIGIN (SPECIFY) SEX ( ) FEMALE ( ) MALE DISABILITY ( ) MENTAL ( ) PHYSICAL AGE (SPECIFY DATE OF BIRTH) REPRISAL (List prior EEO activity, case number if known, and date of activity) GENETIC INFORMATION PREGNANCY SEXUAL ORIENTATION STATUS AS A PARENT - 2 - ISSUE(S) IN THE COMPLAINT (CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX/BOXES) NONSELECTION AWARDS RETIREMENT DETAIL TIME AND ATTENDANCE SUSPENSION REASSIGNMENT SEPARATION/TERMINATION DUTY HOURS REPRIMAND PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL SEXUAL HARASSMENT ASSIGNMENT OF DUTIES WORK CONDITIONS OTHER (SPECIFY) PART 3. EVENT INFORMATION: PROVIDE A BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF EACH ALLEGED DISCRIMINATORY INCIDENT, INCLUDING THE SPECIFIC DATE OF THE INCIDENT,

356

4D XCAT phantom for multimodality imaging research  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The authors develop the 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom for multimodality imaging research. Methods: Highly detailed whole-body anatomies for the adult male and female were defined in the XCAT using nonuniform rational B-spline (NURBS) and subdivision surfaces based on segmentation of the Visible Male and Female anatomical datasets from the National Library of Medicine as well as patient datasets. Using the flexibility of these surfaces, the Visible Human anatomies were transformed to match body measurements and organ volumes for a 50th percentile (height and weight) male and female. The desired body measurements for the models were obtained using the PEOPLESIZE program that contains anthropometric dimensions categorized from 1st to the 99th percentile for US adults. The desired organ volumes were determined from ICRP Publication 89 [ICRP, ''Basic anatomical and physiological data for use in radiological protection: reference values,'' ICRP Publication 89 (International Commission on Radiological Protection, New York, NY, 2002)]. The male and female anatomies serve as standard templates upon which anatomical variations may be modeled in the XCAT through user-defined parameters. Parametrized models for the cardiac and respiratory motions were also incorporated into the XCAT based on high-resolution cardiac- and respiratory-gated multislice CT data. To demonstrate the usefulness of the phantom, the authors show example simulation studies in PET, SPECT, and CT using publicly available simulation packages. Results: As demonstrated in the pilot studies, the 4D XCAT (which includes thousands of anatomical structures) can produce realistic imaging data when combined with accurate models of the imaging process. With the flexibility of the NURBS surface primitives, any number of different anatomies, cardiac or respiratory motions or patterns, and spatial resolutions can be simulated to perform imaging research. Conclusions: With the ability to produce realistic, predictive 3D and 4D imaging data from populations of normal and abnormal patients under various imaging parameters, the authors conclude that the XCAT provides an important tool in imaging research to evaluate and improve imaging devices and techniques. In the field of x-ray CT, the phantom may also provide the necessary foundation with which to optimize clinical CT applications in terms of image quality versus radiation dose, an area of research that is becoming more significant with the growing use of CT.

Segars, W. P.; Sturgeon, G.; Mendonca, S.; Grimes, Jason; Tsui, B. M. W. [Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, 2424 Erwin Road, Hock Plaza, Suite 302, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, 2424 Erwin Road, Hock Plaza, Suite 302, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, 2424 Erwin Road, Hock Plaza, Suite 302, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

STOCK DEFINITION AND GEOGRAPHIC RANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sperm whales are found throughout the world's oceans in deep waters to the edge of the ice at both poles (Leatherwood and Reeves 1983; Rice 1989; Whitehead 2002). Sperm whales throughout the world exhibit a geographic social structure where females and juveniles of both sexes occur in mixed groups and inhabit tropical and subtropical waters. Males, as they mature, initially form bachelor groups but eventually become more socially isolated and more wide-ranging, inhabiting temperate and polar waters as well (Whitehead 2003). Sperm whales were commercially hunted in the Caribbean Sea by American whalers from sailing vessels until the early 1900s

Puerto Rico; U. S. Virgin Isl; S Stock

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Diet of Nesting Red-Cockaded Woodpecker at Three Locations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors studied diets of nestling red-cockaded woodpeckers for two years on three sites in South Carolina and Georgia. Cameras recorded 33 different types of prey. Wood roaches were the most common, amounting to 50% of the prey. In addition, blueberries and saw fly larvae were collected by birds. Snail shells were also collected. Morista's index of diet overlap ranged from 0.94 to 0.99 for breeding males and females. We conclude that nestling diets are similar across the region.

Hanula, J.L.; Lipcomb, D.; Franzreb, K.E.; Loeb, S.C.

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

359

The sociality, ontogeny, and function of corvid post-conflict affiliation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

females, 4 males) in large outdoor aviaries, in which birds were able to fly freely, at the University of Cambridge Sub-Department of Animal Behaviour in Madingley, U. K. Rooks and jackdaws were housed in the same aviary (17 x 9 x 3m) and jays... back, oriented such that both birds’ heads face the same direction. Accompanied by growling vocalizations. R, JD, J Affiliative: passive Proximity Individuals within one body length of each other, but more than 5 cm apart. R, JD, J Co...

Logan, Corina

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most abandoned lek sites were located 0.9 for leks of 10 or more males. Large leks in grasslands should be a higher priority for conservation. Overall, wind power development had a weak effect on the annual probability of lek persistence. 3. We used molecular methods to investigate the mating behavior of prairie chickens. The prevailing view for lek-mating grouse is that females mate once to fertilize the clutch and that conspecific nest parasitism is rare. We found evidence that females mate multiple times to fertilize the clutch (8-18% of broods, 4-38% of chicks) and will parasitize nests of other females during egg-laying (~17% of nests). Variable rates of parentage were highest in the fragmented landscapes at the Smoky Hills field site, and were lower at the Flint Hills field site. Comparisons of the pre- and postconstruction periods showed that wind energy development did not affect the mating behaviors of prairie chickens. 4. We examined use of breeding habitats by radio-marked females and conducted separate analyses for nest site selection, and movements of females not attending nests or broods. The landscape was a mix of native prairie and agricultural habitats, and nest site selection was not random because females preferred to nest in grasslands. Nests tended to be closer to turbines during the postconstruction period and there was no evidence of behavioral avoidance of turbines by females during nest site selection. Movements of females not attending nests or broods showed that females crossed the site of the wind power development at higher rates during the preconstruction period (20%) than the postconstruction period (11%), and that movements away from turbines were more frequent during the postconstruction period. Thus, wind power development appears to affect movements in breeding habitats but not nest site s

Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State University

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

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361

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

362

Vessel structural support system  

SciTech Connect

Vessel structural support system for laterally and vertically supporting a vessel, such as a nuclear steam generator having an exterior bottom surface and a side surface thereon. The system includes a bracket connected to the bottom surface. A support column is pivotally connected to the bracket for vertically supporting the steam generator. The system also includes a base pad assembly connected pivotally to the support column for supporting the support column and the steam generator. The base pad assembly, which is capable of being brought to a level position by turning leveling nuts, is anchored to a floor. The system further includes a male key member attached to the side surface of the steam generator and a female stop member attached to an adjacent wall. The male key member and the female stop member coact to laterally support the steam generator. Moreover, the system includes a snubber assembly connected to the side surface of the steam generator and also attached to the adjacent wall for dampening lateral movement of the steam generator. In addition, the system includes a restraining member of "flat" attached to the side surface of the steam generator and a bumper attached to the adjacent wall. The flat and the bumper coact to further laterally support the steam generator.

Jenko, James X. (N. Versailles, PA); Ott, Howard L. (Kiski Twp., Allegheny County, PA); Wilson, Robert M. (Plum Boro, PA); Wepfer, Robert M. (Murrysville, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Height reduction among prenatally exposed atomic-bomb survivors: A longitudinal study of growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a random coefficient regression model, sex-specific longitudinal analyses of height were made on 801 (392 male and 409 female) atomic-bomb survivors exposed in utero to detect dose effects on standing height. The data set resulted from repeated measurements of standing height of adolescents (age 10-18 y). The dose effect, if any, was assumed to be linear. Gestational ages at the time of radiation exposure were divided into trimesters. Since an earlier longitudinal data analysis has demonstrated radiation effects on height, the emphasis in this paper is on the interaction between dose and gestational age at exposure and radiation effects on the age of occurrence of the adolescent growth spurt. For males, a cubic polynomial growth-curve model applied to the data was affected significantly by radiation. The dose by trimester interaction effect was not significant. The onset of adolescent growth spurt was estimated at about 13 y at 0 Gy. There was no effect of radiation on the adolescent growth spurt For females, a quadratic polynomial growth-curve model was fitted to the data. The dose effect was significant, while the dose by trimester interaction was again not significant. 27 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Nakashima, Eiji; Funamoto, Sachiyo [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Carter, R.L. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Availability of cadmium to rats from crops grown on cadmium-enriched soil  

SciTech Connect

The research was initiated to enhance understanding of the availability to animals of Cd present in edible plants. Such information is of considerable importance since agricultural crops can accumulate high concentrations of the metal when grown in certain soils or with sewage sludge as a fertilizer. Edible plants were labeled with /sup 109/Cd by growing them on /sup 109/CdCl/sup 2/ treated soil. The availability of /sup 109/Cd to male and female rats was then determined by feeding semisynthetic diets containing either freeze-dried radioactive spinach, lettuce, soybean, carrots, tomatoes, or wheat flour, or comparable nonradioactive plant powders spiked with /sup 109/CdCl/sup 2/. Retention of /sup 109/Cd by liver and kidney was determined after a 14-day feeding period. With the exception of spinach, Cd accumulation by rats was not found to be significantly influenced by the form of Cd in the diet whether supplied as plant-bound /sup 109/Cd or added to nonradioactive diets as /sup 109/CdCl/sup 2/. The mean retention of Cd in liver and kidney was 0.17% of the dose consumed for males and 0.26% for females consuming diets containing wheat, soybean, carrots, lettuce, or tomatoes.

Buhler, D.R.; Tinsley, I.J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Original Article Seroepidemiological Study of Human Hydatidosis in Meshkinshahr District, Ardabil Province, Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: The aim of this study was to conduct a sero-epidemiological survey in Meshkinshahr, Ardabil Province, northwestern Iran to detect the rate of hydatidosis in the city and nearby villages. Literature shows that no such study has been conducted so far. Methods: Overall, 670 serum samples were collected from 194 males and 476 females from patients referred to different health centers of the region. All patients filled out a questionnaire and an informed consent. Sera were analyzed using indirect-ELISA test. Ten ?g /ml antigens (Antigen B derived from hydatid cyst fluid), serum dilutions of 1:500 and conjugate anti-human coombs with 1:10000 dilutions were utilized to perform the test. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS software ver. 11.5. Results: The seroprevalence of human hydatidosis was 1.79 % by ELISA test in the region. This rate for females was 1.68 % and males 2.6%, respectively. There was no significant difference as regards all factors studied and the seropositivity. According to job, farmers and ranchmen had the highest rate of infection as 3.17%. The sero-prevalence of infection was 2.6% % in illiterate people which showed the highest rate. As regards residency, urban life showed no significant difference with rural life (1.1 % vs. 2.58%).

Iranian J Parasitol; Z Heidari; M Mohebali; Z Zarei; M Aryayipour; Mr Eshraghian; Eb Kia; S Shodajei; J Abdi; A Rakhshanpour; Mb Rokni

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Chronic pharmacologic inhibition of EGFR leads to cardiac dysfunction in C57BL/6J mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecule-targeted therapies like those against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are becoming widely used in the oncology clinic. With improvements in treatment efficacy, many cancers are being treated as chronic diseases, with patients having prolonged exposure to several therapies that were previously only given acutely. The consequence of chronic suppression of EGFR activity may lead to unexpected toxicities like altered cardiac physiology, a common organ site for adverse drug effects. To explore this possibility, we treated C57BL/6J (B6) mice with two EGFR small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), irreversible EKB-569 and reversible AG-1478, orally for 3 months. In B6 female mice, chronic exposure to both TKIs depressed body weight gain and caused significant changes in left ventricular (LV) wall thickness and cardiac function. No significant differences were observed in heart weight or cardiomyocyte size but histological analysis revealed an increase in fibrosis and in the numbers of TUNEL-positive cells in the hearts from treated female mice. Consistent with histological results, LV apoptotic gene expression was altered, with significant downregulation of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2l1. Although there were no significant differences in any of these endpoints in treated male mice, suggesting sex may influence susceptibility to TKI mediated toxicity, the LVs of treated male mice had significant upregulation of Egf, Erbb2 and Nppb over controls. Taken together, these data suggest that chronic dietary exposure to TKIs may result in pathological and physiological changes in the heart.

Barrick, Cordelia J. [Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Yu Ming [Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Program in Oral Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Chao, H.-H. [Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Threadgill, David W. [Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Program in Oral Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)], E-mail: dwt@med.unc.edu

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conferences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 6th Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conference was held at the Minoa Palace Conference Center, Chania, Crete, Greece (16-21 June 2008). The Organizing Committee was composed of Joe Nadeau (CWRU, Cleveland), Rudi Balling (German Research Centre, Brauschweig), David Galas (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Lee Hood (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Diane Isonaka (Seattle), Fotis Kafatos (Imperial College, London), John Lambris (Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia),Harris Lewin (Univ. of Indiana, Urbana-Champaign), Edison Liu (Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore), and Shankar Subramaniam (Univ. California, San Diego). A total of 101 individuals from 21 countries participated in the conference: USA (48), Canada (5), France (5), Austria (4), Germany (3), Italy (3), UK (3), Greece (2), New Zealand (2), Singapore (2), Argentina (1), Australia (1), Cuba (1), Denmark (1), Japan (1), Mexico (1), Netherlands (1), Spain (1), Sweden (1), Switzerland (1). With respect to speakers, 29 were established faculty members and 13 were graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. With respect to gender representation, among speakers, 13 were female and 28 were male, and among all participants 43 were female and 58 were male. Program these included the following topics: Cancer Pathways and Networks (Day 1), Metabolic Disease Networks (Day 2), Day 3 ? Organs, Pathways and Stem Cells (Day 3), and Day 4 ? Inflammation, Immunity, Microbes and the Environment (Day 4). Proceedings of the Conference were not published.

Nadeau, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest Research Institute] [Pacific Northwest Research Institute

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

368

Drawings of Scientists  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists have a strong impact on our world and my life. . . . There are so many different kinds of scientists and they have many different personalities. But they all have one thing in common, a love for science and discovery. . . . Scientist Judy is wearing her white lab coat. She is a very simple person . . . simple clothes, simple house, simple personality. I think everyone has little bit of science "love" in them. They wonder about processes in their life and processes in their body. A scientist is a male or female that enjoys learning about the Earth and its contents. Scientists have a strong impact on our world and my life. . . . There are so many different kinds of scientists and they have many different personalities. But they all have one thing in common, a love for science and discovery. . . . Scientist Judy is wearing her white lab coat. She is a very simple person . . . simple clothes, simple house, simple personality. I think everyone has little bit of science "love" in them. They wonder about processes in their life and processes in their body. A scientist is a male or female that enjoys learning about the Earth and its contents. Angela Program Contact: Marge Bardeen - mbardeen@fnal.gov Web Maintainer: ed-webmaster@fnal.gov Last Update: March 2, 2000 URL: http://www-ed.fnal.gov/projects/scientists/angela

369

Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The success of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival, appropriate development of the reproductive system, and the behavior and survival of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. Current velocity in rearing vessels had little if any effect on reproductive behavior of captively reared steelhead. However, males and females reared in high velocity vessels participated a greater number of spawning events than siblings reared in low velocity tanks. Observations of nesting females and associated males in a natural stream (Hamma Hamma River) were consistent with those observed in a controlled spawning channel. DNA pedigree analyses did not reveal significant differences in the numbers of fry produced by steelhead reared in high and low velocity vessels. To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon are being exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Subsequently they will be tested for development of long-term memories of these odorants. In 2002-2003, the efficacy of EOG analysis for assessing imprinting was demonstrated and will be applied in these and other behavioral and molecular tools in the current work plan. Results of these experiments will be important to determine the critical periods for imprinting for the offspring of captively-reared fish destined for release into natal rivers or lakes. By early August, the oocytes of all of Rapid River Hatchery chinook salmon females returning from the ocean had advanced to the tertiary yolk globule stage; whereas, only some of the captively reared Lemhi River females sampled had advanced to this stage, and the degree of advancement was not dependent on rearing temperature. The mean spawning time of captive Lemhi River females was 3-4 weeks after that of the Rapid River fish. Captive Lemhi River females produced smaller and fewer eggs than the Rapid River females; however, relative fecundity was higher than that of the Rapid River fish. Female coho salmon that ceased or slowed oocyte development in the spring had lower body growth from the previous August onward compared with females that continued oocyte growth. This indicates that growth during the late summer and fall, one year prior to spawning, can determine the decision to mature the following spring. Therefore it is important to maintain the growth of broodstock during the summer/fall period to ensure the continuation of ovary development in the subsequent spring. A combined whole cell vaccine of Renogen with killed R. salmoninarum strain MT239 may be effective in reducing the occurrence of BKD during the period immediately after seawater transfer, but not in yearling seawater-adapted chinook salmon. Control of BKD is likely to require an integrated disease management plan, utilizing three components, namely broodstock segregation, antibiotics, and vaccination. Vaccine results incorporated with antibiotic treatment will be used to work toward an integrated disease management plan to help to reduce the cycle of BKD transmission in the captive stocks to increase survival safely. Patterns of estimated survival in one chinook salmon stock (Grovers Creek)were generally consistent with inbreeding depression: progeny of fish that were full siblings (approximate increment in F of 0.25) survived to return at much lower rates than did progeny of fish that were half siblings (F {approx} 0.125) or unrelated individuals (F {approx} 0). Growth at sea of Grovers Creek Hatchery stock study fish was lower than that of UWH stock fish. Among the inbreeding groups alone, no clear differences in growth were detectable. However, preliminary results suggest the general pattern of growth was opposite that expected if inbreeding depression reduced growth: the highest growth was in progeny of related parents.

Berejikian, Barry A. (National Marine Fisheries Service)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon; Assessment of Captive Broodstock Technologies, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The success of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival, appropriate development of the reproductive system, and the behavior and survival of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. Current velocity in rearing vessels had little if any effect on reproductive behavior of captively reared steelhead. However, males and females reared in high velocity vessels participated a greater number of spawning events than siblings reared in low velocity tanks. Observations of nesting females and associated males in a natural stream (Hamma Hamma River) were consistent with those observed in a controlled spawning channel. DNA pedigree analyses did not reveal significant differences in the numbers of fry produced by steelhead reared in high and low velocity vessels. To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon are being exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Subsequently they will be tested for development of long-term memories of these odorants. In 2002-2003, the efficacy of EOG analysis for assessing imprinting was demonstrated and will be applied in these and other behavioral and molecular tools in the current work plan. Results of these experiments will be important to determine the critical periods for imprinting for the offspring of captively-reared fish destined for release into natal rivers or lakes. By early August, the oocytes of all of Rapid River Hatchery chinook salmon females returning from the ocean had advanced to the tertiary yolk globule stage; whereas, only some of the captively reared Lemhi River females sampled had advanced to this stage, and the degree of advancement was not dependent on rearing temperature. The mean spawning time of captive Lemhi River females was 3-4 weeks after that of the Rapid River fish. Captive Lemhi River females produced smaller and fewer eggs than the Rapid River females; however, relative fecundity was higher than that of the Rapid River fish. Female coho salmon that ceased or slowed oocyte development in the spring had lower body growth from the previous August onward compared with females that continued oocyte growth. This indicates that growth during the late summer and fall, one year prior to spawning, can determine the decision to mature the following spring. Therefore it is important to maintain the growth of broodstock during the summer/fall period to ensure the continuation of ovary development in the subsequent spring. A combined whole cell vaccine of Renogen with killed R. salmoninarum strain MT239 may be effective in reducing the occurrence of BKD during the period immediately after seawater transfer, but not in yearling seawater-adapted chinook salmon. Control of BKD is likely to require an integrated disease management plan, utilizing three components, namely broodstock segregation, antibiotics, and vaccination. Vaccine results incorporated with antibiotic treatment will be used to work toward an integrated disease management plan to help to reduce the cycle of BKD transmission in the captive stocks to increase survival safely. Patterns of estimated survival in one chinook salmon stock (Grovers Creek) were generally consistent with inbreeding depression: progeny of fish that were full siblings (approximate increment in F of 0.25) survived to return at much lower rates than did progeny of fish that were half siblings (F {approx} 0.125) or unrelated individuals (F {approx} 0). Growth at sea of Grovers Creek Hatchery stock study fish was lower than that of UWH stock fish. Among the inbreeding groups alone, no clear differences in growth were detectable. However, preliminary results suggest the general pattern of growth was opposite that expected if inbreeding depression reduced growth: the highest growth was in progeny of related parents.

Berejikian, Barry

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Investigations into the reproductive performance and larval rearing of the Brown shrimp, Farfantepenaeus aztecus, using closed recirculating systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of unilateral eyestalk ablation, diets and sex ratios were evaluated on two wild populations of Farfantepenaeus aztecus in a closed recirculating maturation system. Ovarian development and spawning frequencies of ablated females in both studies were higher than the non-ablated females. Replacement of bloodworms in maturation diet with enriched adult Artemia sp. had no negative effect on the number of eggs spawned and resulted in increased hatch and survival rates from Nauplius I to Zoea I. Life span of ablated females fed enriched Artemia sp. was longer than ablated females fed bloodworms. Replacement of the expensive bloodworm diet component with adult enriched Artemia sp. is possible without negative impact on female reproductive performance. Reducing male to female ratio from 2:1 to 1:1 resulted in a 1.25% decrease in spawning activities of ablated females. The life cycle of pond-raised F1 generation F. aztecus also was completed in the closed recirculating system using unilateral eyestalk ablation as previously described. This study found diets that contained an enriched adult Artemia sp. component performed superior (i.e. hatch rate, nauplii and zoea production) to a diet containing bloodworms. Six consecutive larval rearing trials evaluated changes in select water quality indicators and their effect on growth, survival, and stress tolerance of F. aztecus postlarvae cultured in artificial seawater under closed recirculating and flow-through conditions. The closed recirculating larval rearing system successfully produced five-day-old postlarvae (PL) from Zoea I (Z1) with similar dry weights, lengths and stress resistance to PL produced under standard water exchange practices. The trickling biofilters were found to be a limiting component of this system. A submerged coral biofilter was added to the system and effectively processed culture water for re-use. Addition of the submerged biofilter resulted in improved survival rates in Trials 4, 5 and 6. These studies demonstrate maturation and larval rearing of F. aztecus is feasible in closed recirculating systems. Implementation of these systems in hatcheries bolsters biosecurity while reducing the environmental impact of hatchery effluent. Recirculating and re-use systems are therefore essential in the further development of sustainable hatchery programs for endemic species.

Gandy, Ryan Leighton

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Communication Communication Name: Giovanni Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside U.S. Country: Italy Date: Summer 2011 Question: I have read that cats tend do communicate to each other more with body language (and other sounds: hissing, growling etc) rather than meowing. Again the two exceptions seem to be mother with kittens, and intact males at the intial phases of dominance "discussion". Now, I recently two neutered females (mother 2Y (M) and daughter (D) 10 months). A (very likely male & neutered)cat (X) has been visiting our garden; typically when he arrives and our cats are not out starts meowing (does not sound aggressive, nor his body language does); there have been a couple of initial apparently friendly (nose to nose) allbeit very prident contacts between M and X, but at the end f the sedon one M started growling and I and Dwent got closer and X run off. Since then though X has been coming back evry night and morning, again meowing (again does nt sound aggressive) but now M refuses to go out or stays very well clear of X when he arrived. D in all that is quite prudent but less concerned and X does not seem to have a problem with it at all, and they both roam the garden at the same time with no particular intereaction. Furhter info: M is a fairly big female Norwegian Forest cat (5.5kg), X ia a properly big (non descript)cat (must be 6.5+ kg...so unlikely to be a female), D is still quite small (for a NFC) at about 4kg) WOudl you have any idea for my description on what is going on, and how shoud I interpreter the meowing etc?

373

A mode of action for induction of thyroid gland tumors by Pyrethrins in the rat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prolonged treatment with high doses of Pyrethrins results in thyroid gland tumors in the rat. To elucidate the mode of action for tumor formation, the effect of Pyrethrins on rat thyroid gland, thyroid hormone levels and hepatic thyroxine UDPglucuronosyltransferase activity was investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley CD rats were fed diets containing 0 (control) and 8000 ppm Pyrethrins and female rats diets containing 0, 100, 3000 and 8000 ppm Pyrethrins for periods of 7, 14 and 42 days and for 42 days followed by 42 days of reversal. As a positive control, rats were also fed diets containing 1200-1558 ppm sodium Phenobarbital (NaPB) for 7 and 14 days. The treatment of male rats with 8000 ppm Pyrethrins, female rats with 3000 and 8000 ppm Pyrethrins and both sexes with NaPB resulted in increased thyroid gland weights, which were associated with follicular cell hypertrophy. Thyroid follicular cell replicative DNA synthesis was increased by treatment with Pyrethrins and NaPB for 7 and/or 14 days. Treatment with Pyrethrins and NaPB increased hepatic microsomal thyroxine UDPglucuronosyltransferase activity and serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels (TSH), but reduced serum levels of either thyroxine (T{sub 4}) and/or triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}). The effects of Pyrethrins in female rats were dose-dependent, with 100 ppm being a no-effect level, and on cessation of treatment were essentially reversible in both sexes. The concordance between the effects of Pyrethrins and NaPB suggests that the mode of action for Pyrethrins-induced rat thyroid gland tumors is similar to that of some other non-genotoxic inducers of hepatic xenobiotic metabolism.

Finch, John M. [Inveresk Research, Tranent EH33 2NE, Scotland (United Kingdom); Osimitz, Thomas G. [Science Strategies LLC, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States)]. E-mail: perseus1@worldnet.att.net; Gabriel, Karl L. [ConTox Ltd, Fort Washington, PA 19034-0368 (United States); Martin, Tom [Inveresk Research, Tranent EH33 2NE, Scotland (United Kingdom); Henderson, Wendy J. [Inveresk Research, Tranent EH33 2NE, Scotland (United Kingdom); Capen, Charles C. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43082 (United States); Butler, William H. [Glebe Cottage, Big Common Lane, Bletchingley, Surrey RH14QE, England (United Kingdom); Lake, Brian G. [BIBRA International Ltd, Woodmansterne Road, Carshalton, Surrey SM5 4DS, England (United Kingdom); Centre for Toxicology, School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, England (United Kingdom)

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 2000: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 2000-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon trapping, broodstock selection, and spawning was first implemented in 1998, did not occur in 1999, and was resumed in 2000. A total of 152 salmon were trapped in Johnson Creek in 2000, of which 73 (25 males, 16 females, and 32 jacks) fish were transported to Idaho Fish and Game=s South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility for artificial propagation purposes. The remaining 79 (29 males, 16 females, and 24 jacks) fish were released above the weir to spawn naturally. A total of 65,060 green eggs were taken from 16 female salmon and transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for incubation and rearing. Egg counts indicated an average eye-up rate of 86.0% for 55,971 eyed eggs. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,066 eggs per female. Juvenile fish were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery through November 2001. These fish were transferred to outdoor rearing facilities in December 2001 where they remained until release in March 2002. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags. In addition 9,987 were also PIT tagged. Hand counts provided by marking crews were used to amend the number of juvenile salmon released from the original egg count. A total of 57,392 smolts were released into a temporary acclimation channel in Johnson Creek on March 18, 19, 20, 2002. These fish were held in this facility until a fish screen was removed on March 22, 2002 and the fish were allowed to emigrate.

Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John; Hill, Robert

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aggressive Dogs Aggressive Dogs Name: Santha Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: Outside U.S. Country: Australia Date: Fall 2011 Question: What type of aggression classification would you give a dog that attacks other dogs with out any signs or provocations? Replies: Santha, In my experiences of breeding and raising several (related) Jack Russell Terriers, I've observed it is a matter of perceived threat. By this I mean either the aggressive dog IS threatened in some way, or the aggressive dog PERCEIVES a threat when one might not actually exist, and the dog lashes out. I've seen that most of the female dogs I've had did not get along with each other. My explanation for this is that each of them has a relationship of trust and concern with me, and they see another female dogs as a threat to that "relationship". Oddly, all of the female dogs I have had have gotten along ok with each of the males I've had.

376

Sex-dependent Differences in Intestinal Tumorigenesis Induced in Apc1638N/+ Mice by Exposure to {gamma} Rays  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of 1 and 5 Gy radiation doses and to investigate the interplay of gender and radiation with regard to intestinal tumorigenesis in an adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutant mouse model. Methods and Materials: Apc1638N/+ female and male mice were exposed whole body to either 1 Gy or 5 Gy of {gamma} rays and euthanized when most of the treated mice became moribund. Small and large intestines were processed to determine tumor burden, distribution, and grade. Expression of proliferation marker Ki-67 and estrogen receptor (ER)-{alpha} were also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: We observed that, with both 1 Gy and 5 Gy of {gamma} rays, females displayed reduced susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis compared with males. As for radiation effect on small intestinal tumor progression, although no substantial differences were found in the relative frequency and degree of dysplasia of adenomas in irradiated animals compared with controls, invasive carcinomas were found in 1-Gy- and 5-Gy-irradiated animals. Radiation exposure was also shown to induce an increase in protein levels of proliferation marker Ki-67 and sex-hormone receptor ER-{alpha} in both non tumor mucosa and intestinal tumors from irradiated male mice. Conclusions: We observed important sex-dependent differences in susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc1638N/+ mutants. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that exposure to radiation doses as low as 1 Gy can induce a significant increase in intestinal tumor multiplicity as well as enhance tumor progression in vivo.

Trani, Daniela [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MaastRO) Lab, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, University of Maastricht (Netherlands); Moon, Bo-Hyun [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Kallakury, Bhaskar; Hartmann, Dan P. [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States)] [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Datta, Kamal [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Fornace, Albert J., E-mail: af294@georgetown.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Center of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Mate Retention Inventory-Short Form (MRI-SF) David M. Buss a,*, Todd K. Shackelford b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Mate Retention Inventory-Short Form (MRI-SF) David M. Buss a,*, Todd K. Shackelford b , William devoted to retaining a mate (Buss, 1988b; Buss & Shackelford, 1997). For many species, long-term mate non-married couples (Buss, 1988a, 1988b) as well as newlywed couples (Buss & Shackelford, 1997). Men

Pillow, Jonathan

379

Romney Institute Extended Board Directory | 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

located near the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Southeastern Washington State. Working most of his career Moore, Bryan MPA 2009 38 Morgan, Heather MPA 2010 39 Murphy, Michael MPA 1986 15 Nichol, Kevin P. EMPA year BYU student from Washington, D. C. They were married in June 1961. They celebrated their 50th

Martinez, Tony R.

380

10 Questions for a Mechanical Engineer: Michael Brambley  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As a researcher at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Dr. Michael Brambley is working to improve the energy efficiency of our nation’s buildings. In this "10 Questions," learn how he is marrying engineering and computer technology to cut energy waste in commercial buildings.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

picoTrans: An intelligent icon-driven interface for cross-lingual communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

picoTrans is a prototype system that introduces a novel icon-based paradigm for cross-lingual communication on mobile devices. Our approach marries a machine translation system with the popular picture book. Users interact with picoTrans by pointing ... Keywords: User interface, machine translation, mobile devices

Wei Song; Andrew Finch; Kumiko Tanaka-Ishii; Keiji Yasuda; Eiichiro Sumita

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Weathergods: tangible interaction in a digital tabletop game  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe the game 'Weathergods', which is implemented on the Entertaible tabletop gaming platform [1]. The game uses either iconic or symbolic [2] tangible objects for interaction and marries both the advantages of traditional board ... Keywords: digital tabletop gaming, interaction design, pervasive games, tangible interaction, tangible user interfaces

Saskia Bakker; Debby Vorstenbosch; Elise van den Hoven; Gerard Hollemans; Tom Bergman

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Chapter 4 Technical and economics analysis of energy 4.1 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

options including the system of diesel electricity production, gas, solar hot water heaters, transport of fossil fuels and nuclear energy, and renewable sources of energy, comprising of wind, solar, biomass resources on the Islands, including wind, solar, biomass, hydro, wave, and geothermal. By marrying the range

384

Tritium Supply Considerations Scott Willms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marital Status: Married Citizenship: Canadian Languages: English and French Address: EC6 Physics Candu1 Tel: (905) 823-9040, ext. 34583 (Office) (905) 690-1512 (Home) Fax: (905) 403-7386 Email: Emile.Talbot@candu EXPERIENCE: Oct. 2011 ­ Present Candu Energy Inc., Sheridan Park 2285 Speakman Drive Mississauga, ON L5K 1B1

385

Undergraduate Programs Undergraduate Degree Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marital Status: Married Citizenship: Canadian Languages: English and French Address: EC6 Physics Candu1 Tel: (905) 823-9040, ext. 34583 (Office) (905) 690-1512 (Home) Fax: (905) 403-7386 Email: Emile.Talbot@candu EXPERIENCE: Oct. 2011 ­ Present Candu Energy Inc., Sheridan Park 2285 Speakman Drive Mississauga, ON L5K 1B1

Heller, Barbara

386

More than words : a biography of Daniel Francis Burns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daniel Francis Burns was born in Ireland in 1888 and immigrated to the United States in 1912. He married Mary O'Neill in 1923 and had a family of seven children. He worked as a police officer in the Boston Police Department ...

Burns, Matthew R. (Matthew Robert)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Image categorization combining neighborhood methods and boosting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe an efficient and scalable system for automatic image categorization. Our approach seeks to marry scalable "model-free" neighborhood-based annotation with accurate boosting-based per-tag modeling. For accelerated neighborhood-based classification, ... Keywords: boosting, image categorization, nearest neighbors

Matthew Cooper

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

CTu2J.1.pdf CLEO Technical Digest OSA 2012 Light Emission in Ge Quantum Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3670) Light-emitting diode 1. Introduction The field of Si photonics presents a number of potential benefits. Saraswat, J. Vuckovic, and Y. Nishi, "Room temperature 1.6 µm electroluminescence from Ge light emitting diode on Si substrate" Opt. Express 17, 10019 (2009). [3] P. Chaisakul, D. Marris-Morini, G. Isella, D

Miller, David A. B.

389

PROPRIETARY MATERIAL. 2011 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Limited distribution permitted only to teachers and educators for course preparation. If you are a student using this Manual, you are using it without permission.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Color using Nanostructures Yanhui Zhao@BioNEMS Engineering Science and Mechanics Golden membership Married on 2009, lived happily ever after Lindesy Stirling - SkyrimAll logos are from internet. #12;More than just Microfluidics BioNEMS's success at nano scale Engineering Nanostructures

Bahrami, Majid

390

Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most abandoned lek sites were located <5 km from turbines. Probability of lek persistence was significantly related to habitat and number of males. Leks had a higher probability of persistence in grasslands than agricultural fields, and increased from ~0.2 for leks of 5 males, to >0.9 for leks of 10 or more males. Large leks in grasslands should be a higher priority for conservation. Overall, wind power development had a weak effect on the annual probability of lek persistence. 3. We used molecular methods to investigate the mating behavior of prairie chickens. The prevailing view for lek-mating grouse is that females mate once to fertilize the clutch and that conspecific nest parasitism is rare. We found evidence that females mate multiple times to fertilize the clutch (8-18% of broods, 4-38% of chicks) and will parasitize nests of other females during egg-laying (~17% of nests). Variable rates of parentage were highest in the fragmented landscapes at the Smoky Hills field site, and were lower at the Flint Hills field site. Comparisons of the pre- and postconstruction periods showed that wind energy development did not affect the mating behaviors of prairie chickens. 4. We examined use of breeding habitats by radio-marked females and conducted separate analyses for nest site selection, and movements of females not attending nests or broods. The landscape was a mix of native prairie and agricultural habitats, and nest site selection was not random because females preferred to nest in grasslands. Nests tended to be closer to turbines during the postconstruction period and there was no evidence of behavioral avoidance of turbines by females during nest site selection. Movements of females not attending nests or broods showed that females crossed the site of the wind power development at higher rates during the preconstruction period (20%) than the postconstruction period (11%), and that movements away from turbines were more frequent during the postconstruction period. Thus, wind power development appears to affect movements in breeding habitats but not nest site s

Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State University

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

391

Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 2002, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game continued to develop techniques to rear Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to sexual maturity in captivity and to monitor their reproductive performance under natural conditions. Eyed-eggs were hydraulically collected from redds in the East Fork Salmon River (EFSR; N = 328) and the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (WFYF; N = 308) to establish brood year 2002 culture cohorts. The eyed-eggs were incubated and reared at the Eagle Fish Hatchery, Eagle, Idaho (Eagle). Juveniles collected in 2000 were PIT and elastomer tagged and vaccinated against vibrio Vibrio spp. and bacterial kidney disease prior to being transferred to the NOAA Fisheries, Manchester Marine Experimental Station, Manchester, Washington (Manchester) for saltwater rearing through maturity. Smolt transfers included 203 individuals from the WFYF and 379 from the EFSR. Maturing fish transfers from Manchester to Eagle included 107 individuals from the LEM, 167 from the WFYF, and 82 from the EFSR. This was the second year maturing adults were held on chilled water at Eagle to test if water temperature manipulations could advance spawn timing. Adults from the LEM and WFYF were divided into chilled ({approx} 9 C) and ambient ({approx} 13.5 C) temperature groups while at Eagle. Forty-seven mature females from the LEM (19 chilled, 16 ambient, and 12 ambient not included in the temperature study) were spawned at Eagle with 42 males in 2002. Water temperature group was not shown to affect the spawn timing of these females, but males did mature earlier. Egg survival to the eyed stage averaged 66.5% and did not differ significantly between the temperature groups. Personnel from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe placed a total of 47,977 eyed-eggs from these crosses in in-stream incubators. Mature adults (N = 215 including 56 precocial males) were released into the WFYF to evaluate their reproductive performance. After release, fish distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Twenty-six captive-reared females constructed 33 redds in the WFYF in 2002. Eighteen of these were hydraulically sampled, and eggs were collected from 17. The percentage of live eggs ranged from 0-100% and averaged 34.6%. No live eggs were found in redds spawned by brood year 1997 females. Expanding these results to the remaining redds gives an estimate of 22,900 eyed-eggs being produced by captive-reared fish in the WFYF. Additionally, 130 mature adults (including 41 precocial males) were released into the EFSR. Almost all of these fish moved out of the areas shoreline observers had access to, so no spawning behavior was observed. Radio-telemetry indicated that most of these fish initially moved downstream (although three females moved upstream as far as 7 km) and then held position.

Venditti, David; Willard, Catherine; James, Chris

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock; Research Element, 1993 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Initial steps to recover the species include the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Eagle, Idaho. Research and recovery activities for sockeye conducted by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game during the period of April 1993 to April 1994 are covered by this report. Eight anadromous adults (two female and six male) returned to the Redfish Lake Creek trap this year and were spawned at the Sawtooth Hatchery near Stanley, Idaho. Fecundity was 3160 for each female. The mean fertilization rate was 52% for female {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and 65% for female {open_quotes}B.{close_quotes} Captive broodstock also spawned as well as residual sockeye captured in a Merwin trap in Redfish Lake. Spawning data from 72 fish spawned during this period is included in this report. Captive broodstock also matured later than normal (winter and spring 1994). Fish were spawned and samples were taken to investigate reasons for poor fertilization rates. Twenty-four out migrants of 1991 were selected for return to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning. Releases were made in August of 1993. All fish were implanted with sonic tags and tracking of this group began soon after the release to identify spawning-related activities. A research project is being conducted on captive broodstock diets. The project will investigate the effect of diet modification on spawn timing, gamete quality, and fertilization rates. A second project used ultrasound to examine fish for sexual maturity. The goal was to obtain a group a fish to be released f or volitional spawning. A total of 44 fish were found to be mature. The performance of all captive groups held at Eagle are included in this report.

Johnson, Keith A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Report on student participants at the 2003 Annual Meeting of the National Society of Black Physicists  

SciTech Connect

The first meeting of African American physicists was held in 1973 at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, with around 50 Black physicists in attendance. In 1977, this organization was formally established as the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP) out of a need to address many concerns of African American physicists. During the ensuing years the Conference began to grow and was hosted by different institutions at various geographic locations. This year, the 2003 Annual Conference of the National Society of Black Physicists and Black Physics Students was hosted by Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia during the weekend of February 12th-15th, 2003. This Conference brought together over 500 African American physics students and working physicists. Also attending were corporate and graduate school recruiters, administrators, professional society representatives and others concerned with the small representation of minorities in the field of physics. The organizers of the Conference contracted with the Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of Physics to conduct a formal evaluative study of the meeting, resulting in this report. The evaluation questionnaire was designed by the organizers of the NSBP conference with input from the Statistical Research Center's staff. It included questions on the students' backgrounds and demographic characteristics, physics research experience, career goals, challenges faced in their academic pursuits, and ratings of various aspects of the conference. The questionnaire was distributed at the conference when the students signed in. Of the 330 students who were registered, roughly 304 attended and were given the four-page questionnaire to complete. Responses were collected on the last night of the conference, with 172 (approximately 57%) returning completed questionnaires. This low response rate could be attributed in part to the fact that respondents were asked to provide possibly sensitive personal information. Student participants at the conference were asked to provide data on various aspects of their backgrounds and demographic characteristics. We found that there were significantly more undergraduate participants than graduate participants present at the conference (65% versus 35%). More than two-thirds of the undergraduate student attendees were upperclassmen. On the other hand, close to half of the graduate student attendees were still in the early stages of their graduate career. The overall median age was 23 years. The median age for undergraduates was 21, while for graduate students it was 29 years. We found no age difference between undergraduate males and females. However, there was an age difference between graduate male and female students. While among females the median age was 27, for graduate males the median age was 30 years. As shown, we see that women were well represented at this year's conference. The overall proportion of female student respondents was 41%. Among undergraduates, the proportion of females was 48%. While comparable data on all Black physics students nationwide are not available, this number bachelors recipients going to women, as reported by Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) on AIP's most recent ''Enrollments and Degrees Study''. HBCUs confer more than half of all physics degrees by African-Americans in the US. The proportion of females among graduate student participants at the NSBP conference was 29%.

Julius Dollison, Michael Neuchatz

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Development of Novel High-Resolution Melting (HRM) Assays for Gender Identification of Caribbean Flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber ruber) and other Birds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unambiguous gender identification (ID) is needed to assess parameters in studies of population dynamics, behavior, and evolutionary biology of Caribbean Flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber ruber) and other birds. Due to its importance for management and conservation, molecular (DNA-based) avian gender ID assays targeting intron-size differences of the Chromosome Helicase ATPase DNA Binding (CHD) gene of males (CHD-Z) and females (CHD-W) have been developed. Male (ZZ) and female (WZ) genotypes are usually scored as size polymorphisms through agarose or acrylamide gels. For certain species, W-specific restriction sites or multiplex polymerase chain-reaction (PCR) involving CHD-W specific primers are needed. These approaches involve a minimum of three steps following DNA isolation: PCR, gel electrophoresis, and photo-documentation, which limit high throughput scoring and automation potential. In here, a short amplicon (SA) High-resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) assay for avian gender ID is developed. SA-HRMA of an 81-Base Pair (bp) segment differentiates heteroduplex female (WZ) from homoduplex male (ZZ) genotypes by targeting Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) instead of intron-size differences between CHD-Z and CHD-W genes. To demonstrate the utility of the approach, the gender of Caribbean Flamingo (P. ruber ruber) (17 captive from the Dallas Zoo and 359 wild from Ria Lagartos, Yucatan, Mexico) was determined. The assay was also tested on specimens of Lesser Flamingo (P. minor), Chilean Flamingo (P. chilensis), Saddle-billed Stork (Ephippiorhynchus senegalensis), Scarlet Ibis (Eudocimus ruber), White-bellied Stork (Ciconia abdimii), Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja), Marabou Stork (Leptoptilos crumeniferus), Greater Roadrunner (Geococcyx californianus), and Attwater's Prairie Chicken (Tympanuchus cupido attwateri). Although the orthologous 81 bp segments of Z and W are highly conserved, sequence alignments with 50 avian species across 15 families revealed mismatches affecting one or more nucleotides within the SA-HRMA forward or reverse primers. Most mismatches were located along the CHD-Z gene that may generate heteroduplex curves and thus gender ID errors. For such cases, taxon and species-specific primer sets were designed. The SA-HRMA gender ID assay can be used in studies of avian ecology and behavior, to assess sex-associated demographics and migratory patterns, and as a proxy to determine the health of the flock and the degree by which conservation and captive breeding programs are functioning.

Chapman, Alexandra

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

The Impact of Science Notebook Writing on ELL and Low-SES Students' Science Language Development and Conceptual Understanding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This quantitative study explored the impact of literacy integration in a science inquiry classroom involving the use of science notebooks on the academic language development and conceptual understanding of students from diverse (i.e., English Language Learners, or ELLs) and low socio-economic status (low-SES) backgrounds. The study derived from a randomized, longitudinal, field-based NSF funded research project (NSF Award No. DRL - 0822343) targeting ELL and non-ELL students from low-SES backgrounds in a large urban school district in Southeast Texas. The study used a scoring rubric (modified and tested for validity and reliability) to analyze fifth-grade school students’ science notebook entries. Scores for academic language quality (or, for brevity, language) were used to compare language growth over time across three time points (i.e., beginning, middle, and end of the school year) and to compare students across categories (ELL, former ELL, non-ELL, and gender) using descriptive statistics and mixed between-within subjects analysis of variance (ANOVA). Scores for conceptual understanding (or, for brevity, concept) were used to compare students across categories (ELL, former ELL, non-ELL, and gender) in three domains using descriptive statistics and ANOVA. A correlational analysis was conducted to explore the relationship, if any, between language scores and concept scores for each group. Students demonstrated statistically significant growth over time in their academic language as reflected by science notebook scores. While ELL students scored lower than former ELL and non-ELL students at the first two time points, they caught up to their peers by the third time point. Similarly, females outperformed males in language scores in the first two time points, but males caught up to females in the third time point. In analyzing conceptual scores, ELLs had statistically significant lower scores than former-ELL and non-ELL students, and females outperformed males in the first two domains. These differences, however, were not statistically significant in the last domain. Last, correlations between language and concept scores were overall, positive, large, and significant across domains and groups. The study presents a rubric useful for quantifying diverse students’ science notebook entries, and findings add to the sparse research on the impact of writing in diverse students’ language development and conceptual understanding in science.

Huerta, Margarita

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

The Effect of Environmental Contaminants on Mating Dynamics and Population Viability in a Sex-Role-Reversed Pipefish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding how anthropogenic activity impacts the health and viability of wildlife populations is one of the most important tasks of environmental biology. A key concern related to bi-products of human activity is the accumulation of environmental pollutants within aquatic environments. Pollutants such as endocrine disruptors and heavy metals have the potential to impact both human and wildlife populations in contaminated areas. While much research has focused on how these compounds impact natural selection processes, such as viability and reproduction, their effect on sexual selection processes is not as clear. The goal of this dissertation was to address how environmental contaminants impact sexual selection processes in a sex-role reversed pipefish and evaluate how these effects may impact long-term population viability. Here we show that short periods of exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of a synthetic estrogen result in male pipefish with female-like secondary sexual traits. While these males are capable of reproduction, exposed males are discriminated against by females in mate choice tests. In natural populations, this type of discrimination could reduce male mating opportunities, potentially reducing their reproductive success. In an additional component of this dissertation, it was discovered that pipefish populations around Mobile Bay, specifically Weeks Bay, are currently being exposed to significantly elevated levels of mercury. These populations are genetically distinct from coastal populations but moderate levels of gene flow occur among sites, and gene flow between contaminated and non-contaminated population may be influencing how environmental contaminants are impacting genetic diversity and population viability. In the case of endocrine disruptors, migration between contaminated and non-contaminated sites may negatively impact population viability. Morphological traits induced with exposure to contaminants may be maintained for extended periods of time, therefore, the effect the exposed phenotype has on mating dynamics and sexual selection could be carried to non-contaminated sites if exposed individuals move to new populations. On the other hand, immigration of individuals from non-contaminated sites into contaminated areas may help maintain genetic diversity within exposed populations. In conclusion, the work presented in this dissertation shows that the presence of environmental toxins can significantly impact sexual selection processes, which in turn can have profound effects on the viability and future evolutionary trajectory of populations. Future work in this area should not only address how these toxins impact individual fitness, but should also address how population structure may be influencing the severity of these compounds on natural populations.

Partridge, Charlyn G.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Mating behaviour, epibiotic growth, and the effect of salinity on grooming activity in the hermaphroditic shrimp Lysmata wurdemanni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many species of caridean shrimp are protandrous hermaphrodites, maturing initially as males but developing into females as they age and grow. A unique sexual system was recently discovered in the peppermint shrimp, Lysmata wurdemanni. In this species, individuals are initially male, but become simultaneous functional hermaphrodites over time. As in most caridean shrimp, L. wurdemanni can mate as a male during the intermoult period, but can reproduce through female function for only a short period after moulting. Ecdysis does not occur en masse in this species, and thus the operational sex ratio found in populations of L. wurdemanni is extremely male-biased. Sexual selection theory suggests that these conditions will result in increased competition for access to mates. Evolutionary pressures should therefore have selected for mechanisms that permit individuals to quickly identify and locate potential mating partners. L. wurdemanni were exposed to chemical stimuli collected from recently moulted conspecifics of varying reproductive condition. Test animals were able to distinguish among the different conditions, and physically manipulated only the plastic nozzle used to pump solutions collected from shrimp with ovaries filled with vitellogenic oocytes. It was subsequently hypothesized that methyl farnesoate, a hormone associated with ovarian maturation in crustaceans, might be a key component of sex pheromones used by L. wurdemanni. However, a series of methyl farnesoate concentrations did not elicit responses, indicating this species does not use this hormone alone when determining reproductive condition. Reproductive behaviour in L. wurdemanni was observed to differ both before and after copulation, as well as with increasing population density. Intermoult individuals were more likely to approach, follow and remain in the vicinity of a near-moult shrimp before mating could occur, and under high density conditions. The near-moult shrimp approached conspecifics only under low density conditions, and performed rapid escape behaviours only after copulation had occurred. The unusual occurrence of epibiota upon L. wurdemanni was described, and the location, size and age of barnacles quantified. The effect of salinity upon grooming activities was tested. Results indicated that carapace grooming was depressed at low salinities, and could account for the considerable epibiota found in this region.

Giri, Tuhin

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Announcing the Clean Energy Trust Semifinalists | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announcing the Clean Energy Trust Semifinalists Announcing the Clean Energy Trust Semifinalists Announcing the Clean Energy Trust Semifinalists January 24, 2012 - 6:54pm Addthis Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs On January 6th, the Clean Energy Trust announced the semifinalists for its inaugural student clean energy challenge. Semifinalists were chosen from more than 40 innovative clean energy business plans submitted from eight Midwestern states. The 16 semifinalist teams represent five states (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, and Ohio) and 11 universities, with the most teams coming from Purdue University (four teams) and Northwestern University (three teams). Within the submissions, Clean Energy Trust reviewers saw a broad assortment of undergraduate and graduate students, male and female

400

Increased frequency of CD4{sup -}8{sup -}T cells bearing T-cell receptor {alpha}{beta} chains in peripheral blood of atomic bomb survivors exposed to high doses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rare T-cell subpopulation, CD4{sup -z}8{sup -}{alpha}{beta} cells, may be differentiated through a pathway (or pathways) different from the pathway(s) of conventional CD4+ or CD8+ cells. In the present study, the frequencies of CD4{sup -}8{sup -} T cells in peripheral-blood {alpha}{beta} T cells in 409 atomic bomb survivors were determined to investigate late effects of radiation on the composition of human T-cell subpopulations. The frequency of CD4{sup -}8{sup -}{alpha}{beta} T-cell decreased significantly with the subject`s age and was higher in females than males. A significant increase in the frequency was found in the survivors exposed to more than 1.5Gy, suggesting that the previous radiation exposure altered differentiation and development of T cells. 25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Yoichiro Kusunoki; Seishi Kyoizumi; Yuko Hirai; Shoichiro Fujita; Mitoshi Akiyama [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Health effects of radon in air  

SciTech Connect

Widely accepted risk estimates for exposure to radon in homes are derived largely from studies of miners. These include large groups of US Czechoslovakian, and Canadian uranium miners, Newfoundland fluorspar miners, and Swedish iron, lead, and zinc miners, all of which give roughly consistent results, with the excess risk of lung cancer increasing linearly with the exposure to radon. The authors have studied correlations between average radon levels and lung cancer rates in counties of the US. One study based on 50,000 purchased measurements in the main living areas of houses in which there have been no previous measurements involves 310 counties. It gives a weak but statistically significant negative correlation between mean radon levels and lung cancer rates for both females and males, whereas the usual risk estimates predict a large positive correlation.

Cohen, B.L. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome  

SciTech Connect

Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells that, when mature, are capable of navigating the female reproductive tract and fertilizing an oocyte. The sperm cell is thought to be largely quiescent in terms of transcriptional and translational activity. As a result, once it has left the male reproductive tract, the sperm cell is essentially operating with a static population of proteins. It is therefore theoretically possible to understand the protein networks contained in a sperm cell and to deduce its cellular function capabilities. To this end we have performed a proteomic analysis of mouse sperm isolated from the cauda epididymis and have confidently identified 2,850 proteins, which is the most comprehensive sperm proteome for any species reported to date. These proteins comprise many complete cellular pathways, including those for energy production via glycolysis, ?-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding and transport, and cell signaling systems. This proteome should prove a useful tool for assembly and testing of protein networks important for sperm function.

Chauvin, Theodore; Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Nicora, Carrie D.; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Roberts, Kenneth P.

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

403

Announcing the Clean Energy Trust Semifinalists | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announcing the Clean Energy Trust Semifinalists Announcing the Clean Energy Trust Semifinalists Announcing the Clean Energy Trust Semifinalists January 24, 2012 - 6:54pm Addthis Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs On January 6th, the Clean Energy Trust announced the semifinalists for its inaugural student clean energy challenge. Semifinalists were chosen from more than 40 innovative clean energy business plans submitted from eight Midwestern states. The 16 semifinalist teams represent five states (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, and Ohio) and 11 universities, with the most teams coming from Purdue University (four teams) and Northwestern University (three teams). Within the submissions, Clean Energy Trust reviewers saw a broad assortment of undergraduate and graduate students, male and female

404

Gene Expression Pathways Activated and Repair of DNA of Double Strand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathways Activated and Repair of DNA of Double Strand Pathways Activated and Repair of DNA of Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) Following Low Dose Ionizing Radiation in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells (HBECs) With and Without Defined Premalignant Oncogenic Changes John Minna University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Abstract We want to determine the effect of low dose ionizing radiation on the molecular progression of lung epithelial cells towards lung cancer. Our endpoints are focused on specific molecular and cellular changes known to be associated with lung cancer development and quantitating those changes as a function of low dose ionizing radiation. We use immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) developed from >40 individuals (including those from current, former, and never smokers, males, females,

405

Adopt-A-Platoon, Brookhaven Veterans Association, Brookhaven Employees  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Morale, Welfare, and Relaxation Units (MWRs) Morale, Welfare, and Relaxation Units (MWRs) We support a MWR unit (Morale Welfare and Relaxation), known as the "Soldiers' Truck Stop". It is a place where convoys of trucks stop on their way to refuel and rest before continuing on with their mission. Many times they arrive late at night and the chow hall will be closed. They are able to get something to eat here and also take a shower and get some rest. They would prefer to have travel size supplies for both male and female Soldiers. These places are similar to a USO or Red Cross Canteen but are now called MWRs. They are run by Chaplains in the Army are very sparse and do not have a lot of resources. Brookhaven's AaP has shipped 29 boxes of supplies and requested items totaling 890lbs.

406

SLAC Dosimeter / ID Request Form A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feb 2009 (updated 13 May 2010) SLAC-I-760-0A07J-006-R010 1 of 2 Feb 2009 (updated 13 May 2010) SLAC-I-760-0A07J-006-R010 1 of 2 SLAC Dosimeter / ID Request Form A (For applicants who have completed SLAC Environment, Safety, and Health Training) Sections 1-5 completed by applicant. Section 1: Contact Information Last name: First name: MI: Male Female Birth year (yyyy): Job title: Contact information/mailing address: City: State: Zip code: Country: Dept/Group: Phone number: Mail stop: Users or non-SLAC employees only: List employer, company, or university : Section 2: Identification Badge Request I am applying for my first SLAC identification badge; I have successfully completed the following ES&H training (indicate all that apply): SON SOC EOESH GERT RWT I RWT II

407

Mentee Profile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mentee Profile Mentee Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentor from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Are you student or intern? Do you have a preference on mentor? For example, male, female, particular career field, specific person or other? If so, what or who? Do you want a mentor in your career field? What are your career goals?

408

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Working at CERN - Relocating to CERN -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working at CERN Working at CERN Mandate Life in Geneva Map to P5 Computers Search People Relocation Visa: Long Term Invitation: Long Term Visa: Short Term Invitation: Short Term Invitation: Long Term For the long term French and Swiss invitations, the following information is needed: *Gender: (male/female) Work address: (including street address for Federal Express) *Home address: *Citizenship: *Place of birth (City and country): *Date of birth: *Passport number: *Date of passport issue: *Date of passport expiration: Professional title: Address of employing institute: Dates of visit to CERN: Email address: Your phone number: Your fax number: The fax numbers of the Swiss and French consulates where you will apply for the visas: *We also need this information for any family members traveling with you...

409

OMB Control No.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 (02-94) OMB Control No. 1910-0600 U.S. Department of Energy APPLICANT DISABILITY, RACE/NATIONAL ORIGIN AND SEX IDENTIFICATION (Please read the Instructions and Privacy Act Statement before completing this form) Vacancy Announcement Number Name (Last, First, Middle Initial) Position Title, Series, Grade Social Security Number Sex Male Female OMB Burden Disclosure Statement Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 10 minutes per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including

410

Sleep Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sleep Assessment Sleep Assessment 1 | Thank you for taking the time to complete this extensive form. Sleep disturbances and/or fatigue are most often the result of many factors. In order to best treat your condition we need to understand your symptoms and history. Please bring your completed assessment form to your appointment. To schedule an appointment please call 505 844-HBES (4237). Name: Employee ID#: Date: Male Female Age: Health Plan : United BCBSNM Other: Referred by: Sleep and Health History In general, would you describe your sleep as: Refreshing Not Refreshing How would you rate your sleep? Very Good Good Adequate Poor Very Poor How would you describe your sleep problem? Sleep Problem (indicate all that apply) Duration of problem

411

Research and Recovery of Snake River Sockeye Salmon, 1995-1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Initial steps to recover the species include the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s Eagle Fish Hatchery in Eagle, Idaho. Research and recovery activities for sockeye conducted by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game at the Eagle Fish Hatchery during the period April 1, 1995 to April 1, 1996 are covered by this report. The performance of all captive broodstock groups held at Eagle Fish Hatchery is included in this report. No anadromous adults returned to Redfish Lake in 1995. Three adult residual males were captured in a merwin trap and used in the spawning of captive residual females held at Eagle Fish Hatchery.

Pravecek, Jay J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Modeling the determinants of the social impacts of agricultural development projects  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to help policy-makers improve the social sustainability of development projects, this study identifies the key determinants of farmers' attitudes relating to the social impacts of the floodwater spreading project (FWSP) on the Gareh-Bygone plain in Iran. In order to analyze the links between the various factors that affect the experience of social impact, a theoretical framework was developed. Stratified random sampling was used to survey 138 farm households from the four villages in the region. One male and one female from each house were interviewed face-to-face using a questionnaire, resulting in a total of 276 interviews. Structural factors were found to be the largest contribution to stakeholders' attitudes relating to the social impacts of the project. Results from a cluster analysis suggested that the level of floodwater information, level of participation, water access, ownership change, and environmental worldview were the most important factors explaining attitude towards social impact of the FWSP.

Ahmadvand, Mostafa, E-mail: Ahmadvand_2000@yahoo.co [Department of Rural Development Management, Faculty of Agriculture, Yasouj University, Yasouj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karami, Ezatollah, E-mail: ekarami@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Agricultural Extension and Education, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Iman, Mohammad Taghi, E-mail: Iman@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Sociology, School of Social Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Gender Recognition Based on Sift Features  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper proposes a robust approach for face detection and gender classification in color images. Previous researches about gender recognition suppose an expensive computational and time-consuming pre-processing step in order to alignment in which face images are aligned so that facial landmarks like eyes, nose, lips, chin are placed in uniform locations in image. In this paper, a novel technique based on mathematical analysis is represented in three stages that eliminates alignment step. First, a new color based face detection method is represented with a better result and more robustness in complex backgrounds. Next, the features which are invariant to affine transformations are extracted from each face using scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) method. To evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm, experiments have been conducted by employing a SVM classifier on a database of face images which contains 500 images from distinct people with equal ratio of male and female.

Yousefi, Sahar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Conditional sterility in plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

Meagher, Richard B. (Athens, GA); McKinney, Elizabeth (Athens, GA); Kim, Tehryung (Taejeon, KR)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

415

DEVELOPMENTAL DYNAMICS 235:1738–1752, 2006 REVIEWS–A PEER REVIEWED FORUM Molecular Genetic Cascades for External Genitalia Formation: An Emerging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

External genitalia are anatomical structures located at the posterior embryonic region as part of several urogenital/reproductive organs. The embryonic anlage of the external genitalia, the genital tubercle (GT) develops as a bud-shaped structure with an initial urethral plate and later urethra. Embryonic external genitalia are considered to be one of the appendages. Recent experiments suggest that essential regulatory genes possess similar functions for the outgrowth regulation of the GT and limb appendages. The transient embryonic epithelia located in the distal GT are called the distal urethral epithelium (DUE) regulating, at least in part, the (distal) GT development. This review covers the available data about early patterning of GT and discusses the molecular developmental similarities and points of divergence between the different appendages. Development of the male and female external genitalia is also reviewed. Developmental Dynamics

H. Kataoka; A. Kuroiwa; Y. Chen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Training Quality and Earnings: The Effects of Competition on the Provision of Public-Sponsored Training Programs,” Mimeo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the effectiveness of market-based approaches in the provision of publicsponsored training programs. In particular, we study the link between training quality and labor earnings using a Peruvian program that targets disadvantaged youths. Multiple proxies for training quality are identified from bidding processes in which public and private training institutions that operate for profit compete for limited public funding. Using difference-indifferences kernel matching and standard regression-based approaches, we find that beneficiaries attending high-quality training courses have higher average and marginal treatment impacts. These earnings differentials are larger for females rather than males, and are larger in the medium term rather than in the short run. External validity was assessed by using five different cohorts of individuals over an eight-year period.

Alberto Chong; Jose Galdo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Mentor Profile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mentor Profile Mentor Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentee from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Do you want a student or intern mentee? Do you have a preference on mentee? For example, male, female, particular career field or other? If so, what or state name of pre selected mentee? Do you want a mentee in your career field? What are your hobbies?

418

A SUBCHRONIC INHALATION STUDY OF FISCHER 344 RATS EXPOSED TO 0, 0.4, 1.4 OR 4.0 PPM ACROLEIN.  

SciTech Connect

Fischer 344 rats were exposed to 0.0, 0.4, 1.4, or 4.0 ppm acrolein for 62 days. The major objective of the study was to relate the results of a series of pulmonary function tests to biochemical and pathological alterations observed in the lung. Cytological and reproductive potential endpoints were also assessed after acrolein exposure. Rats were exposed to acrolein for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week for 62 days. Mortality was observed only in the 4.0 ppm chamber where 32 of 57 exposed males died; however, none of the 8 exposed females died. Most of the mortality occurred within the first 10 exposure days. Histologic examination indicated that the animals died of acute bronchopneumonia. The surviving males and females exposed to 4.0 ppm acrolein gained weight at a significantly slower rate than control animals. The growth of both sexes in the 0.4 and 1.4 ppm groups was similar to that of their respective controls. Histopathologic examination of animals after 62 days of exposure revealed bronchiolar epithelial necrosis and sloughing, bronchiolar edema with macrophages, and focal pulmonary edema in the 4.0 ppm group. These lesions were, in some cases, associated with edema of the trachea and peribronchial lymph nodes, and acute rhinitis which indicated an upper respiratory tract effect of acrolein. Of particular interest was the variability of response between rats in the 4.0 ppm group, some not affected at all while others were moderately affected. Intragroup variability in toxicity was also apparent in the 1.4 ppm exposure group where only 3 of 31 animals examined had lesions directly related to acrolein exposure. Extra respiratory organs appeared unaffected.

KUTZMAN,R.S.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Scale Insects and Mealy Bugs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale Insects and Mealy Bugs Scale Insects and Mealy Bugs Nature Bulletin No. 404-A January 30, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SCALE INSECTS AND MEALY BUGS The insect world contains an enormous number and variety of species but, of them all, the Scale Insects and Mealy Bugs come nearest to being vegetables. Most insects are active animals that fly, hop, scamper, crawl or burrow, but these queer creatures spend most of their lives merely sitting in one spot, sucking plant juices from a branch, twig, leaf, or fruit. Some of our most destructive pests are included among the several hundred kinds of these highly specialized insects. They are so small that the average person seldom realizes that they are responsible for the sickly or dying condition of a tree or shrub. Adult scale insects are extremely variable in shape, and range in size from that of a pinhead up to forms which are a quarter of an inch long. Each hides under a hard protective shell, or scale, of wax secreted by pores on its body, and are frequently so numerous that they form a dense crust. The females molt a few times, and usually discard their legs and wings, before they mature. She lays eggs under the scale and then dies. These hatch into young (called "crawlers") which move around for a period varying from a few hours to a day or two before they settle down and build scales. Unlike the female, the male -always the smaller of the two -- goes through a cocoon stage from which he emerges with a pair of wings but with no means of taking food. He merely mates and dies. Males are scarce In most kinds and in many species have never been seen.

420

Validation of protection provided by one brand of filtering facepiece respirator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A previous laboratory study of a widely used disposable dust / mist (D/M) respirator (3M{trademark}8710) utilized a challenge agent that had high penetration values for D/M filter media. Therefore, measured protection factors (PFs) reflected both filter and faceseal penetration, and would be lower than that expected for faceseal penetration only. The purpose of this study was to determine a PF for this brand of disposable D/M respirator using a challenge agent that has low filter penetration for this type of filter. Methodology involved qualitatively (QLFT) and quantitatively (QNFT) fit testing 15 males and 15 females while wearing the respirator. One QLFT was done per subject using the saccharin method. Three QNFTs were performed on each subject utilizing a 2.5 {mu}m mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) monodisperse challenge aerosol. Measured PF`s were corrected for lung deposition of this size aerosol. The average fit for each subject was the arithmetic mean of the three PFs. The PFs were found to be approximately log-normally distributed, so logs of PFs were used in the statistical analysis. The exponent of the 95% lower tolerance level (LTL) of the fifth percentile of the log PFs was 50. This compares to an exponent of the 95% LTL of the fifth percentile of the log PFs of two determined in a previous study and to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Assigned Protection Factor (APF) of ten. No significant difference of average fit between males and females was found. The sensitivity of the saccharin QLFT was 42.9%, and specificity could not be evaluated.

Peacock, J.R. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health Sciences

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Induction of murine CYP1A2 gene expression by acenaphthylene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acenaphthylene and related polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are industrial combustion by-products which are also found in cooked foods. Recent studies in this laboratory have shown that acenaphthylene induces Cypla2 gene expression in mice and this study further investigates this induction response. Studies with six genetically-inbred strains of mice have shown that the activity of acenaphthylene (300 mg/kg) as an inducer of CYPlA2-dependent methoxyresorufin 0-demethylase (MROD) was age-and strain-dependent. The results showed that DBA mice, compared to the C57BL/6, C3H, CBA, A/j and SJL strains were most responsive to induction after a single dose of acenaphthylene (300 mg/kg). Hepatic MROD activity in acenaphthylene-treated DBA mice was induced 22-and 4-fold in males and females respectively. In contrast, a <2 to 4-fold induction of ethoxyresorufin 0-deethylase (EROD) activity was observed in both sexes. The other inbred strains had higher basal rates of hepatic MROD activity than the DBA strain, (i.e. C3H, C57BL/6, CBA, A/j and SJL). Differences in induction of MROD activity by acenaphthylene among the strains was primarily due to allelic variation (responsive or non responsive) at the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) locus. Current studies are focused on further characterizing the strain-specific effects of acenaphthylene and related compounds and the molecular regulation of hepatic CYPlA2 gene expression in male and female DBA mice and other rodent species.

Miggins, John Wesley

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Old Socorro Mission: an osteobiological analysis of the skeletal remains from the 1982-1985 field excavations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The skeletal remains of 51 individuals from the Old Socorro Mission (OSM) were analyzed to provide both a demographic profile and an assessment of their health. According to Spanish documents, the mission, which was in use from 1684 to 1829, served the Spanish families and Piro Indians who were living at the settlement. Of the 51 burials recovered, 23 of the adults were identifiable as to sex: 15 males and 8 females. All age categories were represented: one fetal, 15 infants, five in early childhood, three in late childhood, one adolescent/adult, 19 adults, and seven old adults. Physical characteristics, such as stature and robusticity were also determined. Stature estimates of the OSM sample did not differ significantly from other Indian groups from the region. Visual observation of the OSM sample indicated that the population appeared to be sexually robust. The males and females displayed a pronounced degree of skeletal dimorphism both in stature and other discrete traits. Examination of the dentition revealed numerous pathological conditions. The OSM population displayed a high frequency of cariogenic activity, enamel hypoplasia, abscessing, antemortem tooth loss, alveolar resorption, and periodontal infection. Dental anomalies, shoveling and enamel wrinkling, were also present. The OSM sample revealed numerous skeletal pathological conditions. Degenerative joint disease, infectious disease, neoplasias, traumatic injuries, and skeletal dysplasias were evident in both sexes. Anomalous features were also identified, such as developmental and cultural modifications. The high frequency of developmental variations is suggestive of a small breeding population with restricted gene flow. The lack of skeletal lesions with dietary imbalances suggests that the OSM people were well nourished. However, the high incidence of degenerative joint disease suggests that the Piro Indians. suffered a great amount of physical stress.

Raisor, Michelle Jeanette

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Viruses in laboratory-reared cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae: Phycitinae), is a non-native species threatening a variety of native cacti, particularly endangered species of Opuntia (Zimmerman et al. 2001), on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Cactoblastis cactorum populations have expanded from Florida northward along the Atlantic coast as far as Charleston, SC, and westward along the Gulf of Mexico to Dauphin Island, south of Mobile, AL. It is feared that further movement to the west will allow C. cactorum to enter the US desert Southwest and Mexico, particularly the latter. Numerous cactus species, especially those of the genera Opuntia and Nopalea, are native to the U.S. and Mexico. Local economies based on agricultural and horticultural uses of cacti could be devastated by C. cactorum (Vigueras and Portillo 2001). A bi-national control program between the US and Mexico is being developed, utilizing the sterile insect technique (SIT). In the SIT program, newly emerged moths are irradiated with a {sup 60}Co source and released to mate with wild individuals. The radiation dose completely sterilizes the females and partially sterilizes the males. When irradiated males mate with wild females, the F1 progeny of these matings are sterile. In order for the SIT program to succeed, large numbers of moths must be reared from egg to adult on artificial diet in a quarantined rearing facility (Carpenter et al. 2001). Irradiated insects must then be released in large numbers at the leading edge of the invasive population and at times which coincide with the presence of wild individuals available for mating. Mortality from disease in the rearing colony disrupts the SIT program by reducing the numbers of insects available for release.

Marti, O.G.; Myers, R.E.; Carpenter, J.E. [United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Crop Protection and Management Research Laboratory, PO Box 748, Tifton, GA 31794 (United States); Styer, E.L. [University of Georgia, Veterinary Diagnostic and Investigational Laboratory, PO Box 1389, Tifton, GA 31794 (United States)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Effects of Relative Power on Role-Taking Accuracy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I conduct an experiment to test the impact of relative power differential on the relationship between gender and role-taking accuracy. First in an 80 subject study, and then in the current study, role-taking accuracy is conceptualized as the accuracy with which one can predict the behavior of another or others. In Study 1, I examined self-evaluative measures of role-taking ability and found that self-evaluative measures of role-taking do not correlate with actual role-taking accuracy. In addition, women were more accurate role-takers than were men in same-gender dyads regardless of the existence of a prior relationship between the two individuals. This prior experimental research showed that female friends were much more accurate role-takers than were male friends. In fact, female strangers were more accurate role-takers than were male friends. It is my conjecture however, that role taking ability is not directly connected to gender; rather I propose that it is a situationally prompted ability based on the need for individuals of relatively less power to predict the behavior of individuals with relatively more power. In other words, while women are, indeed, better role takers, this is not a general ability; rather it is prompted by their relatively low positions of power. In Study 2, I examine role-taking accuracy under conditions in which differential power is assigned to one member of a dyad and established through interaction. I predict that power position will account for variability in role-taking accuracy, but gender will not. I tested this hypothesis using power balanced and power-imbalanced, task-oriented, same and cross gender dyads. I found that power position does account for variation in role-taking accuracy while gender and gender composition of the dyad do not account for variation in role-taking accuracy.

Love, Tony

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of methyl ethyl ketone in mice: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) is a widely used industrial solvent which results in considerable human exposure. In order to assess the potential for MEK to cause developmental toxicity in rodents, four groups of Swiss (CD-1) mice were exposed to 0, 400, 1000 or 3000 ppM MEK vapors, 7 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Ten virgin females and approx.30 plug-positive females per group were exposed concurrently for 10 consecutive days (6--15 dg for mated mice). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 18 dg. Uterine implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Exposure of pregnant mice to these concentrations of MEK did not result in apparent maternal toxicity, although there was a slight, treatment-correlated increase in liver to body weight ratios which was significant for the 3000-ppM group. Mild developmental toxicity was evident at 3000-ppM as a reduction in mean fetal body weight. This reduction was statistically significant for the males only, although the relative decrease in mean fetal body weight was the same for both sexes. 17 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

Mast, T.J.; Dill, J.A.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

doi:10.1267/ahc.05052 Clinicopathological Characteristics of Esophageal Squamous Papillomas in Japanese Patients—With Comparison of Findings from Western Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To clarify the characteristics of esophageal squamous papillomas (ESPs) in the Japanese population, we investigated 38 ESPs of 35 Japanese patients from a file with 17,387 upper gastrointestinal endoscopies in our university hospital. ESPs accounted for 0.20 % of the total number of endoscopies and comprised 21 females and 14 males with an average age of 59.2 years. More than half of the ESPs (52.6%) were located in the middle esophagus. The ratio of human papilloma virus (HPV) positive ESPs was 10.5 % and all were located in the middle esophagus of female patients only. HPV-positive ESP cases were younger (46.8 years) than HPV-negative cases (60.8 years). Based on comparison with the reports from western countries, we attribute the low prevalence in the lower esophagus to the relatively fewer occurrences of severe reflux esophagitis (RE) due to chronic gastritis with low gastric acid secretion among Japanese patients. Key words: squamous papilloma, esophagus, gastroesophageal reflux diseases, reflux esophagitis, human papilloma virus I.

Kuniko Takeshita; Shin-ichi Murata; Shoji Mitsufuji; Naoki Wakabayashi; Keisho Kataoka; Yasunari Tsuchihashi; Takeshi Okanoue

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Epidemiology of Multiple Sclerosis in Scotland: Inferences from Hospital Admissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disorder with a highly characteristic disease distribution. Prevalence and incidence in general increase with increasing distance from the equator. Similarly the female to male sex ratio increases with increasing latitude. Multiple possible risk factors have been hypothesised for this epidemiological trend, including human leukocyte antigen allele frequencies, ultraviolet exposure and subsequent vitamin D levels, smoking and Epstein-Barr virus. In this study we undertook a study of medical records across Scotland on an NHS health board level of resolution to examine the epidemiology of MS in this region. Methods and Results: We calculated the number and rate of patient-linked hospital admissions throughout Scotland between 1997 and 2009 from the Scottish Morbidity Records. We used weighted-regression to examine correlations between these measures of MS, and latitude and smoking prevalence. We found a highly significant relationship between MS patient-linked admissions and latitude (r weighted by standard error (r sw) = 0.75, p = 0.002). There was no significant relationship between smoking prevalence and MS patient-linked admissions. Discussion: There is a definite latitudinal effect on MS risk across Scotland, arising primarily from an excess of female MS patients at more Northerly latitudes. Whether this is a true gradient or whether a threshold effect may apply at particular

Adam E. H; Lynne Jarvis; Ryan Mclaughlin; Anastasia Fries; George C. Ebers; Sreeram V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2006 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the tenth season (1997-2006) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the eighth season (1999-2006) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies In 2006, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from February 27, 2006 through to April 10, 2006 and a total of 240,568 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2004 egg source and included captive brood (40,982) and conventional (199,586) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2006 began May 15th, the first Chinook was captured on June 14, 2006 and the last Chinook was captured on September 27, 2006. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2006. A total of 534 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 205 natural origin fish and 329 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 33 natural and 120 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning and 397 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally. In 2006, no hatchery origin adult Chinook were transported and out planted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in under seeded habitat. In order to meet egg take goals for the conventional portion of the program, a determination was made that approximately 147 adults were needed for broodstock. As a result 16 (8 males and 8 females) of the 153 fish collected for broodstock were returned to the Lostine River to spawn naturally. Females that were spawned and provided the brood source were made up of 12 natural females and 45 supplementation females. One of these females tested positive for high levels of Bacterial Kidney Disease and consequently this females eggs were destroyed. The remaining females produced a total of 241,372 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 85.47% which yielded a total of 206,309 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,162 eggs per female. The brood year 2006 eggs will be incubated and reared at Lookingglass Hatchery until

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 1998: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 1998-2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon collection and spawning began in 1998. A total of 114 fish were collected from Johnson Creek and 54 fish (20 males and 34 females) were retained for Broodstock. All broodstock were transported to Lower Snake River Compensation Plan's South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility, operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. The remaining 60 fish were released to spawn naturally. An estimated 155,870 eggs from Johnson Creek chinook spawned at the South Fork Salmon River facility were transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for rearing. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,871. Approximately 20,500 eggs from females with high levels of Bacterial Kidney Disease were culled. This, combined with green-egg to eyed-egg survival of 62%, resulted in about 84,000 eyed eggs produced in 1998. Resulting juveniles were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery in 1999. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags and 8,043 were also PIT tagged. A total of 78,950 smolts were transported from the McCall Fish Hatchery and released directly into Johnson Creek on March 27, 28, 29, and 30, 2000.

Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Swans and Cygnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Swans and Cygnets Swans and Cygnets Name: Vida Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I live near a 17 acre lake. We had a pair of nesting mutes which had successfully raised 6 surviving cygnets each summer for three summers. This year, two trumpeters flew in and the mute male fought them to the death. His efforts were complicated by the fact that wire had been placed in the water to keep the geese and ducks from walking onto the shore. The mute male died from his attack of the trumpeter and being tangled in the wire. The female mute remained on her nest and successfully hatched 7 cygnets! We were all so happy to see her doing such a great job! ------------------------------------ The cygnets are not quite full grown now. They are still dark grey and their wings are still small. For some reason, the mother has begun 'rejecting' one of the cygnets. She has gone so far a crying cygnet into the weeds away from the other 6. She had been raising the 7 toghether all along and I don't have any idea why she would 'turn' on this one.

431

Summer Warblers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summer Warblers Summer Warblers Nature Bulletin No. 191-A May 8, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SUMMER WARBLERS The swarms of warblers that appear in May -- colorful, ceaselessly active, and bursting with song -- tarry only briefly and pass on toward their northern nesting grounds. In autumn they appear again -- so quietly and so soberly dressed they seem to be different birds -- tarry briefly and pass on. Among those that migrate through the Chicago region, there are only four kinds of which enough remain and nest so that they may be called common summer residents: the American Redstart, the Yellow Warbler, the Yellow-throat and the Oven-bird. The redstarts, from their winter homes in the West Indies, Central America and northern South America, scatter over the United States east of the Great Plains, and Canada from British Columbia to Newfoundland. It is one of the most abundant, colorful and butterfly- like of all warblers. The adult male is black with a white belly and a striking pattern of orange-red on wings and tail. On the females and young males the black is replaced by grayish olive-green and the orange-red by lemon yellow. Rarely quiet, constantly flitting about, the redstart has a peculiar habit of repeatedly drooping its wings and spreading out its long tail fanwise.

432

Health assessment for Anaconda Smelter Site, Anaconda, Deer Lodge County, Montana, Region 8. CERCLIS No. MTD093291656. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA,) Region VIII has requested that the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) evaluate the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Reports for the Mill Creek, Montana Anaconda Swelter Site. Extensive environmental sampling by EPA, urinary arsenic surveys conducted by the Centers for Disease Control, the Endangerment Assessment (EA,) and the RI have consistently shown extensive contamination of soils and house dust by arsenic, cadmium, and lead, and episodic contamination of drinking water with arsenic above the EPA Maximal Contaminant Level (MCL). The RI presents results of calculations showing, potentially, an elevated excess lifetime risk of skin cancer for males from chronic exposure to arsenic by ingestion. The calculations were performed only for males, the most sensitive subpopulation; however, the female subpopulation would also be expected to have a lesser but elevated excess skin cancer risk from ingestion of arsenic. The long-term health effects of cadmium and lead are additional concerns. When EPA makes a Record of Decision (ROD) for the Mill Creek site, ATSDR can more readily make a definitive statement about the adequacy of the chosen Alternative for reducing the public health risk at Mill Creek.

Not Available

1987-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

433

Building Design | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Design Building Design As a researcher at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Dr. Michael Brambley is working to improve the energy efficiency of our nation’s buildings. In this "10 Questions," learn how he is marrying engineering and computer technology to cut energy waste in commercial buildings. As a researcher at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Dr. Michael Brambley is working to improve the energy efficiency of our nation's buildings. In this "10 Questions," learn how he is marrying engineering and computer technology to cut energy waste in commercial buildings. Commercial buildings have high energy needs and can put great strain on the nation's power grids during peak periods. Developing more efficient

434

Green Button Applications | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Button Applications Green Button Applications Home > Groups > Groups > Green Button Applications Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Recently Engaged? Just Married? Share Your News on Lake Zurich Patch - Patch.com Google News on Green Button Applications - 2 hours 35 min ago Recently Engaged? Just Married? Share Your News on Lake Zurich Patch Patch.com Smith and Jones to Be Wed), add the details and then click on the "Add photos/videos" button to add an engagement photo, wedding portrait or video to your announcement. Once you're done, click the green "Post now" button and your announcement will be ... and more » From Tweet to Ad to Mini Modern Scandal - New York Times Google News on Green Button Applications - 2 hours 40 min ago From Tweet to Ad to Mini Modern Scandal

435

Mapping of a possible X-linked form of familial developmental dysphasia (FDD) in a single large pedigree  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Children diagnosed with developmental dysphasia develop speech very late without exhibiting sensory or motor dysfunction, and when they do begin to speak their grammar is abnormal. A large three-generation British pedigree was recently identified in which 16 out of 30 members were diagnosed as dysphasic. Assuming a dominant mode of inheritance with homogeneous phenotypic expression and complete penetrance among affected members, we showed by simulation analysis that this pedigree has the power to detect linkage to marker loci with an average maximum LOD score of 3.67 at {theta}=0.1. Given the absence of male-to-male transmission and a ratio of female to male affecteds (10/6) in this pedigree within the expected range for an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance, we decided to begin a genome-wide linkage analysis with microsatellite markers on the human X chromosome. Fifteen individuals (10 affected) from three generations were genotyped with 35 polymorphic STS`s (Research Genetics) which were approximately uniformly distributed along the X chromosome. Two-point linkage was assessed using the MLINK and ILINK programs from the LINKAGE package. Markers DXS1223, DXS987, DXS996 and DXS1060 on Xp22 showed consistent linkage to the disease locus with a maximum LOD score of 0.86 at a distance of 22 cM for DXS1060. If further analysis with additional markers and additional family members confirms X-linkage, such a localization would provide support for Lehrke`s hypothesis for X-linkage of major intellectual traits including verbal functioning.

Dunne, P.W.; Doody, R.S.; Epstein, H.F. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Colorado Homeowner Preferences on Energy and Environmental Policy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This survey inquiring into Colorado homeowners' preferences on energy and environmental policy shows that more-affluent, married Colorado single-family homeowners are somewhat favorable to utility restructuring; want to see green power developed; prefer to share the costs broadly by various means; are willing to pay slightly higher electricity rates to develop renewable sources of electricity; and believe that utility customers don't have enough choice in their electric service today.

Farhar, B. C.; Coburn, T. C.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

437

Colorado Homeowner Preferences on Energy and Environmental Policy  

SciTech Connect

This survey inquiring into Colorado homeowners' preferences on energy and environmental policy shows that more-affluent, married Colorado single-family homeowners are somewhat favorable to utility restructuring; want to see green power developed; prefer to share the costs broadly by various means; are willing to pay slightly higher electricity rates to develop renewable sources of electricity; and believe that utility customers don't have enough choice in their electric service today.

Farhar, B. C.; Coburn, T. C.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

438

The Working Poor and Welfare Recipiency by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many people do not seem to take advantage of the welfare system. Of the working poor who qualify for welfare, two thirds of those eligible for food stamps and one-third of those eligible for AFDC do not receive these benefits. Those who qualified for assistance were in their prime working years--between 25 and 45. Thus they were not "marginal" workers who were too young or old to be attached to the labor force. Those who qualified for assistance worked many hours: Most of those who qualified for food stamps worked full time. Most of those who qualified for AFDC worked at least half-time. Most of those who qualified for AFDC or food stamps had high school degrees or greater. Many of those who qualified for AFDC or food stamps were in married couple families: For food stamps, almost half of those who qualified were in married couple families; one third of those who qualified for AFDC were in married couple families. Thus the portrait of the eligible working poor was not one of marginal workers, either disproportionately younger or older workers, or workers who are otherwise out of the ordinary. Most were in their prime working years, most worked many hours, most had decent educations, and many were married. Most of those who qualified for food stamps or AFDC simply earned too little or were in unstable jobs: Most were in service and clerical occupations, and in retail and professional industries (the latter dominated by health and residential care). These jobs are the lowest paying occupations and industries. Few of those eligible for AFDC or food stamps belonged to unions (7 % were represented by labor unions), further depressing their wages and adding job instability. 2

Marlene Kim; Thanos Mergoupis; Marlene Kim; Thanos Mergoupis

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

P450 aromatase alterations and DNA damage as avian pollution biomarkers in cliff and cave swallow breeding near the Rio Grande region, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The endocrine system, specifically relating to sex hormones, and genetic material can be targets of environmental contaminants. Environmental contaminants in the Rio Grande region may originate from industrial or agricultural processes and growing populations lacking proper water and sewage infrastructure. Cliff (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) and cave (P. fulva) swallows breeding near the Rio Grande were selected to monitor aromatase activity alterations and DNA damage. Swallows were sampled at six sites along the Rio Grande from Brownsville to Laredo, and a reference site (Somerville) 350 miles north of the Rio Grande. DNA damage, based on nuclear DNA content, was determined by flow cytometry. A significantly larger mean half peak coefficient of variation (HPCV) of DNA content in contaminated sites compared to a reference site reflects possible chromosomal damage. No detectable HPCV differences were observed in cave swallows among locations, notwithstanding the presence of mutagenic contaminants. Selenium may provide a protective role against genetic damage. However, cliff swallows from Laredo had significantly higher HPCV values than those from Somerville. DNA damage could be attributed to metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons released near Laredo. Brains and gonads, two estrogen-dependent organs, were tested for aromatase activity with a tritiated water method. Brain aromatase activity was higher, though not always statistically, for male cave and male and female cliff swallows. Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) may play a role in the increased activity. Female cave swallows in Llano Grande appeared to have a greatly depressed brain aromatase activity, possibly attributed to past human use of toxaphene. Testicular and ovarian aromatase activity in cliff and cave swallows from Rio Grande was higher than in those from Somerville, though not always significantly. DDE, atrazine, sewage treatment plant contaminants (phthalates, alkylphenols, ethynylestradiol), metals, or other pollutants could play a role in the increased gonadal activity. Increased aromatase activity, in association with contaminants, may be easier to detect in testes of male birds which normally exhibit low levels of estrogen. Siterelated contaminants may be playing a role in DNA damage and aromatase alterations. This is the first known study which uses aromatase activity as an endocrine disruptor indicator in wild birds.

Sitzlar, Megan Annette

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Associative Learning Capabilities of Adult Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Other Mosquitoes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The association of olfactory information with a resource is broadly known as olfactory-based associative learning. From an ecological perspective, associative learning can reduce search time for resources and fine tune responses to changing biotic and abiotic factors in a variable environment, which in mosquitoes has implications for pathogen transmission and vector control strategies. The purpose of this dissertation was to examine the ability for olfactory-based associative learning across the major life history domains of mosquitoes. Six different experiments comprise this dissertation. The first was to evaluate the response of mosquitoes following conditioning to 5, 10 or 50% sucrose concentrations with individual level mosquito conditioning and testing and introduction of statistical analysis with binary logistic regression. Mosquitoes did not respond in a dose dependent manner with respect to positive response to target odors following conditioning. This effect appears to be related to the mosquitoes' prior exposure to sugar as those exposed to 10% sucrose before conditioning did not prefer 50% sucrose but significantly fewer chose 5% sucrose. In an evaluation of host associated odors and second blood meal choice by females using a dual-choice olfactometer no significant effects were observed. The lack of significance may have been due to insufficient sample sizes, problems with odor collection or physiological state of mosquitoes. Effects of predatory mosquitofish on larval development and female oviposition choice were evaluated by rearing in separated habitats under three different treatments followed by an oviposition choice assay. Females did not prefer their natal habitat or avoid predators but chose substrate that had contained mosquitofish fed conspecific larvae. Mosquitofish affected larval development with acceleration in treatments with mosquitofish fed Tetramin® and delayed pupation in treatments with mosquitofish fed conspecific larvae. Mosquito memory length was evaluated by conditioning and testing at six time intervals from colony and field populations at two ages. Younger mosquitoes showed higher levels of positive response after conditioning at all time intervals except the longest (24h). Finally the olfactory-based associative learning ability of Anopheles cracens was evaluated. Significant evidence for learning was observed in males but not females at a memory length interval of 24h.

Sanford, Michelle Rene?e

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "married male female" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Why Do the Karo Batak Prefer Women with Big Feet? Flexible Mate Preferences and the Notion That One Size Fits All  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and females judge attractiveness (Barber 1995; Buss 1994; Geary et al. 2004; Shackelford et al. 2005; Symons of potential female partners (Shackelford et al. 2005; Buss 1989). The emphasis on female attractiveness makes

Kushnick, Geoff

442

Public women: the representation of prostitutes in German Weimar films (1919-1933)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the representation of prostitution in German Weimar films between 1919 and 1933. It theorizes that prostitutes are illustrated through characters who are public women. The women who step out of their homes to enter public, or who are somehow introduced to strangers without leaving their homes are public women. The public women in these films, as public women living in Germany, were in danger of being identified as prostitutes and becoming prostitutes. A woman’s public position made her vulnerable to the male sexualized gaze. The male sexualized gaze ultimately led to a woman’s prostitution. The thesis analyzes 4 films to demonstrate woman’s depiction as a prostitute. The first film, Nosferatu, depicts a seemingly virtuous woman whose husband begins to prostitute her, but ultimately she prostitutes herself in exchange for the service of a supernatural law. The film symbolically discusses social issues regarding prostitution, family life, and venereal disease. The second film, Metropolis, protects its public female character from the sexualized gaze with religion and motherhood at the beginning of the film. However, as the film progresses the main character, Maria, is unwillingly prostituted by the head of the society in exchange for a robot that looks like her. The robot employs the male sexualized gaze and her position as a prostitute to overturn society as a vagina dentata. The third and fourth films are The Blue Angel and Variety respectively. Both of these films depict women in public positions who use their sexuality for gain. These women prostitute themselves. They are not victims as Maria and Ellen are in the two previous films. The women in this chapter use their sexuality and prostitution as a way to attain agency. The women in these films I label as vagina dentata because they purposefully destroy men for their own gain. These women use public sexuality to find and engage their male prey as patrons before they emasculate them. The thesis views the women of Weimar films differently than other scholars have by making her the focus of the film and interpreting her public exposure as her gateway to prostitution.

Hoban, Melissa Lee

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Microsoft Word - SWPA 06 Hum Cap Mgmt Plan.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(protgs) have received 5 promotions (4 females) and one was placed in an Upward Mobility Program (female minority). Southwestern is currently beginning its 4 th...

444

Gender and age differences in mixed metal exposure and urinary excretion  

SciTech Connect

Background: Little is known about the variation in exposure to toxic metals by age and gender and other potential modifying factors. We evaluated age and gender differences by measurements of metal/element concentrations in urine in a rural population in Matlab, Bangladesh, in three age groups: 8-12 (N=238), 14-15 (N=107) and 30-88 (N=710) years of age, living in an area with no point sources of metal exposure but where elevated water arsenic concentrations are prevalent. Results: We found marked differences in urine concentrations of metals and trace elements by gender, age, tobacco use, socioeconomic and nutritional status. Besides a clearly elevated urinary arsenic concentration in all age groups (medians 63-85 {mu}g As/L), and despite the low degree of contamination from industries and traffic, the urine concentrations of toxic metals such as cadmium and lead were clearly elevated, especially in children (median 0.31 {mu}g Cd/L and 2.9 {mu}g Pb/L, respectively). In general, women had higher urinary concentrations of toxic metals, especially Cd (median 0.81 {mu}g/L) compared to men (0.66 {mu}g/L) and U (median 10 ng/L in women, compared to 6.4 ng/L in men), while men had higher urinary concentrations of the basic and essential elements Ca (69 mg/L in men, 30-50 years, compared to 52 mg/L in women), Mg (58 mg/L in men compared to 50 mg/L in women), Zn (182 {mu}g/L in men compared to 117 {mu}g/L in women) and Se (9.9 {mu}g/L in men compared to 8.7 {mu}g/L in women). Manganese was consistently higher in females than in males in all age groups, suggesting a biological difference between females and males in Mn metabolism. Increasing socioeconomic status decreased the toxic metal exposure significantly in children and especially in men. Poor iron status was detected in 17% of children, adolescents and women, but only in 6% of men. Also zinc deficiency was more prevalent in females than in males. Conclusions: Women and children seemed to be more at risk for toxic metal exposure than men and at the same time more vulnerable to micronutrient deficiency. Higher concentrations of the toxic metals in urine in women are likely to reflect an increased gastrointestinal absorption of these metals at micronutrient deficiency, such as low body iron stores and Zn deficiency. Higher urinary concentrations of the essential elements in men likely reflect a better nutritional status. There is a need for information on exposure, lifestyle and socioeconomic factors, stratified by gender and age, for the purpose of conducting balanced risk assessment and management that considers such differences.

Berglund, Marika, E-mail: Marika.Berglund@ki.se [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)] [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Lindberg, Anna-Lena [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)] [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Rahman, Mahfuzar; Yunus, Mohammad [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research (Bangladesh)] [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research (Bangladesh); Grander, Margaretha [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)] [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Loennerdal, Bo [Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)] [Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Vahter, Marie [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)] [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Sensemaking in a High-Risk Lifestyle: The Relationship Between Work and Family for Public Safety Families  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Past research concerning work and family has largely been from traditional, white-collar settings and has only taken into consideration the perceptions of the employees' experiences with regard to the relationship between work and family. However, there is no doubt that employees' in non-traditional settings, particularly those employed in public safety professions (i.e. police and fire) experience the relationship between work and family differently than those in white-collar settings, especially since they put their lives on the line daily for the protection and betterment of the community, society and even the world. In addition, the experiences and perceptions of work and family will undoubtedly be different for the family members (i.e. children and spouses) of those employed in such "life-threatening" professions. This study sought to understand how public safety employees, as well as their families, make sense out of the relationship between work and family by first examining what metaphors they employ to articulate the relationship between work and family. In addition, this study sought to examine if male versus female public safety employees experience the relationship between work and family in similar or different ways, as well as if police officers and fire fighters experience the relationship similarly or differently. Using qualitative methods, the findings indicate that public safety employees and their families articulate and make sense of the relationship between work and family in both similar and different ways. Contrary to previous work-family research, dominant metaphors and constructs such as balance, conflict, segmentation, etc. did not appear at all within this study. Instead, participants likened the relationship between work and family to competition, nature, organism, change, integration, opposition, ambiguity, and destruction. Public safety employees and their families also experienced and made sense of the relationship between work and family through humor, emotion management, fear and risk assessment. Findings also indicate that both male and female public safety employees internalize risk in much the same way, as well as agree that parenthood in general, is devalued in the public safety profession. With regard to differences, findings indicate that females have a harder time negotiating a healthy relationship between work and family, have their competency levels always questioned by family or co-workers, and use different language and rhetoric from males when talking about work and family. Finally, results show that police officers and fire fighters make sense of work and family in much the same way with regard to "dirty work" and communication rules but differ in terms of coping mechanisms and job satisfaction. This study suggests a number of implications for both theory and practice. The findings also point to many necessary areas of future research which could further our understanding of the relationship between work and family, not only in professions characterized by high-risk, non-standard hours and stress, but also in standard white-collar professions as well.

Bochantin, Jaime Elizabeth

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. Spawning ground surveys for spring (stream-type) Chinook salmon were conducted in four main spawning areas (Mainstem, Middle Fork, North Fork, and Granite Creek System) and seven minor spawning areas (South Fork, Camas Creek, Desolation Creek, Trail Creek, Deardorff Creek, Clear Creek, and Big Creek) in the John Day River basin during August and September of 2005. Census surveys included 298.2 river kilometers (88.2 rkm within index, 192.4 rkm additional within census, and 17.6 rkm within random survey areas) of spawning habitat. We observed 902 redds and 701 carcasses including 227 redds in the Mainstem, 178 redds in the Middle Fork, 420 redds in the North Fork, 62 redds in the Granite Creek System, and 15 redds in Desolation Creek. Age composition of carcasses sampled for the entire basin was 1.6% age 3, 91.2% age 4, and 7.1% age 5. The sex ratio was 57.4% female and 42.6% male. Significantly more females than males were observed in the Granite Creek System. During 2005, 82.3% of female carcasses sampled had released all of their eggs. Significantly more pre-spawn mortalities were observed in Granite Creek. Nine (1.3%) of 701 carcasses were of hatchery origin. Of 298 carcasses examined, 4.0% were positive for the presence of lesions. A significantly higher incidence of gill lesions was found in the Granite Creek System when compared to the rest of the basin. Of 114 kidney samples tested, two (1.8%) had clinical BKD levels. Both infected fish were age-4 females in the Middle Fork. All samples tested for IHNV were negative. To estimate spring Chinook and summer steelhead smolt-to-adult survival (SAR) we PIT tagged 5,138 juvenile Chinook and 4,913 steelhead during the spring of 2005. We estimated that 130,144 (95% CL's 97,133-168,409) Chinook emigrated from the upper John Day subbasin past our seining area in the Mainstem John Day River (river kilometers 274-296) between February 4 and June 16, 2005. We also estimated that 32,601 (95% CL's 29,651 and 36,264) Chinook and 47,921 (95% CL's 35,025 and 67,366) steelhead migrated past our Mainstem rotary screw trap at river kilometer (rkm) 326 between October 4, 2004 and July 6, 2005. We estimated that 20,193 (95% CL's 17,699 and 22,983) Chinook and 28,980 (95% CL's 19,914 and 43,705) steelhead migrated past our Middle Fork trap (rkm 24) between October 6, 2004 and June 17, 2005. Seventy three percent of PIT tagged steelhead migrants were age-2 fish, 13.8% were age-3, 12.7% were age-2, and 0.3% were age 4. Spring Chinook SAR for the 2002 brood year was estimated at 2.5% (100 returns of 4,000 PIT tagged smolts). Preliminary steelhead SAR (excluding 2-ocean fish) for the 2004 tagging year was estimated at 1.61% (60 returns of 3,732 PIT-tagged migrants).

Wilson, Wayne

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The role of seasonal wetlands in the ecology of the American alligator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) has been frequently studied in large reservoirs and coastal marshes. Large ontogenetic shifts in their diet and morphology have been linked with changes in habitat use, with adult males using deep, open water and juveniles and nesting females relying on vegetated marsh. In certain regions of the inland portion of the alligator’s range, these different aquatic habitats are represented by seasonal wetlands and riverine systems that are separated by a terrestrial matrix. Ontogenetic habitat shifts, therefore, would require overland movements between systems, which has important implications for conservation of the species. I tested several commonly used methods of surveying alligator populations to determine the most effective method of studying alligators in seasonal wetlands. I then used systematic trapping, nest surveys and radio telemetry to determine habitat use and overland movement rates by different sex and size classes. I found that seasonal wetlands provided nesting and nursery sites for these inland alligator populations, but that both juveniles undergoing an ontogenetic shift and nesting females move between the wetlands and riverine systems. Overland movements by alligators between the wetland and riverine habitats establish a level of functional connectivity between these aquatic ecosystems. I constructed a habitat suitability index of both the wetlands and the surrounding landscape to determine which patch and landscape characteristics were important to wetland use by alligators. I found that both descriptive wetland characteristics and the spatial relationships between wetlands were important predictors of alligator use. Overland movement was related to upland landuse as well as distance between aquatic habitats. Conserving a variety of wetland sizes and types within an intact upland matrix is critical to maintaining connectivity across the landscape. Furthermore, understanding how species may act as mobile links between ecosystems, particularly those with ontogenetic niche shifts, illustrates the importance of approaching conservation from a landscape perspective.

Subalusky, Amanda Lee

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Stridulatory organ morphology, acoustics, and function in the red imported fire ant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this research was to determine whether stridulation in the red imported fire ant (RIFA) serves a significant communicative function. Three general objectives were developed. 1) Characterize the stridulatory organ (SO). 2) Determine the information content of the signal through an acoustics analysis; and 3) Determine colony level employment of the SO. Characterization of the morphology of the SO revealed a general increase in all SO parameters (length, width, distance between teeth, and total teeth) in relation to ant size. This was most evident in the worker caste. The SO was significantly different between castes suggesting that the resulting acoustical properties could serve to distinguish each caste. Morphological analysis revealed that the SO of males is thin and unlikely to be very functional. Based on the differences in the structure of the SO between female castes, the possible evolution of the SO is discussed. Characterization of the acoustical properties, pulse length and pulse carrier frequency for both directions of gaster movement, showed that both were variable and overlapped between the female castes. This suggests that signals are not altered for different contexts (Markl et. al. 1977). Pulse lengths for both directions of gaster movement were the only properties shown to be significantly different between castes, while short pulse frequency was the only acoustical property found correlated to ant size. These differences are discussed in terms of selection, as opposed to allometric variation or developmental processes. Three colony level behaviors associated with RIFAs, disturbance response, emigration, and excavation, were examined for SO employment. Stridulation was not associated with mound disturbance or employed during nest emigration. However, stridulations were found to be significantly employed during soil excavation. Thus, sound may be serving one or more possible functions: 1) As an aid in the removal of soil particles; 2) As a signal communicating a need to dig; 3) As an acoustical imaging tool; and 4. As an aid in mound construction via particle compression and the expulsion of interstitial water.

Rauth, Steven Joseph

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Behavioral ecology of striped skunk: factors influencing urban rabies management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) are a rabies vector in Texas and efforts are underway to develop an oral rabies vaccination program for skunks. To better understand some of the components necessary, I studied the habitat preferences and home range of skunks, an alternative skunk capture method, and surveyed the knowledge base of medical providers practicing across the state. I radiocollared 99 skunks from the Houston, Texas metropolitan area and monitored skunk movements from March 2004–June 2006. To accelerate progress of this study, I captured 93 of 99 skunks using a dip net. Dip netting allowed for an effective collection alternative to cage trapping. Movement data indicated a strong preference for short grass areas (82%), however, habitat use changed to remote, brushy areas when temperatures were ?7C. Habitat use during the year was different (P = 0.001), with December 2004, January 2005, and February 2005 significantly (P = 0.001) different from one another. Additionally, habitat use during December 2005, February 2006, and March 2006 were significantly different (P = 0.045, P =0.098, and P =0.003, respectively). Data from 20 skunks, covering multiple seasons, were analyzed for home range use. I found male home range use averaged 255 ha (217–345), while females averaged 126 ha (60–218). Male range use was significantly larger than females (P = 0.005). No significant seasonal movements were observed. Lastly, I conducted a survey of 297 Texas primary care medical providers to assess their knowledge of rabies vaccine procedures and their experience with rabies vaccines. Small town providers within the oral rabies vaccination baiting zone were more aware of rabies prophylaxis (P 95% of 297) rarely saw patients for rabies prophylaxis. Survey data indicated providers have minimal, if any, experience with acquiring and administering rabies prophylaxis. My data suggests that an effective oral rabies vaccination program could be established within urban areas by using short grass area baiting strategies during the fall season, using dip net capturing for faster surveillance collection, and by initiating a rabies education program targeted at Texas’ primary care physicians and their staff.

Ruffino, Denise Marie

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Examining solid waste management issues in the City of Bryan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic aspects of household recycling behavior and attitudes in City of Bryan are examined to improve solid waste management policies in the city. Using survey data collected by mail and personal interviews, residentsÂ? attitudes towards solid waste management are analyzed, in general, and specifically, the factors influencing recycling behavior examined using logistic regression. In addition, three alternative policies are presented to respondents. First, support for an additional drop-off recycling center (Policy I) is examined. Second, WTP for two different recycling programs, curbside recycling service (Policy II), and curbside recycling with a drop-off recycling center (Policy III), as a function of socio-economic factors thought to influence WTP are computed using contingent valuation method, an indirect valuation tool. Finally, preference for a particular policy among the three alternatives presented to the residents of Bryan is explored. Because of the different data collection modes and assumptions on the bid prices two logit models are estimated to examine recycling behavior, and Policy I and two multinomial logit models for the most preferred policy, whereas four logit models are estimated for Policy II and III. The estimated models are similar both within the Policies and between the Policies in terms of the affects of variables, significance of coefficients, and consistency with previous studies indicating a potential set of factors that can be used to explain WTP for recycling services. Bryan residents that are female, white, employed, have higher incomes, have children, own a house, and are self-perceived environmentalists tend to recycle more. Similarly, males, nonwhites, older respondents, students, non-environmentalists and non-recyclers are more likely to support an additional drop-off center. WTP for Policy II is positively influenced by males, whites, respondents who are employed, low-income respondents, environmentalists, non-recyclers, and those who support Policy I. In comparison, WTP for Policy III is positively influenced by females, whites, respondents who are employed, younger respondents, environmentalists, non-recyclers, and those who support Policy I. In the case of both Policies I and II, the bid price negatively influences WTP as expected. While the WTP for Policy II is slightly higher than the estimated cost of a curbside recycling service ($2.50), the WTP for Policy III is lower than the estimated cost. No consistent pattern emerges across most of the coefficients and the four possible alternatives, three proposed policies and the current situation. However, probabilities computed using the multinomial logit results is the highest for Policy II, followed by either Policy III or no change to the existing solid waste management policy.

Arekere, Dhananjaya Marigowda

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon : Project Progress Report, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

During 2001, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game continued to develop techniques to rear chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to sexual maturity in captivity and to monitor their reproductive performance under natural conditions. Eyed-eggs were hydraulically collected from redds in the East Fork Salmon River (EFSR; N = 311) and the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (WFYF; N = 272) to establish brood year 2001 culture cohorts. The eyed-eggs were incubated and reared by family group at the Eagle Fish Hatchery (Eagle). Juveniles collected the previous summer were PIT and elastomer tagged and vaccinated against vibrio Vibrio spp. and bacterial kidney disease prior to the majority of them being transferred to the National Marine Fisheries Service, Manchester Marine Experimental Station for saltwater rearing through maturity. Smolt transfers included 210 individuals from the Lemhi River (LEM), 242 from the WFYF, and 178 from the EFSR. Maturing fish transfers from Manchester to Eagle included 62 individuals from the LEM, 72 from the WFYF, and 27 from the EFSR. Additional water chilling capacity was added at Eagle in 2001 to test if spawn timing could be advanced by temperature manipulations, and adults from the LEM and WFYF were divided into chilled ({approx} 9 C) and ambient ({approx} 13.5 C) water temperature groups while at Eagle. Twenty-five mature females from the LEM (11 chilled, 14 ambient) were spawned in captivity with 23 males with the same temperature history in 2001. Water temperature group was not shown to affect the spawn timing of these females, but males did mature earlier. Egg survival to the eyed stage of development averaged 37.9% and did not differ significantly between the two temperature groups. A total of 8,154 eyed-eggs from these crosses were placed in in-stream incubators by personnel from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe. Mature adults (N = 89) were released into the WFYF to evaluate their reproductive performance. After release, fish distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Five of the 18 redds spawned by captive-reared parents were hydraulically sampled to assess survival to the eyed stage of development. Eyed-eggs were collected from four of these, and survival to this stage ranged from 0%-89%. Expanding these results to the remaining redds produced an estimate of 15,000 eyed-eggs being produced by captive-reared fish.

Venditti, David A.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Medical x-ray exposure doses as contaminants of atomic bomb doses  

SciTech Connect

Since 1967 at the times of their biennial ABCC/RERF radiological examinations, all Adult Health Study (AHS) subjects have been interviewed to determine the exposures to medical x-rays they experienced in institutions other than RERF in order to estimate the numbers of examinations and corresponding doses which they received. These data have been stored on computer tapes together with the doses these subjects received during their radiological examinations in the ABCC/RERF Department of Radiology. Thus, their medical x-ray doses are available along with their atomic bomb doses (tentative 1965 doses revised, T65DR) for assessment of the role of ionizing radiation in the development of diseases. The medical x-ray doses incurred at RERF were assessed by means of phantom dosimetry. Those at other institutions were determined using phantom dosimetry data and results of surveys for trends in radiological examinations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. By the end of 1982, the average medical x-ray doses to the active bone marrow were 12.04 mGy for A-bomb exposed groups and 8.92 mGy for control groups (not-in-cities); to the male gonads, 2.26 mGy and 1.89 mGy, respectively; and to the female gonads, 17.45 mGy and 12.58 mGy, respectively. Results for Hiroshima and Nagasaki were similar. The main impact of medical x-ray doses was in the lowest T65DR group. Medical x-ray active bone marrow doses ranged from 0.05-500% (mean, 35%) of A-bomb doses in