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1

Assessor Training Annex A: Referencing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NVLAP Assessor Training Annex A: Referencing NVLAP Accreditation #12;Assessor Training: Annex · NVLAP reserves the right to control its use #12;Assessor Training: Annex A (rev. 2012-07-31) 33 · NVLAP of technical competence #12;Assessor Training: Annex A (rev. 2012-07-31) 44 · It is NVLAP's responsibility

2

Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility Construction Quality - January 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility Construction Quality - January 2015 January,...

3

IEA HPP ANNEX 36: QUALITY INSTALLATION / QUALITY MAINTENANCE SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper summarizes the goals and planned activities to be undertaken by the participants in Annex 36. Some background information and status of Annex work specific to each participant is provided as well.

Hourahan, Mr. Glenn [Air Conditioning Contractors of America, Arlington, VA; Domanski, Dr. Piotr [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The IEA/ECBCS/Annex 40 Glossary on Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Energy Agency's (IEA) Energy Conservation in Building and Community Systems' (ECBCS) Annex 40 has developed a glossary of commissioning terms as one of the first commissioning tools produced within the annex. The glossary consists...

Akashi, Y.; Castro, N.; Novakovic, V.; Viaud, B.; Jandon, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Bonneville Power Ampere Annex Z-995 Building  

High Performance Buildings Database

Vancouver, WA The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a federal agency headquartered in Portland, Oregon, provides about half of the electricity used in the Pacific Northwest and operates more than three-fourths of the region's high-voltage transmission. Because BPA markets power at cost from 31 federal dams, its rates are among the least expensive electricity in the country. The Ampere Annex project is a renovation of an exisiting 60-year-old standard warehouse building located within the Ross Complex.

6

Radium issues at Hunters Point Annex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radium was a common source of illumination used in numerous instruments and gauges for military equipment prior to 1970. As a result of its many military applications radium 226 is now a principle radionuclide of concern at military base closures sites throughout the United States. This is an overview of the site characterization strategy employed and a potential site remediation technology being considered at a radium contaminated landfill at Hunters Point Annex, a former U.S. Navy shipyard in San Francisco, California.

Dean, S.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

annex iv advanced: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(TAMU) Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and shall be considered 12 IEA HPP Annex 41 Cold Climate Heat Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: .) - Task...

8

annex ii draft: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

element includes the Plasma Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 4 IEA HPP Annex 41 Cold Climate Heat Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: .) - Task...

9

annex xxiii phase: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exemples d'approches typologiques Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 17 IEA HPP Annex 41 Cold Climate Heat Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: .) - Task...

10

Annex I ITER Organization Service Contract General Conditions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Annex I ITER Organization Service Contract General Conditions (2014) Page 1 of 21 GENERAL CONDITIONS FOR ITER ORGANIZATION SERVICE CONTRACTS (2014) Definitions...

11

Radioactive Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex The EMSL Radiochemistry Annex, located in the 3410 Material Science and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contamination during transportation. Dispersible radioactive material must be placed in rigid, leak- tight inner be sufficient such that EMSL staff will not encounter radioactive contamination when they open the shippingRadioactive Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex The EMSL Radiochemistry Annex, located

12

annex iii draft: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contents of the Draft SEIS. Homestead Air; Force Base 2000-01-01 5 IEA HPP Annex 41 Cold Climate Heat Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: .) - Task...

13

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Facility - April 2014 April 2014 Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Construction Quality The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Enforcement and Oversight...

14

Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Effects of Energy Removal on...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on Physical Systems. Held under the auspices of the Annex IV initiative to the IEA Ocean Energy Systems, the webinar will be on February 3, 2015, from 8:00 to 9:30 AM PST...

15

E-Print Network 3.0 - annex iiib applied Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ALF-Annex D CFP 2006-EN Anna Lindh Euro-Mediterranean Foundation for the Dialogue between Cultures Summary: ALF- Annex D - CFP 2006-EN Anna Lindh...

16

E-Print Network 3.0 - amending annex ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 KYOTO PROTOCOL TO THE UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE Summary: in Annex I" means a Party included in Annex I to the Convention, as may be...

17

E-Print Network 3.0 - annex ii technical Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GDP of about 0.2% to 2% in 2010 for different Annex II regions. With full emissions trading between... to Annex II countries. Under assumptions of dras- tic ... Source:...

18

Tethys and Annex IV Progress Report for FY 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System, dubbed Tethys after the mythical Greek titaness of the seas, is being developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support the U.S. Department of Energys Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP). Functioning as a smart database, Tethys enables its users to identify key words or terms to help gather, organize and make available information and data pertaining to the environmental effects of MHK and offshore wind (OSW) energy development. By providing and categorizing relevant publications within a simple and searchable database, Tethys acts as a dissemination channel for information and data which can be utilized by regulators, project developers and researchers to minimize the environmental risks associated with offshore renewable energy developments and attempt to streamline the permitting process. Tethys also houses a separate content-related Annex IV data base with identical functionality to the Tethys knowledge base. Annex IV is a collaborative project among member nations of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement (OES-IA) that examines the environmental effects of ocean energy devices and projects. The U.S. Department of Energy leads the Annex IV working with federal partners such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). While the Annex IV database contains technical reports and journal articles, it is primarily focused on the collection of project site and research study metadata forms (completed by MHK researchers and developers around the world, and collected by PNNL) which provide information on environmental studies and the current progress of the various international MHK developments in the Annex IV member nations. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the content, accessibility and functionality enhancements made to the Annex IV and Tethys knowledge bases in FY12.

Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Copping, Andrea E.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

International Collaboration on Offshore Wind Energy Under IEA Annex XXIII  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper defines the purpose of IEA Annex XXIII, the International Collaboration on Offshore Wind Energy. This international collaboration through the International Energy Agency (IEA) is an efficient forum from which to advance the technical and environmental experiences collected from existing offshore wind energy projects, as well as the research necessary to advance future technology for deep-water wind energy technology.

Musial, W.; Butterfield, S.; Lemming, J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Annexes 195 13.11 Fecal Accident Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annexes 195 13.11 Fecal Accident Plan Residual and Contact Time Table Loose Stool Chlorine Residual and Contact Time Table Formed Stool Chlorine Residual mg/l or PPM Time Minutes 2 25 Sample Fecal Accident/spa at three locations to ensure proper mixing. Record fecal accidents in maintenance logs. Follow normal pool

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

VI-1 PAPERS PUBLISHED  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

148030ENAS%206038.pdf. A new detection system for very low-energy protons from -delayed p-decay, A. Spiridon, Proceedings of VI European Summer School on Experimental...

22

Si m pa rele: Annexes I et II, Si m pa rele: Annexe III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and text in English. Updated periodically. N 4 - Strategy of Aristide Government for Social and Economic Reconstruction (August 1994). 1994. Pp. iv-9. Official document setting forth recovery plan for Haiti. Introduction and text in English. N 5... Peyi Dayiti. 1995. Pp. v-71. Haitian-language version of N 5, in Pressoir-Faublas orthography. Introduction in English. N 7 - Samuel G. Perkins, "On the Margin of Vesuvius": Sketches of St. Domingo, 1785-1793. 1995. Pp. vi-75. First-hand account...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy Agency (IEA-AMT) Annex on Thermoelectric  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Thermoelectric materials transport properties measurements improvement and standardization is undertaken by new IEA annex under the Advanced Materials for Transportation implementing agreement

24

E-Print Network 3.0 - annex volume directory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrical Eng (EE1) Engineering Annex (EGA) Engineering Library (ELB) Fisheries Center (FIS... ) Gerberding Hall (GRB) Gould Hall (GLD) Graves Hall (TGB) Guggenheim Hall (GUG)...

25

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for solar and low energy buildings. Also relevant is HP IAof Existing and Low Energy Buildings Develop methodologiesas a Existing and Low Energy Buildings; ECBCS Annex 40,

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Haaren Hall North Hall WestportNew Building BMW 54th St. Annex Getting Around  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Haaren Hall North Hall WestportNew Building BMW 54th St. Annex Getting Around 4th Edition September . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMW · Floor 6

Rosen, Jay

27

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HP HP HP CurrentAnnexes TransportationofThermalEnergyUtilizingThermalEnergyStorageTechnology OptimisedPowerGenerationwithThermalEnergyStorage Sustainable

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel cells and other cogeneration systems, while SHC IAFuel Cell and Other Cogeneration Systems; ECBCS Annex 44,Fuel Cell and Other Cogeneration Systems government and

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Rupture loop annex ion exchange RLAIX vault deactivation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This engineering report documents the deactivation, stabilization and final conditions of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located northwest of the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns, piping debris, and column liquid were removed from the vault, packaged and shipped for disposal. The vault walls and floor were decontaminated, and portions of the vault were painted to fix loose contamination. Process piping and drains were plugged, and the cover blocks and rain cover were installed. Upon closure,the vault was empty, stabilized, isolated.

Ham, J.E.; Harris, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

IEA Annex 26: Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration/Heat Recovery Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With increased concern about the impact of refrigerant leakage on global warming, a number of new supermarket refrigeration system configurations requiring significantly less refrigerant charge are being considered. In order to help promote the development of advanced systems and expand the knowledge base for energy-efficient supermarket technology, the International Energy Agency (IEA) established IEA Annex 26 (Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration/Heat Recovery Systems) under the ''IEA Implementing Agreement on Heat Pumping Technologies''. Annex 26 focuses on demonstrating and documenting the energy saving and environmental benefits of advanced systems design for food refrigeration and space heating and cooling for supermarkets. Advanced in this context means systems that use less energy, require less refrigerant and produce lower refrigerant emissions. Stated another way, the goal is to identify supermarket refrigeration and HVAC technology options that reduce the total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) of supermarkets by reducing both system energy use (increasing efficiency) and reducing total refrigerant charge. The Annex has five participating countries: Canada, Denmark, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The working program of the Annex has involved analytical and experimental investigation of several candidate system design approaches to determine their potential to reduce refrigerant usage and energy consumption. Advanced refrigeration system types investigated include the following: distributed compressor systems--small parallel compressor racks are located in close proximity to the food display cases they serve thus significantly shortening the connecting refrigerant line lengths; secondary loop systems--one or more central chillers are used to refrigerate a secondary coolant (e.g. brine, ice slurry, or CO2) that is pumped to the food display cases on the sales floor; self-contained display cases--each food display case has its own refrigeration unit; low-charge direct expansion--similar to conventional multiplex refrigeration systems but with improved controls to limit charge. Means to integrate store HVAC systems for space heating/cooling with the refrigeration system have been investigated as well. One approach is to use heat pumps to recover refrigeration waste heat and raise it to a sufficient level to provide for store heating needs. Another involves use of combined heating and power (CHP) or combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP) systems to integrate the refrigeration, HVAC, and power services in stores. Other methods including direct recovery of refrigeration reject heat for space and water heating have also been examined.

Baxter, VAN

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

31

Annex I ITER Organization Service Contract General Conditions (2014)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site|Andrea LockwoodAndrzej19a n d i aAnnex

32

Commissioning of Building HVAC Systems for Improved Energy Performance: A Summary of Annex 40 Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

( Japan, France, Canada, Belgium, Switzerland, Sweden, USA, Germany, Norway, Finland) took part as full members, observers participated from 4 other countries (The Netherlands, Korea, China, Hungary). The Annex is organized in 5 tasks according...

Visier, J. C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM Lab VI - 1 In the previous problems you explored by electric currents. This lab will carry that investigation one step further, determining how changing magnetic fields can give rise to electric currents. This is the effect that allows the generation

Minnesota, University of

34

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM Lab VI - 1 In the previous problems you explored the magnetic field and its effect on moving charges. You also saw how electric currents could create magnetic can give rise to electric currents. This is the effect that allows the generation of electricity

Minnesota, University of

35

Microbial Reduction of Intragrain U(VI) in Contaminated Sediment...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Intragrain U(VI) in Contaminated Sediment. Microbial Reduction of Intragrain U(VI) in Contaminated Sediment. Abstract: The accessibility of precipitated, intragrain U(VI) in a...

36

IEA SHC TASK 44 and HPP Annex 38 Solar and heat pump systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;IEA SHC TASK 44 and HPP Annex 38 Solar and heat pump systems T44A38 Dr. Anja Loose Institute for Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering (ITW) Research and Testing Centre for Thermal Solar Systems (TZS) Dr.itw.uni-stuttgart.de Institute for Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering Research and Testing Centre for Thermal Solar Systems

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

37

Annex 3 Resource Management Review The following questions will be addressed by the Resource Management Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management Review: Work Breakdown Structure Is there a valid work breakdown structure? Does it coverAnnex 3 ­ Resource Management Review The following questions will be addressed by the Resource the complete project? Are there work package (WP) descriptions? Are these detailed enough? Do they have WP

38

Chapter VI Conclusion and Suggestions Chapter VIChapter VIChapter VIChapter VI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design for low cost, short range, low data rate and dense WSN application. Because of its low-cost are presented for future works. VI.1 Conclusion This work is an attempt toward low-power mm-wave transceiver of the fabricated LNA showed that this noise model can describe the noise behaviour of the transistors with good

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

39

Vi har fet et Det flles kursus har  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

offentlige tilskud. Det stiller krav til at vi laver modeller, der er mere dynamiske end vi er vant til inden

40

Environmental effects of marine energy development around the world. Annex IV Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annex IV is an international collaborative project to examine the environmental effects of marine energy devices among countries through the International Energy Agencys Ocean Energy Systems Initiative (OES). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) serves as the Operating Agent for the Annex, in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM; formerly the Minerals Management Service), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Numerous ocean energy technologies and devices are being developed around the world, and the few data that exist about the environmental effects of these technologies are dispersed among countries and developers. The purpose of Annex IV is to facilitate efficient government oversight of the development of ocean energy systems by compiling and disseminating information about the potential environmental effects of marine energy technologies and to identify methods of monitoring for these effects. Beginning in 2010, this three-year effort produced a publicly available searchable online database of environmental effects information (Tethys). It houses scientific literature pertaining to the environmental effects of marine energy systems, as well as metadata on international ocean energy projects and research studies. Two experts workshops were held in Dublin, Ireland (September 2010 and October 2012) to engage with international researchers, developers, and regulators on the scope and outcomes of the Annex IV project. Metadata and information stored in the Tethys database and feedback obtained from the two experts workshops were used as resources in the development of this report. This Annex IV final report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment that survey, compile, and analyze the best available information in one coherent location. These case studies address 1) the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines; 2) the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals; and 3) the effects of energy removal on physical systems. Each case study contains a description of environmental monitoring efforts and research studies, lessons learned, and analysis of remaining information gaps. The information collected through the Annex IV effort and referenced in this report, can be accessed on the Tethys database at http://mhk.pnnl.gov/wiki/index.php/Tethys_ Home.

Copping, Andrea; Hanna, Luke; Whiting, Johnathan; Geerlofs, Simon; Grear, Molly; Blake, Kara (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)); Coffey, Anna; Massaua, Meghan; Brown-Saracino, Jocelyn; Battey, Hoyt (US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States))

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Status of the International Energy Agency, Annex 11, Subtask B. Interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is meant to describe the status of the International Energy Agency (IEA), Annex 11 (Integrated Systems), Subtask B (Analytical Tools) effort being carried out by the Member Nations. The goal of this Annex is to identify, compile, and integrate models of hydrogen technology components into system models that will describe overall pathways. Examples would include: PV/electrolysis/pipeline transport/hydride storage/PEM fuel cell utilization or natural gas steam reforming/liquefaction/truck transport/hydrogen refueling station. Component models are developed by the Member Nations and integrated into the desired overall system. Subtask B is concerned with identifying and compiling existing component models from Member Nations, or developing these models from data supplied by the Member Nations via Subtask A.

Skolnik, E.G. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

s1, s2, . . . , sN vi = ai, i = i/vi, i = i/vi,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

¹ ¹ vi = ai, i = i/vi, i = i/vi, xi = vi cos i cos i yi = vi sin i zi = vi cos i sin i amin ai(t) amax(t) i¹ ´ µ amin amax¸ max max ¹ º º þ º ¹ i¹ xri = xi + xdi cos i cos i - ydi cos i - zdi sin i cos i]T ¸ Ni i¹ ¸ rd R3 ¸ ¹ ¸ k > 0 º þ ¿ º º ý þ ¹ ¹ º º ¹ ¹ º ½ ? ? ? º¸ ? Ý???¹ ???? ?º ??Ð? ?? ?Ý?? ?? Ð

Granichin, Oleg

43

REU 2005: SCHEDULE FOR WEEKS THREE AND FOUR Morning talks: Ryerson Annex 276  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for analysis of diagnostic tests. Date YSP Abert/Babai Abert Babai Bader Gordon Apprentice Problems Discrete Apprentice Problems Discrete Ryer. Annex 276 Eck 206 Eck 206 Eck 206 Eck 206 Mon, July 11 9:30­2:30 9/Babai (Apprentice) 9:30­12:00 TWThF Abert (Problems) 2:45­4:00 T, 2:45­4:15 Th Babai (Discrete mathematics) 2

May, J. Peter

44

Appendix VI Corrective Action Strategy  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACME | NationalTbilisi | AvailableVI

45

LABORATORY VI ENERGY AND THERMAL PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY VI ENERGY AND THERMAL PROCESSES Lab VI - 1 The change of the internal energy of a system temperature. In this lab you will concentrate on quantifying the changes in internal energy within the framework of conservation of energy. In the problems of this lab, you will master the relation

Minnesota, University of

46

The Radiolysis of AmVI Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reduction of bismuthate-produced AmVI by 60Co gamma-rays was measured using post-irradiation UV/Vis spectroscopy. The reduction of AmVI by radiolysis was rapid, producing AmV as the sole product. Relatively low absorbed doses in the ~0.3 kGy range quantitatively reduced a solution of 2.5 x 10-4 M AmVI. The addition of bismuthate to samples during irradiation did not appear to protect AmVI from radiolytic reduction during these experiments. It was also shown here that AmV is very stable toward radiation. The quantitative reduction of the AmVI concentration here corresponds to 1.4 hours of exposure to a process solution, however the actual americium concentrations will be higher and the expected contact times short when using centrifugal contactors. Thus, the reduction rate found in these initial experiments may not be excessive.

Bruce J. Mincher

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption In A Contaminated Aquifer Sediment: A Fluorescence Spectroscopy Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI)...

48

Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with SyntheticManganese...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite. Abstract:...

49

Final Report for Annex II--Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources In Saudi Arabia, 1998-2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Final Report for Annex II - Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources in Saudi Arabia 1998-2000 summarizes the accomplishment of work performed, results achieved, and products produced under Annex II, a project established under the Agreement for Cooperation in the Field of Renewable Energy Research and Development between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United States. The report covers work and accomplishments from January 1998 to December 2000. A previous progress report, Progress Report for Annex II - Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources in Saudi Arabia 1993-1997, NREL/TP-560-29374, summarizes earlier work and technical transfer of information under the project. The work was performed in at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and at selected weather stations of the Saudi Meteorological and Environmental Protection Administration (MEPA).

Myers, D. R.; Wilcox, S. M.; Marion, W. F.; Al-Abbadi, N. M.; Mahfoodh, M.; Al-Otaibi, Z.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

IEA Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide presents insights and guidance from DOEs gathered through longstanding and extensive participation in IEA implementing agreements (IAs) and annexes. Even though DOE has been a key participant in international research activities through the IEA since the 1970s, the experience, knowledge, and institutional memory associated with these activities can be lost or forgotten easily as key DOE managers retire or leave the department. The guide seeks to assemble in a single reference some of the learning that has occurred through participation in IEA IAs as a guide for BTP managers currently responsible for IAs and for those who might consider entering into new IEA activities in the future.

Evans, Meredydd; Meier, Alan; Runci, Paul J.

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

51

Proceedings of the IEA implementing agreement on photovoltaic power systems. Annex 4 workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement on Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS), established in 1993, is a collaborative effort of sponsoring countries to reduce costs of technology applications, increase awareness of potential value, and foster market deployment of PV. Task 4, the Modeling of Distributed Photovoltaic Power Generation in Support of the Electric Grid, is one of six project work areas established under the Implementing Agreement. The work under Task 4 has been assigned to Annex 4. Although Task 4 was framed in 1993, no progress had been made in implementation as of mid-1995. The Annex 4 Workshop, described herein, was a focused effort by the participants to redefine the issuer in light of today`s knowledge, and to gain interest among potential collaborators and participants. The purpose of the workshop was to determine the current status of methods for evaluating the benefits of and planning for grid-connected PV systems and to establish a plan for further action according to the needs and priorities of participants.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

VI Congreso de CEISAL: Independencias Dependencias Interdependencias  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 VI Congreso de CEISAL: Independencias ­ Dependencias ­ Interdependencias Toulouse, 30 de Junio al avances del bloque hacia la integración. Esa tendencia no se contradice con la existencia de determinados

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

53

Date Code postal Rfection et scurisation terrasse annex suaps lot 2 : Etancheit SMAC 80 834,79  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

37250 72700 72703 Rfection et scurisation terrasse annex suaps lot 2 : Etancheit SMAC 80 834,79 INEO Marchs de travaux de 133 000 et plus 6 458,38 Cration salle de TP Informatique INEO ATLANTIQUE 4 997 d'amlioration des installations de chauffage et de mise en scurit Lot 5 NETTOYAGE VMC INEO

Di Girolami, Cristina

54

FINAL DRAFT VI. Application 3: Recruitment Prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINAL DRAFT 106 VI. Application 3: Recruitment Prediction Contributors: S. Sarah Hinckley, Bernard Megrey, Thomas Miller Definition What do we mean by recruitment prediction? The first thing to consider in defining this term is the time horizon of the prediction. Short-term predictions mean the use of individual

Miller, Tom

55

U(VI) reduction to mononuclear U(VI) by desulfitobacterium spp.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) affects uranium mobility and fate in contaminated subsurface environments and is best understood in Gram-negative model organisms such as Geobacter and Shewanella spp. This study demonstrates that U(VI) reduction is a common trait of Gram-positive Desulfitobacterium spp. Five different Desulfitobacterium isolates reduced 100 {mu}M U(VI) to U(IV) in <10 days, whereas U(VI) remained soluble in abiotic and heat-killed controls. U(VI) reduction in live cultures was confirmed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis. Interestingly, although bioreduction of U(VI) is almost always reported to yield the uraninite mineral (UO{sub 2}), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis demonstrated that the U(IV) produced in the Desulfitobacterium cultures was not UO{sub 2}. The EXAFS data indicated that the U(IV) product was a phase or mineral composed of mononuclear U(IV) atoms closely surrounded by light element shells. This atomic arrangement likely results from inner-sphere bonds between U(IV) and C/N/O- or P/S-containing ligands, such as carbonate or phosphate. The formation of a distinct U(IV) phase warrants further study because the characteristics of the reduced material affect uranium stability and fate in the contaminated subsurface.

Fletcher, K. E.; Boyanov, M. I.; Thomas, S. H.; Wu, Q.; Kemner, K. M.; Loffler, F. E. (Biosciences Division); (Georgia Inst. of Tech.)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Kinetic modeling of petroleum formation in the Maracaibo Basin: Final report, Annex 12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop and test improved kinetic models of petroleum generation and cracking, pore pressure buildup, and fluid expulsion. The work was performed jointly between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Research Organization of the Venezuelan National Petroleum Company under Annex 12 of an agreement between DOE and the Venezuelan Ministry of Energy and Mines. Laboratory experiments were conducted at both LLNL and INTEVEP to obtain the reaction rate and product composition information needed to develop chemical kinetic models. Experiments at INTEVEP included hydrous pyrolysis and characterization of oils by gas and liquid chromatography. Experiments at LLNL included programmed pyrolysis in open and self-purging reactors, sometimes including on-line gas analysis by tandem mass spectrometry, and characterization of oils by gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance. The PMOD code was used to develop a detailed pyrolysis mechanism from the extensive laboratory data. This mechanism is able to predict yield of bitumen, oil, and gas as a function of time and temperature for such diverse laboratory conditions as hydrous pyrolysis and rapid, programmed, open pyrolysis. PMOD calculations were compared to geologic observations for 22 wells in the Maracaibo basin. When permeability parameters are chosen to match calculated pore pressures with measured present day values, the PMOD calculations indicate that organic maturation reactions contribute a significant fraction of the overpressure during oil generation and early oil cracking. Calculations agreed with observed geochemical maturity parameters of the source rock. 37 refs., 64 figs., 20 tabs.

Burnham, A.K.; Braun, R.L.; Sweeney, J.J.; Reynolds, J.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Vallejos, C.; Talukdar, S. [INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Caracas (Venezuela)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas September 2006 Volume VI Number 7 Texas A Tribute to Henry M. Hank Beachell Henry Monroe Beachell, co- recipient of the 1996 World Food Prize... was the need for additional research, particularly addressing the development of rice varieties that compete more effectively with weed species, and the development of improved weed and fertilizer management options. The U.S. organic market is projected...

59

DeMEASS VI Conference Ede, the Netherlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DeMEASS VI Conference Ede, the Netherlands May 26-28, 2014 A Hybrid Trailing Edge Control Surface, YANG, G?RSES, AHN, ?ZGEN, YAMAN 2/23 DeMEASS VI Conference Ede, the Netherlands May 26-28, 2014, ?ZGEN, YAMAN DeMEASS VI Conference Ede, the Netherlands May 26-28, 2014 A Hybrid Trailing Edge Control

Yaman, Yavuz

60

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

15 Figure 9. Electricity Consumption per Household per year,vi Annexes Annex 1. Model of Electricity Consumption by MPCEAnnex 1. Model of Electricity Consumption by MPCE Class

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Air quality VI details environmental progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report is given of the International Conference on Air Quality VI where key topics discussed were control of mercury, trace elements, sulphur trioxide and particulates. This year a separate track was added on greenhouse gas reduction, with panels on greenhouse gas policy and markets, CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration, and monitoring, mitigation and verification. In keynote remarks, NETL Director Carl Bauer noted that emissions have gone down since 1990 even though coal consumption has increased. The conference provided an overview of the state-of-the-science regarding key pollutants and CO{sub 2}, the corresponding regulatory environment, and the technology readiness of mitigation techniques. 1 photo.

NONE

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

Blue Canyon VI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHIS PAGE ISJump to:BlackfeetBreezes I &VI Jump

63

Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reducer isolated from the Hanford 100H site capable of Iron(study for bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H area RomyVI)contamination at Hanford ?? Cr(VI) highly soluble, toxic

Chakraborty, Romy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO-VI Using GeeWiz  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. The well-known KENO-VI three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code is one of the primary criticality safety analysis tools in SCALE. The KENO-VI primer is designed to help a new user understand and use the SCALE/KENO-VI Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that the user has a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with SCALE/KENO-VI in particular. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of SCALE/KENO-VI that are useful in criticality analyses. The primer is based on SCALE 6, which includes the Graphically Enhanced Editing Wizard (GeeWiz) Windows user interface. Each example uses GeeWiz to provide the framework for preparing input data and viewing output results. Starting with a Quickstart section, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for SCALE/KENO-VI input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with SCALE/KENO-VI. The sections that follow Quickstart include a list of basic objectives at the beginning that identifies the goal of the section and the individual SCALE/KENO-VI features that are covered in detail in the sample problems in that section. Upon completion of the primer, a new user should be comfortable using GeeWiz to set up criticality problems in SCALE/KENO-VI. The primer provides a starting point for the criticality safety analyst who uses SCALE/KENO-VI. Complete descriptions are provided in the SCALE/KENO-VI manual. Although the primer is self-contained, it is intended as a companion volume to the SCALE/KENO-VI documentation. (The SCALE manual is provided on the SCALE installation DVD.) The primer provides specific examples of using SCALE/KENO-VI for criticality analyses; the SCALE/KENO-VI manual provides information on the use of SCALE/KENO-VI and all its modules. The primer also contains an appendix with sample input files.

Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

NUREG/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUREG/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption Models in a Field Setting U.S. Geological Survey U/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption Models in a Field Setting Manuscript Completed: August 2006 Date Published: August 2006 Prepared by G. P. Curtis, J. A. Davis Water Resources Division U.S. Geological Survey

66

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 9): Treasure Island Naval Station, Hunter`s Point Annex, Parcel A, San Francisco, CA, November 28, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hunters Point Annex (HPA) was deactivated and placed in industrial reserve in 1974. The U.S. Department of the Navy (Navy) and EPA Region IX have selected no action for the sites at Parcel A of HPA: IR-59: The Groundwater underlying Parcel A; and IR-59 Jerrold Avenue Investigation (JAI): The soil at a residential lot on Jerrold Avenue within Parcel A.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

OES-IA Annex IV: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices - Report from the Experts Workshop September 27th 28th 2010 Clontarf Castle, Dublin Ireland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experts' workshop was convened in Dublin Ireland September 27th 28th 2010 in support of IEA Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement Annex IV. PNNL was responsible for organizing the content of the workshop, overseeing the contractors (Irish Marine Institute) hosting the event, presenting material on Annex IV and materials applicable to the workshop intent. PNNL is also overseeing a contractor (Wave Energy Center/University of Plymouth WEC/UP) in the collection and analysis of the Annex IV data. Fifty-eight experts from 8 countries attended the workshop by invitation, spending two days discussing the needs of Annex IV. Presentations by DOE (background on Annex IV), PNNL (process for developing Annex IV; presentation of the draft database for PNNL project, plans for incorporating Annex IV data), WEC/UP on the environmental effect matrix, and four MHK developers (two from the UK, one from Ireland and one from Sweden; each discussing their own projects and lessons learned for measuring and mitigating environmental effects, as well as interactions with consenting [permitting] processes) helped provide background. The workshop participants worked part of the time in the large group and most of the time in four smaller breakout groups. Participants engaged in the process and provided a wealth of examples of MHK environmental work, particularly in the European nations. They provided practical and actionable advice on the following: Developing the Annex IV database, with specific uses and audiences Strong consensus that we should collect detailed metadata on available data sets, rather than attempting to draw in copious datasets. The participants felt there would then be an opportunity to then ask for specific set of data as needed, with specific uses and ownership of the data specified. This is particularly important as many data collected, particularly in Europe but also in Canada, are proprietary; developers were not comfortable with the idea of handing over all their environmental effects data, but all said they would entertain the request if they specifics were clear. The recommendation was to collect metadata via an online interactive form, taking no more than one hour to complete. Although the idea of cases representing the best practices was recognized as useful, the participants pointed out that there are currently so few MHK projects in the water, that any and all projects were appropriate to highlight as cases. There was also discomfort at the implication that best practices implied lesser practices; this being unhelpful to a new and emerging industry. Workshop participants were asked if they were willing to continue to engage in the Annex IV process; all expressed willingness. The workshop was successful in adequately addressing its objectives and through participation and interaction in the breakout sessions around the various topics. As a result of the workshop, many delegates are now better informed and have a greater understanding of the potential environmental effects of MHK devices on the marine environment. There is now a greater sense of understanding of the issues involved and consensus by those regulators, developers and scientists who attended the workshop. A strong network has also been built over the two days between European and US/Canadian technical experts in wave and tidal energy.

Copping, Andrea E.; O'Toole, Michael J.

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

68

A case study of the perceptions of current and former school board members of a recently annexed, rural, impoverished, South Texas, Latino school district in a high stakes accountability system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research study was a qualitative study involving eight current or former school board members of a recently annexed, rural, impoverished, Latino school district in South Texas. The purpose of this intrinsic case study was to highlight...

Rodriguez, Claudia G.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Eligibility Conditions for Project Associates - Amendments to the Management's proposals concerning project associates approved by the Finance Committee and the Council in June 1994 - Amendment to Document CERN/2048 (Annex)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eligibility Conditions for Project Associates - Amendments to the Management's proposals concerning project associates approved by the Finance Committee and the Council in June 1994 - Amendment to Document CERN/2048 (Annex)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Identification of simultaneous U(VI) sorption complexes and U...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

conditions under which U (VI)-CO3-Ca complexes inhibit U reduction. Citation: Singer DM, SME Chatman, ES Ilton, KM Rosso, JF Banfield, and G Waychunas.2012."Identification of...

71

Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abstract: Uranium(VI) diffusion was investigated in a fine-grained saprolite sediment that was collected from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge site, TN, where...

72

Building on lessons learned : too high hopes without HOPE VI?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By providing substantial grants to public housing authorities to demolish and rebuild distressed public housing and provide services to public housing residents, the HOPE VI program has helped transform these developments ...

Wang, Kristen J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

A case study of the perceptions of current and former school board members of a recently annexed, rural, impoverished, South Texas, Latino school district in a high stakes accountability system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A CASE STUDY OF THE PERCEPTIONS OF CURRENT AND FORMER SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS OF A RECENTLY ANNEXED, RURAL, IMPOVERISHED, SOUTH TEXAS, LATINO SCHOOL DISTRICT IN A HIGH STAKES ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM A Dissertation by CLAUDIA G... OF THE PERCEPTIONS OF CURRENT AND FORMER SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS OF A RECENTLY ANNEXED, RURAL, IMPOVERISHED, SOUTH TEXAS, LATINO SCHOOL DISTRICT IN A HIGH STAKES ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM A Dissertation by CLAUDIA G. RODRIGUEZ Submitted to the Office...

Rodriguez, Claudia G.

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

74

VIM: Initial ENDF/B-VI experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The VIM Monte Carlo particle transport code uses detailed continuous-energy cross sections produced from ENDF/B data by a set of specialized codes developed or adapted for use at Argonne National Laboratory. ENDF/B-IV data were used until about 1979, and Version V data since then. These VIM libraries were extensively benchmarked against the MC{sup 2}-2 code and against ZPR and ZPPR criticals for fast spectrum calculations, as well as other fast and thermal experiments and calculations. Recently, the cross section processing codes have been upgraded to accommodate ENDF/B-VI files, and a small library has been tested. Several fundamental tasks comprise the construction of a faithful representation of ENDF data for VIM calculations: (1) The resolved resonance parameters are converted to Doppler-broadened continuous-energy cross sections with energy grids suitable for linear-linear interpolation. (2) The unresolved resonance parameter distributions are sampled to produce many (40-400) resonance ladders in each energy band. These are converted to Doppler-broadened continuous energy resonance cross sections that are then binned by cross section, accumulating ladders until statistical convergence, the result being probability tables of total cross sections and conditional mean scattering and fission cross sections. VIM samples these tables at run time, and File 3 back ground cross sections are added. (3) Anisotropic angular distribution data are converted to angular probability tables. All other ENDF data are unmodified, except for format.

Blomquist, R.N.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Interstellar O VI in the Large Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I summarize Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of interstellar O VI absorption towards 12 early-type stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), the closest disk galaxy to the Milky Way. LMC O VI is seen towards all 12 stars with properties (average column densities, kinematics) very similar to those of the Milky Way halo, even though O/H in the LMC is lower by a factor of ~2.5. Sight lines projected onto known LMC superbubbles show little enhancement in O VI column density compared to sight lines towards quiescent regions of the LMC. The O VI absorption is displaced by \\~-30 km/sec from the corresponding low-ionization absorption associated with the bulk of the LMC gas. The LMC O VI most likely arises in a vertically-extended distribution, and I discuss the measurements in the context of a halo composed of radiatively-cooling hot gas. In this case, the mass-flow rate from one side of the LMC disk is of the order 1 solar mass/yr.

J. Christopher Howk

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

76

Energy and momentum of Bianchi Type VI_h Universes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtain the energy and momentum of the Bianchi type VI_h universes using different prescriptions for the energy-momentum complexes in the framework of general relativity. The energy and momentum of the Bianchi VI_h universe are found to be zero for the parameter h = -1 of the metric. The vanishing of these results support the conjecture of Tryon that Universe must have a zero net value for all conserved quantities.This also supports the work of Nathan Rosen with the Robertson-Walker metric. Moreover, it raises an interesting question: "Why h=-1 case is so special?"

S. K. Tripathy; B. Mishra; G. K. Pandey; A. K. Singh; T. Kumar; S. S. Xulu

2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

77

Energy and momentum of Bianchi Type VI_h Universes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtain the energy and momentum of the Bianchi type VI_h universes using different prescriptions for the energy-momentum complexes in the framework of general relativity. The energy and momentum of the Bianchi VI_h universe are found to be zero for the parameter h = -1 of the metric. The vanishing of these results support the conjecture of Tryon that Universe must have a zero net value for all conserved quantities.This also supports the work of Nathan Rosen with the Robertson-Walker metric. Moreover, it raises an interesting question: "Why h=-1 case is so special?"

Tripathy, S K; Pandey, G K; Singh, A K; Kumar, T; Xulu, S S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

John F. Stolz

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Realities and perceptions : HOPE VI poverty deconcentration and implications for broader neighborhood revitalization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HOPE VI was developed in 1992 as program to demolish and revitalize the nation's most severely distressed public housing. One element of the HOPE VI program is to move low-income households out of an environment of ...

Vanderford, Carrie Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution vi Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vi Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution vi Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Accelerated Publications Three-Dimensional Structure of DesVI from Streptomyces Venezuelae: A Sugar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accelerated Publications Three-Dimensional Structure of DesVI from Streptomyces Venezuelae: A Sugar for the biosynthesis of dTDP-desosamine in Streptomyces Venezuelae, with the last step catalyzed by DesVI, an N

Holden, Hazel

82

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment methods vi Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

porous media. Materials and Methods Experimental... Effects of Solid-to-Solution Ratio on Uranium(VI) Adsorption and Its Implications T A O C H E N G... , Wisconsin 53706 U(VI)...

83

E-Print Network 3.0 - appendix vi calculation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

facility, calculations showing compliance... ) (D) (vi) The noise emission abatement system; Appendix B (h) ... Source: California Energy Commission Collection: Energy...

84

Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent upon initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.

Cao, Bin; Ahmed, B.; Kennedy, David W.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

2011-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

85

Diplomatic Metonymy and Antithesis in 3 Henry VI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

love that leads inevitably from corporeal feeble shadow (al corpo una debil umbra) to the souls immaterial and divine substance (sustanzia).44 In other words, Camilla sceptically suspects a world like that of the Henry VI plays, a world of obscured...

Craigwood, J.

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

86

AM(VI) PARTITIONING STUDIES: FY14 FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of higher oxidation states of americium in partitioning from the lanthanides is under continued investigation by the sigma team. This is based on the hypothesis that Am(VI) can be produced and remain stable in irradiated first cycle raffinate solution long enough to perform solvent extraction for separations. The stability of Am(VI) to autoreduction was measured using millimolar americium concentrations in a 1-cm cell with a Cary 6000 UV/Vis spectrophotometer for data acquisition. At millimolar americium concentrations, Am(VI) is stable enough against its own autoreduction for separations purposes. A second major accomplishment during FY14 was the hot test. Americium oxidation and extraction was performed using a centrifugal contactor-based test bed consisting of an extraction stage and two stripping stages. Sixty-three percent americium extraction was obtained in one extraction stage, in agreement with batch contacts. Promising electrochemical oxidation results have also been obtained, using terpyridine ligand derivatized electrodes for binding of Am(III). Approximately 50 % of the Am(III) was oxidized to Am(V) over the course of 1 hour. It is believed that this is the first demonstration of the electrolytic oxidation of americium in a non-complexing solution. Finally, an initial investigation of Am(VI) extraction using diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA) was performed.

Bruce J Mincher

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Public health assessment for Treasure Island Naval Station, Hunters Point Annex, San Francisco, San Francisco County, California, Region 9. Cerclis No. CA1170090087. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naval Station Treasure Island, Hunters Point Annex (HPA), an inactive Naval shipyard located on a peninsula in the San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, California, was listed for base closure in 1990. Metals, pesticides, radium-226, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, petroleum products, and asbestos have been found in various media such as soil, groundwater, surface water, air, and sediments. Navy contractors have identified 58 HPA areas where there may be contamination; investigations at these areas are ongoing.

Not Available

1994-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Remediation of chromium(VI) in the vadose zone: stoichiometry and kinetics of chromium(VI) reduction by sulfur dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The reaction was also rapid, with the half-time of about 45 minutes at pH 6 and about 16 hours at pH 7. A two-step kinetic model was developed to describe changes in concentrations of Cr(VI), S(IV), and S(V). Nonlinear regression was applied to obtain...

Ahn, Min

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: EOR thermal processes. Seventh Amendment and Extension to Annex 4, Enhanced oil recovery thermal processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Seventh Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 50 through 55. The first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh reports on Annex IV, Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5 and IV-6 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, DOE/BC-86/2/SP, DOE/BC-87/2/SP, DOE/BC-89/l/SP, DOE/BC-90/l/SP, and DOE/BC-92/l/SP) contain the results for the first 49 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1987, November 1988, December 1989, and October 1991, respectively. Each task report has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Reid, T B [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)] [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States); Colonomos, P [INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Caracas (Venezuela)] [INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Caracas (Venezuela)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on tapes.'' Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the tape'' number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

Rose, P.F. (comp.)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on ``tapes.`` Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the ``tape`` number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

Rose, P.F. [comp.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

SEGS VI Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginiaRooseveltVI Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name

93

Microstructural analyses of Cr(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing Residue (COPR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The speciation and distribution of Cr(VI) in the solid phase was investigated for two types of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) found at two deposition sites in the United States: gray-black (GB) granular and hard brown (HB) cemented COPR. COPR chemistry and mineralogy were investigated using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy and micro-X-ray diffraction, complemented by laboratory analyses. GB COPR contained 30percent of its total Cr(VI) (6000 mg/kg) as large crystals(>20 ?m diameter) of a previously unreported Na-rich analog of calcium aluminum chromate hydrates. These Cr(VI)-rich phases are thought to be vulnerable to reductive and pH treatments. More than 50percent of the Cr(VI) was located within nodules, not easily accessible to dissolved reductants, and bound to Fe-rich hydrogarnet, hydrotalcite, and possibly brucite. These phases are stable over a large pH range, thus harder to dissolve. Brownmilleritewasalso likely associated with physical entrapment of Cr(VI) in the interior of nodules. HB COPR contained no Cr(VI)-rich phases; all Cr(VI) was diffuse within the nodules and absent from the cementing matrix, with hydrogarnet and hydrotalcite being the main Cr(VI) binding phases. Treatment ofHBCOPRis challenging in terms of dissolving the acidity-resistant, inaccessible Cr(VI) compounds; the same applies to ~;;50percent of Cr(VI) in GB COPR.

CHRYSOCHOOU, MARIA; FAKRA, SIRINE C .; Marcus, Matthew A.; Moon, Deok Hyun; Dermatas, Dimitris

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

KALELE ROAD Annexes 913  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wist Hall KHET TV/ PBS Hawai`i Dean Hall Hawai`i Hall Crawford Hall Architecture School Gartley Hall Path Dole Street Parking Structure Bus Shelter Bus Shelter Art Building Sustainability Courtyard

95

Annex IV Environmental Webinar  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department will present a live webcast on Instrumentation for Monitoring Around Marine Renewable Energy Devices, highlighting themes that arose during a related workshop.

96

Radiochemistry Annex | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

shales. Consequently, the results from this work could aid predictions of shale caprock integrity in large-scale GCS, as well as methane transmissivity in enhanced gas recovery...

97

SSMP Annex A  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

using indirect drive beam geometry, mitigating stimulated scattering of incident laser energy, and the use of second harmonic (2, green) laser light. This requires continued...

98

SSMP Annex D  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Reviewwill help prepare local students for careers inaward

99

SSMP Annex A  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF CIVIL to Mod 0099 datedMod0/%2A enFY

100

Method for making graded I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductors and solar cell obtained thereby  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved cell photovoltaic conversion efficiencies are obtained by the simultaneous elemental reactive evaporation process of Mickelsen and Chen for making semiconductors by closer control of the evaporation rates and substrate temperature during formation of the near contact, bulk, and near junction regions of a graded I-III-VI.sub.2, thin film, semiconductor, such as CuInSe.sub.2 /(Zn,Cd)S or another I-III-VI.sub.2 /II-VI heterojunction.

Devaney, Walter E. (Seattle, WA)

1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

RisNyt NO2 2005 I de kommende rtier vil vi se store  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- per: For det første et meget tættere samspil mellem energiproduktion og forbrug end vi kender i dag

102

Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor films for solar cell application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to an improved thin film solar cell with excellent electrical and mechanical integrity. The device comprises a substrate, a Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor absorber layer and a transparent window layer. The mechanical bond between the substrate and the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor layer is enhanced by an intermediate layer between the substrate and the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor film being grown. The intermediate layer contains tellurium or substitutes therefor, such as Se, Sn, or Pb. The intermediate layer improves the morphology and electrical characteristics of the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor layer.

Basol, Bulent M. (Redondo Beach, CA); Kapur, Vijay K. (Northridge, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

U(VI) sorption and reduction kinetics on the magnetite (111) surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U(VI) (introduced as uranyl nitrate), 1 mM NaNO 3 , [CO 3 ]respect to uraninite and uranyl nitrate mechanical mixture

Singer, D.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE VI-11 DIRECTOR Tribble  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms Control R&DNuclear fuelOPTICS FOR AOREM hostsJeskeHodges21VI-11

105

Tracking the Sun VI: An Historical Summary of the Installed Price of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory. Tracking the Sun VI: The Installed Price ofRange ?10 kW Tracking the Sun VI: The Installed Price ofRange ?10 kW Tracking the Sun VI: The Installed Price of

Barbose, Galen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Geothermal Program Review VI: proceedings. Beyond goals and objectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program Review VI was comprised of six sessions, including an opening session, four technical sessions that addressed each of the major DOE research areas, and a session on special issues. The technical sessions were on Hydrothermal, Hot Dry Rock, Geopressured and Magma resources. Presenters in the technical sessions discussed their R and D activities within the context of specific GTD Programmatic Objectives for that technology, their progress toward achieving those objectives, and the value of those achievements to industry. The ''Special Issues'' presentations addressed several topics such as the interactions between government and industry on geothermal energy R and D; the origin and basis for the programmatic objectives analytical computer model; and international marketing opportunities for US geothermal equipment and services. The unique aspect of Program Review VI was that it was held in conjunction with the National Geothermal Association's Industry Round Table on Federal R and D. The Round Table provided a forum for open and lively discussions between industry and government researchers and gave industry an opportunity to convey their needs and perspectives on DOE's research programs. These discussions also provided valuable information to DOE regarding industry's priorities and directions.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

ORNL/TM-2008/069 KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORNL/TM-2008/069 KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO-VI Using Gee Nuclear Information System (INIS) representatives from the following source. Office of Scientific or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/TM-2008/069 Nuclear Science

Pennycook, Steve

108

Simulation of reactive transport of uranium(VI) in groundwater with variable chemical conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stored in poorly designed facilities or where it has been leached from U mill tailings [USDOE, 1996Simulation of reactive transport of uranium(VI) in groundwater with variable chemical conditions alluvial aquifer beneath a former U(VI) mill located near Naturita, CO, was simulated using a surface

109

Modeling the Removal of Uranium U(VI) from Aqueous Solutions in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include natural U deposits, mining, milling, and tailing operations and U.S. Department of Energy (DOEModeling the Removal of Uranium U(VI) from Aqueous Solutions in the Presence of Sulfate Reducing The reduction kinetics of soluble hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) to insoluble tetravalent U(IV) by both a mixed

110

Microbial reduction of iron(III)-rich nontronite and uranium(VI)1 Gengxin Zhang1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Microbial reduction of iron(III)-rich nontronite and uranium(VI)1 2 Gengxin Zhang1 , John M Cosmochimica Acta9 10 Title running head: bioreduction of nontronite and uranium11 12 *Corresponding author17 examined the reduction of iron(III)-rich nontronite NAu-2 and uranium(VI) by18 Shewanella

Burgos, William

111

UMBC Policy on Facilities Use UMBC Policy # VI-4.10.01 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UMBC Policy on Facilities Use UMBC Policy # VI-4.10.01 1 I. Introduction This policy is predicated on the University System of Maryland Policy 145.0 VI-4.10- POLICY ON THE USE of Regents on January 11, 1990. The policy reads: 1. The physical facilities of the University System may

Adali, Tulay

112

Effects of Solid-to-Solution Ratio on Uranium(VI) Adsorption and Its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Solid-to-Solution Ratio on Uranium(VI) Adsorption and Its Implications T A O C H E N G, and Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1215 West Dayton Street, Madison interacting ligands. Introduction The migration of uranium(VI), as well as other radionuclides and metal

Roden, Eric E.

113

Aerobic uranium (VI) bioprecipitation by metal-resistant bacteria isolated from radionuclide-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerobic uranium (VI) bioprecipitation by metal-resistant bacteria isolated from radionuclide uranium [U(VI)] mediated by the intrinsic phosphatase acti- vities of naturally occurring bacteria leaks occur, these wastes come into contact with surrounding geologic media, allowing for migration

Skolnick, Jeff

114

Simulation of Reduction of Cr(VI) by Fe(II) Produced Electrochemically in a Parallel-Plate Electrochemical Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the cathode, electrocoagulation uses electricity to produce a reducing agent ferrous ions from an iron anode the reduction of Cr VI by permeable reactive barriers. Gheju and Lovi7 reported that the re- duction of Cr VI

115

Chromium(VI) bioremoval by pseudomonas bacteria: role of microbial exudates for natural attenuation and biotreatment of Cr(VI) contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the role of microbial exudates, e.g., exopolymeric substance (EPS) and alginic acid, on microbial Cr(VI) reduction by two different Pseudomonas strains (P. putida P18 and P. aeuroginosa P16) as a method for treating subsurface environment contaminated with Cr(VI). Our results indicate that microbial exudates significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by forming less toxic and highly soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes despite the fact Cr(III) has a very low solubility under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). The formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes led to the protection of the cells and chromate reductases from inactivation. In systems with no organic ligands, soluble organo-Cr(III) end products were formed between Cr(III) and the EPS directly released by bacteria due to cell lysis. Our results also provide evidence that cell lysis played an important role in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas bacteria due to the release of constitutive reductases that intracellularly and/or extracellularly catalyzed the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The overall results highlight the need for incorporation of the release and formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes into reactive transport models to more accurately design and monitor in situ microbial remediation techniques for the treatment of subsurface systems contaminated with Cr(VI).

Dogan, N.M.; Dodge, C.; Kantar, C.; Gulcan, S.; Yilmaz, B.C.; Mazmanci, M.A.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

116

Chromium(VI) Bioremoval by Pseudomonas Bacteria: Role of Microbial Exudates for Natural Attenuation and Biotreatment of Cr(VI) Contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the role of microbial exudates, e.g., exopolymeric substance (EPS) and alginic acid, on microbial Cr(VI) reduction by two different Pseudomonas strains (P. putida P18 and P. aeuroginosa P16) as a method for treating subsurface environment contaminated with Cr(VI). Our results indicate that microbial exudates significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by forming less toxic and highly soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes despite the fact Cr(III) has a very low solubility under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). The formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes led to the protection of the cells and chromate reductases from inactivation. In systems with no organic ligands, soluble organo-Cr(III) end products were formed between Cr(III) and the EPS directly released by bacteria due to cell lysis. Our results also provide evidence that cell lysis played an important role in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas bacteria due to the release of constitutive reductases that intracellularly and/or extracellularly catalyzed the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The overall results highlight the need for incorporation of the release and formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes into reactive transport models to more accurately design and monitor in situ microbial remediation techniques for the treatment of subsurface systems contaminated with Cr(VI).

N Mercan Dogan; C Kantar; S Gulcan; C Dodge; B Coskun Yilmaz; M Ali Mazmanci

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most reactive surfaces in clay-dominated sediments are present within nanopores (pores of nm dimension). The behavior of geological fluids and minerals in nanopores is significantly different from those in normal non-nanoporous environments. The effect of nanopore surfaces on U(VI) sorption/desorption and reduction is likely to be significant in clay-rich subsurface environments. Our research results from both model nanopore system and natural sediments from both model system (synthetic nanopore alumina) and sediments from the ORNL Field Research Center prove that U(VI) sorption on nanopore surfaces can be greatly enhanced by nanopore confinement environments. The results from the project provide advanced mechanistic, quantitative information on the physiochemical controls on uranium sorption and redox behavior in subsurface sediments. The influence of nanopore surfaces on coupled uranium sorption/desorption and reduction processes is significant in virtually all subsurface environments, because most reactive surfaces are in fact nanopore surfaces. The results will enhance transfer of our laboratory-based research to a major field research initiative where reductive uranium immobilization is being investigated. Our results will also provide the basic science for developing in-situ colloidal barrier of nanoporous alumina in support of environmental remediation and long term stewardship of DOE sites.

Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Jung, Hun-Bok; Konishi, Hiromi; Boyanov, Maxim; Sun, Yubing; Mishra, Bhoopesh

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

118

Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexavalent chromium is a widespread contaminant found in groundwater. In order to stimulate microbially mediated Cr(VI)-reduction, a poly-lactate compound was injected into Cr(VI)-contaminated aquifers at site 100H at Hanford. Investigation of bacterial community composition using high-density DNA microarray analysis of 16S rRNA gene products revealed a stimulation of Pseudomonas, Desulfovibrio and Geobacter species amongst others. Enrichment of these organisms coincided with continued Cr(VI) depletion. Functional gene-array analysis of DNA from monitoring well indicated high abundance of genes involved in nitrate-reduction, sulfate-reduction, iron-reduction, methanogenesis, chromium tolerance/reduction. Clone-library data revealed Psedomonas was the dominant genus in these samples. Based on above results, we conducted lab investigations to study the dominant anaerobic culturable microbial populations present at this site and their role in Cr(VI)-reduction. Enrichments using defined anaerobic media resulted in isolation of an iron-reducing, a sulfate-reducing and a nitrate-reducing isolate among several others. Preliminary 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified the isolates as Geobacter metallireducens, Pseudomonas stutzeri and Desulfovibrio vulgaris species respectively. The Pseudomonas isolate utilized acetate, lactate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced Cr(VI). Anaerobic washed cell suspension of strain HLN reduced almost 95?M Cr(VI) within 4 hr. Further, with 100?M Cr(VI) as sole electron-acceptor, cells grew to 4.05 x 107 /ml over 24 h after an initial lag, demonstrating direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction coupled to growth. These results demonstrate that Cr(VI)-immobilization at Hanford 100H site could be mediated by direct microbial metabolism in addition to indirect chemical reduction of Cr(VI) by end-products of microbial activity.

Chakraborty, Romy; Chakraborty, Romy

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

119

Fision product evaluations for ENDF/B-VI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the ENDF/B-V fission-product evaluations were completed during the time period 1974--1980, and some of these were based on very limited experimental data. For short-lived fission products, there is still very little experimental data available because of the difficulty of obtaining these measurements. However, since 1980 a considerable amount of new experimental data have become available for stable and long-lived fission products. By utilizing the new data, significant improvements are now possible for some fission-product evaluations. The purpose of this paper is to report on 16 ENDF/B-VI evaluations that have been done at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary emphasis in this work has been placed on the resolved resonance region, but for some nuclides, new experimental data were also used to improve the evaluations for energies above the resolved resonance range.

Wright, R.Q.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO{sub 2} and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH{sub 2}DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml{sup {minus}1}) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms.

Fredrickson, J.K.; Kostandarithes, H.M.; Li, S.W.; Plymake, A.E.; Daly, M.J.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerl mark vi Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Resources 60 DOI: 10.1126science.1157972 , 359 (2009);323Science Summary: Printing Office, Washington, DC, 1981). 22. J. C. Huneke, G. J. Wasserburg, Lunar Sci. VI, 417...

122

U(VI) sorption and reduction kinetics on the magnetite (111)...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

information in real-time under batch-flow conditions. Citation: Singer DM, SME Chatman, ES Ilton, KM Rosso, JF Banfield, and G Waychunas.2012."U(VI) sorption and...

123

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfa survey vi Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paris VI pastel-00636920,version1-28Oct2011 12;11 elaboration of nitrogen-doped aerogels and xerogels Source: Paris-Sud XI, Universit de - Institut d'Optique, Laboratoire...

124

Cr(VI) reduction in aqueous solutions by using copper smelter slag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of Copper Smelter Slag (CSS) to reduce Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions has been investigated. The extent of reduction if dependent on the amounts of acid and reductant, contact time, Cr(VI) concentration, temperature of the solution and particle size of CSS. The amount of acid is the most important variable affecting the reduction process. When twice the amount of acid required with respect to Cr(VI) was used, Cr(VI) in 100 ml solution (100 mg/l) was completely reduced in a contact period less than 5 min by a 10 g/l dosage of CSS. Reduction efficiency increased with increase in temperature of solution, showing that the process is endothermic. Reduced chromium, and iron and other metals dissolved from CSS were effectively precipitated by using NaOH or calcinated carbonation sludge from sugar plant.

Kiyak, B.; Oezer, A.; Altundogan, H.S.; Erdem, M.; Tuemen, F. (Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey))

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Cr(VI) reduction in aqueous solutions by using copper smelter slag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of Copper Smelter Slag (CSS) to reduce Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions has been investigated. The extent of reduction if dependent on the amounts of acid and reductant, contact time, Cr(VI) concentration, temperature of the solution and particle size of CSS. The amount of acid is the most important variable affecting the reduction process. When twice the amount of acid required with respect to Cr(VI) was used, Cr(VI) in 100 ml solution (100 mg/l) was completely reduced in a contact period less than 5 min by a 10 g/l dosage of CSS. Reduction efficiency increased with increase in temperature of solution, showing that the process is endothermic. Reduced chromium, and iron and other metals dissolved from CSS were effectively precipitated by using NaOH or calcinated carbonation sludge from sugar plant.

Kiyak, B.; Oezer, A.; Altundogan, H.S.; Erdem, M.; Tuemen, F. [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)] [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Reduction of Health Risks Due to Chromium(VI)Using Mesquite: A Potential Cr Phytoremediator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium is a transition metal extensively used in industry. Cr mining and industrial operations account for chromium wastes at Superfund sites in the United States. A study was performed to investigate the possibility of using mesquite (Prosopis spp.), which is an indigenous desert plant species, to remove Cr from contaminated sites. In this study, mesquite plants were grown in an agar-based medium containing 75 mg L-1 and 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI). The Cr content of leaf tissue (992 mg kg-1 of dry weight, from 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI)) indicated that mesquite could be classified as a chromium hyperaccumulator. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies performed to experimental samples showed that mesquite roots absorbed some of the supplied Cr(VI). However, the data analyses of plant tissues demonstrated that the absorbed Cr(VI) was fully reduced to Cr(III) in the leaf tissue.

Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.; Aldrich, Mary V.; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Parsons, Jason G.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

127

Reduction of U(VI) Complexes by Anthraquinone Disulfonate: Experiment and Molecular Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past studies demonstrate that complexation will limit abiotic and biotic U(VI) reduction rates and the overall extent of reduction. However, the underlying basis for this behavior is not understood and presently unpredictable across species and ligand structure. The central tenets of these investigations are: (1) reduction of U(VI) follows the electron-transfer (ET) mechanism developed by Marcus; (2) the ET rate is the rate-limiting step in U(VI) reduction and is the step that is most affected by complexation; and (3) Marcus theory can be used to unify the apparently disparate U(VI) reduction rate data and as a computational tool to construct a predictive relationship.

Ainsworth, C.C.; Wang, Z.; Rosso, K.M.; Wagnon, K.; Fredrickson, J.K.

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

128

Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

Uranium(VI) extraction by TBP in the presence of HDBP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of di-n-butyl phosphoric acid (HDBP) upon extraction of uranium(VI) by tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) from 0.5--3.0 M nitric acid solutions has been studied. It has been shown that the uranium(VI) distribution coefficient D{sub U} for extraction by 1.1 M TBP in tri-decane or xylene is increased when HDBP is present in the organic phase. For iso-molar solutions of (TBP + HDBP) with a total concentration of 0.36 M, and Uranium(VI) aqueous concentration up to 10--20 g/l, a maximum value of D{sub U} is observed when TBP/HDBP = 1; for higher U(VI) concentration the maximum gradually disappears, with D{sub U} growing monotonically with the HDBP content in the organic phase. Uranium(VI) absorption spectra for 1.1 M TBP in tri-decane or xylene, containing HDBP, provide evidence for the formation of compounds, of which composition is intermediate between uranyl nitrate--TBP disolvate and the U(VI)--HDBP complex. It is proposed that these intermediate compounds are UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}HDBP.TBP and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(HDBP){sub 2}.

Fedorov, Yu.S.; Zilberman, B.Ya.; Kulikov, S.M.; Blazheva, I.V.; Mishin, E.N. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Wallwork, A.L.; Denniss, I.S.; May, I. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, Sellafield (United Kingdom); Hill, N.J. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, Risley (United Kingdom)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Spectroscopic study of the interaction of U(VI) with transferrin and albumin for speciation of U(VI) under blood serum conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation in human tissue, TAT allows to selectively deliver a highly cytotoxic radiation dose to targeted ternary complexes with carbonate acting as a synergistic anion. Together with literature data describing the interaction of U(VI) with low molecular weight inorganic and organic serum components, the speciation of U

Boyer, Edmond

131

Abiotic U(VI) Reduction by Sorbed Fe(II) on Natural Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were performed as a function of aqueous Fe(II) concentration to determine the uptake and oxidation of Fe(II), and Fe(II)-mediated abiotic reduction of U(VI) by aquifer sediments from the Rifle IFRC field site in Colorado, USA. Mssbauer analysis of the sediments spiked with aqueous 57Fe(II) showed that 57Fe(II) was oxidized on the mineral surfaces to 57Fe(III) and most likely formed a nano-particulate Fe(III)-oxide or ferrihydrite-like phase. The extent of 57Fe oxidation decreased with increasing 57Fe(II) uptake, such that 100 % was oxidized at 7.3 ?mol/g Fe and 52 % at 39.6 ?mol/g Fe, indicating that the sediments had a finite capacity for oxidation of Fe(II). Abiotic U(VI) reduction was observed by XANES spectroscopy only when the Fe(II) uptake was greater than approximately 20 ?mol/g and surface-bound Fe(II) was present. The level of U(VI) reduction increased with increasing Fe(II)- loading above this level to a maximum of 18 and 36 % U(IV) at pH 7.2 (40.7 ?mol/g Fe) and 8.3 (56.1 ?mol/g Fe), respectively in the presence of 400 ppm CO2. Greater U(VI) reduction was observed in CO2 free systems [up to 44 and 54 % at pH 7.2 (17.3 ?mol/g Fe) and 8.3 (54.8 ?mol/g Fe), respectively] compared to 400 ppm CO2 systems, presumably due to differences in aqueous U(VI) speciation. While pH affects the amount of Fe(II) uptake onto the solid phase, with greater Fe(II) uptake at higher pH, similar amounts of U(VI) reduction were observed at pH 7.2 and 8.3 for a similar Fe(II) uptake. Thus, it appears that abiotic U(VI) reduction is controlled primarily by Fe(II) concentration and aqueous U(VI) speciation. The range of Fe(II) loadings tested in this study are within the range observed in bioreduced sediments, suggesting that Fe(II)-mediated abiotic U(VI) reduction may indeed play a role in field settings.

Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Singer, David M.; Bargar, John R.; Williams, Kenneth H.

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mssbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

133

Sediment studies of the biological factors controlling the reduction of U(VI).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were conducted primarily with sediments, both in laboratory incubations and in a field experiment, with supporting studies with pure cultures. To our knowledge the sediment studies were the first on microbial U(VI) reduction in actual uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments, under conditions that mimic those found in situ. Important findings included: (1) U(VI) reduction is a biotic process in subsurface sediments. (2) U(VI) reduction can be stimulated most effectively with the addition of acetate. Although it had been speculated that microbial U(VI) reduction might be capable of this type of environmental remediation ever since the discovery of microbial U(VI) reduction, this had not been previously demonstrated under environmentally relevant conditions. (3) U(VI) is reduced concurrently with Fe(III) and prior to sulfate reduction. U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction proceeded concurrently, accompanied by a dramatic enrichment in organisms in the Geobacteraceae. Sulfate-reducing microorganisms do not appear to be important components of the microbial community reducing U(VI) in these subsurface sediments. (4) Nitrate has important influences on U(VI) reduction. Nitrate inhibits the reduction of metals until nitrate is depleted. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms such as Geobacter metallireducens and Desulfitobacterium species can oxidize Fe(II) with the reduction of nitrate which is an important consideration because our previous studies have demonstrated that freshly precipitated Fe(III) oxides can reoxidize U(IV) to U(VI). The discovery that G. metallireducens can ''run backwards'' and oxidize U(IV) when nitrate is present reveals another mechanism preventing precipitation of U(IV) in the presence of nitrate as well as potential novel strategy for removing uranium from the subsurface after a site has been remediated. (5) Importance of understanding Fe(III) forms available for microbial reduction. Fe(III) is orders of magnitude more abundant than U(VI) as an electron acceptor to support microbial growth. It was demonstrated that poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxides and structural Fe(III) in clays are the predominant forms of microbially reducible Fe(III). Such findings are important for the development of models of Fe(III) reduction in similar aquifer environments, such as those found at many UMTRA sites. (6) Mechanisms for Fe(III) oxide reduction. It was discovered that phylogenetically distinct Fe(III) reducer have different strategies for reducing Fe(III) and the fact that Geobacter species must directly contact Fe(III) in order to reduce it may help explain its predominance over other Fe(III) reducers in the subsurface. (7) Transfer of laboratory results to the field. Results from laboratory studies were used to design a field experiment in which U(VI) reduction was successfully precipitated from the contaminated water with the injection of acetate.

Lovley, derek, R.

2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

134

Differential isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by an aquifer-derived bacterium under arobic versus denitrifying conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied Cr isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2. Despite the fact that strain RCH2 reduces Cr(VI) co-metabolically under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions and at similar specific rates, fractionation was markedly different under these two conditions (ε ~2? aerobically and ~0.4? under denitrifying conditions).

Han, R.; Qin, L.; Brown, S. T.; Christensen, J. N.; Beller, H. R.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

UMBC Policy VI-10.00.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON POLICY FORMULATION AND MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UMBC Policy VI-10.00.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON POLICY FORMULATION AND MANAGEMENT UMBC Policy No. VI-10.00.01 I. POLICY STATEMENT The UMBC community should have access to well-articulated and understandable University Policies and related Operating Procedures. Those responsible for writing, updating

Adali, Tulay

136

FATE AND TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES [U(VI), Sr, Cs] IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FATE AND TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES [U(VI), Sr, Cs] IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE AND TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES [U(VI), Sr, Cs] IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE Abstract by Kenton A that influence radionuclide fate and transport in the Hanford vadose zone. Hanford was established for nuclear

Flury, Markus

137

Studies of the Di-iron(VI) Intermediate in Ferrate-Dependent Oxygen Evolution from Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information ABSTRACT: Molecular oxygen is produced from water via the following reaction of potassium ferrateStudies of the Di-iron(VI) Intermediate in Ferrate-Dependent Oxygen Evolution from Water Rupam consumption of natural abundance water. The derived 18 O KIEs provide insights concerning the identity

Roth, Justine P.

138

PHYS 2750, Winter 2014 page 1 of 2 General Physics VI: Modern Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYS 2750, Winter 2014 page 1 of 2 General Physics VI: Modern Physics PHYS 2750 1. What is this course all about? The Golden Age of Physics is often referred to as the the period from the late 1800's up to about the mid 1900's. Physics 2750 is a course which explores many of the fundamental

Quirion, Guy

139

ViDE: A Vision-Based Approach for Deep Web Data Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ViDE: A Vision-Based Approach for Deep Web Data Extraction Wei Liu, Xiaofeng Meng, Member, IEEE, and Weiyi Meng, Member, IEEE Abstract--Deep Web contents are accessed by queries submitted to Web databases and the returned data records are enwrapped in dynamically generated Web pages (they will be called deep Web pages

140

VI. ICRF HEATING D. B. BATCHELOR (ORNL), M. D. CARTER (ORNL), R. H. GOULDING (ORNL),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VI. ICRF HEATING D. B. BATCHELOR (ORNL), M. D. CARTER (ORNL), R. H. GOULDING (ORNL), D. J. HOFFMAN in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) has been chosen as the primary auxiliary heating technique for BPX. This decision is based on the wide successof ICRF heating in existing large-scale experiments

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141

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report Section VI. Safety and Codes & Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to H2 from 0-100% at 450o C in N2 background Future Directions · Fabricate 2nd generation sensors.A Safety VI.A.1 Gallium Nitride Integrated Gas/Temperature Sensors for Fuel Cell System Monitoring catalytic gate field effect transistor (FET) sensors to resolve and detect carbon monoxide (CO

142

In the light of evolution VI: Brain and behavior Georg F. Striedtera,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the light of evolution VI: Brain and behavior Georg F. Striedtera,b , John C. Aviseb (1859), Darwin (1) barely mentioned the brain. Only in The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation system, must have evolved. Even so, Darwin himself wrote little on the brain. Instead, Darwin asked his

Avise, John

143

Dendritic Chelating Agents. 2. U(VI) Binding to Poly(amidoamine) and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction The mining and processing of uranium ores and the production, reprocessing and disposal of uranium streams is a key compo- nent of the uranium nuclear fuel cycle (1­4). Uranyl [U(VI)] is the most stable uranium species under the typical oxidizing conditionsencounteredinthetreatmentofaqueouseffluents (3

Goddard III, William A.

144

VI. SENSOR CALIBRATIONS One of the most important aspects of high  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13 VI. SENSOR CALIBRATIONS One of the most important aspects of high quality solar radiation be determined (in volts/watts/meter2 ). This is done by simulta- neously comparing the measured output to an input signal must be determined. For the CR-10 data logger this means check- ing the relation between

Oregon, University of

145

Clostridium chromiireducens sp. nov., isolated from Cr(VI)-contaminated soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by its ability to reduce Cr(VI) in low concentrations. Mixed acid fermentation during growth on glucose resulted in accumulation of acetate, butyrate, formate and lactate. Morphological studies indicated the presence of peritrichous flagella, pili and an S-layer. The major cellular fatty acids (.5 %) were C16 : 0

Florida, University of

146

Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea). VI. Anterior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea). VI of the North American natricine snake Seminatrix pygaea are described using light and electron micros- copy is a glycoprotein. Overall, the characteristics of the ante- rior testicular ducts of this snake are concordant

Sever, David M.

147

Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this paper is to carry out field investigations to assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford 100H site.

T. C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E. Brodie; S.; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; M.; P. E. Long; Resch, C.T.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

148

VI. Conclusions In recent years, our graduate program has enjoyed increasing success as the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

62 Philosophy VI. Conclusions In recent years, our graduate program has enjoyed increasing success study dollars are never guaranteed, and in these uncertain times, are more at risk than ever. We hope of the core areas of philosophy. Two areas where we are not as strong as we need to be are Ethics

Rock, Chris

149

Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of "local equilibrium" assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of U(VI) diffusion in silt/clay layers. Batch isotherm experiments were first used to confirm sorption isotherms under the intended test conditions and diffusion cell experiments were then conducted to explore the diffusion hypotheses. Important new information was obtained about the role of aqueous calcium and solid calcium carbonate in controlling sorption equilibrium with Hanford sediments. The retarded interparticle diffusion model with local sorption equilibrium was shown to very successfully simulate diffusion at high aqueous concentration of U(VI). By contrast, however, diffusion data obtained at low concentration suggested nonequilibrium of sorption even at diffusion time scales. Such nonequilibrium effects at low concentration are likely to be the result of sorption retarded intraparticle diffusion, and strong U(VI) sorption in the low concentration range.

Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

150

Reduction of Cr(VI) under acidic conditions by the facultative Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for biological reduction of Cr(VI) under acidic conditions was evaluated with the acidophilic, facultatively metal-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum strain JF-5 to explore the role of acidophilic microorganisms in the Cr cycle in low-pH environments. An anaerobic suspension of washed A. cryptum cells rapidly reduced 50 M Cr(VI) at pH 3.2; biological reduction was detected from pH 1.7-4.7. The reduction product, confirmed by XANES analysis, was entirely Cr(III) that was associated predominantly with the cell biomass (70-80%) with the residual residing in the aqueous phase. Reduction of Cr(VI) showed a pH optimum similar to that for growth and was inhibited by 5 mM HgCl2, suggesting that the reaction was enzyme-mediated. Introduction of O2 into the reaction medium slowed the reduction rate only slightly, whereas soluble Fe(III) (as ferric sulfate) increased the rate dramatically, presumably by the shuttling of electrons from bioreduced Fe(II) to Cr(VI) in a coupled biotic-abiotic cycle. Starved cells could not reduce Cr(VI) when provided as sole electron acceptor, indicating that Cr(VI) reduction is not an energy-conserving process in A. cryptum. We speculate, rather, that Cr(VI) reduction is used here as a detoxification mechanism.

David E. Cummings; Scott Fendorf; Rajesh K. Sani; Brent M. Peyton; Timothy S. Magnuson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

USE OF MICRO X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND DIFFRACTION TO DELINEATE Cr(VI) SPECIATION IN COPR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The speciation of Cr(VI) in Cromite Ore Processing Residue was investigated by means of bulk XRD, and a combination of micro-XRF, -XAS and -XRD at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.. Bulk XRD yielded one group of phases that contained explicitly Cr(VI) in their structure, Calcium Aluminum Chromium Oxide Hydrates, accounting for 60% of the total Cr(VI). Micro-analyses at ALS yielded complimentary information, confirming that hydrogarnets and hydrotalcites, two mineral groups that can host Cr(VI) in their structure by substitution, were indeed Cr(VI) sinks. Chromatite (CaCrO4) was also identified by micro-XRD, which was not possible with bulk methods due to its low content. The acquisition of micro-XRF elemental maps enabled not only the identification of Cr(VI)-binding phases, but also the understanding of their location within the matrix. This information is invaluable when designing Cr(VI) treatment, to optimize release and availability for reduction.

CHRYSOCHOOU, M.; MOON, D. H.; FAKRA, S.; MARCUS, M.; DERMATAS, D.; CHRISTODOULATOS, C.

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

152

AFS-2 FLOWSHEET MODIFICATIONS TO ADDRESS THE INGROWTH OF PU(VI) DURING METAL DISSOLUTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Alternate Feed Stock Two (AFS-2) PuO{sub 2} production campaign, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted a series of experiments concluding that dissolving Pu metal at 95C using a 610 M HNO{sub 3} solution containing 0.050.2 M KF and 02 g/L B could reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to dissolving Pu metal under the same conditions but at or near the boiling temperature. This flowsheet was demonstrated by conducting Pu metal dissolutions at 95C to ensure that PuO{sub 2} solids were not formed during the dissolution. These dissolution parameters can be used for dissolving both Aqueous Polishing (AP) and MOX Process (MP) specification materials. Preceding the studies reported herein, two batches of Pu metal were dissolved in the H-Canyon 6.1D dissolver to prepare feed solution for the AFS-2 PuO{sub 2} production campaign. While in storage, UV-visible spectra obtained from an at-line spectrophotometer indicated the presence of Pu(VI). Analysis of the solutions also showed the presence of Fe, Ni, and Cr. Oxidation of Pu(IV) produced during metal dissolution to Pu(VI) is a concern for anion exchange purification. Anion exchange requires Pu in the +4 oxidation state for formation of the anionic plutonium(IV) hexanitrato complex which absorbs onto the resin. The presence of Pu(VI) in the anion feed solution would require a valence adjustment step to prevent losses. In addition, the presence of Cr(VI) would result in absorption of chromate ion onto the resin and could limit the purification of Pu from Cr which may challenge the purity specification of the final PuO{sub 2} product. Initial experiments were performed to quantify the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) (presumed to be facilitated by Cr(VI)) as functions of the HNO{sub 3} concentration and temperature in simulated dissolution solutions containing Cr, Fe, and Ni. In these simulated Pu dissolutions studies, lowering the temperature from near boiling to 95 C reduced the oxidation rate of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). For 8.1 M HNO{sub 3} simulated dissolution solutions, at near boiling conditions >35% Pu(VI) was present in 50 h while at 95 C <10% Pu(VI) was present at 50 h. At near boiling temperatures, eliminating the presence of Cr and varying the HNO{sub 3} concentration in the range of 78.5 M had little effect on the rate of conversion of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). HNO{sub 3} oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) in a pure solution has been reported previously. Based on simulated dissolution experiments, this study concluded that dissolving Pu metal at 95C using a 6 to 10 M HNO{sub 3} solution 0.050.2 M KF and 02 g/L B could reduce the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. To demonstrate this flowsheet, two small-scale experiments were performed dissolving Pu metal up to 6.75 g/L. No Pu-containing residues were observed in the solutions after cooling. Using Pu metal dissolution rates measured during the experiments and a correlation developed by Holcomb, the time required to completely dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver using this flowsheet was estimated to require nearly 5 days (120 h). This value is reasonably consistent with an estimate based on the Batch 2 and 3 dissolution times in the 6.1D dissolver and Pu metal dissolution rates measured in this study and by Rudisill et al. Data from the present and previous studies show that the Pu metal dissolution rate decreases by a factor of approximately two when the temperature decreased from boiling (112 to 116C) to 95C. Therefore, the time required to dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver at 95C would likely double (from 36 to 54 h) and require 72 to 108 h depending on the surface area of the Pu metal. Based on the experimental studies, a Pu metal dissolution flowsheet utilizing 610 M HNO{sub 3} containing 0.050.2 M KF (with 02 g/L B) at 95C is recommended to reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. The time required to completely di

Crapse, K.; Rudisill, T.; O'Rourke, P.; Kyser, E.

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

153

In Situ Bioreduction of Uranium (VI) to Submicromolar Levels and Reoxidation by Dissolved Oxygen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater within Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN (ORFRC) contains up to 135 {micro}M uranium as U(VI). Through a series of experiments at a pilot scale test facility, we explored the lower limits of groundwater U(VI) that can be achieved by in-situ biostimulation and the effects of dissolved oxygen on immobilized uranium. Weekly 2 day additions of ethanol over a 2-year period stimulated growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and immobilization of uranium as U(IV), with dissolved uranium concentrations decreasing to low levels. Following sulfite addition to remove dissolved oxygen, aqueous U(VI) concentrations fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant limit (MCL) for drinking water (<30 {micro}g L{sup -1} or 0.126 {micro}M). Under anaerobic conditions, these low concentrations were stable, even in the absence of added ethanol. However, when sulfite additions stopped, and dissolved oxygen (4.0-5.5 mg L{sup -1}) entered the injection well, spatially variable changes in aqueous U(VI) occurred over a 60 day period, with concentrations increasing rapidly from <0.13 to 2.0 {micro}M at a multilevel sampling (MLS) well located close to the injection well, but changing little at an MLS well located further away. Resumption of ethanol addition restored reduction of Fe(III), sulfate, and U(VI) within 36 h. After 2 years of ethanol addition, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) analyses indicated that U(IV) comprised 60-80% of the total uranium in sediment samples. At the completion of the project (day 1260), U concentrations in MLS wells were less than 0.1 {micro}M. The microbial community at MLS wells with low U(VI) contained bacteria that are known to reduce uranium, including Desulfovibrio spp. and Geobacter spp., in both sediment and groundwater. The dominant Fe(III)-reducing species were Geothrix spp.

Wu, Weimin [ORNL; Carley, Jack M [ORNL; Luo, Jian [Stanford University; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A. [Stanford University; Cardenas, Erick [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Leigh, Mary Beth [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hwang, Chaichi [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Kelly, Shelly D [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ruan, Chuanmin [ORNL; Wu, Liyou [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Van Nostrand, Joy [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Gentry, Terry J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Fields, Matthew Wayne [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Kemner, Kenneth M [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Marsh, Terence [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tiedje, James [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Fendorf, Scott [Stanford University; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Criddle, Craig [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Effects of Chromium(VI) and Chromium(III) on Desulfovibrio vulgaris Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Desulfovibrio vulgaris ATCC 29579 is a well studied sulfate reducer that has known capabilities of reducing heavy metals and radionuclides, like chromium and uranium. Cultures grown in a defined medium (i.e. LS4D) had a lag period of approximately 40 h when exposed to 50 ?Mof Cr(VI). Substrate analysis revealed that although chromium is reduced within the first 5 h, growth does not resume for another 35 h. During this time, small amounts of lactate are still utilized but the reduction of sulfate does not occur. Sulfate reduction occurs concurrently with the accumulation of acetate approximately 40 h after inoculation, when growth resumes. Similar amounts of hydrogen are produced during this time compared to hydrogen production by cells not exposed to Cr(VI); therefore an accumulation of hydrogen cannot account for the utilization of lactate. There is a significant decrease in the carbohydrate to protein ratio at approximately 25 h, and this result indicated that lactate is not converted to glycogen. Most probable number analysis indicated that cell viability decreased steadily after inoculation and reached approximately 6 x 104 cells/ml 20 h post-chromium exposure. Regeneration of reducing conditions during chromium exposure does not induce growth and in fact may make the growth conditions even more unfavorable. This result suggested that an increase in Eh was not solely responsible for the decline in viability. Cell pellets collected 10 h after chromium-exposure were unable to resume growth when suspended into fresh medium. Supernatants from these pellets were able to support cell growth upon re- inoculation. D. vulgaris cells treated with a non-dose dependent addition of ascorbate at the same time of Cr(VI) addition did not enter a lag period. Ascorbate added 3 h post-Cr(VI) exposure did not prevent the growth lag. These results indicated that Desulfovibrio utilized lactate to reduce Cr(VI) without the reduction of sulfate, that the decline in cell viability and cell growth was most likely a consequence of Cr(III), and that an organic ligand could protect D. vulgaris cells from Cr(III) toxicity. Lactate consumption decoupled from sulfate reduction in the presence of Cr(VI) could provide organic carbon for organo- Cr(III) complexes.

M.E. Clark; A. Klonowska; S.B. Thieman; B. Giles; J.D. Wall; and M.W. Fields

2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

155

Rate-limited U(VI) desorption during a small-scale tracer test in a hetereogeneous uranium contaminated aquifer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Contaminants in the Hanford Vadose Zone, Vadose Zone J. ,transport in a contaminated Hanford sediment, Environ. Sci.of U(VI) observed in Hanford sediment column experiments. A

Fox, P.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Microbial community changes during sustained Cr(VI) reduction at the 100H site in Hanford, WA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the 100H site in Hanford, WA Romy Chakraborty 1 , Eoin Lcontaminated aquifer at the Hanford (WA) 100H site in 2004.Cr(VI) reduction at Hanford, and a comparison of the

Chakraborty, Romy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Influence of flow regime on U(VI) sorption kinetics in fine sediments at the Hanford site, Washington, USA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The effect of flow rate on U(VI) sorption kinetics was investigated by a series of column tests using the reactive mass fraction (<2mm) of sediments (more)

Moser, Jessa V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Geoengineering en utvg? Hur allvarliga det nrmaste rhundradets klimatfrndringar blir vet vi inte. Utfallet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geoengineering ­ en utväg? Hur allvarliga det närmaste århundradets klimatförändringar blir vet vi fantasieggande åtgärdsförslag som går under samlingsnamnet geoengineering, vilket på svenska möjligen skulle termen. Med geoengineering avses avsiktlig omstöpning av klimat och miljö på global skala. Den kanske

159

Heteroepitaxy of group IV-VI nitrides by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heteroepitaxial growth of selected group IV-VI nitrides on various orientations of sapphire (?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is demonstrated using atomic layer deposition. High quality, epitaxial films are produced at significantly lower temperatures than required by conventional deposition methods. Characterization of electrical and superconducting properties of epitaxial films reveals a reduced room temperature resistivity and increased residual resistance ratio for films deposited on sapphire compared to polycrystalline samples deposited concurrently on fused quartz substrates.

Klug, Jeffrey A., E-mail: jklug@anl.gov; Groll, Nickolas R.; Pellin, Michael J.; Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: prolier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Becker, Nicholas G.; Cao, Chaoyue; Zasadzinski, John F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Weimer, Matthew S. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

160

TREATMENT TESTS FOR EX SITU REMOVAL OF CHROMATE & NITRATE & URANIUM (VI) FROM HANFORD (100-HR-3) GROUNDWATER FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes batch and ion exchange column laboratory scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and uranium (present as uranium [VI]) from contaminated Hanford site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include: chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium; and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan. The method suggested for future study is anion exchange.

BECK MA; DUNCAN JB

1994-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Electrode Induced Removal and Recovery of Uranium (VI) from Acidic Subsurfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overarching objective of this research is to provide an improved understanding of how aqueous geochemical conditions impact the removal of U and Tc from groundwater and how engineering design may be utilized to optimize removal of these radionuclides. Experiments were designed to address the unique conditions in Area 3 of ORNL while also providing broader insight into the geochemical effectors of the removal rates and extent for U and Tc. The specific tasks of this work were to: 1) quantify the impact of common aqueous geochemical and operational conditions on the rate and extent of U removal and recovery from water, 2) investigate the removal of Tc with polarized graphite electrode, and determine the influence of geochemical and operational conditions on Tc removal and recovery, 3) determine whether U and Tc may be treated simultaneous from Area 3 groundwater, and examine the bench-scale performance of electrode-based treatment, and 4) determine the capacity of graphite electrodes for U(VI) removal and develop a mathematical, kinetic model for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution. Overall the body of work suggests that an electrode-based approach for the remediation of acidic subsurface environments, such as those observed in Area 3 of ORNL may be successful for the removal for both U(VI) and Tc. Carbonaceous (graphite) electrode materials are likely to be the least costly means to maximize removal rates and efficiency by maximizing the electrode surface area.

Gregory, Kelvin [Carnegie Mellon University

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

162

Equations of state of ice VI and ice VII at high pressure and high temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-pressure H{sub 2}O polymorphs among which ice VI and ice VII are abundant in the interiors of large icy satellites and exo-planets. Knowledge of the elastic properties of these pure H{sub 2}O ices at high-temperature and high-pressure is thus crucial to decipher the internal structure of icy bodies. In this study we assess for the first time the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) relations of both polycrystalline pure ice VI and ice VII at high pressures and temperatures from 1 to 9 GPa and 300 to 450 K, respectively, by using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PVT data are adjusted to a second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and give V{sub 0} = 14.17(2) cm{sup 3}?mol{sup ?1}, K{sub 0} = 14.05(23) GPa, and ?{sub 0} = 14.6(14) 10{sup ?5} K{sup ?1} for ice VI and V{sub 0} = 12.49(1) cm{sup 3}?mol{sup ?1}, K{sub 0} = 20.15(16) GPa, and ?{sub 0} = 11.6(5) 10{sup ?5} K{sup ?1} for ice VII.

Bezacier, Lucile; Hanfland, Michael [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France); Journaux, Baptiste; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Cardon, Herv; Daniel, Isabelle [Laboratoire de Gologie de Lyon, UMR 5276 CNRS, Ecole Normale Suprieure de Lyon Universit Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 rue Raphael Dubois, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

163

Effect of Subgrid Heterogeneity on Scaling Geochemical and Biogeochemical Reactions: A Case of U(VI) Desorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of subgrid heterogeneity in sediment properties on the rate of uranyl[U(VI)] desorption was investigated using a sediment collected from the US Department of Energy Hanford site. The sediment was sieved into 7 grain size fractions that each exhibited different U(VI) desorption properties. Six columns were assembled using the sediment with its grain size fractions arranged in different spatial configurations to mimic subgrid heterogeneity in reactive transport properties. The apparent rate of U(VI) desorption varied significantly in the columns. Those columns with sediment structures leading to preferential transport had much lower rates of U(VI) desorption than those with relatively homogeneous transport. Modeling analysis indicated that the U(VI) desorption model and parameters characterized from well-mixed reactors significantly over-predicted the measured U(VI) desorption in the columns with preferential transport. A dual domain model, which operationally separates reactive transport properties into two subgrid domains improved the predictions significantly. A similar effect of subgrid heterogeneity, albeit at a less degree, was observed for denitrification, which also occurred in the columns. The results imply that subgrid heterogeneity is an important consideration in extrapolating reaction rates from the laboratory to field.

Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Shan, Huimei; Zachara, John M.

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

164

Investigations of HRC-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hypothesis: Lactate (Hydrogen Release Compound-HRC{trademark}) injection into chromium contaminated groundwater through an injection well will cause indirect or direct bioreduction of chromate [Cr(VI)] and precipitation of insoluble species of [Cr(III)] on soil particles, probably catalyzed at oxide surfaces, at the field scale. Objective: Assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford Site's 100-H Area field site. Types of Research: A three-well system (injection well and upgradient and downgradient monitoring wells) was used for conducting the in situ biostimulation and monitoring. To assess the pre- and post-injection test groundwater conditions, we used an integrated monitoring approach, involving hydraulic, geochemical, microbial, and geophysical techniques and analytical methods, as well as conducted five Br-tracer injection tests and four pumping tests (concurrently with the Br-tracer tests). Groundwater biostimulation was conducted by injection of 40 lbs of {sup 13}C-labeled HRC into the injection well (over the depth interval from 44-50 ft) on 8/3/2004, followed by low-flow pumping (1.2 to 2.5 l/min) through the downgradient well (to ensure capture of groundwater flow lines passing through the injection well) for 27 days. Main Results: Although the total microbial population in sediments is relatively low (<10{sup 5} cells g-1) under background conditions, which is likely insufficient for direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction, several types of bacteria, e.g., Bacillus/Arthrobacter and Geobacter, are present in the Hanford sediments, which are known to reduce or sorb hexavalent chromium. The HRC injection stimulated microbial cell counts to reach the maximum of 2 x 10{sup 7} cells g{sup -1} 13-17 days after the injection, and generated highly reducing conditions. Geochemical and isotopic observations confirmed microbial metabolism of HRC. The Cr(VI) concentration in the monitoring and pumping wells decreased below drinking water minimum contaminant limits and remained below background concentrations even after 1.5 years, when redox conditions and microbial densities had returned to background levels. Fe(II) levels have remained high and may account for the continued reduction of Cr(VI).

T.C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E.Brodie; S. Hubbard; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; Long, P.E.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

165

Investigations of HRC-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hypothesis: Lactate (Hydrogen Release Compound-HRC{trademark}) injection into chromium contaminated groundwater through an injection well will cause indirect or direct bioreduction of chromate [Cr(VI)] and precipitation of insoluble species of [Cr(III)] on soil particles, probably catalyzed at oxide surfaces, at the field scale. Objective: Assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford Site's 100-H Area field site. Types of Research: A three-well system (injection well and upgradient and downgradient monitoring wells) was used for conducting the in situ biostimulation and monitoring. To assess the pre- and post-injection test groundwater conditions, we used an integrated monitoring approach, involving hydraulic, geochemical, microbial, and geophysical techniques and analytical methods, as well as conducted five Br-tracer injection tests and four pumping tests (concurrently with the Br-tracer tests). Groundwater biostimulation was conducted by injection of 40 lbs of {sup 13}C-labeled HRC into the injection well (over the depth interval from 44-50 ft) on 8/3/2004, followed by low-flow pumping (1.2 to 2.5 l/min) through the downgradient well (to ensure capture of groundwater flow lines passing through the injection well) for 27 days. Main Results: Although the total microbial population in sediments is relatively low (<10{sup 5} cells g{sup -1}) under background conditions, which is likely insufficient for direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction, several types of bacteria, e.g., Bacillus/Arthrobacter and Geobacter, are present in the Hanford sediments, which are known to reduce or sorb hexavalent chromium. The HRC injection stimulated microbial cell counts to reach the maximum of 2 x 10{sup 7} cells g{sup -1} 13-17 days after the injection, and generated highly reducing conditions. Geochemical and isotopic observations confirmed microbial metabolism of HRC. The CR(VI) concentration in the monitoring and pumping wells decreased below drinking water minimum contaminant limits and remained below background concentrations even after 1.5 years, when redox conditions and microbial densities had returned to background levels. Fe(II) levels have remained high and may account for the continued reduction of Cr(VI).

Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Joyner, D.; Borglin, S.; Brodie, E.; Hubbard, S.; Williams, K.; Peterson, J.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T.; Firestone, M.; Long, P.E.; Resch, C.T.; Cantrell, K.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

166

Reactive oxygen species mediate Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through PI3K/AKT-dependent activation of GSK-3?/?-catenin signaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens that primarily target the lungs. Cr(VI) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules involved in Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis have not been extensively studied. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to Cr(VI) at nanomolar concentrations (10100 nM) for 3 months not only induced cell transformation, but also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of Cr(VI)-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) increased levels of intracellular ROS and antiapoptotic proteins. Transfection with catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) prevented Cr(VI)-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion, migration, and xenograft tumors. While chronic Cr(VI) exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K/AKT/GSK-3?/?-catenin and PI3K/AKT/mTOR, transfection with catalase or SOD markedly inhibited Cr(VI)-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or ?-catenin almost completely suppressed the Cr(VI)-mediated increase in total and active ?-catenin proteins and colony formation. In particular, Cr(VI) suppressed autophagy of epithelial cells under nutrition deprivation. Furthermore, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3?, ?-catenin, mTOR, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with Cr(VI)-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that ROS is a key mediator of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through the activation of PI3K/AKT-dependent GSK-3?/?-catenin signaling and the promotion of cell survival mechanisms via the inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy. - Highlights: Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. ROS play an important role in Cr(VI)-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. PI3K/AKT/GSK-3?/?-catenin signaling involved in Cr(VI) carcinogenesis. The inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy contributes to Cr(VI) carcinogenesis.

Son, Young-Ok; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Fan, Jia; Kim, Dong-Hern; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biosciences, Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Innovative Approach to Prevent Acid Drainage from Uranium Mill Tailings Based on the Application of Na-Ferrate (VI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation of uranium mining and milling plants gives rise to huge amounts of wastes from both mining and milling operations. When pyrite is present in these materials, the generation of acid drainage can take place and result in the contamination of underground and surface waters through the leaching of heavy metals and radionuclides. To solve this problem, many studies have been conducted to find cost-effective solutions to manage acid mine drainage; however, no adequate strategy to deal with sulfide-ric h wastes is currently available. Ferrate (VI) is a powerful oxidizing agent in aqueous media. Under acidic conditions, the redox potential of the Ferrate (VI) ion is the highest of any other oxidant used in wastewater treatment processes. The standard half cell reduction potential of ferrate (VI) has been determined as +2.20 V to + 0.72 V in acidic and basic solutions, respectively. Ferrate (VI) exhibits a multitude of advantageous properties, including higher reactivity and selectivity than traditional oxidant alternatives, as well as disinfectant, flocculating, and coagulant properties. Despite numerous beneficial properties in environmental applications, ferrate (VI) has remained commercially unavailable. Starting in 1953, different methods for producing a high purity, powdered ferrate (VI) product were developed. However, producing this dry, stabilized ferrate (VI) product required numerous process steps which led to excessive synthesis costs (over $20/lb) thereby preventing bulk industrial use. Recently a novel synthesis method for the production of a liquid ferrate (VI) based on hypochlorite oxidation of ferric ion in strongly alkaline solutions has been discovered (USPTO 6,790,428; September 14, 2004). This on-site synthesis process dramatically reduces manufacturing cost for the production of ferrate (VI) by utilizing common commodity feedstocks. This breakthrough means that for the first time ferrate (VI) can be an economical alternative to treating acid mining drainage generating materials. The objective of the present study was to investigate a methodology of preventing the generation of acid drainage by applying ferrate (VI) to acid generating materials prior to the disposal in impoundments or piles. Oxidizing the pyritic material in mining waste could diminish the potential for acid generation and its related environmental risks and long-term costs at disposal sites. The effectiveness of toxic metals removal from acid mine drainage by applying ferrate (VI) is also examined. Preliminary results presented in this paper show that the oxidation of pyrite by ferrate is a first-order rate reaction in Fe(VI) with a half-life of about six hours. The stability of Fe(VI) in water solutions will not influence the reaction rate in a significant manner. New low-cost production methods for making liquid ferrate on-site makes this technology a very attractive option to mitigate one of the most pressing environmental problems in the mining industry. (authors)

Fernandes, H.M.; Reinhart, D.; Lettie, L.; Franklin, M.R. [University of Central Florida, P.O. Box. 162450, Orlando, FL, 32816-2450 (United States); Fernandes, H.M.; Franklin, M.R. [Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD), Av. Salvador Allende s/n - Recreio - Rio de Janeiro - RJ - 22795-090 (Brazil); Sharma, V. [Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Daly, L.J. [Ferrate Treatment Technologies, LLC, 6432 Pine Castle Blvd. Unit 2C, Orlando, FL, 32809 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Actes du VI Congrs Latino Amricain de Sociologie Rurale, Sustentabilidad y Democratizacin de las Sociedades Rurales Latinoamericanas , Porto Alegre, Nov 2002.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Actes du VI Congrès Latino Américain de Sociologie Rurale, « Sustentabilidad y Democratización de

Boyer, Edmond

169

Permeable Reactive Biobarriers for In Situ Cr(VI) Reduction: Bench Scale Tests Using Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromate (Cr(VI)) reduction studies were performed in bench scale flow columns using the fermentative subsurface isolate Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6. In these tests, columns packed with either quartz sand or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-coated quartz sand, were inoculated with strain ES6 and fed nutrients to stimulate growth before nutrient-free Cr(VI) solutions were injected. Results show that in columns containing quartz sand, a continuous inflow of 2 mg/L Cr(VI) was reduced to below detection limits in the effluent for durations of up to 5.7 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued proving the ability of strain ES6 to reduce chromate in the absence of an external electron donor. In the HFO-containing columns, Cr(VI) reduction was significantly prolonged and effluent Cr(VI) concentrations remained below detectable levels for periods of up to 66 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued. Fe was detected in the effluent of the HFO-containing columns throughout the period of Cr(VI) removal indicating that the insoluble Fe(III) bearing solids were being continuously reduced to form soluble Fe(II) resulting in prolonged abiotic Cr(VI) reduction. Thus, growth of Cellulomonas within the soil columns resulted in formation of permeable reactive barriers that could reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) for extended periods even in the absence of external electron donors. Other bioremediation systems employing Fe(II)-mediated reactions require a continuous presence of external nutrients to regenerate Fe(II). After depletion of nutrients, contaminant removal within these systems occurs by reaction with surface-associated Fe(II) that can rapidly become inaccessible due to formation of crystalline Fe-minerals or other precipitates. The ability of fermentative organisms like Cellulomonas to reduce metals without continuous nutrient supply in the subsurface offers a viable and economical alternative technology for in situ remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater through formation of permeable reactive biobarriers (PRBB).

Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; Robin Gerlach; Vaideeswaran; William A. Apel; James N. Petersen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

171

Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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172

Abiotic U(VI) Reduction by Sorbed Fe(II) on Natural Sediments. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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173

First use of a HyViSI H4RG for Astronomical Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first astronomical results from a 4K2 Hybrid Visible Silicon PIN array detector (HyViSI) read out with the Teledyne Scientific and Imaging SIDECAR ASIC. These results include observations of astronomical standards and photometric measurements using the 2.1m KPNO telescope. We also report results from a test program in the Rochester Imaging Detector Laboratory (RIDL), including: read noise, dark current, linearity, gain, well depth, quantum efficiency, and substrate voltage effects. Lastly, we highlight results from operation of the detector in window read out mode and discuss its potential role for focusing, image correction, and use as a telescope guide camera.

Simms, Lance M.; /SLAC; Figer, Donald F.; Hanold, Brandon J.; Kerr, Daniel J.; /Rochester Imaging Lab.; Gilmore, D.Kirk; Kahn, Steven M.; /SLAC; Tyson, J.Anthony; /UC,

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

174

ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME VI)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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175

Microbial community changes during sustained Cr(VI) reduction at the 100H site in Hanford, WA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexavalent Chromium is a widespread contaminant found in soil, sediment, and groundwater. In order to stimulate microbially-mediated reduction of Cr(VI), a poly-lactate compound (HRC) was injected into the Chromium-contaminated aquifer at the Hanford (WA) 100H site in 2004. Cr(VI) concentrations rapidly declined to below the detection limit and remained so for more than three years after injection. Based on the results of the bacterial community composition using high-density DNA 16S rRNA gene microarrays, we observed the community to transition through denitrifying, ironreducing and sulfate-reducing populations. As a result, we specifically focused isolation efforts on three bacterial species that were significant components of the community. Positive enrichments in defined anaerobic media resulted in the isolation of an iron-reducing Geobacter metallireducens-like isolate, a sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio vukgaris-like strain and a nitrate-reducing Pseudomonas stutzeri-like isolate among several others. All of these isolates were capable of reducing Cr(VI) anoxically and have been submitted for genome sequencing to JGI. To further characterize the microbial, and geochemical mechanisms associated with in situ Cr(VI) reduction at the site, additional HRC was injected in 2008. The goal was to restimulate the indigenous microbial community and to regenerate the reducing conditions necessary for continued Cr(VI) bio-immobilization in the groundwater. Analysis of the microbial populations post-injection revealed that they recovered to a similar density as after the first injection in 2004. In this study, we present the results from our investigation into microbially-mediated Cr(VI) reduction at Hanford, and a comparison of the microbial community development following two HRC injections four years apart.

Chakraborty, Romy; Brodie, Eoin L; Faybishenko, Boris; Piceno, Yvette M; Tom, Lauren; Choudhuri, Swati; Beller, Harry R; Liu, Jenny; Torok, Tamas; Joyner, Dominique C; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Zhou, Aifen; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Joe; Long, Phil E; Newcomer, Darrell R; Andersen, Gary L; Hazen, Terry C.

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

176

Compared performances of ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 for MOX core physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States is currently evaluating the use of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in commercial light water reactors for reducing weapons-grade Pu stockpiles. The design and licensing processes will require that the validity of the nuclear data libraries and codes used in the effort be demonstrated. Unfortunately, there are only a very limited number of relatively old and nonrepresentative integral experiments freely available to the US programs. This lack of adequate experimental data can be partially remediated by comparing the results of well-validated European codes with the results of candidate US codes. The authors have compared the performances of the JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VI.4 libraries for a series of benchmarks for k{sub eff}, void worth, and pin power distributions. Note that JEF-2.2 has been extensively validated for MOX applications. To obtain systematic comparisons between JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VI results, the two libraries were implemented with the same processing code options in two independent code systems: (1) VIM, a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code developed at Argonne National Laboratory, with its own processing codes independent of NJOY; and (2) DRAGON, a two-dimensional lattice code developed at Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal. A standard 172-energy-group structure was used in the NJOY processing code.

Finck, P.J.; Laurin-Kovitz, K.; Palmiotti, G.; Stenberg, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Uranium (VI)Bis(imido) chalcogenate complexes:synthesis and density functional theory analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bis(imido) uranium(VI) trans- and cis-dichalcogenate complexes with the general formula U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 (EAr = O-2-tBuC6H4, SPh, SePh, TePh) and U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(R2bpy) (EAr = SPh, SePh, TePh) (R2bpy = 4,4'-disubstituted-2,2'-bipyridyl, R = Me, tBu) have been prepared. This family of complexes includes the first reported monodentate selenolate and tellurolate complexes of uranium(VI). Density functional theory calculations show that covalent interactions in the U-E bond increase in the trans-dichalcogenate series U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 as the size of the chalcogenate donor increases and that both 5f and 6d orbital participation is important in the M-E bonds of U-S, U-Se, and U-Te complexes.

Spencer, Liam P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boncella, James M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Microbial Community Changes in Response to Ethanol or Methanol Amendments for U(VI) Reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial community responses to ethanol, methanol and methanol + humics amendments in relationship to uranium bioremediation were studied in laboratory microcosm experiments using sediments and ground water from a uranium-contaminated site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Ethanol addition always resulted in uranium reduction at rate of 0.8-1.0 mol l-1 d-1 while methanol addition did so occasionally at rate 0.95 mol l-1 d-1. The type of carbon source added, the duration of incubation, and the sampling site influenced the bacterial community structure upon incubation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicated (1) bacterial communities found in ethanol- and methanol-amended samples with U(VI) reduction were similar due to presence of -Proteobacteria, and -Proteobacteria (members of the families Burkholderiaceae, Comamonadaceae, Oxalobacteraceae, and Rhodocyclaceae); (2) methanol-amended samples without U(VI) reduction exhibited the lowest diversity and the bacterial community contained 69.2-92.8% of the family Methylophilaceae; and (3) the addition of humics resulted in an increase of phylogenetic diversity of -Proteobacteria (Rodoferax, Polaromonas, Janthinobacterium, Methylophilales, unclassified) and Firmicutes (Desulfosporosinus, Clostridium).

Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Madden, Andrew [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Drake, Meghan M [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University; Akob, Denise M. [Florida State University; Kusel, Kirsten [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena Germany; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A modified model for calculating lattice thermal expansion of I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} and I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4} tetrahedral compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general empirical formula was found for calculating lattice thermal expansion for compounds having their properties extended for compound groups having different mean ionicity as well as more than one type of cation atoms with that of different numbers of them such as I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} and I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4}. The difference in the valence electrons for cations and anions in the compound was used to correlate the deviations caused by the compound ionicity. The ionicity effects, which are due to their different numbers for their types, were also added to the correlation equation. In general, the lattice thermal expansion for a compound semiconductor can be calculated from a relation containing melting point, mean atomic distance and number of valence electrons for the atoms forming the compound. The mean ionicity for the group compounds forming I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} was found to be 0.323 and 0.785 for the ternary group compounds of I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4}.

Omar, M.S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Kurdistan (Iraq)]. E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

180

Complexation of U(VI) with 1-Hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonicAcid (HEDPA) in Acidic to Basic Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complexation of U(VI) with 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) in acidic to basic solutions has been studied with multiple techniques. A number of 1:1 (UO{sub 2}H{sub 3}L), 1:2 (UO{sub 2}H{sub j}L{sub 2} where j = 4, 3, 2, 1, 0 and -1) and 2:2 ((UO{sub 2}){sub 2}H{sub j}L{sub 2} where j = 1, 0 and -1) complexes form, but the 1:2 complexes are the major species in a wide pH range. Thermodynamic parameters (formation constants, enthalpy and entropy of complexation) were determined by potentiometry and calorimetry. Data indicate that the complexation of U(VI) with HEDPA is exothermic, favored by the enthalpy of complexation. This is in contrast to the complexation of U(VI) with dicarboxylic acids in which the enthalpy term usually is unfavorable. Results from electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and {sup 31}P NMR have confirmed the presence of 1:1, 1:2 and 2:2 U(VI)-HEDPA complexes.

Reed, W A; Rao, L; Zanonato, P; Garnov, A; Powell, B A; Nash, K L

2007-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

VI Simpsio Brasileiro de Solos No Saturados 2007/ Salvador-Bahia 321 Estimation of the Hydraulic Conductivity Function of Unsaturated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VI Simpósio Brasileiro de Solos Não Saturados 2007/ Salvador-Bahia 321 Estimation of the Hydraulic Simpósio Brasileiro de Solos Não Saturados 2007/ Salvador-Bahia 1.2 Prediction of the K-function Early

Zornberg, Jorge G.

182

All-vapor processing of p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor and ohmic contacts thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An all dry method for producing solar cells is provided comprising first heat-annealing a II-VI semiconductor; enhancing the conductivity and grain size of the annealed layer; modifying the surface and depositing a tellurium layer onto the enhanced layer; and then depositing copper onto the tellurium layer so as to produce a copper tellurium compound on the layer.

McCandless, Brian E. (Elkton, MD)

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

183

6999Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 28 / Friday, February 10, 2006 / Proposed Rules vi. Federal Rules That May Duplicate,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

March 9, 2006. ADDRESSES: The hearing will be in room 154 of the U.S. Federal Office Building, 222 W. 7 for submitting comments. · Mail: P. O Box 21668, Juneau, AK 99802 · Hand delivery to the Federal Building : 709 W6999Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 28 / Friday, February 10, 2006 / Proposed Rules vi. Federal

184

VI-8.00(B) UMCP POLICY ON STUDENT ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG ABUSE APPROVED BY PRESIDENT SEPTEMBER 9, 1992  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VI-8.00(B) UMCP POLICY ON STUDENT ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG ABUSE APPROVED BY PRESIDENT SEPTEMBER 9, 1992 I. Policy The University of Maryland at College Park is dedicated to the pursuit and dissemination of drugs and alcohol. In keeping with this commitment, it is the policy of the University that the illegal

Li, Teng

185

Evidence for ice VI as an inclusion in cuboid diamonds from high P-T near infrared spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evidence for ice VI as an inclusion in cuboid diamonds from high P-T near infrared spectroscopy H.W., Washington, D.C. 20015-1305, USA ABSTRACT Near infrared absorption (NIR) spectra of natural morphologically on heating to 1208C. The combination band of H2O at high pressure and temperature was measured using

Hemley, Russell J.

186

Model-based Analysis of Mixed Uranium(VI) Reduction by Biotic and Abiotic Pathways During in Situ Bioremediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium bioremediation has emerged as a potential strategy of cleanup of radionuclear contamination worldwide. An integrated geochemical & microbial community model is a promising approach to predict and provide insights into the bioremediation of a complicated natural subsurface. In this study, an integrated column-scale model of uranium bioremediation was developed, taking into account long-term interactions between biotic and abiotic processes. It is also combined with a comprehensive thermodynamic analysis to track the fate and cycling of biogenic species. As compared with other bioremediation models, the model increases the resolution of the connection of microbial community to geochemistry and establishes direct quantitative correlation between overall community evolution and geochemical variation, thereby accurately predicting the community dynamics under different sedimentary conditions. The thermodynamic analysis examined a recently identified homogeneous reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) under dynamic sedimentary conditions across time and space. It shows that the biogenic Fe(II) from Geobacter metabolism can be removed rapidly by the biogenic sulphide from sulfate reducer metabolism, hence constituting one of the reasons that make the abiotic U(VI) reduction thermodynamically infeasible in the subsurface. Further analysis indicates that much higher influent concentrations of both Fe(II) and U(VI) than normal are required to for abiotic U(VI) reduction to be thermodynamically feasible, suggesting that the abiotic reduction cannot be an alternative to the biotic reduction in the remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater.

Zhao, Jiao; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

187

Myosin VI is required for structural integrity of the apical surface of sensory hair cells in zebrafish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Myosin VI is required for structural integrity of the apical surface of sensory hair cells deafness in humans and deafness in Snell's waltzer mice associated with abnormal fusion of hair cell and epithelial morphogenesis, the role of this protein in the sensory hair cells remains unclear. To investigate

Avraham, Karen

188

Influence of calcite on uranium(VI) reactive transport in the groundwaterriver mixing zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calcite is an important mineral that can affect uranyl reactive transport in subsurface sediments. This study investigated the distribution of calcite and its influence on uranyl adsorption and reactive transport in the groundwater-river mixing zone at US Hanford 300A, Washington State. Simulations using a 2D reactive transport model under field-relevant hydrogeochemical conditions revealed a complex distribution of calcite concentration as a result of dynamic groundwater-river interactions. The calcite concentration distribution in turn affected the spatial and temporal changes in aqueous carbonate, calcium, and pH, which subsequently influenced U(VI) mobility and discharge rates into the river. The results implied that calcite distribution and its concentration dynamics is an important consideration for field characterization, monitoring, and reactive transport prediction.

Ma, Rui; Liu, Chongxuan; Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Zachara, John M.; Zheng, Chunmiao

2014-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

189

Coextraction behavior of Tc(VII) and U(VI) by CMPO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coextraction behavior of technetium(VII) and uranium(VI) from nitric acid solution by n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) in the absence or presence of tributyl phosphate (TBP) was investigated. The extraction of technetium was remarkably enhanced in the presence of uranium at less than 0.1M nitric acid concentration, and with the initial concentration ratio of [U]/[Tc] = 50 in the aqueous phase, the distribution coefficient of Tc(VII) at 0.01M nitric acid was about one hundred times greater than that obtained in the absence of uranium. The coextraction of technetium and uranium was presumed to occur due to the same ion exchange mechanism as reported in the Tc-U-TBP system. However, the effect of TBP on this coextraction was not observed in the present study. 17 refs., 8 figs.

Takeuchi, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Satoru; Yamawaki, Michio (Univ. of Tokyo, Ibaraki (Japan)); Tachimori, Shoichi (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan))

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Bianchi type-VI anisotropic dark energy model with varying EoS parameter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the scope of an anisotropic Bianchi type-VI cosmological model we have studied the evolution of the universe filled with perfect fluid and dark energy. To get the deterministic model of Universe, we assume that the shear scalar $(\\sigma)$ in the model is proportional to expansion scalar $(\\vartheta)$. This assumption allows only isotropic distribution of fluid. Exact solution to the corresponding equations are obtained. The EoS parameter for dark energy as well as deceleration parameter is found to be the time varying functions. Using the observational data qualitative picture of the evolution of the universe corresponding to different of its stages is given. The stability of the solutions obtained is also studied.

Bijan Saha

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

191

Calculation of the electron structure of vacancies and their compensated states in III-VI semiconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Green's functions theory and the bond-orbital model are used as a basis for calculations of the electron structure of local defects-specifically, vacancies and their compensated states in III-VI semiconductors. The energy levels in the band gap are established, and the changes induced in the electron densities in the GaS, GaSe, and InSe semiconductors by anion and cation vacancies and their compensated states are calculated. It is established that, if a vacancy is compensated by an atom of an element from the same subgroup with the same tetrahedral coordination and if the ionic radius of the compensating atom is smaller than that of the substituted atom, the local levels formed by the vacancy completely disappear. It is shown that this mechanism of compensation of vacancies provides a means not only for recovering the parameters of the crystal, but for improving the characteristics of the crystal as well.

Mehrabova, M. A., E-mail: Mehrabova@mail.ru; Madatov, R. S. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Radiation Problems (Azerbaijan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Acceleration of Microbially Mediated U(VI) Reduction at a Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Colorado Plateau  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A second field-scale electron donor amendment experiment was conducted in 2003 at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site in Rifle, Colorado. The objective of the 2003 experiment (done in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy's UMTRA Groundwater Project) was to test the hypothesis that amendment of increased concentration of electron donor would result in an increased export of electron donor down gradient which in turn would create a larger zone of down-gradient U(VI) bioreduction sustained over a longer time period relative to the 2002 experiment (Anderson et al. 2003). During the first experiment (2002), {approx}3 mM acetate was amended to subsurface over a period of 3 months in a 15m by 18m by 2.5m volume comprised of 3 upgradient monitoring wells, 20 injection wells, and 15 down-gradient monitoring wells. After an initial one-month phase of metal reduction, bioavailable oxidized Fe was consumed near the injection gallery and the dominant terminal electron accepting process became sulfate reduction, rapidly consuming the injected acetate. For the 2003 experiment, we amended sufficient acetate ({approx}10 mM) to consume available sulfate and export acetate down-gradient where bioavailable oxidized Fe was still present. Data from the experiment indicate that acetate was exported further down gradient, resulting in a larger zone of microbial U(VI) reduction than for the 2002 experiment. Geohydrologic, geochemical, and microbiological data collected during the course of both experiments enable assessment of relative importance of a number of factors controlling the experimental outcomes. Companion posters by Anderson et al. and White et al. provide additional results.

Phil Long; Todd Anderson; Aaron Peacock; Steve Heald; Yun-Juan Chang; Dick Dayvault; Derek R. Lovley; C.T. Resch; Helen Vrionis; Irene Ortiz-Bernad; D.C. White

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

193

Thermodynamic stabilities of U(VI) minerals: Estimated and observed relationships  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gibbs free energies of formation ({Delta}G{degree}{sub f}) for several structurally related U(VI) minerals are estimated by summing the Gibbs energy contributions from component oxides. The estimated {Delta}G{degree}{sub f} values are used to construct activity-activity (stability) diagrams, and the predicted stability fields are compared with observed mineral occurrences and reaction pathways. With some exceptions, natural occurrences agree well with the mineral stability fields estimated for the systems SiO{sub 2}-CaO-UO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}-CaO-UO{sub 3}H{sub 2}O, providing confidence in the estimated thermodynamic values. Activity-activity diagrams are sensitive to small differences in {Delta}G{degree}{sub f} values, and mineral compositions must be known accurately, including structurally bound H{sub 2}O. The estimated {Delta}G{degree}{sub f} values are not considered reliable for a few minerals for two major reasons: (1) the structures of the minerals in question are not closely similar to those used to estimate the {Delta}G{sub f}* values of the component oxides, and/or (2) the minerals in question are exceptionally fine grained, leading to large surface energies that increase the effective mineral solubilities. The thermodynamic stabilities of uranium(VI) minerals are of interest for understanding the role of these minerals in controlling uranium concentrations in oxidizing groundwaters associated with uranium ore bodies, uranium mining and mill tailings and geological repositories for nuclear waste.

Finch, R.J. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rates of contaminant U(VI) release from individual size fractions of a composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through batch reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. Variability in equilibrium adsorption among the various size fractions was determined in static batch reactors and analyzed using the surface complexation modeling approach. The estimated stoichiometric coefficients of U(VI) surface complexation reactions with respect to pH and carbonate concentrations varied with size fractions. This source of variability significantly increased the uncertainty in U(VI) conditional equilibrium constants over that estimated from experimental errors alone. A minimum difference between conditional equilibrium constants was established in order to evaluate statistically significant differences between sediment adsorption properties. A set of equilibrium and kinetic expressions for cation exchange, calcite dissolution, aerobic respiration, and silica dissolution were incorporated in a reaction-rate model to describe the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through batch experiments. Parameters in the reaction-rate model, calibrated using experimental data for select size fractions, predicted the changes in solute concentrations for the bulk, <2 mm, sediment sample. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multi-rate surface complexation model with an assumed lognormal distribution for the rate constants. The estimated mean and standard deviation were the same for all < 2mm size fractions, but differed in the 2-8mm size fraction. Micropore volumes in the varied size fractions were also similar as assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data. These findings provide further support for the link between microporosity and particle-scale mass transfer rates controlling kinetic U(VI) adsorption/desorption and for the utility of N2 desorption isotherms for characterizing pore networks that influence mass transfer rates.

Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

195

Similarity of the Surface Reactivity of Hydrous Ferric Oxide and Hematite: Sorption and Redox of U(VI) and Fe(II)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrous Ferric Oxide (HFO) vs. Hematite--Thermodynamically distinctive bulk phases, but the surfaces could be similar due to hydration of the interface. Hypothesis--The surface of HFO is energetically similar to the surface of hematite. Objective--Compare the reactions of HFO and hematite with U(VI) and Fe(II). Experimental--The reactions of interests were (1) preparation of sub-micron hematite, (2) sorption of U(VI), and (3) redox of U(VI) and Fe(II) with HFO or hematite.

Je-Hun Jang; Dempsey, Brian A.; Burgos, William D.; Yeh, George; Roden, Eric

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

196

O. DONY-HNAULT. 2014 Sur la radio-activit du peroxyde d'hydrogne. Travaux du laboratoire de l'Institut Physiologie. Solvay. t. VI. f 03.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

l'Institut Physiologie. Solvay. t. VI. f 03. L'eau oxygénée a la propriété d'émettre les radiations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

197

Spatially resolved U(VI) partitioning and speciation: Implications for plume scale behavior of contaminant U in the Hanford vadose zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EM/GJ1302- 2006, Stoller Hanford Office, Richland, WA. 2006.characterization of U(VI) in Hanford vadose zone poreUranium Geochemistry at the Hanford Site. Pacific Northwest

Wan, Jiamin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

A Conceptual model of coupled biogeochemical and hydrogeological processes affected by in situ Cr(VI) bioreduction in groundwater at Hanford 100H Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Groundwater at Hanford 100H Site B.Faybishenko, P.E.Long,Cr(VI) contaminated groundwater at Hanford 100H site. A slowHRC TM ), was injected in Hanford sediments to stimulate

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

ELECTRONIC SOLUTION SPECTRA FOR URANIUM AND NEPTUNIUM IN OXIDATION STATES (III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectra have been recorded for solutions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) of uranium and neptunium in oxidation states (III) to (VI). The spectra for U(III), Np(III) and Np(IV) in AHF are very similar to those in acidified aqueous solution, but that for U(IV) suggests that the cationic species is UF{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The AHF spectra for the elements in oxidation states (V) and (VI) are not comparable with those of the formally analogous aqueous solutions, where the elements exist as well-defined dioxo-cations. However, the AHF spectra can be related to spectra in the gas phase, in the solid state or in non-aqueous solvents for each element in its appropriate oxidation state.

Baluka, M.; Edelstein, N.; O'Donnell, T. A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Upscaling of Long-Term U(VI) Desorption from Pore Scale Kinetics to Field-Scale Reactive Transport Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of the project is the development of scientifically defensible approaches for upscaling reactive transport models (RTM) through a detailed understanding of U(VI) desorption across several spatial scales: bench-, intermediate-, and field-scales. The central hypothesis of the project is that the development of this methodology will lead to a scientifically defensible approach for conceptual model development for multicomponent RTM at contaminated DOE sites, leading to predictive transport simulations with reduced uncertainty.

Steefel, Carl I.; Li Li; Davis, J.A.; Curtis, G.P.; Honeyman, B.D.; Kent, D.B.; Kohler, M.; Rodriguez, D.R.; Johnson, K.J.; Miller, A.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI{sub 2}  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same are disclosed, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI{sub 2} chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin ``composition-graded`` layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns ({approx_equal}2.5 {mu}m to {approx_equal}5.0 {mu}m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii) a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion occurs (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer. 16 figs.

Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

202

Compared performances of ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 for MOX core physics.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US is currently evaluating the use of MOX fuel in commercial LWR's for reducing weapons grade Pu stockpiles. The design and licensing processes will require that the validity of the nuclear data libraries and codes used in the effort be demonstrated. Unfortunately, there are only a very limited number of relatively old and non representative integral experiments' freely available to the US programs. This lack of adequate experimental data can be partially remediated by comparing the results of well validated European codes with the results of candidate US codes. The demonstration can actually be divided in two components: a code to code (Monte Carlo) comparison can easily demonstrate the validity and limits of the proposed algorithms; and the performances of nuclear data libraries should be compared, major trends should be observed, and their origins should be explained in terms of differences in evaluated nuclear data; In this paper, we have compared the performances of the JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VI.4 libraries for a series of benchmarks for k{sub eff}, void worth, and pin power distributions. Note that JEF-2.2 has been extensively validated for MOX applications.

Finck, P. J.

1998-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

203

Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI.sub. 2  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin "composition-graded" layer ranging from on the order ot about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns (.congruent.2.5 .mu.m to .congruent.5.0 .mu.m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, causes the The Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. EG-77-C-01-4042, Subcontract No. XJ-9-8021-1 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA) [Bellevue, WA; Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA) [Seattle, WA

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

204

Diamylamylphosphonate solvent extraction of Am(VI) from nuclear fuel raffinate simulant solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The separation of hexavalent americium from the lanthanides in simulated PUREX raffinate solution using 1 M diamylamylphosphonate in dodecane extraction was investigated. Hexavalent americium was prepared using room-temperature sodium bismuthate oxidation. Under these conditions the majority of the lanthanides were not oxidized and remained inextractable. A separation factor of approximately 50 was provided for americium from europium over the nitric acid concentration range 67 M. Cerium was the exception with oxidation to CeIV resulting in its co-extraction with AmVI. However, since americium is readily reduced to AmIII it was easily stripped with a dilute acidic solution of hydrogen peroxide. Although hydrogen peroxide also reduces cerium, it does so slowly, and a selective americium strip was achieved, with a separation factor of between 1525. Alternatively, since americium spontaneously reduced in the loaded organic phase, samples allowed to stand for 2 hours could be selectively stripped of americium by contact with 1 M HNO3 containing no additional reagents. The implications for use in fuel cycle separations are discussed.

Bruce J. Mincher; Leigh R. Martin; Nicholas C. Schmitt

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Influence of phosphate and silica on U(VI) precipitation from acidic and neutralized wastewaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium speciation and physical-chemical characteristics were studied in solids precipitated from synthetic acidic to circumneutral wastewaters in the presence and absence of dissolved silica and phosphate to examine thermodynamic and kinetic controls on phase formation. Composition of synthetic wastewater was based on disposal sites 216-U-8 and 216-U-12 Cribs at the Hanford site (WA, USA). In the absence of dissolved silica or phosphate, crystalline or amorphous uranyl oxide hydrates, either compreignacite or meta-schoepite, precipitated at pH 5 or 7 after 30 d of reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic calculations. In the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica representative of groundwater concentrations, amorphous phases dominated by compreignacite precipitated rapidly at pH 5 or 7 as a metastable phase and formation of poorly-crystalline boltwoodite, the thermodynamically stable uranyl silicate phase, was slow. In the presence of phosphate (3 mM), meta-ankoleite initially precipitated as the primary phase at pH 3, 5, or 7 regardless of the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica. Analysis of precipitates by U LIII-edge EXAFS indicated that autunite-type sheets of meta-ankoleite transformed to phosphuranylite-type sheets after 30 d of reaction, probably due to Ca substitution in the structure. Low solubility of uranyl phosphate phases limits dissolved U(VI) concentrations but differences in particle size, crystallinity, and precipitate composition vary with pH and base cation concentration, which will influence the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of these phases.

Kanematsu, Masakazu; Perdrial, Nicolas; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A.

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

206

Near-Infrared Photoluminescence Enhancement in Ge/CdS and Ge/ZnS Core/Shell Nanocrystals: Utilizing IV/II-VI Semiconductor Epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ge nanocrystals have a large Bohr radius and a small, size-tunable band gap that may engender direct character via strain or doping. Colloidal Ge nanocrystals are particularly interesting in the development of near-infrared materials for applications in bioimaging, telecommunications and energy conversion. Epitaxial growth of a passivating shell is a common strategy employed in the synthesis of highly luminescent IIVI, IIIV and IVVI semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we use relatively unexplored IV/IIVI epitaxy as a way to enhance the photoluminescence and improve the optical stability of colloidal Ge nanocrystals. Selected on the basis of their relatively small lattice mismatch compared with crystalline Ge, we explore the growth of epitaxial CdS and ZnS shells using the successive ion layer adsorption and reaction method. Powder X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy techniques, including energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction, clearly show the controllable growth of as many as 20 epitaxial monolayers of CdS atop Ge cores. In contrast, Ge etching and/or replacement by ZnS result in relatively small Ge/ZnS nanocrystals. The presence of an epitaxial IIVI shell greatly enhances the near-infrared photoluminescence and improves the photoluminescence stability of Ge. Ge/IIVI nanocrystals are reproducibly 13 orders of magnitude brighter than the brightest Ge cores. Ge/4.9CdS core/shells show the highest photoluminescence quantum yield and longest radiative recombination lifetime. Thiol ligand exchange easily results in near-infrared active, water-soluble Ge/IIVI nanocrystals. We expect this synthetic IV/IIVI epitaxial approach will lead to further studies into the optoelectronic behavior and practical applications of Si and Ge-based nanomaterials.

Guo, Yijun [Ames Laboratory; Rowland, Clare E [Argonne National Laboratory; Schaller, Richard D [Argonne National Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Ames Laboratory

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

207

IEA HPP Annex 41 Cold Climate Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Air-Source Heat Pumps Van D. Baxter Oak Ridge National Laboratory European Heat Pump Summit Nuremberg ­ Cold Climate Heat Pumps Improving low ambient temperature performance of air-source heat pumps as having large number of hours with OD temperature -7 °C (19 °F). Air-source heat pumps (ASHP

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

208

IEA HPP Annex 36 Installation/Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on installation of air to air heat pump The aim is to use an ergonomic approach, in order to reduce Laboratory European Heat Pump Summit Nuremberg, Germany October 15, 2013 #12;3 Managed by UT), USA 3 10-11 October 2013 EdF, France 4 12 May 2014 Workshop at IEA Heat Pump conference, Montreal

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

209

Annex 3: `Flagship' Case Study Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, engagement, quality of experience, personal and social benefits. A total of 401 adults were interviewed Quality of Life for CSR07 Jake Morris & Kieron Doick #12;Birches Valley Forest Centre Contents Chapter 2.2 Engagement 6 2.3 Quality of Experience 6 2.4 Personal benefits 7 2.5 Social benefits 10 3

210

Workplan and Annex: Solar Resource Knowledge Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Solar Resource Knowledge Management'' will be a new task under the International Energy Agency's Solar Heating and Cooling Programme. The task development has involved researchers from Germany, France, Switzerland, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Canada, the U.S. that have been engaged in the use of satellite imagery to develop solar resource maps and datasets around the world. The task will address three major areas: (1) ''Benchmarking'' of satellite-based solar resource methods so that resource information derived from approaches developed in one country or based on a specific satellite can be quantitatively intercompared with methods from other countries using different satellites, as well as with ground data; (2) Data archiving and dissemination procedures, especially focusing on access to the data by end users; and (3) basic R&D for improving the reliability and usability of the data, and for examining new types of products important to the solar industry, such as solar resource forecasts.

Renne, D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

U.S.-China vehicle annex  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The United States and China conduct information exchanges, joint studies, technology demonstrations, and training sessions with national laboratories, automotive industry partners, and other private industries involved in energy efficient transportation.

212

RadEMSL (Radiochemistry Annex Overview) | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001DataGeothermal

213

Fraunhofer ISE IEA HPP Annex 43  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the future? Biogas from biological waste: agriculture, landfill, waste (sewage) water Usage of biogas: heat

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

214

Emergency Support Function #12 … Energy Annex  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatementNOTElectricityof Energy776 IDEPARTMENT OF

215

Emergency Support Function #12; Energy Annex  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit| Department ofNon-Road Engines, ReportEnergyStandard23, 2008Emergency

216

SANS study of third phase formation in the U(VI)-HNO{sub 3}/ TBP-n-dodecane system.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spite of its technological importance, third phase formation in the extraction of hexavalent actinides from nitric acid solutions into alkane solutions of tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) has received only limited attention. The focus of the few available literature works has been primarily centered on the composition of the third phase and on the stoichiometry of the metal complexes. Very little is known, on the other hand, about the structure and morphology of the third phase species of hexavalent actinides. In the present investigation, the formation of a third phase upon extraction of U(VI) by 20% TBP in deuterated n-dodecane from nitric acid solutions was studied. Chemical analyses have shown that U(VI) exists in the third phase as a species having the composition UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}(TBP){sub 2}{center_dot}HNO{sub 3}. Small-angle neutron scattering measurements on TBP solutions loaded with only HNO{sub 3} or with increasing amounts of U(VI) have revealed the presence, both before and after phase splitting, of relatively large ellipsoidal aggregates with the parallel and perpendicular axes having lengths up to about 64 and 15 Angstroms, respectively. The formation of these aggregates is observed in all cases, that is, when only HNO3, only UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, or both HNO{sub 3} and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} are extracted by the TBP solution. Upon third phase formation, the SANS data reveal the presence of smaller aggregates in both the heavy and light organic phase.

Chiarizia, R.; Jensen, M. P.; Borkowski, M.; Ferraro, J. R.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Littrell, K. C.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Effect of temperature on the extraction of uranium(VI) from nitric acid by tri-n-amyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies have been carried out on the effect of temperature on the extraction of U(VI) from nitric acid medium by tri-n-amyl phosphate/n-dodecane, measured as a function of the extractant concentration and aqueous phase acidity. The results indicate that the extraction is exothermic as in the case of tri-n-butyl phosphate. From the data available an effort has been made to calculate the equilibrium constant, the Gibbs energy change and the entropy changes of the extraction reaction. 21 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Srinivasan, T.G.; Rao, P.R.V. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Sood, D.D. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)]|[BARC, Mumbai (India)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

"Aegean Seals of the Late Bronze Age: Stylistic Groups, VI. Fourteenth Century Mainland and Later Fourteenth Century Cretan Workshops"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Island Sanctuaries Group sW 17 /G\\I M:t4R ) oV &+W 14 6\\w 16 12 10 50 John G. Younger Fig. 1 1-5: Columbia Gtoup 6*8: Group with Misplaced Fotelegs 9: Group with Crossed Hocks m, 53Aegean seals of the Late Bronze Age VI 37 Fig. 4 31 -38: Rhodian Hunt.... 'Ihe Group with Misplaced Forelegs 3. The Group with Crossed Hocks 4. The Group with Wicked Eyes B. The Island Sanctuaries Clroup (p.61) 5. The Central Island Sanctuaties Group 6. The Rhodian Hunt Group 7. The Island Sanctuaries Group: Miscellaneous...

Younger, John G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The O VI Absorbers Toward PG0953+415: High Metallicity, Cosmic-Web Gas Far From Luminous Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spectrum of the low-redshift QSO PG0953+415 shows two strong, intervening O VI absorption systems. To study the nature of these absorbers, we have used the Gemini Multiobject Spectrograph to conduct a deep spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey in the 5' x 5' field centered on the QSO. This survey is fully complete for r' web. Evidently, some regions of the web filaments are highly metal enriched. We discuss the origin of the high-metallicity gas and suggest that the enrichment might have occurred long ago (at high z).

Todd M. Tripp; Bastien Aracil; David V. Bowen; Edward B. Jenkins

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

220

Effects of Electromagnetic Field on the Dynamics of Bianchi type $VI_0$ Universe with Anisotropic Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type $VI_0$ cosmological models with cosmological constant are investigated in the presence of anisotropic dark energy. We examine the effects of electromagnetic field on the dynamics of the universe and anisotropic behavior of dark energy. The law of variation of the mean Hubble parameter is used to find exact solutions of the Einstein field equations. We find that electromagnetic field promotes anisotropic behavior of dark energy which becomes isotropic for future evolution. It is concluded that the isotropic behavior of the universe model is seen even in the presence of electromagnetic field and anisotropic fluid.

M. Sharif; M. Zubair

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Microsoft Word - ViArray_Fact_ Sheet_SAND2011-3935P_updated_format.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program Preliminary Needs535:UFC 2300.004/2013AprilViA Tru Sandia N

222

Subsurface Biogeochemical Heterogeneity (Field-scale removal of U(VI) from groundwater in an alluvial aquifer by electron donor amendment)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determine if biostimulation of alluvial aquifers by electron donor amendment can effectively remove U(VI) from groundwater at the field scale. Uranium contamination in groundwater is a significant problem at several DOE sites. In this project, the possibility of accelerating bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) as a means of decreasing U(VI) concentrations in groundwater is directly addressed by conducting a series of field-scale experiments. Scientific goals include demonstrating the quantitative linkage between microbial activity and U loss from groundwater and relating the dominant terminal electron accepting processes to the rate of U loss. The project is currently focused on understanding the mechanisms for unexpected long-term ({approx}2 years) removal of U after stopping electron donor amendment. Results obtained in the project successfully position DOE and others to apply biostimulation broadly to U contamination in alluvial aquifers.

Long, Philip E.; Derek R. Lovley; A. L. NGuessan; Kelly Nevin; C. T. Resch; Evan Arntzen; Jenny Druhan; Aaron Peacock; Brett Baldwin; Dick Dayvault; Dawn Holmes; Ken Williams; Susan Hubbard; Steve Yabusaki; Yilin Fang; D.C. White; John Komlos; Peter Jaffe

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

VI-Band Follow-Up Observations of Ultra-Long-Period Cepheid Candidates in M31  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ultra-long period Cepheids (ULPCs) are classical Cepheids with pulsation periods exceeding $\\approx 80$ days. The intrinsic brightness of ULPCs are ~1 to ~3 mag brighter than their shorter period counterparts. This makes them attractive in future distance scale work to derive distances beyond the limit set by the shorter period Cepheids. We have initiated a program to search for ULPCs in M31, using the single-band data taken from the Palomar Transient Factory, and identified eight possible candidates. In this work, we presented the VI-band follow-up observations of these eight candidates. Based on our VI-band light curves of these candidates and their locations in the color-magnitude diagram and the Period-Wesenheit diagram, we verify two candidates as being truly ULPCs. The six other candidates are most likely other kinds of long-period variables. With the two confirmed M31 ULPCs, we tested the applicability of ULPCs in distance scale work by deriving the distance modulus of M31. It was found to be $\\mu_...

Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Yang, Michael Ting-Chang; Lin, Chi-Sheng; Hsiao, Hsiang-Yao; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lin, I-Ling; Kanbur, Shashi M; Ip, Wing-Huen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

A flowsheet concept for an Am/Ln separation based on Am{sup VI} solvent extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The separation of Am from the lanthanides and curium is a key step in proposed advanced fuel cycle scenarios. The partitioning and transmutation of Am is desirable to minimize the long-term radiotoxicity of material interred in a future high-level waste repository. However, a separation amenable to process scale-up remains elusive. Higher oxidation states of americium have recently been used to demonstrate solvent extraction-based separations using conventional fuel cycle ligands. Here, the successful partitioning of Am{sup VI} from the bulk of lanthanides and curium using diamyl-amyl-phosphonate (DAAP) extraction is reported. Due to the instability of Am{sup VI} in the organic phase it was readily selectively stripped to a new acidic aqueous phase to provide separation from co-extracted Ce{sup IV}. The use of NaBiO{sub 3} as an oxidant to separate Am from the lanthanides and Cm by solvent extraction has been successfully demonstrated on the bench scale. Based on these results, flowsheet concepts can be designed that result in 96 % Am recovery in the presence of a few percent of the remaining Cm and the lanthanides in two extraction contacts. Preliminary results also indicate that the DAAP extractant is robust toward ?- irradiation under realistic conditions of acidity and dissolved oxygen concentration.

Mincher, B.J.; Law, J.D. [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Tungsten(VI) Nitride Having a W2(-N)2 Core Zachary J. Tonzetich, Richard R. Schrock,* Keith M. Wampler, Brad C. Bailey,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Tungsten(VI) Nitride Having a W2(-N)2 Core Zachary J. Tonzetich, Richard R. Schrock,* Keith M-331, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 Received September 27, 2007 The tungsten that the tungsten alkylidyne species W(C-t-Bu)(CH2-t-Bu)(OAr)2 (Ar ) 2,6-diisopropylphenyl) can be prepared readily

Mller, Peter

226

Sequential Extraction Method for Determination of Fe(II/III) and U(IV/ VI) in Suspensions of Iron-Bearing Phyllosilicates and Uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Bearing Phyllosilicates and Uranium Fubo Luan and William D. Burgos*, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Information ABSTRACT: Iron-bearing phyllosilicates strongly influence the redox state and mobility of uranium-times more Fe(II) than U(VI). INTRODUCTION Uranium contamination is a problem at many U.S. Department

Burgos, William

227

VI Simpsio Brasileiro de Solos No Saturados 2007/ Salvador-Bahia 421 Relao Entre a Resistncia a Trao Obtida via Ensaio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VI Simpósio Brasileiro de Solos Não Saturados 2007/ Salvador-Bahia 421 Relação Entre a Resistência Saturados 2007/ Salvador-Bahia uma maior atenção vem sendo dada a este tipo de mecanismo, especialmente por

Zornberg, Jorge G.

228

Preservation of Our World in the Wake of Change, Vol. VI A/B ISEEQS Pub. Jerusalem, Israel, 1996. Editor: Y. Steinberger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

553 Preservation of Our World in the Wake of Change, Vol. VI A/B ISEEQS Pub. Jerusalem, Israel, Jerusalem 91904, Israel and G. Schiller Department of Field Crops and Natural Resources, Agricultural components. In wind- dispersed species, for example, selection for dispersal capacity may often favor small

Nathan, Ran

229

Growth of alternating (1OO)/(lll )-oriented II-VI regions for quasi-phase-matched nonlinear optical devices on GaAs substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ferroelectrics such as lithium nio- bate and potassium titanyl phosphate. Efficient operation is possible) nonlinear interactions. II-VI semiconductors, with transparency from the far in- frared to the visible phasematched interactions.' A powerful alternative technique, QPM, re- quires periodic patterning of the sign

Fejer, Martin M.

230

Chromium Remediation or Release? Effect of Iron(II) Sulfate Addition on Chromium(VI) Leaching from Columns of Chromite Ore Processing Residue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chromite ore processing residue (COPR), derived from the so-called high lime processing of chromite ore, contains high levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) and has a pH between 11 and 12. Ferrous sulfate, which is used for ...

Geelhoed, Jeanine S; Meeussen, Johannes CL; Roe, Martin J; Hillier, Stephen; Thomas, Rhodri P; Farmer, John G; Paterson, Edward

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

VI INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYMPOSIUM (ITS2006), SEPTEMBER 3-6, 2006, FORTALEZA-CE, BRAZIL 1 Fringe Benefits of the H.264/AVC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Motion Picture Experts Groups (MPEG) from the International Standards Organization (ISO) and of the VideoVI INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYMPOSIUM (ITS2006), SEPTEMBER 3-6, 2006, FORTALEZA-CE, BRAZIL, and Tiago A. Fonseca Abstract-- H.264/AVC is the newest, state-of-the-art, video compression standard

de Queiroz, Ricardo L.

232

VI 1.50 Policy on the Reporting of Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (Approved by the Board of Regents on December 9, 2011)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 VI ­ 1.50 Policy on the Reporting of Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (Approved by the Board of Regents on December 9, 2011) I. PURPOSE The purpose of this policy is to provide guidance to staff into contact with the USM community. II. AUTHORITY The reporting requirements addressed in this policy

Milchberg, Howard

233

The Regulation of Salmonella Typhi Vi Capsular Antigen Expression in Intestinal Model Epithelia and the Bovine Ligated-Ileal Loop Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, a major public health concern in developing countries, continues to be a priority for the World Health Organization. S. Typhi possesses a viaB locus responsible for the biosynthesis of the Vi-capsular antigen, a...

Tran, Quynh Tien-Ngoc

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

234

A review of "King James VI and I and his English Parliaments" by Conrad Russell, edited by Richard Cust and Andrew Thrush  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is the Duke?s #23; nal speech?the one explaining why things happened the way you thought that they would probably happen?that you really want to hear. Conrad Russell, King James VI and I and his English Parliaments. Edited by Richard Cust and Andrew #22...

Peacey, Jason

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

WVU FY 2009Expanding West Virginia's Economy WE s t Vi rg i n i a U n i V E r s i t y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WVU FY 2009Expanding West Virginia's Economy WE s t Vi rg i n i a U n i V E r s i t y: amy The opinions herein reflect those of the authors and do not reflect those of the West Virginia University Board Direct expenditures from West Virginia University led to a total economic impact of approximately $4

Mohaghegh, Shahab

236

AN ORIGIN FOR THE SOUTH POLE-AITKEN BASIN THORIUM. V.I. Chikmachev, S.G.Pugacheva, Sternberg State Astronomical institute. Moscow University.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN ORIGIN FOR THE SOUTH POLE-AITKEN BASIN THORIUM. V.I. Chikmachev, S.G.Pugacheva, Sternberg State, that within the limits of the possible Al-Khwarizmi/King basin [3]. The SPA basin thorium map: The using data Lunar Prospector [4] the thorium distribution map demonstrated a hemisphere of the Moon which contains

Chikmachov, Vadim I.

237

Living Village K i o n i Vi l l a g e , I t h a c a , G r e e c e  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A A Western Washington University | 2010 #12;Living | Village Kioni Village Ithaca, Greece Sustainable IthacaLiving Village K i o n i Vi l l a g e , I t h a c a , G r e e c e A X Nicholas Zaferatos Zaferatos, Sustainable Ithaca Faculty Program Director, at nicholas.zaferatos@wwu.edu #12;Table of Contents

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

238

PROBING THE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM/GALAXY CONNECTION. V. ON THE ORIGIN OF Ly? AND O VI ABSORPTION AT z < 0.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the association of galaxies with Ly? and O VI absorption, the most commonly detected transitions of the low-z intergalactic medium (IGM), in the fields of 14 quasars with z[subscript em] = 0.060.57. Confirming ...

Prochaska, J. Xavier

239

A Spectroscopic Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation on the Reduction of Uranium(VI) by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2DS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, the reduction rate of uranyl complexes with hydroxide, carbonate, EDTA, and Desferriferrioxamine B (DFB) by anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2DS), a potential electron shuttle for microbial reduction of metal ions (Newman and Kolter 2000), is studied by stopped-flow kinetics techniques under anoxic atmosphere. The apparent reaction rates varied with ligand type, solution pH, and U(VI) concentration. For each ligand, a single largest kobs within the studied pH range was observed, suggesting the influence of pH-dependent speciation on the U(VI) reduction rate. The maximum reaction rate found in each case followed the order of OH- > CO32- > EDTA > DFB, consistent with the same trend of the thermodynamic stability of the uranyl complexes and ionic sizes of the ligands. Increasing the stability of uranyl complexes and ligand size decreased the maximum reduction rate. The pH-dependent rates were modeled using a second-order rate expression that was assumed to be dependent on a single U(VI) complex and AH2DS species. By quantitatively comparing the calculated and measured apparent rate constants as a function of pH, species AHDS3- was suggested as the primary reductant in all cases examined. Species UO2CO3(aq) , UO2HEDTA-, and (UO2)2(OH)22+ were suggested as the principal electron acceptors among the U(VI) species mixture in carbonate, EDTA, and hydroxyl systems, respectively.

Wang, Zheming; Wagnon, Ken B.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Liu, Chongxuan; Rosso, Kevin M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

240

Applications of ENDF/B-VI and JENDL-3.1 iron data to reactor pressure vessel fluence analysis using continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparison is made of results obtained from neutron transmissions analysis of RPV performed by MCNP with ENDF/B-VI and JENDL-3.1 iron data. At first, a one-dimensional discrete ordinates transport calculation using VITAMIN-C fine-group library based on ENDF/B-IV was performed for a cylindrical model of a PWR to generate the source spectrum at the front of the RPV. And then, the transmission of neutrons through RPV was calculated by MCNP with the moderated fission spectrum incident on the vessel face. For these ENDF/B-IV, -VI and JENDL-3.1 iron data were processed into continuous energy point data form by NJOY91.91. The fast neutron fluxes and dosimeter reaction rates through RPV using each iron data were intercompared.

Kim, Jungo-Do; Gil, Choong-Sup [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 3: Federal Regions IV and VI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the third volume of a five-volume report, designed to provide useful information for policy analysis in the Department of Energy, especially for the examination of possible areas of conflict between the implementation of a national energy policy calling for the increased use of coal and the pursuit of clean air. Information is presented for each state in Federal Regions IV and VI under the following section headings: state title page (includes a summary of air quality data); revised state implementation plan outline; maps of nonattainment areas, as designated; Storage and Retrieval of Aerometric Data (SAROAD); SAROAD data maps; power plant data; power plant maps; and county maps. States in Federal Region IV include: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Those in Federal Region VI include: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. (JGB)

Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Ppn. SoL Snow Deplh Observer Vis. Vi;,. Vis. 00 in. 0 in. S5 J5 mi. mi. \\7 mi.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Vi;,. Vis. 00 in. 0 in. S5 J5 mi. mi. \\7 mi. #12;..,- . M I~ · , \\f: ':'0 ll)A.\\I~S· Jb/ Ii I i. $".7~in. 0700 1300 1900 R.H. 24 hr. Mov. Clds. Clds. Clds.Sea L. - ! 0lU/l() .:. flOS-~ '/c. - mi. 30. Vis.Ppn. Sol. Snow Depth Observer a ~Sin. mi. J5 1111. mi.Q.O in. \\/ \\7_____~_____._._!O

Thompson, Anne

243

FINAL REPORT FOR THE REDUCTION OF CHROME (VI) TO CHROME (III) IN THE SECONDARY WASTE STREAM OF THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the laboratory results of RPP-PLAN-35958, Test Plan for the Effluent Treatment Facility to Reduce Chrome (VI) to Chrome (III) in the Secondary Waste Stream With the exception of the electrochemical corrosion scans, all work was carried out at the Center for Laboratory Science (CLS) located at the Columbia Basin College. This document summarizes the work carried out at CLS and includes the electrochemical scans and associated corrosion rates for 304 and 316L stainless steel.

DUNCAN JB; GUTHRIE MD

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

244

CIMAT, VI Escuela de verano, 25 de julio 7 de agosto 1999 Introducci'on a la Geometr'ia de la Mec'anica Cl'asica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parametrizada por (x(t); ?? x(t)): (d) Dibujar las gr'aficas de su energ'ia cin'etica T = ( ?? x) 2 =2 y potencial­ vaci'on de energ'ia, E = T + V = constante: (e) Repetir los 4 incisos anteriores con x(1) = 2; ?? x(0CIMAT, VI Escuela de verano, 25 de julio ­ 7 de agosto 1999 Introducci'on a la Geometr'ia de la Mec

Bor, Gil

245

CIMAT, VI Escuela de verano, 25 de julio -7 de agosto 1999 Introducci'on a la Geometr'ia de la Mec'anica Cl'asica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(t), `x(t)). (d)Dibujar las gr'aficas de su energ'ia cin'etica T = (x`)2=2 y potencial* * V = x2- vaci'on de energ'ia, E = T + V = constante. (e)Repetir los 4 incisos anteriores con x(1) = 2, `x CIMAT, VI Escuela de verano, 25 de julio - 7 de agosto 1999 Introducci'on a la Geometr'ia de la

Bor, Gil

246

Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facultative iron-reducing (Fe(III)-reducing) Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes (Fe(III)-NTA and Fe(III)-citrate) but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 M) of either of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 M) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A also could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ~7:3 in PIPES and ~1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments.

Ahmed, B.; Cao, B.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

247

Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 Chalcopyrite Semiconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science.1 A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity,2 5 which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors,6 and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism,7 9 make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

Feng, wanxiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ding, Jun [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics/Chinese Academy of Scie; Xiao, Di [ORNL; Yao, yugui [Chinese Academy of Sciences

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI$_2$ and II-IV-V$_2$ Chalcopyrite Semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science. A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity, which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI$_2$ and II-IV-V$_2$ can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors, and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism, make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

Wanxiang Feng; Jun Ding; Di Xiao; Yugui Yao

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Impact of uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes on uranium(VI) adsorption to synthetic and natural sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption on soil and sediment solids may decrease aqueous uranium concentrations and limit its propensity for migration in natural and contaminated settings. Uranium adsorption will be controlled in large part by its aqueous speciation, with a particular dependence on the presence of dissolved calcium and carbonate. Here we quantify the impact of uranyl speciation on adsorption to both goethite and sediments from the Hanford Clastic Dike and Oak Ridge Melton Branch Ridgetop formations. Hanford sediments were preconditioned with sodium acetate and acetic acid to remove carbonate grains, and Ca and carbonate were reintroduced at defined levels to provide a range of aqueous uranyl species. U(VI) adsorption is directly linked to UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} speciation, with the extent of retention decreasing with formation of ternary uranyl-calcium-carbonato species. Adsorption isotherms under the conditions studied are linear, and K{sub d} values decrease from 48 to 17 L kg{sup -1} for goethite, from 64 to 29 L kg{sup -1} for Hanford sediments, and from 95 to 51 L kg{sup -1} for Melton Branch sediments as the Ca concentration increases from 0 to 1 mM at pH 7. Our observations reveal that, in carbonate-bearing waters, neutral to slightly acidic pH values ({approx}5) and limited dissolved calcium are optimal for uranium adsorption.

Stewart, B.D. [Stanford University; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Fendorf, Scott [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Influence of ammonium availability on expression of nifD and amtB genes during biostimulation of a U(VI) contaminated aquifer: implications for U(VI) removal and monitoring the metabolic state of Geobacteraceae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the physiological status of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by 2 orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 ?M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences suggested that ammonium may have been one factor influencing the community composition prior to acetate amendment with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species with higher ammonium and Dechloromonas species dominating at the site with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to acetate concentrations rather than ammonium levels. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium transporter gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during uranium reduction. The abundance of amtB was inversely correlated to ammonium levels, whereas nifD transcript levels were similar across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB transcript expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of subsurface Geobacter species. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical and physiological interactions at the field scale in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes during bioremediation.

Mouser, Paula J.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Elifantz, Hila; Holmes, Dawn E.; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

251

Compliance with the Clean Air Act Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program requirements at U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Reservation Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program of the Clean Air Act (CAA) requires promulgation of regulations to reduce and prevent damage to the earth's protective ozone layer. Regulations pursuant to Title VI of the CAA are promulgated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at Title 40 CFR, Part 822. The regulations include ambitious production phaseout schedules for ozone depleting substances (ODS) including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), halons, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform under 40 CFR 82, Subpart A. The regulations also include requirements for recycling and emissions reduction during the servicing of refrigeration equipment and technician certification requirements under Subpart F; provisions for servicing of motor vehicle air conditioners under Subpart B; a ban on nonessential products containing Class 1 ODS under Subpart C; restrictions on Federal procurement of ODS under Subpart D; labeling of products using ODS under Subpart E; and the Significant New Alternatives Policy Program under Subpart G. This paper will provide details of initiatives undertaken at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of requirements under the Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program. The Stratospheric Ozone Protection Plans include internal DOE requirements for: (1) maintenance of ODS inventories; (2) ODS procurement practices; (3) servicing of refrigeration and air conditioning equipment; (4) required equipment modifications or replacement; (5) technician certification training; (6) labeling of products containing ODS; (7) substitution of chlorinated solvents; and (8) replacement of halon fire protection systems. The plans also require establishment of administrative control systems which assure that compliance is achieved and maintained as the regulations continue to develop and become effective.

Humphreys, M.P.; Atkins, E.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Acceleration of Field-Scale Bioreduction of U(VI) in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer: Temporal and Spatial Evolution of Biogeochemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium mill tailings sites provide access to uranium-contaminated groundwater at sites that are shallow and low hazard, making it possible to address the following scientific objectives: (1) Determine the dominant electron accepting processes at field sites with long-term metal/rad contamination; (2) Define the biogeochemical transformations that may be important to either natural or accelerated bioremediation under field conditions; and (3) Examine the potential for using biostimulation (electron donor addition) to accelerate reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) at the field scale.

Long, Phil

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

253

Immobilization of U(VI) from Oxic Groundwater by Hanford 300 Area Sediments and Effects of Columbia River Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regions within the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area (300 A) site experience periodic hydrologic influences from the nearby Columbia River as a result of changing river stage, which causes changes in groundwater elevation, flow direction and water chemistry. An important question is the extent to which the mixing of Columbia River water and groundwater impacts the speciation and mobility of uranium (U). In this study, we designed experiments to mimic interactions among U, oxic groundwater or Columbia River water, and 300 A sediments in the subsurface environment of Hanford 300 A. The goals were to investigate mechanisms of: 1) U immobilization in 300 A sediments under bulk oxic conditions and 2) U remobilization from U-immobilized 300 A sediments exposed to oxic Columbia River water. Initially, 300 A sediments in column reactors were fed with U(VI)-containing oxic 1) synthetic groundwater (SGW), 2) organic-amended SGW (OA-SGW), and 3) de-ionized (DI) water to investigate U immobilization processes. After that, the sediments were exposed to oxic Columbia River water for U remobilization studies. The results reveal that U was immobilized by 300 A sediments predominantly through reduction (80-85%) when the column reactor was fed with oxic OA-SGW. However, U was immobilized by 300 A sediments through adsorption (100%) when the column reactors were fed with oxic SGW or DI water. The reduced U in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW was relatively resistant to remobilization by oxic Columbia River water. Oxic Columbia River water resulted in U remobilization (?7%) through desorption, and most of the U that remained in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW (?93%) was in the form of uraninite nanoparticles. These results reveal that: 1) the reductive immobilization of U through OA-SGW stimulation of indigenous 300 A sediment microorganisms may be viable in the relatively oxic Hanford 300 A subsurface environments and 2) with the intrusion of Columbia River water, desorption may be the primary process resulting in U remobilization from OA-SGW-stimulated 300 A sediments at the subsurface of the Hanford 300 A site.

Ahmed, B.; Cao, Bin; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

254

LABORATORY VI ROTATIONAL DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wheels are everywhere. Balls spin when they are thrown. The earth rotates about its axis. Rotations to predict the outcome of a rotational system. · Choose a useful system when using rotational kinematics of systems. PREPARATION: Read Paul M. Fishbane: Chapter 9, Section 9-1; Chapter 5, Section 5-4. You should

Minnesota, University of

255

VI-1 PAPERS PUBLISHED  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV >41 - March 31, 2012

256

VI-1 TALKS PRESENTED  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV >41 - March 31,

257

VI-1 TALKS PRESENTED  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV >41 - March 31,3 -

258

FE(VI)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolution Enhancedenvironmental stewardship | Department

259

MONOGRAFIAS DE FISICA VI  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU . S . D e p a r t m e n ty

260

Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition: Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

Wilkins, M.J.; Callister, S.J.; Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; Nicora, C.D.; Lovley, D.R.; Long, P.E.; Lipton, M.S.

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition; Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the U.S. Department of Energys Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Miletto, Marzia; Williams, Kenneth H.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lovely, Derek R.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Updates to the ORIGEN-S Cross-Section Libraries Using ENDF-VI, EAF-99, and FENDL-2.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The standard cross-section library for light-water reactor (LWR) analyses used by the ORIGEN-S depletion and decay code has been extensively updated. This work entailed the development of broad multigroup neutron cross sections for ORIGEN-S from several sources of pointwise continuous-energy cross-section evaluations, including the U.S. Evaluated Nuclear Data Files ENDF/B-VI Release 7, the Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library FENDL-2.0, and the European Activation File EAF-99. The pointwise cross sections were collapsed to a three-group structure using a continuous-energy neutron flux spectrum representative of the typical neutronic conditions of typical LWR fuel and formatted for use by ORIGEN-S. In addition, the fission-product library has been expanded to include ENDF/B-VI fission yield data for 30 fissionable actinides. The processing codes and procedures are explained. Preliminary verification studies using the updated libraries were performed using the modules of the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) system. Comparisons between the previous basic ORIGEN-S libraries and the updated libraries developed in this work are presented.

Murphy, B.D.

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

263

High-Pressure Synthesis and Structure Determination of K6(SeO4)(SeO5), The First Potassium Orthoselenate(VI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on the first synthesis of a potassium orthoselenate(VI), K{sub 6}(SeO{sub 4})(SeO{sub 5}), and the structure determination from synchrotron powder diffraction data. The title compound crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 with a = 8.1259(1) {angstrom}, c = 17.4953(2) {angstrom}, V = 1155.21(2) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 4. Selenium displays two different complex anions, tetrahedral SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and trigonal-bipyramidal SeO{sub 5}{sup 4-}. When the formula is reduced to A{sub 3}B, the spatial arrangement of the constituting building units can be derived from the Li{sub 3}Bi type of structure.

Orosel,D.; Dinnebeier, R.; Jansen, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

I-III-VI.sub.2 based solar cell utilizing the structure CuInGaSe.sub.2 CdZnS/ZnO  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin film I-III-VI.sub.2 based solar cell having a first layer of copper indium gallium selenide, a second layer of cadmium zinc sulfide, a double layer of zinc oxide, and a metallization structure comprised of a layer of nickel covered by a layer of aluminum. An optional antireflective coating may be placed on said metallization structure. The cadmium zinc sulfide layer is deposited by means of an aqueous solution growth deposition process and may actually consist of two layers: a low zinc content layer and a high zinc content layer. Photovoltaic efficiencies of 12.5% at Air Mass 1.5 illumination conditions and 10.4% under AMO illumination can be achieved.

Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA); Stewart, John M. (Seattle, WA)

1992-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

265

Bulk liquid membrane for the recovery of chromium(VI) from a hydrochloric acid medium using dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 as extractant-carrier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solvent extraction and transfer of chromic acid from hydrochloric acid medium through a bulk liquid membrane containing dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (L) were studied. Extraction experiments pointed out that chromium(VI) was coextracted with the chloride ion which formed the complex ion pair L(H{sub 3}O{sup +})CrO{sub 3}Cl{sup {minus}} in the organic phase. The Donnan equilibrium isotherm based on the extraction, stripping, and CrO{sub 3}Cl{sup {minus}} hydrolysis equilibria allowed prediction of the performance of the semipermeable membrane to concentrate chlorochromic acid in the receiving phase. Transport experiments confirmed the ability of the liquid membrane to recover chlorochromic acid in pure water. The transport kinetics was modeled by using the two-film theory applied to the liquid membrane.

Zouhri, A. [Univ. Ibnou Zohr, Agadir (Morocco). Faulte de Sciences] [Univ. Ibnou Zohr, Agadir (Morocco). Faulte de Sciences; Ernst, B.; Burgard, M. [Ecole Europeenne de Chimie, Polymeres et Materiaux, Strasbourg (France)] [Ecole Europeenne de Chimie, Polymeres et Materiaux, Strasbourg (France)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Theoretical analyses of (n,xn) reactions on sup 235 U, sup 238 U, sup 237 Np, and sup 239 Pu for ENDF/B-VI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theoretical analyses were performed of neutron-induced reactions on {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu between 0.01 and 20 MeV in order to calculate neutron emission cross sections and spectra for ENDF/B-VI evaluations. Coupled-channel optical model potentials were obtained for each target nucleus by fitting total, elastic, and inelastic scattering cross section data, as well as low-energy average resonance data. The resulting deformed optical model potentials were used to calculate direct (n,n{prime}) cross sections and transmission coefficients for use in Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory analyses. A fission model with multiple barrier representation, width fluctuation corrections, and preequilibrium corrections were included in the analyses. Direct cross sections for higher-lying vibrational states were calculated using DWBA theory, normalized using B(E{ell}) values determined from (d,d{prime}) and Coulomb excitation data, where available, and from systematics otherwise. Initial fission barrier parameters and transition state density enhancements appropriate to the compound systems involved were obtained from previous analyses, especially fits to charged-particle fission probability data. The parameters for the fission model were adjusted for each target system to obtain optimum agreement with direct (n,f) cross section measurements, taking account of the various multichance fission channels, that is, the different compound systems involved. The results from these analyses were used to calculate most of the neutron (n,n), (n,n{prime}), and (n,xn) cross section data in the ENDF/B/VI evaluations for the above nuclei, and all of the energy-angle correlated spectra. The deformed optical model and fission model parameterizations are described. Comparisons are given between the results of these analyses and the previous ENDF/B-V evaluations as well as with the available experimental data. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Young, P.G.; Arthur, E.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

ENDF-6 Formats Manual Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-VII  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 2006, the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) of the United States released the new ENDF/B-VII.0 library. This represented considerable achievement as it was the 1st major release since 1990 when ENDF/B-VI has been made publicly available. The two libraries have been released in the same format, ENDF-6, which has been originally developed for the ENDF/B-VI library. In the early stage of work on the VII-th generation of the library CSEWG made important decision to use the same formats. This decision was adopted even though it was argued that it would be timely to modernize the formats and several interesting ideas were proposed. After careful deliberation CSEWG concluded that actual implementation would require considerable resources needed to modify processing codes and to guarantee high quality of the files processed by these codes. In view of this the idea of format modernization has been postponed and ENDF-6 format was adopted for the new ENDF/B-VII library. In several other areas related to ENDF we made our best to move beyond established tradition and achieve maximum modernization. Thus, the 'Big Paper' on ENDF/B-VII.0 has been published, also in December 2006, as the Special Issue of Nuclear Data Sheets 107 (1996) 2931-3060. The new web retrieval and plotting system for ENDF-6 formatted data, Sigma, was developed by the NNDC and released in 2007. Extensive paper has been published on the advanced tool for nuclear reaction data evaluation, EMPIRE, in 2007. This effort was complemented with release of updated set of ENDF checking codes in 2009. As the final item on this list, major revision of ENDF-6 Formats Manual was made. This work started in 2006 and came to fruition in 2009 as documented in the present report.

Herman, M.; Members of the Cross Sections Evaluation Working Group

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

CAPACITIES 2012 annexes 1 -3 WORK PROGRAMME 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

------------------------- · Central African L · Saint Vincent UM ASIA (EECA) Republic and Grenadines · Armenia3 LM · Chad L · Suriname

De Cindio, Fiorella

269

Annex I Differentiation Proposals: Implications for Welfare, Equity and Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capita, per GDP or specific economic structures or fuel mixes) will rapidly lead towards special pleading to suggest definitions that favor their own particular circumstances. Those with particularly energy-efficient economies propose carbon intensity of gross domestic product (GDP) as a criterion, poorer countries suggest

270

annex der einfluss: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

auf den Bewegungsumfang der Halswirbelsule und die elektrische Aktivitt des SPC (Musculus semispinalis capitis) (more) Pogrzeba, Miriam Ruth 2009-01-01 13...

271

Annex 3: `Flagship' Case Study Report 2009/10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.3 Additional benefits 21 4.4 Barriers to visiting 21 5. Ingrebourne's visitor profile 23 5.1 Socio, benefits and barriers For more information contact Kieron Doick kieron.doick@forestry.gsi.gov.uk Jake, entering into a long-term management lease of the site as part of the Thames Chase Community Forest. The FC

272

Annex I ITER Organization Service Contract General Conditions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

day overnight inclusively; Travel by train (second or first class); Travel by private car reimbursement rate is 0.50 km plus toll and parking expenses when flight or...

273

Radioactive Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dispersible radioactive material must be placed in rigid, leak- tight inner containers (e.g., durable screw-top sample jars). Non-dispersible radioactive material may...

274

ACTS OF VIOLENCE ANNEX V ACTS OF VIOLENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. CONSIDERATIONS FOR SECONDARY EXPLOSIVE DEVICES...................13 R. MEDICAL TRIAGE AND MASS CASUALTY ......................................................................14 V. RECOVERY

275

Annex 1: `Flagship' Case Study Report 2009/10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between April and December 2009, as Bentley does not operate a formal system to permit group activities. The group, or individual, request permission (a permit) to hold the activity on FC land. An `event

276

Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportati...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents.docx More Documents & Publications TEPP Model Needs Assessment Document First Responder Initial Response Procedure Hazardous...

277

Annex 2: `Flagship' Case Study Report 2009/10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to engagement, quality of experience, personal and social benefits. A total of 166 visitors were interviewed Quality of Life for CSR07 Jake Morris & Kieron Doick #12;Birches Valley Forest Centre Contents Chapter.4 Accident record 7 3. Headline indicators 8 3.1 Engagement 8 3.2 Quality of experience 8 3

278

Development of NMRI spectroscopy for improved petroleum recovery, Annex 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objectives are to develop and apply Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI) and CT X-Ray Scanning methods for determining rock, fluid, and petrophysical properties and for fundamental studies of multiphase flow behavior in porous media. Specific objectives are to: (1) develop NMRI procedures for measuring porosity, permeability, pore size distribution, capillary pressure, and wetting characteristics, (2) apply imaging methods for improved methods of determining two- and three-phase relative permeability functions, (3) apply NMRI for development of a better understanding of dispersed phase displacement processes, and (4) apply imaging methods to develop a better understanding of saturation distribution and fingering during miscible displacements. The objectives have been organized into four subtasks. Annual progress reports for each subtask are provided.

Barrufet, M.A.; Flumerfelt, R.W.; Jennings, J.W.; Walsh, M.P.; Watson, A.T.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Annex A Metrics for the Smart Grid System Report  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Tax incentives, regulations and technical standards favor PHEVs. Supply Constrained - Infusion of PHEVs in marketplace constrained by automotive and battery manufacturers' ability...

280

Radiochemistry Annex: It's getting hot in there | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115,PerformanceUsing Radioactive

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Annex A Metrics for the Smart Grid System Report  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysis ofDepartmentAnnelise

282

Annex: Attributes of Proliferation Resistance for Civilian Nuclear Power  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysis ofDepartmentAnneliseSystems |

283

Enterprise Assessments, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Constructio...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of liquid or semi-solid radioactive and chemical waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. DOE-ORP serves as DOE line management for two functions: the Tank...

284

Emergency Support Function #12; Energy Annex | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQ Contract ESPCElectricalofVoltage UnbalanceEmergenciesSupport

285

Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility Construction  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQBusinessinSupportingEnergy2 ENRON CORPSite-Level Exercise

286

Emergency Support Function #12; Energy Annex - Support Agencies |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatementNOTElectricityof Energy776 IDEPARTMENT

287

Smart Grid System Report (July 2009) - Annex | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research |RegulationRenewable Energy (EERE) |SeniorItDepartmentManage

288

UNFCCC-Global Map-Annex 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save Energy Now Jump to:Development Reports

289

Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010 Printing and Mail Managersfor 12of Energy

290

Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Effects of Energy Removal on Physical  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EERE Blog Posts1-034C. Lawrence About Us Andrew C. LawrenceAnnaSystems |

291

WP3NA2_0027 Annex No. 1 to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5 Equipment 37 5.6 Measurement traceability 41 5.7 Sampling 43 5.8 Handling of test and calibration results 43 6.3 Test methods 51 6.4 Test performance 52 6.5 Test equipment 57 6.6 Maintenance 58 6.7 Calibration Project addressed the qualification (in the form of mutual accreditation) of European laboratories

292

`Heat pumps in Smart Grids' IEA Annex 42  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facility Scandinavian interconnections Demand side Response (via smart grid) Industrial Residential.M. Wagener Managing Consultant OPERATING AGENT: #12;GAS HEAT PUMPS COMMERCIAL SECTOR RESEARCH, STRATEGY AUTOMATION HEAT PUMPS DOMESTIC AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS WORKING GROUP THERMAL DRIVEN HEAT PUMPS TARGET

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

293

Microbial enhanced oil recovery research. Final report, Annex 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop an engineering framework for the exploitation of microorganisms to enhance oil recovery. An order of magnitude analysis indicated that selective plugging and the production of biosurfactants are the two most likely mechanisms for the mobilization of oil in microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). The latter, biosurfactant production, is easier to control within a reservoir environment and was investigated in some detail. An extensive literature survey indicated that the bacterium Bacillus licheniformis JF-2 produces a very effective surface active agent capable of increasing the capillary number to values sufficiently low for oil mobilization. In addition, earlier studies had shown that growth of this bacterium and biosurfactant production occur under conditions that are typically encountered in MEOR, namely temperatures up to 55{degrees}C, lack of oxygen and salinities of up to 10% w/v. The chemical structure of the surfactant, its interfacial properties and its production by fermentation were characterized in some detail. In parallel, a set of experiments as conducted to measure the transport of Bacillus licheniformis JF-2 in sandpacks. It was shown that the determining parameters for cell transport in porous media are: cell size and degree of coagulation, presence of dispersants, injection velocity and cell concentration. The mechanisms of bacteria retention within the pores of the reservoir were analyzed based on heuristic arguments. A mathematical simulator of MEOR was developed using conservation equations in which the mechanisms of bacteria retention and the growth kinetics of the cells were incorporated. The predictions of the model agreed reasonably well with experimental results.

Sharma, M.M.; Gerogiou, G.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Annex I differentiation proposals : implications for welfare, equity and policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drawing upon a variety of different criteria, many nations have introduced proposals to differentiate the reductions in carbon emissions that would be required of industrialized nations in the short to medium term. This ...

Reiner, David M.; Jacoby, Henry D.

295

Technical Research Centre of Finland VTT Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Implementing Agreement on District Heating and Cooling, including the integration of CHP. #12;IEA DISTRICT and the authors. ISBN 90-5748-021-2 #12;Abstract IEA DISTRICT HEATING AND COOLING, ANNEX VI: Report 2002: S1 has been to further develop and test simple models of district heating (DH) systems with respect

296

Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

Abou El-Maaref, A., E-mail: aahmh@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Uosif, M.A.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt)] [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M. [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)] [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health-related research. Volume VI, workplace and environmental monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the sixth in a series of seven volumes which constitute a guide to records of the Rocky Flats Plant useful for conducting health-related research. The primary purpose of Volume VI is to describe record series pertaining to workplace and environmental monitoring activities at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant, now named the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, near Denver, Colorado. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project, provides a history of workplace and environmental monitoring practices at Rocky Flats, and identifies organizations contributing to workplace and environmental monitoring policies and activities. Other topics include the scope and arrangement of this volume and the organization to contact for access to these records. Comprehensive introductory and background information is available in Volume I. Other volumes in the guide pertain to administrative and general subjects, facilities and equipment, production and materials handling, waste management, and employee health. In addition, HAI has produced a subject-specific guide, titled The September 1957 Rocky Flats Fire. A Guide to Record Series of the Department of Energy and Its Contractors, which researchers should consult for further information about records related to this incident.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Apparatus for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells employing materials selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for forming thin-film, large area solar cells having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n-type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin "composition-graded" layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns (.congruent.2.5 .mu.m to .congruent.5.0 .mu.m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, causes the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer to evolve into p-type material, thereby defining a thin layer heterojunction device characterized by the absence of voids, vacancies and nodules which tend to reduce the energy conversion efficiency of the system.

Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA); Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Distribution Behavior of U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), and Zr(IV) with N,N-Dihexyl Octanamide Under Uranium-Loading Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)-based PUREX process has been the workhorse of the nuclear fuel reprocessing industry for the last four and a half decades, a few drawbacks associated with the use of TBP have caused concern to the separation scientists and technologists. These shortcomings may pose a serious challenge particularly during the reprocessing of (a) short cooled thermal reactor fuels, (b) fast reactor fuels with the larger Pu content and significantly higher burn up, and (c) while treating various waste streams for their disposal to the environment. The N,N-dialkyl aliphatic amides have received particular attention as alternate potential extractants for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels in view of (a) the innocuous nature of their degradation products, namely, carboxylic acids/amines and (b) the possibility to incinerate the used solvent leading to reduced volume of secondary waste. The physical and chemical properties of these amides are influenced strongly by the nature of alkyl groups. The extractant N,N-dihexyl octanamide (DHOA) was found to be a promising candidate among a large number of extractants studied. Laboratory batch studies as well as mixer settler studies were performed under process conditions with DHOA and compared with those of TBP. DHOA was found to extract Pu(IV) more efficiently than TBP, both at trace-level concentration as well as under uranium loading conditions. In addition, the extraction behavior of Am(III) and Zr(IV) was studied at varying nitric acid concentrations (1 to 6 M). Extraction behavior of uranium at macroconcentrations (9.9 to 157.7 g/l) was carried out at different temperatures, and it was observed that D{sub U} decreased with the increase in U loading as well as with the increase of temperature (in the range 25 to 45 deg. C) and that the two-phase reaction was exothermic in nature. Mixer settler studies on U(VI) revealed that DHOA is similar to TBP during the extraction cycle but better than TBP during the stripping cycle.

Manchanda, V.K.; Ruikar, P.B.; Sriram, S.; Nagar, M.S.; Pathak, P.N.; Gupta, K.K.; Singh, R.K.; Chitnis, R.R.; Dhami, P.S.; Ramanujam, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India)

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Spatially resolved U(VI) partitioning and speciation: Implications for plume scale behavior of contaminant U in the Hanford vadose zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A saline-alkaline brine containing high concentrations of U(VI) was accidentally spilled at the Hanford Site in 1951, introducing 10 tons of U into sediments under storage tank BX-102. U concentrations in the deep vadose zone and groundwater plumes increase with time, yet how the U has been migrating is not fully understood. We simulated the spill event in laboratory soil columns, followed by aging, and obtained spatially resolved U partitioning and speciation along simulated plumes. We found after aging, at apparent steady state, that the pore aqueous phase U concentrations remained surprisingly high (up to 0.022 M), in close agreement with the recently reported high U concentrations (up to 0.027 M) in the vadose zone plume (1). The pH values of aged pore liquids varying from 10 to 7, consistent with the measured pH of the field borehole sediments varying from 9.5 to 7.4 (2), from near the plume source to the plume front. The direct measurements of aged pore liquids together with thermodynamic calculations using a Pitzer approach revealed that UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} {sup 4-} is the dominant aqueous U species within the plume body (pH 8-10), while Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} and CaUO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 2-} are also significant in the plume front vicinity (pH 7-8), consistent with that measured from field borehole porewaters (3). U solid phase speciation varies at different locations along the plume flow path and even within single sediment grains, because of location dependent pore and micropore solution chemistry. Our results suggest that high geochemical stability of UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4-} in the original carbonate and sodium rich waste solution permits its continues migration and the field observed increases of U concentrations in the vadose zone and groundwater.

Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wang, Zheming; Dixit, Suvasis; Steefel, Carl; Saiz, Eduardo; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

PR_VI_50mwind  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Metadata also available as Metadata: IdentificationInformation DataQualityInformation SpatialDataOrganizationInformation SpatialReferenceInformation EntityandAttributeI...

302

VI. Required Appendices Appendix A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a successful academic with proficiency in biomedical sciences research. PREREQUISITES All students must of information (articles, books, videos, internet sites, etc.) that will provide the interested student. By continuing your enrollment in the course you acknowledge your understanding of this policy. ACADEMIC

303

VI. , 3 3. 4 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planescape Torment Sacrifice Star Wars: Knight of the Old Republic The Elder Scrolls X-COM: UFO Defense (UFO

Kaplan, Alexander

304

Title VI | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler Tina Butler Tina-Butler.jpgLightingWindows Tips:StudyIXVI

305

Jones PJS, Qiu W & De Santo EM (2013) Governing marine protected areas: social-ecological resilience through institutional diversity. Marine Policy, 41, 5-13 -doi:10.1016/j.marpol.2012.12.026  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of different incentives economic, interpretative, knowledge, legal and participative employed to address-led), resilience in MPA governance systems derives from employing a diversity of inter-connected incentives of strong driving forces, rather than relying on particular types of incentives and institutions

Jones, Peter JS

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

307

Predictive calculations to assess the long-term effect of cementitious materials on the pH and solubility of uranium(VI) in a shallow land disposal environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One proposed method of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal is to mix the radioactive waste streams with cement, place the mixture in steel barrels, and dispose of the barrels in near-surface unsaturated sediments. Cement or concrete is frequently used in burial grounds, because cement porewaters are buffered at high pH values and lanthanides and actinides; are very insoluble in highly alkaline environments. Therefore, leaching of these contaminants from the combined cement/low-level radioactive waste streams will at least initially be retarded. The calculations performed in this study demonstrate that the pH of cement porewaters will be maintained at a value greater than 10 for 10,000 years under Hanford specific hydrogeochemical conditions. Ten thousand years is the period generally studied in longterm performance assessments per regulatory guidance. The concentrations of dissolved hexavalent uranium [U(VI)], the valence form of dissolved U usually present in oxidizing surface and groundwaters, are also constrained by the high pH and predicted solution compositions over the 10,000-year period, which is favorable from a long-term performance perspective.

Criscenti, L.J.; Serne, R.J.; Krupka, K.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wood, M.I. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Radiative rates for E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions in the Br-like ions Sr IV, Y V, Zr VI, Nb VII, and Mo VIII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energies and lifetimes are reported for the lowest 375 levels of five Br-like ions, namely Sr~IV, Y~V, Zr~VI, Nb~VII, and Mo~VIII, mostly belonging to the 4s$^2$4p$^5$, 4s$^2$4p$^4$4$\\ell$, 4s4p$^6$, 4s$^2$4p$^4$5$\\ell$, 4s$^2$4p$^3$4d$^2$, 4s4p$^5$4$\\ell$, and 4s4p$^5$5$\\ell$ configurations. Extensive configuration interaction has been included and the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package ({\\sc grasp}) has been adopted for the calculations. Additionally, radiative rates are listed among these levels for all E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions. From a comparison with the measurements, the majority of our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 2\\%, although discrepancies between theory and experiment for a few are up to 6\\%. An accuracy assessment of the calculated radiative rates (and lifetimes) is more difficult, because no prior results exist for these ions.

Aggarwal, K M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

including Task 11 on Time of Use Pricing Top lighting (and Climate Change Time of Use Pricing and Energy Use for

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LocalEnergyPlanningforCityQuartersorNeighbourhoodsandImplementation CaseStudiesII:IntegratedEnergyPlanningforCommunitiesandImplementationStrategies

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Guidelines to Defra's GHG conversion factors for company reporting Annexes updated June 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.498 Coking Coal tonnes x 2810 x 2810 kWh x 0.349 x 0.332 Aviation Spirit tonnes x 3128 x 3128 kWh x 0.250 x 0.281 x 0.267 Burning Oil1 tonnes x 3150 x 3150 kWh x 0.258 x 0.245 litres x 2.518 x 2.518 Coal 2 tonnes xWh x 0.249 x 0.237 Lubricants tonnes x 3171 x 3171 kWh x 0.263 x 0.250 Petroleum Coke tonnes x 3410 x

312

Guidelines for Company Reporting on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Annexes updated July 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0.32 LPG kWh x 0.214 therms x 6.27 litres x 1.49 Coking Coal tonnes x 2736 kWh x 0.331 Aviation.63 Petrol tonnes x 3135 kWh x 0.24 litres x 2.30 Fuel Oil tonnes x 3223 kWh x 0.27 Coal2 tonnes x 2548 kWh xWh x 0.25 Petroleum Coke tonnes x 3410 kWh x 0.34 Refinery Miscellaneous kWh x 0.24 therms x 7

313

Astronomy Department UC Berkeley B-20 Hearst Field Annex # 3411 Berkeley, CA 94720  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are primary goals of the Astronomy Decadal Review. NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD NPP Fellow://ratir.astroscu.unam.mx/public/ · Support the construction (mechanical, cryogenic, optical, and electronic systems), commissioning

Militzer, Burkhard

314

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design, and operation of net-zero energy buildings Develop net importer of information But also missed opportunities: Scandinavian solutions for indoor air quality in zero-energy

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

E-Print Network 3.0 - annex project w-484 Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cellular Biophysics, Columbia University Collection: Biology and Medicine 69 Forest and Carbon offset investments: problems and Summary: project activities that reduce emissions...

316

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EnergyEfficientCommunities Methods anddesigntoolsfor51 EnergyEfficientCommunities 51a Methodsanddesign51 EnergyEfficientCommunities 51a Methodsanddesign

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs (Annex 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interdisciplinary studies of the Upper Pennsylvanian Lansing and Kansas City groups have been undertaken in order to improve the geologic characterization of petroleum reservoirs and to develop a quantitative understanding of the processes responsible for formation of associated depositional sequences. To this end, concepts and methods of sequence stratigraphy are being used to define and interpret the three-dimensional depositional framework of the Kansas City Group. The investigation includes characterization of reservoir rocks in oil fields in western Kansas, description of analog equivalents in near-surface and surface sites in southeastern Kansas, and construction of regional structural and stratigraphic framework to link the site specific studies. Geologic inverse and simulation models are being developed to integrate quantitative estimates of controls on sedimentation to produce reconstructions of reservoir-bearing strata in an attempt to enhance our ability to predict reservoir characteristics.

Watney, W.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

E-Print Network 3.0 - annex xx hawt Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Art 2009 Summary: wind turbine (HAWT) concepts, followed by a short list of small wind turbines on the market. Based... direction) Height: 240m Turbine: three HAWTs, 29m in...

319

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EnergyStorage SustainableCoolingwithThermalEnergyEnergyStorage SustainableCoolingwithThermalEnergyEnergyStorage SustainableCoolingwithThermalEnergy

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECBCS)* Clean Coal Sciences* Climate Technology Initiative (Clean Coal Centre* Industrial Energy-Related Technologies

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Annexation of Interchromosomal Space During Viral Infection of 3D Tissue Matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The process of viral infection has been shown to be a tightly structured process that exerts precise control over the nucleus. By quantitatively documenting the dynamic nuclear changes in response to nuclear infection of cells suspended in a three...

Crannell, Zachary

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

322

Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Layup Program...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

attaching supports and hardware were also stored in the QUEUE area on cribbing under plastic tarpaulins. The materials in the storage areas are identified through the use of tags...

323

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solarandlowenergybuildings SolarheatforindustrialprocessSolarandLowEnergyBuildings SolarHeatforIndustrialProcessSolarandLowEnergyBuildings SolarHeatforIndustrialProcess

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heating systems, and -Solar thermal heating and cooling (Storage Concepts for Solar Thermal Systems in Low EnergySHC Task 35, PV/Solar, Thermal includes hot water analysis

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

andConservation SolarAirConditioningandRefrigeration PolymericMaterialsforSolarThermalApplications EnergyandConservation SolarAirConditioningandRefrigeration PolymericMaterialsforSolar ThermalApplications EnergyandConservation SolarAirConditioningandRefrigeration PolymericMaterialsforSolarThermalApplications Energy

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ThermalEnergyUtilizingThermalEnergyStorageTechnologyPowerGenerationwithThermalEnergyStorage SustainableCoolingwithThermalEnergyStorage Demonstrationprojects/

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy, Washington, DC. Demand Side Management ImplementingEnergy Agency Demand Side Management Programme. Task XIII:Energy Agency Demand Side Management Program. Task XIII:

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Annex 36: QI and QM Sensitivity Studies Page 1 of 8 Legal Text 15 December 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and maintenance practices for both air-to-air and water-to-air heat pumps in the US are: improper refrigerant recognized that heat pump equipment suffers significant performance loss depending on how the equipment. This causes heat pumps to operate inefficiently and waste considerable energy. However, it is unclear whether

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

329

Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

CARRELL, R.D.

2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

330

Retri-Commissioning the Aria Building Using Cite-AHU: An Annex 40 Collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, shown in the left side of Figure 1, has a constant speed supply fan which draws 6575 m3/hr (100 %) of outdoor air through a plate heat exchanger with exhaust air crossflow. A manual damper controls the bypass. Preconditioned air is then filtered...% though there is no capability to dehumidify or to modulate the amount of supply air. There is no exhaust fan. AHU 1 (not pictured) is similar to AHU 2 in design but supplies 6500 m3/h of air which has been conditioned to meet the 20 ?C supply air...

Castro, N.; Vaezi-Nejad, H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Annex III-evaluation of past and ongoing enhanced oil recovery projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Infill Drilling Predictive Model (IDPM) was developed by Scientific Software-Intercomp (SSI) for the Bartlesville Project Office (BPO) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The model and certain adaptations thereof were used in conjunction with other models to support the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission`s (IOGCC) 1993 state-by-state assessment of the potential domestic reserves achievable through the application of Advanced Secondary Recovery (ASR) and Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques. Funding for this study was provided by the DOE/BPO, which additionally provided technical support. The IDPM is a three-dimensional (stratified, five-spot), two-phase (oil and water) model which uses a minimal amount of reservoir and geologic data to generate production and recovery forecasts for ongoing waterflood and infill drilling projects. The model computes water-oil displacement and oil recovery using finite difference solutions within streamtubes. It calculates the streamtube geometries and uses a two-dimensional reservoir simulation to track fluid movement in each streamtube slice. Thus the model represents a hybrid of streamtube and numerical simulators.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Development of NMRI spectroscopy for improved petroleum recovery, Annex 6. Annual report, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objectives are to develop and apply Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI) and CT X-Ray Scanning methods for determining rock, fluid, and petrophysical properties and for fundamental studies of multiphase flow behavior in porous media. Specific objectives are to: (1) develop NMRI procedures for measuring porosity, permeability, pore size distribution, capillary pressure, and wetting characteristics, (2) apply imaging methods for improved methods of determining two- and three-phase relative permeability functions, (3) apply NMRI for development of a better understanding of dispersed phase displacement processes, and (4) apply imaging methods to develop a better understanding of saturation distribution and fingering during miscible displacements. The objectives have been organized into four subtasks. Annual progress reports for each subtask are provided.

Barrufet, M.A.; Flumerfelt, R.W.; Jennings, J.W.; Walsh, M.P.; Watson, A.T.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Review DOE has participated in IEA implementingand reviews planned and existing energy efficiency programs in IEAof the IEA Secretariat. It also reviews global energy

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand-Side Management, District Heating & Cooling, and Heatbuildings. However, the District Heating and Cooling IA hassystems as part of district heating networks. SHC Tasks 38A

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results from a program evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy?s Buildings Technologies Program (BTP) participation in collaborative international technology implementing agreements. The evaluation was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the fall of 2007 and winter 2008 and was carried out via interviews with stakeholders in four implementing agreements in which BTP participates, reviews of relevant program reports, websites and other published materials. In addition to these findings, the report includes a variety of supporting materials such that aim to assist BTP managers who currently participate in IEA implementing agreements or who may be considering participation.

Evans, Meredydd; Runci, Paul; Meier, Alan

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels FE-24 GTN, Roomand Community Systems (ECBCS)* Clean Coal Sciences* ClimateHydrogen* Hydropower IEA Clean Coal Centre* Industrial

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Friday, May 17, 2013 -SFSU Annex I HIGHLIGHTS OF THE EVENING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Come and see an array of projects in biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, geosciences, geography, math, physics, and psychology. During the showcase, students are competing for a total of more FREE ADMISSION cordially invites you and your guests to the 15 th The College of Science & Engineering

338

Friday, May 4, 2012 -SFSU Annex I HIGHLIGHTS OF THE EVENING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of new knowledge. Come and see an array of projects in biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, geosciences, math, and physics. During the showcase, students are competing for a total of more than $8 FREE ADMISSION cordially invites you and your guests to the 14 th The College of Science & Engineering

339

Emergency Support Function #8 … Public Health and Medical Services Annex  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACME |Supplement5869Google Earth Files

340

Independent Oversight Activity Report, K-West Annex Facility - June 2013 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietipDepartment ofThe full textImmobilization Plant -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility - April  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietipDepartment ofThe fullTreatment andofIndependent-of2014 |

342

Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300Algoil JumpAltergyExperiments |AnhuiAnnetta, Texas: Energy Resources Jump

343

Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of liquid or semi-solid radioactive and chemical waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. DOE-ORP serves as DOE line management for two functions: the Tank...

344

Emergency Action Plan and Annexes 2013 Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 28 of 37  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-353-5111, Camden 856-225-6111): Emergency Procedures for Radiation Incidents Minor Incident: Laboratory Guidelines in laboratory survey book Major Incident: (Any of the following conditions) Laboratory Guidelines: > 100 u, if applicable Remove contaminated clothing Measure and record amount of contamination on skin with applicable

Garfunkel, Eric

345

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MeasuresforGovernmentBuildingRetrofits" DevelopBestPracticeGuidelinesMeasuresforGovernmentBuildingRetrofits" DevelopBestPracticeGuidelinesMeasuresforGovernmentBuildingRetrofits" DevelopBestPracticeGuidelines

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EnergyRenovationofResidentialBuildings ConceptdefinitionandEnergyRenovationofResidentialBuildings 50a ConceptdefinitionandEnergyRenovationofResidentialBuildings 50a Conceptdefinitionand

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Energy Sector-Specific Plan: An Annex to the National Infrastructure  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQBusinessinSupporting Jobs andHVAC |andofBillion in

348

Enterprise Assessments, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Construction Quality - January 2015  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department oftoTheseClickDepartmentImmobilization2014Hanford Site

349

EMSL Strategic Plan to Maximize Scientific Impact of the Radiochemistry Annex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct:DirectivesSAND2015-21271 7An Integratedcombinationthe

350

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX G, Standard Remittance Advice For Payment of Fees  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies Colorado Steamboat DeploymentMeetingEnergy

351

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Buildings & Community Systems, Demand-Side Management,Demand-Side Management Implementing Agreement (www.ieadsm.org) ECBCS Energy Conservation in BuildingsBuilding Technologies Program, Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Demand Side Management

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Emergency Action Plan and Annexes 2013 Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 18 of 37  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leaving the safe location If Caught Outdoors and No Shelter Is Nearby: Find a low spot away from trees winds, lightning, and other hazardous weather conditions. In an emergency dial 9-1-1. The alternate RUPD-225-6111.. New Brunswick/Piscataway Campuses utilizes Lighting Detection Systems to detect and announce

Garfunkel, Eric

353

VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 25 Prof. K. A. Gridnev, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia Extreme Neutron Rich Sector of the Nuclear Chart: New Horizon September 26 Dr....

354

Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

responsible for oversight of GM re- search. According to the report released in De- cember of 2005, the OIG found several shortcom- ings in the protocols APHIS had in place to monitor transgenic re- search. According to the re- port, the number of ap- proved..., causing widespread devastation of commercialized crops. Due, in part, to intense public concern regarding GMOs, the USDAs Office of the Inspector General (OIG) launched a review of the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), the agency...

355

Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

article summarizes information submitted in the Sec- tion 18 Request. Rice is a major commodity in all southern rice-producing states. Rice farming generates revenue for related businesses such as irrigation districts, fuel suppliers, implement dealerships...; thus, southern rice farming generates at least $4-5 billion annually in revenue, which sustains many rural and urban com- munities in the South. Successful rice farming requires considerable economic inputs. In 2006, esti- mated direct expenses...

356

VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 Professor Helmut Satz, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany Quark Confinement and Hadrosythesis May 14 Dr. Daniel Abriola, Internaltional Atomic...

357

Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume VI, 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Students who conducted research at DOE National Laboratories during 2005 were invited to include their research abstracts, and for a select few, their completed research papers in this Journal. This Journal is direct evidence of students collaborating with their mentors. Fields in which these students worked include: Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Engineering; Environmental Science; General Sciences; Materials Sciences; Medical and Health Sciences; Nuclear Sciences; Physics; and Science Policy.

Faletra, P.; Schuetz, A.; Cherkerzian, D.; Clark, T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Chapter VI: Integrating North American Energy Markets  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

i Considering these impacts over such a period leads to what is called the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of a GHG. The 100-year GWP for methane from the "Intergovernmental...

359

VI-9 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 - March 31, 2013 Faculty and Research Group Leaders Aldo Bonasera, Senior Scientist Charles M. Folden III, Assist. Prof. of Nuclear Chemistry Rainer Fries, Assist. Professor of...

360

Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a large number of questions from the audience. The biofuels topic is so critical to Texas agriculture that it is likely that I will be discussing it from time to time during the next several issues. In many states, the biofuels boat is rapidly... gaining speed. Some states are providing monetary incentives for businesses to establish production plants. Some states see tremendous value in biofuels research, and are providing broad-based funding to foster research focusing on increasing ethanol...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not favor one country over another. In the last issue of Texas Rice, I also discussed the need for a massive increase in federal and state funding for biofuels crop production. On June 7, 2006, the Worldwatch Institute presented a 38-page report titled..., Biofuels for Transportation. The report identifies the opportunities and limitations associated with biofuels production in the U.S. and elsewhere. Based on data presented in the report, ethanol production worldwide has increased at an annual rate of ca...

362

Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an interesting history that is very regional within the U.S. rice industry. At one extreme, brown-bagging in the Texas conventional long-grain market is almost non- existent. In contrast, an estimated 30-40% of Arkansas and Missouri farmers brown-bag rice seed... ..............................................................12 Sincerely, L.T. Wilson Professor and Center Director Jack B. Wendt Endowed Chair in Rice Research Welcome to the Octo- ber issue of Texas Rice. The U.S. long grain rice market has at least partially recov- ered from the impact...

363

Flyer, Title VI | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember U.S.Financial Statement:Fire2Fleet BriefingsFlyer,

364

VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV >41 - March 31,3

365

VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV >41 - March

366

VI-9 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV >41 - March2 - March

367

VI-9 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV >41 - March2 -

368

DarkStar VI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump to: navigation, searchIllinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,DarkStar

369

Chapter VI: Integrating North American Energy Markets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStanding FriedelIron-Sulfur3-1 November8-1 November

370

Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Rick Norman, Univer- sity of Arkansas; and Brian Ottis, University of Missouri. For more information email twalker@drec.msstate.edu Photo by Mike Jund Rice seedlings at the 4 and 5 leaf stage, with urea applied, just prior to permanent flood. Achieving...s Nutrition Research Center Researcher in the News... Growing up a carpenters son with a love for science, Mike debated on which would be his career, and which would be his hobby. In the end, he decided on career in plant science, but his skill for building...

371

I.D I VI Figure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSL Bubblesstructure the Parker ~press -

372

Part VI: Section I: Contract Clause  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil's ImpactAppendix Al Statement of Work forG CONTRACTII

373

Microsoft Word - FeVI.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMappingENVIRONMENTALHYDROPOWER MEETING Tulsa16, 20138,AprilF F Fig. 1.Fe6

374

Role of U(VI) Adsorption in U(VI) Reduction by Geobacter Species.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous work had suggested that Acholeplasma palmae has a higher capacity for uranium sorption than other bacteria studied. Sorption studies were performed with cells in suspension in various solutions containing uranium and results were used to generate uranium-biosorption isotherms.

None, None

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

375

Air Source Heat Pumps for Cold Climate Applications: Recent U. S. R&D Results from IEA HPP Annex 41  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air source heat pumps are easily applied to buildings almost anywhere. They are widespread in milder climate regions but their use in cold regions is hampered due to low efficiency and heating capacity at cold outdoor temperatures. This article describes selected R&D activities aimed at improving their cold weather performance.

Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Groll, Dr. Eckhard A. [Purdue University, Ray W. Herrick Laboratories; Shen, Bo [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Thermal front tracking with cross borehole electromagnetic imaging: Task 32 of Annex 4 of the implementing agreement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field experiments at the Texaco Kern River Field were conducted to identify optimum transmission frequencies and assess the electromagnetic interference problems present in the system. We concluded that the transmitter must be operated below 3 MHz for attenuation measurements to be in the conduction regime. Operation in the conduction regime is necessary if we are to correlate images to independent measurements such as the dual induction logs. We also concluded that electromagnetic interference problems become more severe as the frequency is lowered. We are currently designing a downhole active transmitter that will operate at 2 MHz. This frequency is low enough to be in the conduction regime and to increase our transmission distance capability, but high enough so that we can still drive a 1 or 2 meter antenna. By driving the antenna with a downhole oscillator we dramatically reduce the chance of electromagnetic interference pathways. Future plans are to test the transmitter at the Texaco field site and demonstrate correlation to induction logs. This will be followed by a brine tracing experiment at the same site. We will then move our equipment to a new pilot test site for a substantial series of cooperative experiments with Texaco. 5 refs., 11 figs.

Harben, P.E.; Pihlman, M.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Annex A -Newly arrived pests and diseases Organism(s) Means of spread Control measures Control approaches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, landscape (die back, reduced vigour, tree mortality) Knowledge gaps Research in progress Opportunities and mortality. Larval hairs cause severe health problems for people and animals (skin rash, eye & throat) Long-distance: Planting material; soil. Locally: Rain, wind- blown mists, soil on footwear etc. Current

378

Annex A -Other threats globally Organism(s) Means of spread Control measures Control approaches being used in other  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(die back, reduced vigour, tree mortality) Knowledge gaps Research in progress Opportunities to work). Locally: Adult flight or 'ballooning' of early instar larvae by wind blow. Prohibition of the import causing severe defoliation and occasional tree mortality throughout range in North America. Potential

379

Tree Health Expert Group -Annex A -Established pests and diseases Organism(s) Means of spread Control measures Control approaches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commercial loss amenity, landscape (die back, reduced vigour, tree mortality) Knowledge gaps Research likely to be involved underway Dieback and/or rapid mortality of infected native oaks. On average 25: Rain, and longer distances by wind-blown mists Destruction of infected planting stock. Use

380

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Annex XXIII: Phase III Results Regarding Tripod Support Structure Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes. This paper describes the findings of code-to-code verification activities of the IEA Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration.

Nichols, J.; Camp, T.; Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Azcona, J.; Martinez, A.; Munduate, X.; Vorpahl, F.; Kleinhansl, S.; Kohlmeier, M.; Kossel, T.; Boker, C.; Kaufer, D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A Comparative Study into Architecture-Based Safety Evaluation Methodologies using AADL's Error Annex and Failure Propagation Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Effects Analysis (FMEA) [25] are used to create evidence that the system fulfils its safety requirements design phase) are used to automatically produce Fault Trees and FMEA tables based on an architecture

Han, Jun

382

JOURNAL DE CHIMIE-PHYSIQUE; T. VI; 1908.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distillations fraction- nes dans un appareil tout en verre, entre la temprature ordinaire et celles du mlange carbonique ou de l'air liquide. L criterium de la puret tait la constance de la pression pendant une distillation et aussi la constance des densits trouves, aprs de nouvelles distilla- tions. Les donnes

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

383

CoViCAD: Comprehensive Visualization of Coronary Artery Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the patient suffers a my- ocardial infarction, also known as heart attack. Part of the heart mus- cle tissue viability information in a detailed anatomical context. We combine multiple MRI scans (whole heart anatomical data, late enhancement data) and multiple segmentations (polygonal heart model, late enhancement

384

Interaction of Uranium(VI) with Phthalic Acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phthalic acid, a ubiquitous organic compound found in soil, water, and in domestic and nuclear wastes can affect the mobility and bioavailability of metals and radionuclides. We examined the complexation of uranium with phthalic acid by potentiometric titration, electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. Potentiometric titration of a 1:1 U/phthalic acid indicated uranyl ion bonding with both carboxylate groups of phthalic acid; above pH 5 the uranyl ion underwent hydrolysis with one hydroxyl group coordinated to the inner-sphere of uranium. In the presence of excess phthalic acid, ESI-MS analysis revealed the formation of both 1:1 and 1:2 U/phthalic acid complexes. EXAFS studies confirmed the mononuclear biligand 1:2 U/phthalic acid complex as the predominant form. These results show that phthalates can form soluble stable complexes with uranium and may affect its mobility.

Vazquez, G.; Dodge, C; Francis, A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

SUR L'EDUCATION MATH V.I. ARNOLD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

moiti#19;e de leur science |n'ayant d'ailleurs pas la moindre id#19;ee d'aucune autre. Ils ont com- menc sont une h#19;er#19;esie ; mais on peut aussi les introduire plus tard dans la th#19;eorie comme "nombres id#19;eaux", ceci pour s'adapter aux besoins de la physique et du monde r#19;eel). Malheureusement

Arnold, Vladimir Igorevich

386

Universit Paris VI LG301 2008-2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kepler pour qu'il dérive ses trois lois ? a) Ptolémée. b) Galilée. c) Tycho Brahe. d) Johann Stöffler. e expliquer les mouvements des planètes autour du Soleil ? a) Newton. b) Tycho Brahe. c) Johannes Kepler. d) Tycho Brahé c) Nicolas Copernic. d) Johannes Kepler. e) Aucune de ces réponses. #12;5) Où apparaissent

Aubin, David

387

ENDF/VI six-group delayed neutron data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to individual precursor data (emission probabilities (Pn) and neutron spectra), the ENDF system requires {bar {nu}}(E), and its time-dependence and spectra using a few time groups. These data have been greatly extended, tested, and recently (June 1989) compared with new measurements of pulse spectra. 7 refs., 2 figs.

England, T.R.; Brady, M.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Microsoft Word - VI-1 Papers Published 2003.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the S 17 and S 18 astrophysical factors from the breakup of 8 B and 9 C at intermediate energies L. Trache, F. Carstoiu, C. A. Gagliardi, A. M. Mukhamedzhanov and R. E. Tribble...

389

THE CARINA PROJECT. VI. THE HELIUM-BURNING VARIABLE STARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present new optical (BVI) time-series data for the evolved variable stars in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The quality of the data and the observing strategy allowed us to identify 14 new variable stars. Eight out of the 14 are RR Lyrae (RRL) stars, 4 are Anomalous Cepheids (ACs), and 2 are geometrical variables. Comparison of the period distribution for the entire sample of RRLs with similar distributions in nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies and in the Large Magellanic Cloud indicates that the old stellar populations in these systems share similar properties. This finding is also supported by the RRL distribution in the Bailey diagram. On the other hand, the period distribution and the Bailey diagram of ACs display significant differences among the above stellar systems. This evidence suggests that the properties of intermediate-age stellar populations might be affected both by environmental effects and structural parameters. We use the BV Period-Wesenheit (PW) relation of RRLs together with evolutionary prescriptions and find a true distance modulus of 20.09 {+-} 0.07 (intrinsic) {+-} 0.1 (statistical) mag that agrees quite well with similar estimates available in the literature. We identified four peculiar variables. Taking into account their position in the Bailey diagram and in the BV PW relation, two of them (V14 and V149) appear to be candidate ACs, while two (V158 and V182) might be peculiar RRLs. In particular, the variable V158 has a period and a V-band amplitude very similar to the low-mass RRL-RRLR-02792-recently identified by Pietrzynski et al. in the Galactic bulge.

Coppola, G.; Marconi, M.; Ripepi, V.; Dall'Ora, M.; Musella, I. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Via Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Stetson, P. B. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, NRC-Herzberg, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Bono, G.; Buonanno, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica-Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Fabrizio, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, via M. Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Pulone, L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Fiorentino, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Monelli, M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Nonino, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-40131 Trieste (Italy); Thevenin, F. [Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Lab. Lagrange, UMR 7293, Observatoire de la Cote dAzur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice (France); Walker, A. R., E-mail: coppola@na.astro.it [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

390

Volume VI, Chapter 2 Run Reconstructions of Select  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Coweeman tule fall chinook, East Fork Lewis tule fall chinook, North Fork Lewis bright fall chinook, Wind, Wind summer steelhead, and Grays chum. These populations were selected because they represent a mixture of the ratio of recruits to spawners, in the absence of density dependent mortality (Neave 1953). Run

391

New insights into uranium (VI) sol-gel processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) investigations on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory process for sol-gel synthesis of microspherical nuclear fuel (UO{sub 2}), has been extremely useful in sorting out the chemical mechanism in the sol-gel steps. {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H NMR studies on the HMTA gelation agent (Hexamethylene tetramine, C{sub 6}H{sub 12}N{sub 4}) has revealed near quantitative stability of this adamantane-like compound in the sol-gel process, contrary to its historical role as an ammonia source for gelation from the worldwide technical literature. {sup 17}O NMR of uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup ++}) hydrolysis fragments produced in colloidal sols has revealed the selective formation of a uranyl trimer, ((UO{sub 2}){sub 3}({mu}{sub 3}-O)({mu}{sub 2}-OH){sub 3}){sup +}, induced by basic hydrolysis with the HMTA gelation agent. Spectroscopic results will be presented to illustrate that trimer condensation occurs during sol-gel processing leading to layered polyanionic hydrous uranium oxides in which HMTAH{sup +} is occluded as an intercalation'' cation. Subsequent sol-gel processing of microspheres by ammonia washing results in in-situ exchange and formation of a layered hydrous ammonium uranate with a proposed structural formula of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2} ((UO{sub 2}){sub 8} O{sub 4} (OH){sub 10}) {center dot} 8H{sub 2}O. This compound is the precursor to sintered UO{sub 2} ceramic fuel. 23 refs., 10 figs.

King, C.M.; Thompson, M.C.; Buchanan, B.R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA)); King, R.B. (Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry); Garber, A.R. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Precision engineering center. 1988 Annual report, Volume VI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To reverse the downward trend in the balance of trade, American companies must concentrate on increasing research into new products, boosting productivity, and improving manufacturing processes. The Precision Engineering Center at North Carolina State University is a multidisciplinary research and graduate education program dedicated to providing the new technology necessary to respond to this challenge. One extremely demanding manufacturing area is the fabrication and assembly of optical systems. These systems are at the heart of such consumer products as cameras, lenses, copy machines, laser bar-code scanners, VCRs, and compact audio discs - products that the Japanese and other East Asian countries are building dominance. A second critical area is the fabrication of VLSI and ULSI circuits. The tolerances required to produce the next generation of components for such systems have created the need for new approaches - approaches that could either make or break America`s competitive position. This report contains individual reports on research projects grouped into three broad areas: measurement and actuation; real-time control; precision fabrication. Separate abstracts for these articles have been indexed into the energy database.

Dow, T. [ed.; Fornaro, R.; Keltie, R.; Paesler, M. [and others

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

DOE human genome program contractor-grantee workshop VI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is presented from the workshop on the Human Genome Project. Topics include sequencing, genetic mapping, informatics, ethical and legal issues, and infrastructure.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chalcogenide cleaves the phosphorous - chalcogen bond andoxygen, nitrogen, or phosphorous atoms. The binding energyDuring this process, the phosphorous atom is attacked by an

Liu, Haitao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

(180-VI-NPPH, Amend. 4, March 2003) United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Focus on ecological principles · Consider the effects and interactions of planned systems and practices the land's relationship to the entire farm, ranch, or watershed · Ensure the conservationist's presence out uses. Planning involves more than considering individual resources. It focuses on the natural systems

Mukhtar, Saqib

396

North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material Presentation made by Carlisle Smith for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY North American...

397

Microsoft Word - APP VI, Rev 3 _03-19-20  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

D.L. Finnegan, J.L. Thompson, C.M. Miller, P.L. Baca, L.F. Olivas, C.G. Geoffrion, D.K. Smith, W. Goishi, B.K. Esser, J.W. Meadows, N. Namboodiri, and J.F. Wild. 2001. Nevada Test...

398

Proto Algic VI: Conditioned Yurok Reflexes of Proto Algic Vowels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organization. In a recent paper, 'Reduplication and Infixation in Yurok: Morphology, Semantics, and Diachrony,1 Andrew Garrett has presented a set of reconstructed Proto Ritwan vowels (and a few consonants), based on a similar set suggested by Howard Berman... some years ago in his paper 'Two Phonological Innovations in Ritwan' (Garrett 2001, Berman 1982). In a cryptic footnote, he dismisses my reconstruction of Proto Algic phonology without a Ritwan subgrouping (Proulx 1984): 'I am unpersuaded...

Proulx, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Texas Adapted Genetic Strategies for Beef Cattle VI: Creating Breeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

breeds created recently a reg- istry was established when breed formation began, with required documentation of parentage. After quarantine and disease-testing facilities were established in North America, the importa- tion of many new breeds began... Salorn? ?5/8 Salers, 3/8 Texas Longhorn Senepol? ?pool of Red Poll and N?Dama (a humpless west African heat-tolerant breed) Texon? ?pool of Devon and Texas Longhorn Other breed combinations In addition to the British-Continental combina- tions...

Hammack, Stephen P.

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

400

VI International SAUM Conference on Systems, Automatic Control and Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, aircrafts, robots, electrical cir­ cuits, power systems, nuclear reactors, chemical reactors, dc thousand journal papers and more than twenty books were published by engineering and mathematics

Gajic, Zoran

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1 Closing American Electric0-A2 GDF Suez37 Energia89

402

Microsoft Word - APP VI, Rev 3 _03-19-20  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review ofElectronic Input Options Gary2013 Annual8

403

Catalytic Adsorptive Stripping Determination of Trace Chromium (VI) at  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites ProposedOccupational Health Services| AdvancedPortalBismuth

404

Microsoft Word - VI-1 Papers Published 2003.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program Preliminary Needs535:UFC 2300.004/2013April 2014About DOE2 -

405

Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModification and Application ofof aEMSL

406

Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of4 Federal6Clean Energy | DepartmentBrandonYoungHFBRIII

407

An Octahedral Coordination Complex of Iron(VI)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site| Department ofAn Inside LookAn Iron is

408

North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring Safe  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010 PrintingNeed forNews »Department ofMeeting

409

Ch. VI, The geophysical environment around Waunita Hot Springs | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy Information on PV2009 | OpenCeradyne Inc Jump to:CerionEnergy

410

An Octahedral Coordination Complex of Iron(VI)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mail ShareRed CrossAn Iridate with Fermi Arcs AnProteomic

411

Building Energy Modeling (BEM) Overview  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Annex 58: validation-grade experiments Targeted research & advanced development * Modelica Buildings Library & IEA Annex 60 * Modelica + Functional Mockup Interface * Will form...

412

Orange County Change: Census 2000-2010 Center for Demographic Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the largest increases were those that annexed the largest areas of land. Lake Forest and Newport Beach annexed areas that had existing development. Lake Forest annexed the communities of Foothill Ranch and Portola Hills. Newport Beach annexed Newport Coast and San Joaquin Hills. Irvine has made several consecutive

de Lijser, Peter

413

Ukraine Kievenergo district heating project. Volume 1. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study, conducted by Joseph Technolgoy Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The purpose of this study was directed toward increasing the heat capacity, reducing fuel costs and import requirements, bringing about energy efficiency in the Kiev District Heating (DH) system; improving environmental conditions in affected areas; and supporting the strengthening and restructuring of Kiev, DH institutions and development of the DH sector. The report lists project risks and offers recommendations to minimize these risks. Also included are detailed cost estimates and financial analyses. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) Acknowledgement, (2) Project Summary, (3) Abbreviations, (4) I. Sector Background and Objectives, (5) II. The Project, (6) III. Implementing Agencies, (7) IV. Financial Aspects, (8) V. Project Benefits and Risks, (9) VI. Agreements to be Reached and Recommendations, (10) Annexes.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs (Annex 1). Annual report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interdisciplinary studies of the Upper Pennsylvanian Lansing and Kansas City groups have been undertaken in order to improve the geologic characterization of petroleum reservoirs and to develop a quantitative understanding of the processes responsible for formation of associated depositional sequences. To this end, concepts and methods of sequence stratigraphy are being used to define and interpret the three-dimensional depositional framework of the Kansas City Group. The investigation includes characterization of reservoir rocks in oil fields in western Kansas, description of analog equivalents in near-surface and surface sites in southeastern Kansas, and construction of regional structural and stratigraphic framework to link the site specific studies. Geologic inverse and simulation models are being developed to integrate quantitative estimates of controls on sedimentation to produce reconstructions of reservoir-bearing strata in an attempt to enhance our ability to predict reservoir characteristics.

Watney, W.L.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

ANNEX 1: ERC PEER REVIEW EVALUATION PANELS (ERC For the planning and operation of the evaluation of ERC grant proposals by panels, the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

allocation between this valley and the capital city of Fortaleza, and risk perception. Such changes drought has long been identified as a critical factor in the state's economy, ecology, culture

Garulli, Andrea

416

Development of an alternative kraft black liquor recovery process based on low-temperature processing in fluidized beds. Final technical report on Annex 9, Task 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research program was to provide the fundamental knowledge and experimental data from pilot scale operation for an alternative black liquor recovery technology which would have a higher overall energy efficiency, would not suffer from the smelt-water explosion hazard and would be lower in capital cost. In addition, the alternative process would be more flexible and well suited for incremental recovery capacity or for new pulping processes, such as the new sulfide-sulfide-AQ process. The research program consists of number of specific research objectives with the aim to achieve the ultimate objective of developing an alternative recovery process which is shown in Figure 1. The specific objectives are linked to individual unit operations and they represent the following research topics: (1) superheated steam drying of kraft black liquors; (2) fast pyrolysis of black liquor; (3) hydrogen sulfide absorption from flue gas; (4) reduction of sodium sulfate in solid phase with gaseous hydrogen; and (5) verification of the fundamental results in fluidized bed pilot plant. The accomplishments in each of these objectives are described.

Kubes, G.J.

1994-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

417

A guidebook for insulated low-slope roof systems. IEA Annex 19, Low-slope roof systems: International Energy Agency Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems Programme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-slope roof systems are common on commercial and industrial buildings and, to a lesser extent, on residential buildings. Although insulating materials have nearly always been a component of low-slope roofs, the amount of insulation used has increased in the past two decades because of escalation of heating and cooling costs and increased awareness of the need for energy conservation. As the amount of insulation has increased, the demand has intensified for design, installation, and maintenance information specifically for well-insulated roofs. Existing practices for design, installation, and maintenance of insulated roofs have evolved from experience. Typically, these practices feature compromises due to the different properties of materials making up a given roof system. Therefore, they should be examined from time to time to ensure that they are appropriate as new materials continue to enter the market and as the data base on existing systems expands. A primary purpose of this International Energy Agency (IEA) study is to assess current roofing insulation practices in the context of an accumulating data base on performance.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Annex Volume B. DOE-Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center report. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) combustion tests were conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. Combustion and flue-gas treatment of three different physical forms of SRC, as well as a No. 6 fuel oil, were evaluated. The three SRC fuels were (1) pulverized SRC Fuel; (2) SRC Residual Fuel Oil; and (3) SRC/Water Slurry. The SRC Residual Fuel Oil was a solution of SRC Fuel dissolved in heated process solvent. Approximately 500 tons of pulverized SRC Fuel and 30,000 gallons of SRC Residual Fuel Oil were combusted in a 700 hp (30 x 130 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr fuel input) oil-designed watertube package boiler. Sixty four-hour ASME combustion tests with three different SRC fuels were successfully concluded. The principal parameters evaluated were excess air levels and combustion air preheat temperature levels. Extensive data were collected on flue-gas levels of O/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, CO, unburned hydrocarbons, SO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, uncontrolled particulates, uncontrolled opacity and carbon content of the flue-gas particulates. Boiler and combustion efficiencies were measured. The particulates were characterized via mass loadings, impactors, in-situ resistivity measurements, ultra-fine sampling, optical large particle sampling, five-stage cyclone sampling and chemical analysis of various cut sizes. A three-field pilot electrostatic precipitator (ESP) containing over 1000 square feet of plate collection area, a reverse air fabric filter pilot dust collector and a commercial pulse-jet fabric filter dust collector were operated at high collection efficiency. The results will be valuable in making recommendations for future tests and will provide a basis for conversion of industrial oil-fired boilers to SRC fuels. 11 references, 20 figures, 29 tables.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

VI Symposium of Specialists in Electric Operational and Expansion Planning -VI SEPOPE, May 24-29,1998, Bahia, Brazil POWER SYSTEM PLANNING IN THE SOUTH AMERICA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the execution of a few macro projects, capital intensive, with high impact on the economic development of each country, and where their revenues depend on the local conditions and the development of future projects in infrastructure development and the required regulations in the energy field. It describes how the planning

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

420

Limited Sectoral Trading between the EU ETS and China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the negotiations of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), new market mechanisms are proposed to involve Non-Annex I countries in the carbon markets developed by Annex I countries, beyond ...

Gavard, Claire

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

International Agreements Comments  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DOE True Primary DOE Fossil Energy Annex III - for Cooperation in the areas of Oil and Gas Title: Annex III to the Protocol for Cooperation in the Field of Fossil Energy...

422

FSAP services are... Free. FSAP does not bill insurance companies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South Ice Rink s William D. Mullins Center Student UnionPhysical Plant Textbook Annex Garage Machmer

Mountziaris, T. J.

423

Where the Sky Is the Right Color: Scale and Air Pollution in the Big Bend Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

III), emissions from copper smelters (Annex IV), and urbanemissions from copper smelters] was finally signed in 1987,

Donez, Francisco Juan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

www.heatpumpcentre.or IEA HEAT PUMP PROGRAMME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) #12;www.heatpumpcentre.or g Annex 41 ­ Cold climate heat pumps (Improving low ambient temperature to efficient and reliable systems and equipment for buildings in cold climates Annex 40 Heat pump concepts technologies, such as pellet boilers and gas boilers Annex 38 Systems using solar thermal energy

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

425

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

426

BUSINESS CONTINUITY The University of Texas at Austiniv  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plan Annex 2014 BUSINESS CONTINUITY VIII #12;#12;#12;The University of Texas at Austiniv #12;Business Continuity Plan Annex v Acknowledgement The University of Texas at Austin Business Continuity Plan Annex has been developed from the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) Business

Johnston, Daniel

427

MultiPurpose University High  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Post Office Campus Center Student Services Bachman Hall Bachman Hall Annexes Engineering Quad Porteus Addition Keller Hall Physical Science Building Pacific Ocean Science Technology Kuykendall Annex Bilger Hall Student Services Center Webster Hall Spalding Hall Snyder Hall Miller Hall Maile Way Annexes Under

Learned, John

428

Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.05-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (< 0.05mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms, and stirred flow-cell experiments were conducted to derive kinetic data of uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size-specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment, but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. Our analysis also showed that uranium adsorption site concentration estimated from the adsorption isotherms was 3 orders of magnitude less than a site concentration estimated from sediment surface area and generic site density. One important implication of this study is that grain size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site, and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

429

Advective Desorption of Uranium (VI) from Contaminated Hanford Vadose Zone Sediments under Saturated and Unsaturated Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sedimentary, hydrologic, and geochemical variations in the Hanford subsurface environment, as well as compositional differences in contaminating waste streams, have created vast differences in the migration and mobility of uranium within the subsurface environment. A series of hydraulically-saturated and -unsaturated column experiments were performed to i.) assess the effect of water content on the advective desorption and migration of uranium from contaminated sediments, and ii.) evaluate the uranium concentration that can develop in porewater and/or groundwater as a result of desorption/dissolution reactions. Flow rate and moisture content were varied to evaluate the influence of contact time, pore water velocity, and macropore desaturation on aqueous uranium concentrations. Sediments were collected from the T-TX-TY tank farm complex and the 300 Area Process Ponds located on the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington State. The sediments vary in depth, mineralogy, and in contamination events. Experiments were conducted under mildly alkaline/calcareous conditions representative of conditions commonly encountered at repository sites across the arid western United States and, in particular, the Hanford site. Results illustrate the release of uranium from these sediments is kinetically controlled and low water contents encountered within the Hanford vadose zone result in the formation of mobile-immobile water regimes, which isolate a fraction of the reactive sites within the sediments, effectively reducing the concentration of uranium released into migrating porewaters.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Qafoku, Nikolla; Smith, Steven C.; Forrester, Steven W.

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

430

Changes in U(VI) speciation upon sorption onto montmorillonite from aqueous and organic solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The speciation of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} Tributylphosphate (TBP) mixtures has been investigated in solution and intercalated with the reference smectite clay SAz-1 using x-ray absorption, Raman, and luminescence spectroscopies. Neither aquated UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} nor its TBP complex undergoes any detectable changes in uranium oxidation state on intercalation. Further, at the pH values employed in this work, there is no evidence for hydrolysis of the uranium species to generate dimeric or higher order uranium oligomers. However, we do find indications that the structures of the solution complexes are altered on intercalation, particularly for the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}/TBP system. In addition, several lines of evidence suggest that, at the loading levels used in this study, the uranyl species may be interacting with two or more spectroscopically distinguishable sites on SAz-1. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Chisholm-Brause, C.; Morris, D.E.; Eller, P.G.; Buscher, T.; Conradson, S.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Diplomacy & deception : King James VI of Scotland's foreign relations with Europe (c.1584-1603) .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis is the first attempt to provide an assessment of Scottish-Jacobean foreign relations within a European context in the years before 1603. Moreover, it (more)

Fry, Cynthia Ann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

TH`ESE DE DOCTORAT DE L'UNIVERSITE PARIS VI Specialite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

toutes les personnes qui de pr`es ou de loin m'ont apport´e aide et id´ees. Sans la gentillesse de Nacera'adsorption : du pore unique au solide d´esordonn´e . . . . . . 12 1.2.1 Hyst´er´esis dans un pore isol

Boyer, Edmond

433

Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of II-VI Semiconductor Micro- and Nanoparticles towards Sensor Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leads to slow heating and allows decomposition of reagents or products over time. Microwave-assisted heating provides faster, localized heating at the molecular level with near instantaneous control over reaction parameters. In this work, microwave...

Majithia, Ravish

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

ENDF/B-VI (Evaluated Nuclear Data File) six-group delayed neutron data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to individual precursor data (emission probabilities (P{sub n}) and neutron spectra), the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) system requires {bar {nu}}(E) and its time dependence and spectra using a few time groups. These data have been greatly extended, tested, and recently (June 1989) compared with new measurements of pulse spectra.

England, T.R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (USA)); Brady, M.C. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

UNIVERSITE PARIS VI Memoire en vue d'obtenir l'habilitation `a diriger des  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

d'approche purement topologique : celle de la m´ethode BKW complexe. On gagnerait certainement beaucoup a reformuler cette analyse BKW dans notre contexte. Mais c'est un point que je n'ai pas en- core

van Straten, Duco

436

Thermophysical analysis of II-VI semiconductors by PPE calorimetry and lock-in thermography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An accurate determination of thermophysical properties such as thermal diffusivity, thermal effusivity and thermal conductivity is extremely important for characterization and quality assurance of semiconductors. Thermal diffusivity and effusivity of some binary semiconductors have been investigated. Two experimental techniques were used: a contact technique (PPE calorimetry) and a non contact technique (lock-in thermography). When working with PPE, in the back (BPPE) configuration and in the thermally thick regim of the pyroelectric sensor, we can get the thermal diffusivity of the sample by performing a scanning of the excitation frequency of radiation. Thermal effusivity is obtained in front configuration (sensor directly irradiated and sample in back position) by performing a thickness scan of a coupling fluid. By using the lock-in thermography technique, the thermal diffusivity of the sample is obtained from the phase image. The results obtained by the two techniques are in good agreement. Nevertheless, for the determination of thermal diffusivity, lock-in thermography is preferred.

Streza, M.; Dadarlat, D. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Strza?kowski, K. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 (Poland)] [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 (Poland)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

437

Universit Paris VI -Pierre et Marie Curie -UFR des Sciences de la Vie Discipline : Ocanologie Biologique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lenfant, Marion Jarraya, Suzanne Mills, Serge Planes, Jean-Pierre Pointier, Jocelyne Blanc, Jean d'eau. Merci à Thierry Lison de Loma, pour son aide sur le terrain à Raiatea, et pour avoir bien

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

438

Th`ese de Doctorat de l'Universite Paris VI Pierre et Marie Curie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lindgren, doctorant `a l'Universit´e de Lulea maintenant `a l'UCL, pour les travaux passionnants de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

439

Adsorption of Chromium (VI) by metal hydroxide sludge from the metal finishing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Management, United States (2008)" #12;2 1 Introduction Industrial aqueous pollution (heavy metals) accounts sludge (MHS) during the treatment of their liquid effluents charged with heavy metals. Generally, a small for 30 to 40% of industrial pollution. Metal finishing is one of the sectors which contributes mostly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

440

A Stepping Stone In addition to opening doors to industry, the VI-A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Devices, Booz Allen Hamilton, The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Linear Technology, Maxim, Microsoft

Williams, Brian C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A Stepping Stone In addition to opening doors to industry, the VI-A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Devices, Booz Allen Hamilton, The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Intersil, Linear Technology, Maxim

Williams, Brian C.

442

17. J. Haywood, The Penguin Historical Atlas of the Vi-kings (Penguin Books, London, 1995).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adenine dinucleotide phos- phate. Low micromolar concentrations of carbon monoxide inhibited the DNA binding activity of holo-NPAS2 but not that of apo-NPAS2. Upon exposure to carbon monoxide, inactive BMAL1 heme binding during the purification of NPAS2, a mammali- an bHLH (basic helix-loop-helix)­PAS tran

Rutter, Jared

443

Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorptiondesorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size...

444

E-Print Network 3.0 - american caesalpiniaceae vi Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2011 Terry W Henkel Summary: associated with Dicymbe (Caesalpiniaceae) in Guyana. Advisor: Rytas Vilgalys. 1988 MS (Botany), University... to Armillaria (Physalacriaceae,...

445

Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WA 99352 Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SCWork at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was

Hu, Yung-Jin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

E-Print Network 3.0 - aortaklap tager vi Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ris National Laboratory Collection: Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources 73 LM Glasfiber er verdens strste pro-ducent af vinger til vindmller. Summary: er indstbt i...

447

RADIATION-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF U(VI) ALTERATION PHASES OF UO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U{sup 6+}-phases are common alteration products of spent nuclear fuel under oxidizing conditions, and they may potentially incorporate actinides, such as long-lived {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np, delaying their transport to the biosphere. In order to evaluate the ballistic effects of {alpha}-decay events on the stability of the U{sup 6+}-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) for six different structures of U{sup 6+}-phases: uranophane, kasolite, boltwoodite, saleeite, carnotite, and liebigite. The target uranyl-minerals were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and identification confirmed by SAED (selected area electron diffraction) in TEM (transmission electron microscopy). The TEM observation revealed no initial contamination of uraninite in these U{sup 6+} phases. All of the samples were irradiated with in situ TEM observation using 1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+} in the IVEM (intermediate-voltage electron microscope) at the IVEM-Tandem Facility of Argonne National Laboratory. The ion flux was 6.3 x 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}/sec. The specimen temperatures during irradiation were 298 and 673 K, respectively. The Kr{sup 2+}-irradiation decomposed the U{sup 6+}-phases to nanocrystals of UO{sub 2} at doses as low as 0.006 dpa. The cumulative doses for the pure U{sup 6+}-phases, e.g., uranophane, at 0.1 and 1 million years (m.y.) are calculated to be 0.009 and 0.09 dpa using SRIM2003. However, with the incorporation of 1 wt.% {sup 239}Pu, the calculated doses reach 0.27 and {approx}1.00 dpa in ten thousand and one hundred thousand years, respectively. Under oxidizing conditions, multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO{sub 2} followed by alteration to U{sup 6+}-phases should be further investigated to determine the fate of trace elements that may have been incorporated in the U{sup 6+}-phases.

S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

448

Radiation-Induced Decomposition of U(VI) Phase to Nanocrystals of UO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U{sup 6+}-phases are common alteration products, under oxidizing conditions, of uraninite and the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel. These U{sup 6+}-phases are subjected to a radiation field caused by the {alpha}-decay of U, or in the case of spent nuclear fuel, incorporated actinides, such as {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np. In order to evaluate the effects of {alpha}-decay events on the stability of the U{sup 6+}-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) of U{sup 6+}-phases. The heavy-particle irradiations are used to simulate the ballistic interactions of the recoil-nucleus of an {alpha}-decay event with the surrounding structure. The Kr{sup 2+}-irradiation decomposed the U{sup 6+}-phases to UO{sub 2} nanocrystals at doses as low as 0.006 displacements per atom (dpa). U{sup 6+}-phases accumulate substantial radiation doses ({approx}1.0 displacement per atom) within 100,000 years if the concentration of incorporated {sup 239}Pu is as high as 1 wt%. Similar nanocrystals of UO{sub 2} were observed in samples from the natural fission reactors at Oklo, Gabon. Multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO{sub 2} followed by alteration to U{sup 6+}-phases provide a mechanism for the remobilization of incorporated radionuclides.

S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing; L. Wang

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

449

Genogroup IV and VI Canine Noroviruses Interact with Histo-Blood Group Antigens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tissue samples were donated by a large pharmaceutical company. The six dogs had been bred for scientific research but were deemed unsuitable for the purpose and were humanely euthanized. The use of rats for antibody generation was approved by the national... to F) humanely euthanized as surplus to industry research requirements. Sections of the gastrointestinal tract (1 cm2) were dissected from the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and colon and placed into 90% ethanol fixative to best preserve...

Caddy, Sarah; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Goodfellow, Ian

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

450

RSONANCE ET RELAXATION DES FLUORS DANS DES FLUORURES COMPLEXES D'URANIUM VI PULVRULENTS (1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lev6e (par exemple pour UF 6' Ámol 2- 110 X 10-6 cgs) ; un important paramagnetisme de Van Vleck va de temperature ambiante. NaF, soigneusement d6shydrat6, est mis dans un reci- pient de Kel-F et UF6 est introduit

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

451

Magnetic resonance as a structural probe of a uranium (VI) sol-gel process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NMR investigations on the ORNL process for sol-gel synthesis of microspherical nuclear fuel (UO{sub 2}), has been useful in sorting out the chemical mechanism in the sol-gel steps. {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H NMR studies on the HMTA gelation agent (Hexamethylene tetramine, C{sub 6}H{sub l2}N{sub 4}) has revealed near quantitative stability of this adamantane-like compound in the sol-Gel process, contrary to its historical role as an ammonia source for gelation from the worldwide technical literature. {sub 17}0 NMR of uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup ++}) hydrolysis fragments produced in colloidal sols has revealed the selective formation of a uranyl trimer, ((UO{sub 2}){sub 3}({mu}{sub 3}-O)({mu}{sub 2}-OH){sub 3}){sup +}, induced by basic hydrolysis with the HMTA gelation agent. Spectroscopic results show that trimer condensation occurs during sol-gel processing leading to layered polyanionic hydrous uranium oxides in which HMTAH{sup +} is occluded as an intercalation'' cation. Subsequent sol-gel processing of microspheres by ammonia washing results in in-situ ion exchange and formation of a layered hydrous ammonium uranate with a proposed structural formula of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}((UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 10}) {center dot} 8H{sub 2}0. This compound is the precursor to sintered U0{sub 2} ceramic fuel.

King, C.M.; Thompson, M.C.; Buchanan, B.R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); King, R.B. (Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Garber, A.R. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Magnetic resonance as a structural probe of a uranium (VI) sol-gel process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NMR investigations on the ORNL process for sol-gel synthesis of microspherical nuclear fuel (UO{sub 2}), has been useful in sorting out the chemical mechanism in the sol-gel steps. {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H NMR studies on the HMTA gelation agent (Hexamethylene tetramine, C{sub 6}H{sub l2}N{sub 4}) has revealed near quantitative stability of this adamantane-like compound in the sol-Gel process, contrary to its historical role as an ammonia source for gelation from the worldwide technical literature. {sub 17}0 NMR of uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup ++}) hydrolysis fragments produced in colloidal sols has revealed the selective formation of a uranyl trimer, [(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}({mu}{sub 3}-O)({mu}{sub 2}-OH){sub 3}]{sup +}, induced by basic hydrolysis with the HMTA gelation agent. Spectroscopic results show that trimer condensation occurs during sol-gel processing leading to layered polyanionic hydrous uranium oxides in which HMTAH{sup +} is occluded as an ``intercalation`` cation. Subsequent sol-gel processing of microspheres by ammonia washing results in in-situ ion exchange and formation of a layered hydrous ammonium uranate with a proposed structural formula of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 10}] {center_dot} 8H{sub 2}0. This compound is the precursor to sintered U0{sub 2} ceramic fuel.

King, C.M.; Thompson, M.C.; Buchanan, B.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); King, R.B. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Garber, A.R. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acidic uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in-situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in-situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/y) show that desorption of U and HA were non-detectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH < 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results demonstrated that HA-treatment is a promising in-situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface.

Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Tokunaga, T.K.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium molybdate vi Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

+ HNO3 Solution, 250 ml Reagent 6: Methyl Green... Reagent 2: Sulfosalicylic Acid + CaCl2 Solution, 250 ml Reagent 3: 0.5 N NaOH, 250 ml Reagent 4: Ammonium... with this kit....

455

Regulation of Myosin VI transport, tethering to actin and cargo binding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ice cold PBS containing 1mM CaCl2 and 0.1 mM MgCl2 (PBS-CM)mM NaCl, 1 mM MgCl2, 0.1 mM CaCl2, 75 mM NaOH, 1% BSA for 90

Naccache, Samia Nidal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. VI. POTENTIALLY INTERESTING CANDIDATE SYSTEMS FROM FOURIER-BASED STATISTICAL TESTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through quarter six of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

Steffen, Jason H. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, P.O. Box 500, MS 127, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Ford, Eric B. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States); Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David G.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Seader, Shawn; Twicken, Joseph D. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Fabrycky, Daniel C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Holman, Matthew J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Welsh, William F. [Astronomy Department, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1221 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kjeldsen, Hans [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Prsa, Andrej, E-mail: jsteffen@fnal.gov [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 East Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

457

Duty Hours Language VI. Resident Duty Hours in the Learning and Working Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-house call. E. On-call Activities 1. In-house call must occur no more frequently than every third night

Kay, Mark A.

458

cole normale suprieure Universit Paris VI Pierre et Marie Curie Dpartement d'Informatique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diffrentielle sur C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 4 PMI et PMI+ 31 4.1 PMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 4.2 PMI et les attaques algbriques de dchiffrement . . . . . . . . . . 32 4.3 Un biais-Granboulan-Stern . . . . 35 4.3.2 Une attaque alternative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 4.4 PMI

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

459

Sustainable Practices Policy Sections II, III.I. and V.I. Sustainable Water Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

areas of a building located outside of the enclosed structure). OGSF50 is also known as "California consumption because it contains objectionable pollution, contamination minerals or infective agents, including in the context of the local watershed, and enhance economic, social and environmental sustainability while

California at Santa Cruz, University of

460

Universit Paris VI Pierre et Marie Curie cole Doctorale Cerveau Cognition Comportement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contrôle cortico-spinal à partir des aires motrices et pré-motrices impliquant le système propriospinal Contrôle cortico-spinal à partir des aires motrices et pré-motrices impliquant le système propriospinal commandes motrices provenant de structures supérieures, ainsi que l'initiation et la terminaison du

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Microsoft Word - U(VI)andSr(II)BatchSorption bh  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C and D point towards some of the precipitates. Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into Mesoporous Silica Important reactive phenomena that affect the...

462

Infrared reflectance and transmission spectra in II-VI alloys and superlattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Room temperature measurements of the far-infrared (FIR) reflectance spectra are reported for the polar optical phonons in a series of bulk Cd[subscript x]Zn[subscript 1?x]Te (0 ? x ? 1) and CdSe[subscript x]Te[subscript ...

Talwar, Devki N.

463

Computation of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Phase-VI Rotor in Pitch Motion during Standstill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previously, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations of dynamic stall on wind turbine blades have been performed for stand still conditions with moderate success by among others the present authors. In the present work, numerical investigations are performed to illustrate the possibilities of state of the art CFD methods for this problem, including the numerical requirements as time-step and grid resolution. Additionally, the effect of different types of modeling is investigated, ranging from fully turbulent Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), transitional RANS, to transitional delayed detached-eddy simulation computations. The investigation indicates that detailed information and fair agreement with measurements can be obtained.

Sorensen, N. N.; Schreck, S.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

50 CFR Ch. VI (10110 Edition) 600.345 (iii) The extent to which the fishery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measures should not im- pose unnecessary burdens on the econ- omy, on individuals, on private or pub- lic should be designed to give fishermen the greatest possible freedom of action in conducting business of the private sec- tor to another, or from the government to the private sector. Redistribution of costs through

465

PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI, VOLUME 36.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sixth meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) took place on October 1, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. RHIC is now in its second year of operation for physics production and the first polarized proton collision run at {radical}s=200 GeV is expected to start in eight weeks. The RSC has developed a plan for this coming run through two previous meetings, RHIC Spin Physics III (August 3, 2000) and IV (October 13-14, 2000). We requested the following: two weeks of polarized proton studies in AGS, three weeks of polarized collider commissioning, and five weeks of polarized proton physics run. As a result, we have obtained all we asked and the above plans are implemented in the current operation schedule. The focus of the present meeting was to bring all involved in the RHIC Spin activities up-to-date on the progress of machine development, theory issues, and experimental issues. This meeting was right after the Program Advisory Committee (PAC) meeting and it started with the comments on the PAC discussion by Gerry Bunce, who was informed about the PAC deliberations by Tom Kirk. The PAC was fully supportive to complete the proposed spin program within the currently available budget for RHIC run 2 operations. Gerry further explained the expected luminosity to be {integral} Ldt = 0.5 pb{sup -1} per week, reflecting the current machine status. The introductory session also had a talk from Werner Vogelsang that reviewed the progress in perturbative QCD theory focused on spin effects.

BLAND,L.; SAITO,N.

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

466

A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil HA (Elliott) and a reference Peat HA (Pahokee) from theHA after we found that the Peat HA has similar effect. HAof total 50 mg/L Soil HA and Peat HA separately. (4) Testing

Wan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

screw, which serves as a point on which the scale vi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

object is at the level of the battery, it is necessary to employ an angle of ?re equal to the angle of arrival which we wish to attain. But let us suppose that the angle...

468

Mesoporous magnetic carbon nanocomposite fabrics for highly efficient Cr(VI) removal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-up production a Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA. E-mail: zhanhu.guo@ lamar.edu; suying.wei@lamar.edu; Tel: +1 (409) 8

Guo, John Zhanhu

469

Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HOPO ligand with uranyl nitrate and Et 3 N or methanolic KOHbis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand, uranyl nitrate, and Et 3 N in DMF oruranyl complexes are difficult to separate from the mixture of potassium, tetramethylammonium and nitrate

Szigethy, Geza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Recent developments in Cr{sup 2+}-doped II-VI compound lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition-metal-doped zinc chalcogenide crystals have recently been investigated as potential mid-IR lasers. Tetrahedrally-coordinated Cr{sup 2+} ions are especially attractive as lasants on account of high luminescence quantum yields for emission in the 2000-3000 nm range. {sup 5}E radiative lifetimes and emission cross sections are respectively {approximately}10 {mu}sec and {approximately}10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}. The associated absorption band peaked at {approximately}1800 nm enables laser-diode pumping of the Cr{sup 2+} systems. Laser demonstrations with ZnS:Cr and ZnSe:Cr (using a MgF{sub 2}:Co{sup 2+} laser pump source) gave slope efficiencies up to 30%. Excited-state-absorption losses appear small, and passive losses dominate. Tuning experiments with a birefringent filter evidence a tuning range covering at least 2280 - 2530 nm. Cr-doped laser samples can be produced by Bridgman growth, seeded physical vapor transport, or diffusion doping.

Page, R.H.; DeLoach, L.D.; Schaffers, K.I., Patel, F.D.; Beach, R.J.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Burger, A. [Fisk Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Center for Photonic Materials and Devices

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Complexation of Gluconate with Uranium(VI) in Acidic Solutions: Thermodynamic Study with Structural Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uranium is approximately one order of magnitude lower than expected, suggesting that the coordination chemistry

Zhang, Zhicheng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Behavior of Uranium(VI) during HEDPA Leaching for Aluminum Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges Brian A. Powell 1 ,to produce a clay-like sludge layer, a slurry phase, and anto be concentrated in the sludge phase, which is primarily

Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Martin, Leigh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Hanford waste tank sludge simulants. J. Nucl. Sci.from simulated tank waste sludges. Sep. Sci. Tech. 38(2),Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates. In preparation,

Powell, Brian A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

The European Large Area ISO Survey VI - Discovery of a new hyperluminous infrared galaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the discovery of the first hyperluminous infrared galaxy (HyLIG) in the course of the European Large Area ISO Survey (ELAIS). This object has been detected by ISO at 6.7, 15, and 90 microns, and is found to be a broad-line, radio-quiet quasar at a redshift: z = 1.099. From a detailed multi-component model fit of the spectral energy distribution, we derive a total infrared luminosity: L_IR (1-1000 microns) ~ 1.0 x 10E13 h_65^-2 L_sun (q_0 = 0.5), and discuss the possible existence of a starburst contributing to the far-IR output. Observations to date present no evidence for lens magnification. This galaxy is one of the very few HyLIGs with an X-ray detection. On the basis of its soft X-ray properties, we suggest that this broad-line object may be the face-on analogue of narrow-line, Seyfert-like HyLIGs.

T. Morel; A. Efstathiou; S. Serjeant; I. Marquez; J. Masegosa; P. Heraudeau; C. Surace; A. Verma; S. Oliver; M. Rowan-Robinson; I. Georgantopoulos; D. Farrah; D. M. Alexander; I. Perez-Fournon; C. J. Willott; F. Cabrera-Guerra; E. A. Gonzalez-Solares; A. Cabrera-Lavers; J. I. Gonzalez-Serrano; P. Ciliegi; F. Pozzi; I. Matute; H. Flores

2001-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

475

Th`ese de doctorat de l'universite Paris VI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

´et´e num´eriques. Je suis recon- naissant `a Florent Calvo de m'avoir donn´e go^ut aux m´ethodes num

Boyer, Edmond

476

Microsoft Word - ViArray_Fact_ Sheet_SAND2011-3935P_updated_format...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Pipeline A 8 D-A Conve 8 Multiplexe 2 Temperatu 64 Comparat 48 Amplifier 128 Analog 1 Analog Tra dard P For mo Corporation, a w lear Security Adm W d-Signal Die Size...

477

Electrodeposited doped II-VI semiconductor films and devices incorporating such films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a photovoltaic device. It comprises: a first thin film of a compound semiconductor of a first conductivity type including tellurium and a metal selected from Group IIB of the Periodic Table of Elements and containing as a dopant impurity in a concentration not exceeding 10{sup 20} atoms per cubic centimeter a metal selected from Group IB, a second semiconductor thin film in contact with the first semiconductor thin film and having a second conductivity type opposite that of the first conductivity type and electrical contacts to each of the first and second semiconductor thin films. Also described is the device wherein the first thin film is p-type cadmium telluride.

Ondris, M.; Picher, M.A.; Brownfield, R.E.

1990-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

478

I. ASCRC General Education Form Group VI Historical and Cultural Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Industrial Revolution. V. Student Learning Goals: Briefly explain how this course will meet the applicable of modernization unleashed by the Industrial Revolution. In the first half of the course, we examine the process-century Romanticism developed as an esthetic response to the forces of modernization unleashed by the Industrial

Vonessen, Nikolaus

479

Co-extraction of Am(VI) and the major actinides with tributyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium bismuthate was found to be an effective oxidant for Am in nitric acid solutions up to 6 M in concentration. However, in the presence of tributyl phosphate, americium was quickly reduced to the trivalent state, resulting in low distribution ratios. Pre-equilibration of the organic phase with bismuthate at the appropriate acid concentration was not effective at preventing americium reduction by tributyl phosphate. However, when a small amount of perchloric acid was added to the acidic, bismuthate-containing aqueous phase, much higher distribution ratios for americium extraction were achieved. Data comparing the extraction of americium to hexavalent uranium, neptunium and plutonium are presented. Slope analysis was used to confirm the extraction of americium in the hexavalent state. (authors)

Mincher, Bruce J.; Martin, Leigh R.; Schmitt, Nicholas C. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83413-7113 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

ENTROPY OF FORMATION OF VACANCIES IN SOLIDS Laboratoire d'Electrochimie (*), Universit Paris VI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L-9 ENTROPY OF FORMATION OF VACANCIES IN SOLIDS F. B?NI?RE Laboratoire d of the vacancy are identified to those in the liquid state. This leads in a first approximation to the relation. In these crystals, the thermodynamic parameters of formation of a Schottky defect (cation vacancy + anion vacancy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "marpol annex vi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

UNIVERSITE PIERRE ET INSTITUT FRANCAIS MARIE CURIE -PARIS VI DU PETROLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: MODELISATION DE L'AUTO-INFLAMMATION ET DE LA COMBUSTION POUR LES MOTEURS DIESEL soutenue le 9 decembre 1997 COMBUSTION POUR LES MOTEURS DIESEL Antonio Pires da Cruz - Institut Francais du Petrole 1 et 4 Av. Bois Preau- teurs Diesel. L'accent est mis sur la prise en compte des e ets induits par la turbulence. Seule l

Boyer, Edmond

482

Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007;318:11081113. 8. CancerGenomeAtlasNetwork. somaticmutationinhumancancergenomes. Nature2007;446:153158. 11. KatohM. Cancergenomicsandgeneticsof

Spellman, Paul T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Final report. Part VI. The nature of pseudovitrinites in Kentucky coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overall average pseudovitrinite content for 1055 eastern Kentucky coal samples is nearly 9% while average percentage of pseudovitrinite for 551 western Kentucky coals is approximately 4%. Examination of variation in pseudovitrinite content relative to rank changes shows uniformity in pseudovitrinite percentages within the 4 to 7 V-type interval for eastern Kentucky coals but a gradual increase in pseudovitrinite content for western Kentucky coals over the same rank interval. Coals from both coal fields show similar, distinct increases in pseudovitrinite percentage in the highest V-type categories. However, it is suggested here that these supposed increases in pseudovitrinite percentages are not real but rather, indicate distinct increase in the brightness of nitrinite resulting from increased alteration of vitrinite beginning at this stage of coalification and continuing into the higher rank stages. This conclusion is reached when it is found that differences between pseudovitrinite and vitrinite reflectance are least in coals at these high rank intervals of Kentucky and, also, when vitrinite particles are often visually observed having brightness equal to that of pseudovitrinite particles. Relation of pseudovitrinite to other sulfur forms and total sulfur in general shows no significant trends, although the relatively high pyritic sulfur content in western Kentucky coals, coupled with relatively low inert percentages suggest the existence of predominantly reducing, or at least non-oxidizing conditions in the Pennsylvanian peat swamps of western Kentucky. Initial work involving Vicker's microhardness testing of coals indicates that microhardness values for pseudovitrinite are higher than those for vitrinite within the same sample regardless of coal rank or coal field from which the sample was collected. 15 references, 9 figures, 9 tables.

Trinkle, E.J.; Hower, J.C.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

VI CONGRESO DEL CEISAL Toulouse, del 30 de junio al 3 de Julio de 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla Posgrado en Negocios Internacionales y actual Candidato a Doctor en Negocios Internacionales Líneas de investigación: la globalización y el ambiente de los negocios internacionales 21 sur 1103 Colonia Santiago, C.P. 72160, Puebla, México Teléfono (222

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

485

Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Murali, M. S. ; Nash, K. L. Solv. Extr. Ion Exch. 2001, 19,D. C. ; Raymond, K. N. Solv. Extr. Ion Exch. 2004, 22, (22)DMF) and UO 2 (bis-Me-3,2-HOPO)(solv) tabulated in Table 2-

Szigethy, Geza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Ac#vi#es of the US Burning Plasma Organiza#on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

=ons · USBPO ­ Coordinates US burning plasma research, to advance scien=fic understanding USBPO organizes the US Fusion Energy Science community to support burning plasma research 5 Charles Greenfield (Director) Amanda Hubbard (Deputy Director) Nermin

487

Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption In A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110). |Gas-phase

488

VI-12 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV >41 - March 31,3 -2

489

VI-12 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV >41 - March 31,3 -23

490

Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI'  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652 Srivastava,Pacific1ofDepartmentb. PartHeavy-duty

491

Abiotic Reductive Immobilization of U(VI) by Biogenic Mackinawite. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre the Effects of GlobalASCRAbigail Ferrieri Abigail

492

Characterization of a type vi secretion system and related proteins of pseudomonas syringae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

secreted effectors and toxins, to develop a pathogenic interaction with its host. The B728a genome was recently sequenced, revealing the presence of 1,297 genes with unknown function. This dissertation demonstrates that a 29.9-kb cluster of genes in the B...

Records, Angela Renee

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

493

Laser radar VI; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 23-25, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topics presented include lidar wind shear detection for commercial aircraft, centroid tracking of range-Doppler images, an analytic approach to centroid performance analysis, simultaneous active/passive IR vehicle detection, and resolution limits for high-resolution imaging lidar. Also presented are laser velocimetry applications, the application of laser radar to autonomous spacecraft landing, 3D laser radar simulation for autonomous spacecraft landing, and ground based CW atmospheric Doppler lidar performamce modeling.

Becherer, R.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

speciation in Hanford waste tank sludge simulants. J. Nucl.and Sr(II) from simulated tank waste sludges. Sep. Sci.Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates. In

Powell, Brian A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Behavior of Uranium(VI) during HEDPA Leaching for Aluminum Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges Brian A. PowellThe underground storage tanks at the Hanford site containtime, the material in the tanks has stratified to produce a

Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Martin, Leigh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

National Energy Board Act Part VI (Oil and Gas) Regulations (Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations from the National Energy Board cover licensing for oil and gas, including the exportation and importation of natural gas. The regulations also cover inspections, reporting...

497

Hanford Tank Farms Waste Feed Flow Loop Phase VI: PulseEcho System Performance Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the visual and ultrasonic PulseEcho critical velocity test results obtained from the System Performance test campaign that was completed in September 2012 with the Remote Sampler Demonstration (RSD)/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform located at the Monarch test facility in Pasco, Washington. This report is intended to complement and accompany the report that will be developed by WRPS on the design of the System Performance simulant matrix, the analysis of the slurry test sample concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) data, and the design and construction of the RSD/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform.

Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

498

Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolutionFES6FYRANDOMOverview The652CASL-U-2014-0014-002300A,

499

The effect of U(VI) bioreduction kinetics on subsequent reoxidation of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe MolecularPlaceTheof carbonbiogenic U(IV). |

500

Identification of simultaneous U(VI) sorption complexes and U(IV)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. |Endecaheme c-Type