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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Residual oil saturation, Annex VI-1. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE fossil energy report VI-1  

SciTech Connect

This report, dealing with the US/Venezuela Cooperative exchange agreement on residual oil saturation (Annex VI), contains the results of efforts by scientists from both countries to improve the state of present technology for accurately measuring the amount of residual oil remaining in a particular reservoir of interest. To date, those efforts have resulted in an exchange of ideas through a sharing of technical literature and bibliographic listings pertinent to the subject, reciprocal visits to the laboratories and field sites where residual oil saturation measurement R and D is in progress, an exchange of ideas through workshops held in each country, and open discussions covering areas of future cooperative R and D. The text of the basic agreement , Annex VI and all amendments, are appended to the report. In addition to a chronicle of events detailing progress under Annex VI, this report also inlcudes a discussion of future work to be performed in the areas of subsidence accompanying the extraction of oil and interwell oil saturation measurement. A meeting was held in Bartlesville May 10 and 11 to formulate plans in this area.

Wesson, T.C.; VonDomselaar, H.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

in 2015 comes from Annex VI to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL Annex VI), which is an international agreement that generally...

3

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

consumption comes from Annex VI to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL Annex VI), which is an international agreement that generally...

4

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

consumption comes from Annex VI to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL Annex VI), which is an international agreement that generally...

5

A9RB1B5.tmp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

in 2015 comes from Annex VI to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL Annex VI), which is an international agreement that generally...

6

Radiochemistry Annex | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radionuclide speciation and detection of chemical signatures. The annex houses nuclear magnetic resonance instruments and surface science capabilities, such as X-ray...

7

EMSL - Radiochemistry Annex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radionuclide speciation and detection of chemical signatures. The annex houses nuclear magnetic resonance instruments and surface science capabilities, such as X-ray...

8

Assessor Training Annex A: Referencing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NVLAP Assessor Training Annex A: Referencing NVLAP Accreditation #12;Assessor Training: Annex · NVLAP reserves the right to control its use #12;Assessor Training: Annex A (rev. 2012-07-31) 33 · NVLAP of technical competence #12;Assessor Training: Annex A (rev. 2012-07-31) 44 · It is NVLAP's responsibility

9

PUBLIC INFORMATION ANNEX I -PUBLIC INFORMATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANNEX I PUBLIC INFORMATION #12;ANNEX I - PUBLIC INFORMATION 11/12/2013 v. 2.0 Page I-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex I: Public Information, and contents within, is a guide to how the University maintains public information during an incident. The Annex is written in support of the Texas A&M University (TAMU

10

Marshall Field Annex 1897 -1920  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

until 1919. The library finally moved into the new space in 1920 and reopened in May 1921 with seven, creation, maintenance and endowment of a free public library." The John Crerar Library a brief historialMarshall Field Annex 1897 - 1920 CREATION--The John Crerar Library was first opened at the Marshall

He, Chuan

11

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K-West Annex Facility - April 2014 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility - April 2014 April 2014 Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility...

12

Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportati...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents This part should...

13

Vi Rapp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vi Rapp Vi Rapp Vi Rapp Residential Building Systems Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R3074 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-3080 (510) 495-2035 VHRapp@lbl.gov This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. Publications 2013 Rapp, Vi H., Albert Pastor-Perez, Brett C. Singer, and Craig P. Wray. Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: Validating VENT-II., 2013. Download: PDF (836.92 KB) 2012 Rapp, Vi H., Brett C. Singer, J. Chris Stratton, and Craig P. Wray. Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems., 2012. Download: PDF (1.78 MB) Rapp, Vi H., A. DeFilippo, and Samveg Saxena. "Extending the lean operating

14

Non Annex B Countries List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non Annex B Countries A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, Y, Z A Afghanistan (1949-2007) Albania (1933-2007) Algeria (1900-2007) American Samoa (1954-2007) Angola (1950-2007) Antarctic Fisheries (1970-2007) Antigua & Barbuda (1957-2007) Argentina (1887-2007) Armenia (1992-2007) Aruba (1986-2007) Azerbaijan (1992-2007) B Bahamas (1950-2007) Bahrain (1933-2007) Bangladesh (1972-2007) Barbados (1928-2007) Belarus (1992-2007) Belize (1950-2007) Benin (1958-2007) Bermuda (1950-2007) Bhutan (1970-2007) Bolivia (1928-2007) Bosnia-Herzegovinia (1992-2007) Botswana (1950-2007) Brazil (1901-2007) British Virgin Islands (1957-2007) Brunei (Darussalam) (1930-2007) Burkina Faso (1958-2007) Burundi (1962-2007) C Cambodia (1955-2007) Cameroon (1950-2007)

15

Independent Oversight Activity Report, K-West Annex Facility...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Oversight Activity Report, K-West Annex Facility - June 2013 June 2013 Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Layup Program for Construction SuspensionDelay...

16

IEA HPP ANNEX 36: QUALITY INSTALLATION / QUALITY MAINTENANCE SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The paper summarizes the goals and planned activities to be undertaken by the participants in Annex 36. Some background information and status of Annex work specific to each participant is provided as well.

Hourahan, Mr. Glenn [Air Conditioning Contractors of America, Arlington, VA; Domanski, Dr. Piotr [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

The IEA/ECBCS/Annex 40 Glossary on Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Energy Agency's (IEA) Energy Conservation in Building and Community Systems' (ECBCS) Annex 40 has developed a glossary of commissioning terms as one of the first commissioning tools produced within the annex. The glossary consists...

Akashi, Y.; Castro, N.; Novakovic, V.; Viaud, B.; Jandon, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Annex IV Environmental Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annex IV Environmental Webinar Annex IV Environmental Webinar Annex IV Environmental Webinar January 23, 2014 12:00PM to 1:30PM EST Online The Energy Department will present a live webcast on Instrumentation for Monitoring Around Marine Renewable Energy Devices, highlighting themes that arose during a related workshop. Webinar presentations will include discussion on monitoring of near-field interactions between marine mammals and marine renewable energy converters, determining the distribution and habitat use of marine animals in the vicinity of marine renewable energy converters, and characterizing sound produced by marine renewable energy converters. 12:00 to 1:30 p.m. Eastern Standard Time 9:00 to 10:30 a.m. Pacific Standard Time Join Lync Meeting Join by phone866-528-1882 or 509-375-4555

19

IEA HPP Annex 36 Installation/Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compiled and reviewed last week during meeting at EdF 10-11 October 2013 Submit final report to IEA HPP Ex#12;IEA HPP Annex 36 ­ Quality Installation/Quality Maintenance Van D. Baxter Oak Ridge National), USA 3 10-11 October 2013 EdF, France 4 12 May 2014 Workshop at IEA Heat Pump conference, Montreal

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

20

Emergency Support Function #12; Energy Annex  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2008 ESF #12 - Energy Annex ESF #12-1 January 2008 ESF #12 - Energy Annex ESF #12-1 ESF Coordinator: Department of Energy Primary Agency: Department of Energy Support Agencies: Department of Agriculture Department of Commerce Department of Defense Department of Homeland Security Department of the Interior Department of Labor Department of State Department of Transportation Environmental Protection Agency Nuclear Regulatory Commission Tennessee Valley Authority INTRODUCTION Purpose Emergency Support Function (ESF) #12 - Energy is intended to facilitate the restoration of damaged energy systems and components when activated by the Secretary of Homeland Security for incidents requiring a coordinated Federal response. Under Department of Energy (DOE) leadership, ESF #12 is an integral part of the larger DOE responsibility of maintaining

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bonneville Power Ampere Annex Z-995 Building  

Vancouver, WA The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a federal agency headquartered in Portland, Oregon, provides about half of the electricity used in the Pacific Northwest and operates more than three-fourths of the region's high-voltage transmission. Because BPA markets power at cost from 31 federal dams, its rates are among the least expensive electricity in the country. The Ampere Annex project is a renovation of an exisiting 60-year-old standard warehouse building located within the Ross Complex.

22

E-Print Network 3.0 - annex iv advanced Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preparation and Waste... 2193 |Saudi Arabia |Annex II Under |Annex II: Assessment of Solar Radiation | 72197 |199 ... Source: Pint, Bruce A. - Materials Science &...

23

Emergency Support Function #12; Energy Annex | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Support Function #12; Energy Annex Emergency Support Function #12; Energy Annex Emergency Support Function #12; Energy Annex Emergency Support Function (ESF) #12 - Energy is intended to facilitate the restoration of damaged energy systems and components when activated by the Secretary of Homeland Security for incidents requiring a coordinated Federal response. Under Department of Energy (DOE) leadership, ESF #12 is an integral part of the larger DOE responsibility of maintaining continuous and reliable energy supplies for the United States through preventive measures and restoration and recovery actions. Emergency Support Function #12; Energy Annex More Documents & Publications Emergency Support Function #12; Energy Annex - Support Agencies Special Report: IG-0847 Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 1, Issue 1 - January 201

24

Radioactive Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex The EMSL Radiochemistry Annex, located in the 3410 Material Science and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contamination during transportation. Dispersible radioactive material must be placed in rigid, leak- tight inner be sufficient such that EMSL staff will not encounter radioactive contamination when they open the shippingRadioactive Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex The EMSL Radiochemistry Annex, located

25

Radioactive Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex The EMSL Radiochemistry Annex, located in the 3410 Material Science and Technology Building, is authorized to work with small to moderate amounts of radioactive material. In order to work within 3410 facility radiological limits, potential users must provide detailed information about the type and quantity of radioactive material, the form and packaging of the material and the type of work that will be performed at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex. Radioactive material includes both purchased radioactive material and samples that contain concentrations of radioactive material in excess of normal background levels. Please realize that some samples that may not be considered to be radioactive material at your institution will be managed as radioactive material at

26

Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This part should contain a general statement of the intent of this Annex. To provide for the planning, preparedness and coordination of emergency service efforts to respond to a transportation...

27

Annex A Metrics for the Smart Grid System Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annex A Annex A Metrics for the Smart Grid System Report A.iii Table of Contents Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... A.1 Metric #1: The Fraction of Customers and Total Load Served by Real-Time Pricing, Critical Peak Pricing, and Time-of-Use Pricing ........................................................................................ A.2 Metric #2: Real-Time System Operations Data Sharing ...................................................................... A.9 Metric #3: Standard Distributed Resource Connection Policies .......................................................... A.18 Metric #4: Regulatory Recovery for Smart Grid Investments ............................................................. A.23

28

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

develop advanced storage concepts for solar and low energyAnnex 32, Advanced Storage Concepts for Solar and Low EnergyAnnexes Advancedstorageconceptsforsolarandlowenergy

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

E-Print Network 3.0 - annex iiib applied Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ALF-Annex D CFP 2006-EN Anna Lindh Euro-Mediterranean Foundation for the Dialogue between Cultures Summary: ALF- Annex D - CFP 2006-EN Anna Lindh...

30

E-Print Network 3.0 - annex project w-484 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with a simple analysis... with the production of a good.5 In parentheses we include CIM-EARTH projections for 2020 under a business... ), Other Annex B (OAB), and non-Annex B...

31

Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Effects of Energy Removal on Physical Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Please mark your calendars for the next Annex IV Environmental webinar titled: Effects of Energy Removal on Physical Systems. Held under the auspices of the Annex IV initiative to the IEA Ocean...

32

Guidelines to Defra's GHG conversion factors for company reporting Annexes updated June 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the standard conversion factors at Annex 1. If, however, you export energy or heat to another business (or2007 Guidelines to Defra's GHG conversion factors for company reporting Annexes updated June 2007 results #12;Annex 1 - Fuel Conversion Factors Last updated: Jun-07 Table 1 Fuel Type Amount used per year

33

Annex: Attributes of Proliferation Resistance for Civilian Nuclear Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annex: Attributes of Proliferation Resistance for Civilian Nuclear Annex: Attributes of Proliferation Resistance for Civilian Nuclear Power Systems Annex: Attributes of Proliferation Resistance for Civilian Nuclear Power Systems The NERAC1 Task Force on Technology Opportunities for Increasing the Proliferation Resistance of Global Civilian Nuclear Power Systems (TOPS) determined at its first meeting in November 1999 that a set of metrics was needed to judge proliferation resistance and to identify areas in which technical contributions could be useful. However, because of the time constraints imposed on the Task Force and the difficulty of developing quantifiable metrics, it was decided that a set of qualitative attributes could be developed and would be useful in providing a framework for both future discussions and for the development of a set of quantifiable

34

UNFCCC-Global Map-Annex 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-Global Map-Annex 1 UNFCCC-Global Map-Annex 1 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Map-Annex 1 Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Climate Topics: Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.unfccc.int/di/map/ Country: Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States

35

Tethys and Annex IV Progress Report for FY 2012  

SciTech Connect

The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System, dubbed Tethys after the mythical Greek titaness of the seas, is being developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support the U.S. Department of Energys Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP). Functioning as a smart database, Tethys enables its users to identify key words or terms to help gather, organize and make available information and data pertaining to the environmental effects of MHK and offshore wind (OSW) energy development. By providing and categorizing relevant publications within a simple and searchable database, Tethys acts as a dissemination channel for information and data which can be utilized by regulators, project developers and researchers to minimize the environmental risks associated with offshore renewable energy developments and attempt to streamline the permitting process. Tethys also houses a separate content-related Annex IV data base with identical functionality to the Tethys knowledge base. Annex IV is a collaborative project among member nations of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement (OES-IA) that examines the environmental effects of ocean energy devices and projects. The U.S. Department of Energy leads the Annex IV working with federal partners such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). While the Annex IV database contains technical reports and journal articles, it is primarily focused on the collection of project site and research study metadata forms (completed by MHK researchers and developers around the world, and collected by PNNL) which provide information on environmental studies and the current progress of the various international MHK developments in the Annex IV member nations. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the content, accessibility and functionality enhancements made to the Annex IV and Tethys knowledge bases in FY12.

Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Copping, Andrea E.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Flyer, Title VI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Titles VI and IX of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended prohibit discrimination in programs and activities receiving Federal financial assistance.

37

Annex 2 Risk Guidance Science Programme Office Project Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Annex 2 ­ Risk Guidance Science Programme Office Project Management Guidance on Risk Management the risk. This approach underpins the key objective of risk management. Basic Principles and Process STFC management structure and internal reporting within the STFC's Science Programme Office (SPO) through its

38

Electronic Annex -2 Uncertainty in Paleohydrologic Reconstructions from Molecular D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calculations Using the Electronic Spreadsheet A dataset of hydrogen isotope measurements are used to illustrate1 Electronic Annex -2 Uncertainty in Paleohydrologic Reconstructions from Molecular D Example how to use the calculation spreadsheet that accompanies this manuscript. The example dataset includes

Polissar, Pratigya J.

39

International Collaboration on Offshore Wind Energy Under IEA Annex XXIII  

SciTech Connect

This paper defines the purpose of IEA Annex XXIII, the International Collaboration on Offshore Wind Energy. This international collaboration through the International Energy Agency (IEA) is an efficient forum from which to advance the technical and environmental experiences collected from existing offshore wind energy projects, as well as the research necessary to advance future technology for deep-water wind energy technology.

Musial, W.; Butterfield, S.; Lemming, J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

VI-1 TALKS PRESENTED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R. Rapp, EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force on "Direct-Photon Flow Puzzle", GSI, Darmstadt, Germany (February 2014). VI-7 Quarkonia in the quark-gluon plasma, R. Rapp, Invited...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy Agency (IEA-AMT) Annex on Thermoelectric  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Thermoelectric materials transport properties measurements improvement and standardization is undertaken by new IEA annex under the Advanced Materials for Transportation implementing agreement

42

E-Print Network 3.0 - annex volume directory Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Eng (EE1) Engineering Annex (EGA) Engineering Library (ELB) Fisheries Center (FIS... ) Gerberding Hall (GRB) Gould Hall (GLD) Graves Hall (TGB) Guggenheim Hall (GUG)...

43

Jones P.J.S. (2008) Fishing industry and related perspectives on the issues raised by no-take marine protected area proposals. Marine Policy 32(4), 749-758. doi:10.1016/j.marpol.2007.12.009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the potential of NTMPAs to address concerns about declines in marine biodiversity and associated declines-take marine protected area proposals. Marine Policy 32(4), 749-758. doi:10.1016/j.marpol.2007.12.009 1 Fishing industry and related perspectives on the issues raised by no-take marine protected area proposals Jones P

Jones, Peter JS

44

Independent Oversight Activity Report, K-West Annex Facility - June 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K-West Annex Facility - June K-West Annex Facility - June 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, K-West Annex Facility - June 2013 June 2013 Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Layup Program for Construction Suspension/Delay [HIAR-Hanford-2013-06-10] Construction on the modified K-West Annex Facility was suspended by the Department of Energy in April 2013 due to budget cuts mandated by congressional budget sequestration. After construction was suspended, the Richland Operations Project Office directed the contractor to place the project in a safe, stable configuration to preserve the completed work, and to document completed work activities to support construction restart. In May 2013, the contractor completed the efforts necessary to protect and preserve the completed work at the project site. Independent Oversight

45

Title VI | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VI VI Title VI Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, and national origin in programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance. The law states, in part, that: No person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance. The Office of Civil Rights is responsible for monitoring and enforcing compliance with Title VI, investigating Title VI-related complaints, and providing technical assistance to recipients of Department of Energy financial assistance. The Department has promulgated regulations that

46

VI Classic Green and Poisson Functions 213 VI.1Problems in Half-Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contents VI Classic Green and Poisson Functions 213 VI.2Green Function for the Heat Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .* * . . 220 VI.1.3The Case #12; Chapter VI Classic Green and Poisson Functions In Chapter IV we gave a definition

Menaldi, Jose-Luis

47

Presentation to the EAC: Annex 1 Global Smart Grid Inventory Progress and Plans - Eric Lightner  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Plans: and Plans: Annex 1 Global Smart Grid Inventory Eric Lightner, Annex 1 Lead (U.S. DOE) October 2012 Australia Korea Belgium The Netherlands Canada Russia China Spain Finland Sweden France Switzerland Ireland United Kingdom Italy United States Japan Operating Agent (as of August 2011) All 22 ISGAN signatories contributing data and information to Annex 1 Annex 1 Participants Task 1: Unified ISGAN framework for assessment of national-level motivating drivers and technology priorities for smart grids (completed with delivery of summary report) Task 2: Development and population of the initial project inventory with data content exchangeable with those in other existing smart grid databases (in progress) Task 3: Quantitative analysis on select inventory projects,

48

Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: No abstract prepared. Author(s): John Travis Finger, Eddie Ross Hoover Published: Publisher Unknown, Date Unknown Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Annex_7_-_The_Iea%27S_Role_In_Advanced_Geothermal_Drilling&oldid=389771" Category: Reference Materials What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

49

Energy Sector-Specific Plan: An Annex to the National Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sector-Specific Plan: An Annex to the National Sector-Specific Plan: An Annex to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan Energy Sector-Specific Plan: An Annex to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan In its role as the lead Sector-Specific Agency for the Energy Sector, the Department of Energy has worked closely with dozens of government and industry partners to prepare this updated 2010 Energy Sector-Specific Plan (SSP). Much of that work was conducted through the two Energy Sector Coordinating Councils (SCCs) and the Energy Government Coordinating Council (GCC). Energy Sector-Specific Plan: An Annex to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan More Documents & Publications National Infrastructure Protection Plan Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as

50

Commissioning of Building HVAC Systems for Improved Energy Performance: A Summary of Annex 40 Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

( Japan, France, Canada, Belgium, Switzerland, Sweden, USA, Germany, Norway, Finland) took part as full members, observers participated from 4 other countries (The Netherlands, Korea, China, Hungary). The Annex is organized in 5 tasks according...

Visier, J. C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

develop advanced storage concepts for solar and low energyAnnex 32, Advanced Storage Concepts for Solar and Low EnergyAdvancedstorageconceptsforsolarandlowenergybuildings

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

KU to open Library Annex on west campus that will hold 1.6 million volumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the addition of 1.6 miles of linear shelving space each year. The Library Annex will relieve overcrowded stacks and enable the libraries to increase the space available for library users. Circulating materials will be reshelved more quickly and stacks... will be less densely packed with materials, making shelf-browsing easier for library users. More individual study and group study spaces will be configured as well. One of the real advantages of the Library Annex is the climate-controlled environment...

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

53

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM Lab VI - 1 In the previous problems you explored by electric currents. This lab will carry that investigation one step further, determining how changing magnetic fields can give rise to electric currents. This is the effect that allows the generation

Minnesota, University of

54

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM Lab VI - 1 In the previous problems you explored the magnetic field and its effect on moving charges. You also saw how electric currents could create magnetic can give rise to electric currents. This is the effect that allows the generation of electricity

Minnesota, University of

55

Correcting injection pressure maladjustments to reduce NOX emissions by marine diesel engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions from the exhausts of marine diesel engines comprises several different gases including NOX. These are currently regulated at the international level under Regulation 13 of ANNEX VI of MARPOL 73/78, but this regulation only applies to new engines and is based on bench tests, for only a single engine designated the parent engine. Here, the need to take measurements from across their whole range and once in operation on board a vessel is examined. This would not only improve assessment of new equipment against the current regulation, but would also detect defects in the functioning of the engine.

C. Vanesa Durn Grados; Zigor Uriondo; Manuel Clemente; Francisco J. Jimnez Espadafor; Juan Moreno Gutirrez

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

University of North Carolina at Charlotte Design and Construction Manual Section 3, Annex B Construction Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

does not include burning, incinerating, or thermally destroying waste. Can be conducted on-site (as ­ Construction Waste Management ANNEX B WASTE REDUCTION & RECYCLING GUIDELINES #12;University of North Carolina at Charlotte Design and Construction Manual Section 3, Annex B ­ Construction Waste Management WASTE REDUCTION

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

57

Microbial Reduction of Intragrain U(VI) in Contaminated Sediment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intragrain U(VI) in Contaminated Sediment. Microbial Reduction of Intragrain U(VI) in Contaminated Sediment. Abstract: The accessibility of precipitated, intragrain U(VI) in a...

58

Astronomy Department UC Berkeley B-20 Hearst Field Annex # 3411 Berkeley, CA 94720  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ori D. Fox Astronomy Department UC Berkeley B-20 Hearst Field Annex # 3411 Berkeley, CA 94720 http://astro.berkeley.edu/ofox/website/Homepage.html ofox@berkeley.edu EDUCATION: Ph.D. in Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 2010 M.Sc. in Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 2006 B.A. in Astronomy & Physics, with honors, Boston

Militzer, Burkhard

59

Retri-Commissioning the Aria Building Using Cite-AHU: An Annex 40 Collaboration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to develop a service tool called CITE-AHU, an automated commissioning tool for air-handling units. The work was carried out as part of an IEA Annex 40 research project and included the retro-commissioning of a real building in Paris as a field test...

Castro, N.; Vaezi-Nejad, H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Guidelines for Company Reporting on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Annexes updated July 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005 Annex 1 - Fuel Conversion Factors Table 2: Converting fuel types to CO2 Fuel Type Amount used per of UK Energy Statistics DTI 2004 1 The factor for electricity has been changed slightly from conversion factor can only be applied if your company has entered into a renewables source contract

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Vi har fet et Det flles kursus har  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

offentlige tilskud. Det stiller krav til at vi laver modeller, der er mere dynamiske end vi er vant til inden

62

Annex A -Potential threats in EU Organism(s) Means of spread Control measures Control approaches being used in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annex A - Potential threats in EU Organism(s) Means of spread Control measures Control approaches options Potential threats in EU keep out, knowledge of trade routes, awareness on nurseries, foresters

63

s1, s2, . . . , sN vi = ai, i = i/vi, i = i/vi,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

¹ ¹ vi = ai, i = i/vi, i = i/vi, xi = vi cos i cos i yi = vi sin i zi = vi cos i sin i amin ai(t) amax(t) i¹ ´ µ amin amax¸ max max ¹ º º þ º ¹ i¹ xri = xi + xdi cos i cos i - ydi cos i - zdi sin i cos i]T ¸ Ni i¹ ¸ rd R3 ¸ ¹ ¸ k > 0 º þ ¿ º º ý þ ¹ ¹ º º ¹ ¹ º ½ ? ? ? º¸ ? Ý???¹ ???? ?º ??Ð? ?? ?Ý?? ?? Ð

Granichin, Oleg

64

Microsoft PowerPoint - IntroAgenda_Annex_22_Spring_2011_final.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annex 22 Annex 22 Collaborative Research on Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Spring 2011 Workshop Graz University of Technology, Austria July 4-5, 2011 Welcome! U. S. Department of Energy / Argonne National Laboratory International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement on Advanced Fuel Cells (AFC) * Established in 1990 as part of an international energy technology collaboration, duration of each implementing agreement is 3-5 years * Current implementing agreement: Duration Jan. 2009 - Jan. 2014 * Signatories: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United States - The program continues to actively encourage new participants * Aim of IEA-AFC - Advance the state of understanding in the field of advanced fuel cells

65

Enhanced oil recovery for thermal processes. First amendment and extension to Annex IV  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the result of efforts under the several tasks of the First Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal processes. The report is presented in six sections (for each of the six tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each one of the tasks. Each section has been abstracted and processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 8-13. The first report on Annex IV, Venezuela-MEM/USE-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15), contains the results from the first seven tasks. That report is dated April 1983, entitled, EOR Thermal Processes.

Peterson, G.; Schwartz, E.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Radiolysis of AmVI Solutions  

SciTech Connect

The reduction of bismuthate-produced AmVI by 60Co gamma-rays was measured using post-irradiation UV/Vis spectroscopy. The reduction of AmVI by radiolysis was rapid, producing AmV as the sole product. Relatively low absorbed doses in the ~0.3 kGy range quantitatively reduced a solution of 2.5 x 10-4 M AmVI. The addition of bismuthate to samples during irradiation did not appear to protect AmVI from radiolytic reduction during these experiments. It was also shown here that AmV is very stable toward radiation. The quantitative reduction of the AmVI concentration here corresponds to 1.4 hours of exposure to a process solution, however the actual americium concentrations will be higher and the expected contact times short when using centrifugal contactors. Thus, the reduction rate found in these initial experiments may not be excessive.

Bruce J. Mincher

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption In A Contaminated Aquifer Sediment: A Fluorescence Spectroscopy Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI)...

68

Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with SyntheticManganese...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite. Abstract: Plutonium(VI) sorption on the surface of well-characterized synthetic manganese-substituted goethite...

69

Final Report for Annex II--Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources In Saudi Arabia, 1998-2000  

SciTech Connect

The Final Report for Annex II - Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources in Saudi Arabia 1998-2000 summarizes the accomplishment of work performed, results achieved, and products produced under Annex II, a project established under the Agreement for Cooperation in the Field of Renewable Energy Research and Development between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United States. The report covers work and accomplishments from January 1998 to December 2000. A previous progress report, Progress Report for Annex II - Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources in Saudi Arabia 1993-1997, NREL/TP-560-29374, summarizes earlier work and technical transfer of information under the project. The work was performed in at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and at selected weather stations of the Saudi Meteorological and Environmental Protection Administration (MEPA).

Myers, D. R.; Wilcox, S. M.; Marion, W. F.; Al-Abbadi, N. M.; Mahfoodh, M.; Al-Otaibi, Z.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX G, Standard Remittance Advice For Payment of Fees  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Form NWPA-830G (Revised 03/12) ANNEX A TO APPENDIX G Standard Remittance Advice For Payment of Fees OMB No: 1901-0260 Expires: 3-31-2016 Burden: 5 Hours Section 1. Identification Information: Please first read the instructions on the back. Section 2. Net Electricity Generated Calculation 1.1 Purchaser Information: Item Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Station Total 1 1.11 Name:____________________________________________ 2.1 Unit ID Code: 1.12 Address:__________________________________________

71

Blue Canyon VI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

VI VI Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Canyon VI Facility Blue Canyon VI Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EDP Renewables North America LLC Developer EDP Renewables North America LLC Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Lawton OK Coordinates 34.8582°, -98.54752° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.8582,"lon":-98.54752,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

72

Adapting to health impacts of climate change: a study of UNFCCC Annex I  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adapting to the health effects of climate change is one of the key challenges facing public health this century. Our knowledge of progress on adaptation, however, remains in its infancy. Using the Fifth National Communications of Annex I parties to the UNFCCC, 1912 initiatives are systematically identified and analyzed. 80% of the actions identified consist of groundwork (i.e.preparatory) action, with only 20% constituting tangible adaptations. No health vulnerability was recognized by all 38 Annex I countries. Furthermore, while all initiatives affect at least one health vulnerability, only 15% had an explicit human health component. Consideration for the special needs of vulnerable groups is uneven and underdeveloped. Climate change is directly motivating 71% of groundwork actions, and 61% of adaptation initiatives are being mainstreamed into existing institutions or programs. We conclude that the adaptation responses to the health risks of climate change remain piecemeal. Policymakers in the health sector must engage with stakeholders to implement adaptation that considers how climate change will impact the health of each segment of the population, particularly within those groups already considered most vulnerable to poor health outcomes.

A C Lesnikowski; J D Ford; L Berrang-Ford; J A Paterson; M Barrera; S J Heymann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Annex to the agreement on CLUSTER Dual Masters between IST and KTH Master Program on Systems, Control and Robotics (SCR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Control and Robotics (SCR) B-1/4 Appendix B: Dual Degree Agreement between Instituto Superior Técnico (IST on Systems, Control and Robotics (SCR) B-2/4 This page is intentionally left blank #12;Annex to the agreement on CLUSTER Dual Masters between IST and KTH Master Program on Systems, Control and Robotics (SCR) B-3/4 FIRST

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

74

Radiological assessment report for the University of Rochester Annex, 400 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York, April-May 1984  

SciTech Connect

In light of the results of the comprehensive radiological assessment of the annex and auxiliary facilities, the following conclusions can be made: There is no immediate hazard from the elevated levels of radioactivity detected; however, some of these levels are above criteria. The radon, thoron, actinon, long-lived particulates, and tritium in the air are all below criteria for unrestricted use. Some ductwork has been identified as being contaminated. All ductwork must, therefore, be considered potentially contaminated. Since several floor drains were found to exhibit elevated readings, and the samples had elevated concentrations of radionuclides, it must be concluded that the drain and sewer systems of the Annex are contaminated with radioactive material. Since the samples collected from the storm and sewer systems outside the building also had elevated concentrations of radionuclides, these systems are also considered contaminated with radioactive material. The grounds around the Annex have exhibited background concentrations of radionuclides. Two rooms, B-330 and B-332, were inaccessible for survey due to the presence of stored furniture and equipment. Therefore, no comment about their radiological status can be made. At the common baseboard for Room C-12 and C-16 and on the floor below the tile in Room C-40, contamination appeared to be masked by construction modifications. Other areas of the Annex must also be considered potentially contaminated where modifications may have masked the contamination.

Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Flynn, K.F.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Upgrade, Parker Annex, La Paz County, Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Bouse Substation Expansion and Upgrade, Parker Annex, La Paz County, Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western has requested that APS relocate an existing 69kV transmission line. This will consist of replacing existing conductor and 69-kV Gang Operated Switch and installing 6 new steel monopole structures, an above ground primary meter and underground cable from the 3 phase transition. The project is located in La Paz County, Arizona. The legal description is Section 27 & 34 Township 8 North, Range 19 West on the Gila and Salt River Baseline and Meridian (USGS Black Peak & Bouse NW, AZ 7.5' maps). Western owns the land. This work is planned to begin the month of September 2011 and be completed by

76

DarkStar VI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DarkStar VI DarkStar VI Jump to: navigation, search Name DarkStar VI Place Collinsville, Illinois Zip 62234-2022 Sector Services Product Manufacturer of biodiesel processing equipment and supplier of accessories, information and services. Coordinates 36.720014°, -79.91284° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.720014,"lon":-79.91284,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

77

VI. References V. Realistic Learning (Rate Based  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VI. References V. Realistic Learning (Rate Based III. Mean Field Model IV. Spike Timing Depended Results Batch Learning ber of pattern stored patterns Low pass filtering: Presynaptic Adaptation ( ):see Christian Albers and Klaus Pawelzik University of Bremen -- Institute for Theoretical Physics -- Department

Kreiter, Andreas K.

78

ENDF-201, ENDF/B-VI summary documentation supplement 1, ENDF/HE-VI summary documentation  

SciTech Connect

The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) provides coordination for and serves as the secretariat to the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSWEG). CSEWG is responsible for the oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data File. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the file is maintained at the NNDC. For a description of the ENDF/B-VI file, see the ENDF-102 Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF-6. The purpose of this addendum to the ENDF/B-VI Summary Documentation is to provide documentation of Releases 1, 2, 3, and 4 for the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/HE-VI evaluated nuclear data libraries. These releases contain many new and revised evaluations for the neutron, photo-atomic interaction, radioactive decay data, spontaneous fission product yield, neutron-induced fission product yield, thermal neutron scattering, proton, deuteron, and triton sublibraries. The summaries have been extracted mainly from the ENDF/B-VI File 1 comments (MT = 451), which have been checked, edited, and may also include supplementary information. Some summaries have been provided by the evaluators in electronic format, while others are extracted from reports on the evaluations. All references have been checked and corrected, or updated where appropriate. A list of the laboratories which have contributed evaluations used in ENDF/B-VI is given.

McLane, V.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Modelling modal choice effects of regulation on low-sulphur marine fuels in Northern Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The implementation of MARPOL Annex VI in the North and Baltic Sea Sulphur Emission Control Area (SECA) has raised economic concerns among shippers and shipowners, as well as spurred policymakers to appeal to various interests, such as citizen health, export industry competitiveness, and consumer prices. To justify their cases, policymakers and stakeholders have commissioned various agencies to monitor the implementations effects upon sustainability, especially regarding a potential modal shift from sea to road transport. This article thus reviews some of these commissioned studies in order to analyse the effects of the implementation and the possibility of modal shift. It also provides an agent-based simulation study of route choice for comparatively high-value cargo from Lithuania in the east to the United Kingdom in the west. Ultimately, the results of our TAPAS study do not provide concrete evidence supporting a modal shift from sea to road transport and indeed, they indicate that a shift is unlikely to occur.

Johan Holmgren; Zoi Nikopoulou; Linda Ramstedt; Johan Woxenius

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Low Dose Radiation Program: Workshop VI Abstracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop VI Principal Investigator and Abstracts Workshop VI Principal Investigator and Abstracts Anderson, Carl Whole Genome Analysis of Functional Protein Binding Sites and DNA Methylation: Application to p53 and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation. Averbeck, Dietrich Cellular Responses at Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation. Azzam, Edouard Adaptive Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate ?-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism. Bailey, Susan The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability. Balajee, Adayabalam Low Dose Radiation Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Human 3-Dimensional Skin Model System. Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen Imaging Bioinformatics for Mapping Multidimensional Responses. Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen Biological Response to Radiation Mediated through the Microenvironment and

82

Final Technical Report -- GEO-VI - USGEO  

SciTech Connect

Representatives of US earth observations departments and agencies, other participating governments, NGOs and civil society participated in the Sixth Plenary Meeting of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO-VI), hosted by the United States in Washington, DC on November 17 and 18, 2009. The meeting was held in the Atrium Ballroom of the Ronald Reagan International Trade Center. Exhibitions of international Earth observation technology and programs were held concurrently in the same venue. A number of GEO committee meetings and side events were held in conjunction with the GEO-VI Plenary, including the GEO-IGOS Symposium on Earth observation science and applications, the GEOSS in the Americas Forum on Coastal Zones, and separate meetings of the GEO Communities of Practice on Carbon, Health, and Air Quality.

Hirsch, Leonard

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

DeMEASS VI Conference Ede, the Netherlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DeMEASS VI Conference Ede, the Netherlands May 26-28, 2014 A Hybrid Trailing Edge Control Surface, YANG, G?RSES, AHN, ?ZGEN, YAMAN 2/23 DeMEASS VI Conference Ede, the Netherlands May 26-28, 2014, ?ZGEN, YAMAN DeMEASS VI Conference Ede, the Netherlands May 26-28, 2014 A Hybrid Trailing Edge Control

Yaman, Yavuz

84

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15 Figure 9. Electricity Consumption per Household per year,vi Annexes Annex 1. Model of Electricity Consumption by MPCEAnnex 1. Model of Electricity Consumption by MPCE Class

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Ch. VI, The geophysical environment around Waunita Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ch. VI, The geophysical environment around Waunita Hot Springs Author A. L. Lange Editor T. G. Zacharakis Published Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation with the U.S....

86

Air quality VI details environmental progress  

SciTech Connect

A report is given of the International Conference on Air Quality VI where key topics discussed were control of mercury, trace elements, sulphur trioxide and particulates. This year a separate track was added on greenhouse gas reduction, with panels on greenhouse gas policy and markets, CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration, and monitoring, mitigation and verification. In keynote remarks, NETL Director Carl Bauer noted that emissions have gone down since 1990 even though coal consumption has increased. The conference provided an overview of the state-of-the-science regarding key pollutants and CO{sub 2}, the corresponding regulatory environment, and the technology readiness of mitigation techniques. 1 photo.

NONE

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reducer isolated from the Hanford 100H site capable of Iron(study for bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H area RomyVI)contamination at Hanford ?? Cr(VI) highly soluble, toxic

Chakraborty, Romy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: Third ammendment and extension to Annex IV enhanced oil recovery thermal processes  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of efforts under the seven tasks of the Third Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of effort under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 25 through 31. The first, second, and third reports on Annex IV, ((Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, and IV-3 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, and DOE/BC-86/2/SP)) contain the results from the first 24 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, and March 1986. Selected papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Peterson, G.; Munoz, J.D.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

NUREG/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUREG/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption Models in a Field Setting U.S. Geological Survey U/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption Models in a Field Setting Manuscript Completed: August 2006 Date Published: August 2006 Prepared by G. P. Curtis, J. A. Davis Water Resources Division U.S. Geological Survey

90

Reduction of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) by organic chelating agents  

SciTech Connect

The reduction of NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} by oxalate, citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was investigated in low ionic strength media and brines. This was done to help establish the stability of the An(VI) oxidation state depended on the pH nd relative strength of the various oxidation state-specific complexes. At low ionic strength and pH 6, NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was rapidly reduced to form NpO{sub 2}{sup +} organic complexes. At longer times, Np(IV) organic complexes were observed in the presence of citrate. PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was predominantly reduced to Pu{sup 4+}, resulting in the formation of organic complexes or polymeric/hydrolytic precipitates. The relative rates of reduction to the An(V) complex were EDTA > citrate > oxalate. Subsequent reduction to An(IV) complexes, however, occurred in the following order: citrate > EDTA > oxalate because of the stability of the An(VI)-EDTA complex. The presence of organic complexants led to the rapid reduction of NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in G-Seep brine at pHs 5 and 7. At pHs 8 and 10 in ERDA-6 brine, carbonate and hydrolytic complexes predominated and slowed down or prevented the reduction of An(VI) by the organics present.

Reed, D.T.; Wygmans, D.G.; Aase, S.B.; Banaszak, J.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Layup Program for Construction Suspension/Delay, June 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-Hanford-2013-06-10 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Layup Program for Construction Suspension/Delay Dates of Activity : June 10, 2013 Report Preparer: Joseph Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: 1. Perform an inspection of the project site to examine the contractor's actions to protect completed work from deteriorating during the current suspension of construction work activities. 2. Inspect storage areas to determine if construction materials are stored in a manner that will prevent deterioration during possible long-term storage while construction work is suspended.

92

Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Layup Program for Construction Suspension/Delay, June 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-Hanford-2013-06-10 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Layup Program for Construction Suspension/Delay Dates of Activity : June 10, 2013 Report Preparer: Joseph Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: 1. Perform an inspection of the project site to examine the contractor's actions to protect completed work from deteriorating during the current suspension of construction work activities. 2. Inspect storage areas to determine if construction materials are stored in a manner that will prevent deterioration during possible long-term storage while construction work is suspended.

93

Microsoft PowerPoint - Pt_degradation_Annex_22_Spring_2011_XW_final.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Limitations: Limitations: The Role of Electrocatalyst Degradation Xiaoping Wang, Debbie Myers, Nancy Kariuki, Ramachandran Subbaraman, Rajesh Ahluwalia, and Xiaohua Wang Argonne National Laboratory IEA Annex 22 Spring Workshop Graz University of Technology Graz, Austria July 4-5, 2011 The submitted manuscript has been created by UChicago Argonne, LLC, Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne"). Argonne, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on its behalf, a paid-up nonexclusive, irrevocable worldwide license in said article to reproduce, prepare derivative works, distribute copies to the public, and perform publicly and display publicly, by or on behalf of the

94

Enhanced-oil-recovery thermal processes, annex IV. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE fossil-energy report IV-1  

SciTech Connect

The Agreement between the United States and Venezuela was designed to further energy research and development in six areas. This report focuses on Annex IV - Enhanced-Oil-Recovery Thermal Processes which was divided into seven tasks. This report will discuss the information developed within Task I related to the Department of Energy providing data on the performance of insulated oil-well tubulars. Surface generated steam has been traditionally used in thermal enhanced oil recovery processes. In past years the tubing through which the steam is injected into the reservoir has been bare with relatively high heat losses. In recent years however various materials and designs for insulating the tubing to reduce heat losses have been developed. Evaluation of several of these designs in an instrumented test tower and in an oil field test environment was undertaken. These tests and the resulting data are presented.

Peterson, G.; Schwartz, E.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

OES-IA Annex IV: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices - Report from the Experts Workshop September 27th 28th 2010 Clontarf Castle, Dublin Ireland  

SciTech Connect

An experts' workshop was convened in Dublin Ireland September 27th 28th 2010 in support of IEA Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement Annex IV. PNNL was responsible for organizing the content of the workshop, overseeing the contractors (Irish Marine Institute) hosting the event, presenting material on Annex IV and materials applicable to the workshop intent. PNNL is also overseeing a contractor (Wave Energy Center/University of Plymouth WEC/UP) in the collection and analysis of the Annex IV data. Fifty-eight experts from 8 countries attended the workshop by invitation, spending two days discussing the needs of Annex IV. Presentations by DOE (background on Annex IV), PNNL (process for developing Annex IV; presentation of the draft database for PNNL project, plans for incorporating Annex IV data), WEC/UP on the environmental effect matrix, and four MHK developers (two from the UK, one from Ireland and one from Sweden; each discussing their own projects and lessons learned for measuring and mitigating environmental effects, as well as interactions with consenting [permitting] processes) helped provide background. The workshop participants worked part of the time in the large group and most of the time in four smaller breakout groups. Participants engaged in the process and provided a wealth of examples of MHK environmental work, particularly in the European nations. They provided practical and actionable advice on the following: Developing the Annex IV database, with specific uses and audiences Strong consensus that we should collect detailed metadata on available data sets, rather than attempting to draw in copious datasets. The participants felt there would then be an opportunity to then ask for specific set of data as needed, with specific uses and ownership of the data specified. This is particularly important as many data collected, particularly in Europe but also in Canada, are proprietary; developers were not comfortable with the idea of handing over all their environmental effects data, but all said they would entertain the request if they specifics were clear. The recommendation was to collect metadata via an online interactive form, taking no more than one hour to complete. Although the idea of cases representing the best practices was recognized as useful, the participants pointed out that there are currently so few MHK projects in the water, that any and all projects were appropriate to highlight as cases. There was also discomfort at the implication that best practices implied lesser practices; this being unhelpful to a new and emerging industry. Workshop participants were asked if they were willing to continue to engage in the Annex IV process; all expressed willingness. The workshop was successful in adequately addressing its objectives and through participation and interaction in the breakout sessions around the various topics. As a result of the workshop, many delegates are now better informed and have a greater understanding of the potential environmental effects of MHK devices on the marine environment. There is now a greater sense of understanding of the issues involved and consensus by those regulators, developers and scientists who attended the workshop. A strong network has also been built over the two days between European and US/Canadian technical experts in wave and tidal energy.

Copping, Andrea E.; O'Toole, Michael J.

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

96

SEGS VI Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEGS VI Solar Power Plant SEGS VI Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name SEGS VI Solar Power Plant Facility SEGS VI Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Developer Luz Location Kramer Junction, California Coordinates 34.9925°, -117.540833° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9925,"lon":-117.540833,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

97

Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract: Uranium(VI) diffusion was investigated in a fine-grained saprolite sediment that was collected from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge site, TN, where...

98

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Fort Devens-Sudbury Training Annex (areas of contamination A4, A7, and A9), Middlesex County, MA, September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The US Army Sudbury Annex (the Annex) is a National Priorities List (NPL) site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This Record of Decision addresses past releases of contaminants to all media at area of contamination (AOC) A4-Waste Dump, and past releases to groundwater at AOC A7-Old Gravel Pit Landfill and AOC A9-Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Burn Area.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The reduction of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) by organic chelating agents.  

SciTech Connect

The reduction of NpO{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} by oxalate. citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was investigated in low ionic strength media and brines. This was done to help establish the stability of the An(VI) oxidation state in the presence of organic complexants. The stability of the An(VI) oxidation state depended on the pH and relative strength of the various oxidation state-specific complexes. At low ionic strength and pH 6, NpO{sub 2}O{sup 2+} was rapidly reduced to form NpO{sub 2}{sup +} organic complexes. At longer times, Np(IV) organic complexes were observed in the presence of citrate. PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was predominantly reduced to Pu{sup 4+}, resulting in the formation of organic complexes or polymeric/hydrolytic precipitates. The relative rates of reduction to the An(V) complex were EDTA > citrate > oxalate. Subsequent reduction to An(IV) complexes, however, occurred in the following order: citrate > EDTA > oxalate because of the stability of the An(V)-EDTA complex. The presence of organic complexants led to the rapid reduction of NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}P{sup 2+} in G-seep brine at pHs 5 and 7. At pHs 8 and 10 in ERDA-6 brine, carbonate and hydrolytic complexes predominated and slowed down or prevented the reduction of An(VI) by the organics present.

Reed, D.T.; Aase, S.B.; Banaszak, J.E.

1998-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

100

VIM: Initial ENDF/B-VI experience  

SciTech Connect

The VIM Monte Carlo particle transport code uses detailed continuous-energy cross sections produced from ENDF/B data by a set of specialized codes developed or adapted for use at Argonne National Laboratory. ENDF/B-IV data were used until about 1979, and Version V data since then. These VIM libraries were extensively benchmarked against the MC{sup 2}-2 code and against ZPR and ZPPR criticals for fast spectrum calculations, as well as other fast and thermal experiments and calculations. Recently, the cross section processing codes have been upgraded to accommodate ENDF/B-VI files, and a small library has been tested. Several fundamental tasks comprise the construction of a faithful representation of ENDF data for VIM calculations: (1) The resolved resonance parameters are converted to Doppler-broadened continuous-energy cross sections with energy grids suitable for linear-linear interpolation. (2) The unresolved resonance parameter distributions are sampled to produce many (40-400) resonance ladders in each energy band. These are converted to Doppler-broadened continuous energy resonance cross sections that are then binned by cross section, accumulating ladders until statistical convergence, the result being probability tables of total cross sections and conditional mean scattering and fission cross sections. VIM samples these tables at run time, and File 3 back ground cross sections are added. (3) Anisotropic angular distribution data are converted to angular probability tables. All other ENDF data are unmodified, except for format.

Blomquist, R.N.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Fort Devens Sudbury Training Annex, source control operable unit, Middlesex County, MA, September 29, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This Record of Decision (ROD) document presents the selected source control (SC) remedial action at areas of contamination (AOCs) A7 and A9 at the Fort Devens Sudbury Training Annex (Annex), Middlesex County, Massachusetts. The major components of the selected remedy for AOCs A7 and A9 include: Excavation and off-site treatment and disposal of laboratory waste at AOC A7; Excavation of contaminated soil from AOC A9 and consolidation at AOC A7; Consolidation of contaminated soil and solid waste at AOC A7 to within the limits of the landfill cap; Construction of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle C landfill cap at AOC A7; Environmental monitoring and operation and maintenance (O&M) at AOC A7; Institutional controls at AOC A7 to limit future site use and to restrict site access; and Five-year reviews at AOC A7.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Speciation of uranium(VI) sorption complexes on montmorillonite  

SciTech Connect

Environmental contaminant releases that contain uranium are among the most serious problems that must be confronted by restoration programs. To facilitate restoration, information concerning the speciation of uranium is needed. Under oxidizing conditions, dissolved uranium is predominantly in the U(VI) (uranyl) form and is quite mobile in the environment, however sorption onto soils may retard its movement. In this study, we have investigated the effects of changes in solution speciation on the nature of uranyl sorption complexes on montmorillonite, a common soil constituent. Aqueous U(VI) solutions between pH 3 to 7 were batch-equilibrated with montmorillonite for several days; specific pH values were selected such that the solutions consisted of dominantly monomeric, oligomeric, or a mix of monomeric and oligomeric aqueous uranyl species. Emission spectroscopy was used to investigate the nature of U(VI) sorbed to montmorillonite.

Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Morris, D.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Richard, R.E. (Fort Lewis Coll., Durango, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

John F. Stolz

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Energy and momentum of Bianchi Type VI_h Universes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We obtain the energy and momentum of the Bianchi type VI_h universes using different prescriptions for the energy-momentum complexes in the framework of general relativity. The energy and momentum of the Bianchi VI_h universe are found to be zero for the parameter h = -1 of the metric. The vanishing of these results support the conjecture of Tryon that Universe must have a zero net value for all conserved quantities.This also supports the work of Nathan Rosen with the Robertson-Walker metric. Moreover, it raises an interesting question: "Why h=-1 case is so special?"

S. K. Tripathy; B. Mishra; G. K. Pandey; A. K. Singh; T. Kumar; S. S. Xulu

2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

105

Energy and momentum of Bianchi Type VI_h Universes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We obtain the energy and momentum of the Bianchi type VI_h universes using different prescriptions for the energy-momentum complexes in the framework of general relativity. The energy and momentum of the Bianchi VI_h universe are found to be zero for the parameter h = -1 of the metric. The vanishing of these results support the conjecture of Tryon that Universe must have a zero net value for all conserved quantities.This also supports the work of Nathan Rosen with the Robertson-Walker metric. Moreover, it raises an interesting question: "Why h=-1 case is so special?"

Tripathy, S K; Pandey, G K; Singh, A K; Kumar, T; Xulu, S S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Optimizing Cr(VI) adsorption on activated carbon produced from heavy oil fly ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to explore the beneficial utilization of heavy oil fly ash (HOFA) generated in the power plants, the present study is intended to optimize the chromium(VI) [Cr(VI)] adsorption on activated carbon prod...

Abdullah Mofarrah; Tahir Husain; Bing Chen

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Accelerated Publications Three-Dimensional Structure of DesVI from Streptomyces Venezuelae: A Sugar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accelerated Publications Three-Dimensional Structure of DesVI from Streptomyces Venezuelae: A Sugar for the biosynthesis of dTDP-desosamine in Streptomyces Venezuelae, with the last step catalyzed by DesVI, an N

Holden, Hazel

108

Abiotic U(VI) Reduction by Sorbed Fe(II) on Natural Sediments...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U(VI) Reduction by Sorbed Fe(II) on Natural Sediments. Abiotic U(VI) Reduction by Sorbed Fe(II) on Natural Sediments. Abstract: Laboratory experiments were performed as a function...

109

N,N'-Dioctanoylpiperazine as a novel extractant for U(VI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

N,N'-Dioctanoylpiperazine (DOPEZ), a novel extractant for U(VI) in carbon tetrachloride has been studied. The principal factors affecting the U(VI) distribution ratio, i.e., the concentration of aqueous nitric ac...

Yang Xing-Cun; Bao Bo-Rong; Sun Guo-Xin

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution vi Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vi Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution vi Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790...

111

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment methods vi Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

porous media. Materials and Methods Experimental... Effects of Solid-to-Solution Ratio on Uranium(VI) Adsorption and Its Implications T A O C H E N G... , Wisconsin 53706 U(VI)...

112

Supporting technology for enhanced recovery, Annex V: evaluate application of recently developed techniques in the areas of drilling, coring, and telemetry. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE fossil-energy report V-1  

SciTech Connect

The Agreement between the United States and Venezuela was designed to further energy research and development in six areas. This report focuses on Annex V - Drilling, Coring, and Telemetry as supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery projects in the United States and Venezuela. Annex V consists of 18 tasks to perform these three projects. This report completes the work for Annex V. Energy research and development in the area of Enhanced Oil Recovery has as its goal the more efficient and complete production of the third crop of oil. Methods and techniques must be developed to assist in the implementation of EOR projects. Technology development that reduces costs and provides better reservoir information often has a direct impact on the economic viability of EOR projects and Annex V addresses these areas. Each of the three areas covered by Annex V are separate entities and are presented in this report as different sections. Each has its own Abstract. The drilling and coring tests were highly successful but only a limited amount of work was necessary in the Telemetry area because a field test was not feasible.

Williams, C.R.; Lichaa, P.; Van Domselaar, H.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Probing the 5f electrons in a plutonyl(VI) cluster complex  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the structural, spectroscopic and preliminary magnetic characterization of a tri-metallic plutonyl(VI) polyoxometalate complex.

May, Iain [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Advances in Fe(VI) charge storage: Part I. Primary alkaline super-iron batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent advances in super-iron batteries, based on an unusual Fe(VI) cathodic charge storage, are presented. Fe(VI) cathodes that have been demonstrated in super-iron batteries include the synthesized Fe(VI) compound with three-electron cathodic charge capacity Na2FeO4, K2FeO4, Rb2FeO4, Cs2FeO4 (alkali Fe(VI) salts), alkali earth Fe(VI) salts BaFeO4, SrFeO4, and also a transition Fe(VI) salt Ag2FeO4 which exhibits a five-electron cathodic charge storage. This paper focus on the primary alkaline Fe(VI) charge storage in aqueous electrolyte systems. Primary alkaline super-iron batteries exhibit a higher capacity than conventional alkaline batteries. Configuration optimization, enhancement and mediation of Fe(VI) cathode charge transfer of primary Fe(VI) alkaline batteries are summarized. Composite Fe(VI)/Mn(IV or VII), Fe(VI)/Ag(II) and zirconia coating stabilized Fe(VI)/Ag(II) cathode alkaline batteries are also illustrated.

Xingwen Yu; Stuart Licht

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - automaatne- vi vabalpsissteem Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vi 2 value of bit 2 Does the 2-bit counter above reach state 11... v3 v4 v5 v6 v7 f0 f1 f2 fi vi+1 vi+3 ... Source: Franco, John - Department of Electrical and Computer...

116

Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent upon initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.

Cao, Bin; Ahmed, B.; Kennedy, David W.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

2011-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

117

Temperature effect on U(VI) sorption onto Na-bentonite1 Ziqian Yang a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Temperature effect on U(VI) sorption onto Na-bentonite1 Ziqian Yang a , Lei Huang a , Zhijun Guo Nantes/Université de5 Nantes, 4 rue Alfred Kastler, BP 20722, 44307 Nantes, France6 Sorption / U(VI ) / Na-bentonite / Temperature effect / Surface complexation model7 Summary8 U(VI) sorption on a purified

Boyer, Edmond

118

Remediation of chromium(VI) in the vadose zone: stoichiometry and kinetics of chromium(VI) reduction by sulfur dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The reaction was also rapid, with the half-time of about 45 minutes at pH 6 and about 16 hours at pH 7. A two-step kinetic model was developed to describe changes in concentrations of Cr(VI), S(IV), and S(V). Nonlinear regression was applied to obtain...

Ahn, Min

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: EOR thermal processes. Seventh Amendment and Extension to Annex 4, Enhanced oil recovery thermal processes  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Seventh Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 50 through 55. The first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh reports on Annex IV, Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5 and IV-6 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, DOE/BC-86/2/SP, DOE/BC-87/2/SP, DOE/BC-89/l/SP, DOE/BC-90/l/SP, and DOE/BC-92/l/SP) contain the results for the first 49 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1987, November 1988, December 1989, and October 1991, respectively. Each task report has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Reid, T B [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)] [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States); Colonomos, P [INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Caracas (Venezuela)] [INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Caracas (Venezuela)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Evaluate past and ongoing enhanced oil-recovery projects in the United States and Venezuela, annex III. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE fossil-energy report III-1  

SciTech Connect

The Agreement between the United States and Venezuela was designed to further energy research and development in six areas. This report focuses on Annex III - Evaluate Past and Ongoing Enhanced Oil Recovery Projects in the United States and Venezuela. Annex III has separated this portion of the coopertive energy research and development effort into four tasks for study. Energy research and development in the area of Enhanced Oil Recovery has as its goal the more efficient and complete production of the third crop of oil. Methods and techniques must be developed to assist the decision maker in the best timing and method for his EOR project. If a method can be developed to predict production based on certain known reservoir parameters, the producer will be able to make more accurate decisions. Accurate predictive models can be developed if a larger data base with enough data on varied reservoirs and processes is compiled. Statistical algorithms can be developed, tested, and verified with actual production data. New data can be used to recalibrate the models for improved accuracy. The developed models can then be used to evaluate current or anticipated EOR projects.

Ward, D.C.; Garcia, J.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

El VI Festival de Teatro Hispano (Miami, 1991)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FALL 1991 153 El VI Festival de Teatro Hispano (Miami, 1991) Jos A. Escarpanter La sexta edicin del Festival de Teatro Hispano, organizado por Teatro Avante de Miami, se desarroll del 31 de mayo al 16 de junio, esta vez en dos teatros, lo... cual permiti la presentacin de un mayor nmero de grupos que en aos anteriores, pues cada noche se celebraron funciones en ambas salas. En total participaron diecisis conjuntos, de los cuales cuatro fueron compaas locales. De otras ciudades de...

Escarpanter, José A.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO BUFFALOES / SPORTS INFORMATION SERVICE www.CUBuffs.com Fieldhouse Annex #50, 357 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0357 --Telephone 303/492-5626 --david.plati@colorado.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, when Colorado won all five western meets en route to the NCAA title, this winter was topsyUNIVERSITY OF COLORADO BUFFALOES / SPORTS INFORMATION SERVICE www.CUBuffs.com Fieldhouse Annex #50, 357 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0357 -- Telephone 303/492-5626 -- david.plati@colorado.edu David Plati

Stowell, Michael

123

Effects of Ionizing Radiation: United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation: UNSCEAR 2006 Report, Volume 1Report to the General Assembly, with Scientific Annexes A and B  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......immune system. Annex E: Sources-to-effects assessment for radon in homes and workplaces. The publication of the 2006 reports...exposed to fallout from the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan, and studies in regions with high natural background levels......

Monty Charles

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Summary of the planning, management, and evaluation process for the Geothermal Program Review VI conference  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to present an overview of the planning, facilitation, and evaluation process used to conduct the Geothermal Program Review VI (PR VI) conference. This document was also prepared to highlight lessons learned from PR VI and, by utilizing the evaluation summaries and recommendations, be used as a planning tool for PR VII. The conference, entitled Beyond Goals and Objectives,'' was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technology Division (GTD), PR VI was held in San Francisco, California on April 19--21, 1988 and was attended by 127 participants. PR VI was held in conjunction with the National Geothermal Association's (NGA) Industry Round Table. This document presents a brief summary of the activities, responsibilities, and resources for implementing the PR VI meeting and provides recommendations, checklists, and a proposed schedule for assisting in planning PR VII.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Method for making graded I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductors and solar cell obtained thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved cell photovoltaic conversion efficiencies are obtained by the simultaneous elemental reactive evaporation process of Mickelsen and Chen for making semiconductors by closer control of the evaporation rates and substrate temperature during formation of the near contact, bulk, and near junction regions of a graded I-III-VI.sub.2, thin film, semiconductor, such as CuInSe.sub.2 /(Zn,Cd)S or another I-III-VI.sub.2 /II-VI heterojunction.

Devaney, Walter E. (Seattle, WA)

1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

126

Effects of Phosphate on Uranium(VI) Adsorption to Goethite-Coated Sand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Phosphate on Uranium(VI) Adsorption to Goethite-Coated Sand T A O C H E N G , M A R K O natural and contaminated environments. We studied U(VI) adsorption on goethite-coated sand (to mimic of increase in U(VI) adsorption. Phosphate was strongly bound by the goethite surface in the low pH range

Roden, Eric E.

127

RisNyt NO2 2005 I de kommende rtier vil vi se store  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- per: For det første et meget tættere samspil mellem energiproduktion og forbrug end vi kender i dag

128

Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments. Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A,...

129

U(VI) sorption and reduction kinetics on the magnetite (111) surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U(VI) (introduced as uranyl nitrate), 1 mM NaNO 3 , [CO 3 ]respect to uraninite and uranyl nitrate mechanical mixture

Singer, D.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

SSMP Annex A  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

FY 2011 Stockpile Stewardship Plan FY 2011 Stockpile Stewardship Plan May 2010 National Nuclear Security Administration "So today, I state clearly and with conviction America's commitment to seek the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons. I'm not naive. This goal will not be reached quickly -- perhaps not in my lifetime. It will take patience and persistence. But now we, too, must ignore the voices who tell us that the world cannot change. ...we will reduce the role of nuclear weapons in our national security strategy, and urge others to do the same. Make no mistake: As long as these weapons exist, the United States will maintain a safe, secure and effective arsenal to deter any adversary, and guarantee that defense to our allies...But we will begin the work of reducing our arsenal."

131

KALELE ROAD Annexes 913  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wist Hall KHET TV/ PBS Hawai`i Dean Hall Hawai`i Hall Crawford Hall Architecture School Gartley Hall Path Dole Street Parking Structure Bus Shelter Bus Shelter Art Building Sustainability Courtyard

132

SSMP Annex A  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

support of the design laboratories, as well as disassembly, testing, quality assurance, repair, refurbishment, retirement, and final disposition of nuclear weapon assemblies,...

133

SSMP Annex D  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

old and has a relatively inflexible infrastructure requiring perpetual maintenance and repair. Costs for facility readiness alone total 120 - 150 million 46 FY 2011 Biennial...

134

Evaluated nuclear data file ENDF/B-VI  

SciTech Connect

For the past 25 years, the United States Department of Energy has sponsored a cooperative program among its laboratories, contractors and university research programs to produce an evaluated nuclear data library which would be application independent and universally accepted. The product of this cooperative activity is the ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data file. After approximately eight years of development, a new version of the data file, ENDF/B-VI has been released. The essential features of this evaluated data library are described in this paper. 7 refs.

Dunford, C.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Uranium (VI) solubility in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine  

SciTech Connect

When present, uranium is usually an element of importance in a nuclear waste repository. In the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), uranium is the most prevalent actinide component by mass, with about 647 metric tons to be placed in the repository. Therefore, the chemistry of uranium, and especially its solubility in the WIPP conditions, needs to be well determined. Long-term experiments were performed to measure the solubility of uranium (VI) in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine, a simulated WIPP brine, at pC{sub H+} values between 8 and 12.5. These data, obtained from the over-saturation approach, were the first repository-relevant data for the VI actinide oxidation state. The solubility trends observed pointed towards low uranium solubility in WIPP brines and a lack of amphotericity. At the expected pC{sub H+} in the WIPP ({approx} 9.5), measured uranium solubility approached 10{sup -7} M. The objective of these experiments was to establish a baseline solubility to further investigate the effects of carbonate complexation on uranium solubility in WIPP brines.

Lucchini, Jean-francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Revised evaluations for ENDF/B-VI Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to report on revised cross-section evaluations for 17 nuclides that have been prepared for ENDF/B-VI Revision 2. The nuclides considered include five fission products and various isotopes of cadmium and hafnium. The previous ENDF/B-VI evaluations for these 17 nuclides were carried over from ENDF/B-V and were completed in the 1974--1980 time period. By utilizing the experimental data that have become available since 1980 the revised evaluations will result in significant improvements in the evaluated nuclear data files. The primary emphasis was placed on the resolved and unresolved resonance regions, but new experimental data were also used to improve the cross sections for energies above the unresolved resonance region. Negative elastic scattering cross sections were encountered in some of the previous evaluations; since the revised evaluations use multilevel Breit-Wigner (MLBW) parameters, rather than single-level Breit-Wigner (SLBW), this problem is eliminated.

Wright, R.Q.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Kinetics of chromium(VI) reduction by ferrous iron  

SciTech Connect

Chromium is a primary inorganic contaminant of concern at the Pantex Plant. Chromium concentrations have been found to be two orders of magnitude higher than the drinking water standards, particularly in certain wells in the perched aquifer below Zone 12. In situ reduction of a mobile form of chromium, Cr(VI) to an immobile form, Cr(III), was examined as a viable option to active soil restoration. Successfully immobilizing chromium in the vadose zone as Cr(III) will reduce the amount of chromium that reaches the groundwater table. The results from the solution experiments indicated that chromium was rapidly and stoichiometrically reduced by Fe(II) in solution. Also, the slurry experiments showed that the aquifer solids removed Fe(II) from solution, but a portion of the iron removed remained available for reaction with Cr(VI), but at a slower rate. A model to predict different amounts of iron pseudo-components was developed, which allowed prediction of iron amounts required to reduce chromium under in situ conditions.

Batchelor, B.; Schlautman, M.; Hwang, I.; Wang, R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

UMBC Policy on Facilities Use UMBC Policy # VI-4.10.01 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UMBC Policy on Facilities Use UMBC Policy # VI-4.10.01 1 I. Introduction This policy is predicated on the University System of Maryland Policy 145.0 VI-4.10- POLICY ON THE USE of Regents on January 11, 1990. The policy reads: 1. The physical facilities of the University System may

Adali, Tulay

139

Effects of Solid-to-Solution Ratio on Uranium(VI) Adsorption and Its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Solid-to-Solution Ratio on Uranium(VI) Adsorption and Its Implications T A O C H E N G, and Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1215 West Dayton Street, Madison interacting ligands. Introduction The migration of uranium(VI), as well as other radionuclides and metal

Roden, Eric E.

140

Aerobic uranium (VI) bioprecipitation by metal-resistant bacteria isolated from radionuclide-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aerobic uranium (VI) bioprecipitation by metal-resistant bacteria isolated from radionuclide uranium [U(VI)] mediated by the intrinsic phosphatase acti- vities of naturally occurring bacteria leaks occur, these wastes come into contact with surrounding geologic media, allowing for migration

Skolnick, Jeff

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Chromium(VI) bioremoval by pseudomonas bacteria: role of microbial exudates for natural attenuation and biotreatment of Cr(VI) contamination  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the role of microbial exudates, e.g., exopolymeric substance (EPS) and alginic acid, on microbial Cr(VI) reduction by two different Pseudomonas strains (P. putida P18 and P. aeuroginosa P16) as a method for treating subsurface environment contaminated with Cr(VI). Our results indicate that microbial exudates significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by forming less toxic and highly soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes despite the fact Cr(III) has a very low solubility under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). The formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes led to the protection of the cells and chromate reductases from inactivation. In systems with no organic ligands, soluble organo-Cr(III) end products were formed between Cr(III) and the EPS directly released by bacteria due to cell lysis. Our results also provide evidence that cell lysis played an important role in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas bacteria due to the release of constitutive reductases that intracellularly and/or extracellularly catalyzed the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The overall results highlight the need for incorporation of the release and formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes into reactive transport models to more accurately design and monitor in situ microbial remediation techniques for the treatment of subsurface systems contaminated with Cr(VI).

Dogan, N.M.; Dodge, C.; Kantar, C.; Gulcan, S.; Yilmaz, B.C.; Mazmanci, M.A.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

142

Chromium(VI) Bioremoval by Pseudomonas Bacteria: Role of Microbial Exudates for Natural Attenuation and Biotreatment of Cr(VI) Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the role of microbial exudates, e.g., exopolymeric substance (EPS) and alginic acid, on microbial Cr(VI) reduction by two different Pseudomonas strains (P. putida P18 and P. aeuroginosa P16) as a method for treating subsurface environment contaminated with Cr(VI). Our results indicate that microbial exudates significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by forming less toxic and highly soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes despite the fact Cr(III) has a very low solubility under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). The formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes led to the protection of the cells and chromate reductases from inactivation. In systems with no organic ligands, soluble organo-Cr(III) end products were formed between Cr(III) and the EPS directly released by bacteria due to cell lysis. Our results also provide evidence that cell lysis played an important role in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas bacteria due to the release of constitutive reductases that intracellularly and/or extracellularly catalyzed the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The overall results highlight the need for incorporation of the release and formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes into reactive transport models to more accurately design and monitor in situ microbial remediation techniques for the treatment of subsurface systems contaminated with Cr(VI).

N Mercan Dogan; C Kantar; S Gulcan; C Dodge; B Coskun Yilmaz; M Ali Mazmanci

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments  

SciTech Connect

Most reactive surfaces in clay-dominated sediments are present within nanopores (pores of nm dimension). The behavior of geological fluids and minerals in nanopores is significantly different from those in normal non-nanoporous environments. The effect of nanopore surfaces on U(VI) sorption/desorption and reduction is likely to be significant in clay-rich subsurface environments. Our research results from both model nanopore system and natural sediments from both model system (synthetic nanopore alumina) and sediments from the ORNL Field Research Center prove that U(VI) sorption on nanopore surfaces can be greatly enhanced by nanopore confinement environments. The results from the project provide advanced mechanistic, quantitative information on the physiochemical controls on uranium sorption and redox behavior in subsurface sediments. The influence of nanopore surfaces on coupled uranium sorption/desorption and reduction processes is significant in virtually all subsurface environments, because most reactive surfaces are in fact nanopore surfaces. The results will enhance transfer of our laboratory-based research to a major field research initiative where reductive uranium immobilization is being investigated. Our results will also provide the basic science for developing in-situ colloidal barrier of nanoporous alumina in support of environmental remediation and long term stewardship of DOE sites.

Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Jung, Hun-Bok; Konishi, Hiromi; Boyanov, Maxim; Sun, Yubing; Mishra, Bhoopesh

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

144

Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area  

SciTech Connect

Hexavalent chromium is a widespread contaminant found in groundwater. In order to stimulate microbially mediated Cr(VI)-reduction, a poly-lactate compound was injected into Cr(VI)-contaminated aquifers at site 100H at Hanford. Investigation of bacterial community composition using high-density DNA microarray analysis of 16S rRNA gene products revealed a stimulation of Pseudomonas, Desulfovibrio and Geobacter species amongst others. Enrichment of these organisms coincided with continued Cr(VI) depletion. Functional gene-array analysis of DNA from monitoring well indicated high abundance of genes involved in nitrate-reduction, sulfate-reduction, iron-reduction, methanogenesis, chromium tolerance/reduction. Clone-library data revealed Psedomonas was the dominant genus in these samples. Based on above results, we conducted lab investigations to study the dominant anaerobic culturable microbial populations present at this site and their role in Cr(VI)-reduction. Enrichments using defined anaerobic media resulted in isolation of an iron-reducing, a sulfate-reducing and a nitrate-reducing isolate among several others. Preliminary 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified the isolates as Geobacter metallireducens, Pseudomonas stutzeri and Desulfovibrio vulgaris species respectively. The Pseudomonas isolate utilized acetate, lactate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced Cr(VI). Anaerobic washed cell suspension of strain HLN reduced almost 95?M Cr(VI) within 4 hr. Further, with 100?M Cr(VI) as sole electron-acceptor, cells grew to 4.05 x 107 /ml over 24 h after an initial lag, demonstrating direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction coupled to growth. These results demonstrate that Cr(VI)-immobilization at Hanford 100H site could be mediated by direct microbial metabolism in addition to indirect chemical reduction of Cr(VI) by end-products of microbial activity.

Chakraborty, Romy; Chakraborty, Romy

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

145

CFD Simulation of the NREL Phase VI Rotor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The simulation of the turbulent and potentially separating flow around a rotating, twisted, and tapered airfoil is a challenging task for CFD simulations. This paper describes CFD simulations of the NREL Phase VI turbine that was experimentally characterized in the 24.4m x 36.6m NREL/NASA Ames wind tunnel (Hand et al., 2001). All computations in this article are performed on the experimental base configuration of 0o yaw angle, 3o tip pitch angle, and a rotation rate of 72 rpm. The significance of specific mesh resolution regions to the accuracy of the CFD prediction is discussed. The ability of CFD to capture bulk quantities, such as the shaft torque, and the detailed flow characteristics, such as the surface pressure distributions, are explored for different inlet wind speeds. Finally, the significant three-dimensionality of the boundary layer flow is demonstrated.

Song, Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Microsoft Word - Tracking the Sun VI_working version.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VI VI An Historical Summary of the Installed Price of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2012 Galen Barbose, Naïm Darghouth, Samantha Weaver, and Ryan Wiser July 2013 Tracking the Sun VI An Historical Summary of the Installed Price of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2012 Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Primary Authors: Galen Barbose, Naïm Darghouth, Samantha Weaver, Ryan Wiser Executive Summary ...................................................................................................... 1 1. Introduction .............................................................................................................. 5 2. Data Summary .......................................................................................................... 8

147

Constitutive Type VI Secretion System Expression Gives Vibrio cholerae Intra- and Interspecific Competitive Advantages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The type VI secretion system (T6SS) mediates protein translocation across the cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae the causative agent of cholera. All V. cholerae strains examined to date ...

Unterweger, Daniel

148

Microstructural analyses of Cr(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing Residue (COPR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Christodoulatos, C. Ettringite-Induced Heave in Chromite Orehydrotalcite calcite quartz ettringite amorphous HB n.d.of the total Cr(VI). Ettringite (Ca 6 Al 2 (SO 4 ) 3 (OH) 12

CHRYSOCHOOU, MARIA

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Sorption von Ln(III)/An(III) und U(VI) an Tonmineralen und natrlichen Tongesteinen.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis sorption of An(III)/(VI) is studied onto monomineralic clays and natural claystones by batch and spectroscopic studies and model calculations, in order to (more)

Hartmann, Eva

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Methylbutylmalonamide as an extractant for U(VI), Pu(IV) and Am(III)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The unsymmetrical diamide methylbuthylmalonamide has been synthesized and used in the extraction of U(VI), Pu(IV) and Am(III) in benzene medium. The distribution ratio for the three cations was found to increa...

G. M. Nair; D. R. Prabhu; G. R. Mahajan

1994-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

151

Dioctyl butyramide and dioctyl isobutyramide as extractants for uranium(VI) and plutonium(IV)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two isomeric monoamides, dioctyl butyramide (DOBA) and dioctyl isobutyramide (DOIBA) were synthesized for extracting uranium(VI) and plutonium(IV) from aqueous nitric acid medium into various diluents such asn-do...

G. M. Nair; G. R. Mahajan; D. R. Prabhu

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Crystalline phases of II-VI compound semiconductors grown by pulsed laser deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-VI compound semiconductors, ZnS, ZnSe, CdS, CdSe, and CdTe, were grown epitaxially on 111 and 100 InP and Ga and mirror-like surface morphology. It was found that, on 111 -oriented substrates, CdS and CdSe films were, which is the main source of the troublesome native doping in II-VI compounds. High energy atoms and ions

Kwok, Hoi S.

153

Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks  

SciTech Connect

Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

154

Bianchi {VI}$_{0}$ in Scalar and Scalar-Tensor Cosmologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study several cosmological models with Bianchi \\textrm{VI}$_{0}$ symmetries under the self-similar approach. In order to study how the \\textquotedblleft constants\\textquotedblright\\ $G$ and $\\Lambda$ may vary, we propose three scenarios where such constants are considered as time functions. The first model is a perfect fluid. We find that the behavior of $G$ and $\\Lambda$ are related. If $G$ behaves as a growing time function then $\\Lambda$ is a positive decreasing time function but if $G$ is decreasing then $\\Lambda$ is negative. For this model we have found a new solution. The second model is a scalar field, where in a phenomenological way, we consider a modification of the Klein-Gordon equation in order to take into account the variation of $G$. Our third scenario is a scalar-tensor model. We find three solutions for this models where $G$ is growing, constant or decreasing and $\\Lambda$ is a positive decreasing function or vanishes. We put special emphasis on calculating the curvature invariants in order to see if the solutions isotropize.

J. A. Belinchn

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

155

Bulk solubility and speciation of plutonium(VI) in phosphate-containing solutions  

SciTech Connect

The solubility and speciation of Pu(VI) with phosphate as a function of pH was investigated to determine the ability of phosphate to act as an actinide getter. The general properties were first investigated and are reported here with the goal of performing more quantitative experiments in the future. Solubility was approached from oversaturation at initial pH = 4, 10 and 13.4. Absorption spectra were recorded, the solution filtered and the filtrate counted. Absorption spectra were obtained at varying phosphate concentrations and at pH of 2.7 to 11.9. The effect of complexation on the 833 mn Pu(VI) band was characterized. Evidence for three phosphate complexes was obtained for pH < 10 which have absorption bands at 842, 846 and 849 mn. Evidence for colloid formation was observed but is not conclusive. The possibility of colloids prevents accurate analysis of the solubility experiments. A concentration of 10[sup [minus]5] to 10[sup [minus]6] M Pu(VI) was measured in the filtrate at pH [le] 10 that were passed through a 50 mn filter. Pu(VI) complexes with phosphate over hydroxide at pH [le] 11.6, but at pH [ge] 11.9, only hydrolyzed Pu(VI) was detected. At pH = 12, the concentration of Pu(VI) was as high as 10[sup [minus]4] M.

Weger, H.T.; Okajima, S.; Cunnane, J.C.; Reed, D.T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Bulk solubility and speciation of plutonium(VI) in phosphate-containing solutions  

SciTech Connect

The solubility and speciation of Pu(VI) with phosphate as a function of pH was investigated to determine the ability of phosphate to act as an actinide getter. The general properties were first investigated and are reported here with the goal of performing more quantitative experiments in the future. Solubility was approached from oversaturation at initial pH = 4, 10 and 13.4. Absorption spectra were recorded, the solution filtered and the filtrate counted. Absorption spectra were obtained at varying phosphate concentrations and at pH of 2.7 to 11.9. The effect of complexation on the 833 mn Pu(VI) band was characterized. Evidence for three phosphate complexes was obtained for pH < 10 which have absorption bands at 842, 846 and 849 mn. Evidence for colloid formation was observed but is not conclusive. The possibility of colloids prevents accurate analysis of the solubility experiments. A concentration of 10{sup {minus}5} to 10{sup {minus}6} M Pu(VI) was measured in the filtrate at pH {le} 10 that were passed through a 50 mn filter. Pu(VI) complexes with phosphate over hydroxide at pH {le} 11.6, but at pH {ge} 11.9, only hydrolyzed Pu(VI) was detected. At pH = 12, the concentration of Pu(VI) was as high as 10{sup {minus}4} M.

Weger, H.T.; Okajima, S.; Cunnane, J.C.; Reed, D.T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Uranium(VI) extraction by TBP in the presence of HDBP  

SciTech Connect

The influence of di-n-butyl phosphoric acid (HDBP) upon extraction of uranium(VI) by tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) from 0.5--3.0 M nitric acid solutions has been studied. It has been shown that the uranium(VI) distribution coefficient D{sub U} for extraction by 1.1 M TBP in tri-decane or xylene is increased when HDBP is present in the organic phase. For iso-molar solutions of (TBP + HDBP) with a total concentration of 0.36 M, and Uranium(VI) aqueous concentration up to 10--20 g/l, a maximum value of D{sub U} is observed when TBP/HDBP = 1; for higher U(VI) concentration the maximum gradually disappears, with D{sub U} growing monotonically with the HDBP content in the organic phase. Uranium(VI) absorption spectra for 1.1 M TBP in tri-decane or xylene, containing HDBP, provide evidence for the formation of compounds, of which composition is intermediate between uranyl nitrate--TBP disolvate and the U(VI)--HDBP complex. It is proposed that these intermediate compounds are UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}HDBP.TBP and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(HDBP){sub 2}.

Fedorov, Yu.S.; Zilberman, B.Ya.; Kulikov, S.M.; Blazheva, I.V.; Mishin, E.N. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Wallwork, A.L.; Denniss, I.S.; May, I. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, Sellafield (United Kingdom); Hill, N.J. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, Risley (United Kingdom)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Structure of the type VI secretion phospholipase effector Tle1 provides insight into its hydrolysis and membrane targeting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crystal structure and molecular dynamics simulations analysis of the type VI secretion phospholipase effector Tle1 provide insights into its hydrolysis and membrane targeting.

Hu, H.

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

159

Chromium (VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Elevated Chromium Concentrations Exhibited in Corrosion Resistant Coatings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is included in stainless steel production, paints, finishes, and protective coatings as a corrosion inhibitor to help protect integrity of steel and (more)

Miller, Robert B, II

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

T-637: VMSA-2011-0009 VMware hosted product updates, ESX patches and VI ,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: VMSA-2011-0009 VMware hosted product updates, ESX patches 7: VMSA-2011-0009 VMware hosted product updates, ESX patches and VI , Client update resolve multiple T-637: VMSA-2011-0009 VMware hosted product updates, ESX patches and VI , Client update resolve multiple June 6, 2011 - 3:04pm Addthis PROBLEM: VMSA-2011-0009 VMware hosted product updates, ESX patches and VI , Client update resolve multiple PLATFORM: Supported Platforms VMSA-2011-0009 ABSTRACT: This patch provides a fix for the following three security issues in the VMware Host Guest File System (HGFS). None of these issues affect Windows based Guest Operating Systems. CVE-2011-2146 Mount.vmhgfs Information Disclosure, information disclosure via a vulnerability that allows an attacker with access to the Guest to determine if a path exists in the Host filesystem and whether it is a file or directory regardless of permissions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Those early days as we remember them (Part VI) - Met Lab & Early Argonne History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VI | Met Lab and Early Argonne History | Argonne National Laboratory VI | Met Lab and Early Argonne History | Argonne National Laboratory 1/2 Those early days as we remember them Part Vl Lester C. Furney (second from right), who formerly handled public relations at Argonne and is author of the article below, is pictured here in February 1956 with (l to r) Major General D. J. Keirn, Major General James McCormack, Jr. (Ret.), and Lt. General James H. Doolittle (Ret.) during a

162

FATE AND TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES [U(VI), Sr, Cs] IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FATE AND TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES [U(VI), Sr, Cs] IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE AND TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES [U(VI), Sr, Cs] IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE Abstract by Kenton A that influence radionuclide fate and transport in the Hanford vadose zone. Hanford was established for nuclear

Flury, Markus

163

Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea). VI. Anterior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea). VI of the North American natricine snake Seminatrix pygaea are described using light and electron micros- copy is a glycoprotein. Overall, the characteristics of the ante- rior testicular ducts of this snake are concordant

Sever, David M.

164

Dendritic Chelating Agents. 2. U(VI) Binding to Poly(amidoamine) and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Introduction The mining and processing of uranium ores and the production, reprocessing and disposal of uranium streams is a key compo- nent of the uranium nuclear fuel cycle (1­4). Uranyl [U(VI)] is the most stable uranium species under the typical oxidizing conditionsencounteredinthetreatmentofaqueouseffluents (3

Goddard III, William A.

165

PHYS 2750, Winter 2014 page 1 of 2 General Physics VI: Modern Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYS 2750, Winter 2014 page 1 of 2 General Physics VI: Modern Physics PHYS 2750 1. What is this course all about? The Golden Age of Physics is often referred to as the the period from the late 1800's up to about the mid 1900's. Physics 2750 is a course which explores many of the fundamental

Quirion, Guy

166

ViGs: A Grid Simulation and Monitoring Tool for ATLAS Aaron T. Thor1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, as the performance of a grid computing architecture is closely tied with its networking infrastructure acrossViGs: A Grid Simulation and Monitoring Tool for ATLAS Workflows Aaron T. Thor1 , Gergely V. Záruba1 boundaries, and encouraging collaborations. To date, setting up large scale grids has been mostly

Záruba, Gergely

167

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report Section VI. Safety and Codes & Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to H2 from 0-100% at 450o C in N2 background Future Directions · Fabricate 2nd generation sensors.A Safety VI.A.1 Gallium Nitride Integrated Gas/Temperature Sensors for Fuel Cell System Monitoring catalytic gate field effect transistor (FET) sensors to resolve and detect carbon monoxide (CO

168

Photopumping of a C iii ultraviolet laser by Mn vi line radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multiple-pass gain is reported at 2177 and 2163 A? in C iii ions in a vacuum-arc discharge, pumped by Mn vi line radiation from a laser-produced Mn plasma. These Be-like uv lasers pumped by resonant photoexcitation are prototypes for soft x-ray lasers in higher-Z, isoelectronic analogs.

Niansheng Qi and Mahadevan Krishnan

1987-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

169

Studies of the Di-iron(VI) Intermediate in Ferrate-Dependent Oxygen Evolution from Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information ABSTRACT: Molecular oxygen is produced from water via the following reaction of potassium ferrateStudies of the Di-iron(VI) Intermediate in Ferrate-Dependent Oxygen Evolution from Water Rupam consumption of natural abundance water. The derived 18 O KIEs provide insights concerning the identity

Roth, Justine P.

170

In the light of evolution VI: Brain and behavior Georg F. Striedtera,b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the light of evolution VI: Brain and behavior Georg F. Striedtera,b , John C. Aviseb (1859), Darwin (1) barely mentioned the brain. Only in The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation system, must have evolved. Even so, Darwin himself wrote little on the brain. Instead, Darwin asked his

Avise, John

171

VI. SENSOR CALIBRATIONS One of the most important aspects of high  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13 VI. SENSOR CALIBRATIONS One of the most important aspects of high quality solar radiation measurements is the accurate calibration of sensors and recording instrumentation. To do this, several careful measurements must be made and evaluated. First, the response of the sensors to the incoming radiation must

Oregon, University of

172

Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of "local equilibrium" assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of U(VI) diffusion in silt/clay layers. Batch isotherm experiments were first used to confirm sorption isotherms under the intended test conditions and diffusion cell experiments were then conducted to explore the diffusion hypotheses. Important new information was obtained about the role of aqueous calcium and solid calcium carbonate in controlling sorption equilibrium with Hanford sediments. The retarded interparticle diffusion model with local sorption equilibrium was shown to very successfully simulate diffusion at high aqueous concentration of U(VI). By contrast, however, diffusion data obtained at low concentration suggested nonequilibrium of sorption even at diffusion time scales. Such nonequilibrium effects at low concentration are likely to be the result of sorption retarded intraparticle diffusion, and strong U(VI) sorption in the low concentration range.

Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

173

Reduction of Cr(VI) under acidic conditions by the facultative Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum  

SciTech Connect

The potential for biological reduction of Cr(VI) under acidic conditions was evaluated with the acidophilic, facultatively metal-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum strain JF-5 to explore the role of acidophilic microorganisms in the Cr cycle in low-pH environments. An anaerobic suspension of washed A. cryptum cells rapidly reduced 50 M Cr(VI) at pH 3.2; biological reduction was detected from pH 1.7-4.7. The reduction product, confirmed by XANES analysis, was entirely Cr(III) that was associated predominantly with the cell biomass (70-80%) with the residual residing in the aqueous phase. Reduction of Cr(VI) showed a pH optimum similar to that for growth and was inhibited by 5 mM HgCl2, suggesting that the reaction was enzyme-mediated. Introduction of O2 into the reaction medium slowed the reduction rate only slightly, whereas soluble Fe(III) (as ferric sulfate) increased the rate dramatically, presumably by the shuttling of electrons from bioreduced Fe(II) to Cr(VI) in a coupled biotic-abiotic cycle. Starved cells could not reduce Cr(VI) when provided as sole electron acceptor, indicating that Cr(VI) reduction is not an energy-conserving process in A. cryptum. We speculate, rather, that Cr(VI) reduction is used here as a detoxification mechanism.

David E. Cummings; Scott Fendorf; Rajesh K. Sani; Brent M. Peyton; Timothy S. Magnuson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

USE OF MICRO X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND DIFFRACTION TO DELINEATE Cr(VI) SPECIATION IN COPR  

SciTech Connect

The speciation of Cr(VI) in Cromite Ore Processing Residue was investigated by means of bulk XRD, and a combination of micro-XRF, -XAS and -XRD at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.. Bulk XRD yielded one group of phases that contained explicitly Cr(VI) in their structure, Calcium Aluminum Chromium Oxide Hydrates, accounting for 60% of the total Cr(VI). Micro-analyses at ALS yielded complimentary information, confirming that hydrogarnets and hydrotalcites, two mineral groups that can host Cr(VI) in their structure by substitution, were indeed Cr(VI) sinks. Chromatite (CaCrO4) was also identified by micro-XRD, which was not possible with bulk methods due to its low content. The acquisition of micro-XRF elemental maps enabled not only the identification of Cr(VI)-binding phases, but also the understanding of their location within the matrix. This information is invaluable when designing Cr(VI) treatment, to optimize release and availability for reduction.

CHRYSOCHOOU, M.; MOON, D. H.; FAKRA, S.; MARCUS, M.; DERMATAS, D.; CHRISTODOULATOS, C.

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

175

AFS-2 FLOWSHEET MODIFICATIONS TO ADDRESS THE INGROWTH OF PU(VI) DURING METAL DISSOLUTION  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Alternate Feed Stock Two (AFS-2) PuO{sub 2} production campaign, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted a series of experiments concluding that dissolving Pu metal at 95C using a 610 M HNO{sub 3} solution containing 0.050.2 M KF and 02 g/L B could reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to dissolving Pu metal under the same conditions but at or near the boiling temperature. This flowsheet was demonstrated by conducting Pu metal dissolutions at 95C to ensure that PuO{sub 2} solids were not formed during the dissolution. These dissolution parameters can be used for dissolving both Aqueous Polishing (AP) and MOX Process (MP) specification materials. Preceding the studies reported herein, two batches of Pu metal were dissolved in the H-Canyon 6.1D dissolver to prepare feed solution for the AFS-2 PuO{sub 2} production campaign. While in storage, UV-visible spectra obtained from an at-line spectrophotometer indicated the presence of Pu(VI). Analysis of the solutions also showed the presence of Fe, Ni, and Cr. Oxidation of Pu(IV) produced during metal dissolution to Pu(VI) is a concern for anion exchange purification. Anion exchange requires Pu in the +4 oxidation state for formation of the anionic plutonium(IV) hexanitrato complex which absorbs onto the resin. The presence of Pu(VI) in the anion feed solution would require a valence adjustment step to prevent losses. In addition, the presence of Cr(VI) would result in absorption of chromate ion onto the resin and could limit the purification of Pu from Cr which may challenge the purity specification of the final PuO{sub 2} product. Initial experiments were performed to quantify the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) (presumed to be facilitated by Cr(VI)) as functions of the HNO{sub 3} concentration and temperature in simulated dissolution solutions containing Cr, Fe, and Ni. In these simulated Pu dissolutions studies, lowering the temperature from near boiling to 95 C reduced the oxidation rate of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). For 8.1 M HNO{sub 3} simulated dissolution solutions, at near boiling conditions >35% Pu(VI) was present in 50 h while at 95 C <10% Pu(VI) was present at 50 h. At near boiling temperatures, eliminating the presence of Cr and varying the HNO{sub 3} concentration in the range of 78.5 M had little effect on the rate of conversion of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). HNO{sub 3} oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) in a pure solution has been reported previously. Based on simulated dissolution experiments, this study concluded that dissolving Pu metal at 95C using a 6 to 10 M HNO{sub 3} solution 0.050.2 M KF and 02 g/L B could reduce the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. To demonstrate this flowsheet, two small-scale experiments were performed dissolving Pu metal up to 6.75 g/L. No Pu-containing residues were observed in the solutions after cooling. Using Pu metal dissolution rates measured during the experiments and a correlation developed by Holcomb, the time required to completely dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver using this flowsheet was estimated to require nearly 5 days (120 h). This value is reasonably consistent with an estimate based on the Batch 2 and 3 dissolution times in the 6.1D dissolver and Pu metal dissolution rates measured in this study and by Rudisill et al. Data from the present and previous studies show that the Pu metal dissolution rate decreases by a factor of approximately two when the temperature decreased from boiling (112 to 116C) to 95C. Therefore, the time required to dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver at 95C would likely double (from 36 to 54 h) and require 72 to 108 h depending on the surface area of the Pu metal. Based on the experimental studies, a Pu metal dissolution flowsheet utilizing 610 M HNO{sub 3} containing 0.050.2 M KF (with 02 g/L B) at 95C is recommended to reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. The time required to completely di

Crapse, K.; Rudisill, T.; O'Rourke, P.; Kyser, E.

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

176

Investigation on Microbial Dissolution of Uranium (VI) from Autunite Mineral - 13421  

SciTech Connect

Precipitating autunite minerals by polyphosphate injection was identified as a feasible remediation strategy for sequestering uranium in contaminated groundwater and soil in situ at the Hanford Site. Autunite stability under vadose and saturated zone environmental conditions can help to determine the long-term effectiveness of this remediation strategy. The Arthrobacter bacteria are one of the most common groups in soils and are found in large numbers in Hanford soil as well as other subsurface environments contaminated with radionuclides. Ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, these bacteria can play a significant role in the dissolution of minerals and the formation of secondary minerals. The main objective of this investigation was to study the bacterial interactions under oxidizing conditions with uranium (VI); study the potential role of bicarbonate, which is an integral complexing ligand for U(VI) and a major ion in groundwater compositions; and present data from autunite dissolution experiments using Arthrobacter strain G968, a less U(VI)-tolerant strain. Sterile 100 mL glass mixed reactors served as the major bioreactor for initial experimentation. These autunite-containing bioreactors were injected with bacterial cells after the autunite equilibrated with the media solution amended with 0 mM, 3 mM 5 mM and 10 mM concentrations of bicarbonate. G968 Arthrobacter cells in the amount of 10{sup 6} cells/mL were injected into the reactors after 27 days, giving time for the autunite to reach steady state. Abiotic non-carbonate controls were kept without bacterial inoculation to provide a control for the biotic samples. Samples of the solution were analyzed for dissolved U(VI) by means of kinetic phosphorescence analyzer KPA-11 (Chemcheck Instruments, Richland, WA). Analysis showed that as [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}] increases, a diminishing trend on the effect of bacteria on autunite leaching is observed. Viability of cells was conducted after 24 hours of cell incubation with the appropriate uranium and bicarbonate concentration treatment. As expected, the cells started to reduce after day 41 due to the nutritional exhaustion of the media. Moreover, viable bacteria accounted for more than 94% in the presence of 10 mM bicarbonate. Experiments showed that despite differences between the G975 and the G968 bacterial strains resistance to U(VI), in the presence of bicarbonate ions they are able to dissolute uranium from autunite mineral at the same capacity. The effect of both bacterial strains on autunite dissolution is reduced as the concentration of bicarbonate increases while the increase in soluble U(VI) concentration induced by G968 and G975 is dwarfed, for larger [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}]. (authors)

Sepulveda, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel [Applied Research Center, Florida International University. 10555 West Flagler St. Suite 2100, Miami Fl 33175 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University. 10555 West Flagler St. Suite 2100, Miami Fl 33175 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

In Situ Bioreduction of Uranium (VI) to Submicromolar Levels and Reoxidation by Dissolved Oxygen  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater within Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN (ORFRC) contains up to 135 {micro}M uranium as U(VI). Through a series of experiments at a pilot scale test facility, we explored the lower limits of groundwater U(VI) that can be achieved by in-situ biostimulation and the effects of dissolved oxygen on immobilized uranium. Weekly 2 day additions of ethanol over a 2-year period stimulated growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and immobilization of uranium as U(IV), with dissolved uranium concentrations decreasing to low levels. Following sulfite addition to remove dissolved oxygen, aqueous U(VI) concentrations fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant limit (MCL) for drinking water (<30 {micro}g L{sup -1} or 0.126 {micro}M). Under anaerobic conditions, these low concentrations were stable, even in the absence of added ethanol. However, when sulfite additions stopped, and dissolved oxygen (4.0-5.5 mg L{sup -1}) entered the injection well, spatially variable changes in aqueous U(VI) occurred over a 60 day period, with concentrations increasing rapidly from <0.13 to 2.0 {micro}M at a multilevel sampling (MLS) well located close to the injection well, but changing little at an MLS well located further away. Resumption of ethanol addition restored reduction of Fe(III), sulfate, and U(VI) within 36 h. After 2 years of ethanol addition, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) analyses indicated that U(IV) comprised 60-80% of the total uranium in sediment samples. At the completion of the project (day 1260), U concentrations in MLS wells were less than 0.1 {micro}M. The microbial community at MLS wells with low U(VI) contained bacteria that are known to reduce uranium, including Desulfovibrio spp. and Geobacter spp., in both sediment and groundwater. The dominant Fe(III)-reducing species were Geothrix spp.

Wu, Weimin [ORNL; Carley, Jack M [ORNL; Luo, Jian [Stanford University; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A. [Stanford University; Cardenas, Erick [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Leigh, Mary Beth [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hwang, Chaichi [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Kelly, Shelly D [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ruan, Chuanmin [ORNL; Wu, Liyou [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Van Nostrand, Joy [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Gentry, Terry J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Fields, Matthew Wayne [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Kemner, Kenneth M [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Marsh, Terence [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tiedje, James [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Fendorf, Scott [Stanford University; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Criddle, Craig [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Effects of Chromium(VI) and Chromium(III) on Desulfovibrio vulgaris Cells  

SciTech Connect

Desulfovibrio vulgaris ATCC 29579 is a well studied sulfate reducer that has known capabilities of reducing heavy metals and radionuclides, like chromium and uranium. Cultures grown in a defined medium (i.e. LS4D) had a lag period of approximately 40 h when exposed to 50 ?Mof Cr(VI). Substrate analysis revealed that although chromium is reduced within the first 5 h, growth does not resume for another 35 h. During this time, small amounts of lactate are still utilized but the reduction of sulfate does not occur. Sulfate reduction occurs concurrently with the accumulation of acetate approximately 40 h after inoculation, when growth resumes. Similar amounts of hydrogen are produced during this time compared to hydrogen production by cells not exposed to Cr(VI); therefore an accumulation of hydrogen cannot account for the utilization of lactate. There is a significant decrease in the carbohydrate to protein ratio at approximately 25 h, and this result indicated that lactate is not converted to glycogen. Most probable number analysis indicated that cell viability decreased steadily after inoculation and reached approximately 6 x 104 cells/ml 20 h post-chromium exposure. Regeneration of reducing conditions during chromium exposure does not induce growth and in fact may make the growth conditions even more unfavorable. This result suggested that an increase in Eh was not solely responsible for the decline in viability. Cell pellets collected 10 h after chromium-exposure were unable to resume growth when suspended into fresh medium. Supernatants from these pellets were able to support cell growth upon re- inoculation. D. vulgaris cells treated with a non-dose dependent addition of ascorbate at the same time of Cr(VI) addition did not enter a lag period. Ascorbate added 3 h post-Cr(VI) exposure did not prevent the growth lag. These results indicated that Desulfovibrio utilized lactate to reduce Cr(VI) without the reduction of sulfate, that the decline in cell viability and cell growth was most likely a consequence of Cr(III), and that an organic ligand could protect D. vulgaris cells from Cr(III) toxicity. Lactate consumption decoupled from sulfate reduction in the presence of Cr(VI) could provide organic carbon for organo- Cr(III) complexes.

M.E. Clark; A. Klonowska; S.B. Thieman; B. Giles; J.D. Wall; and M.W. Fields

2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

179

Rate-limited U(VI) desorption during a small-scale tracer test in a hetereogeneous uranium contaminated aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Contaminants in the Hanford Vadose Zone, Vadose Zone J. ,transport in a contaminated Hanford sediment, Environ. Sci.of U(VI) observed in Hanford sediment column experiments. A

Fox, P.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Microbial community changes during sustained Cr(VI) reduction at the 100H site in Hanford, WA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the 100H site in Hanford, WA Romy Chakraborty 1 , Eoin Lcontaminated aquifer at the Hanford (WA) 100H site in 2004.Cr(VI) reduction at Hanford, and a comparison of the

Chakraborty, Romy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Influence of flow regime on U(VI) sorption kinetics in fine sediments at the Hanford site, Washington, USA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The effect of flow rate on U(VI) sorption kinetics was investigated by a series of column tests using the reactive mass fraction (<2mm) of sediments (more)

Moser, Jessa V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Etudes spectroscopiques du dopage dans les matriaux II-VI pour les dtecteurs infrarouge et les cellules photovoltaques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ce travail de thse prsente les caractristiques optiques et lectriques de dopants dans des couches de CdHgTe, CdZnTe et CdS. Ces 3 matriaux II-VI ont (more)

Gemain, Frdrique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Ruthenium(VI) catalyzed oxidation of sodium salts of lactic, tartaric and glycolic acid by alkaline hexacyanoferrate(III)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The kinetics of ruthenium(VI) catalyzed oxidation of sodium salts of lactic, tartaric and glycolic acid by hexacyanoferrate(III) in aqueous alkaline medium have been studied at constant ionic strength. The rea...

P. Kumar; K. C. Gupta; K. Vehari

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Extraction of uranium(VI) and plutonium(IV) with dihexylbutyramide and dihexylisobutyramide from nitric acid medium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The extraction of uranium(VI) and plutonium(IV) was carried out with two isomeric monoamides, dihexylbutyramide (DHBA) and dihexylisobutyramide (DHIBA) from nitric acid medium, usingn-dodecane as diluent. The pos...

G. M. Nair; D. R. Prabhu; G. R. Mahajan

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Heteroepitaxy of group IV-VI nitrides by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect

Heteroepitaxial growth of selected group IV-VI nitrides on various orientations of sapphire (?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is demonstrated using atomic layer deposition. High quality, epitaxial films are produced at significantly lower temperatures than required by conventional deposition methods. Characterization of electrical and superconducting properties of epitaxial films reveals a reduced room temperature resistivity and increased residual resistance ratio for films deposited on sapphire compared to polycrystalline samples deposited concurrently on fused quartz substrates.

Klug, Jeffrey A., E-mail: jklug@anl.gov; Groll, Nickolas R.; Pellin, Michael J.; Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: prolier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Becker, Nicholas G.; Cao, Chaoyue; Zasadzinski, John F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Weimer, Matthew S. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

186

New thermal neutron scattering files for ENDF/B-VI release 2  

SciTech Connect

At thermal neutron energies, the binding of the scattering nucleus in a solid, liquid, or gas affects the cross section and the distribution of secondary neutrons. These effects are described in the thermal sub-library of Version VI of the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VI) using the File 7 format. In the original release of the ENDF/B-VI library, the data in File 7 were obtained by converting the thermal scattering evaluations of ENDF/B-III to the ENDF-6 format. These original evaluations were prepared at General Atomics (GA) in the late sixties, and they suffer from accuracy limitations imposed by the computers of the day. This report describes new evaluations for six of the thermal moderator materials and six new cold moderator materials. The calculations were made with the LEAPR module of NJOY, which uses methods based on the British code LEAP, together with the original GA physics models, to obtain new ENDF files that are accurate over a wider range of energy and momentum transfer than the existing files. The new materials are H in H{sub 2}O, Be metal, Be in BeO, C in graphite, H in ZrH, Zr in ZrH, liquid ortho-hydrogen, liquid para-hydrogen, liquid ortho-deuterium, liquid para-deuterium liquid methane, and solid methane.

MacFarlane, R.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Effect of Subgrid Heterogeneity on Scaling Geochemical and Biogeochemical Reactions: A Case of U(VI) Desorption  

SciTech Connect

The effect of subgrid heterogeneity in sediment properties on the rate of uranyl[U(VI)] desorption was investigated using a sediment collected from the US Department of Energy Hanford site. The sediment was sieved into 7 grain size fractions that each exhibited different U(VI) desorption properties. Six columns were assembled using the sediment with its grain size fractions arranged in different spatial configurations to mimic subgrid heterogeneity in reactive transport properties. The apparent rate of U(VI) desorption varied significantly in the columns. Those columns with sediment structures leading to preferential transport had much lower rates of U(VI) desorption than those with relatively homogeneous transport. Modeling analysis indicated that the U(VI) desorption model and parameters characterized from well-mixed reactors significantly over-predicted the measured U(VI) desorption in the columns with preferential transport. A dual domain model, which operationally separates reactive transport properties into two subgrid domains improved the predictions significantly. A similar effect of subgrid heterogeneity, albeit at a less degree, was observed for denitrification, which also occurred in the columns. The results imply that subgrid heterogeneity is an important consideration in extrapolating reaction rates from the laboratory to field.

Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Shan, Huimei; Zachara, John M.

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

188

Advances in Fe(VI) charge storage: Part II. Reversible alkaline super-iron batteries and nonaqueous super-iron batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reversible thin film Fe(VI/III) cathodic charge/discharge storage in alkaline batteries is presented. Whereas ultra-thin (e.g., 3nm) Fe(VI/III) films exhibit a high degree of reversibility, thicker films are increasingly passive toward the Fe(VI) charge transfer. An extended conductive matrix facilitates a 100-fold enhancement in charge storage for reversible Fe(VI/III) super-iron thin films. The thicker (100s of nanometers) films deposited on extended conductive matrixes composed of high-surface-area Pt, Ti, and Au can sustain high reversibility, which provides the possibility of using Fe(VI) salts as the cathode materials for rechargeable Fe(VI)/metal hydride batteries. Super-iron cathodes can also be discharged in conjunction with a Li anode in nonaqueous media. Optimization of the nonaqueous primary super-iron/Li batteries is summarized. Fe(VI) cathodes are also reversible in nonaqueous electrolyte systems. The charge/discharge process of super-iron cathodes in nonaqueous media involves both the lithiation/delithiation of the active mass and the reduction/oxidation of the Fe(VI/III), while only the thin film Fe(VI/III) electrodes can sustain high reversibility involving the full theoretical capacity in the nonaqueous batteries.

Xingwen Yu; Stuart Licht

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Actes du VI Congrs Latino Amricain de Sociologie Rurale, Sustentabilidad y Democratizacin de las Sociedades Rurales Latinoamericanas , Porto Alegre, Nov 2002.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Actes du VI Congrès Latino Américain de Sociologie Rurale, « Sustentabilidad y Democratización de

Boyer, Edmond

190

Permeable Reactive Biobarriers for In Situ Cr(VI) Reduction: Bench Scale Tests Using Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6  

SciTech Connect

Chromate (Cr(VI)) reduction studies were performed in bench scale flow columns using the fermentative subsurface isolate Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6. In these tests, columns packed with either quartz sand or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-coated quartz sand, were inoculated with strain ES6 and fed nutrients to stimulate growth before nutrient-free Cr(VI) solutions were injected. Results show that in columns containing quartz sand, a continuous inflow of 2 mg/L Cr(VI) was reduced to below detection limits in the effluent for durations of up to 5.7 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued proving the ability of strain ES6 to reduce chromate in the absence of an external electron donor. In the HFO-containing columns, Cr(VI) reduction was significantly prolonged and effluent Cr(VI) concentrations remained below detectable levels for periods of up to 66 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued. Fe was detected in the effluent of the HFO-containing columns throughout the period of Cr(VI) removal indicating that the insoluble Fe(III) bearing solids were being continuously reduced to form soluble Fe(II) resulting in prolonged abiotic Cr(VI) reduction. Thus, growth of Cellulomonas within the soil columns resulted in formation of permeable reactive barriers that could reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) for extended periods even in the absence of external electron donors. Other bioremediation systems employing Fe(II)-mediated reactions require a continuous presence of external nutrients to regenerate Fe(II). After depletion of nutrients, contaminant removal within these systems occurs by reaction with surface-associated Fe(II) that can rapidly become inaccessible due to formation of crystalline Fe-minerals or other precipitates. The ability of fermentative organisms like Cellulomonas to reduce metals without continuous nutrient supply in the subsurface offers a viable and economical alternative technology for in situ remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater through formation of permeable reactive biobarriers (PRBB).

Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; Robin Gerlach; Vaideeswaran; William A. Apel; James N. Petersen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering  

SciTech Connect

To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

192

Neptunium(V) and neptunium(VI) solubilities in synthetic brines of interest to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect

The solubility of Np(V) and Np(VI) has been measured in three synthetic Na-K-Mg-Cl brines in the presence of CO{sub 2}(g). Experiments were prepared from oversaturation by adding an excess of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} or NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to the brines and allowing the neptunium solids to precipitate. Vessels were maintained in contact with fixed CO{sub 2}(g) partial pressures at constant pH and 24 {+-} 1 C. Dissolved Np(V) concentrations decreased several orders of magnitude within the first 100 days of the experiment, while dissolved Np(VI) concentrations decreased initially but then remained relatively constant for more than 400 days. The solid phases formed in all experiments were identified by X-ray powder diffraction as KNpO{sub 2}CO{sub 3}{center_dot}xH{sub 2}O(s). Steady state concentrations for Np(V) are similar to those observed for Pu(V) in the same brines under the same conditions, where Pu occurs predominantly as Pu(V). Similarly, steady state concentrations for Np(VI), which was not reduced over a two year period, compare well with measured Pu(VI) concentrations in the same brines before the Pu(VI) was reduced to Pu(V).

Novak, C.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nitsche, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.]|[Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Silber, H.B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.]|[San Jose State Univ., CA (United States). Chemistry Dept.] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Telescope Guiding with a HyViSI H2RG Used in Guide Mode  

SciTech Connect

We report on long exposure results obtained with a Teledyne HyViSI H2RG detector operating in guide mode. The sensor simultaneously obtained nearly seeing-limited data while also guiding the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope. Results from unguided and guided operation are presented and used to place lower limits on flux/fluence values for accurate centroid measurements. We also report on significant noise reduction obtained in recent laboratory measurements that should further improve guiding capability with higher magnitude stars.

Simms, Lance M.; /SLAC; Figerb, Donald F.; Hanold, Brandon J.; /Rochester Inst. Tech.; Kahn, Steven M.; Gilmore, D.Kirk; /SLAC

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

194

First use of a HyViSI H4RG for Astronomical Observations  

SciTech Connect

We present the first astronomical results from a 4K2 Hybrid Visible Silicon PIN array detector (HyViSI) read out with the Teledyne Scientific and Imaging SIDECAR ASIC. These results include observations of astronomical standards and photometric measurements using the 2.1m KPNO telescope. We also report results from a test program in the Rochester Imaging Detector Laboratory (RIDL), including: read noise, dark current, linearity, gain, well depth, quantum efficiency, and substrate voltage effects. Lastly, we highlight results from operation of the detector in window read out mode and discuss its potential role for focusing, image correction, and use as a telescope guide camera.

Simms, Lance M.; /SLAC; Figer, Donald F.; Hanold, Brandon J.; Kerr, Daniel J.; /Rochester Imaging Lab.; Gilmore, D.Kirk; Kahn, Steven M.; /SLAC; Tyson, J.Anthony; /UC,

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

Magnetized Bianchi Type $VI_{0}$ Barotropic Massive String Universe with Decaying Vacuum Energy Density $?$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bianchi type $VI_{0}$ massive string cosmological models using the technique given by Letelier (1983) with magnetic field are investigated. To get the deterministic models, we assume that the expansion ($\\theta$) in the model is proportional to the shear ($\\sigma$) and also the fluid obeys the barotropic equation of state. It was found that vacuum energy density $\\Lambda \\propto \\frac{1}{t^{2}}$ which matches with natural units. The behaviour of the models from physical and geometrical aspects in presence and absence of magnetic field is also discussed.

Anirudh Pradhan; Raj Bali

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

196

Uranium (VI)Bis(imido) chalcogenate complexes:synthesis and density functional theory analysis  

SciTech Connect

Bis(imido) uranium(VI) trans- and cis-dichalcogenate complexes with the general formula U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 (EAr = O-2-tBuC6H4, SPh, SePh, TePh) and U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(R2bpy) (EAr = SPh, SePh, TePh) (R2bpy = 4,4'-disubstituted-2,2'-bipyridyl, R = Me, tBu) have been prepared. This family of complexes includes the first reported monodentate selenolate and tellurolate complexes of uranium(VI). Density functional theory calculations show that covalent interactions in the U-E bond increase in the trans-dichalcogenate series U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 as the size of the chalcogenate donor increases and that both 5f and 6d orbital participation is important in the M-E bonds of U-S, U-Se, and U-Te complexes.

Spencer, Liam P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boncella, James M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Compared performances of ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 for MOX core physics  

SciTech Connect

The United States is currently evaluating the use of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in commercial light water reactors for reducing weapons-grade Pu stockpiles. The design and licensing processes will require that the validity of the nuclear data libraries and codes used in the effort be demonstrated. Unfortunately, there are only a very limited number of relatively old and nonrepresentative integral experiments freely available to the US programs. This lack of adequate experimental data can be partially remediated by comparing the results of well-validated European codes with the results of candidate US codes. The authors have compared the performances of the JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VI.4 libraries for a series of benchmarks for k{sub eff}, void worth, and pin power distributions. Note that JEF-2.2 has been extensively validated for MOX applications. To obtain systematic comparisons between JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VI results, the two libraries were implemented with the same processing code options in two independent code systems: (1) VIM, a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code developed at Argonne National Laboratory, with its own processing codes independent of NJOY; and (2) DRAGON, a two-dimensional lattice code developed at Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal. A standard 172-energy-group structure was used in the NJOY processing code.

Finck, P.J.; Laurin-Kovitz, K.; Palmiotti, G.; Stenberg, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

A modified model for calculating lattice thermal expansion of I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} and I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4} tetrahedral compounds  

SciTech Connect

A general empirical formula was found for calculating lattice thermal expansion for compounds having their properties extended for compound groups having different mean ionicity as well as more than one type of cation atoms with that of different numbers of them such as I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} and I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4}. The difference in the valence electrons for cations and anions in the compound was used to correlate the deviations caused by the compound ionicity. The ionicity effects, which are due to their different numbers for their types, were also added to the correlation equation. In general, the lattice thermal expansion for a compound semiconductor can be calculated from a relation containing melting point, mean atomic distance and number of valence electrons for the atoms forming the compound. The mean ionicity for the group compounds forming I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} was found to be 0.323 and 0.785 for the ternary group compounds of I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4}.

Omar, M.S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Kurdistan (Iraq)]. E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

199

6999Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 28 / Friday, February 10, 2006 / Proposed Rules vi. Federal Rules That May Duplicate,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 9, 2006. ADDRESSES: The hearing will be in room 154 of the U.S. Federal Office Building, 222 W. 7 for submitting comments. · Mail: P. O Box 21668, Juneau, AK 99802 · Hand delivery to the Federal Building : 709 W6999Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 28 / Friday, February 10, 2006 / Proposed Rules vi. Federal

200

VI Simpsio Brasileiro de Solos No Saturados 2007/ Salvador-Bahia 321 Estimation of the Hydraulic Conductivity Function of Unsaturated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VI Simpósio Brasileiro de Solos Não Saturados 2007/ Salvador-Bahia 321 Estimation of the Hydraulic Simpósio Brasileiro de Solos Não Saturados 2007/ Salvador-Bahia 1.2 Prediction of the K-function Early

Zornberg, Jorge G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Complexation of U(VI) with 1-Hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonicAcid (HEDPA) in Acidic to Basic Solutions  

SciTech Connect

Complexation of U(VI) with 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) in acidic to basic solutions has been studied with multiple techniques. A number of 1:1 (UO{sub 2}H{sub 3}L), 1:2 (UO{sub 2}H{sub j}L{sub 2} where j = 4, 3, 2, 1, 0 and -1) and 2:2 ((UO{sub 2}){sub 2}H{sub j}L{sub 2} where j = 1, 0 and -1) complexes form, but the 1:2 complexes are the major species in a wide pH range. Thermodynamic parameters (formation constants, enthalpy and entropy of complexation) were determined by potentiometry and calorimetry. Data indicate that the complexation of U(VI) with HEDPA is exothermic, favored by the enthalpy of complexation. This is in contrast to the complexation of U(VI) with dicarboxylic acids in which the enthalpy term usually is unfavorable. Results from electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and {sup 31}P NMR have confirmed the presence of 1:1, 1:2 and 2:2 U(VI)-HEDPA complexes.

Reed, W A; Rao, L; Zanonato, P; Garnov, A; Powell, B A; Nash, K L

2007-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

202

Enumeration and Characterization of Iron(III)-Reducing Microbial Communities from Acidic Subsurface Sediments Contaminated with Uranium(VI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bioremediation potential in uranium-contaminated subsurface...reduced. Once nitrate is depleted, U(VI) and Fe(III...bacteria, a study in a uranium-contaminated mill tailing...sludge. American Public Health Association, Washington...detection of trace levels of uranium by laser-induced kinetic...

Lainie Petrie; Nadia N. North; Sherry L. Dollhopf; David L. Balkwill; Joel E. Kostka

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR GOVERNMENT HOUSE Charlotte Amalie, V.I. 00802  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GOVERNMENT HOUSE GOVERNMENT HOUSE Charlotte Amalie, V.I. 00802 340-774-0001 March 4,2009 The Honorable Steven Chu Secretary U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S . W. Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: State Energy Program Assurances Dear Secretary Chu: As a condition of receiving our State share of the $3.1 billion funding for the State Energy Program (SEP) under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), P.L. 11 1-5, I am providing the following assurances. I have written to the chairman of our Public Service Commission and requested that it consider additional actions to promote energy efficiency, consistent with the statutory requirements set forth in the ARRA and its obligations to maintain just and reasonable rates, while protecting the public. I have also written to the

204

Calculation of the electron structure of vacancies and their compensated states in III-VI semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

The Green's functions theory and the bond-orbital model are used as a basis for calculations of the electron structure of local defects-specifically, vacancies and their compensated states in III-VI semiconductors. The energy levels in the band gap are established, and the changes induced in the electron densities in the GaS, GaSe, and InSe semiconductors by anion and cation vacancies and their compensated states are calculated. It is established that, if a vacancy is compensated by an atom of an element from the same subgroup with the same tetrahedral coordination and if the ionic radius of the compensating atom is smaller than that of the substituted atom, the local levels formed by the vacancy completely disappear. It is shown that this mechanism of compensation of vacancies provides a means not only for recovering the parameters of the crystal, but for improving the characteristics of the crystal as well.

Mehrabova, M. A., E-mail: Mehrabova@mail.ru; Madatov, R. S. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Radiation Problems (Azerbaijan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Radiation cooling and gain calculation for C VI 182 A line in C/Se plasma  

SciTech Connect

A model is developed which is capable of describing the evolution of gain resulting from both rapid radiative and expansion cooling of a recombining, freely expanding plasma. It is demonstrated for the particular case of a carbon/selenium plasma that the cooling rate which leads to optimal gain can be achieved by adjusting the admixture of an efficiently radiating material (selenium) in the gain medium (carbon). Comparison is made to a recent observation of gain in a recent NRL/Rochester experiment with carbon/selenium plasma for the n = 3 ..-->.. 2 transition in C VI occurring at 182 A. The predicted maximum gain is approx.10 cm/sup -1/, as compared to observation of 2 to 3 cm/sup -1/.

Nam, C.H.; Valeo, E.; Suckewer, S.; Feldman, U.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 6777% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. ... This analysis grouped the phylogeny of HF sediment-associated organisms into 14 different phylotypes including members of Proteobacteria (classes Beta-, Delta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria) and Firmicutes (class Clostridia) (Table S5, Figure 4A and B). ... Although the impacts of nutrient inputs from river water intrusion, recharge through the vadose zone, or even detrital sedimentary organic matter on microbial activities in shallow aquifers are not understood, such sources may contribute to ephemeral bursts or localized regions of microbial activity described as hot moments and hot spots. ...

Ji-Hoon Lee; James K. Fredrickson; Ravi K. Kukkadapu; Maxim I. Boyanov; Kenneth M. Kemner; Xueju Lin; David W. Kennedy; Bruce N. Bjornstad; Allan E. Konopka; Dean A. Moore; Charles T. Resch; Jerry L. Phillips

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

Influence of calcite on uranium(VI) reactive transport in the groundwaterriver mixing zone  

SciTech Connect

Calcite is an important mineral that can affect uranyl reactive transport in subsurface sediments. This study investigated the distribution of calcite and its influence on uranyl adsorption and reactive transport in the groundwater-river mixing zone at US Hanford 300A, Washington State. Simulations using a 2D reactive transport model under field-relevant hydrogeochemical conditions revealed a complex distribution of calcite concentration as a result of dynamic groundwater-river interactions. The calcite concentration distribution in turn affected the spatial and temporal changes in aqueous carbonate, calcium, and pH, which subsequently influenced U(VI) mobility and discharge rates into the river. The results implied that calcite distribution and its concentration dynamics is an important consideration for field characterization, monitoring, and reactive transport prediction.

Ma, Rui; Liu, Chongxuan; Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Zachara, John M.; Zheng, Chunmiao

2014-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

208

Intensity enhancement of O VI ultraviolet emission lines in solar spectra due to opacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Opacity is a property of many plasmas, and it is normally expected that if an emission line in a plasma becomes optically thick, its intensity ratio to that of another transition that remains optically thin should decrease. However, radiative transfer calculations undertaken both by ourselves and others predict that under certain conditions the intensity ratio of an optically thick to thin line can show an increase over the optically thin value, indicating an enhancement in the former. These conditions include the geometry of the emitting plasma and its orientation to the observer. A similar effect can take place between lines of differing optical depth. Previous observational studies have focused on stellar point sources, and here we investigate the spatially-resolved solar atmosphere using measurements of the I(1032 A)/I(1038 A) intensity ratio of O VI in several regions obtained with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (...

Keenan, F P; Madjarska, M S; Rose, S J; Bowler, L A; Britton, J; McCrink, L; Mathioudakis, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Coextraction behavior of Tc(VII) and U(VI) by CMPO  

SciTech Connect

The coextraction behavior of technetium(VII) and uranium(VI) from nitric acid solution by n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) in the absence or presence of tributyl phosphate (TBP) was investigated. The extraction of technetium was remarkably enhanced in the presence of uranium at less than 0.1M nitric acid concentration, and with the initial concentration ratio of [U]/[Tc] = 50 in the aqueous phase, the distribution coefficient of Tc(VII) at 0.01M nitric acid was about one hundred times greater than that obtained in the absence of uranium. The coextraction of technetium and uranium was presumed to occur due to the same ion exchange mechanism as reported in the Tc-U-TBP system. However, the effect of TBP on this coextraction was not observed in the present study. 17 refs., 8 figs.

Takeuchi, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Satoru; Yamawaki, Michio (Univ. of Tokyo, Ibaraki (Japan)); Tachimori, Shoichi (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan))

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Electronic structure of wurtzite II-VI compound semiconductor cleavage surfaces studied by scanning tunneling microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of cleavage surfaces of wurtzite II-VI compound semiconductors. CdSe(1120), CdSe(1010), and CdS(1010) were investigated. The STM images confirm a 11 reconstruction for all surfaces. At negative and positive sample voltages the occupied and empty dangling-bond states above anions and cations, respectively, dominate the contrast of the STM images. No states in the band gap were found. The electronic structure of the surface permits the observation of dopant atoms in subsurface layers and thus also cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy studies of point defects and heterostructures.

B. Siemens, C. Domke, Ph. Ebert, and K. Urban

1997-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

O VI RECOMBINATION LINES IN ULTRAVIOLET AND VISIBLE SPECTRA OF RR TELESCOPII  

SciTech Connect

Nineteen recombination lines of O VI are identified in ultraviolet and visible spectra of the symbiotic nova RR Telescopii at wavelengths between 1122 and 6203 A. Only three of the lines have previously been reported from astronomical spectra, and eight lines have never been reported from either astronomical or laboratory spectra. The lines represent transitions between levels with principal quantum numbers up to 13, and the strongest lines by flux occur at 1124.82, 2070.90, and 3434.66 A, corresponding to transitions 4-5, 5-6, and 6-7. As the lines are produced by recombination onto O VII, they potentially allow O VII emitting regions in astrophysical plasmas to be probed at ultraviolet and visible wavelengths that otherwise can only be studied at X-ray wavelengths.

Young, P. R., E-mail: pyoung9@gmu.edu [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

212

Analysis of radiation exposure, Task Force RAZOR. Exercise Desert Rock VI, Operation Teapot. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

The radiation dose to Task Force RAZOR personnel participating in Shot Apple II of Operation Teapot, Exercise Desert Rock VI, is reconstructed. Task force personnel were exposed to initial radiation while in their vehicles or in trenches at the time of Apple II detonation. They were also exposed to residual radiation during their subsequent manuever and during an inspection of the equipment display area. The calculated total gamma doses to fully-participating Task Force RAZOR personnel range from about 0.8 rem to 1.8 rem. The highest dose was received by personnel of the armored infantry platoon on right flank nearest ground zero. Internal radiation dose commitments to maximally exposed personnel inside vehicles are estimated to be about 0.4 rem to the thyroid, 0.003 rem to the whole body, and 0.002 rem to the bone.

Edwards, R.; Goetz, J.; Klemm, J.

1983-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

The nuclear-weapon states and article VI of the NPT  

SciTech Connect

The Non-Proliferation Treaty rests on a basic bargain between the five declared nuclear-weapon states - the United States, Russia, Britain, France and China and 167 states that do not possess nuclear weapons. In addition, to the arms control and disarmaments commitments in Article VI, the parties pledge in the treaty`s pramble their determination to seek a comprehensive test ban (CTB) and express the understanding that in connection with the treaty on general and complete disarmament the parties should seek the cessation of manufacture of nuclear weapons, the liquidation of all their existing stock piles, and the elimination from national arsenals of nuclear weapons and means of their delivery. The author discusses the status of these agreements and the extent to which they have been fulfilled.

Mendelsohn, J.; Lockwood, D.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Enhanced control and sensing for the REMOTEC ANDROS Mk VI robot. CRADA final report  

SciTech Connect

This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., and REMOTEC, Inc., explored methods of providing operator feedback for various work actions of the ANDROS Mk VI teleoperated robot. In a hazardous environment, an extremely heavy workload seriously degrades the productivity of teleoperated robot operators. This CRADA involved the addition of computer power to the robot along with a variety of sensors and encoders to provide information about the robot`s performance in and relationship to its environment. Software was developed to integrate the sensor and encoder information and provide control input to the robot. ANDROS Mk VI robots are presently used by numerous electric utilities to perform tasks in reactors where substantial exposure to radiation exists, as well as in a variety of other hazardous environments. Further, this platform has potential for use in a number of environmental restoration tasks, such as site survey and detection of hazardous waste materials. The addition of sensors and encoders serves to make the robot easier to manage and permits tasks to be done more safely and inexpensively (due to time saved in the completion of complex remote tasks). Prior research on the automation of mobile platforms with manipulators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR, B&R code KC0401030) Laboratory, a BES-supported facility, indicated that this type of enhancement is effective. This CRADA provided such enhancements to a successful working teleoperated robot for the first time. Performance of this CRADA used the CESAR laboratory facilities and expertise developed under BES funding.

Spelt, P.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Harvey, H.W. [REMOTEC, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments  

SciTech Connect

Rates of contaminant U(VI) release from individual size fractions of a composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through batch reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. Variability in equilibrium adsorption among the various size fractions was determined in static batch reactors and analyzed using the surface complexation modeling approach. The estimated stoichiometric coefficients of U(VI) surface complexation reactions with respect to pH and carbonate concentrations varied with size fractions. This source of variability significantly increased the uncertainty in U(VI) conditional equilibrium constants over that estimated from experimental errors alone. A minimum difference between conditional equilibrium constants was established in order to evaluate statistically significant differences between sediment adsorption properties. A set of equilibrium and kinetic expressions for cation exchange, calcite dissolution, aerobic respiration, and silica dissolution were incorporated in a reaction-rate model to describe the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through batch experiments. Parameters in the reaction-rate model, calibrated using experimental data for select size fractions, predicted the changes in solute concentrations for the bulk, <2 mm, sediment sample. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multi-rate surface complexation model with an assumed lognormal distribution for the rate constants. The estimated mean and standard deviation were the same for all < 2mm size fractions, but differed in the 2-8mm size fraction. Micropore volumes in the varied size fractions were also similar as assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data. These findings provide further support for the link between microporosity and particle-scale mass transfer rates controlling kinetic U(VI) adsorption/desorption and for the utility of N2 desorption isotherms for characterizing pore networks that influence mass transfer rates.

Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

216

COINCIDENCES BETWEEN O VI AND O VII LINES: INSIGHTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION SIMULATIONS OF THE WARM-HOT INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM  

SciTech Connect

With high-resolution (0.46 h{sup -1} kpc), large-scale, adaptive mesh-refinement Eulerian cosmological hydrodynamic simulations we compute properties of O VI and O VII absorbers from the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) at z = 0. Our new simulations are in broad agreement with previous simulations with {approx}40% of the intergalactic medium being in the WHIM. Our simulations are in agreement with observed properties of O VI absorbers with respect to the line incidence rate and Doppler-width-column-density relation. It is found that the amount of gas in the WHIM below and above 10{sup 6} K is roughly equal. Strong O VI absorbers are found to be predominantly collisionally ionized. It is found that (61%, 57%, 39%) of O VI absorbers of log N(O VI) cm{sup 2} = (12.5-13, 13-14, > 14) have T < 10{sup 5} K. Cross correlations between galaxies and strong [N(O VI) > 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}] O VI absorbers on {approx}100-300 kpc scales are suggested as a potential differentiator between collisional ionization and photoionization models. Quantitative prediction is made for the presence of broad and shallow O VI lines that are largely missed by current observations but will be detectable by Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observations. The reported 3{sigma} upper limit on the mean column density of coincidental O VII lines at the location of detected O VI lines by Yao et al. is above our predicted value by a factor of 2.5-4. The claimed observational detection of O VII lines by Nicastro et al., if true, is 2{sigma} above what our simulations predict.

Cen Renyue, E-mail: cen@astro.princeton.edu [Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Similarity of the Surface Reactivity of Hydrous Ferric Oxide and Hematite: Sorption and Redox of U(VI) and Fe(II)  

SciTech Connect

Hydrous Ferric Oxide (HFO) vs. Hematite--Thermodynamically distinctive bulk phases, but the surfaces could be similar due to hydration of the interface. Hypothesis--The surface of HFO is energetically similar to the surface of hematite. Objective--Compare the reactions of HFO and hematite with U(VI) and Fe(II). Experimental--The reactions of interests were (1) preparation of sub-micron hematite, (2) sorption of U(VI), and (3) redox of U(VI) and Fe(II) with HFO or hematite.

Je-Hun Jang; Dempsey, Brian A.; Burgos, William D.; Yeh, George; Roden, Eric

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

218

Spatially resolved U(VI) partitioning and speciation: Implications for plume scale behavior of contaminant U in the Hanford vadose zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EM/GJ1302- 2006, Stoller Hanford Office, Richland, WA. 2006.characterization of U(VI) in Hanford vadose zone poreUranium Geochemistry at the Hanford Site. Pacific Northwest

Wan, Jiamin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A Conceptual model of coupled biogeochemical and hydrogeological processes affected by in situ Cr(VI) bioreduction in groundwater at Hanford 100H Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Groundwater at Hanford 100H Site B.Faybishenko, P.E.Long,Cr(VI) contaminated groundwater at Hanford 100H site. A slowHRC TM ), was injected in Hanford sediments to stimulate

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Structure of high-temperature nickel alloy ZhS36VI for single-crystal blades of high-pressure turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fine structure, phase composition, and segregation inhomogeneity of carbonless single-crystal rhenium-alloyed alloy ZhS36VI in cast and heat-treated conditions are studied. The structural and phase stabili...

V. P. Kuznetsov; V. P. Lesnikov; E. V. Moroz

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Sequential Extraction Method for Determination of Fe(II/III) and U(IV/ VI) in Suspensions of Iron-Bearing Phyllosilicates and Uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electron donors to stimulate anaerobic conditions and reduce mobile uranyl (VI) to sparingly soluble uraninite (U(IV)O2(s)).1-3 However, further studies have shown that uraninite can be reoxidized by nitrate,4

Burgos, William

222

Gas Combustion Appliances: Validating VENT-II Vi H. Rapp, Albert Pastor-Perez, Brett C. Singer, and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: Validating VENT-II Vi H. Rapp, Albert Pastor-Perez, Brett C. Singer, and Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division April 2013 In Press as: Vi H. Rapp, Albert Pastor-Perez, Brett C. Singer, and Craig P. Wray. 2013. "Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: A Validation of VENT-II". HVAC&R Research, DOI:10.1080/10789669.2013.771948 LBNL-6193E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof,

223

Structure of ABC Transporter MsbA in Complex with ATP Vi and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ABC Transporter MsbA ABC Transporter MsbA in Comlex with ATP Vi and Lipopolysaccharide: Implications for Lipid Flipping Christopher L. Reyes and Geoffrey Chang* Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 N. Torrey Pines Rd. CB105, La Jolla, CA 92137 ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are integral membrane proteins critical for the transport of a wide variety of substrate molecules across the cell membrane. MsbA, along with human MDR1 P-glycoprotein, are members of the ABC transporter family that have been implicated in multidrug resistance by coupling ATP binding and hydrolysis to substrate transport. This drug efflux results in resistance to antibiotics in microorganisms and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs in human cancer cells1. Using x-ray diffraction data collected at SSRL Beam Line 11-1 and ALS, we have determined the 4.2 Å x-ray crystal structure of MsbA in complex with transition state mimic ADP, vanadate (an analog of the g phosphate of ATP) and the human immunomodulatory substrate Ra lipopolysaccharide. This structure is the first intact ABC transporter in complex with nucleotide and substrate.

224

Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI{sub 2}  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same are disclosed, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI{sub 2} chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin ``composition-graded`` layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns ({approx_equal}2.5 {mu}m to {approx_equal}5.0 {mu}m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii) a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion occurs (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer. 16 figs.

Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

225

Compared performances of ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 for MOX core physics.  

SciTech Connect

The US is currently evaluating the use of MOX fuel in commercial LWR's for reducing weapons grade Pu stockpiles. The design and licensing processes will require that the validity of the nuclear data libraries and codes used in the effort be demonstrated. Unfortunately, there are only a very limited number of relatively old and non representative integral experiments' freely available to the US programs. This lack of adequate experimental data can be partially remediated by comparing the results of well validated European codes with the results of candidate US codes. The demonstration can actually be divided in two components: a code to code (Monte Carlo) comparison can easily demonstrate the validity and limits of the proposed algorithms; and the performances of nuclear data libraries should be compared, major trends should be observed, and their origins should be explained in terms of differences in evaluated nuclear data; In this paper, we have compared the performances of the JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VI.4 libraries for a series of benchmarks for k{sub eff}, void worth, and pin power distributions. Note that JEF-2.2 has been extensively validated for MOX applications.

Finck, P. J.

1998-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

226

Coupled spin and valley physics in monolayer MoS2 and group-VI dichalcogenides  

SciTech Connect

We show that inversion symmetry breaking together with spin-orbit coupling leads to coupled spin and valley physics in monolayer MoS2 and group-VI dichalcogenides, making possible controls of spin and valley in these 2D materials. The spin-valley coupling at the valence band edges suppresses spin and valley relaxation, as flip of each index alone is forbidden by the 0.1 eV valley contrasting spin splitting. Valley Hall and spin Hall effects coexist in both electron-doped and hole-doped systems. Optical interband transitions have frequency-dependent polarization selection rules which allow selective photoexcitation of carriers with various combination of valley and spin indices. Photo-induced spin Hall and valley Hall effects can generate long lived spin and valley accumulations on sample boundaries. The physics discussed here provides a route towards the integration of valleytronics and spintronics in multi-valley materials with strong spin-orbit coupling and inversion symmetry breaking.

Xiao, Di [ORNL; Liu, G. B. [University of Hong Kong, The; Feng, wanxiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Xu, Xiaodong [University of Washington; Yao, Wang [University of Hong Kong, The

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI.sub. 2  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin "composition-graded" layer ranging from on the order ot about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns (.congruent.2.5 .mu.m to .congruent.5.0 .mu.m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, causes the The Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. EG-77-C-01-4042, Subcontract No. XJ-9-8021-1 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA) [Bellevue, WA; Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA) [Seattle, WA

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

228

The impact of low sulphur fuel requirements in shipping on the competitiveness of roro shipping in Northern Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Overall, the effect of the new Annex VI agreement may ... in the shipping industry. Based on historical price differences, the use of MGO (0. ... imply a cost increase per ton of bunker fuel of on average 80% to ...

Theo Notteboom

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Influence of phosphate and silica on U(VI) precipitation from acidic and neutralized wastewaters  

SciTech Connect

Uranium speciation and physical-chemical characteristics were studied in solids precipitated from synthetic acidic to circumneutral wastewaters in the presence and absence of dissolved silica and phosphate to examine thermodynamic and kinetic controls on phase formation. Composition of synthetic wastewater was based on disposal sites 216-U-8 and 216-U-12 Cribs at the Hanford site (WA, USA). In the absence of dissolved silica or phosphate, crystalline or amorphous uranyl oxide hydrates, either compreignacite or meta-schoepite, precipitated at pH 5 or 7 after 30 d of reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic calculations. In the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica representative of groundwater concentrations, amorphous phases dominated by compreignacite precipitated rapidly at pH 5 or 7 as a metastable phase and formation of poorly-crystalline boltwoodite, the thermodynamically stable uranyl silicate phase, was slow. In the presence of phosphate (3 mM), meta-ankoleite initially precipitated as the primary phase at pH 3, 5, or 7 regardless of the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica. Analysis of precipitates by U LIII-edge EXAFS indicated that autunite-type sheets of meta-ankoleite transformed to phosphuranylite-type sheets after 30 d of reaction, probably due to Ca substitution in the structure. Low solubility of uranyl phosphate phases limits dissolved U(VI) concentrations but differences in particle size, crystallinity, and precipitate composition vary with pH and base cation concentration, which will influence the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of these phases.

Kanematsu, Masakazu; Perdrial, Nicolas; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A.

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

230

SANS study of third phase formation in the U(VI)-HNO{sub 3}/ TBP-n-dodecane system.  

SciTech Connect

In spite of its technological importance, third phase formation in the extraction of hexavalent actinides from nitric acid solutions into alkane solutions of tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) has received only limited attention. The focus of the few available literature works has been primarily centered on the composition of the third phase and on the stoichiometry of the metal complexes. Very little is known, on the other hand, about the structure and morphology of the third phase species of hexavalent actinides. In the present investigation, the formation of a third phase upon extraction of U(VI) by 20% TBP in deuterated n-dodecane from nitric acid solutions was studied. Chemical analyses have shown that U(VI) exists in the third phase as a species having the composition UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}(TBP){sub 2}{center_dot}HNO{sub 3}. Small-angle neutron scattering measurements on TBP solutions loaded with only HNO{sub 3} or with increasing amounts of U(VI) have revealed the presence, both before and after phase splitting, of relatively large ellipsoidal aggregates with the parallel and perpendicular axes having lengths up to about 64 and 15 Angstroms, respectively. The formation of these aggregates is observed in all cases, that is, when only HNO3, only UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, or both HNO{sub 3} and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} are extracted by the TBP solution. Upon third phase formation, the SANS data reveal the presence of smaller aggregates in both the heavy and light organic phase.

Chiarizia, R.; Jensen, M. P.; Borkowski, M.; Ferraro, J. R.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Littrell, K. C.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Emergency Support Function #12 … Energy Annex  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ESF Coordinator: Department of Energy Primary Agency: Department of Energy Support Agencies: Department of Agriculture Department of Commerce Department of Defense Department of Homeland Security Department of the Interior Department of Labor Department of State Department of Transportation Environmental Protection Agency Nuclear Regulatory Commission Tennessee Valley Authority INTRODUCTION Purpose Emergency Support Function (ESF) #12 - Energy facilitates the reestablishment of damaged energy systems and components when activated by the Secretary of Homeland Security for incidents requiring a coordinated Federal response under the Stafford Act. The term "energy" includes producing, storing, refining, transporting, generating, transmitting, conserving, building, distributing, maintaining, and controlling energy

232

Fraunhofer ISE IEA HPP Annex 43  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the future? Biogas from biological waste: agriculture, landfill, waste (sewage) water Usage of biogas: heat

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

233

U.S.-China vehicle annex  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The United States and China conduct information exchanges, joint studies, technology demonstrations, and training sessions with national laboratories, automotive industry partners, and other private industries involved in energy efficient transportation.

234

Annex 3: `Flagship' Case Study Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quality of Life for CSR07 Jake Morris & Kieron Doick #12;Birches Valley Forest Centre Contents Chapter 5.6 Ethnic group (aggregated as non-white) 39 5.7 Long term limiting illness 40 5.8 Annual: Ingrebourne Community Woodland | Jake Morris & Kieron Doick | 26/03/2009 #12;Birches Valley Forest Centre 1

235

Workplan and Annex: Solar Resource Knowledge Management  

SciTech Connect

''Solar Resource Knowledge Management'' will be a new task under the International Energy Agency's Solar Heating and Cooling Programme. The task development has involved researchers from Germany, France, Switzerland, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Canada, the U.S. that have been engaged in the use of satellite imagery to develop solar resource maps and datasets around the world. The task will address three major areas: (1) ''Benchmarking'' of satellite-based solar resource methods so that resource information derived from approaches developed in one country or based on a specific satellite can be quantitatively intercompared with methods from other countries using different satellites, as well as with ground data; (2) Data archiving and dissemination procedures, especially focusing on access to the data by end users; and (3) basic R&D for improving the reliability and usability of the data, and for examining new types of products important to the solar industry, such as solar resource forecasts.

Renne, D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in a II-VI Diluted Magnetic Semiconductor Zn1-xCrxTe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetic and magneto-optical properties of a Cr-doped II-VI semiconductor ZnTe were investigated. Magnetic circular dichroism measurements showed a strong interaction between the sp carriers and localized d spins, indicating that Zn1-xCrxTe is a diluted magnetic semiconductor. The Curie temperature of the film with x=0.20 was estimated to be 30010???K, which is the highest value ever reported for a diluted magnetic semiconductor in which sp-d interactions were confirmed. In spite of its high Curie temperature, Zn1-xCrxTe film shows semiconducting electrical transport properties.

H. Saito; V. Zayets; S. Yamagata; K. Ando

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

237

"Aegean Seals of the Late Bronze Age: Stylistic Groups, VI. Fourteenth Century Mainland and Later Fourteenth Century Cretan Workshops"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Island Sanctuaries Group sW 17 /G\\I M:t4R ) oV &+W 14 6\\w 16 12 10 50 John G. Younger Fig. 1 1-5: Columbia Gtoup 6*8: Group with Misplaced Fotelegs 9: Group with Crossed Hocks m, 53Aegean seals of the Late Bronze Age VI 37 Fig. 4 31 -38: Rhodian Hunt.... 'Ihe Group with Misplaced Forelegs 3. The Group with Crossed Hocks 4. The Group with Wicked Eyes B. The Island Sanctuaries Clroup (p.61) 5. The Central Island Sanctuaties Group 6. The Rhodian Hunt Group 7. The Island Sanctuaries Group: Miscellaneous...

Younger, John G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Effect of temperature on the extraction of uranium(VI) from nitric acid by tri-n-amyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect

Studies have been carried out on the effect of temperature on the extraction of U(VI) from nitric acid medium by tri-n-amyl phosphate/n-dodecane, measured as a function of the extractant concentration and aqueous phase acidity. The results indicate that the extraction is exothermic as in the case of tri-n-butyl phosphate. From the data available an effort has been made to calculate the equilibrium constant, the Gibbs energy change and the entropy changes of the extraction reaction. 21 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Srinivasan, T.G.; Rao, P.R.V. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Sood, D.D. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)]|[BARC, Mumbai (India)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Analysis of radiation exposure, Third Marine Corps Provisional Atomic Exercise Brigade. Exercise Desert Rock VI, Operation Teapot. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

The radiation dose is reconstructed for 3d MCPAEB personnel participating in exercises involving helicopter-lifted assaults in conjunction with Shot Bee of Operation Teapot, Exercise Desert Rock VI. Brigade personnel were exposed to initial radiation while in trenches at the time of the Shot Bee detonation. They were also exposed to residual radiation from an earlier test shot (Shot Turk) during their subsequent maneuvers and to residual radiation from Shot Bee during an inspection of equipment displays. The calculated total gamma doses to the bulk of the participating troops range from about 0.57-0.85 rem.

Goetz, J.; Klemm, J.; Ortlieb, E.

1984-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Next-generation multijunction solar cells: The promise of II-VI materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High concentration photovoltaic (HCPV) systems offer the highest photovoltaic(PV) conversion efficiencies. Also as production is beginning to ramp up HCPV is becoming cost competitive with thin-film poly-CdTe and crystalline Si systems in high solar insolation regions. High solar concentrations X???500 are used to increase cell efficiencies and greatly reduce the cell area per unit of incident solar radiation thereby greatly reducing the cell cost per watt. The monolithic three-junction (3J) solar cells presently used in HCPV systems typically consist of two epitaxialIII-V homojunctions such as GaInP and GaInAs grown on an active Ge substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The III-Vbandgaps are chosen to match the currents generated in each junction and minimize the energy lost to thermalization of the electron-hole pairs generated subject to the constraint of approximate lattice matching. We propose using cells consisting of one or more CdTe-based II-VI homojunctions grown on large-area active Si substrates by high-throughput MBE or a less expensive high-vacuum deposition technique as an alternative to III-V based multijunction cells grown by MOCVD. The bandgap of Si is more optimal than that of Ge for two-junction (2J) or 3J cells and lattice mismatches affect the efficiencies of such cells only slightly which allows greater freedom in the choice of bandgaps and thus the potential for higher efficiencies. Also such cells could be manufactured at a much lower cost due to the larger area much lower cost and superior mechanical properties of Si substrates as compared to Ge substrates. The much lower cell cost also would enable medium concentration PV systems that would require more cell area but with simplified less expensive tracking and optics resulting in lower overall system costs. Promising initial results from material-property measurements and single-junction and 2J CdZnTe/Si cell characterization results are given. Both the promise of the proposed technology and the challenges it faces are discussed.

J. W. Garland; T. Biegala; M. Carmody; C. Gilmore; S. Sivananthan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Plutonium(IV) and plutonium(VI) extraction by 1-hydroxy-6-N-octylcarboxamide-2-(1H)-pyridinone  

SciTech Connect

Extraction of Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) from nitric acid media by the promising new extractant 1-hydroxy-6-N-octylcarboxamide-2(1H)-pyridinone (octyl-1,2-HOPO) has been investigated. The effects of nitric acid, sodium, aluminum and iron(III) nitrates on extraction have been examined. Octyl-1,2-HOPO exhibits high specificity for Pu(IV) over a wide range of acidity and ionic strength. The affinity of octyl-1,2-HOPO for Pu(VI) is much less than for Pu(IV). However, the extraction of Pu(VI) is possible from acidic as well as from highly salted media. Two water soluble ligands, 1-hydroxyethane-1,1,-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) and H(2,2)-1,2-HOPO, have been shown to be very effective for back extraction.

Romanovski, V.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst. for Transactinium Science; Hoffman, D.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst. for Transactinium Science]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; White, D.J.; Xu, J.; Raymond, K.N. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Facile additive-free synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles for efficient adsorptive removal of Congo red and Cr(VI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The iron oxide nanoparticles had been successfully synthesized via an additive-free hydrolysis process at 75C for 12h. The product was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and N2 adsorptiondesorption. The results of XRD and N2 adsorptiondesorption demonstrated that the as-prepared product was mainly ?-Fe2O3 with a large surface area of 164.1m2g?1. The TEM images illustrated that the as-prepared product was found to consist of a mixture of irregular spherical nanoparticles (a diameter of ?50nm) and nanowhiskers (a diameter of ?50nm and uneven length). The as-prepared product was used to investigate its promising applications in water treatment. Due to its small size and large surface area, the maximum adsorption capacities of Congo red and Cr(VI) have been determined using the Langmuir equation and found to reach up to 253.8 and 17.0mgg?1, respectively. The facile synthesis method and the superior adsorption performance derived from the iron oxide nanoparticles display the potential applications for the removal of Congo red and Cr(VI) from aqueous solution.

Tao Hao; Chao Yang; Xuehui Rao; Jide Wang; Chunge Niu; Xintai Su

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

VI-Band Follow-Up Observations of Ultra-Long-Period Cepheid Candidates in M31  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ultra-long period Cepheids (ULPCs) are classical Cepheids with pulsation periods exceeding $\\approx 80$ days. The intrinsic brightness of ULPCs are ~1 to ~3 mag brighter than their shorter period counterparts. This makes them attractive in future distance scale work to derive distances beyond the limit set by the shorter period Cepheids. We have initiated a program to search for ULPCs in M31, using the single-band data taken from the Palomar Transient Factory, and identified eight possible candidates. In this work, we presented the VI-band follow-up observations of these eight candidates. Based on our VI-band light curves of these candidates and their locations in the color-magnitude diagram and the Period-Wesenheit diagram, we verify two candidates as being truly ULPCs. The six other candidates are most likely other kinds of long-period variables. With the two confirmed M31 ULPCs, we tested the applicability of ULPCs in distance scale work by deriving the distance modulus of M31. It was found to be $\\mu_...

Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Yang, Michael Ting-Chang; Lin, Chi-Sheng; Hsiao, Hsiang-Yao; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lin, I-Ling; Kanbur, Shashi M; Ip, Wing-Huen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

No Measurable Changes in 238U/235U due to DesorptionAdsorption of U(VI) from Groundwater at the Rifle, Colorado, Integrated Field Research Challenge Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium (U) is an element of considerable interest due to its importance for energy and weapons industries and its contribution to the risk associated with radioactive waste storage and disposal. ... (21)In the case of adsorption, where the U redox state does not change, differences between the coordination environments of the adsorbed and dissolved U(VI) species are suggested to be responsible for the isotope effect. ... We expect little isotope fractionation occurs with adsorption of uranyl carbonato and calcium-uranyl carbonato complexes, as outer-sphere complexes should not alter the local U(VI) environment. ...

Alyssa E. Shiel; Parker G. Laubach; Thomas M. Johnson; Craig C. Lundstrom; Philip E. Long; Kenneth H. Williams

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

245

Computed oscillator strengths and energy levels for Fe III, Fe IV, Fe V, and Fe VI with calculated wavelengths and wavelengths derived from established data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calculated weighted oscillator strengths are tabulated for spectral lines of Fe III, Fe IV, Fe V, and Fe VI. The lines belong to transition arrays 3d6-3d54p and 3d54s-3d54p in Fe III, 3d5-3d44p and 3d44s-3d44p in Fe IV, 3d4-3d34p and 3d34s-3d34p in Fe V, and 3d3-3d24p and 3d24s-3d24p in Fe VI. For the calculations, Slater parameters are optimized on the basis of minimizing the discrepancies between observed and computed wavelengths. Configuration interaction was included among the 3dn, 3dn?14s, 3dn?24s2, 3dn?14d, and 3dn?15s even configurations and among the 3dn?14p, 3dn?24s4p, and 3dn?15p odd configurations, with 3p53dn+1 added for Fe VI. Calculated wavelengths are compared with observational data, and the compositions of energy levels are listed. This completes a series of similar computations for these complex configurations covering Fe I to Fe VI.

B.C. Fawcett

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

VI Simpsio Brasileiro de Solos No Saturados 2007/ Salvador-Bahia 421 Relao Entre a Resistncia a Trao Obtida via Ensaio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VI Simpósio Brasileiro de Solos Não Saturados 2007/ Salvador-Bahia 421 Relação Entre a Resistência Saturados 2007/ Salvador-Bahia uma maior atenção vem sendo dada a este tipo de mecanismo, especialmente por

Zornberg, Jorge G.

247

Preservation of Our World in the Wake of Change, Vol. VI A/B ISEEQS Pub. Jerusalem, Israel, 1996. Editor: Y. Steinberger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

553 Preservation of Our World in the Wake of Change, Vol. VI A/B ISEEQS Pub. Jerusalem, Israel, Jerusalem 91904, Israel and G. Schiller Department of Field Crops and Natural Resources, Agricultural components. In wind- dispersed species, for example, selection for dispersal capacity may often favor small

Nathan, Ran

248

Coordination structures of lanthanide(III) and uranyl(VI) nitrato complexes with N,N?-dimethyl-N,N?-dibutylmalonamide. Part II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coordination structures of lanthanide(III) and uranyl(VI) nitrato complexes with N,N?-dimethyl-N,N?-dibutylmalonamide (DMDBMA) were investigated in terms of 1H, 13C and 14N NMR measurements, infrared spectrum, molar conductivity measurement, absorption spectrum, fluorescence spectrum, magnetic susceptibility measurement and thermal analysis. The chemical formulae of the isolated lanthanide(III) and uranyl(VI) nitrato-DMDBMA complexes are Ln(NO3)3 2DMDBMA and UO2(NO3)2 DMDBMA, respectively. The DMDBMA coordinates to the lanthanide(III) and uranyl(VI) ions, with the oxygen atoms of carbonyl group and nitrate ions coordinate to the central metal ions in a bidentate manner. For the lanthanide(III) nitrato complexes, the coordination number is ten, and a change of the coordination structure occurs between the lighter and heavier complexes. The uranyl(VI) nitrato-DMDBMA complex has an eight-coordinated structure with the uranyl group surrounded by six oxygen atoms, four from the bidentate nitrate groups and two from the bidentate DMDBMA, lying in the plane perpendicular to the axial uranyl group.

Takashi Nakamura; Chie Miyake

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control VI, August 22-27, 2004, Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy Voltage Stability Enhancement via Model Predictive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control VI, August 22-27, 2004, Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy Voltage of the North American power system in August 2003 could have been avoided by tripping a relatively small amount be more palatable. Recent advances in communications and computer systems facilitate such non-disruptive

Hiskens, Ian A.

250

Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide  

SciTech Connect

Detection and quantification of the aquo ions of Pu in 1 MHClO4 was carried out using a 1-meter liquid core waveguide (LCW) coupledto a fiber optic UV-Vis spectrometer. Detection limits of 7 x 10-7 M forPu(VI), 1.6 x 10-5 M for Pu(V), 5 x 10-6 M for Pu(IV) and 8 x 10-6 M forPu(III) were achieved. The limits of detection represent increases of 18to 33 times those achievable using a conventional 1-cm path length.Because of the much lower detection limits of the LCW, routineidentification of the oxidation states in dilute Pu solutions can bemade.

Wilson, Richard E.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Nitsche, Heino

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Analysis of radiation exposure for troop observers, Exercise Desert Rock VI, Operation Teapot. Final report 1 Mar-15 Jul 80  

SciTech Connect

The radiation doses to troop observers and volunteer observers for Exercise Desert Rock VI are reconstructed for each applicable shot of Operation Teapot (1955). Initial neutron and gamma radiation doses are determined from transport codes ATR4 and ATR4.1. Residual radiation contours and decay rates are established through a new automated procedure that utilizes raw data in regression analysis to fit space-time models. Troop operations data are combined with the radiological data to determine integrated dose. Uncertainties are calculated for each parameter. The volunteers received the highest observer--1.6 rem gamma and 4.5 rem neutron. The highest dose received by troop observers was 1.4 rem gamma and 1.4 rem neutron at Shot Tesla.

Goetz, J.; McGahan, J.; Kaul, D.; Weitz, R.; Klemm, J.

1980-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Si m pa rele: Annexes I et II, Si m pa rele: Annexe III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/10/93 81202 11/93 81202 11/93 81202 11/93 81202 AL ABRE, Daniel 55 M 07/92 84200 07/92 84200 Excution sommaire: Autre Excution sommaire: Autre 'un Groupement De Paysans Torture (kalot, coups de pied; bastonnade): Personnel de chef de section...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Extraction behavior of uranium(VI), plutonium(IV), zirconium(IV), ruthenium(III) and europium(III) with ?-pre-irradiated solutions of N,N?-methylbutyl substituted amides in n-dodecane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The extraction of plutonium(IV), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV), europium(III) and ruthenium(III) with ?-pre-irradiated n-dodecane solutions of methylbutyl substituted hexanamide (MBHA), octanamide (MBOA) and deca...

P. B. Ruikar; M. S. Nagar; M. S. Subramanian

1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Accumulation of Amorphous Cr(III)Te(IV) Nanoparticles on the Surface of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through Reduction of Cr(VI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Industrial effluents constitute a major source of metal pollution of aquatic bodies. ... Before the XAFS measurement, all samples were maintained in argon (Ar) atmosphere in order to remove any air-borne contamination leading to sample oxidation. ... (-500 mV vs. Ag/AgCl) showed that a mediatorless MR-1 biocathode started up under aerated conditions in the presence of lactate, received 5.5 and 1.7 times more electrons for Cr(VI) redn. ...

Dong-Hun Kim; Sunhwa Park; Min-Gyu Kim; Hor-Gil Hur

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

255

Ppn. SoL Snow Deplh Observer Vis. Vi;,. Vis. 00 in. 0 in. S5 J5 mi. mi. \\7 mi.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Vi;,. Vis. 00 in. 0 in. S5 J5 mi. mi. \\7 mi. #12;..,- . M I~ · , \\f: ':'0 ll)A.\\I~S· Jb/ Ii I i. $".7~in. 0700 1300 1900 R.H. 24 hr. Mov. Clds. Clds. Clds.Sea L. - ! 0lU/l() .:. flOS-~ '/c. - mi. 30. Vis.Ppn. Sol. Snow Depth Observer a ~Sin. mi. J5 1111. mi.Q.O in. \\/ \\7_____~_____._._!O

Thompson, Anne

256

CIMAT, VI Escuela de verano, 25 de julio 7 de agosto 1999 Introducci'on a la Geometr'ia de la Mec'anica Cl'asica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parametrizada por (x(t); ?? x(t)): (d) Dibujar las gr'aficas de su energ'ia cin'etica T = ( ?? x) 2 =2 y potencial­ vaci'on de energ'ia, E = T + V = constante: (e) Repetir los 4 incisos anteriores con x(1) = 2; ?? x(0CIMAT, VI Escuela de verano, 25 de julio ­ 7 de agosto 1999 Introducci'on a la Geometr'ia de la Mec

Bor, Gil

257

CIMAT, VI Escuela de verano, 25 de julio -7 de agosto 1999 Introducci'on a la Geometr'ia de la Mec'anica Cl'asica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(t), `x(t)). (d)Dibujar las gr'aficas de su energ'ia cin'etica T = (x`)2=2 y potencial* * V = x2- vaci'on de energ'ia, E = T + V = constante. (e)Repetir los 4 incisos anteriores con x(1) = 2, `x CIMAT, VI Escuela de verano, 25 de julio - 7 de agosto 1999 Introducci'on a la Geometr'ia de la

Bor, Gil

258

Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect

A facultative iron-reducing (Fe(III)-reducing) Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes (Fe(III)-NTA and Fe(III)-citrate) but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 M) of either of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 M) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A also could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ~7:3 in PIPES and ~1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments.

Ahmed, B.; Cao, B.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

259

Marcos Heil Costa Departamento de Engenharia Agrícola, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Brasil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

43 a 553. 43 a 553. 1 Efeitos de Variabilidade Climática e Desmatamento No Regime de Águas Superficiais Marcos Heil Costa Departamento de Engenharia Agrícola, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Brasil Michael T. Coe Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, Massachusetts, USA Jean Loup Guyot LMTG, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, Toulouse, France O regime de escoamento de rios na Bacia Amazônica mostra uma considerável variabilidade em escalas interanuais e decadais. A principal fonte de variação são os eventos do El Niño-Oscilação Sul (ENOS). Eventos de El Niño causam diminuição de precipitação, escoamento fluvial e padrões de inundação em toda a região, com reduções mais fortes que ocorrem na parte norte da bacia. Por outro lado, os eventos do La Niña causam aumento

260

Impact of uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes on uranium(VI) adsorption to synthetic and natural sediments  

SciTech Connect

Adsorption on soil and sediment solids may decrease aqueous uranium concentrations and limit its propensity for migration in natural and contaminated settings. Uranium adsorption will be controlled in large part by its aqueous speciation, with a particular dependence on the presence of dissolved calcium and carbonate. Here we quantify the impact of uranyl speciation on adsorption to both goethite and sediments from the Hanford Clastic Dike and Oak Ridge Melton Branch Ridgetop formations. Hanford sediments were preconditioned with sodium acetate and acetic acid to remove carbonate grains, and Ca and carbonate were reintroduced at defined levels to provide a range of aqueous uranyl species. U(VI) adsorption is directly linked to UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} speciation, with the extent of retention decreasing with formation of ternary uranyl-calcium-carbonato species. Adsorption isotherms under the conditions studied are linear, and K{sub d} values decrease from 48 to 17 L kg{sup -1} for goethite, from 64 to 29 L kg{sup -1} for Hanford sediments, and from 95 to 51 L kg{sup -1} for Melton Branch sediments as the Ca concentration increases from 0 to 1 mM at pH 7. Our observations reveal that, in carbonate-bearing waters, neutral to slightly acidic pH values ({approx}5) and limited dissolved calcium are optimal for uranium adsorption.

Stewart, B.D. [Stanford University; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Fendorf, Scott [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Extraction of actinide (III, IV, V, VI) ions and TcO4- byN,N,N',N'- tetraisobutyl-3-oxa-glutaramide  

SciTech Connect

The extraction behavior of U(VI), Np(V), Pu(IV), Am(III), and TcO{sub 4}{sup -} with N, N, N', N'-tetraisobutyl-3-oxa-glutaramide (TiBOGA) were investigated. An organic phase of 0.2 mol/L TiBOGA in 40/60% (V/V) 1-octanol/kerosene showed good extractability for actinides (III, IV, V VI) and TcO{sub 4}{sup -}from aqueous solutions of HNO{sub 3} (0.1 to 4 mol/L). At 25 C, the distribution ratio of the actinide ions (D{sub An}) generally increased as the concentration of HNO{sub 3} in the aqueous phase was increased from 0.1 to 4 mol/L, while the D{sub Tc} at first increased, then decreased, with a maximum of 3.0 at 2 mol/L HNO{sub 3}. Based on the slope analysis of the dependence of D{sub M} (M = An or Tc) on the concentrations of reagents, the formula of extracted complexes were assumed to be UO{sub 2}L{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, NpO{sub 2}L{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}), PuL(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}, AmL{sub 3}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, and HL{sub 2}(TcO{sub 4}) where L = TiBOGA. The enthalpy and entropy of the corresponding extraction reactions, {Delta}{sub r}H and {Delta}{sub r}S, were calculated from the dependence of D on temperature in the range of 15-55 C. For U(VI), Np(V), Am(III) and TcO{sub 4}{sup -}, the extraction reactions are enthalpy driven and disfavored by entropy ({Delta}{sub r}H < 0 and {Delta}{sub r}S < 0). In contrast, the extraction reaction of Pu(IV) is entropy driven and disfavored by enthalpy ({Delta}{sub r}H > 0 and {Delta}{sub r}S > 0). A test run with 0.2 mol/L TiBOGA in 40/60% 1-octanol/kerosene was performed to separate actinides and TcO{sub 4}{sup -} from a simulated acidic high-level liquid waste (HLLW), using tracer amounts of {sup 238}U(VI), {sup 237}Np(V), {sup 239}Pu(VI), {sup 241}Am(III) and {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}. The distribution ratios of U(VI), Np(V), Pu(VI), Am(III) and TcO{sub 4}{sup -} were 12.4, 3.9, 87, > 1000 and 1.5, respectively, confirming that TiBOGA is a promising extractant for the separation of all actinides and TcO{sub 4}{sup -} from acidic HLLW. It is noteworthy that the extractability of TiBOGA for Np(V) from acidic HLLW (D{sub Np(V)} = 3.9) is much higher than that of many other extractants that have been studies for the separation of actinides from HLLW.

Tian, Guoxin; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Jianchen; Rao, Linfeng

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Immobilization of U(VI) from Oxic Groundwater by Hanford 300 Area Sediments and Effects of Columbia River Water  

SciTech Connect

Regions within the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area (300 A) site experience periodic hydrologic influences from the nearby Columbia River as a result of changing river stage, which causes changes in groundwater elevation, flow direction and water chemistry. An important question is the extent to which the mixing of Columbia River water and groundwater impacts the speciation and mobility of uranium (U). In this study, we designed experiments to mimic interactions among U, oxic groundwater or Columbia River water, and 300 A sediments in the subsurface environment of Hanford 300 A. The goals were to investigate mechanisms of: 1) U immobilization in 300 A sediments under bulk oxic conditions and 2) U remobilization from U-immobilized 300 A sediments exposed to oxic Columbia River water. Initially, 300 A sediments in column reactors were fed with U(VI)-containing oxic 1) synthetic groundwater (SGW), 2) organic-amended SGW (OA-SGW), and 3) de-ionized (DI) water to investigate U immobilization processes. After that, the sediments were exposed to oxic Columbia River water for U remobilization studies. The results reveal that U was immobilized by 300 A sediments predominantly through reduction (80-85%) when the column reactor was fed with oxic OA-SGW. However, U was immobilized by 300 A sediments through adsorption (100%) when the column reactors were fed with oxic SGW or DI water. The reduced U in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW was relatively resistant to remobilization by oxic Columbia River water. Oxic Columbia River water resulted in U remobilization (?7%) through desorption, and most of the U that remained in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW (?93%) was in the form of uraninite nanoparticles. These results reveal that: 1) the reductive immobilization of U through OA-SGW stimulation of indigenous 300 A sediment microorganisms may be viable in the relatively oxic Hanford 300 A subsurface environments and 2) with the intrusion of Columbia River water, desorption may be the primary process resulting in U remobilization from OA-SGW-stimulated 300 A sediments at the subsurface of the Hanford 300 A site.

Ahmed, B.; Cao, Bin; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

263

MONOGRAFIAS DE FISICA VI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the Latin American School of Physics June 2 7 - August 7, I 9 6 0 RIO DE JANEIRO BRASIL DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products....

264

LABORATORY VI ROTATIONAL DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wheels are everywhere. Balls spin when they are thrown. The earth rotates about its axis. Rotations to predict the outcome of a rotational system. · Choose a useful system when using rotational kinematics of systems. PREPARATION: Read Paul M. Fishbane: Chapter 9, Section 9-1; Chapter 5, Section 5-4. You should

Minnesota, University of

265

VI-1 PAPERS PUBLISHED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - March 31, 2012 Isoscalar giant resonances in 48 Ca, Y.-W. Lui, D. H. Youngblood, S. Shlomo, X. Chen, Y. Tokimoto, Krishichayan, M. Anders, and J. Button, Phys. Rev. C 83,...

266

TLE Forum VI  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...barrels of energy every single day. That energy demand is driven...Looking at the per capita oil consumption...with the GDP (Figure...domestic product per capita shows that...with the GDP. The size...International Energy Agency forecasts...predict oil demand in 2030 to...

Sylvie Dale

267

Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition: Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI)  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

Wilkins, M.J.; Callister, S.J.; Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; Nicora, C.D.; Lovley, D.R.; Long, P.E.; Lipton, M.S.

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Reactivity Effects of Differences Between JEFF-3.1 and ENDF/B-VI.8 in Analysis of Six MASURCA Cores of the R-Z Program  

SciTech Connect

Six early cores of the MASURCA R-Z program were modeled using ERANOS 2.1. These cores were designed such that their neutron spectra would be similar to that of an oxide-fueled sodium-cooled fast reactor, some containing enriched uranium and others containing depleted uranium and plutonium. Effects of modeling assumptions and solution methods both in ECCO lattice calculations and in BISTRO Sn flux solutions were evaluated using JEFF-3.1 cross-section libraries. Reactivity effects of differences between JEFF-3.1 and ENDF/B-VI.8 were also quantified using perturbation theory analysis. The most important nuclide with respect to reactivity differences between cross-section libraries was 23Na, primarily a result of differences in the angular dependence of elastic scattering which is more forward-peaked in ENDF/B-VI.8 than in JEFF-3.1. Differences in 23Na inelastic scattering cross-sections between libraries also generated significant differences in reactivity, more due to the differences in magnitude of the cross-sections than the angular dependence. The nuclide 238U was also found to be important with regard to reactivity differences between the two libraries mostly due to a large effect of inelastic scattering differences and two smaller effects of elastic scattering and fission cross-sections. In the cores which contained plutonium, 239Pu fission cross-section differences contributed significantly to the reactivity differences between libraries.

MIchael A. Pope

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Experimental and theoretical analysis of a nondispersive solvent extraction pilot plant for the removal of Cr(VI) from a galvanic process wastewaters  

SciTech Connect

The scale-up of a chemical process from the results obtained in a laboratory scale involves a high degree of uncertainty. Experimental tests in pilot plants are therefore necessary in order to decrease that uncertainty. When the processes are not simple, these experimental tests should be supplemented by simulation studies which are a highly useful tool in the analysis of a chemical plant. A nondispersive solvent extraction (NDSX) plant includes two processes, extraction and stripping, coupled by an organic phase. Because of this fact, the variables of the system are interrelated, making the prediction of the behavior of the whole system difficult. Because of this complexity, in this work, the behavior of a NDSX pilot plant has been experimentally and theoretically analyzed. The removal and recovery of chromium(VI) from wastewaters of a galvanic process have been used as a case study for the simulation and experimental analysis of the NDSX process. The mathematical model consists of nonlinear partial differential equations which are solved using the process simulator gPROMS. Once the suitability of the proposed model and parameters for the description of removal and concentration of Cr(VI) in the NDSX pilot plant was checked, the simulation was used to perform a sensitivity analysis to operating variables such as flow rates, volumes, total carrier concentration, and initial complex species concentration. The theoretically predicted behavior was checked with some experimental results, and a satisfactory performance of the pilot plant was achieved.

Alonso, A.I.; Galan, B.; Gonzalez, M.; Ortiz, I. [Univ. de Cantabria, Santander (Spain). Dept. Quimica] [Univ. de Cantabria, Santander (Spain). Dept. Quimica

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

II-VI Compounds. Brian Ray. Pergamon, New York, 1969. xvi, 272 pp., illus. $10.50. International Series of Monographs in the Science of the Solid State, vol. 2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...by the defects present in the crystal. II-VI compounds are midway between ionic solids, in which properties are determined by...samples, just the sort of thing against which the author does battle throughout most of the book. Chopra has made a good job of...

C. H. Henry

1970-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

271

Structural studies of molybdenum(VI) coordination chemistry: Crystal and molecular structure of Mo2O4(2,2-dimethylpropane-1,3-diolate)2.(H2O)2 containing a ?-dioxo bridge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The crystal structure of the compound Mo2 VI O4 (2,2-dimethylpropane-1,3-diolate)2 (H2O)2 has been determined. Crystals are triclinic, space groupP1 witha = 7.603(3),b = 6.396(3),c = 8.930(6) ...

C. K. Chew; B. R. Penfold

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Underground Injection Control Permit Applications for FutureGen 2.0 Morgan County Class VI UIC Wells 1, 2, 3, and 4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FG-RPT-017 FG-RPT-017 Revision 1 Underground Injection Control Permit Applications for FutureGen 2.0 Morgan County Class VI UIC Wells 1, 2, 3, and 4 SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION March 2013 (Revised May 2013 in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Completeness Review) Acknowledgment: This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FE0001882. Disclaimer: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

273

Generators Yu.N. Barmakov, N.G. Ignatiev, B.D. Lemeshko, V.I. Mikerov, and D.I. Yurkov  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1(b): Techniques for Dynamic Experiments 1(b): Techniques for Dynamic Experiments Research of Possibility of Radiography in Fast Neutrons by Use of Portable Neutron Generators Yu.N. Barmakov, N.G. Ignatiev, B.D. Lemeshko, V.I. Mikerov, and D.I. Yurkov FSUE All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics Russia, Moscow, Suschevskaya st. 22, PO Box: 127055, web site: www.vniia.ru Neutron portable generators are one of the sources, generating neutron and X-ray radiations at one time. Those distinguish with rather small size of radiating area (~1mm), and, also, with wide ranges of radiation time spans (starting with continuous radiation and ending with pulses having »25 ns width). Just mentioned features, in general, provide wide range of generators possible practical applications, and, particularly, application in research

274

I-III-VI.sub.2 based solar cell utilizing the structure CuInGaSe.sub.2 CdZnS/ZnO  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin film I-III-VI.sub.2 based solar cell having a first layer of copper indium gallium selenide, a second layer of cadmium zinc sulfide, a double layer of zinc oxide, and a metallization structure comprised of a layer of nickel covered by a layer of aluminum. An optional antireflective coating may be placed on said metallization structure. The cadmium zinc sulfide layer is deposited by means of an aqueous solution growth deposition process and may actually consist of two layers: a low zinc content layer and a high zinc content layer. Photovoltaic efficiencies of 12.5% at Air Mass 1.5 illumination conditions and 10.4% under AMO illumination can be achieved.

Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA); Stewart, John M. (Seattle, WA)

1992-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

275

High-Pressure Synthesis and Structure Determination of K6(SeO4)(SeO5), The First Potassium Orthoselenate(VI)  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on the first synthesis of a potassium orthoselenate(VI), K{sub 6}(SeO{sub 4})(SeO{sub 5}), and the structure determination from synchrotron powder diffraction data. The title compound crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 with a = 8.1259(1) {angstrom}, c = 17.4953(2) {angstrom}, V = 1155.21(2) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 4. Selenium displays two different complex anions, tetrahedral SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and trigonal-bipyramidal SeO{sub 5}{sup 4-}. When the formula is reduced to A{sub 3}B, the spatial arrangement of the constituting building units can be derived from the Li{sub 3}Bi type of structure.

Orosel,D.; Dinnebeier, R.; Jansen, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

ENDF-6 Formats Manual Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-VII  

SciTech Connect

In December 2006, the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) of the United States released the new ENDF/B-VII.0 library. This represented considerable achievement as it was the 1st major release since 1990 when ENDF/B-VI has been made publicly available. The two libraries have been released in the same format, ENDF-6, which has been originally developed for the ENDF/B-VI library. In the early stage of work on the VII-th generation of the library CSEWG made important decision to use the same formats. This decision was adopted even though it was argued that it would be timely to modernize the formats and several interesting ideas were proposed. After careful deliberation CSEWG concluded that actual implementation would require considerable resources needed to modify processing codes and to guarantee high quality of the files processed by these codes. In view of this the idea of format modernization has been postponed and ENDF-6 format was adopted for the new ENDF/B-VII library. In several other areas related to ENDF we made our best to move beyond established tradition and achieve maximum modernization. Thus, the 'Big Paper' on ENDF/B-VII.0 has been published, also in December 2006, as the Special Issue of Nuclear Data Sheets 107 (1996) 2931-3060. The new web retrieval and plotting system for ENDF-6 formatted data, Sigma, was developed by the NNDC and released in 2007. Extensive paper has been published on the advanced tool for nuclear reaction data evaluation, EMPIRE, in 2007. This effort was complemented with release of updated set of ENDF checking codes in 2009. As the final item on this list, major revision of ENDF-6 Formats Manual was made. This work started in 2006 and came to fruition in 2009 as documented in the present report.

Herman, M.; Members of the Cross Sections Evaluation Working Group

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Radioactive Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The radioactive material must then be placed in inner packages that will prevent radioactive contamination during transportation. Dispersible radioactive material must be...

278

Annexation of Crimea: Causes, Analysis and Global Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Toronto Press Inc. 22. Ukraines revolution and the farNeo-Nazi threat in new Ukraine. BBC Newsnight, Februarycharge-of-the-right-brigade- ukraine-and-the-dynamics-of-1?

Saluschev, Sergey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Thoron and decay products, beyond UNSCEAR 2006 Annex E  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......uranium, tin, tantalum, niobium, rare earths, aluminum, some copper and...elevated radioactivity levels in phosphogypsum arising from the production of phosphate...226Ra 0.1-15 000 Residue (rare earth extraction) 228Ra 20-3000......

D. B. Chambers

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Enterprise Assessments, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Constructio...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

of liquid or semi-solid radioactive and chemical waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. DOE-ORP serves as DOE line management for two functions: the Tank...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

CAPACITIES 2012 annexes 1 -3 WORK PROGRAMME 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

------------------------- · Central African L · Saint Vincent UM ASIA (EECA) Republic and Grenadines · Armenia3 LM · Chad L · Suriname

De Cindio, Fiorella

282

Annex I Differentiation Proposals: Implications for Welfare, Equity and Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capita, per GDP or specific economic structures or fuel mixes) will rapidly lead towards special pleading to suggest definitions that favor their own particular circumstances. Those with particularly energy-efficient economies propose carbon intensity of gross domestic product (GDP) as a criterion, poorer countries suggest

283

Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Effects of Energy Removal on...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

changes may occur to the physical oceanography, including alternations in water flow, sediment transport, and water quality, as well as decreases in the tidal currents and tidal...

284

Annex 3: `Flagship' Case Study Report 2009/10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3 Additional benefits 21 4.4 Barriers to visiting 21 5. Ingrebourne's visitor profile 23 5.1 Socio, benefits and barriers For more information contact Kieron Doick kieron.doick@forestry.gsi.gov.uk Jake, entering into a long-term management lease of the site as part of the Thames Chase Community Forest. The FC

285

Annex I differentiation proposals : implications for welfare, equity and policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drawing upon a variety of different criteria, many nations have introduced proposals to differentiate the reductions in carbon emissions that would be required of industrialized nations in the short to medium term. This ...

Reiner, David M.; Jacoby, Henry D.

286

Microbial enhanced oil recovery research. Final report, Annex 5  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop an engineering framework for the exploitation of microorganisms to enhance oil recovery. An order of magnitude analysis indicated that selective plugging and the production of biosurfactants are the two most likely mechanisms for the mobilization of oil in microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). The latter, biosurfactant production, is easier to control within a reservoir environment and was investigated in some detail. An extensive literature survey indicated that the bacterium Bacillus licheniformis JF-2 produces a very effective surface active agent capable of increasing the capillary number to values sufficiently low for oil mobilization. In addition, earlier studies had shown that growth of this bacterium and biosurfactant production occur under conditions that are typically encountered in MEOR, namely temperatures up to 55{degrees}C, lack of oxygen and salinities of up to 10% w/v. The chemical structure of the surfactant, its interfacial properties and its production by fermentation were characterized in some detail. In parallel, a set of experiments as conducted to measure the transport of Bacillus licheniformis JF-2 in sandpacks. It was shown that the determining parameters for cell transport in porous media are: cell size and degree of coagulation, presence of dispersants, injection velocity and cell concentration. The mechanisms of bacteria retention within the pores of the reservoir were analyzed based on heuristic arguments. A mathematical simulator of MEOR was developed using conservation equations in which the mechanisms of bacteria retention and the growth kinetics of the cells were incorporated. The predictions of the model agreed reasonably well with experimental results.

Sharma, M.M.; Gerogiou, G.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Radiochemistry Annex: It's getting hot in there | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Daniel Kaplan and Peter Jaffe's earlier research on uranium contaminated wetlands used EMSL's helium ion microscopy in the Quiet Wing to image biogenic nano-iron...

288

Annex 1: Submission from Bruce McKirdy, NDA Annex 1: Submission from Bruce McKirdy, NDA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

could cause harm to life and the environment.29 While safety is a national responsibility geological environment for hosting a geological disposal facility is6 established by the development of a safety case which needs to satisfy the independent nuclear7 regulators, how the engineered2 and natural

289

Theory of optical properties of II-VI semiconductor quantum dots containing a single magnetic ion in a strong magnetic field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a microscopic theory of the magnetic field dependence of the optical properties of IIVI semiconductor quantum dots containing a single magnetic (Mn) impurity. The single-particle electron and heavy-hole states are described exactly by two-dimensional harmonic oscillators in a magnetic field, the Mn ion is treated as a spin of an isoelectronic impurity, and the quantum dot anisotropy is included perturbatively. The electron-hole direct, short-, and long-range exchange electron-hole Coulomb interactions, as well as the short-range spin-spin contact exchange interaction of the electron and the hole with the magnetic impurity is included. The electron-hole-Mn states are expanded in a finite number of configurations controlled by the number of confined electronic quantum dot shells and the full interacting Hamiltonian is diagonalized numerically in this basis. The absorption and emission spectrum is predicted as a function of photon energy, magnetic field, number of confined shells, and anisotropy. It is shown that the magnetic-field-induced enhancement of the exchange interaction of the Mn spin with the exciton is largely canceled by increased electron-hole Coulomb interactions. The predicted weak magnetic field dependence of the spacing of emission lines agrees well with the results of the spin model at low magnetic fields but differs at higher magnetic fields. Correlations in the exciton-Mn complex are predicted to determine absorption spectra.

Anna H. Trojnar; Marek Korkusi?ski; Marek Potemski; Pawel Hawrylak

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

290

The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health-related research. Volume VI, workplace and environmental monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth in a series of seven volumes which constitute a guide to records of the Rocky Flats Plant useful for conducting health-related research. The primary purpose of Volume VI is to describe record series pertaining to workplace and environmental monitoring activities at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant, now named the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, near Denver, Colorado. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project, provides a history of workplace and environmental monitoring practices at Rocky Flats, and identifies organizations contributing to workplace and environmental monitoring policies and activities. Other topics include the scope and arrangement of this volume and the organization to contact for access to these records. Comprehensive introductory and background information is available in Volume I. Other volumes in the guide pertain to administrative and general subjects, facilities and equipment, production and materials handling, waste management, and employee health. In addition, HAI has produced a subject-specific guide, titled The September 1957 Rocky Flats Fire. A Guide to Record Series of the Department of Energy and Its Contractors, which researchers should consult for further information about records related to this incident.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Spatially resolved U(VI) partitioning and speciation: Implications for plume scale behavior of contaminant U in the Hanford vadose zone  

SciTech Connect

A saline-alkaline brine containing high concentrations of U(VI) was accidentally spilled at the Hanford Site in 1951, introducing 10 tons of U into sediments under storage tank BX-102. U concentrations in the deep vadose zone and groundwater plumes increase with time, yet how the U has been migrating is not fully understood. We simulated the spill event in laboratory soil columns, followed by aging, and obtained spatially resolved U partitioning and speciation along simulated plumes. We found after aging, at apparent steady state, that the pore aqueous phase U concentrations remained surprisingly high (up to 0.022 M), in close agreement with the recently reported high U concentrations (up to 0.027 M) in the vadose zone plume (1). The pH values of aged pore liquids varying from 10 to 7, consistent with the measured pH of the field borehole sediments varying from 9.5 to 7.4 (2), from near the plume source to the plume front. The direct measurements of aged pore liquids together with thermodynamic calculations using a Pitzer approach revealed that UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} {sup 4-} is the dominant aqueous U species within the plume body (pH 8-10), while Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} and CaUO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 2-} are also significant in the plume front vicinity (pH 7-8), consistent with that measured from field borehole porewaters (3). U solid phase speciation varies at different locations along the plume flow path and even within single sediment grains, because of location dependent pore and micropore solution chemistry. Our results suggest that high geochemical stability of UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4-} in the original carbonate and sodium rich waste solution permits its continues migration and the field observed increases of U concentrations in the vadose zone and groundwater.

Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wang, Zheming; Dixit, Suvasis; Steefel, Carl; Saiz, Eduardo; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Distribution Behavior of U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), and Zr(IV) with N,N-Dihexyl Octanamide Under Uranium-Loading Conditions  

SciTech Connect

While the tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)-based PUREX process has been the workhorse of the nuclear fuel reprocessing industry for the last four and a half decades, a few drawbacks associated with the use of TBP have caused concern to the separation scientists and technologists. These shortcomings may pose a serious challenge particularly during the reprocessing of (a) short cooled thermal reactor fuels, (b) fast reactor fuels with the larger Pu content and significantly higher burn up, and (c) while treating various waste streams for their disposal to the environment. The N,N-dialkyl aliphatic amides have received particular attention as alternate potential extractants for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels in view of (a) the innocuous nature of their degradation products, namely, carboxylic acids/amines and (b) the possibility to incinerate the used solvent leading to reduced volume of secondary waste. The physical and chemical properties of these amides are influenced strongly by the nature of alkyl groups. The extractant N,N-dihexyl octanamide (DHOA) was found to be a promising candidate among a large number of extractants studied. Laboratory batch studies as well as mixer settler studies were performed under process conditions with DHOA and compared with those of TBP. DHOA was found to extract Pu(IV) more efficiently than TBP, both at trace-level concentration as well as under uranium loading conditions. In addition, the extraction behavior of Am(III) and Zr(IV) was studied at varying nitric acid concentrations (1 to 6 M). Extraction behavior of uranium at macroconcentrations (9.9 to 157.7 g/l) was carried out at different temperatures, and it was observed that D{sub U} decreased with the increase in U loading as well as with the increase of temperature (in the range 25 to 45 deg. C) and that the two-phase reaction was exothermic in nature. Mixer settler studies on U(VI) revealed that DHOA is similar to TBP during the extraction cycle but better than TBP during the stripping cycle.

Manchanda, V.K.; Ruikar, P.B.; Sriram, S.; Nagar, M.S.; Pathak, P.N.; Gupta, K.K.; Singh, R.K.; Chitnis, R.R.; Dhami, P.S.; Ramanujam, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India)

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

PR_VI_50mwind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metadata also available as Metadata: IdentificationInformation DataQualityInformation SpatialDataOrganizationInformation SpatialReferenceInformation EntityandAttributeI...

294

Appendix VI Corrective Action Strategy  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Test Area CR Closure Report DoD U.S. Department of Defense DOE U.S. Department of Energy DOEDP U.S. Department of EnergyDefense Program DOEEM U.S. Department of Energy...

295

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect

Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

296

The P-V-T equation of state of D2O ice VI determined by neutron powder diffraction in the range 0 < P < 2.6 GPa and 120 < T < 330 K, and the isothermal equation of state of D2O ice VII from 2 to 7 GPa at room temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ice VI is an important rock-forming mineral phase in icy planetary bodies; the pressure and temperature dependence of its density have been measured using powder neutron diffraction, throughout the high-pressure stability field, to obtain an accurate equation of state parameterization. These data are used to derive other thermodynamic quantities of use in planetary modelling.

Fortes, A.D.

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

297

Bringing part of the lab to the field: On-site chromium speciation in seawater by electrodeposition of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) on portable coiled-filament assemblies and measurement in the lab by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A field-deployable electrochemical approach to preconcentration, matrix clean up and selective electrodeposition of Cr(III) and Cr(III)+Cr(VI) in seawater is described. Using portable, battery-operated electrochemical instrumentation, Cr species in seawater were electrodeposited in the field on portable coiled-filament assemblies made from Re. Assemblies with dried residues of Cr(III) or Cr(III)+Cr(VI) on them were transported to the lab for concentration determination by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Electrodeposition offers selective species deposition, preconcentration and matrix clean up from seawater samples. For selective deposition, free Cr(VI) was electrodeposited at ?0.3V and Cr(III)+Cr(VI) at ?1.6V (both vs Ag/AgCl). Interestingly, at 0V (vs Ag/AgCl) and in the absence of an electrodeposition potential only Cr(VI) was spontaneously and selectively adsorbed on the coil and reasons for this are given. Due to preconcentration afforded by electrodeposition, the detection limits obtained after a 60s electrodeposition at the voltages stated above using buffered (pH=4.7) artificial seawater spiked with either Cr(III) or Cr(VI) were 20pg/mL for Cr(III) and 10pg/mL for Cr(VI). For comparison, the detection limit for Cr obtained by pipetting directly on the coil 5?L of diluted standard solution was 500pg/mL, thus it was concluded that electrodeposition offered 40 to 60 fold improvements. Matrix clean up is required due to the high salt content of seawater and this was addressed by simply rinsing the coil with 18.2M? water without any loss of Cr species. Reasons for this are provided. The method was validated in the lab using buffered artificial seawater and it was used in the field for the first time by sampling seawater, buffering it and immediately electrodepositing Cr species on portable assemblies on-site. Electrodeposition in the field addressed species transformation during sample pre-treatment. Such transformations occur due to sample acidification and may take place during transport and possibly storage prior to analysis. Thus, electrodeposition in the field is more reflective of Cr species concentration at the environmental conditions (e.g., temperature) at the time of sampling. It also opens up the possibility for shipping to the lab portable assemblies with Cr species on them rather than shipping large volumes of sample to the lab, thus also reducing shipping, handling and storage costs.

Hamid R. Badiei; Jennifer McEnaney; Vassili Karanassios

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Predictive calculations to assess the long-term effect of cementitious materials on the pH and solubility of uranium(VI) in a shallow land disposal environment  

SciTech Connect

One proposed method of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal is to mix the radioactive waste streams with cement, place the mixture in steel barrels, and dispose of the barrels in near-surface unsaturated sediments. Cement or concrete is frequently used in burial grounds, because cement porewaters are buffered at high pH values and lanthanides and actinides; are very insoluble in highly alkaline environments. Therefore, leaching of these contaminants from the combined cement/low-level radioactive waste streams will at least initially be retarded. The calculations performed in this study demonstrate that the pH of cement porewaters will be maintained at a value greater than 10 for 10,000 years under Hanford specific hydrogeochemical conditions. Ten thousand years is the period generally studied in longterm performance assessments per regulatory guidance. The concentrations of dissolved hexavalent uranium [U(VI)], the valence form of dissolved U usually present in oxidizing surface and groundwaters, are also constrained by the high pH and predicted solution compositions over the 10,000-year period, which is favorable from a long-term performance perspective.

Criscenti, L.J.; Serne, R.J.; Krupka, K.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wood, M.I. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Accurate calculations of neutron kerma (Kinetic Energy Released in MAterials) and damage from ENDF/B-VI evaluations for silicon, chromium, iron and nickel, and comparison with ENDF/B-V results  

SciTech Connect

Accurate calculations of kerma (Kinetic Energy Released in MAterials) factors and displacement cross sections are fundamental to studies of neutron heating and neutron radiation damage. Damage and heating studies are important elements in both fission and fusion reactor design. For fusion reactor studies, heating in the blanket helps determine the efficiency, and heating studies in the superconducting magnet regions determine properties of the blanket and shield, thereby affecting the economics of the reactor. Radiation damage is important for reactor core lifetime studies and is related directly to the economy and safety of both fusion and fission reactors. Calculation of kerma factors and displacement cross sections require nuclear data for neutron-induced reactions. These data are normally obtained from evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as ENDF/B (US), JENDL (Japan), JEF/EFF (Europe) and BROND (USSR). Unfortunately, most of these evaluated libraries do not contain sufficient information for a direct calculation of these quantities, and various approximations must be employed. The accuracy of the kerma factors and displacement cross sections, and thus the heating and damage functions, are directly related to the available information from the data libraries. In this paper we describe improvements incorporated in the latest version of the US library, ENDF/B-VI, which allow exact calculations of these quantities for many of the structural materials included in the library. 11 refs., 6 figs.

Larson, D.C.; Hetrick, D.M.; Fu, C.Y.; Epperson, S.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); MacFarlane, R.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Topics for letter "R" | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Lab Quiet Wing Radiochemistry Annex Virtual Tour Topics for letter "R" R&D 100 award radiochemistry Radiochemistry Annex Radiochemistry Annex radiologial...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fiscal Year 1985 Department of Energy Authorization: uranium enrichment, electric energy systems, and storage programs. Volume VI. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Research and Production of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, February 22, 28; March 1984  

SciTech Connect

Volume VI of the hearing record covers three days of testimony on uranium enrichment, electric energy systems, and storage problems. DOE Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Shelby Brewer reviewed the current market crisis which threatens the US capability of continuing as a reliable enrichment supplier, and outlined DOE's response to the problem. Laboratory and non-DOE witnesses from the nuclear industry followed with their assessments of the problem. Witnesses on the third day described research on high-voltage electric fields, how electromagnetic pulses affect the electric grid, and ways to improve the delivery of electric power, as well as efficient, cost-effective energy-storage systems.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Emergency Action Plan and Annexes 2013 Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 28 of 37  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Material (RAM) No personal contamination Localized contamination No spreadCi of Radioactive Material (RAM) Skin and/or clothing contamination is involved (any quantity) Airborne RAM: Location of incident Authoree Name and telephone number of person reporting Persons contaminated

Garfunkel, Eric

303

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand-Side Management, District Heating & Cooling, and Heatbuildings. However, the District Heating and Cooling IA hassystems as part of district heating networks. SHC Tasks 38A

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Developing life-cycle phases for the DoDAF using ISO15704 Annex A (GERAM)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a development of the US Department of Defense Architecture Framework (DoDAF) based on life-cycle concept of the Generalized Enterprise Reference Architecture and Methodology (GERAM) framework/ISO 15704:2000 requirements. Previous ... Keywords: DoDAF, Enterprise architecture, GERAM, ISO15704, Life-cycle

Kamal Chaharsooghi; Mohammad Ahmadi Achachlouei

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A systematic evaluation of the C4ISR AF using ISO15704 Annex A (GERAM)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an analytical mapping of the US Department of Defence (DoD) Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) AF onto the Generalised Enterprise Reference Architecture and Methodology ... Keywords: C4ISR, Enterprise architecture, GERAM, ISO15704, Life cycle, Life history, Modelling framework, Reference models

Ovidiu Noran

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ThermalEnergyUtilizingThermalEnergyStorageTechnologyPowerGenerationwithThermalEnergyStorage SustainableCoolingwithThermalEnergyStorage Demonstrationprojects/

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particularly for multi- family buildings. The United Statesprimarily on multi-story buildings, not single-family homes.

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HeatPumpsforBuildings AdvancedModelingandToolsforHeatPumpsforBuildings AdvancedModelingandToolsforHeatPumpsforBuildings AdvancedModelingandToolsfor

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

of liquid or semi-solid radioactive and chemical waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. DOE-ORP serves as DOE line management for two functions: the Tank...

310

E-Print Network 3.0 - annex xx hawt Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Art 2009 Summary: wind turbine (HAWT) concepts, followed by a short list of small wind turbines on the market. Based... direction) Height: 240m Turbine: three HAWTs, 29m in...

311

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EnergyStorage SustainableCoolingwithThermalEnergyEnergyStorage SustainableCoolingwithThermalEnergyEnergyStorage SustainableCoolingwithThermalEnergy

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Layup Program...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

attaching supports and hardware were also stored in the QUEUE area on cribbing under plastic tarpaulins. The materials in the storage areas are identified through the use of tags...

313

Lauren M. Weiss Astronomy Department B-20 Hearst Field Annex, Berkeley, CA 94720  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earth Radii (poster), L. M. Weiss & G. W. Marcy, Kepler Science Conference II, Nov. 2013. The Mass@berkeley.edu 585-747-2482 http://astro.berkeley.edu/~lweiss Current Position National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, University of California Berkeley Education Ph. D. in Astronomy, University of California

Militzer, Burkhard

314

Annex 36: QI and QM Sensitivity Studies Page 1 of 8 Legal Text 15 December 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and maintenance practices for both air-to-air and water-to-air heat pumps in the US are: improper refrigerant charges (up to 15% off), incorrect airflow over the coil (up to 50% off design), oversized equipment

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

315

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sustainable housing in participating counties by 2010. This effort will be accomplished by presenting builders and real estate

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has participated inand sponsorship of an EERE-wide symposium on internationalinternational activities in the EERE portfolio. Additional

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Illustrating the AADL error modeling annex (v.2) using a simple safety-critical medical device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Developing and certifying safety-critical and highly reliable systems almost always includes significant emphasis on hazard analysis and risk assessment. There have been substantial improvements in automation and formalization of other aspects of critical ... Keywords: aadl, error analysis, error modeling, formal architecture, hazard analysis, risk assessment

Brian Larson; John Hatcliff; Kim Fowler; Julien Delange

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Microbial enhanced oil recovery research. Annex 5, Summary annual report, 1991--1992  

SciTech Connect

The surface active lipopeptide produced by Bacillus licheniformis JF-2 was isolated to near apparent homogeneity. NMR experiments revealed that this compound consists of a heptapeptide with an amino acid sequence similar to surfactin and a heterogeneous fatty acid consisting of the normal-, anteiso-, and iso- branched isomers. The surface activity of the B. licheniformis JF-2 surfactant was shown to depend on the presence of fermentation products and is strongly affected by the pH. Under conditions of optimal salinity and pH the interfacial tension against decane was 6 {times} 10{sup 3} mN/m which is one of the lowest values ever obtained with a microbial surfactant. Microbial compounds which exhibit particularly high surface activity are classified as biosurfactants. Microbial biosurfactants include a wide variety of surface and interfacially active compounds, such as glycolipids, lipopeptides polysaccharideprotein complexes, phospholipids, fatty acids and neutral lipids. Biosurfactants are easily biodegradable and thus are particularly suited for environmental applications such as bioremediation and the dispersion of oil spills. Bacillus licheniformis strain JF-2 has been shown to be able to grow and produce a very effective biosurfactant under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and in the presence of high salt concentrations. The production of biosurfactants in anaerobic, high salt environments is potentially important for a variety of in situ applications such as microbial enhanced oil recovery. As a first step towards evaluating the commercial utility of the B. licheniformis JF-2 surfactant, we isolated t-he active. compound from the culture supernatant, characterized its chemical structure and investigated its phase behavior. We found that the surface activity of the surfactant is strongly dependent on the pH of the aqueous. phase. This may be important for the biological function of the surfactant and is of interest for several applications in surfactancy.

Sharma, M.M.; Georgiou, G. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Assessment of GHG inventories from the LUCF sector of Annex-I countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reporting of CO2...emissions and removals from the landuse change and forestry (LUCF) sector is assessed in this paper based onthe National GHG inventories and the National Communications submittedby the...2 (555...

N.H. Ravindranath; Rodel Lasco; P. Sudha

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Washington, DC. Demand Side Management ImplementingEnergy Agency Demand Side Management Programme. Task XIII:Energy Agency Demand Side Management Program. Task XIII:

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design, and operation of net-zero energy buildings Develop net importer of information But also missed opportunities: Scandinavian solutions for indoor air quality in zero-energy

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels FE-24 GTN, Roomand Community Systems (ECBCS)* Clean Coal Sciences* ClimateHydrogen* Hydropower IEA Clean Coal Centre* Industrial

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Annexation of Interchromosomal Space During Viral Infection of 3D Tissue Matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The process of viral infection has been shown to be a tightly structured process that exerts precise control over the nucleus. By quantitatively documenting the dynamic nuclear changes in response to nuclear infection of cells suspended in a three...

Crannell, Zachary

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

324

Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs (Annex 1)  

SciTech Connect

Interdisciplinary studies of the Upper Pennsylvanian Lansing and Kansas City groups have been undertaken in order to improve the geologic characterization of petroleum reservoirs and to develop a quantitative understanding of the processes responsible for formation of associated depositional sequences. To this end, concepts and methods of sequence stratigraphy are being used to define and interpret the three-dimensional depositional framework of the Kansas City Group. The investigation includes characterization of reservoir rocks in oil fields in western Kansas, description of analog equivalents in near-surface and surface sites in southeastern Kansas, and construction of regional structural and stratigraphic framework to link the site specific studies. Geologic inverse and simulation models are being developed to integrate quantitative estimates of controls on sedimentation to produce reconstructions of reservoir-bearing strata in an attempt to enhance our ability to predict reservoir characteristics.

Watney, W.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Building Energy Analysis Tools Solar Resource Knowledgeenergysimulationtools PV/thermalsystems SolarresourceEnergySimulationTools PV/ThermalSystems SolarResource

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MaterialsforSolarThermalApplications EnergyUse,MaterialsforSolar ThermalApplications EnergyUse,MaterialsforSolarThermalApplications EnergyUse,

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - annex xxiii phase Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of California, Merced Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 46 Dimensional Metrology for Nanomanufacturing Summary: . Morphologies achieved to date...

328

MINISTERE DE L'ENSEIGNEMENT SUPERIEUR ANNEXE IV-2 ET DE LA RECHERCHE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ème échelon + au moins 5 ans de services effectifs dans le grade article 55 ATRF P 2C ATRF 1C 5 ème échelon + au moins 6 ans de services effectifs dans le grade article 56 ATRF P 1C ATRF P 2C 5 ème échelon

Arleo, Angelo

329

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Review DOE has participated in IEA implementingand reviews planned and existing energy efficiency programs in IEAof the IEA Secretariat. It also reviews global energy

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Annex III-evaluation of past and ongoing enhanced oil recovery projects  

SciTech Connect

The Infill Drilling Predictive Model (IDPM) was developed by Scientific Software-Intercomp (SSI) for the Bartlesville Project Office (BPO) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The model and certain adaptations thereof were used in conjunction with other models to support the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission`s (IOGCC) 1993 state-by-state assessment of the potential domestic reserves achievable through the application of Advanced Secondary Recovery (ASR) and Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques. Funding for this study was provided by the DOE/BPO, which additionally provided technical support. The IDPM is a three-dimensional (stratified, five-spot), two-phase (oil and water) model which uses a minimal amount of reservoir and geologic data to generate production and recovery forecasts for ongoing waterflood and infill drilling projects. The model computes water-oil displacement and oil recovery using finite difference solutions within streamtubes. It calculates the streamtube geometries and uses a two-dimensional reservoir simulation to track fluid movement in each streamtube slice. Thus the model represents a hybrid of streamtube and numerical simulators.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

article summarizes information submitted in the Sec- tion 18 Request. Rice is a major commodity in all southern rice-producing states. Rice farming generates revenue for related businesses such as irrigation districts, fuel suppliers, implement dealerships...; thus, southern rice farming generates at least $4-5 billion annually in revenue, which sustains many rural and urban com- munities in the South. Successful rice farming requires considerable economic inputs. In 2006, esti- mated direct expenses...

332

VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Professor Helmut Satz, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany Quark Confinement and Hadrosythesis May 14 Dr. Daniel Abriola, Internaltional Atomic...

333

Science and society test VI: Energy economics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simple numerical estimates are developed in order to quantify a variety of energy economics issues. The Verhulst equation which considers the effect of finite resources on petroleum production is modified to take into account supply and demand economics. Numerical and analytical solutions to these differential equations are presented in terms of supply and demand elasticity functions various finite resources and the rate of increase in fuel costs. The indirect cost per barrel of imported oil from OPEC is shown to be about the same as the direct cost. These effects as well as those of discounted benefits and deregulation are used in a calculation of payback periods for various energy conserving devices. A phenomenological model for market penetration is developed along with the factors for future energy growth rates. A brief analysis of the economic returns of the house doctor program to reprofit houses for energy conservation is presented.

David W. Hafemeister

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 25 Prof. K. A. Gridnev, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia Extreme Neutron Rich Sector of the Nuclear Chart: New Horizon September 26 Dr....

335

Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume VI, 2006  

SciTech Connect

Students who conducted research at DOE National Laboratories during 2005 were invited to include their research abstracts, and for a select few, their completed research papers in this Journal. This Journal is direct evidence of students collaborating with their mentors. Fields in which these students worked include: Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Engineering; Environmental Science; General Sciences; Materials Sciences; Medical and Health Sciences; Nuclear Sciences; Physics; and Science Policy.

Faletra, P.; Schuetz, A.; Cherkerzian, D.; Clark, T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Part VI: Section I: Contract Clause  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

with the same force and effect as if they were given in full text. Upon request, the Contracting Officer will make their full text available. Also, the full text of a clause may be...

337

Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Rick Norman, Univer- sity of Arkansas; and Brian Ottis, University of Missouri. For more information email twalker@drec.msstate.edu Photo by Mike Jund Rice seedlings at the 4 and 5 leaf stage, with urea applied, just prior to permanent flood. Achieving...s Nutrition Research Center Researcher in the News... Growing up a carpenters son with a love for science, Mike debated on which would be his career, and which would be his hobby. In the end, he decided on career in plant science, but his skill for building...

338

Comparative dosimetry of BEIR VI revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......assuming a 30-d cell cycle, and ICRP Publication...1970s, and all with diesel equipment(4). It...Graphically Interactive General Algorithm for FITting...risk models have the general form: ERR b THE `RADON...locations in four large (diesel-operated) underground......

Anthony C. James; Alan Birchall; Gamal Akabani

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Communications Satellites: Countdown for INTELSAT VI  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...spacecraft structure, thermal design, and dynamic...frequency down-converter, a microwave preamplifier-driver...con-centrated microwave energy through a toroidal...which increases its energy-collecting surface...then in the Indian Ocean region, additional...net-works within the same ocean region. Originally...

L. Pollack; H. Weiss

1984-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis VI.  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This paper is a compilation of the essential results of our experimental work in the determination of the path of carbon in photosynthesis. There are discussions of the dark fixation of photosynthesis and methods of separation and identification including paper chromatography and radioautography. The definition of the path of carbon in photosynthesis by the distribution of radioactivity within the compounds is described.

Calvin, M.

1949-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discarded, and vials were then returned to boxes and held for 8 weeks to obtain F 1 progeny. Mortality with DE alone did not exceed 70% even at the label rate of 500 ppm, with greater mortality in Cocodrie and M-205 than in S-102 (Figure 1). Mortal- ity... project. In August of 2001, Julio assumed the position of rice agronomist at Garrett Farms in Danbury, Texas. Jacko Garrett is one of the premier seedsmen in the state, and has a very high standard of operational procedures. Julio was responsible...

342

Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not favor one country over another. In the last issue of Texas Rice, I also discussed the need for a massive increase in federal and state funding for biofuels crop production. On June 7, 2006, the Worldwatch Institute presented a 38-page report titled..., Biofuels for Transportation. The report identifies the opportunities and limitations associated with biofuels production in the U.S. and elsewhere. Based on data presented in the report, ethanol production worldwide has increased at an annual rate of ca...

343

The Theory of Quantized Fields. VI  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper treats the effect of a time-independent external electromagnetic field upon a Dirac field by constructing the transformation function in a representation adapted to the external field. In addition to the alteration of the Green's function, the structure of the transformation function differs from that of the zero field situation by a factor which describes the energy of the modified vacuum state. A formula for the vacuum energy is obtained and expressed in a form appropriate to a localized field, in terms of the energy eigenvalues of discrete modes, and of the phase shifts associated with continuum modes. Determinantal methods are then introduced, and the class of fields is established for which a certain frequency-dependent modified determinant is an integral function of the parameter measuring the strength of the field. The properties of the determinant are investigated in the two frequency regions |p0|m, with regard to the zeros of the real determinant in the former region, which are the frequencies of the discrete modes, and to the phase of the complex determinant in the latter region. In the second situation, a connection is established with a unitary matrix defined for modes of a given frequency, and the phase of the determinant is expressed in terms of the eigenphases of this matrix. Following a discussion of the asymptotic behavior of the determinant as a function of p0, the modified determinant is constructed in terms of the discrete mode energies and of the eigenphases. This yields a more precise version of the vacuum energy formula, in which a single divergent parameter is exhibited, for a suitable class of fields.The scattering description is introduced by an evaluation of the Green's function, for a sufficiently large time interval, in terms of the discrete modes, and of linear combinations of free particle modes expressed by a unitary matrix which is an extension of that referring to modes of a single frequency. Transition probabilities are derived and summarized in a generating function that serves to evaluate occupation number expectation values for the final state, upon which is based the definition of differential and total scattering cross sections. A discussion is presented of various symmetry operations and the resulting properties of cross sections. Then, a determinantal formula for the individual transition probabilities is used to examine the probability for the persistence of a state, in its dependence upon occupation numbers. An incidental result of this analysis is a qualitative upper limit to total cross sections in relation to the character of the angular distribution. A section is devoted to the properties of eigenphases, including the demonstration of equivalence between phase shifts and eigenphases, and the discussion of alternative procedures for their evaluation in terms of quantities exhibited as convergent power series in the potential. Finally, the determinantal asymptotic behavior is used to obtain a high-energy approximation to the eigenphases for an isotropic scalar potential. The resulting high energy, small angle, form of the scattering cross section is discussed in the extreme quantum and classical limits. An alternative derivation of the high-energy scattering formula is provided in terms of an approximate construction of the Green's function.

Julian Schwinger

1954-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by processing these crops is produced more efficiently than the ethanol produced by corn. Water hyacinth, a weed that chokes waterways if left to grow uncontrolled, is even more energy efficient as a biomass feedstock, Holtzapple said. In the MixAlco process..., the biomass feedstock, with added mi- croorganisms from sources such as dirt, compost piles and swamps, is treated with lime and then fer- mented to form organic salts. Wa- ter is removed and then the mixture is heated to form ketones, such as acetone, which...

345

Nr vi planlgger den fremtidige udvikling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

begyndelsen af det 21. århundrede, mens naturgas og vedvaren- de energi kommer til at stå for en stigende del energiformer som sol, vind og bioenergi i kombination med ener- gilagring, se side 6, kan indpasses i energifor

346

Magnet. Part VIPower Supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The power for the Cosmotron magnet is supplied by a 1750?hp 13 800?volt induction motor that drives a 21 000?kva 12?phase ac generator and a 43?ton flywheel rotating at approximately 900 rpm. The generator output is rectified through 24 double?grid ignitrons which also act as inverters returning most of the magnetic energy of the coil to the rotating set.

G. K. Green; E. E. Shelton

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

University of Minnesota Twin Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Fire Protection Annex I - Facilities Operations/ Utilities Restoration Annex J - Congregate Care Annex K - Finance Annex L - General Counsel Annex M - Hazardous Materials Protection Annex N - Terrorism to ensure the protection of the students, employees and public from the effects of these hazards. This plan

Amin, S. Massoud

348

Fiscal year 1986 Department of Energy Authorization (uranium enrichment and electric energy systems, energy storage and small-scale hydropower programs). Volume VI. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Research and Production of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, February 28; March 5, 7, 1985  

SciTech Connect

Volume VI of the hearing record covers three days of testimony on the future of US uranium enrichment and on programs involving electric power and energy storage. There were four areas of concern about uranium enrichment: the choice between atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) and the advanced gas centrifuge (AGC) technologies, cost-effective operation of gaseous diffusion plants, plans for a gas centrifuge enrichment plant, and how the DOE will make its decision. The witnesses represented major government contractors, research laboratories, and energy suppliers. The discussion on the third day focused on the impact of reductions in funding for electric energy systems and energy storage and a small budget increase to encourage small hydropower technology transfer to the private sector. Two appendices with additional statements and correspondence follow the testimony of 17 witnesses.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Annex Volume C. Boiler emission report. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC) test burn program was conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) located in Bruceton, Pa. One of the objectives of the study was to determine the feasibility of burning SRC fuels in boilers set up for fuel oil firing and to characterize emissions. Testing was conducted on the 700-hp oil-fired boiler used for research projects. No. 6 fuel oil was used for baseline data comparison, and the following SRC fuels were tested: SRC Fuel (pulverized SRC), SRC Residual Oil, and SRC-Water Slurry. Uncontrolled particulate emission rates averaged 0.9243 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Fuel, 0.1970 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Residual Oil, and 0.9085 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC-Water Slurry. On a lb/10/sup 6/ Btu basis, emissions from SRC Residual Oil averaged 79 and 78%, respectively, lower than the SRC Fuel and SRC-Water Slurry. The lower SRC Residual Oil emissions were due, in part, to the lower ash content of the oil and more efficient combustion. The SRC Fuel had the highest emission rate, but only 2% higher than the SRC-Water Slurry. Each fuel type was tested under variable boiler operating parameters to determine its effect on boiler emissions. The program successfully demonstrated that the SRC fuels could be burned in fuel oil boilers modified to handle SRC fuels. This report details the particulate emission program and results from testing conducted at the boiler outlet located before the mobile precipitator take-off duct. The sampling method was EPA Method 17, which uses an in-stack filter.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Air Source Heat Pumps for Cold Climate Applications: Recent U. S. R&D Results from IEA HPP Annex 41  

SciTech Connect

Air source heat pumps are easily applied to buildings almost anywhere. They are widespread in milder climate regions but their use in cold regions is hampered due to low efficiency and heating capacity at cold outdoor temperatures. This article describes selected R&D activities aimed at improving their cold weather performance.

Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Groll, Dr. Eckhard A. [Purdue University, Ray W. Herrick Laboratories; Shen, Bo [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Annex XXIII: Phase III Results Regarding Tripod Support Structure Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes. This paper describes the findings of code-to-code verification activities of the IEA Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration.

Nichols, J.; Camp, T.; Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Azcona, J.; Martinez, A.; Munduate, X.; Vorpahl, F.; Kleinhansl, S.; Kohlmeier, M.; Kossel, T.; Boker, C.; Kaufer, D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Thermal front tracking with cross borehole electromagnetic imaging: Task 32 of Annex 4 of the implementing agreement  

SciTech Connect

Field experiments at the Texaco Kern River Field were conducted to identify optimum transmission frequencies and assess the electromagnetic interference problems present in the system. We concluded that the transmitter must be operated below 3 MHz for attenuation measurements to be in the conduction regime. Operation in the conduction regime is necessary if we are to correlate images to independent measurements such as the dual induction logs. We also concluded that electromagnetic interference problems become more severe as the frequency is lowered. We are currently designing a downhole active transmitter that will operate at 2 MHz. This frequency is low enough to be in the conduction regime and to increase our transmission distance capability, but high enough so that we can still drive a 1 or 2 meter antenna. By driving the antenna with a downhole oscillator we dramatically reduce the chance of electromagnetic interference pathways. Future plans are to test the transmitter at the Texaco field site and demonstrate correlation to induction logs. This will be followed by a brine tracing experiment at the same site. We will then move our equipment to a new pilot test site for a substantial series of cooperative experiments with Texaco. 5 refs., 11 figs.

Harben, P.E.; Pihlman, M.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

A Comparative Study into Architecture-Based Safety Evaluation Methodologies using AADL's Error Annex and Failure Propagation Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Effects Analysis (FMEA) [25] are used to create evidence that the system fulfils its safety requirements design phase) are used to automatically produce Fault Trees and FMEA tables based on an architecture

Han, Jun

354

University of North Carolina at Charlotte Design and Construction Manual TABLE OF CONTENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLUMBING DIVISION 23 HVAC DIVISION 26: ELECTRICAL DIVISION 27: UNC CHARLOTTE ITS DEPARTMENT PROJECT DESIGN REDUCTION & RECYCLING GUIDELINES ANNEX D CAMPUS SIGNAGE STANDARDS ANNEX E SELECTION AND PLACEMENT OF RECYCLING & TRASH CONTAINERS ON CAMPUS ANNEX F DESIGN GUIDE ILLUSTRATIONS ANNEX G DRAWING STANDARDS ANNEX I

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

355

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident consequence uncertainty Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Summary: - Annex E - Consequence assessment of accident scenarios Annex F - HazOp and FMEA Tables and results 4... accident consequences (fatalities). Therefore, we suggest...

356

Texas Adapted Genetic Strategies for Beef Cattle VI: Creating Breeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breeds created recently a reg- istry was established when breed formation began, with required documentation of parentage. After quarantine and disease-testing facilities were established in North America, the importa- tion of many new breeds began... Salorn? ?5/8 Salers, 3/8 Texas Longhorn Senepol? ?pool of Red Poll and N?Dama (a humpless west African heat-tolerant breed) Texon? ?pool of Devon and Texas Longhorn Other breed combinations In addition to the British-Continental combina- tions...

Hammack, Stephen P.

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

357

VI-12 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 - March 31, 2014 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor Present Position Jonathan Button 2013 Decay Detector for the Study of Gant Monopole Resonance in Unstable Nuclei D. H. Youngblood...

358

VI-12 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - March 31, 2013 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor Present Position Mike Mehlman 2012 Design of TAMUTRAP and Testing of RFQ Pressure Control System D. Melconian Continue to Ph. D....

359

Involuntary Speech hat do King George VI, Winston Churchill,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Joe Biden have in common? At one time or another, each has struggled with stuttering, sometimes painfully, and, sometimes, publicly. Stuttering, also referred to as stammering, is a communication disorder to formulate words. After years of attributing stuttering to childhood emotional trauma, poor parenting

Harrison, Stephen C.

360

C3Bio.org - Resources: GC VI 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The North Pole Japan Rocks Egypt Canada Please leave this field blank. required Problem: required Attach a screenshot: optional (.jpg, .jpeg, .jpe, .bmp, .tif, .tiff, .png, .gif)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CoViCAD: Comprehensive Visualization of Coronary Artery Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the patient suffers a my- ocardial infarction, also known as heart attack. Part of the heart mus- cle tissue viability information in a detailed anatomical context. We combine multiple MRI scans (whole heart anatomical data, late enhancement data) and multiple segmentations (polygonal heart model, late enhancement

362

Potential improvements to ENDF/B-VI for fusion data  

SciTech Connect

While ENDF/B-6 is significant improvement over previous versions for fusion reactor design calculations, several areas have not received attention and may need improvement. In addition, broadening of the contents of the evaluations to contain information not easily derived at present should be considered. 11 refs.

Larson, D.C.; Fu, C.Y.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Diplomatic Metonymy and Antithesis in 3 Henry VI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

representation shared characteristics with the rhetorical practice of metonymy. Ambassadors, as Jean Hotman wrote in 1603, were endowed with dignitie to represent their [sovereigns] persons and great- nesse during their Ambassage.1 Such representation asked... , the editors, Gavin Alexander, Joanna Bellis, John Kerrigan, Raphael Lyne and William Sherman for their valuable comments on various incarnations of this work. 1 Jean Hotman, The Ambassador (London, 1603), B2r. 2 The Oxford Shakespeare, ed. Stanley Wells...

Craigwood, J.

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

364

Interaction of Uranium(VI) with Phthalic Acid  

SciTech Connect

Phthalic acid, a ubiquitous organic compound found in soil, water, and in domestic and nuclear wastes can affect the mobility and bioavailability of metals and radionuclides. We examined the complexation of uranium with phthalic acid by potentiometric titration, electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. Potentiometric titration of a 1:1 U/phthalic acid indicated uranyl ion bonding with both carboxylate groups of phthalic acid; above pH 5 the uranyl ion underwent hydrolysis with one hydroxyl group coordinated to the inner-sphere of uranium. In the presence of excess phthalic acid, ESI-MS analysis revealed the formation of both 1:1 and 1:2 U/phthalic acid complexes. EXAFS studies confirmed the mononuclear biligand 1:2 U/phthalic acid complex as the predominant form. These results show that phthalates can form soluble stable complexes with uranium and may affect its mobility.

Vazquez, G.; Dodge, C; Francis, A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

SUR L'EDUCATION MATH V.I. ARNOLD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

moiti#19;e de leur science |n'ayant d'ailleurs pas la moindre id#19;ee d'aucune autre. Ils ont com- menc sont une h#19;er#19;esie ; mais on peut aussi les introduire plus tard dans la th#19;eorie comme "nombres id#19;eaux", ceci pour s'adapter aux besoins de la physique et du monde r#19;eel). Malheureusement

Arnold, Vladimir Igorevich

366

Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Present? No Contaminant Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement ethylene dibromide 2.3 Yes 0.05 Hydrogeology Conduit Flow? No Depth (feet): 100 Mulitple Units...

367

Volume VI, Chapter 9 Comparison of Spawner-Recruit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife 2108 Grand Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661 May 25, 2004 #12;EDT for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), develop the habitat strategy for the Lower Columbia River, Salmon Creek, Washougal River, Duncan Creek, Hamilton Creek, Hardy Creek, Wind River, and the White

368

Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chalcogenide cleaves the phosphorous - chalcogen bond andoxygen, nitrogen, or phosphorous atoms. The binding energyDuring this process, the phosphorous atom is attacked by an

Liu, Haitao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Precision engineering center. 1988 Annual report, Volume VI  

SciTech Connect

To reverse the downward trend in the balance of trade, American companies must concentrate on increasing research into new products, boosting productivity, and improving manufacturing processes. The Precision Engineering Center at North Carolina State University is a multidisciplinary research and graduate education program dedicated to providing the new technology necessary to respond to this challenge. One extremely demanding manufacturing area is the fabrication and assembly of optical systems. These systems are at the heart of such consumer products as cameras, lenses, copy machines, laser bar-code scanners, VCRs, and compact audio discs - products that the Japanese and other East Asian countries are building dominance. A second critical area is the fabrication of VLSI and ULSI circuits. The tolerances required to produce the next generation of components for such systems have created the need for new approaches - approaches that could either make or break America`s competitive position. This report contains individual reports on research projects grouped into three broad areas: measurement and actuation; real-time control; precision fabrication. Separate abstracts for these articles have been indexed into the energy database.

Dow, T. [ed.; Fornaro, R.; Keltie, R.; Paesler, M. [and others

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Exact optics VI. Schmidt cameras and prime correctors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of R (the shapes of both mirrors) in order to satisfy those...alpha. A separation of the mirrors of twice the focal length gives zero Seidel astigmatism (Schwarzschild 1905), and a slightly reduced...done if we have a three-mirror telescope and solve for the......

D. Lynden-Bell; R. V. Willstrop

2008-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

371

Precipitates in a Cr(VI)-Contaminated Concrete  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The composition, determined by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, morphology, and d spacings, measured by electron diffraction, identifies these crystals as chromate enriched ettringite (Ca6Al2((S,Cr)O4)2(OH)1226H2O) with the mole fraction of CrO42- in the SO42- position being 0.41 and 0.72. ... Some of these crystals appear to be pseudomorphs of ettringite. ... The CrO42--hydrocalumite crystals are coated with smaller acicular crystals that are most likely solid solutions between Si-ettringite (Ca6Al2(SiO3)3(OH)1226H2O) and CrO42--ettringite. ...

Carl D. Palmer

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

(180-VI-NPPH, Amend. 4, March 2003) United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Focus on ecological principles · Consider the effects and interactions of planned systems and practices the land's relationship to the entire farm, ranch, or watershed · Ensure the conservationist's presence out uses. Planning involves more than considering individual resources. It focuses on the natural systems

Mukhtar, Saqib

373

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Volume VI, Part II  

SciTech Connect

This document comprises the following: report of remaining contractor work, predecessor/successor logic report, contractor interface report (incoming and outgoing interfaces), and activity specification Barchart plot. (DLC)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material Presentation made by Carlisle Smith for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY North American...

375

Microsoft Word - APP VI, Rev 3 _03-19-20  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

D.L. Finnegan, J.L. Thompson, C.M. Miller, P.L. Baca, L.F. Olivas, C.G. Geoffrion, D.K. Smith, W. Goishi, B.K. Esser, J.W. Meadows, N. Namboodiri, and J.F. Wild. 2001. Nevada Test...

376

Proto Algic VI: Conditioned Yurok Reflexes of Proto Algic Vowels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organization. In a recent paper, 'Reduplication and Infixation in Yurok: Morphology, Semantics, and Diachrony,1 Andrew Garrett has presented a set of reconstructed Proto Ritwan vowels (and a few consonants), based on a similar set suggested by Howard Berman... some years ago in his paper 'Two Phonological Innovations in Ritwan' (Garrett 2001, Berman 1982). In a cryptic footnote, he dismisses my reconstruction of Proto Algic phonology without a Ritwan subgrouping (Proulx 1984): 'I am unpersuaded...

Proulx, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Effects of Fulvic Acid on Uranium(VI) Sorption Kinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Funding provided by the National Science Foundation, the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the U.S. DOE NABIR Program, and in part by the U.S. DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research programs Sustainable Systems Science Focus Area at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231). ... In Handbook of soil science; Summer, M. E., Ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, 2000. ...

Ruth M. Tinnacher; Peter S. Nico; James A. Davis; Bruce D. Honeyman

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

378

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Constitution Constitution Current Version of Constitution Constitution (adopted December 8, 2009) MS Word, Adobe PDF Annexes September 2013 MS Word, Adobe PDF Annexes August 2013 MS Word, Adobe PDF Annexes September 2011 MS Word, Adobe PDF Annexes March 2011 MS Word, Adobe PDF Annexes November 2010 MS Word, Adobe PDF Annexes December 2009 MS Word, Adobe PDF Previous Versions Constitution (ratified December 10, 1999; amended June 5, 2000.) MS Word, Adobe PDF Annex 1: Institutions and Members (updated November 23, 1999) MS Word, Adobe PDF Annex 2: Approved Projects (updated November 23, 1999) MS Word, Adobe PDF Annex 3: Collaboration Board (updated July 14, 1998) MS Word, Adobe PDF Annex 4: Subsystem Participation (updated February 14, 2000) MS Word, Adobe PDF Annex 5: Advisory Board (updated March 1, 2000)

379

University of North Carolina at Charlotte Design and Construction Manual TABLE OF CONTENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLUMBING DIVISION 23 HVAC DIVISION 26: ELECTRICAL DIVISION 27: COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION 28: ELECTRONIC & RECYCLING GUIDELINES ANNEX D CAMPUS SIGNAGE STANDARDS ANNEX F DESIGN GUIDE ILLUSTRATIONS ANNEX G DRAWING STANDARDS ANNEX I FIRE DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS AND FORMS #12;Note: Revised pages in the Design

Kelly, Scott David

380

Orange County Change: Census 2000-2010 Center for Demographic Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the largest increases were those that annexed the largest areas of land. Lake Forest and Newport Beach annexed areas that had existing development. Lake Forest annexed the communities of Foothill Ranch and Portola Hills. Newport Beach annexed Newport Coast and San Joaquin Hills. Irvine has made several consecutive

de Lijser, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Engine-External HC-Dosing for Regeneration of Diesel Particulate Filters for Heavy Duty and NRMM According to Annex XXVII StVZO  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation discusses how a diesel particulate filter can be integrated in the exhaust piping of a heavy-duty engine.

382

A guidebook for insulated low-slope roof systems. IEA Annex 19, Low-slope roof systems: International Energy Agency Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems Programme  

SciTech Connect

Low-slope roof systems are common on commercial and industrial buildings and, to a lesser extent, on residential buildings. Although insulating materials have nearly always been a component of low-slope roofs, the amount of insulation used has increased in the past two decades because of escalation of heating and cooling costs and increased awareness of the need for energy conservation. As the amount of insulation has increased, the demand has intensified for design, installation, and maintenance information specifically for well-insulated roofs. Existing practices for design, installation, and maintenance of insulated roofs have evolved from experience. Typically, these practices feature compromises due to the different properties of materials making up a given roof system. Therefore, they should be examined from time to time to ensure that they are appropriate as new materials continue to enter the market and as the data base on existing systems expands. A primary purpose of this International Energy Agency (IEA) study is to assess current roofing insulation practices in the context of an accumulating data base on performance.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs (Annex 1). Annual report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Interdisciplinary studies of the Upper Pennsylvanian Lansing and Kansas City groups have been undertaken in order to improve the geologic characterization of petroleum reservoirs and to develop a quantitative understanding of the processes responsible for formation of associated depositional sequences. To this end, concepts and methods of sequence stratigraphy are being used to define and interpret the three-dimensional depositional framework of the Kansas City Group. The investigation includes characterization of reservoir rocks in oil fields in western Kansas, description of analog equivalents in near-surface and surface sites in southeastern Kansas, and construction of regional structural and stratigraphic framework to link the site specific studies. Geologic inverse and simulation models are being developed to integrate quantitative estimates of controls on sedimentation to produce reconstructions of reservoir-bearing strata in an attempt to enhance our ability to predict reservoir characteristics.

Watney, W.L.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Annex Volume B. DOE-Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center report. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) combustion tests were conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. Combustion and flue-gas treatment of three different physical forms of SRC, as well as a No. 6 fuel oil, were evaluated. The three SRC fuels were (1) pulverized SRC Fuel; (2) SRC Residual Fuel Oil; and (3) SRC/Water Slurry. The SRC Residual Fuel Oil was a solution of SRC Fuel dissolved in heated process solvent. Approximately 500 tons of pulverized SRC Fuel and 30,000 gallons of SRC Residual Fuel Oil were combusted in a 700 hp (30 x 130 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr fuel input) oil-designed watertube package boiler. Sixty four-hour ASME combustion tests with three different SRC fuels were successfully concluded. The principal parameters evaluated were excess air levels and combustion air preheat temperature levels. Extensive data were collected on flue-gas levels of O/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, CO, unburned hydrocarbons, SO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, uncontrolled particulates, uncontrolled opacity and carbon content of the flue-gas particulates. Boiler and combustion efficiencies were measured. The particulates were characterized via mass loadings, impactors, in-situ resistivity measurements, ultra-fine sampling, optical large particle sampling, five-stage cyclone sampling and chemical analysis of various cut sizes. A three-field pilot electrostatic precipitator (ESP) containing over 1000 square feet of plate collection area, a reverse air fabric filter pilot dust collector and a commercial pulse-jet fabric filter dust collector were operated at high collection efficiency. The results will be valuable in making recommendations for future tests and will provide a basis for conversion of industrial oil-fired boilers to SRC fuels. 11 references, 20 figures, 29 tables.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Spectroscopic study of the interaction of U(VI) with transferrin and albumin for speciation of U(VI) under blood serum conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the interactions of uranium with blood serum components is of high relevance for a rational design of molecules of high relevance for the understanding of toxicological effects of uranium as well as for the devel suitable for in vivo chelation of uranium. We have determined the stability constants for the complexation

Boyer, Edmond

386

VI Symposium of Specialists in Electric Operational and Expansion Planning -VI SEPOPE, May 24-29,1998, Bahia, Brazil POWER SYSTEM PLANNING IN THE SOUTH AMERICA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the execution of a few macro projects, capital intensive, with high impact on the economic development of each country, and where their revenues depend on the local conditions and the development of future projects in infrastructure development and the required regulations in the energy field. It describes how the planning

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

387

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

States. Annex 8 provides a list of software tools for analysing various aspects of demand response, distributed generation, smart grid and energy storage. Annex 9 is a list of...

388

Limited Sectoral Trading between the EU ETS and China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the negotiations of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), new market mechanisms are proposed to involve Non-Annex I countries in the carbon markets developed by Annex I countries, beyond ...

Gavard, Claire

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

(321 upstairs) SEMINARROOM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R-7LOFTS R-8SUITES R-10 SUITES KRESGE FOOD COOP "H" BUILDING "F" BUILDING ANNEX A ANNEX B TO CENTRAL CAMPUS (VIA BRIDGE) PATH & BRIDGE TO GRADUATE STUDENT HOUSING, REDWOOD GROVE APARTMENTS & HELLER

Wilmers, Chris

390

PUBLIC / MEDIA RELATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARMS BRIDGE ANNEX WEST BRIDGE EAST BRIDGE SLOAN KELLOGG SLOAN ANNEX DABNEY HALL FAIRCHILD SPALDING. SPALDING PARKING PARKING PARKING ATHENEAUM WATSON C.E.S. CAMPUS PLANNING H.R. C.I.T. SHOPS C.S.S. C

Goddard III, William A.

391

2478 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 11 / Wednesday, January 18, 2012 / Rules and Regulations J. Executive Order 12898: Federal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their vessels with cleaner marine diesel engines. To the extent Great Lakes steamship owners take advantage fuel efficiency of the diesel engines, and even larger benefits in the long term, when the repowered EMISSIONS FROM MARINE ENGINES AND VESSELS SUBJECT TO THE MARPOL PROTOCOL 1. The authority citation for part

392

Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007;318:11081113. 8. CancerGenomeAtlasNetwork. somaticmutationinhumancancergenomes. Nature2007;446:153158. 11. KatohM. Cancergenomicsandgeneticsof

Spellman, Paul T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Computation of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Phase-VI Rotor in Pitch Motion during Standstill  

SciTech Connect

Previously, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations of dynamic stall on wind turbine blades have been performed for stand still conditions with moderate success by among others the present authors. In the present work, numerical investigations are performed to illustrate the possibilities of state of the art CFD methods for this problem, including the numerical requirements as time-step and grid resolution. Additionally, the effect of different types of modeling is investigated, ranging from fully turbulent Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), transitional RANS, to transitional delayed detached-eddy simulation computations. The investigation indicates that detailed information and fair agreement with measurements can be obtained.

Sorensen, N. N.; Schreck, S.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

ORNL/TM-2008/069 KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased

Pennycook, Steve

395

COMPUTATIONAL MECHANICS WCCM VI in conjunction with APCOM'04, Sept. 5-10, Beijing, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

different length scales into one model are developed. Without any ambitions for completeness, let us mention. As an application, we present the results of the numerical simulation of a Ni-Al alloy. The potential energy on an expansion of the macroscopic deformation function y and leads to a description of the potential energy

Bebendorf, Mario

396

COMPUTATIONAL MECHANICS WCCM VI in conjunction with APCOM'04, Sept. 510, Beijing, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, techniques to combine two or more different length scales into one model are developed. Without any ambitions. As an application, we present the results of the numerical simulation of a Ni­Al alloy. The potential energy on an expansion of the macroscopic deformation function y and leads to a description of the potential energy

Bebendorf, Mario

397

Transit Timing Observations from Kepler. VI. Potentially Interesting Candidate Systems from Fourier-based Statistical Tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through quarter six of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

Jason H. Steffen; Eric B. Ford; Jason F. Rowe; Daniel C. Fabrycky; Matthew J. Holman; William F. Welsh; Natalie M. Batalha; William J. Borucki; Steve Bryson; Douglas A. Caldwell; David R. Ciardi; Jon M. Jenkins; Hans Kjeldsen; David G. Koch; Andrej Pra; Dwight T. Sanderfer; Shawn Seader; Joseph D. Twicken

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of II-VI Semiconductor Micro- and Nanoparticles towards Sensor Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be tuned for application as sensors. ZnO is a direct bandgap semiconductor (3.37 eV) with a large exciton binding energy (60 meV) leading to photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. A microwave-assisted hydrothermal approach allows the use of sub-5 nm...

Majithia, Ravish

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Mutational analysis of centromere DNA from chromosome VI of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...found before that space changes between...and in another construction from position...appearance of red sectors in the otherwise...with the CEN constructions shown. The desired...earlier that space changes at the...function. The sector- ing pattern...centromere and construction of functional...

J H Hegemann; J H Shero; G Cottarel; P Philippsen; P Hieter

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

speciation in Hanford waste tank sludge simulants. J. Nucl.and Sr(II) from simulated tank waste sludges. Sep. Sci.Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates. In

Powell, Brian A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

E-Print Network 3.0 - american caesalpiniaceae vi Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Terry W Henkel Summary: associated with Dicymbe (Caesalpiniaceae) in Guyana. Advisor: Rytas Vilgalys. 1988 MS (Botany), University... to Armillaria (Physalacriaceae,...

402

Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WA 99352 Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SCWork at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was

Hu, Yung-Jin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Genogroup IV and VI Canine Noroviruses Interact with Histo-Blood Group Antigens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tissue samples were donated by a large pharmaceutical company. The six dogs had been bred for scientific research but were deemed unsuitable for the purpose and were humanely euthanized. The use of rats for antibody generation was approved by the national... to F) humanely euthanized as surplus to industry research requirements. Sections of the gastrointestinal tract (1 cm2) were dissected from the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and colon and placed into 90% ethanol fixative to best preserve...

Caddy, Sarah; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Goodfellow, Ian

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

404

Molecular mechanism for self-protection against the type VI secretion system in Vibrio cholerae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first crystal structure of the VgrG3CCD-TsiV3 complex has been determined. The detailed biochemical, biophysical and functional studies delineated the structural basis for self-protection in Vibrio cholerae.

Yang, X.

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

405

High-precision photometry by telescope defocussing. VI. WASP-24, WASP-25 and WASP-26  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present time-series photometric observations of thirteen transits in the planetary systems WASP-24, WASP-25 and WASP-26. All three systems have orbital obliquity measurements, WASP-24 and WASP-26 have been observed with Spitzer, and WASP-25 was previously comparatively neglected. Our light curves were obtained using the telescope-defocussing method and have scatters of 0.5 to 1.2 mmag relative to their best-fitting geometric models. We used these data to measure the physical properties and orbital ephemerides of the systems to high precision, finding that our improved measurements are in good agreement with previous studies. High-resolution Lucky Imaging observations of all three targets show no evidence for faint stars close enough to contaminate our photometry. We confirm the eclipsing nature of the star closest to WASP-24 and present the detection of a detached eclipsing binary within 4.25 arcmin of WASP-26.

Southworth, John; Burgdorf, M; Novati, S Calchi; Dominik, M; Galianni, P; Gerner, T; Giannini, E; Gu, S -H; Hundertmark, M; Jorgensen, U G; Juncher, D; Kerins, E; Mancini, L; Rabus, M; Ricci, D; Schaefer, S; Skottfelt, J; Tregloan-Reed, J; Wang, X -B; Wertz, O; Alsubai, K A; Andersen, J M; Bozza, V; Bramich, D M; Browne, P; Ciceri, S; D'Ago, G; Damerdji, Y; Diehl, C; Dodds, P; Elyiv, A; Fang, X -S; Finet, F; Jaimes, R Figuera; Hardis, S; Harpsoe, K; Jessen-Hansen, J; Kains, N; Kjeldsen, H; Korhonen, H; Liebig, C; Lund, M N; Lundkvist, M; Mathiasen, M; Penny, M T; Popovas, A; Proft, S; Rahvar, S; Sahu, K; Scarpetta, G; Schmidt, R W; Schoenebeck, F; Snodgrass, C; Street, R A; Surdej, J; Tsapras, Y; Vilela, C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation made by Carlisle Smith for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY

407

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium molybdate vi Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

+ HNO3 Solution, 250 ml Reagent 6: Methyl Green... Reagent 2: Sulfosalicylic Acid + CaCl2 Solution, 250 ml Reagent 3: 0.5 N NaOH, 250 ml Reagent 4: Ammonium... with this kit....

408

Regulation of Myosin VI transport, tethering to actin and cargo binding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ice cold PBS containing 1mM CaCl2 and 0.1 mM MgCl2 (PBS-CM)mM NaCl, 1 mM MgCl2, 0.1 mM CaCl2, 75 mM NaOH, 1% BSA for 90

Naccache, Samia Nidal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Region VI of cauliflower mosaic virus encodes a host range determinant.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reaction 4% reaction reaction D4 l0Ca 10 0.492 10Ca 10 1.024c lCa job 0.310c Cabb-B 1ON 4d 0.032 1ON 0 0.032 1ON 10d...Science Foundation grant PCM-8342878, U.S. Department of Agriculture grant 84-CRCR-1- 1505, and Kentucky State THRI project...

J Schoelz; R J Shepherd; S Daubert

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Behavior of Uranium(VI) during HEDPA Leaching for Aluminum Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aluminum Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges Brian A. PowellThe underground storage tanks at the Hanford site containtime, the material in the tanks has stratified to produce a

Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Martin, Leigh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

National Energy Board Act Part VI (Oil and Gas) Regulations (Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations from the National Energy Board cover licensing for oil and gas, including the exportation and importation of natural gas. The regulations also cover inspections, reporting...

412

Th`ese de doctorat de l'universite Paris VI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

´et´e num´eriques. Je suis recon- naissant `a Florent Calvo de m'avoir donn´e go^ut aux m´ethodes num

Boyer, Edmond

413

Microstructural analyses of Cr(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing Residue (COPR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

periclase hydrogarnet brucite CAC (total) hydrotalcitehydrotalcite, and possibly brucite. These phases are stableFigure S1), consisting of brucite-like sheets, held together

CHRYSOCHOOU, MARIA

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

U(VI) Reduction by Diverse Outer Surface c-Type Cytochromes of Geobacter sulfurreducens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...was supported by the Office of Science (Office of Biological and Environmental...supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental...was supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of...

Roberto Orellana; Janet J. Leavitt; Luis R. Comolli; Roseann Csencsits; Noemie Janot; Kelly A. Flanagan; Arianna S. Gray; Ching Leang; Mounir Izallalen; Tnde Mester; Derek R. Lovley

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

415

Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.05-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (< 0.05mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms, and stirred flow-cell experiments were conducted to derive kinetic data of uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size-specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment, but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. Our analysis also showed that uranium adsorption site concentration estimated from the adsorption isotherms was 3 orders of magnitude less than a site concentration estimated from sediment surface area and generic site density. One important implication of this study is that grain size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site, and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

416

Advective Desorption of Uranium (VI) from Contaminated Hanford Vadose Zone Sediments under Saturated and Unsaturated Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Sedimentary, hydrologic, and geochemical variations in the Hanford subsurface environment, as well as compositional differences in contaminating waste streams, have created vast differences in the migration and mobility of uranium within the subsurface environment. A series of hydraulically-saturated and -unsaturated column experiments were performed to i.) assess the effect of water content on the advective desorption and migration of uranium from contaminated sediments, and ii.) evaluate the uranium concentration that can develop in porewater and/or groundwater as a result of desorption/dissolution reactions. Flow rate and moisture content were varied to evaluate the influence of contact time, pore water velocity, and macropore desaturation on aqueous uranium concentrations. Sediments were collected from the T-TX-TY tank farm complex and the 300 Area Process Ponds located on the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington State. The sediments vary in depth, mineralogy, and in contamination events. Experiments were conducted under mildly alkaline/calcareous conditions representative of conditions commonly encountered at repository sites across the arid western United States and, in particular, the Hanford site. Results illustrate the release of uranium from these sediments is kinetically controlled and low water contents encountered within the Hanford vadose zone result in the formation of mobile-immobile water regimes, which isolate a fraction of the reactive sites within the sediments, effectively reducing the concentration of uranium released into migrating porewaters.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Qafoku, Nikolla; Smith, Steven C.; Forrester, Steven W.

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

417

A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids  

SciTech Connect

Acidic uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in-situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in-situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/y) show that desorption of U and HA were non-detectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH < 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results demonstrated that HA-treatment is a promising in-situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface.

Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Tokunaga, T.K.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

VI. ICRF HEATING D. B. BATCHELOR (ORNL), M. D. CARTER (ORNL), R. H. GOULDING (ORNL),  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requires an RF frequency between 85 and 92 MHz, depend- ing on the Shafranov shift and plasma paramag (ORNL), J. R. WILSON (PPPL), and J. J. YUGO (ORNL) VLA. INTRODUCTlON Radio-frequency (RF) power in the D-T fuel plasma. At full field, Be = 9 T, this requires fRF - 90 MHz. In lower field op eration

419

Diplomacy & deception : King James VI of Scotland's foreign relations with Europe (c.1584-1603) .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is the first attempt to provide an assessment of Scottish-Jacobean foreign relations within a European context in the years before 1603. Moreover, it (more)

Fry, Cynthia Ann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Tank Operations Contract No. DE-A C27-08R VI 4800  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the next SST farms to be retrieved (A Farm and AX Farm), and a fluidized bed steam reformer feed variability analysis to support the WTP mission. Completion Document:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

TH`ESE DE DOCTORAT DE L'UNIVERSITE PARIS VI Specialite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

toutes les personnes qui de pr`es ou de loin m'ont apport´e aide et id´ees. Sans la gentillesse de Nacera'adsorption : du pore unique au solide d´esordonn´e . . . . . . 12 1.2.1 Hyst´er´esis dans un pore isol

Boyer, Edmond

422

VI.5 Recycling of plastic waste, rubber waste and end-of-life cars in Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Among different types of consumer waste in Germany, plastic waste, rubber waste, and end-of-life cars are closely intertwined. Processing techniques applied to these types of consumer waste are identical in many cases. This chapter outlines these similarities and discusses each type of consumer waste. The regulations for plastic waste recycling only apply to private households. Regulations are limited to packaging waste with the ordinance on packaging waste being the legal provision. The recycling of packaging remnants from production or defective production units is partially organized by producers themselves. Energy recovery of plastic packaging is limited to combined heat and power stations. Packaging waste that cannot be submitted to mechanical recycling is usually treated by the means of feedstock recycling. The treatment of plastic waste comprises fragmentation, sizing, sorting, washing and drying, agglomeration, and granulation. Rubber waste is unsuitable for deposition at landfill sites because of poor compressibility, resilient surfaces, extremely long rotting time, and forming of cavities with air inclusion. An increased utilization of rubber waste in the production of new tires depends directly on the quality of the vulcanization process.

Peter Dreher; Martin Faulstich; Gabriele Weber-Blaschke; Burkhard Berninger; Uwe Keilhammer

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

screw, which serves as a point on which the scale vi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

grooves greatly increased the accuracy of the weapon, and a number of them ... favor of breech-loading weapons, that they can be loaded and tired much more...

424

Universit Paris VI -Pierre et Marie Curie -UFR des Sciences de la Vie Discipline : Ocanologie Biologique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lenfant, Marion Jarraya, Suzanne Mills, Serge Planes, Jean-Pierre Pointier, Jocelyne Blanc, Jean d'eau. Merci à Thierry Lison de Loma, pour son aide sur le terrain à Raiatea, et pour avoir bien

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

425

Th`ese de Doctorat de l'Universite Paris VI Pierre et Marie Curie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lindgren, doctorant `a l'Universit´e de Lulea maintenant `a l'UCL, pour les travaux passionnants de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

426

Adsorption of Chromium (VI) by metal hydroxide sludge from the metal finishing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Management, United States (2008)" #12;2 1 Introduction Industrial aqueous pollution (heavy metals) accounts sludge (MHS) during the treatment of their liquid effluents charged with heavy metals. Generally, a small for 30 to 40% of industrial pollution. Metal finishing is one of the sectors which contributes mostly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

427

Microsoft PowerPoint - TAB B 02-12-08 Article VI Briefing Interagency...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2008 Introduction YOUR PRESENTERS TODAY: * THOMAS P. D'AGOSTINO, Administrator, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Department of Energy * WILLIAM H. TOBEY, Deputy...

428

17. J. Haywood, The Penguin Historical Atlas of the Vi-kings (Penguin Books, London, 1995).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adenine dinucleotide phos- phate. Low micromolar concentrations of carbon monoxide inhibited the DNA binding activity of holo-NPAS2 but not that of apo-NPAS2. Upon exposure to carbon monoxide, inactive BMAL1 heme binding during the purification of NPAS2, a mammali- an bHLH (basic helix-loop-helix)­PAS tran

Rutter, Jared

429

Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorptiondesorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size...

430

Coherent Neutron Scattering Study of the SmV ? SmVI Transition in TBBA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have shown [1] by X-rays studies that an herring-bone local order exists in the hexagonal SmBA phase or in the pseudo-hexagonal SmBC (SmH) phase. When the studied compounds undergo a SmBC ? SmEC transition, on...

A. M. Levelut; F. Moussa; M. Lambert

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Infrared reflectance and transmission spectra in II-VI alloys and superlattices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Room temperature measurements of the far-infrared (FIR) reflectance spectra are reported for the polar optical phonons in a series of bulk Cd[subscript x]Zn[subscript 1?x]Te (0 ? x ? 1) and CdSe[subscript x]Te[subscript ...

Talwar, Devki N.

432

Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Hanford waste tank sludge simulants. J. Nucl. Sci.from simulated tank waste sludges. Sep. Sci. Tech. 38(2),Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates. In preparation,

Powell, Brian A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Behavior of Uranium(VI) during HEDPA Leaching for Aluminum Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges Brian A. Powell 1 ,to produce a clay-like sludge layer, a slurry phase, and anto be concentrated in the sludge phase, which is primarily

Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Martin, Leigh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Sustainable Practices Policy Sections II, III.I. and V.I. Sustainable Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

areas of a building located outside of the enclosed structure). OGSF50 is also known as "California consumption because it contains objectionable pollution, contamination minerals or infective agents, including in the context of the local watershed, and enhance economic, social and environmental sustainability while

California at Santa Cruz, University of

435

Universit Paris VI Pierre et Marie Curie cole Doctorale Cerveau Cognition Comportement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contrôle cortico-spinal à partir des aires motrices et pré-motrices impliquant le système propriospinal Contrôle cortico-spinal à partir des aires motrices et pré-motrices impliquant le système propriospinal commandes motrices provenant de structures supérieures, ainsi que l'initiation et la terminaison du

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

436

VI-1.20(A) POLTICA DE LA UNIVERSIDAD DE MARYLAND SOBRE LA CONDUCTA SEXUAL INDEBIDA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

razones de sexo, lo cual es contrario al Código de Equidad de la Universidad de Maryland, Diversidad e sexual indebida, que puede ser entre personas del mismo sexo o del sexo opuesto. La conducta sexual indebida puede ser una forma de discriminación por razones de sexo, prohibida por la legislación federal y

Bernstein, Joseph B.

437

Radiation-Induced Decomposition of U(VI) Phase to Nanocrystals of UO2  

SciTech Connect

U{sup 6+}-phases are common alteration products, under oxidizing conditions, of uraninite and the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel. These U{sup 6+}-phases are subjected to a radiation field caused by the {alpha}-decay of U, or in the case of spent nuclear fuel, incorporated actinides, such as {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np. In order to evaluate the effects of {alpha}-decay events on the stability of the U{sup 6+}-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) of U{sup 6+}-phases. The heavy-particle irradiations are used to simulate the ballistic interactions of the recoil-nucleus of an {alpha}-decay event with the surrounding structure. The Kr{sup 2+}-irradiation decomposed the U{sup 6+}-phases to UO{sub 2} nanocrystals at doses as low as 0.006 displacements per atom (dpa). U{sup 6+}-phases accumulate substantial radiation doses ({approx}1.0 displacement per atom) within 100,000 years if the concentration of incorporated {sup 239}Pu is as high as 1 wt%. Similar nanocrystals of UO{sub 2} were observed in samples from the natural fission reactors at Oklo, Gabon. Multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO{sub 2} followed by alteration to U{sup 6+}-phases provide a mechanism for the remobilization of incorporated radionuclides.

S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing; L. Wang

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

438

RADIATION-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF U(VI) ALTERATION PHASES OF UO2  

SciTech Connect

U{sup 6+}-phases are common alteration products of spent nuclear fuel under oxidizing conditions, and they may potentially incorporate actinides, such as long-lived {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np, delaying their transport to the biosphere. In order to evaluate the ballistic effects of {alpha}-decay events on the stability of the U{sup 6+}-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) for six different structures of U{sup 6+}-phases: uranophane, kasolite, boltwoodite, saleeite, carnotite, and liebigite. The target uranyl-minerals were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and identification confirmed by SAED (selected area electron diffraction) in TEM (transmission electron microscopy). The TEM observation revealed no initial contamination of uraninite in these U{sup 6+} phases. All of the samples were irradiated with in situ TEM observation using 1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+} in the IVEM (intermediate-voltage electron microscope) at the IVEM-Tandem Facility of Argonne National Laboratory. The ion flux was 6.3 x 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}/sec. The specimen temperatures during irradiation were 298 and 673 K, respectively. The Kr{sup 2+}-irradiation decomposed the U{sup 6+}-phases to nanocrystals of UO{sub 2} at doses as low as 0.006 dpa. The cumulative doses for the pure U{sup 6+}-phases, e.g., uranophane, at 0.1 and 1 million years (m.y.) are calculated to be 0.009 and 0.09 dpa using SRIM2003. However, with the incorporation of 1 wt.% {sup 239}Pu, the calculated doses reach 0.27 and {approx}1.00 dpa in ten thousand and one hundred thousand years, respectively. Under oxidizing conditions, multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO{sub 2} followed by alteration to U{sup 6+}-phases should be further investigated to determine the fate of trace elements that may have been incorporated in the U{sup 6+}-phases.

S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

439

ON NONLINEAR TRANSFORMATIONS OF CONVEX V.I. BOGACHEV, A.V. KOLESNIKOV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a uniformly convex measure #22; on R 1 and a probability mea- sure #23; #28; #22;, we show that there is a Borel transformation T = (T k ) 1 k=1 of R 1 such that #23; = #22; ? T 1 and F (x) := T (x) x 2 l 2 . Moreover, if #23; is equiva- lent to its translation along (1; 0; 0; : : :), e.g., if #23; is a product

Bielefeld, University of

440

THESE DE DOCTORAT DE L'UNIVERSITE PARIS VI PIERRE ET MARIE CURIE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diffraction des rayons X, - Du côté du DMSC : M-H. Ritti, pour la dilatométrie et l'AFM, merci pour tout ce

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Removal of Uranium(VI) from Solution by Fungal Biomass and Fungal Wall-Related Biopolymers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...REMOVAL OF ARSENIC FROM CONTAMINATED DRINKING-WATER BY A CHITOSAN-CHITIN MIXTURE, WATER RESEARCH 14 : 1307 ( 1980 ). GALUN...cross-links and masks binding sites. Sodium azide, an inhibitor of electron transport, does not affect the uptake process...

M. GALUN; P. KELLER; D. MALKI; H. FELDSTEIN; E. GALUN; S. M. SIEGEL; B. Z. SIEGEL

1983-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

442

PART TWO PERMITTING/CLOSURE OF TSD UNITS/GROUPS ARTICLE VI. ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Sections 3004 and 3005 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. Secs. 6924 and 6925, and RCW 70.105. E. The DOE is the owner of the Hanford Site. 25. The submittals, actions, schedules, and other...

443

Stoichiometries and Thermodynamic Stabilities for Aqueous Sulfate Complexes of U(VI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical speciation of heavy and radioactive metal ions in ground or surface waters is an important issue for the modeling of their transport from polluted soils or radioactive waste storage sites into the environment. ... For instance, sulfate concentrations higher than 10 mM were evaluated in the pore water of clay-rich rocks that may host a deep geological repository of high-level radioactive waste;(2) an environmental concern is also the uranium contamination of drinking water reservoirs near sites where uranium ore has been exploited by leaching with concentrated sulfuric acid. ...

Thomas Vercouter; Pierre Vitorge; Badia Amekraz; Christophe Moulin

2008-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

444

VI.11 Innovative soil and groundwater remediation: the SITE program experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The superfund innovative technology evaluation (SITE) program of the United States environmental protection agency (EPA) has integrated the private sector, EPA, and other federal and state agencies to successfully address complex hazardous waste problems. The SITE program is a key element in EPA's efforts to increase the availability and use of innovative technologies for the remediation of the nation's hazardous waste sites. The SITE program has successfully promoted the development, commercialization, and implementation of innovative treatment technologies. The program provides environmental decision-makers with relevant data on new, viable remediation technologies that may have performance or cost advantages compared to conventional treatment technologies. The SITE program technology evaluations are used by the remediation community to choose cleanup technology options and that data is credible because of the rigorous quality assurance and careful planning of demonstrations. A number of promising technologies based on sound scientific principles being developed under the SITE program are bioremediation, phytotechnology, electroremediation techniques, and treatment trains.

Annette M. Gatchett; Robert A. Olexsey

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HOPO ligand with uranyl nitrate and Et 3 N or methanolic KOHbis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand, uranyl nitrate, and Et 3 N in DMF oruranyl complexes are difficult to separate from the mixture of potassium, tetramethylammonium and nitrate

Szigethy, Geza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Recent developments in Cr{sup 2+}-doped II-VI compound lasers  

SciTech Connect

Transition-metal-doped zinc chalcogenide crystals have recently been investigated as potential mid-IR lasers. Tetrahedrally-coordinated Cr{sup 2+} ions are especially attractive as lasants on account of high luminescence quantum yields for emission in the 2000-3000 nm range. {sup 5}E radiative lifetimes and emission cross sections are respectively {approximately}10 {mu}sec and {approximately}10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}. The associated absorption band peaked at {approximately}1800 nm enables laser-diode pumping of the Cr{sup 2+} systems. Laser demonstrations with ZnS:Cr and ZnSe:Cr (using a MgF{sub 2}:Co{sup 2+} laser pump source) gave slope efficiencies up to 30%. Excited-state-absorption losses appear small, and passive losses dominate. Tuning experiments with a birefringent filter evidence a tuning range covering at least 2280 - 2530 nm. Cr-doped laser samples can be produced by Bridgman growth, seeded physical vapor transport, or diffusion doping.

Page, R.H.; DeLoach, L.D.; Schaffers, K.I., Patel, F.D.; Beach, R.J.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Burger, A. [Fisk Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Center for Photonic Materials and Devices

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

ViSTa-A Strategic Planning Process for NJIT Vision-Strategy-Tactics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of life of the university community. ·Sustain a base of private support. ·Be nationally recognized/upgrades ·Campus events Sustain a base of private support. ·Alumni Association of NJIT ·Alumni/donor participation private sources. ·Develop a core of nationally recognized programs. ·Improve national rankings in research

Bieber, Michael

448

Synthesis and characterization of novel group VI metal (Mo, W) nitride and oxide compounds  

SciTech Connect

Investigations into the preparation of tungsten nitrides have involved the synthesis of molecular precursors, and their conversion to tungsten nitrides at relatively low temperatures. Two interesting molecular precursors, [WNCl{sub 3}{center_dot}NCCH{sub 3}]{sub 4} and WN(N{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}xNCCH{sub 3}, have been prepared and characterized. The molecular structure of the first consists of a W{sub 4}N{sub 4} tetrameric core with multiple and single W-N bonds arranged in an alternating fashion. Three new solid state phases, amorphous W{sub 3}N{sub 5}, cubic WN, and W{sub 2}N{sub 2}(C{sub 2}N{sub 2}), have been discovered by solid state and chemical vapor transport reactions. The structures have been investigated. A systematic study in the Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}-MoO{sub 3}-Mo (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) system has been explored to better understand LnMo{sub 8}O{sub 14}. The study has shown that the sizes of the rare-earth cations affect the formation of these phases. Larger cations (La, Ce, and Pr) aid in the formation of trans-Mo{sub 8} bicapped octahedra, and the smaller cations (Nd, Sm) only stabilize the cis-Mo{sub 8} bicapped octahedra. Magnetic susceptibility measurements have indicated that no effective moment contribution arises from the Mo{sub 8} metal clusters, even though the cis-Mo{sub 8} cluster in LnMo{sub 8}O{sub 14}, containing all cis-Mo{sub 8} octahedra, apparently contains an odd number of electrons (23). Electrical resistivity measurements and electronic structure calculations have shown that the LnMo{sub 8}O{sub 14} compounds containing cis-Mo{sub 8} clusters are metallic, and the LnMo{sub 8}O{sub 14} compounds containing a 1:1 ratio of cis- to trans-Mo{sub 8} clusters are semiconducting.

Zhang, Z.

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

449

Synthesis and characterization of mono- and bis-(tetraalkylmalonamide)uranium(VI) complexes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The complex [UO2(NO3)2(TMMA)] (TMMA=N,N,N?,N?-tetramethylmalonamide) was structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex consists of two bidentate nitrate ions and one bidentate TMMA ligand coordinated to the UO22+ ion. The complex [UO2(THMA)2]2+ (THMA=N,N,N?,N?-tetrahexylmalonamide) was prepared as the BF4? salt; this material tended to form an oil. However, [UO2(TMMA)2](OTf)2 (OTf=triflate) was isolated as a crystalline solid. Comparison of the Fourier transform infrared spectra of these complexes to the spectra of complexes formed in liquidliquid extraction systems supports the hypothesis that complexes of the type [UO2(NO3)2L] and [UO2L2](NO3)2 (L=diamide extractant) form in the extraction systems.

Gregg J Lumetta; Bruce K McNamara; Brian M Rapko; Richard L Sell; Robin D Rogers; Grant Broker; James E Hutchison

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Extraction of U(VI) with N,N?-dimethyl-N,N?-dioctylmalonamide from nitrate media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The extraction of uranyl nitrate with the novel extractant N,N?-dimethyl-N,N?-dioctylmalonamide (DMDOMA) from aqueous sodium nitrate (and nitric acid) was investigated. The extraction mechanism was established an...

Yu Cui; Yufen Hu; Yanju Zhang; Shaohong Yin

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Hanford Tank Farms Waste Feed Flow Loop Phase VI: PulseEcho System Performance Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the visual and ultrasonic PulseEcho critical velocity test results obtained from the System Performance test campaign that was completed in September 2012 with the Remote Sampler Demonstration (RSD)/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform located at the Monarch test facility in Pasco, Washington. This report is intended to complement and accompany the report that will be developed by WRPS on the design of the System Performance simulant matrix, the analysis of the slurry test sample concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) data, and the design and construction of the RSD/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform.

Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

452

Thse de doctorat de l'Universit de Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris VI) et  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rose Examinateur Dr. Mouldi SAIDI CoDirecteur Dr. Siden TOP CoDirecteur Thèse préparée à l mon directeur le Dr. Mouldi Saidi pour m'avoir accueilli au sein de son unité de recherche au CNSTN et

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

453

Reaction of Plutonium(VI) with the Manganese-Substituted Iron Oxide Mineral Goethite.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??More than 60 years of nuclear power and weapons production in the United States has left this country with a large burden of radioactive legacy (more)

Hu, Yung-Jin Hu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

I. ASCRC General Education Form Group VI Historical and Cultural Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Industrial Revolution. V. Student Learning Goals: Briefly explain how this course will meet the applicable of modernization unleashed by the Industrial Revolution. In the first half of the course, we examine the process-century Romanticism developed as an esthetic response to the forces of modernization unleashed by the Industrial

Vonessen, Nikolaus

455

Co-extraction of Am(VI) and the major actinides with tributyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect

Sodium bismuthate was found to be an effective oxidant for Am in nitric acid solutions up to 6 M in concentration. However, in the presence of tributyl phosphate, americium was quickly reduced to the trivalent state, resulting in low distribution ratios. Pre-equilibration of the organic phase with bismuthate at the appropriate acid concentration was not effective at preventing americium reduction by tributyl phosphate. However, when a small amount of perchloric acid was added to the acidic, bismuthate-containing aqueous phase, much higher distribution ratios for americium extraction were achieved. Data comparing the extraction of americium to hexavalent uranium, neptunium and plutonium are presented. Slope analysis was used to confirm the extraction of americium in the hexavalent state. (authors)

Mincher, Bruce J.; Martin, Leigh R.; Schmitt, Nicholas C. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83413-7113 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI, VOLUME 36.  

SciTech Connect

The sixth meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) took place on October 1, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. RHIC is now in its second year of operation for physics production and the first polarized proton collision run at {radical}s=200 GeV is expected to start in eight weeks. The RSC has developed a plan for this coming run through two previous meetings, RHIC Spin Physics III (August 3, 2000) and IV (October 13-14, 2000). We requested the following: two weeks of polarized proton studies in AGS, three weeks of polarized collider commissioning, and five weeks of polarized proton physics run. As a result, we have obtained all we asked and the above plans are implemented in the current operation schedule. The focus of the present meeting was to bring all involved in the RHIC Spin activities up-to-date on the progress of machine development, theory issues, and experimental issues. This meeting was right after the Program Advisory Committee (PAC) meeting and it started with the comments on the PAC discussion by Gerry Bunce, who was informed about the PAC deliberations by Tom Kirk. The PAC was fully supportive to complete the proposed spin program within the currently available budget for RHIC run 2 operations. Gerry further explained the expected luminosity to be {integral} Ldt = 0.5 pb{sup -1} per week, reflecting the current machine status. The introductory session also had a talk from Werner Vogelsang that reviewed the progress in perturbative QCD theory focused on spin effects.

BLAND,L.; SAITO,N.

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

457

ENTROPY OF FORMATION OF VACANCIES IN SOLIDS Laboratoire d'Electrochimie (*), Universit Paris VI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L-9 ENTROPY OF FORMATION OF VACANCIES IN SOLIDS F. B?NI?RE Laboratoire d of the vacancy are identified to those in the liquid state. This leads in a first approximation to the relation. In these crystals, the thermodynamic parameters of formation of a Schottky defect (cation vacancy + anion vacancy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

458

3-Cylinder Turbocharged Gasoline Direct Injection: A High Value Solution for Euro VI Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

3-cylindery gasoline direct injection engines offer similar value in CO2 reduction capability (Euros/% CO2 reduction) at a significantly lower on-cost.

459

Neptunium(V) Partitioning to Uranium(VI) Oxide and Peroxide Solids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Secondary uranium (U) solids are expected to be the long-term solubility limiting phases in cases of subsurface U contamination (1) and at geological repository sites for the disposal of U-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) (2). ... Under the moist, oxidizing environment expected at Yucca Mountain, the proposed repository site in the United States, a paragenetic sequence of hexavalent U oxides and silicates is expected to form (4). ... Primary funding for this work was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science Basic Energy Sciences program under contract DE-FG02-01ER15138. ...

Matthew Douglas; Sue B. Clark; Judah I. Friese; Bruce W. Arey; Edgar C. Buck; Brady D. Hanson

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

460

IEA agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 2000 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The 2000 annual report of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement contains an overview of the agreement, including its guiding principles, latest strategic plan, and a report from the Chairman, Mr. Neil P. Rossmeissl, U.S. Department of Energy. Overviews of the National Hydrogen Programs of nine member countries are given: Canada, Japan, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Task updates are provided on the following annexes: Annex 12 - Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage, Annex 13 - Design and Optimization of Integrated Systems, Annex 14 - Photoelectrolytic Production of Hydrogen, and, Annex 15 - Photobiological Production of Hydrogen.

Elam, Carolyn C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US)] (ed.)

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction INTRO -1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 Exploratory Problem #1: Magnetic Induction VI - 2 Problem #2: Magnetic Flux VI - 4 Problem #3 Difference VI - 9 Problem #5: The Generator VI - 12 Problem #6: Time-Varying Magnetic Fields VI - 15 Check

Minnesota, University of

462

Supplement 1. PFC emissions from UNFCCC data1086 Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emission are reported to UNFCCC by 34 Annex I countries as part of their obligations as signatories to the1087  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(UNFCCC, 2009). Emissions are reported for CF4, C2F6, C3F8, c-C4F8, C4F10, C5F12 and C6F14 in Gg) 6500 (CF4), 9200 (C2F6), 7000 (C3F8), 8700 (c-1089 C4F8), 7000 (C4F10), 7500 (C5F12), and 7400 (C6F14 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 CF4 S 8.58 7.86 7.16 6.77 6.19 6.16 6.31 6.04 5.87 5.74 5.59 4.63 4.47 4

Meskhidze, Nicholas

463

Computergestutztes wissenschaftliches Rechnen Alexander K. Hartmann, Universitat Gottingen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Kette von harten Teilchen i mit Masse mi, Ort xi, Geschwindigkeit vi T1 T2 W¨ande bei x = 0/x = L mit W¨aremb¨adern (Temperatur T1/T2). Wechselwirkung der Teilchen i.i + 1: idealer Sto? (vorher vi, nachher vi) vi = mi - mi+1 mi + mi+1 vi + 2mi+1 mi + mi+1 vi+1 vi+1 = 2mi mi + mi+1 vi - mi - mi+1 mi + mi+1 vi+1 (1

Hartmann, Alexander K.

464

In the Beginnings: The Apotropaic Use of Scriptural Incipits in Late Antique Egypt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VI CE. b. Provenance: Egypt (Oxyrhynchus). c. Material:V-VI CE. b. Provenance: Egypt (Hermopolis? ). c. Material:VI CE. b. Provenance: Egypt (unknown). c. Material: papyrus.

Sanzo, Joseph Emanuel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

CX-005701: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Island Grove Events Center, replace Island Grove direct-fire gas heating system with boiler, replace City Hall Annex boiler, replace Transit Bus Garage boilers with infrared...

466

CX-004039: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Rest Room boiler replacement; 2) Courthouse Annex boiler replacement; 3) Judge Guenther Memorial...

467

Ukraine at the Frontier of Foreign Diplomaacy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In light of the recent events in Ukraine, its civil war and annexation of Crimean peninsula by Russia bring about a problem of Ukrainian fate (more)

Goloborodov, Igor

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

U.S. and Italy Sign Agreement to Collaborate on Carbon Capture...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

while coping with urgent energy security and climate challenges. The Clean Coal and Carbon Sequestration Annex signed between the two countries is part of the Obama...

469

Room to Read: Tracking the Evolution of a New Secondary School Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

knowledge. This new library space, a Learning Commons, istime, design of the library space, account relationshipsthe library collection and library space into annex, fourth

Goodin, Marjorie Cummings

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

BPA?2012?00476?FOIA Request  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

preliminary designs, CAD drawings, tower designs and mitigation plans for the Pearl substation (to include all data of any annex substations that maybe necessary) to accommodate...

471

What Did They Do in IEA 34/43? Or How to Diagnose and Repair Bugs in 500,000 Lines of Code: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Task 34 and Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems Annex 43.

Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospherique ses origines Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

atmospherique . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 3... Bibliographie 135 Annexe A Forcage Atmospherique 2001-2004 141 xi tel-00157976,version1-27Jun2007 12;Table... des matieres...

473

European renewable energy directive: Critical analysis of important default values and methods for calculating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of palm oil biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The GHG calculation method provided in Annex V of ... the EU-RED was used to calculate the GHG-emissions from palm oil production systems. Moreover...

Heinz Stichnothe; Frank Schuchardt

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Topics for letter "u" | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab Quiet Wing Radiochemistry Annex Virtual Tour Topics for letter "u" uantitative UEC UHV VT SPM ultra-high resolution ultra-high vacuum Ultrafast ultrahigh vacuum ultraviolet...

475

Four Years of On-Going Commissioning in CTEC-Varennes Building with a BEMS Assisted CX Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, developed under IEA Annex 40 by the Canadian team has largely contributed in the verification and optimisation of the performance of the building....

Choiniere, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy Agency (IEA-AMT) Annex on Thermoelectric Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy...

477

Approved for Public Release; Further Dissemination Unlimited  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in place around the Annex 3 CHPRC-2014-08, Rev. 0 Overview CHPRC Monthly Performance Report August 2014 Focus on Safety The Decommissioning, Waste, Fuels, and Remediation...

478

UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pacific Ocean Science & Technology Kuykendall Annex Information Technology Center Krauss Hall Holmes HallStairs Pond UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute Exit Dole Street Offices Multipurpose

479

Evaluation of in-house PCR for diagnosis of smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis in Kampala, Uganda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

without_annexes_2009.pdf. USAID: Uganda Tuberculosis CountryTB-HIVclinicalmanual.pdf. The Ministry of Health, Uganda:Uganda National Policy Guidelines for HIV Counselling and

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Topics for letter "W" | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab Quiet Wing Radiochemistry Annex Virtual Tour Topics for letter "W" W-band pulsed EPR spectrometer Washington State Academy of Sciences Washington State University waste...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Ferromagnetic Semiconductor Nanoclusters: Co-doped Cu2O. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D Meyer DE McCready MH Engelhard Capabilities: Spectroscopy and Diffraction NMR and EPR Facility: Radiochemistry Annex Science Theme: Energy Materials & Processes Biosystem...

482

Ferromagnetism in Ti-Doped ZnO Nanoclusters above Room Temperature...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engelhard D Meyer AM Sharma Y Qiang Capabilities: Spectroscopy and Diffraction NMR and EPR Facility: Radiochemistry Annex Science Theme: Energy Materials & Processes Biosystem...

483

Upconversion luminescence of Eu3+ and Mn2+ in ZnS:Mn2+, Eu3+...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W Chen AG Joly JO Malm JO Bovin Capabilities: Spectroscopy and Diffraction NMR and EPR Facility: Radiochemistry Annex Science Theme: Energy Materials & Processes Terrestrial...

484

Chicago South, Illinois, Site Fact Sheet  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Laboratory, and Eckart Hall. Other buildings associated with this site-the New Chemistry Laboratory and Annex, west stands of Stagg Field, and Ricketts Laboratory- have been...

485

Topics for letter "n" | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Lab Quiet Wing Radiochemistry Annex Virtual Tour Topics for letter "n" nano Nano Letters nano-scale particles nano-SIMS NanoDesi nanodevices nanoparticle...

486

Determination of the solubility of Np(IV), Pu(III) - (VI),Am(III) - (VI), and Te(IV), (V) hydroxo compounds in 0.5 - 14 M NaOH solutions  

SciTech Connect

The solubilities of Am(III), Np(IV), Pu(IV), Tc(IV), Np(V), Pu(V), Am(V), and Tc(V) hydroxo compounds were studied in 0.5 to 14 M NaOH solutions at 25{+-}2 {degrees}C. The effects of fluoride, phosphate, carbonate, oxalate, and some other organic complexing agents on the solubilities of Np(IV), Pu(IV), and TC(IV) hydroxides were investigated at 1.0 and 4.0 M NAOH. Some predictions were made on the dissolved (I.V) and (V) species present in alkali solutions.

Delegard, C.H.

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

487

FATE AND TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES [U(VI), Sr, Cs] IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Physical and chemical heterogeneities are inherent in subsurface environments due to varying: mineralogy, pore geometry, solution saturation, and solute concentration. The goals of this research (more)

[No author

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

In situ long-term reductive bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater using hydrogen release compound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100 H Area of the DOE Hanford Facility, Quantum EngineeringCr-immobilization research site at Hanford 100-H area. Wellexperiment was conducted at the Hanford Site (Washington), a

Faybishenko, B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Survey of period variations of superhumps in SU UMa-type dwarf novae. VI. The sixth year (20132014)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Kato et-al. (2009, 2014a), and we mainly used R software 2 for data analysis. In de-trending the data, we...Periods of early superhumps. Object P orb (d) P ESH (d)* ESH References V455 And (2007) 0.05630921(1) 0......

Taichi Kato; Pavol A. Dubovsky; Igor Kudzej; Franz-Josef Hambsch; Ian Miller; Tomohito Ohshima; Chikako Nakata; Miho Kawabata; Hirochika Nishino; Kazunari Masumoto; Sahori Mizoguchi; Masayuki Yamanaka; Katsura Matsumoto; Daisuke Sakai; Daiki Fukushima; Minami Matsuura; Genki Bouno; Megumi Takenaka; Shinichi Nakagawa; Ryo Noguchi; Eriko Iino; Roger D. Pickard; Yutaka Maeda; Arne Henden; Kiyoshi Kasai; Seiichiro Kiyota; Hidehiko Akazawa; Kazuyoshi Imamura; Enrique de Miguel; Hiroyuki Maehara; Berto Monard; Elena P. Pavlenko; Kirill Antonyuk; Nikolaj Pit; Oksana I. Antonyuk; Aleksei V. Baklanov; Javier Ruiz; Michael Richmond; Arto Oksanen; Caisey Harlingten; Sergey Yu. Shugarov; Drahomir Chochol; Gianluca Masi; Francesca Nocentini; Patrick Schmeer; Greg Bolt; Peter Nelson; Joseph Ulowetz; Richard Sabo; William N. Goff; William Stein; Ral Michel; Shawn Dvorak; Irina B. Voloshina; Vladimir Metlov; Natalia Katysheva; Vitaly V. Neustroev; George Sjoberg; Colin Littlefield; Bart?omiej D?bski; Paulina Sowicka; Marcin Klimaszewski; Ma?gorzata Cury?o; Etienne Morelle; Ivan A. Curtis; Hidetoshi Iwamatsu; Neil D. Butterworth; Maksim V. Andreev; Nikolai Parakhin; Aleksandr Sklyanov; Kazuhiko Shiokawa; Rudolf Novk; Tat'yana R. Irsmambetova; Hiroshi Itoh; Yoshiharu Ito; Kenji Hirosawa; Denis Denisenko; Christopher S. Kochanek; Benjamin Shappee; Krzysztof Z. Stanek; Jos L. Prieto; Koh-ichi Itagaki; Rod Stubbings; Jose Ripero; Eddy Muyllaert; Gary Poyner

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

PII S0016-7037(00)00398-7 Characterization of U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes on hematite: EXAFS and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and aquifer contaminant of con- cern at nuclear waste management facilities, uranium mining and milling sites and aquifers (0.01 to 10 M dissolved uranium concentrations, in equilibrium with air, pH 4.5 to 8.5). Both of pH values. Copyright © 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd 1. INTRODUCTION Uranium is a common soil

Lenhart, John J.

491

Dwarf nova oscillations and quasi-periodic oscillations in cataclysmic variables VI. Spin rates, propellering and coherence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......3PROPELLERING As the system passes through the later declining...acts to reduce r 0. The rate of increase or decrease...amplitude. These have a rate of increase of period...showing that some additional physics is required. For VW Hyi...found that the observed rate , which is deduced from......

Brian Warner; Magaretha L. Pretorius

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

vbyCaHbeta CCD Photometry of Clusters. VI. The Metal-Deficient Open Cluster NGC 2420  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CCD photometry on the intermediate-band vbyCaHbeta system is presented for the metal-deficient open cluster, NGC 2420. Restricting the data to probable single members of the cluster using the CMD and the photometric indices alone generates a sample of 106 stars at the cluster turnoff. The average E(b-y) = 0.03 +/- 0.003 (s.e.m.) or E(B-V) = 0.050 +/- 0.004 (s.e.m.), where the errors refer to internal errors alone. With this reddening, [Fe/H] is derived from both m1 and hk, using b-y and Hbeta as the temperature index. The agreement among the four approaches is reasonable, leading to a final weighted average of [Fe/H] = -0.37 +/- 0.05 (s.e.m.) for the cluster, on a scale where the Hyades has [Fe/H] = +0.12. When combined with the abundances from DDO photometry and from recalibrated low-resolution spectroscopy, the mean metallicity becomes [Fe/H] = -0.32 +/- 0.03. It is also demonstrated that the average cluster abundances based upon either DDO data or low-resolution spectroscopy are consistently reliable to 0....

Anthony-Twarog, B J; Cracraft, M; Twarog, B A; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.; Tanner, Delora; Cracraft, Misty; Twarog, Bruce A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Cd-based II-VI semiconductor nanostructures produced by buffer-layer-assisted growth: Structural evolution and photoluminescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, we discuss the assembly of nanostructures of CdS, CdSe, and CdTe using buffer- layer-assisted growth energies for diffusion for CdS, CdSe, and CdTe can be attributed to differences in London dispersion and branched7 core-shell structures. Improvements in the functionality of these structures have included doping

Weaver, John H.

494

Latent and active abPPO4 mushroom tyrosinase cocrystallized with hexatungstotellurate(VI) in a single crystal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mushroom tyrosinase isoform abPPO4 (Agaricus bisporus polyphenol oxidase 4) was crystallized by means of an Anderson-type polyoxometalate. The enzyme crystallized as a crystallographic heterodimer containing the zymogen (L-TYR; 64 kDa), the 21 kDa smaller activated form (A-TYR) and the polyoxometalate (POM) within one single crystal in a 1:1:1 ratio.

Mauracher, S.G.

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

495

The removal of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution by graphene oxidecarbon nanotubes hybrid aerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel graphene oxidecarbon nanotubes (GOCNTs) hybrid aerogels were fabricated via a freeze-drying method ... solutions of GO and CNTs. The resulting aerogels were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, ...

Zexing Gu; Yun Wang; Jun Tang; Jijun Yang

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Hvis det stod til forskerne p Ris, skul-le vi allerede i dag kunne fylde tanken  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, afdelingschef for Plante- forskning, Risø. "Allerede i 1988 blev bio- diesel kommerciel tilgængelig i ?strig. I. "Størstedelen af den bio- diesel, der i dag produceres, bliver lavet ud fra denne sort, og den er blevet endnu

497

ViSTREET: An Educational Virtual Environment for the Teaching of Road Safety Skills to School Students  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Virtual reality (VR) has been prevalently used as a tool to help students learn and to simulate situations that are too hazardous to practice in real life. The present study aims to explore the capability of VR to achieve these two purposes and demonstrate ... Keywords: educational virtual environments, instructional technology, road safety education, virtual reality

Kee Man Chuah; Chwen Jen Chen; Chee Siong Teh

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

USE OF MICRO X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND DIFFRACTION TO DELINEATE Cr(VI) SPECIATION IN COPR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ca 2 FeAlO 5 Periclase MgO Brucite Mg(OH) 2 Calcite CaCO 3Fe +3 ) 2 O 5 00-007-0239> Brucite - Mg(OH) 2 00-008-0458>

CHRYSOCHOOU, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Quantifying differences in the impact of variable chemistry on equilibrium uranium(VI) adsorption properties of aquifer sediments  

SciTech Connect

Uranium adsorption-desorption on sediment samples collected from the Hanford 300-Area, Richland, WA varied extensively over a range of field-relevant chemical conditions, complicating assessment of possible differences in equilibrium adsorption properties. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved in 500-1000 hours although dissolved uranium concentrations increased over thousands of hours owing to changes in aqueous chemical composition driven by sediment-water reactions. A non-electrostatic surface complexation reaction, >SOH + UO22+ + 2CO32- = >SOUO2(CO3HCO3)2-, provided the best fit to experimental data for each sediment sample resulting in a range of conditional equilibrium constants (logKc) from 21.49 to 21.76. Potential differences in uranium adsorption properties could be assessed in plots based on the generalized mass-action expressions yielding linear trends displaced vertically by differences in logKc values. Using this approach, logKc values for seven sediment samples were not significantly different. However, a significant difference in adsorption properties between one sediment sample and the fines (<0.063 mm) of another could be demonstrated despite the fines requiring a different reaction stoichiometry. Estimates of logKc uncertainty were improved by capturing all data points within experimental errors. The mass-action expression plots demonstrate that applying models outside the range of conditions used in model calibration greatly increases potential errors.

Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

500

The peculiar motions of early-type galaxies in two distant regions VI. The maximum-likelihood Gaussian algorithm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......statistical errors. This choice, however, forces us to apply additional corrections when...the and relations of Paper V, and the Fundamental Plane of Paper VII), and determine...Abramowitz M. , Stegun A., 1971, Handbook of Mathematical Functions. Dover, New......

R. P. Saglia; Matthew Colless; David Burstein; Roger L. Davies; Robert K. McMahan; Jr; Gary Wegner

2001-06-11T23:59:59.000Z