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1

Electricity Market and Policy | Electricity Markets and Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Department The Electricity Markets and Policy Group conducts technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S....

2

EERE: Web Site Policies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Web Site Policies The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has developed this page to detail its compliance with the Office of Management and Budget Policies for...

3

EERE: Web Site Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy (EERE) has developed this page to detail its compliance with the Office of Management and Budget Policies for Federal Public Web Sites. To learn more about EERE, visit...

4

Electricity Market and Policy | Electricity Markets and Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Department Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Department The Electricity Markets and Policy Group conducts technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S. electricity sector. Our current research seeks to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to energy efficiency and demand response, renewable energy, electricity resource and transmission planning, and electricity reliability. Demand Response & Smart Grid The Electricity Markets and Policy Group conducts public interest research on the smart grid and concepts, technologies and operating practices it enables from a market, policy, cost, benefit, and performance perspective. LEARN MORE... Electricity Reliability The reliability of the electric power system is critical to the economic

5

LBNL Renewable Energy Market and Policy Analysis | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LBNL Renewable Energy Market and Policy Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Renewable Energy Market and Policy Analysis at LBNL Name Renewable Energy Market and Policy...

6

Renewable Energy Markets and Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energy Markets and Policies Romeo Pacudan, PhD Risoe National Laboratory, Denmark HAPUA Working Group No. 4 Meeting Renewable Energy and Environment in ASEAN Melia Hotel, Hanoi, Vietnam 23-24 June 2005 #12;1. Renewables in Energy Supply Share in Primary Energy Supply 5,9 5,7 4,8 5,8 0 1 2 3 4 5

7

POLICY OPTIONS FOR FCV MARKET INTRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G. Duleep G. Duleep Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. www.eea-inc.com POLICY OPTIONS FOR FCV MARKET INTRODUCTION Prepared for: Hydrogen 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis Meeting Introduction Phases Phase 1 - sales of few hundred FCVs per year. Cost of vehicles will be 5 x over average vehicle and refueling infrastructure will be in an urban area. Phase 2 - ten to twenty thousand FCVs per model and one/two models per major manufacturer. Cost of vehicles will be 2 x over average vehicle, and urban and limited regional refueling infrastructure. Phase 3 - Mass market introduction, FCV cost at 1.1 to 1.2 x. Good regional refueling and limited city pair refueling sites. Policies for Phase 1 Vehicles will not be sold commercially but leased to select fleets and owners. Government fleet buy-

8

LBNL Renewable Energy Market and Policy Analysis | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LBNL Renewable Energy Market and Policy Analysis (Redirected from Renewable Energy Market and Policy Analysis at LBNL) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Renewable Energy Market and...

9

Biogas Markets and Federal Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

americanbiogascouncil.org americanbiogascouncil.org Promoting the Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Industries 1 americanbiogascouncil.org Biogas Markets and Federal Policy Patrick Serfass, Executive Director www.americanbiogascouncil.org Promoting the Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Industries www.americanbiogascouncil.org Promoting the Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Industries American Biogas Council: The Voice of the US Biogas Industry  The only U.S. organization representing the biogas and anaerobic digestion industry  151 Organizations in the U.S., Germany, Italy, Canada, Sweden, Denmark, Belgium, Brazil, the Netherlands and the UK  All Industry Sectors Represented:  Landowners, waste managers  Project developers/owners  Manufacturers  Fuel refiners

10

Geothermal Brief: Market and Policy Impacts Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Geothermal Brief: Market and Policy Impacts Update Bethany Speer Technical Report NREL...

11

Tax policy, housing markets, and elderly homeowners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three essays studying the impact of tax policy on housing markets and elderly homeowners. Chapter One examines the potential lock-in effect of capital gains taxation on home sales, using the ...

Shan, Hui, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Alternative Fuels Market and Policy Trends (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Market forces and policies are increasing opportunities for alternative fuels. There is no one-size-fits-all, catch-all, silver-bullet fuel. States play a critical role in the alternative fuel market and are taking a leading role.

Schroeder, A. N.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Market failures and government policies in gas markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This memorandum analyses the fundamental characteristics of the natural gas market and its consequences for government policies. In the past, the European gas market was dominated by state-owned monopolists but since the start of the liberalisation, privatisation and re-regulation in the early 1990s, the market has fundamentally changed. Nevertheless, governments are still involved in the gas industry, not only in gas exporting countries such as Russia, but also in a country like the Netherlands where the government has imposed a cap on production from the main gas field (Groningen) as well as owns shares in the main wholesale trader (Gasunie Trade & Supply) which has the obligation to accept all gas offered by producers on the small fields. In the main report of this project we present a cost-benefit analysis of the Dutch gas-depletion policy. In this memorandum we explore the natural-gas market more broadly, looking for factors why government intervention may be needed using the welfare-economic approach according to which government intervention should be based on the presence of market failures. After a brief description of the main characteristics of the gas industry, we systematically analyse sources of market failures, such as geopolitical factors, economies of scale and externalities, and finally go into the question which policy options may be chosen to address those market failures.

Machiel Mulder; Gijsbert Zwart

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Markets Title Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Markets Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6155E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Cappers, Peter, Jason MacDonald, and Charles A. Goldman Date Published 03/2013 Keywords advanced metering infrastructure, aggregators of retail customers, ancillary services, demand response, electric utility regulation, electricity market rules, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, institutional barriers, market and value, operating reserves, retail electricity providers, retail electricity tariffs, smart grid Attachment Size

15

Green Investment Horizons: Effects of Policy on the Market for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Investment Horizons: Effects of Policy on the Market for Building Energy Efficiency Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Green Investment...

16

The role of public policy in emerging green power markets: An analysis of marketer preferences  

SciTech Connect

Green power marketing has been heralded by some as a means to create a private market for renewable energy that is driven by customer demand for green products. This report challenges the premise--sometimes proffered in debates over green markets--that profitable, sizable, credible markets for green products will evolve naturally without supportive public policies. Relying primarily on surveys and interviews of US green power marketers, the article examines the role of specific regulatory and legislative policies in enabling the green market, and searches for those policies that are believed by marketers to be the most conducive or detrimental to the expansion of the green market. The authors find that marketers: (1) believe that profitable green power markets will only develop if a solid foundation of supportive policies exists; (2) believe that establishing overall price competition and encouraging customer switching are the top priorities; (3) are somewhat leery of government-sponsored or mandated public information programs; and (4) oppose three specific renewable energy policies that are frequently advocated by renewable energy enthusiasts, but that may have negative impacts on the green marketers' profitability. The stated preferences of green marketers shed light on ways to foster renewables by means of the green market. Because the interests of marketers do not coincide perfectly with those of society, however, the study also recognizes other normative perspectives and highlights policy tensions at the heart of current debates related to green markets. By examining these conflicts, they identify three key policy questions that should direct future research: (1) to what extent should price competition and customer switching be encouraged at the expense of cost shifting; (2) what requirements should be imposed to ensure credibility in green products and marketing; and (3) how should the green power market and broader renewable energy policies interact?

Wiser, R.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Energy Storage Economics and Policy and Market Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Economics and Policy and Market Interactions Speaker(s): Ramteen Sioshansi Date: November 19, 2012 - 4:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Ryan...

18

Energy efficiency, market failures, and government policy  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a framework for evaluating engineering-economic evidence on the diffusion of energy efficiency improvements. Four examples are evaluated within this framework. The analysis provides evidence of market failures related to energy efficiency. Specific market failures that may impede the adoption of cost-effective energy efficiency are discussed. Two programs that have had a major impact in overcoming these market failures, utility DSM programs and appliance standards, are described.

Levine, M.D.; Koomey, J.G.; McMahon, J.E.; Sanstad, A.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Hirst, E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Energy Div.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Policy Building Blocks: Helping Policymakers Determine Policy Staging for the Development of Distributed PV Markets: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is a growing body of qualitative and a limited body of quantitative literature supporting the common assertion that policy drives development of clean energy resources. Recent work in this area indicates that the impact of policy depends on policy type, length of time in place, and economic and social contexts of implementation. This work aims to inform policymakers about the impact of different policy types and to assist in the staging of those policies to maximize individual policy effectiveness and development of the market. To do so, this paper provides a framework for policy development to support the market for distributed photovoltaic systems. Next steps include mathematical validation of the framework and development of specific policy pathways given state economic and resource contexts.

Doris, E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Consumer Choice and Industrial Policy: a Study of UK Energy Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy: A Study of UK Energy Markets Monica Giulietti,Center for the Study of Energy Markets (CSEM) Working PaperPolicy: a study of UK Energy Markets# ? Monica Giulietti

Giulietti, Monica; Waddams Price, Catherine; Waterson, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Clean Energy Policies Analysis: The Role of Policy in Clean Energy Market Transformation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation was written and presented by Elizabeth Doris (NREL) at the November 17 TAP Webinar to provide background detail about how state policies are transforming the clean energy market in different regions of the country.

Doris, E.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Marketing policy for developing countries: the case for Uganda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need to diversify the agricultural sector and avoid dependence upon the export of a narrow range of crops has necessitated increasing participation in non-traditional crops trade. For an agro-based economy to expand and diversify beyond the traditional system, an appropriate production and marketing policy needs to be put in place, if Uganda is going to compete in the international market. The problems inherent in the produce trade and the difficulty of finding export markets for some of the crops justify the improvement of the domestic and export marketing system in order to be able to exploit any available market opportunities. If Uganda is going to compete in the international agricultural market on long-term sustainable basis, then policies that allow and encourage investment and freedom to import agricultural inputs and export agricultural products is essential. Only a modern commercial agricultural production and marketing system can expect to contribute in international trade and thereby contribute much to long-run development. Government and private leadership is required to support an open and competitive system based on laws that maintain competition and property rights and individual freedom to decide what to produce,, and what and where to market.

Bazaala, Nalumansi Mariam

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Magnetic fluorescent ballasts: Market data, market imperfections, and policy success  

SciTech Connect

Many economists have strongly questioned engineering-economic studies aimed at demonstrating anomalously slow diffusion of energy-efficient technology and the benefits of regulations to promote such technology. One argument against such studies is that standard techniques of engineering-economics are either inappropriate for or are routinely misapplied in assessing the performance of the market for energy efficiency. This paper presents engineering-economic evidence on the diffusion of energy efficiency improvements that takes account of such critiques. The authors examine the engineering and economic characteristics of standard and energy-efficient magnetic ballasts for fluorescent lighting. Efficient magnetic ballasts represented an excellent investment for 99% of the commercial building floor stock, and a moderately good investment for 0.7% of the commercial floor stock. Still, these ballasts were only being adopted in the 1980s at a rate commensurate with the enactment of appliance efficiency standards in various states. In this case, there is solid empirical evidence for skepticism about the effectiveness of the market mechanism in promoting cost-effective energy efficiency improvements as well as evidence of the benefits of regulation to counteract this shortcoming.

Koomey, J.G.; Sanstad, A.H.; Shown, L.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

On the economic analysis of problems in energy efficiency: Market barriers, market failures, and policy implications  

SciTech Connect

In his recent paper in The Energy Journal, Ronald Sutherland argues that several so-called ``market barriers`` to energy efficiency frequently cited in the literature are not market failures in the conventional sense and are thus irrelevant for energy policy. We argue that Sutherland has inadequately analyzed the idea of market barrier and misrepresented the policy implications of microeconomics. We find that economic theory, correctly interpreted, does not provide for the categorical dismissal of market barriers. We explore important methodological issues underlying the debate over market barriers, and discuss the importance of reconciling the findings of non-economic social sciences with the economic analysis of energy demand and consumer decision-making. We also scrutinize Sutherland`s attempt to apply finance theory to rationalize high implicit discount rates observed in energy-related choices, and find this use of finance theory to be inappropriate.

Sanstad, A.H.; Koomey, J.G.; Levine, M.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

On the economic analysis of problems in energy efficiency: Market barriers, market failures, and policy implications  

SciTech Connect

In his recent paper in The Energy Journal, Ronald Sutherland argues that several so-called market barriers'' to energy efficiency frequently cited in the literature are not market failures in the conventional sense and are thus irrelevant for energy policy. We argue that Sutherland has inadequately analyzed the idea of market barrier and misrepresented the policy implications of microeconomics. We find that economic theory, correctly interpreted, does not provide for the categorical dismissal of market barriers. We explore important methodological issues underlying the debate over market barriers, and discuss the importance of reconciling the findings of non-economic social sciences with the economic analysis of energy demand and consumer decision-making. We also scrutinize Sutherland's attempt to apply finance theory to rationalize high implicit discount rates observed in energy-related choices, and find this use of finance theory to be inappropriate.

Sanstad, A.H.; Koomey, J.G.; Levine, M.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Trends and Market Effects of Wood Energy Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trends and Market Effects of Wood Energy Policies Bengt Hillring SLU SWEDEN http is the main international energy source · Climate change ­ Energy production ­ CO2 · European Union different the plans to increase #12;#12;Energy Sector Waste Sector Recovered Wood Sawdust Logging Residues Forest

27

Nottingham Business School Biofuels Market and Policy Governance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nottingham Business School Biofuels Market and Policy Governance The last decade has seen a dramatic growth in the global production and consumption of biofuels, as a rapidly- rising number triggered growing concerns about the downsides from different types of biofuel. This, in turn, presents

Evans, Paul

28

Optimal consumption policies in illiquid markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate optimal consumption policies in the liquidity risk model introduced in Pham and Tankov (2007). Our main result is to derive smoothness results for the value functions of the portfolio/consumption choice problem. As an important consequence, we can prove the existence of the optimal control (portfolio/consumption strategy) which we characterize both in feedback form in terms of the derivatives of the value functions and as the solution of a second-order ODE. Finally, numerical illustrations of the behavior of optimal consumption strategies between two trading dates are given.

Cretarola, Alessandra; Pham, Huyn; Tankov, Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

the source. Climate Policy and Labor Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JEL No. J23,Q50 An important component of the debate surrounding climate legislation in the United States is its potential impact on labor markets. Theoretically the connection is ambiguous and depends on the sign of cross-elasticity of labor demand with respect to energy prices, which is a priori unknown. This paper provides some new evidence on this question by estimating the relationship between real electricity prices and indicators of labor market activity using data for 1976-2007. A key contribution of this analysis is that it relies on within-state variation in electricity prices to identify the models and considers all sectors of the U.S. economy rather than focusing only on the manufacturing sector. The main finding is that employment rates are weakly related to electricity prices with implied cross elasticity of full-time equivalent (FTE) employment with respect to electricity prices ranging from-0.16 % to-0.10%. I conclude by interpreting these empirical estimates in the context of increases in electricity prices consistent with H.R. 2454, the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009. The preferred estimates in this paper suggest that in the short-run, an increase in electricity price of 4 % would lead to a reduction in aggregate FTE

Olivier Deschenes; Olivier Deschenes; Olivier Deschenes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Modeling and Analysis Session: Market, Value, and Policy Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Primary objectives: to provide a broad range of analytical support to the Solar Program; and to anticipate and respond to the rapidly evolving analytical needs of the Solar Program. Three broad types of analysis are being carried out under this project including: (1) Market analysis: Developing a PV market penetration model--the SolarDS model--and other tools, in order to gain insight into the factors influencing market penetration of PV technology in U.S. markets. (2) Value analysis: Providing inputs to, support for, and review of the annual GPRA benefits analysis. Also developing methods and tools for improving the quantification of the benefits and cost of solar technologies. (3) Policy analysis: Defining and carrying out analysis that meets the needs of the Solar Energy Technologies Program in a timely fashion, for example evaluating the potential role of solar in the energy economy in the long-term.

Margolis, R. M.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

1 Energy Markets and Policy Group Energy Analysis Department The Impact of Wind Power Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Energy Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department The Impact of Wind Power Projects, Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program #12;2 Energy Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis · Conclusions and Further Research #12;3 Energy Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department Proximity

32

Electricity Markets and Policy Group Energy Analysis Department The Cost of Transmission for Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department 1 The Cost of Transmission Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory February 2009 #12;Electricity Markets and Policy Group · Energy Implications and Future Work #12;Electricity Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department 3 Motivation

33

Energy Analysis Department Electricity Markets and Policy Group The Impact of Rate Design and Net  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Analysis Department Electricity Markets and Policy Group The Impact of Rate Design and Net of Energy #12;Energy Analysis Department Electricity Markets and Policy Group 2 Project Overview Context alternative compensation mechanisms #12;Energy Analysis Department Electricity Markets and Policy Group 3

34

City of Seattle - Sustainable Buildings and Sites Policy (Washington...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon City of Seattle - Sustainable Buildings and Sites Policy (Washington) This is the approved revision...

35

1 Energy Markets and Policy Group Energy Analysis Department An Analysis of the Effects of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Energy Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department An Analysis of the Effects and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department Effects of Residential PV Systems on Home Sales Prices · Future Areas For Research · Questions? #12;3 Energy Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department

36

CUSTOMER-SITED PHOTOVOLTAICS: STATE MARKET ANALYSIS Christy Herig  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CUSTOMER-SITED PHOTOVOLTAICS: STATE MARKET ANALYSIS Christy Herig National Renewable Energy Lab the most expensive form of renewable energy, they are still the most affordable and market Information Agency has not released any new state emission data since the 1999 analysis [2]. The objectives

Perez, Richard R.

37

An Analysis of Government Policy Impacts in the Ethanol and Sugar Markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACT This study determines the impact of U.S. government policies on U.S. ethanol market and its consequences for the U.S. corn, sugar, and HFCS markets. (more)

Marzoughi_Ardakani, Hassan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Environmental Energy Technologies Division Electricity Markets and Policy Group Supporting Solar Power in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Energy Technologies Division Electricity Markets and Policy Group Supporting Solar the impact of RPS policies on solar growth 2 #12;Environmental Energy Technologies Division Electricity by: the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar Energy Technologies Program

39

Site Access Policy | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory About Work with Argonne Safety News Community Events Careers Directory Energy Environment Security User Facilities Science Technology Visiting Argonne Site Access...

40

Natural gas market under the Natural Gas Policy Act  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This first of a series of analyses presents data on the exploration, development, production, and pricing of US natural gas since the passage of the Natural Gas Policy Act in 1978. Designed to give pricing incentives for new-well activity, the NGPA has apparently eliminated many of the pricing differences that existed between interstate and intrastate markets. Estimates of the annual production volumes in trillion CF/yr of gas for the categories defined by the NGPA include new gas 4.5, new onshore wells 4.1, high-cost unconventional gas 0.7, and stripper wells 0.4. Preliminary statistics on the end-use pricing of natural gas suggest that significant changes in the average wellhead prices have not caused correspondingly large increases in the price of delivered gas.

Carlson, M.; Ody, N.; O'Neill, R.; Rodekohr, M.; Shambaugh, P.; Thrasher, R.; Trapmann, W.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

"Market Systems" Models and Energy Policy Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Market Systems" Models and Energy Policy Analysis "Market Systems" Models and Energy Policy Analysis Speaker(s): William Morrow Date: October 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-1099 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Katie Coughlin Many aspects of energy policy in the US intend to influence both "demand-side" (consumer) and "supply-side" (producer) behavior. Analysis for such policies, however, rarely takes into account important complexities related to consumer behavior, firm behavior, competition, and uncertainty that can ultimately limit policy effectiveness. This talk will review the gap between policy analysis and what we know about market behavior. Two elements will serve as an element of focus for detailed discussion: First, game-theoretic "Market Systems" models of product design

42

City of Seattle - Sustainable Buildings and Sites Policy | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » City of Seattle - Sustainable Buildings and Sites Policy City of Seattle - Sustainable Buildings and Sites Policy < Back Eligibility Construction Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Seattle Department of Planning and Development Seattle's Sustainable Building Policy was originally adopted in 2000 and significantly expanded in scope in October 2011. This policy calls for new City-funded projects and major renovations with over 5,000 square feet of

43

Affecting Policy by Manipulating Prediction Markets: Experimental Evidence 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Documented results indicate prediction markets effectively aggregate information and form accurate predictions. This has led to a proliferation of markets predicting everything from the results of elections to a companys sales to movie box office receipts. Recent research suggests prediction markets are robust to manipulation attacks and resulting market outcomes improve forecast accuracy. However, we present evidence from the lab indicating that well funded, single minded manipulators can in fact destroy a prediction markets ability to aggregate information. Our results clearly indicate that the usefulness of prediction markets as inputs to decision making may be limited.

Cary Deck; Shengle Lin; David Porter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Insights and Opportunities: Technologies, Policies, and Markets for Clean Energy Solutions (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

A presentation highlighting how strategic energy analysis can affect technologies, policies, and markets for clean energy solutions. This includes an overview of some of NREL's models and tools as well as results from laboratory analysis.

Arent, D.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Insights and Opportunities: Technologies, Policies, and Markets for Clean Energy Solutions (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

A presentation highlighting how strategic energy analysis can affect technologies, policies, and markets for clean energy solutions. This includes an overview of some of NREL's models and tools as well as results from laboratory analysis.

Arent, D.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Forthcoming, Utilities Policy, 2010. Using Forward Markets to Improve Electricity Market Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forward markets, both medium term and long term, complement the spot market for wholesale electricity. The forward markets reduce risk, mitigate market power, and coordinate new investment. In the medium term, a forward energy market lets suppliers and demanders lock in energy prices and quantities for one to three years. In the long term, a forward reliability market assures adequate resources are available when they are needed most. The forward markets reduce risk for both sides of the market, since they reduce the quantity of energy that trades at the more volatile spot price. Spot market power is mitigated by putting suppliers and demanders in a more balanced position at the time of the spot market. The markets also reduce transaction costs and improve liquidity and transparency. Recent innovations to the Colombia market illustrate the basic elements of the forward markets and their beneficial role. 1

Lawrence M. Ausubel; Peter Cramton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization. Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

This fifth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Information is presented on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. Models are described that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for the NEPA documents at the Hanford Site, are provided.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.] [ed.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fifth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Information is presented on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. Models are described that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for the NEPA documents at the Hanford Site, are provided.

Cushing, C.E. (ed.) [ed.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century MarketsChapter 2 Influence of Legislation and Governmental Policy on Markets for Soybean and Soybean Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century Markets Chapter 2 Influence of Legislation and Governmental Policy on Markets for Soybean and Soybean Products Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Biofu

50

Biofuel policy and stock price in imperfectly competitive markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The increase in demand for corn as a biofuel feedstock has had a significant impact on the agricultural markets in the United States. These include (more)

Tepe, Fatma Sine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

NREL: Energy Analysis - Market and Policy Impact Analysis Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research interests Policy & environmental Energy planning & project development More information on Kelli Anderson Photo of Lori Bird Lori Bird Senior Analyst Areas of expertise...

52

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization, Revision 15  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.; Woody, Dave M.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the sixteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the seventeenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety and health, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

54

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Eschbach, Tara O.; Fowler, Richard A.; Goodwin, Shannon M.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast, Ellen L.; Rohay, Alan C.; Thorne, Paul D.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Eschbach, Tara O.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Goodwin, Shannon M.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Rohay, Alan C.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 9  

SciTech Connect

This ninth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. Not all of the sections have been updated for this revision. The following lists the updated sections: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); culture, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; all of Chapter 6.

Neitzel, D.A. [ed.] [ed.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J. [and others] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Green Lease Policies and Procedures for Lease Acquisition | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Green Lease Policies and Procedures for Lease Acquisition Green Lease Policies and...

58

Attachment 1: Green Lease Policies and Procedures for Lease Acquisitio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Attachment 1: Green Lease Policies and Procedures for Lease Acquisition Attachment 1: Green Lease Policies...

59

Energy Analysis Department Electricity Markets and Policy Group The Shifting Landscape of RatepayerThe Shifting Landscape of Ratepayer--  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Analysis Department Electricity Markets and Policy Group The Shifting Landscape of Ratepayer trends in state policies affecting ratepayer-funded energy efficiency (EE) programs Berkeley Lab-up ratepayer-funded EE program activity #12;Energy Analysis Department Electricity Markets and Policy Group 33

60

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 7  

SciTech Connect

This seventh revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, environmental monitoring, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. Chapter 5.0 was not updated from the sixth revision (1994). It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE Orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.] ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others] and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

This sixth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors; Chapter 5.0 has been significantly updated from the fifth revision. It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions; The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be utilized directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No conclusions or recommendations are provided. This year's report is the twelfth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the thirteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomic, occupational safety, and noise. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, of the 100, 200, 300, and other areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities. Information in Chapter 6 of this document can be adapted and supplemented with specific information for a chapter covering statutory and regulatory requirements in an environment assessment or environmental impact statement.

Neitzel, Duane A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Antonio, Ernest J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Fosmire, Christian J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Fowler, Richard A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Glantz, Clifford S. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Goodwin, Shannon M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Harvey, David W. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Hendrickson, Paul L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Horton, Duane G. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Poston, Ted M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Rohay, Alan C. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Thorne, Paul D. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wright, Mona K. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 8  

SciTech Connect

This eighth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, historical, archaeological and cultural resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. The following sections were updated in this revision: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); historical; archaeological and cultural resources; and all of chapter 6. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

Neitzel, D.A. [ed.] [ed.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J.; Fowler, R.A. [and others] [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The Role of Electricity Pricing Policy in Industrial Siting Decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the many reasons why industries tend to co-locate in a general vicinity is the availability of factors of production. A manufacturer can achieve great savings if his production facility is located near his major raw material supplier. Since many intermediate industrial products are extremely energy intensive, the producer of these products must locate in areas where low cost energy resources are abundant. In many instances, therefore, the existence of these industries will serve as an anchor to other manufacturing industries. Furthermore, industry has great inertia in its locational preferences. It takes a long time to establish a patent of growth or decay. But once it is set in motion it is very difficult to change. Since the pricing policy of electricity plays a significant role in the siting decisions of energy intensive industries, it is therefore imperative for the policy makers to understand the long term impact of their policies. This paper will examine the current pricing policy of the electric utility industry in Texas.

Tam, C. S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Solar energy: industry sector analysis, the role of legislation and policy, and the California and U.S. market outlook.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is a discussion of solar energy technology, the current global and United States markets, the role of government legislation and policy as a (more)

Motta, John James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Government policy and market penetration opportunities for US renewable energy technology in India and Pakistan  

SciTech Connect

Some US renewable energy industries are now looking abroad, especially to the rapidly developing Asia-Pacific region, in order to increase sales and expand markets. The developing world appears in principle to be an important market for renewable energy technologies. These international markets have proven extremely difficult to penetrate, and the US competitive position is threatened by strong, well-organized, government-supported competition from Japan and Western Europe. For example, US photovoltaic manufacturers held 80% of the world PV market in 1980; today their market share is down to 35%. Less developed countries (LDCs) present a potentially significant but highly elusive market for renewable energy technologies. This market may develop for three major reasons; the shortage of electricity supply and the high cost of grid extension to rural areas, the high cost of oil imports and the scarcity of light oil products, and the gradual replacement of traditional fuels with modern ones. The focus of this report is on the policies and attitudes of national and regional governments in India and Pakistan towards renewable energy technology and how these policies and attitudes affect the potential for penetration of these markets by US industry. We have attempted to provide some useful insight into the actual market environment in India and Pakistan rather than just report on official laws, regulations, and policies. The report also examines the economics of technologies in comparison with more traditional sources of energy. It concentrates primarily on technologies, such as photovoltaics and wind electric systems, that would benefit from foreign participation, but also identifies potential market opportunities for advanced solar desalination and other renewable energy technologies. 31 refs.

Sathaye, J.; Weingart, J.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hanford Site National Evnironmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fourth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. In Chapter 4.0 are presented summations of up-to-date information about climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels. Chapter 5.0 describes models, including their principal assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclides transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for environmental impact statements for the Hanford Site, following the structure Chapter 4.0. NO conclusions or recommendations are given in this report.

Cushing, C.E. (ed.) [ed.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Hanford Site National Evnironmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

This fourth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. In Chapter 4.0 are presented summations of up-to-date information about climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels. Chapter 5.0 describes models, including their principal assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclides transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for environmental impact statements for the Hanford Site, following the structure Chapter 4.0. NO conclusions or recommendations are given in this report.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Market and Policy Barriers to Deployment of Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

There has recently been resurgent interest in energy storage, due to a number of developments in the electricity industry. Despite this interest, very little storage, beyond some small demonstration projects, has been deployed recently. While technical issues, such as cost, device efficiency, and other technical characteristics are often listed as barriers to storage, there are a number of non-technical and policy-related issues. This paper surveys some of these main barriers and proposes some potential research and policy steps that can help address them. While the discussion is focused on the United States, a number of the findings and observations may be more broadly applicable.

Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.; Jenkin, T.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Bioenergy market competition for biomass: A system dynamics review of current policies  

SciTech Connect

There is growing interest in the United States and abroad to increase the use of biomass as an energy source due to environmental and energy security benefits. In the United States, the biofuel and biopower industries are regulated by different policies and different agencies and have different drivers, which impact the maximum price the industries are willing to pay for biomass. This article describes a dynamic computer simulation model that analyzes future behavior of bioenergy feedstock markets based on varying policy and technical options. The model simulates the long-term dynamics of these markets by treating advanced biomass feedstocks as a commodity and projecting the total demand of each industry, as well as the market price over time. The model is used for an analysis of the United States bioenergy feedstock market that projects supply, demand, and market price given three independent buyers: domestic biopower, domestic biofuels, and foreign exports. With base-case assumptions, the biofuels industry is able to dominate the market and meet the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) targets for advanced biofuels. Further analyses suggest that United States bioenergy studies should include estimates of export demand for biomass in their projections, and that GHG-limiting policy would partially shield both industries from export dominance.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Robert Jeffers

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site for the many environmental documents being prepared by DOE contractors concerning the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). No statements regarding significance or environmental consequences are provided. This years report is the eighteen revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the nineteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. Two chapters are included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6), numbered to correspond to chapters typically presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology; air quality; geology; hydrology; ecology; cultural, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; noise; and occupational health and safety. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. When possible, subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, for the 100, 200, 300 and other areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities. Information in Chapter 6 can be adapted and supplemented with specific information covering statutory and regulatory requirements for use in an environmental assessment or environmental impact statement. When preparing environmental assessments and EISs, authors should consult Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements published by the DOE Office of NEPA Oversight (DOE 2004). Additional direction and guidance on the preparation of DOE NEPA documents can be found at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/nepa/guidance.html. Individuals seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities may also use the information contained in this document to evaluate projected activities and their impacts. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared individual sections of this document, with input from other Hanford Site contractors with the best available information through May 2007. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. For this 2007 revision, the following sections of the document were reviewed by the authors and updated with the best available information through May 2005: Climate and Meteorology Air Quality Geology Seismicity section only Hydrology Flow charts for the Columbia and Yakima rivers only Ecology Threatened and Endangered Species subsection only Socioeconomics Occupational Safety All of Chapter 6.

Duncan, Joanne P.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Chamness, Mickie A.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Kennedy, Ellen P.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Scott, Michael J.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Thorne, Paul D.

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

72

Policies and Market Factors Driving Wind Power Development in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the United States, there has been substantial recent growth in wind energy generating capacity, with growth averaging 24% annually during the past five years. With this growth, an increasing number of states are experiencing investment in wind energy. Wind installations currently exist in about half of all U.S. states. This paper explores the policies and market factors that have been driving utility-scale wind energy development in the United States, particularly in the states that have achieved a substantial amount of wind energy investment in recent years. Although there are federal policies and overarching market issues that are encouraging investment nationally, much of the recent activity has resulted from state-level policies or localized market drivers. In this paper, we identify the key policies, incentives, regulations, and markets affecting development, and draw lessons from the experience of leading states that may be transferable to other states or regions. We provide detailed discussions of the drivers for wind development in a dozen leading states-California, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Washington, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

Bird, L.; Parsons, B.; Gagliano, T.; Brown, M.; Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Electricity Markets and Policy Group Energy Analysis Department Wind Project Financing Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characteristics of each: - Wind projects have higher capital costs but lower operating costs (e.g., no fuel costs project and finances all costs. No other investor or lender capital is involved. Corporate entity is ableElectricity Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department 1 Wind Project Financing

74

Electricity Markets and Policy Group Energy Analysis Department Financing Non-Residential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department 1 Financing Non-Residential Introduction · Growth in the non-residential PV sector has outpaced that of the residential PV sector in recent years: by one estimate, US non-residential PV capacity has grown from less than half of aggregate annual

75

Lurching towards markets for power: China's electricity policy 19852007 Xiaoli Zhao a,c,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

network. China's coal mines are concentrated in West re- gions, while electric power load center improvement, and electricity demand forecasting. Econ Res J 2003;5:57­65 [in Chinese]. [14] Thomson ElspethLurching towards markets for power: China's electricity policy 1985­2007 Xiaoli Zhao a,c, , Thomas

Lyon, Thomas P.

76

Lurching towards Markets for Power: China's Electricity Policy 1985-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Lurching towards Markets for Power: China's Electricity Policy 1985-2007 Xiaoli Zhaoiiii, * , Thomas P. Lyonii , Cui Song iiii Abstract China's electricity industry has experienced two major stages on the efficiency of these reforms, emphasizing changes in the areas of electricity prices and investment incentives

Lyon, Thomas P.

77

Environmental Assessment for power marketing policy for Southwestern Power Administration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) needs to renew expiring power sales contracts with new term (10 year) sales contracts. The existing contracts have been in place for several years and many will expire over the next ten years. Southwestern completed an Environmental Assessment on the existing power allocation in June, 1979 (a copy of the EA is attached), and there are no proposed additions of any major new generation resources, service to discrete major new loads, or major changes in operating parameters, beyond those included in the existing power allocation. Impacts from a no action plan, proposed alternative, and market power for less than 10 years are described.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

National Environmental Policy Act source guide for the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Source Guide will assist those working with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 to become more familiar with the environmental assessments (EA) and environmental impact statements (EIS) that apply to specific activities and facilities on the Hanford Site. This document should help answer questions concerning NEPA coverage, history, processes, and the status of many of the buildings and units on and related to the Hanford Site. This document summarizes relevant EAs and EISs by briefly outlining the proposed action of each document and the decision made by the US Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessor agencies, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The summary includes the proposed action alternatives and current status of the proposed action. If a decision officially was stated by the DOE, as in a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) or a record of decision (ROD), and the decision was located, a summary is provided. Not all federal decisions, such as FONSIs and RODS, can be found in the Federal Register (FR). For example, although significant large-action FONSIs can be found in the FR, some low-interest FONSIs might have been published elsewhere (i.e., local newspapers).

Jansky, M.T.

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Green Investment Horizons: Effects of Policy on the Market for Building  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Investment Horizons: Effects of Policy on the Market for Building Green Investment Horizons: Effects of Policy on the Market for Building Energy Efficiency Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Green Investment Horizons: Effects of Policy on the Market for Building Energy Efficiency Technologies Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: pdf.wri.org/working_papers/green_investment_horizons.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/green-investment-horizons-effects-pol Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation Regulations: "Building Codes,Emissions Standards,Energy Standards" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

80

State of the States 2010: The Role of Policy in Clean Energy Market Transformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State of the States 2010: State of the States 2010: The Role of Policy in Clean Energy Market Transformation Elizabeth Doris and Rachel Gelman Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-49193 January 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 State of the States 2010: The Role of Policy in Clean Energy Market Transformation Elizabeth Doris and Rachel Gelman Prepared under Task No. IGST.0005 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-49193 January 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

State of the States 2010: The Role of Policy in Clean Energy Market Transformation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State of the States 2010: State of the States 2010: The Role of Policy in Clean Energy Market Transformation Elizabeth Doris and Rachel Gelman Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-49193 January 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 State of the States 2010: The Role of Policy in Clean Energy Market Transformation Elizabeth Doris and Rachel Gelman Prepared under Task No. IGST.0005 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-49193 January 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

82

Projected Impact of Federal Policies on U.S. Wind Market Potential: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the potential for solar-powered agricultural irrigation pumps in the San Joaquin Valley and how these applications could improve the region's air This paper presents results from the Wind Deployment Systems Model (WinDS) for several potential energy policy cases. WinDS is a multiregional, multitime-period, Geographic Information System (GIS), and linear programming model of capacity expansion in the electric sector of the United States. WinDS is designed to address the principal market issues related to the penetration of wind energy technologies into the electric sector. These principal market issues include access to and cost of transmission, and the intermittency of wind power. WinDS has been used to model the impact of various policy initiatives, including a wind production tax credit (PTC) and a renewable portfolio standard (RPS).

Short, W.; Blair, N.; Heimiller, D.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Climate change policy and its effect on market power in the gas market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emitted per MWh of electricity produced in a combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) of 50% efficiency. (The spark spread is the base-load price of electricity for the month ahead less the cost of the gas needed at 50% efficiency to CMI\\Emissions\\CC policy... about 35 /MWh to over 70 /MWh, prompting a spate of complaints to the European Commission, who in response announced a sector inquiry into gas and electricity in June 2005 (European Commission, 2005). A considerable part of the price rise could...

Newbery, David

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

Perspectives on the satellite services industry : analysis of challenges and opportunities in the market, policy and regulatory environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on Space Communications and combines engineering, economics, market, and policy analyses to identify challenges and opportunities in the industry that are beyond the scope of any one isolated discipline. ...

Torres-Padilla, Juan Pablo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement orenvironmental assessment). Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and thepublic, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents. Benefits of Site-wide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review More Documents & Publications Mini-Guidance Articles from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports, Dec. 1994 to Sept. 2005 "Frequently Asked Questions" on the Department of Energy's NEPA Regulations

86

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement orenvironmental assessment). Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and thepublic, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents. Benefits of Site-wide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review More Documents & Publications Mini-Guidance Articles from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports, Dec. 1994 to Sept. 2005 "Frequently Asked Questions" on the Department of Energy's NEPA Regulations

87

Market and policy barriers to energy storage deployment : a study for the energy storage systems program.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric energy storage technologies have recently been in the spotlight, discussed as essential grid assets that can provide services to increase the reliability and resiliency of the grid, including furthering the integration of variable renewable energy resources. Though they can provide numerous grid services, there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, crosscutting barriers and technology barriers. This report, through interviews with stakeholders and review of regulatory filings in four regions roughly representative of the United States, identifies the key barriers restricting further energy storage development in the country. The report also includes a discussion of possible solutions to address these barriers and a review of initiatives around the country at the federal, regional and state levels that are addressing some of these issues. Energy storage could have a key role to play in the future grid, but market and regulatory issues have to be addressed to allow storage resources open market access and compensation for the services they are capable of providing. Progress has been made in this effort, but much remains to be done and will require continued engagement from regulators, policy makers, market operators, utilities, developers and manufacturers.

Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Currier, Aileen B.; Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Ma, Ookie [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.; Kirby, Brendan [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 10  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site environment and is numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in Hanford Site NEPA related documents. The document is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many NEPA documents that are being prepared by contractors. The two chapters in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered this way to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Site-related NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes the Hanford Site environment, and includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes applicable federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site.

Neitzel, D.A. [ed.] [ed.; Fosmire, C.J.; Fowler, R.A. [and others] [and others

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Market and policy barriers to energy storage deployment : a study for the energy storage systems program.  

SciTech Connect

Electric energy storage technologies have recently been in the spotlight, discussed as essential grid assets that can provide services to increase the reliability and resiliency of the grid, including furthering the integration of variable renewable energy resources. Though they can provide numerous grid services, there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, crosscutting barriers and technology barriers. This report, through interviews with stakeholders and review of regulatory filings in four regions roughly representative of the United States, identifies the key barriers restricting further energy storage development in the country. The report also includes a discussion of possible solutions to address these barriers and a review of initiatives around the country at the federal, regional and state levels that are addressing some of these issues. Energy storage could have a key role to play in the future grid, but market and regulatory issues have to be addressed to allow storage resources open market access and compensation for the services they are capable of providing. Progress has been made in this effort, but much remains to be done and will require continued engagement from regulators, policy makers, market operators, utilities, developers and manufacturers.

Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Currier, Aileen B.; Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Ma, Ookie [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.; Kirby, Brendan [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

On-site Housing Procedures, Policies & Responsibilities | Staff Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procedures, Policies & Responsibilities Procedures, Policies & Responsibilities Procedures Brookhaven National Laboratory housing is for the temporary accommodation of personnel appointed to participate in Laboratory programs and not for the long-term or recurrent short-term use by regular employees. Assignments of housing are limited to the periods indicated below and are subject to the availability of appropriate accommodations. The following specify the conditions of assignment of Laboratory housing. Requests for extensions beyond the periods stated below must be made in writing by the Department Chair or Division Manager to the Staff Services Housing Supervisor. Extension requests beyond two years must first be approved by the Deputy Director for Science and Technology. General Information

91

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many NEPA documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No conclusions or recommendations are provided. This year's report is the eleventh revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the 12th revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA; SEPA and CERCLA documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Site-related NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomic; occupational safety, and noise. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, of the 100,200,300, and other Areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) is essentially a definitive NEPA Chapter 6.0, which describes applicable federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. People preparing environmental assessments and EISs should also be cognizant of the document entitled ''Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements'' published by the DOE Office of NEPA Oversight. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared individual sections of this document, with input from other Site contractors. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. The following sections of the document were reviewed by the authors and updated with the best available information through June 1999: Climate and Meteorology; Ecology; Cultural, Archaeological, and Historical Resources; Socioeconomics; and All of Chapter 6.

Rohay, A.C.; Fosmire, C.J.; Neitzel, D.A.; Hoitink, D.J.; Harvey, D.W.; Antonio, E.J.; Wright, M.K.; Thorne, P.D.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Fowler, R.A.; Goodwin, S.M.; Poston, T.M.

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Premier Information Source for Professionals Who Track Environmental and Energy Policy. 1996-2011 E&E Publishing, LLC Privacy Policy Site Map  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Premier Information Source for Professionals Who Track Environmental and Energy Policy. © 1996 testified before Congress in recent years on the economics of climate change and energy policy. He has also-2011 E&E Publishing, LLC Privacy Policy Site Map 11. TREASURY: Tufts economics professor picked to lead

Tufts University

93

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. Chapter 3 summarizes present knowledge of the regional and site hydrologic systems. The purpose of the information presented is to (1) describe the hydrology based on available literature and preliminary site-exploration activities that have been or are being performed and (2) provide information to be used to develop the hydrologic aspects of the planned site characterization program. Chapter 4 contains geochemical information about the Yucca Mountain site. The chapter references plan for continued collection of geochemical data as a part of the site characterization program. Chapter 4 describes and evaluates data on the existing climate and site meterology, and outlines the suggested procedures to be used in developing and validating methods to predict future climatic variation. 534 refs., 100 figs., 72 tabs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Tool to Market Customer-Sited Small Wind Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to make the Wind Powering America effort a success, homeowners and landowners interested in purchasing grid-connected small wind energy systems must be provided with assistance and education. The Clean Power Estimator (CPE) program is a valuable tool for these individuals. In support of this educational effort, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is integrating the CPE program with site-specific wind resource data. This paper describes how the CPE program works, how end users can determine the cost-effectiveness of wind for a specific location, and how companies can use the program to identify high-value wind locations.

Jimenez, T.; George, R.; Forsyth, T.; Hoff, T.E.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Tool to Market Customer-Sited Small Wind Systems: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In order to make the Wind Powering America effort a success, homeowners and landowners interested in purchasing grid-connected small wind energy systems must be provided with assistance and education. The Clean Power Estimator (CPE) program is a valuable tool for these individuals. In support of this educational effort, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is integrating the CPE program with site-specific wind resource data. This paper describes how the CPE program works, how end users can determine the cost-effectiveness of wind for a specific location, and how companies can use the program to identify high-value wind locations.

Jimenez, T.; George, R.; Forsyth, T.; Hoff, T.E.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

OCTOBER 16, 2000The Policy Implications of Portfolio Choice in Underserved Mortgage Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Home ownership increases the incentive to maintain property and neighborhood, as well as decreasing the outflow of rents from low-income zones. However these benefits are not costless to homeowners. With a mortgage comes the possibility of default, the financial demands of maintenance, a reduction in alternate investment opportunities, an increased exposure to fluctuations in local economic conditions, and a drastic reduction in the liquidity of personal wealth. Recently, policy makers have sought to increase mortgage lending in traditionally underserved markets. In this paper we consider the effects of this policy in light of the risk and return of housing and the current tax treatment of the home mortgage deduction. We find housing to be a relatively poor asset class in which to invest the bulk of family wealth. Trends in housing suggest that a large percentage of homeowners who bought and sold within a five year horizon in the United State over the last twenty years lost money on the investment. Lowering the equity required to purchase a home does little to alleviate the problem. We show that the current tax code if anything encourages renting over buying and gentrification of low income housing markets. If the government wishes to encourage home ownership among low income families despite the risks then we argue that government agencies should share information about the risk and return of home ownership with its citizens. In addition, a direct subsidy through a tax credit may be both warranted and necessary to achieve the desired result. JEL Classification: R21Expanding homeownership will strengthen our nations families and communities, strengthen our economy, and expand this countrys great middle class. Rekindling the dream of homeownership for Americas working families can prepare our nation to embrace the rich possibilities of the twenty-first century.

William N. Goetzmann; Matthew Spiegel; William N. Goetzmann; Matthew Spiegel

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Using RPS Policies to Grow the Solar Market in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The market for photovoltaics in the United States remains small relative to the nation's solar resource potential. Nonetheless, annual grid-connected PV installations have grown from just 4 MW in 2000 to over 100 MW in 2006, fast enough to the catch the attention of the global solar industry. The state of California deserves much of the credit for this growth. The State's historical rebate programs resulted in roughly 75% of the nation's grid-connected PV additions from 2000 through 2006 being located in California, and the $3 billion California Solar Initiative will ensure that the State remains a mainstay of the US solar industry for years to come. But California is not the only market for solar in the US; other states have recently developed policies that may rival those of the western state in terms of future growth potential. In particular, 25 states, as well as Washington, D.C., have established renewables portfolio standards (RPS), sometimes called quota systems in Europe, requiring electricity suppliers in those states to source a minimum portion of their need from renewable electricity. (Because a national RPS is not yet in place, my focus here is on state policies). Under many of these state policies, solar is not expected to fare particularly well: PV installations simply cannot compete on cost or scale with large wind plants in the US, at least not yet. In response, an expanding list of states have established solar or distributed generation (DG) set-asides within their RPS policies, effectively requiring that some fraction of RPS-driven supply derive from solar energy. The popularity of set-asides for solar and/or DG has increased dramatically in recent years. Already, 11 states and D.C. have developed such RPS set-asides. These include states with outstanding solar resources, such as Nevada, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico, as well as areas where the solar resource is less robust, including North Carolina, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, New Hampshire, Delaware, and DC. Among those states with set-asides, two are restricted to PV applications, nine also allow solar-thermal electric to qualify, three allow solar heating and/or cooling to qualify, and three have broader renewable DG set-asides. The policies also differ in their targets and timeframes, whether projects must be located in-state, the application of cost caps, and the degree of oversight on how suppliers contract with solar projects. Only three of these states have more than two years of experience with solar or DG set-asides so far: Arizona, Nevada, and New Jersey. And yet, despite the embryonic stage of these policies, they have already begun to have a significant impact on the grid-connected PV market. From 2000-2006, 16% (or 48 MW) of grid-connected PV installations in the US occurred in states with such set-asides, a percentage that increases to 67% if one only considers PV additions outside of California. The importance of these programs is growing and will continue to expand. In fact, if one assumes (admittedly somewhat optimistically) that these policies will be fully achieved, then existing state solar or DG set-asides could result in 400 MW of solar capacity by 2010, 2,000 MW by 2015, and 6,500 MW by 2025. This equates to annual additions of roughly 100 MW through 2010, increasing to over 500 MW per year by 2015 and 700 MW per year by 2020. PV is not assured of all of this capacity, and will receive strong competition from solar-thermal electric facilities in the desert southwest. Nonetheless, set-asides in those states outside of the southwest will favor PV, and even some of the southwestern states have designed their RPS programs to ensure that PV fares well, relative to other forms of solar energy. Since 2000, Arizona and, more recently, New Jersey have represented the largest solar set-aside-driven PV markets. Even more-recent additions are coming from Colorado, Nevada, New York, and Pennsylvania. In the long-term, the largest markets for solar electricity are predicted to include New Jersey, Maryland,

Wiser, Ryan H; Wiser, Ryan H.

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

98

Using RPS Policies to Grow the Solar Market in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The market for photovoltaics in the United States remains small relative to the nation's solar resource potential. Nonetheless, annual grid-connected PV installations have grown from just 4 MW in 2000 to over 100 MW in 2006, fast enough to the catch the attention of the global solar industry. The state of California deserves much of the credit for this growth. The State's historical rebate programs resulted in roughly 75% of the nation's grid-connected PV additions from 2000 through 2006 being located in California, and the $3 billion California Solar Initiative will ensure that the State remains a mainstay of the US solar industry for years to come. But California is not the only market for solar in the US; other states have recently developed policies that may rival those of the western state in terms of future growth potential. In particular, 25 states, as well as Washington, D.C., have established renewables portfolio standards (RPS), sometimes called quota systems in Europe, requiring electricity suppliers in those states to source a minimum portion of their need from renewable electricity. (Because a national RPS is not yet in place, my focus here is on state policies). Under many of these state policies, solar is not expected to fare particularly well: PV installations simply cannot compete on cost or scale with large wind plants in the US, at least not yet. In response, an expanding list of states have established solar or distributed generation (DG) set-asides within their RPS policies, effectively requiring that some fraction of RPS-driven supply derive from solar energy. The popularity of set-asides for solar and/or DG has increased dramatically in recent years. Already, 11 states and D.C. have developed such RPS set-asides. These include states with outstanding solar resources, such as Nevada, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico, as well as areas where the solar resource is less robust, including North Carolina, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, New Hampshire, Delaware, and DC. Among those states with set-asides, two are restricted to PV applications, nine also allow solar-thermal electric to qualify, three allow solar heating and/or cooling to qualify, and three have broader renewable DG set-asides. The policies also differ in their targets and timeframes, whether projects must be located in-state, the application of cost caps, and the degree of oversight on how suppliers contract with solar projects. Only three of these states have more than two years of experience with solar or DG set-asides so far: Arizona, Nevada, and New Jersey. And yet, despite the embryonic stage of these policies, they have already begun to have a significant impact on the grid-connected PV market. From 2000-2006, 16% (or 48 MW) of grid-connected PV installations in the US occurred in states with such set-asides, a percentage that increases to 67% if one only considers PV additions outside of California. The importance of these programs is growing and will continue to expand. In fact, if one assumes (admittedly somewhat optimistically) that these policies will be fully achieved, then existing state solar or DG set-asides could result in 400 MW of solar capacity by 2010, 2,000 MW by 2015, and 6,500 MW by 2025. This equates to annual additions of roughly 100 MW through 2010, increasing to over 500 MW per year by 2015 and 700 MW per year by 2020. PV is not assured of all of this capacity, and will receive strong competition from solar-thermal electric facilities in the desert southwest. Nonetheless, set-asides in those states outside of the southwest will favor PV, and even some of the southwestern states have designed their RPS programs to ensure that PV fares well, relative to other forms of solar energy. Since 2000, Arizona and, more recently, New Jersey have represented the largest solar set-aside-driven PV markets. Even more-recent additions are coming from Colorado, Nevada, New York, and Pennsylvania. In the long-term, the largest markets for solar electricity are predicted to include New Jersey, Maryland, Arizona, and P

Wiser, Ryan H; Wiser, Ryan H.

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

99

Market Dynamics and Local Policy Choices for Converged Systems: Case Study of Integrated Telecommunication Design and Deployment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers have cogently presented the technical case for converged telecommunications systems. However, it is not clear how market-based telecommunications providers and local communities are embracing this technical argument as they design and adopt ... Keywords: design, interoperability, policy, regulation, telecommunications convergence

Thomas A. Horan; Benjamin L. Schooley

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in acordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and eveloping a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing prinicples, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed. 880 refs., 130 figs., 25 tabs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended by the Secretary of Energy and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the requirements of the Nulcear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of the site characterization plan are oulined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Neavada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining hte geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare and environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Alternative energy facility siting policies for urban coastal areas: executive summary of findings and policy recommendations  

SciTech Connect

An analysis was made of siting issues in the coastal zone, one of the nation's most critical natural resource areas and one which is often the target for energy development proposals. The analysis addressed the changing perceptions of citizens toward energy development in the coastal zone, emphasizing urban communities where access to the waterfront and revitalization of waterfront property are of interest to the citizen. The findings of this analysis are based on an examination of energy development along New Jersey's urban waterfront and along the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast, and on redevelopment efforts in Seattle, San Francisco, Boston, and elsewhere. The case studies demonstrate the significance of local attitudes and regional cooperation in the siting process. In highly urbanized areas, air quality has become a predominant concern among citizen groups and an influential factor in development of alternative energy facility siting strategies, such as consideration of inland siting connected by pipeline to a smaller coastal facility. The study addresses the economic impact of the permitting process on the desirability of energy facility investments, and the possible effects of the location selected for the facility on the permitting process and investment economics. The economic analysis demonstrates the importance of viewing energy facility investments in a broad perspective that includes the positive or negative impacts of various alternative siting patterns on the permitting process. Conclusions drawn from the studies regarding Federal, state, local, and corporate politics; regulatory, permitting, licensing, environmental assessment, and site selection are summarized. (MCW)

Morell, D; Singer, G

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Market barriers to energy efficiency: A critical reappraisal of the rationale for public policies to promote energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews current perspectives on market barriers to energy efficiency. Ratepayer-funded utility energy-efficiency programs are likely to change in scope, size, and nature as the deregulation process proceeds; the authors research focuses on understanding to what extent some form of future intervention may be warranted and how they might judge the success of particular interventions, especially those funded by ratepayers. They find that challenges to the existence of market barriers have, for the most part, failed to provide a testable alternative explanation for evidence suggesting that there is a substantial ``efficiency gap`` between a consumer`s actual investments in energy efficiency and those that appear to be in the consumer`s own interest. They then suggest that differences of opinion about the appropriateness of public policies stem not from disputes about whether market barriers exist, but from different perceptions of the magnitude of the barriers, and the efficacy and (possibly unintended) consequences of policies designed to overcome them. They conclude that there are compelling justifications for future energy-efficiency policies. Nevertheless, in order to succeed, they must be based on a sound understanding of the market problems they seek to correct and a realistic assessment of their likely efficacy. This understanding can only emerge from detailed investigations of the current operation of individual markets.

Golove, W.H.; Eto, J.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

CMI\\Emissions\\CC policy and gas 10/12/05 1Climate change policy and its effect on market power in the gas market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The European Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) limits CO2 emissions from covered sectors, especially electricity until December 2007, after which a new set of Allowances will be issued. The paper demonstrates that the impact of controlling the quantity rather than the price of carbon is to reduce the elasticity of demand for gas, amplifying the market power of gas suppliers, and also amplifying the impact of gas price increases on the price of electricity. A rough estimate using just British data suggests that this could increase gas market power by 50%. Key words Climate change, emissions trading, market power, gas, quotas vs taxes JEL classification

David Newbery; David Newbery

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The market for small wind systems in the United States, often defined as systems less than or equal to 100 kW that produce power on the customer side of the meter, is small but growing steadily. The installed capacity of domestic small wind systems in 2002 was reportedly 15-18 MW, though the market is estimated to be growing by as much as 40 percent annually (AWEA, 2002). This growth is driven in part by recent technology advancements and cost improvements and, perhaps more importantly, by favorable policy incentives targeted at small wind systems that are offered in several states. Currently, over half of all states have incentive policies for which residential small wind installations are eligible. These incentives range from low-interest loan programs and various forms of tax advantages to cash rebates that cover as much as 60 percent of the total system cost for turbines 10 kW or smaller installed in residential applications. Most of these incentives were developed to support a ran ge of emerging renewable technologies (most notably photovoltaic systems), and were therefore not specifically designed with small wind systems in mind. As such, the question remains as to which incentive types provide the greatest benefit to small wind systems, and how states might appropriately set the level and type of incentives in the future. Furthermore, given differences in incentive types and levels across states, as well as variations in retail electricity rates and other relevant factors, it is not immediately obvious which states offer the most promising markets for small wind turbine manufacturers and installers, as well as potential residential system owners. This paper presents results from a Berkeley Lab analysis of the impact of existing and proposed state and federal incentives on the economics of grid-connected, residential small wind systems. Berkeley Lab has designed the Small Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT) to compare system economics under current incentive structures a cross all 50 states. SWAT reports three metrics to characterize residential wind economics in each state and wind resource class: (1) Break-Even Turnkey Cost (BTC): The BTC is defined as the aggregate installed system cost that would balance total customer payments and revenue over the life of the system, allowing the customer to ''break-even'' while earning a specified rate of return on the small wind ''investment.'' (2) Simple Payback (SP): The SP is the number of years it takes a customer to recoup a cash payment for a wind system and all associated costs, assuming zero discount on future revenue and payments (i.e., ignoring the time value of money). (3) Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE): The LCOE is the levelized cost of generating a kWh of electricity over the lifetime of the system, and is calculated assuming a cash purchase for the small wind system and a 5.5 percent real discount rate. This paper presents SWAT results for a 10 kW wind turbine and turbine power production is based on a Bergey Excel system. These results are not directly applicable to turbines with different power curves and rated outputs, especially given the fact that many state incentives are set as a fixed dollar amount, and the dollar per Watt amount will vary based on the total rated turbine capacity.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Three essays on monetary policy, the financial market, and economic growth in the U.S. and China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does monetary policy affect the real economy? If so, what is the transmission mechanism or channel through which these effects occur? These two questions are among the most important and controversial in macroeconomics. This dissertation presents some new empirical evidence that addresses each question for the U.S. and Chinese economies. Literature on monetary transmission suggests that the monetary policy can take effect on the real economy through several ways. The most noteworthy one is credit channels, including the bank lending channel and the interest channel. First, I use a new method to test for structural breaks in the U.S. monetary policy history and present some new empirical evidence to support an operative bank lending channel in the transmission mechanism of monetary policy. Results show that an operative bank lending channel existed in 1955 to 1968, and its impact on the economy has become much smaller since 1981, but it still has a significant buffering effect on output by attenuating the effect of the interest channel. Second, I adopt the recently developed time series technique to explore the puzzling negative correlation between output and stock returns in China currently, and posit that it is due to a negative link between monetary policy and stock returns when monetary policy increases output. The monetary policy has not been transmitted well in the public sector which is the principal part of Chinese stock market, and increased investment capital from monetary expansion goes to real estate sector instead of the stock market. Last, I demonstrate how monetary policy has been transmitted into the public and private sectors of China through the credit channel. The fundamental identification problem inherent in using aggregated data that leads to failure in isolating demand shock from supply shock is explicitly solved by introducing control factors. I find that the monetary policy has great impact on private sector rather than public sector through credit channel in China. These findings have important practical implications for U.S. and Chinas economic development by improving the efficiency of the monetary policy because a comprehensive understanding of monetary transmission will lead to better policy design.

Yang, Juan

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Market  

... and its contributions to society and the economy; The marketing group values suggestions from researchers regarding companies to approach.

110

Do active labour market policies reduce the harmful effects of job insecurity? Evidence for flexicurity from the EWCS and ESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the following four components: employer flexibility in hiring and firing employability through training and active labour market policies supportive social security system high-trust social dialogue Benefits of Flexicurity Economic benefits Eg... of uncertainty Loss of work colleagues? Loss of seniority? Psychological reasons for aversion to job insecurity. To have a reasonably stable situation at home, thats the most important thing. A stable home life and a stable situation...

Burchell, Brendan J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Transportation Market Distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport Prices and Markets, Victoria Transport PolicySurvey: Survey Suggests Market-Based Vision of Smart Growth,G. 1996. Roads in a Market Economy, Avebury (Aldershot).

Litman, Todd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Using RPS Policies to Grow the Solar Market in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colorado, Nevada, New York, and Pennsylvania. In the long-term, the largest markets for solar electricity

Wiser, Ryan H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Benefits of Site-wide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3258 3258 (08.93) United States Government Department of Energy - memorandum DATE: REPLY TO ATTN OF: SUBJECT: TO: December 15, 1994 Office of NEPA 0versight:Strickler:202-568-2410 Benefits of Site-wide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review Distribution The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement or environmental assessment). I believe that this information will help program and field offices prepare their annual NEPA planning summaries and their overall NEPA compliance strategies. Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and the public, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents. Background on DOE's at)proachto site-wide

114

State of the States 2010: The Role of Policy in Clean Energy Market Transformation  

SciTech Connect

This report builds on the emerging body of literature seeking to identify quantitative connections between clean energy policy and renewable energy. The methods presented test the relationships between a broad set of policies and clean energy resources (energy efficiency, biomass, geothermal, solar, and wind). Energy efficiency findings are an initial foray into this type of analysis and indicate significant connections between reduced energy use and buildings codes, energy efficiency resource standards (in some cases), and electricity price. Renewable energy findings specify that there is most often a relationship between state policies and solar and wind development, indicating that while policies might apply to a wide variety of renewable resources, further tailoring of policy specifics to resource needs may lead to increased development of a wider variety of renewable energy resources. Further research is needed to refine the connections between clean energy development and policy, especially in the area of the impact of the length of time that a policy has been in place.

Doris, E.; Gelman, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act  

SciTech Connect

Chapter six describes the basis for facility design, the completed facility conceptual design, the completed analytical work relating to the resolution of design issues, and future design-related work. The basis for design and the conceptual design information presented in this chapter meet the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, for a conceptual repository design that takes into account site-specific requirements. This information is presented to permit a critical evaluation of planned site characterization activities. Chapter seven describes waste package components, emplacement environment, design, and status of research and development that support the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project. The site characterization plan (SCP) discussion of waste package components is contained entirely within this chapter. The discussion of emplacement environment in this chapter is limited to considerations of the environment that influence, or which may influence, if perturbed, the waste packages and their performance (particularly hydrogeology, geochemistry, and borehole stability). The basis for conceptual waste package design as well as a description of the design is included in this chapter. The complete design will be reported in the advanced conceptual design (ACD) report and is not duplicated in the SCP. 367 refs., 173 figs., 68 tabs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Strategic Sequencing for State Distributed PV Policies: A Quantitative Analysis of Policy Impacts and Interactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

State and local policymakers show increasing interest in spurring the development of customer-sited distributed generation (DG), in particular solar photovoltaic (PV) markets. Prompted by that interest, this analysis examines the use of state policy as a tool to support the development of a robust private investment market. This analysis builds on previous studies that focus on government subsidies to reduce installation costs of individual projects and provides an evaluation of the impacts of policies on stimulating private market development.

Doris, E.; Krasko, V.A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind system. The incentive amount proposed as part of the 2004 Energy Policywind system. The incentive amount proposed as part of the 2004 Energy Policy

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Workplace Violence Policy Survey of Department of Energy Contractor Sites (ORISE 2002-0580, 2002)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WORKPLACE VIOLENCE POLICY SURVEY WORKPLACE VIOLENCE POLICY SURVEY OF DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACTOR SITES Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health Programs Washington, DC Prepared by Center for Human Reliability Studies Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge, TN May 2002 ORISE 2002-0580 INTRODUCTION No workplace is immune to the threat of workplace violence. It can and does happen anywhere and at any time. Companies must make a concerted effort to evaluate their potential for workplace violence and implement measures to address this issue for the protection of their employees. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (29 USC 654 et. seq., U.S. Department of Labor, amended September 29, 1998) requires companies to provide employees with a safe and healthful place to work. The "general duty" clause of this Act

119

EPRG WORKING PAPER A Nuclear Future? UK Government Policy and the Role of the Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meeting carbon targets requires decarbonising electricity. The least cost strategy involves nuclear power. In a liberalised electricity market, the price of electricity is set by fossil generation whose input costs are volatile but correlated with electricity prices. Nuclear power lacks that hedged and its finance is threatened by low and uncertain EUA prices. The increasing share of intermittent renewables exacerbates price risk. I propose changes to market design and the transmission access regime, while in the absence of an EU-wide reform to the ETS, a carbon tax seems the cheapest and fiscally most responsible way to deliver decarbonised electricity. Keywords JEL Classification Nuclear power, intermittent renewables, wholesale electricity markets, market design, transmission access, balancing, carbon tax

David M. Newbery; David M. Newbery

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Using RPS Policies to Grow the Solar Market in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the largest solar set-aside- driven PV markets. Even more-to PV applications, nine also allow solar- thermal electricsolar is not expected to fare particularly well: PV

Wiser, Ryan H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Using customers data for defining retail market size: a GIS approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geographical Information Systems (GIS) systems provide a wide array of tools for site, demographic and competitive analyses which enable retailers and marketers to answer several questions that are related to retail location. The aim of this ... Keywords: GIS, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, customer data, demographics, geocoding, geographical information systems, market analysis, marketing policy, retail centres, retail customers, retail market size, retail planning, shopping centres

Abdulkader A. Murad

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Guidelines for Hanford Site implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental review process is mandatory for federal agencies. Understanding and complying with NEPA is extremely important to successfully planning and implementing programs at the Hanford Site. This report is intended to help planners and decision makers understand NEPA by describing the NEPA process as it is outlined in NEPA, in regulations, and in guidance information. The requirements and guidance documents that set forth the NEPA process are discussed. Some of the major NEPA concepts and issues are also addressed. This report is intended to be used as a general road map through the maze of NEPA requirements and guidance to ensure that Hanford Site activities are conducted in compliance with NEPA. Enhanced knowledge of the NEPA process is expected to increase the ability of the Hanford Site to work with regulators, interested parties and the public to ensure that the potential environmental impacts of DOE activities are fully considered at the Hanford Site. In addition, an enhanced understanding of NEPA will help project and program managers to integrate NEPA compliance requirements with program planning. 43 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

King, S.E.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

International energy policy: the conflict of investment needs and market signals  

SciTech Connect

The Arabian Gulf is a neglected opportunity and Western Europe a neglected risk on resource and production cost grounds, but the greatest danger to energy security lies in the US imposing its highly market-oriented energy logic on the rest of the world. Speaking for the International Association of Energy Economists, the author points out that energy prospects look different to Europeans than to Americans. Europe needs to develop a balancing factor to Soviet gas, but is ahead of the US in its concern for energy security and the impact of energy development on the environment and society. The US message that free markets provide the best solutions tends to be ignored because the US message persists in its claim that the price of oil drives the entire energy machine. Natural gas offers the most hope as an alternative, but it is necessary to develop committed markets.

Tempest, P.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Applying "Merger Guidelines" market definition to (de)regulatory policy: Pros and cons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since initially presented in the 1982 Department of Justice Horizontal Merger Guidelines, market definition has been adopted nearly worldwide as a framework to see if a merger would substantially lessen competition. This framework is useful for addressing ... Keywords: Deregulation, Forbearance, Merger guidelines, Privatization, Telecommunications

Timothy J. Brennan

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization Report, Revision 17  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many environmental documents being prepared by DOE contractors concerning the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). No statements about significance or environmental consequences are provided. This years report is the seventeenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the eighteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology; air quality; geology; hydrology; ecology; cultural, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; noise; and occupational health and safety. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, of the 100, 200, 300, and other areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities. Information in Chapter 6 of this document can be adapted and supplemented with specific information for a chapter covering statutory and regulatory requirements in an environmental assessment or environmental impact statement. When preparing environmental assessments and EISs, authors should also be cognizant of the document titled Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements published by the DOE Office of NEPA Oversight (DOE 2004). Additional guidance on preparing DOE NEPA documents can be found at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/nepa/guidance.html. Any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities may also use the information contained in this document to evaluate projected activities and their impacts. For this 2005 revision, the following sections of the document were reviewed by the authors and updated with the best available information through May 2005: Climate and Meteorology Air Quality Geology Seismicity section only Hydrology Flow charts for the Columbia and Yakima rivers only Ecology Threatened and Endangered Species subsection only Socioeconomics Occupational Safety All of Chapter 6.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Evaluating Government's Policies on Promoting Smart Metering in Retail Electricity Markets via Agent Based Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, upon the request of the relevant electricity suppliers. DNOs own and manage the meter assets. They also charge electricity suppliers for metering services. The prices they charge electricity suppliers are regulated by Ofgem. In March 2001, Ofgem... options. More recently (May 2007), the government (the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (BERR)) has announced its policies on promoting smart metering technology in of its 2007 white paper on energy Meeting the Energy Challenge...

Zhang, Tao; Nuttall, William J

127

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Source Guide for the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Source Guide will assist those working with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 to become more familiar with the environmental assessments (EA) and environmental impact statements (EIS) that apply to specific activities and facilities on the Hanford Site. This document should help answer questions concerning NEPA coverage, history, processes, and the status of many of the buildings and units on and related to the Hanford Site. This document summarizes relevant EAs and EISs by briefly outlining the proposed action of each document and the decision made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessor agencies, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The summary includes the proposed action alternatives and current status of the proposed action. If a decision officially was stated by the DOE, as in a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) or a record of decision (ROD), and the decision was located, a summary is provided. Not all federal decisions, such as FONSIs and RODs, can be found in the Federal Register (FR). For example, although significant large-action FONSIs can be found in the FR, some low-interest FONSIs might have been published elsewhere (i.e., local newspapers).

JANSKY, M.T.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

How do you perceive environmental change? Fuzzy Cognitive Mapping informing stakeholder analysis for environmental policy making and non-market valuation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In spite of considerable progress in our understanding of ecosystem functioning, our ability to design effective and enforceable environmental policies requires a deep understanding of human perceptions and beliefs. In this respect, what is called today ... Keywords: Decision-making, Environmental management, Fuzzy Cognitive Mapping, Non-market valuation, Scenarios

Areti D. Kontogianni; Elpiniki I. Papageorgiou; Christos Tourkolias

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a Repository Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a Repository Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982

130

Discussion Paper no. 1115-96 Employer Demand, AFDC Recipients, and Labor Market Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I would like to thank Sheldon Danziger for helpful comments on an earlier draft. IRP publications (discussion papers, special reports, and the newsletter Focus) are now available electronically. The IRP Web Site can be accessed at the following address:

Harry J. Holzer

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Electricity end-use efficiency: Experience with technologies, markets, and policies throughout the world  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In its August meeting in Geneva, the Energy and Industry Subcommittee (EIS) of the Policy Response Panel of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified a series of reports to be produced. One of these reports was to be a synthesis of available information on global electricity end-use efficiency, with emphasis on developing nations. The report will be reviewed by the IPCC and approved prior to the UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), Brazil, June 1992. A draft outline for the report was submitted for review at the November 1991 meeting of the EIS. This outline, which was accepted by the EIS, identified three main topics to be addressed in the report: status of available technologies for increasing electricity end-use efficiency; review of factors currently limiting application of end-use efficiency technologies; and review of policies available to increase electricity end-use efficiency. The United States delegation to the EIS agreed to make arrangements for the writing of the report.

Levine, M.D.; Koomey, J.; Price, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Geller, H.; Nadel, S. [American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Mobile Permission Marketing: Framing the Market Inquiry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emergence of a mobile data infrastructure interconnected with the Internet and television marks the advent of a new marketing channel based on mobile messaging and complementary to traditional marketing channels and the Internet. Mobile marketing ... Keywords: Case Studies, Disruptive Technologies, Emerging Technologies, Firm Competencies, Mobile Internet, New Market Entrants, Permission-Based Marketing, Public Policy

Petros Kavassalis; Ntina Spyropoulou; Dimitris Drossos; Evangelos Mitrokostas; Gregory Gikas; Antonis Hatzistamatiou

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

POLICY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2013 3, 2013 POLICY * Successful execution of this research and development (R&D) program will materially contribute to U.S. supply of oil and gas both today and beyond the 10 year R&D horizon. It is the consensus of this Committee that the resource potential impacted by this technology program is significant and of major importance to the Nation. There is a critical need for a sustainable and consistent approach to the technology challenges facing unconventional resource development. * The Committee believes the Plan and the procedures followed in its development to be professional and inclusive, with a significant infusion of industry knowledge. * These Independents are faced with unique and ever more difficult technical challenges in developing new unconventional resources, yet they often lack the

134

Utility rates and service policies as potential barriers to the market penetration of decentralized solar technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At present, economic and institutional concerns dictate that decentralized solar technologies generally require an auxiliary energy source to assure continuous service through periods of adverse weather. Utility rates and service policies regarding auxiliary energy service have a significant impact upon solar system economics, and thus the commercialization of solar energy. The scope of this paper evaluates three basic issues: (1) whether a utility can refuse to provide auxiliary service to solar users, (2) whether a utility can charge higher or lower than traditional rates for auxiliary service, and (3) whether a utility can refuse to purchase excess power generated by small power producers utilizing electricity-producing solar technologies. It appears that a utility cannot refuse to provide auxiliary service to a solar user unless the company can demonstrate that to provide such service, substantial harm would result to its existing customers. Statutes or case decisions also provide that utilities cannot unreasonably discriminate in rates charged to customers for the same service under like conditions. The ability of a utility to provide solar users lower than traditional rates may depend upon the jurisdiction's view of promotional rates. 681 references.

Feuerstein, R. J.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Sign inBecome a MarketWatch member todayFront Page News Viewer Commentary Markets Investing Personal Finance Community Quad/Graphics Inc (QUAD)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.08% Car Review Enter Symbols or Keywords SEARCH 2011 Porsche Spyder Some Boxster fans may say Porsche went from MarketWatch MarketWatch.com Enter Symbols or Keywords SEARCH Site Index Topics Help Feedback. All rights reserved. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy

136

A Market for all Farmers: Market Institutions and Smallholder Participation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bakken, H. (1953). Theory of Markets and Marketing. Madison,1988). The Firm, the Market and the Law. Chicago: UniversityPolicies: The Case of Cereal Markets in West Africa, in

Gabre-Madhin, Eleni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Electricity Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Markets Electricity Markets Researchers in the electricity markets area conduct technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S. electricity sector. Current research seeks to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to energy efficiency and demand response, renewable energy, electricity resource and transmission planning, electricity reliability and distributed generation resources. Research is conducted in the following areas: Energy efficiency research focused on portfolio planning and market assessment, design and implementation of a portfolio of energy efficiency programs that achieve various policy objectives, utility sector energy efficiency business models, options for administering energy efficiency

138

Draft environmental assessment: Richton Dome site, Mississippi. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112). [Contains Glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy identified the Richton dome site as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geo

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regional differences in energy markets and climates, as welldiverse climates and energy markets. These differences areanalyze the effect of other energy market policies in future

Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Energy Efficiency in Regulated and Deregulated Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into other clean energy markets. The issue of doubleet al. , Energy Efficiency Policy and Market Failures, 20impede the functioning of markets, energy efficiency will be

Rotenberg, Edan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Markets for compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table of Contents: Introduction; Characteristics and Benefits of Compost and Competing/Complementary Products; Compost Uses and Markets; Factors Pertinent to Developing Compost Markets; Compost Specifications; Compost Testing Requirements; Compost Distribution; Compost Policies; Economic and Noneconomic Barriers to Developing Compost Markets; Strategies to Mitigate/Overcome Barriers to Developing Compost Markets; and Examples of Existing Programs and Markets (as of 1989).

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Market Structure and Competition: A Cross-Market Analysis of U.S. Electricity Deregulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wolak (2002). Measuring Market Ine?ciencies in CaliforniaWholesale Electricity Market. American Economic Review,s Electricity Crisis: A Market Apart?. Energy Policy. 32(

Bushnell, James; Mansur, Erin T.; Saravia, Celeste

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Inefficiencies and Market Power in Financial Arbitrage: A Study of California's Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and C. Stalon (1999). Second Report on Market Issues in thePower Exchange Energy Markets. Prepared for the Federals Proposed Elec- tricity Market. Utilities Policy vol. 6,

Borenstein, Severin; Bushnell, James; Knittel, Christopher R.; Wolfram, Catherine

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Reforming the U.S. Mortgage Market Through Private Market Incentives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eye View of OECD Housing Markets, OECD Economics DepartmentJohansson (2011), Housing Markets and Structural PoliciesA Responsible Secondary Market System for Housing Finance,

Jaffee, Dwight M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Advanced On-Site Wastewater Treatment and Management Market Study: Volume 2: State Reports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is comprised of summaries of the status of on-site and small community wastewater systems in each state in the United States. The summaries provide an excellent general reference for further research into the status of each state's on-site wastewater systems.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

146

Transportation Sector Market Transition: Using History and Geography to Envision Possible Hydrogen Infrastructure Development and Inform Public Policy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the challenges to building an infrastructure for hydrogen, for use as transportation fuel. Deployment technologies and policies that could quicken deployment are addressed.

Brown, E.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Managing the transition toward self-sustaining alternative fuel vehicle markets : policy analysis using a dynamic behavioral spatial model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing public policy or industry strategy to bolster the transition to alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) is a formidable challenge as demonstrated by historical failed attempts. The transition to new fuels occurs within ...

Supple, Derek R. (Derek Richard)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Market Transformation Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Improvement Opportunities in TVs Implications for Market Transformation Programs journal Energy Policy volume year month pages keywords appliance energy efficiency...

149

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Solar Policy and Program Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and comparison to best practices with suggestions for policy changes to better serve the solar DG market Unbiased analysis of economic and market impacts related to policy changes...

150

NREL: Solar Research - Solar Policy and Program Technical Assistance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and comparison to best practices with suggestions for policy changes to better serve the solar DG market Unbiased analysis of economic and market impacts related to policy changes...

151

NREL: Technology Deployment - Solar Policy and Program Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and comparison to best practices with suggestions for policy changes to better serve the solar DG market Unbiased analysis of economic and market impacts related to policy changes...

152

Very preliminary draft. Please do not quote without permission of authors. Repo Market Microstructure in Unusual Monetary Policy Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The financial turmoil that began in mid?2007 produced severe stress in interbank markets and prompted significant changes in central banks funding operations. This paper examines how official interventions affected the efficiency and reliability of the secondary repo market as a mechanism for the distribution of interbank funding during this unusual period. The limit orderbook from the BrokerTec electronic repo trading platform is reconstructed to provide an accurate measure of available liquidity and funding opportunities at high frequency throughout the crisis. This provides insights about the effectiveness of liquidity provider of last resort efforts by the ECB in reponse to the crisis.

Peter G. Dunne; Michael Fleming; Andrey Zholos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

REPUTATION AND HONESTY IN A MARKET FOR INFORMATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Laboratory Markets, Information Economics and Policy, 7,A Monopolistic Market for Information, Journal of EconomicSunder, S. , 1992, Market for Information: Experimental

Charness, Gary B; Garoupa, Nuno

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Practitioner Perspectives Matter: Public Policy and Private Investment in the U.S. Electric Power Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climate change policy. Energy Policy 35 (11): 5766-5773.and futures markets. Energy Policy 34 (18):4115-4122.natural gas prices. Energy Policy Bonavia, P. (2007).

Barradale, Merrill Jones

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Green Power Network: Green Power Markets Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Markets Green Markets Search Search Help More Search Options Search Site Map News TVA Seeks 126 MW of Renewables in 2014 December 2013 More News More News Subscribe to E-Mail Update Subscribe to e-mail update Events EPA Webinar - The Power of Aggregated Purchasing: How to Green Your Electricity Supply & Save Money January 15, 2014 1:00-2:00 p.m. ET Previous Webinars More News Features Green Power Market Status Report (2011 Data) Featured Green Power Reports Green Pricing Green Power Marketing Green Certificates Carbon Offsets State Policies Overview The essence of green power marketing is to provide market-based choices for electricity consumers to purchase power from environmentally preferred sources. The term "green power" is used to define power generated from renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, geothermal, hydropower and various forms of biomass. Green power marketing has the potential to expand domestic markets for renewable energy technologies by fostering greater availability of renewable electric service options in retail markets. Although renewable energy development has traditionally been limited by cost considerations, customer choice allows consumer preferences for cleaner energy sources to be reflected in market transactions. In survey after survey, customers have expressed a preference and willingness to pay more, if necessary, for cleaner energy sources. You can find more information about purchase options on our "Buying Green Power" page.

156

Market concentration and marketing power among electricity generators in Texas  

SciTech Connect

Policy initiatives designed to foster competition among electricity generators in Texas face a special challenge due to the relative isolation of that system. This isolation contributes to high levels of market concentration and market power that could hinder the development of a truly competitive market. This paper examines market concentration and market power in the ERCOT market for electricity generation by calculating the Herfindahl-Hirschman index (HHI) under various assumptions to gauge the degree of market concentration among generators in ERCOT. In addition, some ongoing studies of market power in ERCOT are discussed. The distinction between market concentration and market power is highlighted.

Zarnikau, J.; Lam, A. [Planergy Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, April 1, 1990--September 30, 1990, Number 3; Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the requirements of Section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, the US Department of Energy has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the period April 1 through September 30, 1990. This report is the third of a series of reports that are issued at intervals of approximately six months during site characterization. The report covers a number of new initiatives to improve the effectiveness of the site characterization program and covers continued efforts related to preparatory activities, study plans, and performance assessment. 85 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

NONE

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Commercial nuclear fuel from U.S. and Russian surplus defense inventories: Materials, policies, and market effects  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear materials declared by the US and Russian governments as surplus to defense programs are being converted into fuel for commercial nuclear reactors. This report presents the results of an analysis estimating the market effects that would likely result from current plans to commercialize surplus defense inventories. The analysis focuses on two key issues: (1) the extent by which traditional sources of supply, such as production from uranium mines and enrichment plants, would be displaced by the commercialization of surplus defense inventories or, conversely, would be required in the event of disruptions to planned commercialization, and (2) the future price of uranium considering the potential availability of surplus defense inventories. Finally, the report provides an estimate of the savings in uranium procurement costs that could be realized by US nuclear power generating companies with access to competitively priced uranium supplied from surplus defense inventories.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

NREL: Technology Transfer - Solar Policy and Program ...  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer ... Unbiased analysis of economic and market impacts related to policy changes;

160

2008 Wind Technologies Market Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

072008 Institution LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, power system economics, renewable...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The analytical foundations of conservation policy  

SciTech Connect

The conservation paradigm is described here as: (1) reflecting the policy goal of energy efficiency, (2) the investment model that market barrier inhibit energy efficiency investments and (3) the emphasis of engineering estimates of market efficiency. In contrast, the economics paradigm emphasizes: (1) economic efficiency and equity, (2) market failures or market imperfections as impediments to achieving economic efficiency and (3) the behavior of markets to make efficient choices. Market barriers discourage investments in energy efficiency, but this is irrelevant for policy purposes where energy efficiency differs from economic efficiency. Where market barriers discourage economically efficient investments, they are of dubious significance for policy purposes unless they are market failures. The market barriers alleged in the conservation literature typically do not coincide with market failures. In a competitive and efficient market economy, investments judged efficient by engineering and present value calculations will not instantaneously achieve a market share of 100 percent. Barriers that delay diffusion are not necessarily appropriate for Government policy.

Sutherland, R.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Market Organization and Market Efficiency in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity markets in the United States exhibit two different forms of organization: decentralized bilateral trading and centralized auction markets. Using detailed data on prices, quantities, and production costs, we examine how market outcomes changed when a large region in the Eastern US rapidly switched from a bilateral system of trade to a well-designed centralized auction market in 2004. Although economic theory yields ambiguous predictions, the empirical evidence indicates that shifting the venue of trade substantially improved overall market efficiency, and that these efficiency gains far exceeded implementation costs. Our analysis points to the merits of organized market institutions for electricity, a central issue in policy debates over market-oriented regulatory reforms.

Erin T. Mansur; Matthew W. White

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

ORNL DAAC Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map ORNL DAAC Site Map About Us About ORNL DAAC Who We Are User Working Group Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Citation Policy News Newsletters Workshops Site Map Products...

164

Designing Competitive Electricity Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains papers that were discussed at the first workshop on Markets for Electricity: Economics and Technology (MEET) held at Stanford University on March 7-8, 1997. The workshop's focus was how to design competitive electricity markets in an industry undergoing rapid changes in both economics and technology. The intended audience includes policy makers, policy-oriented academics, and corporate leaders. Chapters include: Introduction: Economic and Technological Principles in Designing Power M...

1998-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

165

Housing policy in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last three decades, the People's Republic of China (PRC) has managed to replace its welfare-based urban housing system with a market-based housing provision scheme. With such significant housing policy changes, the ...

Gao, Lu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The authors are solely responsible for any omissions or errors contained herein. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence More Documents & Publications Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

167

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HANFORD SITE PURSUANT TO THE NUCLEAR WASTE POLICY ACT OF 1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

step-by-step process by which the President, Congress, affected individual states and Indian tribes, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and other Federal agencies can work together in the siting, construction, and operation of a high-level nuclear waste repository. The DOE is required by Section 116(a) of the Act to identify states having potentially acceptable sites for a waste repository. A potentially acceptable site is defined by the Act as...any site at which, after geologic studies and field mapping but before detailed geologic data gathering, the Department undertakes preliminary drilling and geophysical testing for the definition of the site location. " By letter dated February 2, 1983, the Secretary of the DOE notified the Governor and Legislature of the State of Washington that the Hanford Site, near

Public Law; Public Law; Ooe-richland Wa Foreword

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A Cointegration Rank Test of Market Linkages with an Application to the U.S. Natural Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to interstate natural gas pipelines." Contemporary Policys policy of open access has made natural gas markets more

Walls, W. David

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Forestry Policies (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas) Arkansas) Forestry Policies (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Arkansas Forestry Comission Arkansas' Forests are managed by the Arkansas Forestry Commission. In 2010 the Commission completed the state's Forest Action Plan which comprised both the Forest Resource Assessment and Forest Resource Strategy documents: http://forestry.arkansas.gov/SiteCollectionDocuments/ArkansasForestryCom... http://forestry.arkansas.gov/SiteCollectionDocuments/ArkansasForestResou... The Arkansas Forest Stewardship Program facilitates a number of opportunities for forest landowners, and is intended to be the path forward for any landowner or developer pursuing biomass energy markets.

170

Authorization Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Authorization Policy Authorization Policy Services Overview ECS Audio/Video Conferencing Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools (perfSONAR) ESnet OID Registry PGP Key Service Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) OSCARS Case Study Documentation User Manual FAQ Design Specifications Functional Specifications Notifications Publications Authorization Policy Default Attributes Message Security Clients For Developers Interfaces Links Hardware Requirements DOE Grids Service Transition Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Authorization Policy Introduction An authorization decision consists of deciding if an authenticated entity

171

Energy Efficiency Economics and Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy efficiency and conservation are considered key means for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and achieving other energy policy goals, but associated market behavior and policy responses have engendered debates in the economic literature. We review economic concepts underlying consumer decisionmaking in energy efficiency and conservation and examine related empirical literature. In particular, we provide an economic perspective on the range of market barriers, market failures, and behavioral failures that have been cited in the energy efficiency context. We assess the extent to which these conditions provide a motivation for policy intervention in energy-using product markets, including an examination of the evidence on policy effectiveness and cost. While theory and empirical evidence suggest there is potential for welfare-enhancing energy efficiency policies, many open questions remain, particularly relating to the extent of some of the key market and behavioral failures.

Kenneth Gillingham; Richard G. Newell; Karen Palmer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Comparative analysis of United States and French nuclear power plant siting and construction regulatory policies and their economic consequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite the substantial commitments of time and money which are devoted to the nuclear power plant siting process, the effectiveness of the system in providing a balanced evaluation of the technical, environmental and ...

Golay, Michael Warren.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1991) The Issue of Domestic Energy Market Failure. Canberra,information in energy service markets leading to problemsis a goal of many market-oriented energy policies. However,

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Market power in electricity markets: Beyond concentration measures  

SciTech Connect

The wave of electricity market restructuring both within the US and abroad has brought the issue of horizontal market power to the forefront of energy policy. Traditionally, estimation and prediction of market power has relied heavily on concentration measures. In this paper, the authors discuss the weaknesses of concentration measures as a viable measure of market power in the electricity industry, and they propose an alternative method based on market simulations that take advantage of existing plant level data. The authors discuss results from previous studies they have performed, and present new results that allow for the detection of threshold demand levels where market power is likely to be a problem. In addition, the authors analyze the impact of that recent divestitures in the California electricity market will have on estimated market power. They close with a discussion of the policy implications of the results.

Borenstein, S.; Bushnell, J.; Knittel, C.R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Plenary Session, Harvard Electricity Policy Group, January 29-30, 1998, San Diego, California THE ELECTRIC MARKET RESTRUCTURING IN SOUTH AMERICA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experience", 18th Annual North American Conference International Association of Energy Economics, San in the Chilean electric power sector", Energy Policy, August 1988, pp. 369-377 [4] Hammons, T.J., de Franco, N1 Plenary Session, Harvard Electricity Policy Group, January 29-30, 1998, San Diego, California

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

176

NREL: Technology Deployment - Deployment and Market Transformation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deployment Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Deployment and Market Transformation Email Updates NREL's deployment and market transformation email updates...

177

Interpreting Technology and Policy Implications of Global Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reliability Energy Analysis Appliance Energy Standards China Electricity Markets Energy Policy India Industrial Energy International Energy Studies Public Sector Energy...

178

REVISION POLICY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

REVISION POLICY REVISION POLICY March 2007 Data are collected at the million cubic feet per month level and all calculations mentioned below are carried out at that precision. However, the data published in the Form EIA-914 Monthly Gas Production Report are rounded to the nearest 0.01 billion cubic feet per day (roughly 300 million cubic feet per month). Monthly estimates of gross production published in the Natural Gas Monthly at the national level are rounded to billion cubic feet and those for marketed production at the State level are rounded to million cubic feet. The prior month's production estimate will always be revised each month, when the production estimate for the latest data month is released. For example, a June estimate would be revised when a July estimate is released.

179

An analysis of Russian equity capital markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper begins with the assumption that stock market development has a positive and causal relationship with long run economic growth. It thus takes the view that developing the equity market is an important policy ...

Harwood, Catherine F. (Catherine Freda)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exposure to high energy market prices but were reticentto real-time when energy market prices rose above a certainprices. Finally, organized wholesale markets and policy support by the Federal Energy

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Internet market strategies: Antecedents and implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Web is a new market channel that has become a serious alternative to traditional channels. At present, there is little strategy analysis available to guide a company's decision about its involvement in the internet market. In this paper, we differentiate ... Keywords: Creative pricing policies, IMS model, Internet competition, Internet market, Mixed strategy, Pure strategy, Resource-based theory, Traditional markets

Jaeki Song; Fatemeh Mariam Zahedi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Voluntary Green Power Market Forecast through 2015  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

predicting how consumers will react to factors affecting the voluntary market. The analysis includes a negative policy impacts scenario designed to reflect impacts on the...

183

California's Electricity Crisis: A Market Apart?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Competition Policy in the U.S. Electricity Industry."Electricity Deregulation: Choices and Challenges. J. GriffinFor California Wholesale Electricity Markets. Docket No.

Bushnell, James

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

NREL: Technology Transfer - Solar Policy and Program ...  

This year, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ... Unbiased analysis of economic and market impacts related to policy changes;

185

Potentials and policy implications of energy and material efficiency improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michael. (1989), "Market Failure and Energy Policy,"Energy Policy 17 pp.397-406. Fog, M . H . and Nadkarni, K .Management Programs," Energy Policy 22 Levine, M.D. , Hirst,

Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

User Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Policy User Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing needs assurance of adequate access to the facility. On the other hand, qualified groups that make a large commitment of time and resources need some assurance of an equitable return on their investment. A national facility should be accessible to all qualified researchers and at the ALS there are three modes of access: as a General User, a member of an Approved Program (AP), or as a member of a Participating Research Team (PRT). All proposals for research to be conducted at the ALS are evaluated based on the criteria endorsed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). These criteria are detailed on the IUPAP Web site at IUPAP Recommendations for the Use of Major Physics Users Facilities (pdf version).

187

An Approach to Evaluating Equipment Efficiency Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 authorized studies of several types of industrial equipment to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of labeling rules and minimum energy efficiency standards. An approach to the evaluation of these and related policy options is under development. The approach includes equipment classification and characterization, market characterization, and the subsequent evaluation of effectiveness and costs of the policy options. Technical, economic, and marketing data obtained with the cooperation of industrial groups, such of policy impacts.

Newsom, D. E.; Evans, A. R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT RECOMMENDATION BY THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY REGARDING THE SUITABILITY OF THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE FOR A REPOSITORY UNDER THE NUCLEAR WASTE POLICY ACT OF 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more than half a century, since nuclear science helped us win World War II and ring in the Atomic Age, scientists have known that !he Nation would need a secure, permanent facility in which to dispose of radioactive wastes. Twenty years ago, when Congress adopted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA or ''the Act''), it recognized the overwhelming consensus in the scientific community that the best option for such a facility would be a deep underground repository. Fifteen years ago, Congress directed the Secretary of Energy to investigate and recommend to the President whether such a repository could be located safely at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since then, our country has spent billions of dollars and millions of hours of research endeavoring to answer this question. I have carefully reviewed the product of this study. In my judgment, it constitutes sound science and shows that a safe repository can be sited there. I also believe that compelling national interests counsel in favor of proceeding with this project. Accordingly, consistent with my responsibilities under the NWPA, today I am recommending that Yucca Mountain be developed as the site for an underground repository for spent fuel and other radioactive wastes. The first consideration in my decision was whether the Yucca Mountain site will safeguard the health and safety of the people, in Nevada and across the country, and will be effective in containing at minimum risk the material it is designed to hold. Substantial evidence shows that it will. Yucca Mountain is far and away the most thoroughly researched site of its kind in the world. It is a geologically stable site, in a closed groundwater basin, isolated on thousands of acres of Federal land, and farther from any metropolitan area than the great majority of less secure, temporary nuclear waste storage sites that exist in the country today. This point bears emphasis. We are not confronting a hypothetical problem. We have a staggering amount of radioactive waste in this country--nearly 100,000,000 gallons of high-level nuclear waste and more than 40,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel with more created every day. Our choice is not between, on the one hand, a disposal site with costs and risks held to a minimum, and, on the other, a magic disposal system with no costs or risks at all. Instead, the real choice is between a single secure site, deep under the ground at Yucca Mountain, or making do with what we have now or some variant of it--131 aging surface sites, scattered across 39 states. Every one of those sites was built on the assumption that it would be temporary. As time goes by. every one is closer to the limit of its safe life span. And every one is at least a potential security risk--safe for today, but a question mark in decades to come.

NA

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

189

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

policy uncertainty in concert with continued low natural gasnatural gas prices, modest electricity demand growth, and existing state policiespolicy towards wind energy after 2012, market expectations for continued low natural gas

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Proceedings of the 26th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference (1997): 1301-1304. COMMERCIAL BUILDING INTEGRATED PHOTOVOLTAICS: MARKET AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(without battery storage) unit. Benefits and costs of both types of systems are based on accepted financial the PV:BONUS Program. Modest amounts of battery storage are used in conjunction with a PV array for Energy and Environmental Policy (CEEP); Applied Energy Group (AEG); AC Battery; Solarex; and Ascension

Delaware, University of

191

Economics and regulation of petroleum futures markets  

SciTech Connect

Because the futures market in petroleum products is a relatively recent phenomenon, the implications of public policies formulated for that market have not yet been fully explored. To provide the Office of Competition of the Department of Energy (DOE) with sufficient information to assess policy alternatives, Resource Planning Associates, Inc. (RPA) was asked to analyze the development of the futures market in No. 2 oil, assess the potential for futures markets in other petroleum products, and identify policy alternatives available to DOE. To perform this analysis, the criteria for a viable futures market was established first. Then, the experience to date with the 18-month-old futures market in No. 2 oil was examined, and the potential for viable futures markets in No. 6 oil, gasoline, jet fuel, and crude oil was assessed. Finally, how existing DOE regulations and prospective actions might affect petroleum futures market development was investigated.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Market Structure and Competition: A Cross-Market Analysis of U.S. Electricity Deregulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Deregulated Wholesale Electricity Market. AmericanCompetition Policy in the U.S. Electricity Industry. Electricity Restructuring: Choices and Challenges. J. Gri?en

Bushnell, James; Mansur, Erin T.; Saravia, Celeste

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

MARKET BASED APPROACHES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BASED BASED APPROACHES K.G. DULEEP MANAGING DIRECTOR EEA BACKGROUND * Introduction of fuel-cell vehicles and jump- starting the market will require significant government actions in the near term * Widespread understanding that command- and-control regulations can work for only very low sales volume. * Increased public sales and acceptance will need development of market based policies. ANALYSIS OBJECTIVES * EEA currently evaluating a number of market based approaches to enhancing fuel economy of conventional and hybrid vehicles. * Primary objective of effort is to evaluate a range of market based approaches that can be implemented when FCV models are market ready, and identify ones that could make a difference. * Effort is in the context of modifying existing approaches to special needs of FCVs

194

User Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Policy Print User Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing needs assurance of adequate access to the facility. On the other hand, qualified groups that make a large commitment of time and resources need some assurance of an equitable return on their investment. A national facility should be accessible to all qualified researchers and at the ALS there are three modes of access: as a General User, a member of an Approved Program (AP), or as a member of a Participating Research Team (PRT). All proposals for research to be conducted at the ALS are evaluated based on the criteria endorsed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). These criteria are detailed on the IUPAP Web site at IUPAP Recommendations for the Use of Major Physics Users Facilities (pdf version).

195

User Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Print Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing needs assurance of adequate access to the facility. On the other hand, qualified groups that make a large commitment of time and resources need some assurance of an equitable return on their investment. A national facility should be accessible to all qualified researchers and at the ALS there are three modes of access: as a General User, a member of an Approved Program (AP), or as a member of a Participating Research Team (PRT). All proposals for research to be conducted at the ALS are evaluated based on the criteria endorsed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). These criteria are detailed on the IUPAP Web site at IUPAP Recommendations for the Use of Major Physics Users Facilities (pdf version).

196

User Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Print Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing needs assurance of adequate access to the facility. On the other hand, qualified groups that make a large commitment of time and resources need some assurance of an equitable return on their investment. A national facility should be accessible to all qualified researchers and at the ALS there are three modes of access: as a General User, a member of an Approved Program (AP), or as a member of a Participating Research Team (PRT). All proposals for research to be conducted at the ALS are evaluated based on the criteria endorsed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). These criteria are detailed on the IUPAP Web site at IUPAP Recommendations for the Use of Major Physics Users Facilities (pdf version).

197

Green Power Network: Green Power Network Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Site Map Search Search Help More Search Options Search Site Map News TVA Seeks 126 MW of Renewables in 2014 December 2013 More News More News Subscribe to E-Mail Update Subscribe to e-mail update Events EPA Webinar - The Power of Aggregated Purchasing: How to Green Your Electricity Supply & Save Money January 15, 2014 1:00-2:00 p.m. ET Previous Webinars More News Features Green Power Market Status Report (2011 Data) Featured Green Power Reports GPN Home Events Events Archive Featured Reports News News Archive Subscribe to Monthly Update About the Green Power Network Green Power Markets Green Pricing Green Power Marketing Renewable Energy Certificates Greenhouse Gas Offsets Green Power Policies Buying Green Power Can I Buy Green Power in my State? Community Renewable Energy Development

198

Factors for Bioenergy Market Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Focusing on the development of the whole bioenergy market rather than isolated projects, this paper contributes to the identification of barriers and drivers behind bioenergy technology implementation. It presents a framework for the assessment of the potentials for bioenergy market growth to be used by decision makers in administration and industry. The conclusions are based on case studies of operating bioenergy markets in Austria, US and Sweden. Six important factors for bioenergy market growth have been identified: (1) Integration with other business, e.g. for biomass procurement, (2) Scale effects of bioenergy market, (3) Competition on bioenergy market, (4) Competition with other business, (5) National policy, (6) Local policy and local opinion. Different applications of the framework are discussed.

Roos, A.; Hektor, B.; Graham, R.L.; Rakos, C.

1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

199

Energy Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind turbines Energy Policy Energy policy research at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory covers a wide range of topics from the development of policy strategies to encourage...

200

Market vs. Non-Market Approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a study comparing several alternative policy mechanisms being considered to cut CO2 emissions in the US. The benchmark is Cap-and-Trade, a market-based mechanism that has long been considered the optimal approach to reducing emissions at least cost. Cap-and-Trade is not currently being considered in policy circles due to a variety of factors, but the underlying issue of CO2 emissions reduction is still under active investigation. Alternatives to Cap-and-Trade analyzed here include a...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Green Power Network: Environmental Disclosure Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govern_purch govern_purch Community Choice Aggregation Disclosure Policies Green Power Policies Net Metering Policies Environmental Disclosure Policies A number of states have adopted environmental disclosure policies, requiring electricity suppliers to provide information on fuel sources and, in some cases, emissions associated with electricity generation. The policies have been adopted in states with retail competition as well as in states with traditionally regulated electricity markets. Summaries of state environmental disclosure policies are provided below under the categories full, partial, or proposed. The term partial disclosure requirements refers to policies that are not mandatory, do not apply to all retail electricity suppliers, or do not result in direct disclosure to consumers.

202

title Wind Technologies Market Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

policy group energy analysis and environmental impacts department photovoltaics renewable energy tariff design attachments http eetd lbl gov sites all files publications report...

203

European energy policy: directives and action plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The European secondary legislation sets a legislative framework for the internal Energy market. Moreover different papers are adopted to supplement the directives. The goal of the EU policy is to assure the security of supply; additionally, Europe deals ... Keywords: EU energy policy, internal market, security of supply, sustainability

V. Pozeb; D. Gori?anec; J. Krope

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Practitioner Perspectives Matter: Public Policy and Private Investment in the U.S. Electric Power Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of forward natural gas prices. Energy Policy Bonavia, P. (of natural gas models and futures markets. Energy Policynatural gas prices Views on global warming and carbon policy

Barradale, Merrill Jones

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Market Design Test Environments  

SciTech Connect

Power industry restructuring continues to evolve at multiple levels of system operations. At the bulk electricity level, several organizations charged with regional system operation are implementing versions of a Wholesale Power Market Platform (WPMP) in response to U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission initiatives. Recently the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and several regional initiatives have been pressing the integration of demand response as a resource for system operations. These policy and regulatory pressures are driving the exploration of new market designs at the wholesale and retail levels. The complex interplay among structural conditions, market protocols, and learning behaviors in relation to short-term and longer-term market performance demand a flexible computational environment where designs can be tested and sensitivities to power system and market rule changes can be explored. This paper presents the use of agent-based computational methods in the study of electricity markets at the wholesale and retail levels, and distinctions in problem formulation between these levels.

Widergren, Steven E.; Sun, Junjie; Tesfatsion, Leigh

2006-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

206

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market, including federal and state policy drivers, transmission issues, and grid integration. Finally, the report concludes with a preview of possible near- to medium-term market developments. This version of the Annual Report updates data presented in the previous editions, while highlighting key trends and important new developments from 2008. New to this edition is an executive summary of the report and an expanded final section on near- to medium-term market development. The report concentrates on larger-scale wind applications, defined here as individual turbines or projects that exceed 50 kW in size. The U.S. wind power sector is multifaceted, however, and also includes smaller, customer-sited wind turbines used to power the needs of residences, farms, and businesses. Data on these applications are not the focus of this report, though a brief discussion on Distributed Wind Power is provided on page 4. Much of the data included in this report were compiled by Berkeley Lab, and come from a variety of sources, including the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Appendix provides a summary of the many data sources used in the report. Data on 2008 wind capacity additions in the United States are based on information provided by AWEA; some minor adjustments to those data may be expected. In other cases, the data shown here represent only a sample of actual wind projects installed in the United States; furthermore, the data vary in quality. As such, emphasis should be placed on overall trends, rather than on individual data points. Finally, each section of this document focuses on historical market information, with an emphasis on 2008; with the exception of the final section, the report does not seek to forecast future trends.

Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Interaction of Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, both compliance and voluntary markets have emerged to help support the development of renewable energy resources. Both of these markets are growing rapidly and today about half of U.S. states have RPS policies in place, with a number of these policies adopted in the last several years. In addition, many states have recently increased the stringency of their RPS policies. This paper examines key market interaction issues between compliance and voluntary renewable energy markets. It provides an overview of both the compliance and voluntary markets, addressing each market's history, purpose, size, scope, and benefits while addressing issues, including double counting.

Bird, L.; Lokey, E.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

How Power Marketing Administrations Market Power and Work with Tribes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Power Marketing Administrations Market Power and Work with How Power Marketing Administrations Market Power and Work with Tribes Webinar How Power Marketing Administrations Market Power and Work with Tribes Webinar April 24, 2013 11:00AM MDT Webinar The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program, and Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) are pleased to continue their sponsorship of the Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar Series. The country's federal Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) have valuable generation and transmission assets and have the potential to promote renewable energy development within their respective footprints. Get information on PMA assets and operations, examples of past cooperation with Tribes, and how to work with PMAs to promote future economic growth

209

Site Characterization Awards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Site Characterization Awards Site Characterization Awards A description of...

210

Impact of misalignment of trading agent strategy under a multiple market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We examine the effect of a market pricing policy designed to attract high-valued traders in a multiple market context using JCAT software. Our experiments show that a simple change to pricing policy can create market performance effects that traditional adaptive trading agents are unable to recognize or capitalize on, but that market-policy-aware trading agents can generally obtain. This suggests as parameterized and tunable markets become more common, trading strategies will increasingly need to be conditional on each individual markets policies.

Jung-woo Sohn; Sooyeon Lee; Tracy Mullen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

State and Local Clean Energy Policy Primer: Getting from Here to Clean Electricity with Policy (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet proposes a framework for how states and localities can build policy portfolios by first setting the stage for clean energy in the market with low cost policies, and then growing the market with successive policies until the need for financial incentives can be reduced and eventually eliminated.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Diversity Policies; Diversity Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policies: Brookhaven National Laboratory Diversity Policies: Brookhaven Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Policy Brookhaven Sexual Harassment Policy Brookhaven Veterans Policy...

213

Site Selection Process | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Selection Process Site Selection Process SiteSelectionProcess.pdf More Documents & Publications dgappendices.pdf REAL ESTATE PROCESS OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides...

214

Market Analyses | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Market Analyses Market Analyses Market Analyses November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Need information on the market potential for combined heat and power (CHP) in the U.S.? These assessments and analyses cover a wide range of markets including commercial and institutional buildings and facilities, district energy, and industrial sites. The market potential for CHP at federal sites and in selected states/regions is also examined. Commercial CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants Part I, 17 pp and Part II, 28 pp, Nov. 2007 Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings: Benefits Analysis, 310 pp, April 2002 Engine Driven Combined Heat and Power: Arrow Linen Supply, 21 pp, Dec. 2008 Integrated Energy Systems for Buildings: A Market Assessment, 77 pp,

215

2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report, June 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes 2010 data on fuel cells, including market penetration and industry trends. It also covers cost, price, and performance trends, along with policy and market drivers and the future outlook for fuel cells.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Electronic OTC Trading in the German Wholesale Electricity Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent changes in the German energy policy initiated a deregulation process from a monopolistic to a competitive market, fundamentally changing the market structure, transaction relationships and trading processes. While the mutual exchange of electric ...

Stefan Strecker; Christof Weinhardt

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Evolution of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market trends: an empirical analysis of project data. Energyand market trends provides insights into the distinctive features and policy drivers of a relatively mature private sector energy

Goldman, Charles A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Technical Status, Operating Experience, Risk and Market Assessment of Clean Coal Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas fired combustion turbines and combined cycle plants have dominated the recent power generation markets in the United States and in much of Europe. However, concerns over natural gas price spikes have led many power companies to initiate studies and projects on clean coal technologies as a strategic hedge against over-reliance on natural gas alone to provide future power needs. Regulatory policy, site and project related issues, coal type, and risk assessment by the financiers and owners will ...

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

219

REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Section 1815 of the Act established a five-member Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005)1 was...

220

Quality Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy110406 Page 1 of 3 EOTA - System Level Document Title: Quality Policy Document Number: Q-002 Rev. 110406 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Web Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web Policies Web Policies Accessibility The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is part of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), which...

222

Empowering the Market: How Building Energy Performance Rating...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Empowering the Market: How Building Energy Performance Rating and Disclosure Policies Encourage U.S. Energy Efficiency Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio...

223

Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003). Balancing Natural Gas Policy - Fueling the Demands ofThis lead to the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) in 1978 whichnatural gas markets, demand-side management programs, development of renewable sources, and environmental policies.

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Policy in New England  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards State Renewable Energy Funds Federal Tax Incentives and Grants Net Metering and Interconnection Standards Pollutant Emission Reduction Policies Awareness Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Wind Power Policy in New England Why Incentives and Policy? Federal and state policies play an important role in encouraging wind energy development by leveling the playing field compared to other energy sources. Many of the substantial benefits of wind power as a domestic, zero-emission part of the energy portfolio - sustainability, displacement of pollutant emissions from other power sources, fuel diversity, price stabilization, keeping a substantial portion of energy expenditures in the local economy - are shared by society as a whole and cannot be readily captured by wind generators directly in the price they charge for their output. In addition, while wind power receives some policy support, the level of federal incentives for wind represents less than 1% of the subsidies and tax breaks given to the fossil fuels and nuclear industries (source: "Wind Power An Increasingly Competitive Source of New Generation." Wind Energy Weekly #1130.).

225

Policy Overview and Options for Maximizing the Role of Policy in Geothermal Electricity Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal electricity production capacity has grown over time because of multiple factors, including its renewable, baseload, and domestic attributes; volatile and high prices for competing technologies; and policy intervention. Overarching federal policies, namely the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA), provided certainty to project investors in the 1980s, leading to a boom in geothermal development. In addition to market expansion through PURPA, research and development policies provided an investment of public dollars toward developing technologies and reducing costs over time to increase the market competitiveness of geothermal electricity. Together, these efforts are cited as the primary policy drivers for the currently installed capacity. Informing policy decisions depends on the combined impacts of policies at the federal and state level on geothermal development. Identifying high-impact suites of policies for different contexts, and the government levels best equipped to implement them, would provide a wealth of information to both policy makers and project developers.

Doris, E.; Kreycik, C.; Young, K.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

THREE ESSAYS ON ADDRESSING NEW CHALLENGES FOR ENERGY POLICY .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The three papers in this dissertation all deal with new challenges for energy policy. The first paper deals with mitigation of market power in deregulated (more)

Shawhan, Daniel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

State and Regional Policy Assistance - Program Activities | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and long-terms needs of states, regions, and other organizations to implement policy and market solutions that bring about improved demand response, energy efficiency, renewable...

228

Becoming allies: Combining social science and technological perspectives to improve energy research and policy making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. and the U . K . " Energy Policy 27:217-227. MacDonald,to Market Transformation." Energy Policy 28:137-144. Brown,be otherwise. In most energy policies governing commercial

Diamond, Rick; Moezzi, Mithra

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The policy impact of unified government: evidence from2000 to 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Divided government Energy policy Stock market Eventgovernment (and thus a continuing Democratic veto) would mean stability in energy policy,and divided government. With status quo energy policy out of

Monroe, Nathan W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Petroleum Marketing Annual, 1987  

SciTech Connect

In world crude oil markets, 1987 was a year of limited recovery and relative stability after the dramatic price slide of early 1986. Both foreign and domestic crude thereafter, ending the year somewhat higher than a year ago. In contrast, product wholesale markets remained relatively stable throughout the year, while retail prices sustained a fairly steady increase. As has been the case for over a decade, major price movements in international oil markets generally reflected responses to actual or perceived changes in the policies of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and/or its members. The year began with prices on an upward trend, in reaction to the December 1986 OPEC meeting in which the members resolved to return to an official pricing structure (a departure from the market-based pricing of 1986), and to reduce output quotas. Prices continued to rise until August, when evidence of continued OPEC overproduction appeared to outweigh market optimism, triggering a gradual slide that lasted the remainder of the year. Even with the downturn in the fourth quarter, crude oil markets in 1987, as measured by refiner acquisition costs, finished the year above year-end 1986 levels, and considerably above the lows reached in mid-1986. OPEC's struggle to maintain stable prices and production levels in 1987 reflected the organization's difficulties in reaching and enforcing agreements among its politically and economically diverse membership. 11 figs., 49 tabs.

1988-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

2012 Vehicle Technologies Market Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory s Center for Transportation Analysis developed and published the first Vehicle Technologies Market Report in 2008. Three editions of the report have been published since that time. This 2012 report details the major trends in U.S. light vehicle and medium/heavy truck markets as well as the underlying trends that caused them. The opening section on Energy and Economics discusses the role of transportation energy and vehicle markets on a national scale. The following section examines light-duty vehicle use, markets, manufacture, and supply chains. The discussion of medium and heavy trucks offers information on truck sales and fuel use. The technology section offers information on alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure, and the policy section concludes with information on recent, current, and near-future Federal policies like the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards.

Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Market Transformation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its market transformation subprogram.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Progress report on the scientific investigation program for the Nevada Yucca Mountain site, September 15, 1988--September 30, 1989; Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113), Number 1  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. This report is the first of a series of reports that will hereafter be issued at intervals of approximately 6-months during site characterization. The DOE`s plans for site characterization are described in the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain site. The SCP has been reviewed and commented on by the NRC, the State of Nevada, the affected units of local government, other interested parties, and the public. More detailed information on plans for site characterization is being presented in study plans for the various site characterization activities. This progress report presents short summaries of the status of site characterization activities and cites technical reports and research products that provide more detailed information on the activities. The report provides highlights of work started during the reporting period, work in progress, and work completed and documented during the reporting period. In addition, the report is the vehicle for discussing major changes, if any, to the DOE`s site characterization program resulting from ongoing collection and evaluation of site information; the development of repository and waste-package designs; receipt of performance-assessment results; and changes, if any, that occur in response to external comments on the site characterization programs. 80 refs.

NONE

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Modeling the U.S. Rooftop Photovoltaics Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Global rooftop PV markets are growing rapidly, fueled by a combination of declining PV prices and several policy-based incentives. The future growth, and size, of the rooftop market is highly dependent on continued PV cost reductions, financing options, net metering policy, carbon prices and future incentives. Several PV market penetration models, sharing a similar structure and methodology, have been developed over the last decade to quantify the impacts of these factors on market growth. This study uses a geospatially rich, bottom-up, PV market penetration model--the Solar Deployment Systems (SolarDS) model developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory--to explore key market and policy-based drivers for residential and commercial rooftop PV markets. The identified drivers include a range of options from traditional incentives, to attractive customer financing options, to net metering and carbon policy.

Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Capacity Markets and Market Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The good news is that market stability can be achieved through a combination of longer-term contracts, auctions for far enough in the future to permit new entry, a capacity management system, and a demand curve. The bad news is that if and when stable capacity markets are designed, the markets may seem to be relatively close to where we started - with integrated resource planning. Market ideologues will find this anathema. (author)

Stauffer, Hoff

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Solar PV Market Update, October 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 7 of EPRIs quarterly Solar PV Market Update provides continued insight into some of the front line trends that are afoot throughout the photovoltaic segment. Like previous Updates, it synthesizes primary and secondary data from multiple sources in an effort to highlight economic, policy, and technology developments that are likely to impact utility solar PV investment and planning efforts.This report investigates some of the recent PV market and policy developments that ...

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

EPRI Review of Geologic Disposal for Used Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste: Volume I--The U.S. Site Selection Process Prior to the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. efforts to site and construct a deep geologic repository for used fuel and high level radioactive waste (HLW) proceeded in fits and starts over a three decade period from the late 1950s until 1982, when the U.S. Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). This legislation codified a national approach for developing a deep geologic repository. Amendment of the NWPA in 1987 resulted in a number of dramatic changes in direction for the U.S. program, most notably the selection of Yucca Mountai...

2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

238

NYP Policy and Procedure Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Sites: All Centers Environment of Care Manual Page 1 of 3 ___________________________________________________________ TITLE: ENERGY CONSERVATION POLICY POLICY: It is the policy of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital to design and establish a fundamental understanding of and institutional commitment to environmental responsibility, and to implement methods to reduce energy consumption and related costs. PURPOSE: The purpose of this energy policy is to establish the framework for acceptable protocols, practices and operational standards. To fully integrate NYPH's Strategic Initiatives with the goal of this policy to further foster a culture of engagement by positively impacting the environment of care throughout its entire lifecycle.

239

GTI online - matching gas technologies with global gas markets  

SciTech Connect

The International Centre for Gas Technology Information (ICGTI) is a technology information centre of the International Energy Agency (IEA). Its members account for more than half the world`s natural gas production and consumption. ICGTI has established a web site, GTI Online (http://www.icgti.org). GTI Online is designed to cover all aspects of the gas industry from production to end-use as well as supporting technologies, including market assessment, national energy policies, environmental information and computing and modeling techniques. It si designed to use existing information sources whenever possible, so as not to duplicate public and/or commercial efforts. It is intended to fill the gap in providing useful international information to both the US and global market.

Lang, M., Manor, D.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Advanced On-Site Wastewater Treatment and Management Market Study: Volume 1: Assessment of Short-Term Opportunities and Long-Run Pot ential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-site septic systems have traditionally been considered a temporary solution on the way to sewering. However, the elimination of federal grants for sewers and wastewater treatment plants has brought a new awareness of the high costs and the sometimes adverse environmental consequences of centralized point discharges. At the same time, advances in on-site technologies, including such systems as low-flow water conservation, watertight septic tanks with screens, sand filtration, disinfection, remote monit...

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

LBNL-60590 JART Distributed energy resources market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-60590 JART Distributed energy resources market diffusion model Karl Magnus Maribua , Ryan M by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Distributed Energy Program of the U.S. Department Policy 35 (2007) 4471­4484 Distributed energy resources market diffusion model Karl Magnus Maribua

242

Security Policy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... M/S ACES Pvt. Ltd. Pakistan Page Security Policy ... 2013 M/S ACES Pvt. Ltd. Pakistan 5/27/2013 Page 2. [SECURITY POLICY] May 27, 2013 ...

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

243

Market Analysis - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market Analysis Market Analysis Annual market reports; market data resource center; supply chain, financial, and life cycle analyses; pilot studies for renewables and efficiency at scale. Primary Contact: David Greene Previous and Ongoing Analyses : Market Analysis for Energy Technologies and Fuels Greene, D.L., Leiby, P.N., Bowman, D. (2007). "Integrated Analysis of Market Transformation Scenarios with HyTrans" ORNL/TM-2007/094, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, June. (David Greene, Paul Leiby) Impact of advanced vehicle technologies (e.g. PHEV, EV and FCV) on petroleum use and carbon emissions depends on many technological, behavior, market and policy factors. A consumer choice model with 1458 market segments for the period 2005-2050 has been developed to investigate the

244

Solar PV Market Update: Volume 1 - Spring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Solar PV Market Update provides a snapshot of photovoltaic (PV) market information, along with brief EPRI analyses, to inform EPRI members about economic-, policy-, and technology-related developments in the segment. Delivered on a quarterly basis, the document synthesizes data reporting gleaned from a variety of primary and secondary sources, highlighting specific industry issuesincluding market outlooks, equipment cost and pricing trends, system design and e...

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

245

Geothermal Brief: Market and Policy Impacts Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility-scale geothermal electricity generation plants have generally taken advantage of various government initiatives designed to stimulate private investment. This report investigates these initiatives to evaluate their impact on the associated cost of energy and the development of geothermal electric generating capacity using conventional hydrothermal technologies. We use the Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) to analyze the effects of tax incentives on project economics. Incentives include the production tax credit, U.S. Department of Treasury cash grant, the investment tax credit, and accelerated depreciation schedules. The second half of the report discusses the impact of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Loan Guarantee Program on geothermal electric project deployment and possible reasons for a lack of guarantees for geothermal projects. For comparison, we examine the effectiveness of the 1970s DOE drilling support programs, including the original loan guarantee and industry-coupled cost share programs.

Speer, B.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Indonesia - Labor Market Policies and International Competitiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper-- a product of the Office of the Vice President, Development Economics-- was prepared as a background paper for World Development Report 1995 on labor. Copies of this paper are available free from the Wor}d Bank, 1818 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20433. Please contact the World Development Report Office, room N7-078, telephone 202-4731393, fax 202-676-0652, Internet address mgeller(a.q)worldbank.org (61 pages). September 1995

N. Agrawal

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, April 1, 1991--September 30, 1991, Number 5; Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)  

SciTech Connect

The Site Characterization Progress Report of Yucca Mountain (PR) presents brief summaries of the status of site characterization activities and cites the technical reports and research products that provide more detailed information on the activities. The report provides highlights of work started during the reporting period, work in progress, and work completed and documented during the reporting period. In addition, the report is the vehicle for the discussion of changes to the DOE`s site characterization program resulting from ongoing collection and evaluation of site information; the development of repository and waste-package designs; the results of performance assessments; and any changes that occur in response to external comments. Information covered includes geochemistry, hydrology, geology, climate, and radiation dose estimate calculations.

NONE

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Power Marketing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remarketing Effort Hoover Coordinating Committee Meeting FY2011 - June 7 Mead Transformer Presentation Navajo Navajo Surplus Marketing Parker-Davis Parker-Davis Project...

249

Market Transformation  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This Fuel Cell Technologies Program fact sheet outlines current status and challenges in the market transformation of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

250

Power Marketing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Certificate Solicitations Benefit Review Energy Services Rates and Repayment WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Send correspondence to: Power Marketing Manager Western...

251

2008 Solar Technologies Market Report: January 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report focuses on the U.S. solar electricity market, including photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. The report provides an overview of global and U.S. installation trends. It also presents production and shipment data, material and supply chain issues, and solar industry employment trends. It also presents cost, price, and performance trends; and discusses policy and market drivers such as recently passed federal legislation, state and local policies, and developments in project financing. The final chapter provides data on private investment trends and near-term market forecasts.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Green Power Network: Green Power Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Power Marketing Green Certificates Carbon Offsets State Policies govern_purch Community Choice Aggregation Disclosure Policies Green Power Policies Net Metering Policies Green Power Policies A number of state and local governments have policies in place that encourage the development of green power markets. Government green power purchasing mandates or goals have been established by the federal government, as well as state and local governments to procure renewable energy for the electricity used by government facilities or operations. Community choice aggregation allows communities to determine their electricity generation sources by aggregating the community load and purchasing electricity from an alternate electricity supplier while still receiving transmission and distribution service from their existing provider.

253

Market Acceleration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Market Acceleration Market Acceleration Market Acceleration Photo of several men on a floating platform that is lowering monitoring tools into the ocean. The Water Power Program works to foster a commercial market for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy devices in order to achieve its goal of the nation obtaining 15% of its electricity needs from all types of water power by 2030. Though marine and hydrokinetic energy is still in its infancy, the program is developing a robust portfolio of projects to accelerate wave, tidal and current project deployments and development of the MHK market in general. These projects include project siting activities, market assessments, environmental impact analyses, and research supporting technology commercialization. Learn more about the Water Power Program's work in the following areas of

254

The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Market Readiness (PMR) for Market Readiness (PMR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) - Brazil Name The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) - Brazil Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Partner Australia, Denmark, EC, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway Spain, Switzerland, UK, and US Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://wbcarbonfinance.org/Rou

255

General Renewable Energy-Market Development Studies | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

General Renewable Energy-Market Development Studies General Renewable Energy-Market Development Studies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: General Renewable Energy-Market Development Studies Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, Country: China, Mexico Eastern Asia, Central America References: General Renewable Energy-Market Development Studies[1] Resources Energy-policy Framework Conditions for Electricity Markets and Renewable Energies: 21 Country Analyses, TERNA Wind Energy Programme, GTZ Global Renewable Energy Markets and Policies, Eric Martinot, University of Maryland, School of Public Affairs The Potentials of Renewable Energy, Thematic Background Paper,

256

Increasing access to the carbon market ENERGY, CLIMATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· workshops; Knowledge and information management;· Research, policy analysis, and market surveil-· lanceIncreasing access to the carbon market ENERGY, CLIMATE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 2008 #12;2 World is growing in parallel. With a dynamic carbon market under constant development, the Energy and Carbon Fi

257

Flexiplace/Telework Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

through FY 2018 Initial Budget Formulation "Kick-Off" Chief Information Officer (WFP) Energy.gov Careers & Internships Policy and Guidance Contact Us About This Site Web...

258

Geothermal: Website Policies and Important Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Website Policies and Important Links Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home...

259

Market theories evolve, and so do markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of Competitive Market Behavior," Journal of PoliticalContinuous Double Auction Markets. International Journal ofeds. ), The Dynamics of Market Exchange, North-Holland, 115-

Friedman, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

NREL: State and Local Activities - Clean Energy Policy Analyses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Energy Policy Analyses Clean Energy Policy Analyses Want notifications of new reports and data? Subscribe to E-mail Updates NREL's Clean Energy Policy Analyses (CEPA) project seeks to quantify the connection between state and local policies and clean energy market development, and analyze the impacts of state policy on decision makers. The project brings together U.S. state and local policy stakeholders to consider all of the factors that make up effective state and local energy policies and to identify barriers that impede them. Learn more about clean energy policy basics and CEPA's activities to analyze: State policies Region-specific policies Local policies Innovative policies. This NREL-managed project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program. A voluntary technical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995, Number 12. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)  

SciTech Connect

During the first half of fiscal year 1995, most activities at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project were directed at implementing the Program Plan developed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The Plan is designed to enable the Office to make measurable and significant progress toward key objectives over the next five years within the financial resources that can be realistically expected. Activities this period focused on the immediate goal of determining by 1998 whether Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is technically suitable as a possible site for a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Work on the Project advanced in several critical areas, including programmatic activities such as issuing the Program Plan, completing the first technical basis report to support the assessment of three 10 CFR 960 guidelines, developing the Notice of Intent for the Environmental Impact Statement, submitting the License Application Annotated Outline, and beginning a rebaselining effort to conform with the goals of the Program Plan. Scientific investigation and analysis of the site and design and construction activities to support the evaluation of the technical suitability of the site also advanced. Specific details relating to all Project activities and reports generated are presented in this report.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

CSEM WP 112 Consumer Choice and Industrial Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential natural gas market and examine responses to a specially commissioned survey of nearly seven the UK domestic natural gas market1 As such, it provides a useful example of the developmentCSEM WP 112 Consumer Choice and Industrial Policy: A Study of UK Energy Markets Monica Giulietti

California at Berkeley. University of

263

Policies | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eureka Gadzooks Policies Pullback Policy ALCF Acknowledgment Policy Account Sponsorship & Retention Policy Accounts Policy Data Policy INCITE Quarterly Report Policy ALCC...

264

Role of State Policy in Renewable Energy Development  

SciTech Connect

State policies can support renewable energy development by driving markets, providing certainty in the investment market, and incorporating the external benefits of the technologies into cost/benefit calculations. Using statistical analyses and policy design best practices, this paper quantifies the impact of state-level policies on renewable energy development in order to better understand the role of policy on development and inform policy makers on the policy mechanisms that provide maximum benefit. The results include the identification of connections between state policies and renewable energy development, as well as a discussion placing state policy efforts in context with other factors that influence the development of renewable energy (e.g. federal policy, resource availability, technology cost, public acceptance).

Doris, E.; Busche, S.; Hockett, S.; McLaren, J.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends EETD's energy efficiency program and market trends research includes technical, economic and policy analysis to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to utility-sector energy efficiency programs and regulation, and government-funded energy efficiency initiatives. LBNL's research in this area is focused on: Energy efficiency portfolio planning and market assessment, Design and implementation of a portfolio of energy efficiency programs that achieve various policy objectives Utility sector energy efficiency business models, Options for administering energy efficiency programs, Evaluation, measurement and verification of energy efficiency impacts and ESCO industry and market trends and performance.

266

Policy Flash 2012-66  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DATE: September 19, 2012 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition and Project Management SUBJECT: New Procedures for Submitting Clause or Template Changes SUMMARY: Attached are the new procedures for submitting requests for clause or template changes to the official versions of the clauses and templates contained in STRIPES; including additions or changes to local clauses and templates. Only Site Points of Contact (SPOCs) or Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division (CFAPD) staff, of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management's Office of Policy, can initiate requests for additions or

267

OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)'s mission with regard to State and Regional Policy Assistance is to provide, on an as-requested basis, unbiased policy assistance and analysis to States and regions on State electricity policies, programs, laws, and regulations that facilitate electricity Infrastructure investment needed to deliver clean, affordable, and reliable electricity to customers. OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program More Documents & Publications U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability: Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program

268

Auction market simulator for price based operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the passage of new public utility regulatory policies, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) encourages an open market system for price based operation. A previous paper describes a framework for price based operation and the associated technical issues in an auction market structure. This paper presents an auction market simulator to experimentally study the aspects of power system operation in price-based environment. The proposed simulator can also be used as a tool to train the system operators how to perform electric power transaction in the deregulated environment. This paper presents the simulation results of auction market for price based operation in the 24-bus, 10-generator IEEE Reliability Test System.

Kumar, J.; Sheble, G. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Market design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the author regarding possible amendments. SESSA is an initiative funded by the Sixth EU RTD Framework Programme (Scientific Support to Policy) * Faculty of Economics, Cambridge Sustainable Energy Specific Support Assessment...

Newbery, David

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

270

ORNL Site Ofice  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ORNL Site Ofice ORNL Site Ofice P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6269 January 28, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR GREGORY H. WOODS GENERAL COUNSEL GC-1 FROM: SUBJECT: ��MK = MOORE, MANAGER lF �NL SITE OFFICE ANNUAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) PLANNING SUMMARY FOR 2013- OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY (ORNL) SITE OFFICE (OSO) This correspondence transmits the Annual NEPA Planning Summary for 2013 for OSO.

271

Policies and Procedures | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Communication & Engagement » EM SSAB » Policies and Services » Communication & Engagement » EM SSAB » Policies and Procedures Policies and Procedures The purpose of this document is to provide guidance regarding the operation of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB or Board). Policies and Procedures More Documents & Publications Memorandum: Regarding Delegation of Designated Federal Officials for Site Specific Advisory Boards EM SSAB Charter DOE Manual - ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste Tank Waste and Waste Processing Waste Disposition Packaging and Transportation Site & Facility Restoration Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Facility Engineering Soil & Groundwater Sustainability Program Management Safety

272

Model Policies | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Center Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center FAQs Publications Resource Guides eLearning Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series Utility Savings Estimators Model Policies States and local jurisdictions across the nation have demonstrated leadership in developing programs and policies that both encourage and require compliance with energy codes, stretch codes (e.g., above-minimum codes) and green building techniques, energy-efficiency practices, and environmentally-friendly procedures. The laws and regulations behind these programs and policies can help states and jurisdictions establish unique policies to address their particular needs. Model policies for residential and commercial building construction have

273

Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the potential effects that emerging mandatory carbon markets have for voluntary markets for renewable energy, or green power markets. In an era of carbon regulation, green power markets will continue to play an important role because many consumers may be interested in supporting renewable energy development beyond what is supported through mandates or other types of policy support. The paper examines the extent to which GHG benefits motivate consumers to make voluntary renewable energy purchases and summarizes key issues emerging as a result of these overlapping markets, such as the implications of carbon regulation for renewable energy marketing claims, the demand for and price of renewable energy certificates (RECs), and the use of RECs in multiple markets (disaggregation of attributes). It describes carbon regulation programs under development in the Northeast and California, and how these might affect renewable energy markets in these regions, as well as the potential interaction between voluntary renewable energy markets and voluntary carbon markets, such as the Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX). It also briefly summarizes the experience in the European Union, where carbon is already regulated. Finally, the paper presents policy options for policymakers and regulators to consider in designing carbon policies to enable carbon markets and voluntary renewable energy markets to work together.

Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Carroll, G.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Making Memorial University's Policy Database and Website work for you The policy website at Memorial University of Newfoundland contains a database of policy and procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and press Enter. The Search looks within the Policy title, the Policy Purpose, Policy Scope and all the text, but which may help locate a policy. The search uses both the index of terms as well as string matching. You of browse and search features to help you get the most out of the site. Its navigation is designed to rely

Oyet, Alwell

275

Property:Policies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policies Policies Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Policies Property Type String Description Policies as defined in cleanenergysolutions.org Allows the following values: Deployment Programs Financial Incentives Regulations Subproperties This property has the following 84 subproperties: 2 2010 Vehicle Technologies Market Report A A European Supergrid for Renewable Energy: Local Impacts and Far-Reaching Challenges A Strategy for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in the United Kingdom and Beyond Accelerating Successful Smart Grid Pilots Aligning Utility Incentives with Investment in Energy Efficiency: A Resource of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (United States) Aligning Utility Interests with Energy Efficiency Objectives: A Review of Recent Efforts at Decoupling and Performance Incentives

276

Stock market volatility and price discovery : three essays on the effect of macroeconomic information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simple Microstructure Model of Price Determination . . 3.11Stock Market Volatility and Price Discovery: Three Essays onConstruction Spending PRICES CPI MONETARY POLICY FFR Source:

Rangel, Jose Gonzalo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

POLICY FLASH  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DATE: TO: FROM: January 28,2005 Procurement Directors Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy, ME-61 Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: Changes in Small Business Contracting Policy SUMMARY: This Policy Flash forwards changes to the Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB) price evaluation adjustment, new guidance from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) on improving subcontracting opportunities with small businesses, and the requirement for recertification of small business status. Page 1 of3 POLICY FLASH 2005-16 1. The statute for the SDB price evaluation adjustment implemented in FAR Subpart 19.11 is no longer in effect for civilian agencies, except the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Coast Guard. See the attached Civilian Agency Acquisition Council Letter, dated December 27,2004: ~ CAAC Letter 2004-04, Expirationc

278

POLICY FLASH  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 DATE: TO: FROM: February 10,2005 Procurement Directors Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy, ME-61 Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: Acquisition Guide Updates SUMMARY: This Policy Flash advises you of changes being made to five chapters of the Department of Energy Acquisition Guide. These changes are as follows: Pagel of 2 -_un - --- n__- Chapter 26.1 Energy Policy Act hnplementation - The changes to this chapter were updates and editorial style changes. Chapter 26.2 Energy Policy Act Cost Sharing Requirements - The changes to this chapter were updates and editorial style changes. Chapter 37.1 Support Service Contracting - Revisions were made to recognize performance based service acquisition. Other changes were updates and editorial style changes. Chapter39.1 Acquisitionof InformationResources- The changesto this chapterwere updates

279

National Environmental Policy Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Policy Act Environmental Policy Act to. # LM-24-10 Legacy Management Project/Activity: Abandon four monitoring wells associated with the Rocky Flats, CO~ Site. A. Brief Projecti Activity Description The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) proposes to abandon four groundwater monitoring wells that were installed in the 1990s near the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site. Three of the wells are adjacent to the Great Western Reservoir, and one is adjacent to Standley Lake; the attached map shows the well locations. Wells 11994~ 11894; and 49192 are in the city of Broomfield, and well 49292 is in the city of Westminster. The wells are no longer needed for groundwater monitoring purposes and are scheduled to be abandoned before the end of 20 1 0 and in accordance with regulations

280

Policy & Strategic Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Directed R&D Laboratory Directed R&D Office of Technology Commercialization and Partnerships Other Information BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Policy & Strategic Planning Directorate Policy and Strategic Planning (P&SP) Directorate coordinates development of the Laboratory Strategic Plan and annual business plans at the institutional and organizational Level. This function includes administration of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. The Directorate is also responsible for the Laboratory's technology transfer functions, including collaborations with industry and work for others; and for increasing funding from sources other than DOE. Organization Chart (pdf) Top of Page Last Modified: June 4, 2013 Please forward all questions about this site to: Teresa Baker

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

What kind of interaction between antidumping and competition policies is desirable within Mercosur?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into account market liberalisation policies, politicalthreat to an effective liberalisation course enabled by themade possible through trade liberalisation could merely be

Florncio, Pedro de Abreu e Lima

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Welfare effects of biofuel policies in the presence of environmental externalities and pre-existing distortions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Policy intervention in the biofuel market has led to a significant increase in biofuel production and use in the past several years. However, the welfare (more)

Lasco, Marie Christine D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

NREL: Energy Analysis - Market Analysis Models and Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Analysis Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Market Analysis Models and Tools The following is a list of models and tools that are used for market...

284

Review of U.S. ESCO industry market trends: An empirical analysis of project data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sector energy efficiency services industry and market trendsof US ESCO Industry Market Trends site energy basis (1 kWh =suspect that energy Review of US ESCO Industry Market Trends

Goldman, Charles A.; Hopper, Nicole C.; Osborn, Julie G.; Singer, Terry E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Encouraging the Domestic Small Turbine Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The state incentives for home-based renewables in the domestic market continue to grow and change creating opportunities for the small wind turbine market. Tracking the opportunities to get small wind turbines included in incentive policies and developing a proactive industry approach is important because market changes can occur anytime. There are near-term opportunities to work with states in developing their strategies for disbursing system benefit charges, adding tags to existing policies for other small renewables to include small wind, and developing state-wide net metering programs. Other opportunities to improve the domestic market exist but will be quite challenging to implement. Other opportunities include federal tax credits, state wind access laws, equipment verification for specific states, and leasing programs for small wind turbines.

Forsyth, T.

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

286

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity. Wiley IEEE Press. [25]in the England and Wales Electricity Market, Power WorkingFelder (1996), Should Electricity Markets Have a Capacity

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Information Markets and Aggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Markets and Aggregation by Narahari Mohan PhatakSpring 2012 Information Markets and Aggregation CopyrightMohan Phatak Abstract Information Markets and Aggregation by

Phatak, Narahari Mohan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the prevailing PJM energy market price. The demand in thethe prevailing national energy market price. Last, suppliersraising the national energy market price cap P up to f, in

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Market Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Market Trends Economic Activity Renewables International Oil Markets Oil & Natural Gas Energy Demand Coal Electricity Emissions The projections in AEO2001 are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend forecasts, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. EIA does not propose, advocate, or speculate on future legislative and regulatory changes. All laws are assumed to remain as currently enacted; however, the impacts of emerging regulatory changes, when defined, are reflected.

290

Voluntary Green Power Market Forecast through 2015  

SciTech Connect

Various factors influence the development of the voluntary 'green' power market--the market in which consumers purchase or produce power from non-polluting, renewable energy sources. These factors include climate policies, renewable portfolio standards (RPS), renewable energy prices, consumers' interest in purchasing green power, and utilities' interest in promoting existing programs and in offering new green options. This report presents estimates of voluntary market demand for green power through 2015 that were made using historical data and three scenarios: low-growth, high-growth, and negative-policy impacts. The resulting forecast projects the total voluntary demand for renewable energy in 2015 to range from 63 million MWh annually in the low case scenario to 157 million MWh annually in the high case scenario, representing an approximately 2.5-fold difference. The negative-policy impacts scenario reflects a market size of 24 million MWh. Several key uncertainties affect the results of this forecast, including uncertainties related to growth assumptions, the impacts that policy may have on the market, the price and competitiveness of renewable generation, and the level of interest that utilities have in offering and promoting green power products.

Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Sumner, J.; Kreycik, C.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Voluntary Green Power Market Forecast through 2015  

SciTech Connect

Various factors influence the development of the voluntary 'green' power market--the market in which consumers purchase or produce power from non-polluting, renewable energy sources. These factors include climate policies, renewable portfolio standards (RPS), renewable energy prices, consumers' interest in purchasing green power, and utilities' interest in promoting existing programs and in offering new green options. This report presents estimates of voluntary market demand for green power through 2015 that were made using historical data and three scenarios: low-growth, high-growth, and negative-policy impacts. The resulting forecast projects the total voluntary demand for renewable energy in 2015 to range from 63 million MWh annually in the low case scenario to 157 million MWh annually in the high case scenario, representing an approximately 2.5-fold difference. The negative-policy impacts scenario reflects a market size of 24 million MWh. Several key uncertainties affect the results of this forecast, including uncertainties related to growth assumptions, the impacts that policy may have on the market, the price and competitiveness of renewable generation, and the level of interest that utilities have in offering and promoting green power products.

Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Sumner, J.; Kreycik, C.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Wind Technologies Market Report 9 Wind Technologies Market Report Title 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2010 Authors Wiser, Ryan H., Mark Bolinger, Galen L. Barbose, Naïm Darghouth, Ben Hoen, Andrew D. Mills, Kevin Porter, Sari Fink, and Suzanne Tegen Pagination 88 Date Published 08/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, power system economics, renewable energy, wind power Abstract The U.S. wind power industry experienced yet another record year in 2009, once again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, 2009 was a year of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting the wind power industry and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. The year 2010, meanwhile, is anticipated to be one of some retrenchment, with expectations for fewer wind power capacity additions than seen in 2009. The rapid pace of development and change within the industry has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace, yet the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater.

293

Policy Analysis System (Polysys) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Analysis System (Polysys) Policy Analysis System (Polysys) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Policy Analysis System (Polysys) Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory/University of Tennessee Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Phase: Prepare a Plan Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.agpolicy.org/polysys.html OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Policy Analysis System, Polysys Language: English References: Agricultural Policy Analysis Center Research Tools[1] Model U.S. planning decisions at the level of the agricultural statistics district; crop demands and market prices at the national level; and the integrated livestock sector at the national level. Includes fourteen crops and five livestock commodities.

294

Distributed Wind Market Applications  

SciTech Connect

Distributed wind energy systems provide clean, renewable power for on-site use and help relieve pressure on the power grid while providing jobs and contributing to energy security for homes, farms, schools, factories, private and public facilities, distribution utilities, and remote locations. America pioneered small wind technology in the 1920s, and it is the only renewable energy industry segment that the United States still dominates in technology, manufacturing, and world market share. The series of analyses covered by this report were conducted to assess some of the most likely ways that advanced wind turbines could be utilized apart from large, central station power systems. Each chapter represents a final report on specific market segments written by leading experts in this field. As such, this document does not speak with one voice but rather a compendium of different perspectives, which are documented from a variety of people in the U.S. distributed wind field.

Forsyth, T.; Baring-Gould, I.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Web Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policies Policies /about/_assets/images/icon-70th.jpg Web Policies LANL places a high degree of emphasis on user experience and thus all webspaces are designed, developed, and tested thoroughly for usability and accessibility. Accessibility» Usability» Copyright, Legal» STC Summit Award» LOOK INTO LANL - highlights of our science, people, technologies close Scholarship fund changes lives Life-changing experience: springboard to a career in exercise science and physical therapy. READ MORE Jacob Leyba, recipient of the Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund Domenici scholarship Jacob Leyba, recipient of the Senator Pete Domenici Endowed Scholarship Fund. Contact Us Web Team Email More Like This Bradbury Science Museum Calendar Corporate Responsibility Fact Sheets Publications

296

Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy Integrating Efficiency Into Climate Change Mitigation Policy Speaker(s): Steven R. Schiller Date: December 8, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Diamond Steve will discuss policy options for deploying energy efficiency resources in electricity (non-transportation) end-use markets to meet needed GHG emission reduction levels. This discussion will include listing some barriers inherent to climate policy design, as well as energy markets, that inhibit efficiency investment as an emissions reduction strategy. However, the focus of the talk is on recommendations for effective mechanisms that incorporate end-use electricity energy efficiency into climate change mitigation efforts. In a recent ACEEE paper, Steve and his co-authors,

297

Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE's '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Environmental policy in transition economies : the effectiveness of pollution changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most economists and analysts claim that extended use of pollution charges in environmental policy will have substantial efficiency advantages in countries undergoing transition to market economies. Essentially this paper ...

Sderholm, Patrik

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

STANDARD-SETTING, INNOVATION SPECIALISTS AND COMPETITION POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a simple model of patent licensing followed by product-market competition, this paper investigates several competition policy questions related to standard-setting organizations (SSO's). It concludes that competition ...

Schmalensee, Richard

300

POLICY CONTENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 31, 1999. It lists in alphabetical order the National Customs Rulings (NCR) that were made since the Memorandum was published. 2. Appendix B Supplement 1 is a supplement to Appendix B of Memorandum D11-11-2. It presents the policy content of the more recent NCRs, which are listed by numerical order of tariff items for greater ease of reference.

Um D; National Customs Rulings (ncrs

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Market barriers to energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Discussions of energy policy in an environmentally constrained world often focus on the use of tax instruments to internalize the external effects of energy utilization or achieve specified reductions in energy use in the most cost-effective manner. A substantial literature suggests, however, that significant opportunities exist to reduce energy utilization by implementing technologies that are cost-effective under prevailing economic conditions but that are not fully implemented by existing market institutions. This paper examines the theory of the market for energy-using equipment, showing that problems of imperfect information and transaction costs may bias rational consumers to purchase devices that use more energy than those that would be selected by a well-informed social planner guided by the criterion of economic efficiency. Consumers must base their purchase decisions on observed prices and expectations of postpurchase equipment performance. If it is difficult or costly for individuals to form accurate and precise expectations, the level of energy efficiency achieved by competitive markets will vary from the socially efficient outcome. Such market barriers'' suggest a role for regulatory intervention to improve market performance at prevailing energy prices.

Howarth, R.B. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Andersson, B. (Stockholm School of Economics (Sweden))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Market barriers to energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Discussions of energy policy in an environmentally constrained world often focus on the use of tax instruments to internalize the external effects of energy utilization or achieve specified reductions in energy use in the most cost-effective manner. A substantial literature suggests, however, that significant opportunities exist to reduce energy utilization by implementing technologies that are cost-effective under prevailing economic conditions but that are not fully implemented by existing market institutions. This paper examines the theory of the market for energy-using equipment, showing that problems of imperfect information and transaction costs may bias rational consumers to purchase devices that use more energy than those that would be selected by a well-informed social planner guided by the criterion of economic efficiency. Consumers must base their purchase decisions on observed prices and expectations of postpurchase equipment performance. If it is difficult or costly for individuals to form accurate and precise expectations, the level of energy efficiency achieved by competitive markets will vary from the socially efficient outcome. Such ``market barriers`` suggest a role for regulatory intervention to improve market performance at prevailing energy prices.

Howarth, R.B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Andersson, B. [Stockholm School of Economics (Sweden)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

U.S. Department of Energy Technology Marketing Summaries ...  

Site Map; Printable Version; Share this resource. Send a link to U.S. Department of Energy Technology Marketing Summaries - Energy Innovation Portalto ...

304

NREL: Energy Analysis - State and Local Policy Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State and Local Policy Analysis State and Local Policy Analysis NREL's state and local policy analysis team examines the effects of policy on renewable energy development and deployment on a state and local level. Clean Energy Policy Analyses Project One of NREL's key state and local policy initiatives is the Clean Energy Policy Analyses (CEPA) project. Through this project, NREL analysts seek to quantify the connection between state and local policies and clean energy market development and identify the impact of state policy on decision makers. Learn more about CEPA on the NREL State & Local Activities website. Key Analyses for 2012 Cover of the Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience report State Renewable Portfolio Standards

305

State and Local Clean Energy Policy Primer: Getting from Here to Clean Electricity with Policy (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Single policies do not create market transformation for a Single policies do not create market transformation for a clean energy economy in states and localities. To reap the economic, environmental, and security benefits of clean energy development, suites of policies applied in succession are often the most cost-effective way to move toward transformation. This also allows for states and localities to target the lowest cost strategies first, increasing consumer comfort with innovative clean energy technologies later on. This factsheet proposes a framework for how states and localities can build policy portfolios by first setting the stage for clean energy in the market with low cost policies, and then growing the market with successive policies until the need for financial incentives can be reduced and eventually eliminated.

306

State and Local Clean Energy Policy Primer: Getting from Here to Clean Electricity with Policy (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single policies do not create market transformation for a Single policies do not create market transformation for a clean energy economy in states and localities. To reap the economic, environmental, and security benefits of clean energy development, suites of policies applied in succession are often the most cost-effective way to move toward transformation. This also allows for states and localities to target the lowest cost strategies first, increasing consumer comfort with innovative clean energy technologies later on. This factsheet proposes a framework for how states and localities can build policy portfolios by first setting the stage for clean energy in the market with low cost policies, and then growing the market with successive policies until the need for financial incentives can be reduced and eventually eliminated.

307

Policies for Renewable Electricity Use | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policies for Renewable Electricity Use Policies for Renewable Electricity Use Policies for Renewable Electricity Use October 16, 2013 - 5:12pm Addthis The renewable energy screening should include an assessment of several key utility policies at the facility site. In addition to financial incentives, states and local governments have adopted policies to remove barriers to the use of renewable energy and to facilitate the use of these technologies in a safe and fair manner. These policies are focused on electric-generating technologies and enabling the economic use of on-site power generation at a customer's site. The screening needs to outline the key provisions at the facility site and assess the impact on the use of these technologies at the site under review. Key policies include: Interconnection

308

Necessary and Sufficient Conditions for Optimal Offers in Electricity Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider the optimal policy for a generator offering power into a wholesale electricity market operating under a pool arrangement. Anderson and Philpott [Math. Oper. Res., 27 (2002), pp. 82--100] recently discussed necessary ... Keywords: electricity markets, necessary conditions, optimal offer, sufficient conditions

Edward J. Anderson; Huifu Xu

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

When Do Markets Tip? A Cognitive Hierarchy Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The market structure of platform competition is critically important to managers and policy makers. Network effects in these markets predict concentrated industry structures, whereas competitive effects and differentiation suggest the opposite. Standard ... Keywords: bounded rationality, cognitive hierarchy, platform competition, vertical and horizontal differentiation

Tanjim Hossain, John Morgan

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

NREL: Jobs and Economic Competitiveness - Comparative Advantage Market  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparative Advantage Market Analysis Comparative Advantage Market Analysis The market for solar energy technologies continues to grow (48% compound annual growth rate [CAGR] from 1999-2008). Globalization of these markets has advanced the industry by accelerating performance improvements and reducing product costs through increased competition. NREL's comparative advantage market analysis is focused on understanding the key US export opportunities in the solar energy technologies global market, the US competitive advantages in this market and what US policies can best support/facilitate increased exports. NREL's comparative advantages market analysis studies show that: The US was a net exporter of solar technologies in 2010 and, as an innovation leader in this area, is well positioned for future export

312

Solar Renewable Energy Certificate (SREC) Markets: Status and Trends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines experience in solar renewable energy certificate (SREC) markets in the United States. It describes how SREC markets function--key policy design provisions, eligible technologies, state and regional eligibility rules, solar alternative compliance payments, measurement and verification methods, long-term contracting provisions, and rate caps. It also examines the trends of SREC markets--trading volumes, sourcing trends, trends in the size of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems driven by these markets, and trends in price and compliance. Throughout, the paper explores key issues and challenges facing SREC markets and attempts by policymakers to address some of these market barriers. Data and information presented in this report are derived from SREC tracking systems, brokers and auctions, published reports, and information gleaned from market participants and interviews with state regulators responsible for SREC market implementation. The last section summarizes key findings.

Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Kreycik, C.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U U .S. national energy security de- pends on sufficient energy supplies to support U.S. and global economic growth. Energy policies that have em- phasized reliance on market forces have led to major energy security gains over the past two decades. Major improvements in explo- ration and production technology, as well as the trend toward opening new areas around the globe for exploration and devel- opment, have yielded significant dividends: Strengthening Global Alliances Enhancing National Energy Security and International Relationships * The U.S. and world economies have diversified their sources of oil sup- plies, largely through increased production in the Western Hemisphere, the North Sea, and Africa. * The world's fuel mix is also more diverse, primarily because of greater reli-

314

JM to Revise DOE P 434.1, Notice of Intent to Revise Department of Energy Policy 434.1, Conduct and Approval of Select Agent and Toxin Work at Department of Energy Sites  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This memorandum provides justification for the revision of Department of Energy (DOE) Policy (P) 434.1 Conduct and Approval of Select Agent and Toxin Work at ...

2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

315

Site Map - EERE Commercialization Office - Home - Energy ...  

Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S. Department of Energy | USA.gov ... Small Business and Clean Energy Alliance (CEA) Partnership; Technology ...

316

Fugitive Emissions in 2010 Site Sustainability Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fugitive Emissions in 2010 Site Sustainability Plans Josh Silverman Chair, Fugitive Emissions Working Group Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance (HS-22) April 14, 2011 2...

317

Energy Citations Database (ECD) - Site Map  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Site Map Home Basic Search Fielded Search Document Availability About ECD Help FAQ Contact Us Website Policies and Important Links Alerts Log On Alerts Registration Alerts Help...

318

Solar Photovoltaics Market Update: Volume 2 - Summer 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 2 of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) quarterly Solar PV Market Update provides EPRI members with continued insight into some of the front-line trends throughout the photovoltaic (PV) segment. Whereas Volume 1 of the Solar PV Market Update (1025103) focused more intently on the PV market situation in the United States, this edition explores various solar industry economic, policy, and technology issues from an international perspective. It ...

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

319

Electronic OTC Trading in the German Wholesale Electricity Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Recent changes in the German energy policy initiated a deregulation process from a monopolistic to a competitive market, fundamentally changing the market structure, transaction relationships and trading processes. While the mutual exchange of electric energy has been a business activity between vertically integrated utilities for a long time, wholesale electricity trading in an open market only recently started to gain momentum. Electricity becomes a commodity traded at power exchanges and off-exchange on over the counter (OTC) markets. In Germany, the wholesale electricity market is dominated by OTC trading. Trading in OTC markets is usually performed via telephone and facsimile which leads to a limited price transparency, a limited liquidity, an ex ante restricted number of potential market partners and, last but not least, substantial transaction costs. Market participants are therefore searching for new trading mechanisms to circumvent the problems of the current trading processes. The electronization of trading activities promises to reduce the disadvantages of current OTC trading processes through the automation of tasks within the transaction chain. In this context, electronic markets for electricity trading are coordination mechanisms for the market exchange of electricity and electricity derivatives, i. e., a virtual market place where supply and demand meet and trade. An important feature of electronic markets is an automated dynamic pricing which is currently not supported by electronic markets available for electricity trading in the German wholesale market. A concept for an Electronic Electricity Trading System is therefore proposed with a main focus on automated price discovery.

Stefan Strecker; Christof Weinhardt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

General and Partial Equilibrium Modeling of Sectoral Policies to Address Climate Change in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This document provides technical documentation for work using detailed sectoral models to calibrate a general equilibrium analysis of market and non-market sectoral policies to address climate change. Results of this work can be found in the companion paper, ?Modeling Costs of Economy-wide versus Sectoral Climate Policies Using Combined Aggregate-Sectoral Models?.

Pizer, William; Burtraw, Dallas; Harrington, Winston; Newell, Richard; Sanchirico, James; Toman, Michael

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

POLICY CONCLUSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increased integration of the global economy, there has been a rising concern over the effects of trade policy on the environment. Recent research has shown that trade liberalisation can act as a magnifier of governance problems in the forest sector if the regulatory and institutional capacity is weak. Recognising this risk, the US-Peru free trade agreement includes a binding Forest Annex, which specifies numerous measures to strengthen the legal and institutional framework of Perus forest sector. The Forest Annex also outlines an innovative rule-based, bi-national verification system, which may be of wider relevance in the debate about verification systems design. This paper explores the challenges of this innovative environmental addition to trade policy, and considers implications for forest governance in Peru.

Bernardo Ortiz-von Halle; Braulio Buenda; Chen Hin Keong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

An empirical investigation of the effect of financial liberalisation on growth and financial market performance for Asia-Pacific countries .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Economic liberalisation is still a highly debatable policy issue of today especially in the emerging market context. Past theoretical research and empirical evidence have suggested (more)

Chaudhuri, Sanjana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Topic: Regulatory & Policy Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Regulatory & Policy Recommendations. The impact of regulations and policies on the manufacturing industry in areas such as tax, energy, trade ...

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

324

Solid-State Lighting: Orchestrating Market Success: Seattle Market...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Orchestrating Market Success: Seattle Market Introduction Workshop Video to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Orchestrating Market Success: Seattle Market Introduction...

325

The investigation of the market disequilibrium in the stock market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigated stock market disequilibrium focusing on two topics: the impact of multiple market makers on the market disequilibrium at the market microstructure level, (more)

Park, Jin Suk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Adaptive Experimentation and Domestic Food Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Working Paper examines the dynamics of maize production in distinct environments and localities in Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana, and the various factors that have influenced patterns of agricultural adaptation, innovation and transformation. Specifically, it analyses the influences of neoliberal policies on the institutional framework of maize seed policy, on the technical recommendations of state institutions and on farmer production systems. Drawing on detailed interviews with market traders and small-scale producers, it also contrasts the priorities of farmers with the recommendations of agricultural services and the extent to which research recommendations reflect or fail to reflect the actual developments in maize production systems. Finally, it explores the implications of policy support for the commercialisation of seeds for the wider seed system, including interactions between the formal, informal and market sectors.

Modernisation Farmer; Kojo Sebastian Amanor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Evaluating Energy Efficiency Policies with Energy-Economy Models  

SciTech Connect

The growing complexities of energy systems, environmental problems and technology markets are driving and testing most energy-economy models to their limits. To further advance bottom-up models from a multidisciplinary energy efficiency policy evaluation perspective, we review and critically analyse bottom-up energy-economy models and corresponding evaluation studies on energy efficiency policies to induce technological change. We use the household sector as a case study. Our analysis focuses on decision frameworks for technology choice, type of evaluation being carried out, treatment of market and behavioural failures, evaluated policy instruments, and key determinants used to mimic policy instruments. Although the review confirms criticism related to energy-economy models (e.g. unrealistic representation of decision-making by consumers when choosing technologies), they provide valuable guidance for policy evaluation related to energy efficiency. Different areas to further advance models remain open, particularly related to modelling issues, techno-economic and environmental aspects, behavioural determinants, and policy considerations.

Mundaca, Luis; Neij, Lena; Worrell, Ernst; McNeil, Michael A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

ENERGY POLICY REVIEW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specific restrictions that limit its use and distribution. The terms and conditions are available online at www.iea.org/w/bookshop/pricing.html INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY The International Energy Agency (IEA) is an autonomous body which was established in November 1974 within the framework of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to implement an international energy programme. It carries out a comprehensive programme of energy co-operation among twenty-six of the OECDs thirty member countries. The basic aims of the IEA are: To maintain and improve systems for coping with oil supply disruptions. To promote rational energy policies in a global context through co-operative relations with non-member countries, industry and international organisations. To operate a permanent information system on the international oil market. To improve the worlds energy supply and demand structure by developing alternative energy sources and increasing the efficiency of energy use. To assist in the integration of environmental and energy policies.

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and the Pursuit  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and the Pursuit of Renewable Energy Manufacturing Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and the Pursuit of Renewable Energy Manufacturing Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner: NREL State Clean Energy Policies Analysis Project (SCEPA) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Industry Topics: Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy10osti/46672.pdf

330

Feed-in Tariff Policy: Design, Implementation, and RPS Policy Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feed-in tariff (FIT) policies are implemented in more than 40 countries around the world and are cited as the primary reason for the success of the German and Spanish renewable energy markets. As a result of that success, FIT policy proposals are starting to gain traction in several U.S. states and municipalities. Experience from Europe is also beginning to demonstrate that properly designed FITs may be more cost-effective than renewable portfolio standards (RPS), which make use of competitive solicitations. This article explores the design and operation of feed-in tariff policies, including a FIT policy definition, payment-structure options, and payment differentiation. The article also touches on the potential interactions between FIT policies and RPS policies at the state level.

Cory, K.; Couture, T.; Kreycik, C.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

RUTGERS ENERGY INSTITUTE Energy Policy Seminar Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provide broadly similar economic incentives for clean energy deployment, but they exhibit different Sciences (IMCS) 71 Dudley Road, Cook Campus Abstract: A Clean Energy Standard (CES) is a flexible, marketRUTGERS ENERGY INSTITUTE Energy Policy Seminar Series Presents Bryan Mignone, U.S. Department

Goodman, Robert M.

332

Appendix B Ground Water Management Policy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ground Water Management Policy Ground Water Management Policy for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site and Adjacent Areas This page intentionally left blank Docun~ent Number Q0029500 Appendix B State of Utah DEPARTblENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION OF WATER RIGHTS Ground-Water Management Policy for the Mot~ticello Mill Tailings Site and Adjacent Areas The Monticello Mill Tailings Site is on the southeast portion of the tovm of Monticello in Sectton 36, T33S, K23E and Section 31, i33S. R24E, SLB&M. The mill site was used from 1942 to 1960 in the processing of uranium and vanadium. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently cleaning up the site. The site is in the small canyon that forms the drainage for South Creek. The general direction of water flow, of both surface streams and the shallow

333

ANNUAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT PLANNING SUMMARY FOR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT PLANNING SUMMARY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2012 FOR THE Y-12 NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLEX I. Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) on-going activity. Site-Wide...

334

Morocco-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morocco-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Morocco-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Morocco-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Name Morocco-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Partner Australia, Denmark, EC, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway Spain, Switzerland, UK, and US Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs

335

Jordan-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jordan-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jordan-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Jordan-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Name Jordan-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Partner Australia, Denmark, EC, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway Spain, Switzerland, UK, and US Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs

336

Indonesia-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Indonesia-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Indonesia-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Name Indonesia-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Partner Australia, Denmark, EC, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway Spain, Switzerland, UK, and US Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs

337

Turkey-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turkey-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Turkey-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Turkey-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Name Turkey-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Partner Australia, Denmark, EC, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway Spain, Switzerland, UK, and US Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs

338

Mexico-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Mexico-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mexico-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Name Mexico-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Partner Australia, Denmark, EC, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway Spain, Switzerland, UK, and US Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs

339

Colombia-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Colombia-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Colombia-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Name Colombia-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Partner Australia, Denmark, EC, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway Spain, Switzerland, UK, and US Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs

340

Brazil-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Brazil-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Brazil-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Name Brazil-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Partner Australia, Denmark, EC, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway Spain, Switzerland, UK, and US Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Thailand-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Thailand-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Thailand-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Name Thailand-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Partner Australia, Denmark, EC, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway Spain, Switzerland, UK, and US Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs

342

China-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) China-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: China-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Name China-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Partner Australia, Denmark, EC, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway Spain, Switzerland, UK, and US Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs

343

India-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) India-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: India-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Name India-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Partner Australia, Denmark, EC, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway Spain, Switzerland, UK, and US Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs

344

Ukraine-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ukraine-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Ukraine-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ukraine-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Name Ukraine-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Partner Australia, Denmark, EC, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway Spain, Switzerland, UK, and US Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs

345

Chile-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chile-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Chile-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Chile-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Name Chile-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Partner Australia, Denmark, EC, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway Spain, Switzerland, UK, and US Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs

346

Vietnam-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Vietnam-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Vietnam-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Name Vietnam-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Partner Australia, Denmark, EC, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway Spain, Switzerland, UK, and US Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs

347

International and Domestic Market Opportunities for Biomass Power: Volumes I and II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the domestic and international markets for biopower. Domestic and foreign markets present fundamentally different challenges to private power developers. Volume I focuses on the domestic market for biopower. The domestic challenge lies in finding economically viable opportunities for biopower. Vol. I outlines the current state of the U.S. biomass industry, discusses policies affecting biomass development, describes some demonstration projects currently underway, and discusses the future direction of the industry. Volume II focuses on the international market for biopower. Recent literature states that the electricity investment and policy climate in foreign markets are the key elements in successful private project development. Vol. II discusses the financing issues, policy climate, and business incentives and barriers to biopower development. As India and China are the largest future markets for biopower, they are the focus of this volume. Three other top markets- -Brazil, Indonesia, and the Philippines--are also discussed. Potential financial resources wrap up the discussion.

Not Available

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy attribute laws and market rules have declared that recognizing such generators attributes may be contingent on the presence of a compatible informationinformation system or policy. In any market area where an energyMarket Boundaries: Compatible Information Systems and the Treatment of Imports and Exports Robert Grace Sustainable Energy

Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Green Power Network: Past National Green Power Marketing Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fourth National Green Power Marketing Conference Fourth National Green Power Marketing Conference Key Ingredients for Successful Markets Held May 10-11, 1999 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania The Fourth National Green Power Marketing Conference was organized to examine the current state of green-power marketing and to explore opportunities to improve on the success of green-power sales in both regulated and deregulated markets. The conference was co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Power Research Institute, Renewable Energy Alliance, and Edison Electric Institute. View all of the Conference Presentations in Microsoft PowerPoint 95 (PPT) or Adobe Acrobat PDF format. Format is noted with file sizes. REPORT SUMMARY Today, in regulated monopoly markets, more than 50 utilities offer "green pricing" to their customers, but competitive green power marketing is still in early evolution. After a year of competitive market activity, it has become clear that the rules and mechanisms established for electric industry restructuring are critical to the success of green power marketing. The Fourth National Green Power Conference examined the current state of green power marketing, identified key market and policy needs under electric industry restructuring, and explored opportunities to improve on the success of green power sales in both regulated and deregulated markets.

350

Geothermal hydrothermal direct heat use: US market size and market penetration estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study estimates the future regional and national market penetration path of hydrothermal geothermal direct heat applications in the United States. A Technology Substitution Model (MARPEN) is developed and used to estimate the energy market shares captured by low-temperature (50 to 150/sup 0/C) hydrothermal geothermal energy systems over the period 1985 to 2020. The sensitivity of hydrothermal direct heat market shares to various government hydrothermal commercialization policies is examined. Several substantive recommendations to help accelerate commercialization of geothermal direct heat utilization in the United States are indicated and possible additional analyses are discussed.

El Sawy, A.H.; Entingh, D.J.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliability Assessment [19] PJM, Monitoring Market Unit (at http://www.pjm.com. [20] PJM, Monitoring Market Unit (at http://www.pjm.com. [21] PJM, Monitoring Market Unit (

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

North American Natural Gas Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Syllabus as of 2/27/2013. Will be updated as course progresses. Energy Economics and Policy Spring 2013 ENV/ENERGY 635  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Syllabus as of 2/27/2013. Will be updated as course progresses. 1 Energy Economics and Policy of markets and policies for various energy supply sources (such as petroleum, coal, natural gas, electricity of a variety of government policy responses, including energy price regulation, traditional and market

Ferrari, Silvia

354

Transmission Siting_071508.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coordinating Interstate Electric Coordinating Interstate Electric Transmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate The National Council on Electricity Policy 2 DISCLAIMER: The National Council on Electricity Policy is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The views and opinions expressed herein are strictly those of the authors and may not necessarily agree with the positions of the National Council on Electricity Policy, its committ ee members or the organizations they represent, the National Council funders, or those who commented on the paper during its draft ing. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Coordinating Interstate Electric Transmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate was prepared with the fi nancial assistance of a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offi ce of Electricity Delivery

355

2011 Vehicle Technologies Market Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the major trends in U.S. light-duty vehicle and medium/heavy truck markets as well as the underlying trends that caused them. This report is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP), and, in accord with its mission, pays special attention to the progress of high-efficiency and alternative-fuel technologies. This third edition since this report was started in 2008 offers several marked improvements relative to its predecessors. Most significantly, where earlier editions of this report focused on supplying information through an examination of market drivers, new vehicle trends, and supplier data, this edition uses a different structure. After opening with a discussion of energy and economics, this report features a section each on the light-duty vehicle and heavy/medium truck markets, and concluding with a section each on technology and policy. In addition to making this sectional re-alignment, this year s edition of the report also takes a different approach to communicating information. While previous editions relied heavily on text accompanied by auxiliary figures, this third edition relies primarily on charts and graphs to communicate trends. Any accompanying text serves to introduce the trends communication by the graphic and highlight any particularly salient observations. The opening section on Energy and Economics discusses the role of transportation energy and vehicle markets on a national (and even international) scale. For example, Figures 11 through 13 discuss the connections between global oil prices and U.S. GDP, and Figures 20 and 21 show U.S. employment in the automotive sector. The following section examines Light-Duty Vehicle use, markets, manufacture, and supply chains. Figures 26 through 33 offer snapshots of major light-duty vehicle brands in the U.S. and Figures 38 through 43 examine the performance and efficiency characteristics of vehicles sold. The discussion of Medium and Heavy Trucks offers information on truck sales (Figures 58 through 61) and fuel use (Figures 64 through 66). The Technology section offers information on alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure (Figures 68 through 77), and the Policy section concludes with information on recent, current, and near-future Federal policies like the Cash for Clunkers program (Figures 87 and 88) and the Corporate Automotive Fuel Economy standard (Figures 90 through 99) and. In total, the information contained in this report is intended to communicate a fairly complete understanding of U.S. highway transportation energy through a series of easily digestible nuggets.

Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Petroleum Marketing Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ii U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly August 2011 Preface The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical ...

357

Propane Market Status Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Propane Market Status Report 07272000 Click here to start Table of Contents Propane Market Status Report Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil Propane Demand by Sector Demand Impacted...

358

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ternative Approaches for Power Capacity Markets, Papers andand Steven Stoft, Installed Capacity and Price Caps: Oil onElectricity Markets Have a Capacity requirement? If So, How

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Market Organization and Efficiency in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and information about market procedures, and to Frank Wolak for comments on an earlier draft. v7.55 #12). It seeks to identify specific market rules and pro- tocols that can speed information revelation, discover involved in energy production and its delivery. During the past decade, this heterogeneity in market

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

360

Market Manual 2.0: Market Administration Part 2.14: Information Confidentiality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a catalogue of information in the possession and control of the IESO. Public Disclaimer The posting of documents on this Web site is done for the convenience of market participants and other interested visitors to the IESO Web site. Please be advised that, while the IESO attempts to have all posted documents conform to the original, changes can result from the original, including changes resulting from the programs used to format the documents for posting on the Web site as well as from the programs used by the viewer to download and read the documents. The IESO makes no representation or warranty, express or implied, that the documents on this Web site are exact reproductions of the original documents listed. In addition, the documents and information posted on this Web site are subject to change. The IESO may revise, withdraw or make final these materials at any time at its sole discretion without further notice. It is solely your responsibility to ensure that you are using up-to-date documents and information. This document may contain a summary of a particular market rule. Where provided, the summary has been used because of the length of the market rule itself. The reader should be aware, however, that where a market rule is applicable, the obligation that needs to be met is as stated in the Market Rules. To the extent of any discrepancy or inconsistency between the provisions of a particular market rule and the summary, the provision of the market rule shall govern.

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DOE Announces New Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements DOE Announces New Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements April 27, 2006 - 10:32am Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced new policy measures for the reimbursement of contractor pension and medical benefit plan costs that are based on sound business practices and market-based benchmarks for cost management. The Department will continue to reimburse contractors for costs for current and retired contractor employees' defined benefit pension plans and medical benefit plans under existing contract requirements. For new contractor employees, the Department will reimburse contractors for the costs of their market-based defined contribution pension plans (similar to 401(k)) and market-based medical benefit plans.

362

Demand Response - Policy: More Information | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response - Policy: More Information Demand Response - Policy: More Information Demand Response - Policy: More Information OE's commitment to ensuring non-wires options to modernize the nation's electricity delivery system includes ongoing support of a number of national and regional activities in support of demand response. The New England Demand Response Initiative (NEDRI), OE's initial endeavor to assist states with non-wire solutions, was created to develop a comprehensive, coordinated set of demand response programs for the New England regional power markets. NEDRI's goal was to outline workable market rules, public policies, and regulatory criteria to incorporate customer-based demand response resources into New England's electricity markets and power systems. NEDRI promoted best practices and coordinated

363

Capital Markets Climate Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Markets Climate Initiative Markets Climate Initiative Jump to: navigation, search Name Capital Markets Climate Initiative Agency/Company /Organization World Economic Forum Partner UK Department of Energy and Climate Sector Climate Topics Finance, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/cont Country India, Kenya, South Africa, Mexico, Tanzania Southern Asia, Eastern Africa, Southern Africa, Central America, Eastern Africa References CMCI[1] World Economic Forum[2] The Capital Markets Climate Initiative (CMCI) is a public-private initiative designed to support the scale up of private finance flows for low carbon technologies, solutions and infrastructure in developing economies by: Developing a common understanding amongst policy makers of why and

364

2008 Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program (WIP) Market Report  

SciTech Connect

The Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program (WIP) integrates local needs and interests in order to promote markets for energy efficiency (EE) and renewable energy (RE). Its activities are integrative across disparate technologies and market boundaries. In order to analyze the historical performance and forward-looking potential of this broad program, this report assesses market developments and outlooks at the following aggregated levels: states, cities and communities, Indian tribes, and low-income residential efficiency. The analytical goals of the report are to: identify market drivers for EE and RE, paying attention to subsidies, taxes, targets and mandates, environmental policy, energy security, and economic development; assess efficacy of existing policies; discuss challenges and barriers; evaluate high-impact measures for overcoming challenges and barriers; and forecast future market trends.

Doris, E.; Taylor, R.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS), Nonproliferation and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS) Nonproliferation & National Security (NPNS) Overview Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Strategic Trade Control Review of export license applications Multilateral Export Control Arrangements Interdiction Engagement & Training INECP INSEP GIPP Safeguards Concepts and Approaches Human Capital Development Additional Protocol Technical Assistance National Security Systems & Assessments National Security Information Systems Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Radiation Detection & Response (RDR) Contact NPNS Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nonproliferation and National Security Program Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS)

366

Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting It is state policy to manage groundwater and surface water resources from the perspective of aquifers, watersheds, and river basins to achieve

367

Don't Supersize Me! Toward a Policy of Consumption-Based Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Don't Supersize Me! Toward a Policy of Consumption-Based Energy Efficiency Jeffrey Harris, Rick ultimately reverse) the growth in total energy consumption and carbon emissions. Instead, policy makers need for effective policy in a carbon- and oil-constrained world with increasingly brittle energy markets. To start

Diamond, Richard

368

Price Discovery in the Natural Gas Markets of the United States and Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of the U.S. and Canada natural gas spot markets are evolving through deregulation policies and technological advances. Economic theory suggests that these markets will be integrated. The key question is the extent of integration among the markets. This thesis characterizes the degree of dynamic integration among 11 major natural gas markets, six from the U.S. and five from Canada, and determines each individual markets role in price discovery. This is the first study to include numerous Canadian markets in a North American natural gas market study. Causal flows modeling using directed acyclic graphs in conjunction with time series analysis are used to explain the relationships among the markets. Daily gas price data from 1994 to 2009 are used. The 11 natural gas market prices are tied together with nine long-run co-integrating relationships. All markets are included in the co-integration space, providing evidence the markets are integrated. Results show the degree of integration varies by region. Further results indicate no clear price leader exists among the 11 markets. Dawn market is exogenous in contemporaneous time, while Sumas market is an information sink. Henry Hub plays a significant role in the price discovery of markets in the U.S. Midwest and Northeast, but little to markets in the west. The uncertainty of a markets price depends primarily on markets located in nearby regions. Policy makers may use information on market integration for important policy matters in efforts of attaining efficiency. Gas traders benefit from knowing the price discovery relationships.

Olsen, Kyle

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

ARM/NSA ES&H Policy Statement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

all who work at, use, or visit the ACRFNSAAAO Site. The Site's ES&H policies and procedures are designed to ensure a safe work environment for Sandia employees, Sandia...

370

NREL: Technology Deployment - Solar Deployment and Market Transformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Deployment and Market Transformation Solar Deployment and Market Transformation NREL enables faster, easier, and less expensive solar installations by applying our expertise and knowledge to projects that addresses challenges, inefficiencies, and market barriers to solar technology deployment. Northeast Denver Housing Center Solarize Grassroots Movement Drives Down Solar Prices 30% in Portland, Oregon Solarize Northeast Denver Housing Center NREL Identifies PV for 28 Affordable Housing Units Our technical experts work with policymakers, program administrators, regulators, utilities, transmission organizations, technology developers, financial organizations, and insurance companies to help break down barriers to solar technology deployment by: Developing and delivering policy and market design trainings

371

Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Focus Area: Water power Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-renewable-energy-electricity-generatio Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-electricity-generati Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This video teaches the viewer about the current status and future

372

Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program: FY1999 Grant Descriptions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY1999 Grant FY1999 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program: FY1999 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information Public Benefits and Distributed Generation Outreach Project The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) will hold collaborative workshops with key stakeholders to build consensus on effective policy options for emerging competitive distributed generation markets. FY1999 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information More Documents & Publications Electric Restructuring Outreach Activities and Information Dissemination to State Public Utility Regulators Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program: FY2001 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program: FY2003 Grant Descriptions

373

Privacy Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Privacy Privacy Privacy/Security This web site is part of a federal computer system used to accomplish federal functions. Read the following important privacy and security information carefully. Security Notice October 31, 2000 This web site is part of a federal computer system used to accomplish federal functions. The Department of Energy monitors this web site for security purposes to ensure that it remains available to all users and to protect information in the system. By accessing this web site, you are expressly consenting to these monitoring activities. Unauthorized attempts to defeat or circumvent security features, to use the system for other than intended purposes, to deny service to authorized users, to access, obtain, alter, damage, or destroy information, or otherwise to interfere with the system or its operation are prohibited. Evidence of such acts may be disclosed to law enforcement authorities and result in criminal prosecution under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986 (Pub. L. 99-474) and the National Information Infrastructure Protection Act of 1996 (Pub. L. 104-294), (18 U.S.C. 1030), or other applicable criminal laws.

374

Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages Title Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages Publication Type Report Year of...

375

Privacy/Security Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Privacy/Security Privacy/Security Privacy/Security Policy This web site is part of a federal computer system used to accomplish federal functions. Read the following important privacy and security information carefully. Security Notice October 31, 2000 This web site is part of a federal computer system used to accomplish federal functions. The Department of Energy monitors this web site for security purposes to ensure that it remains available to all users and to protect information in the system. By accessing this web site, you are expressly consenting to these monitoring activities. Unauthorized attempts to defeat or circumvent security features, to use the system for other than intended purposes, to deny service to authorized users, to access, obtain, alter, damage, or destroy information, or otherwise to interfere with the system or its operation are prohibited. Evidence of such acts may be disclosed to law enforcement authorities and result in criminal prosecution under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986 (Pub. L. 99-474) and the National Information Infrastructure Protection Act of 1996 (Pub. L. 104-294), (18 U.S.C. 1030), or other applicable criminal laws.

376

Electricity Market Design and Price Manipulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integration of physical transactions and financial contracts is central to successful electricity market design. Virtually every energy transaction has some impact on prices. The mere fact that a physical transaction can affect prices to some degree, and thereby influence the prices of related financial contracts, cannot be a per se definition of price manipulation. A principled policy for characterizing price manipulation in organized electricity markets includes a stand-alone profitability test. Multiple market-clearing prices arise from degenerate pricing conditions that can occur in electricity markets under economic dispatch. In some instances, small changes in bilateral schedules can produce large changes in prices. These prices affect the value of associated financial transmission rights. A stand-alone profitability test distinguishes transactions that are consistent with workably competitive markets from transactions that serve no economic purpose other than to manipulate prices and profit from other financial contracts. Generalizing this standard to the degenerate conditions that give rise to multiple market-clearing prices provides a principled solution without undermining the market-design foundations that integrate economic dispatch, locational prices and financial transmission rights.

William W. Hogan; William W. Hogan I

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

NREL: Energy Analysis - Policy Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

policy analysis evaluates policies that can advance-or provide alternatives to-renewable energy technologies in meeting national goals. Federal Policy NREL's federal policy team...

378

NERSC Account Policies and Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Account Policies Account Policies There are a number of policies which apply to NERSC users. These policies originate from a number of sources, such as DOE regulations and...

379

The DOD Siting Clearinghouse  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The DoD Siting Clearinghouse The DoD Siting Clearinghouse Dave Belote Director, Siting Clearinghouse Office of the Secretary of Defense The Nexus of National Security & Renewable Energy * Unintended Consequences - Rapid development of renewable technologies - Rapidly changing military technology research & development * Existing Policy and Processes - Not up to date with changing technologies - Land use decision-making authorities fragmented across all levels of government 2 From Nellis to Shepherds Flat: Congressional Push for Action 3 Congressional Response - FY2011 NDAA, Section 358 * Section 358 "Study Of Effects Of New Construction Of Obstructions On Military Installations And Operations" - Integrated review process - 180-day backlog assessment

380

Princeton Site Ofice  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Princeton Site Ofice Princeton Site Ofice P.O. Box 102 Princeton, New Jersey 08542-0102 TO: Gregory H. Woods, General Counsel JA N Z Q= LMN N= SUBJECT: PRINCETON SITE OFFICE (PSO) 2013 ANNUAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) PLANNING SUMMARY Section 5(a)(7) of DOE Order 451.1B Change 3, NEPA Compliance Program, requires each Secretarial Oficer and Head of Field Organization to submit an Annual NEPA Planning Summary to the General Coun. s el. We have reviewed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Forestry Policies (New York) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forestry Policies (New York) Forestry Policies (New York) Forestry Policies (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Conservation New York has nearly 19 million acres of forested land, about 63 percent of the states land area. These lands are managed by the State Department of Environmental Conservation. The Department issued its Forest Action Plan in 2010, which includes discussion of sustainable markets and the promotion of forest products for energy uses by focusing on technical assistance, favorable policies and incentives: http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/lands_forests_pdf/fras070110.pdf The Department provides directory for timber and mill residue users: http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/46935.html

382

Refocused energy policy: a natural gas perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present adminstration's policy on energy development is briefly summarized. While the Department of Energy will be dismantled, several important functions will be preserved and will continue elsewhere in government. The administration's aim is not to present an energy blueprint to predetermine energy solutions, rather, policy is based on the belief that the marketplace must be allowed to determine the most economic and durable energy sources. Revision of the federal leasing policy is discussed. Free market pricing of oil and gas is another key aspect of the new energy policy. The development of advanced technology in the areas of natural gas recovery, methane from coalbed, development of tight sands deposits, geopressured aquifers, and coal gasification is also discussed.

Mares, J.W.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Optimizing password composition policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A password composition policy restricts the space of allowable passwords to eliminate weak passwords that are vulnerable to statistical guessing attacks. Usability studies have demonstrated that existing password composition policies can sometimes result ... Keywords: computational complexity, password composition policy, sampling

Jeremiah Blocki, Saranga Komanduri, Ariel Procaccia, Or Sheffet

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.oecd.org/dataoecd/39/39/42122112.pdf Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Screenshot References: Modelling Ag Policy[1] Overview "The role of agricultural policies in addressing the development needs of poorer countries is high on the political agenda, for both structural reasons and as a result of recent market developments. In the first place,

385

State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to section 139 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. March 2007 State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities More Documents & Publications State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

386

State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to section 139 of the energy policy act of 2005. March 2007 State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities More Documents & Publications State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

387

Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Agency/Company /Organization: International Food Policy Research Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Topics: Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ifpridp01018.pdf RelatedTo: Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium (MIRAGE) Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Screenshot

388

Managing the Costs of Informational Privacy: Pure Bundling as a Strategy in the Individual Health Insurance Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in genetic testing and data mining technologies have increased the availability of genetic information to insurance companies and insureds (applicants and policy holders) in the individual health insurance market (IHIM). Regulators, concerned ... Keywords: Bundling Information Privacy Insurance Markets Insurey Words And Phrases Ance Policy Privacy Privacy Cost

Matt E. Thatcher; Eric K. Clemons

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Power Market Simulation Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's first seminar on electricity market simulation provided a forum for discussion of potential modifications and applications for this new technology, specifically in the areas of market design and operations. The resounding messages heard from both speakers and participants were as follows: o The use of simulation for electricity markets has the potential to help society avoid devastating costs due to market flaws. o Market simulation can be broadly applied with a diverse set of potential users. o C...

2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Market Trend  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

mrktrend.gif (2686 bytes) Economic Activity International Oil Markets Energy Demand Electricity Oil & Natural Gas Coal Emissions The projections in AEO2000 are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend forecasts, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. EIA does not propose, advocate, or speculate on future legislative and regulatory changes. All laws are assumed to remain as currently enacted; however, the impacts of emerging regulatory changes, when defined, are reflected.

391

Web Policies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Web Policies Web Policies Web Policies Accessibility The U.S. Department of Energy is committed to providing access to our web pages for individuals with disabilities. To meet this commitment, this site is built to comply with the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. Section 508 requires that individuals with disabilities, who are members of the public seeking information or services from us, have access to and use of information and data that is comparable to that provided to the public who are not individuals with disabilities, unless an undue burden would be imposed on us. Section 508 also requires us to ensure that Federal employees with disabilities have access to and use of information and data that is comparable to the access to and use of information and data by Federal employees who are not individuals with

392

Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Policy Aviation Management Green Leases Executive Secretariat Energy Reduction at HQ Real Estate Approvals Documents and Publications Facilities and Infrastructure Federal...

393

b. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT POLICY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TMS Financial Management Policy establishes the methods and guidelines by which the .... INVESTMENT POLICIES AND PROCEDURES. 5.1 The...

394

Peru-GVEP Policy Coordination Platform | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GVEP Policy Coordination Platform GVEP Policy Coordination Platform Jump to: navigation, search Name Peru-GVEP Policy Coordination Platform Agency/Company /Organization Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Sector Energy Topics Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Workshop, Lessons learned/best practices Country Peru UN Region "Latin America" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property., Caribbean

395

State and Local Clean Energy Policy Primer: Getting from Here to Clean  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State and Local Clean Energy Policy Primer: Getting from Here to State and Local Clean Energy Policy Primer: Getting from Here to Clean Electricity with Policy (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) State and Local Clean Energy Policy Primer: Getting from Here to Clean Electricity with Policy (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) This fact sheet proposes a framework for how states and localities can build policy portfolios by first setting the stage for clean energy in the market with low cost policies, and then growing the market with successive policies until the need for financial incentives can be reduced and eventually eliminated. 51319.pdf More Documents & Publications Leading the Nation in Clean Energy Deployment (Fact Sheet), Integrated Deployment: Overview of Projects (ID)

396

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

policy support for other renewable energy sources, wind mayrenewable energy and climate policy initiatives. With wind

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

2008 Solar Technologies Market Report  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this report is the U.S. solar electricity market, including photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. The report is organized into five chapters. Chapter 1 provides an overview of global and U.S. installation trends. Chapter 2 presents production and shipment data, material and supply chain issues, and solar industry employment trends. Chapter 3 presents cost, price, and performance trends. Chapter 4 discusses policy and market drivers such as recently passed federal legislation, state and local policies, and developments in project financing. Chapter 5 provides data on private investment trends and near-term market forecasts. Highlights of this report include: (1) The global PV industry has seen impressive growth rates in cell/module production during the past decade, with a 10-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 46% and a 5-year CAGR of 56% through 2008. (2) Thin-film PV technologies have grown faster than crystalline silicon over the past 5 years, with a 10-year CAGR of 47% and a 5-year CAGR of 87% for thin-film shipments through 2008. (3) Global installed PV capacity increased by 6.0 GW in 2008, a 152% increase over 2.4 GW installed in 2007. (4) The United States installed 0.34 GW of PV capacity in 2008, a 63% increase over 0.21 GW in 2007. (5) Global average PV module prices dropped 23% from $4.75/W in 1998 to $3.65/W in 2008. (6) Federal legislation, including the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (EESA, October 2008) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA, February 2009), is providing unprecedented levels of support for the U.S. solar industry. (7) In 2008, global private-sector investment in solar energy technology topped $16 billion, including almost $4 billion invested in the United States. (8) Solar PV market forecasts made in early 2009 anticipate global PV production and demand to increase fourfold between 2008 and 2012, reaching roughly 20 GW of production and demand by 2012. (9) Globally, about 13 GW of CSP was announced or proposed through 2015, based on forecasts made in mid-2009. Regional market shares for the 13 GW are about 51% in the United States, 33% in Spain, 8% in the Middle East and North Africa, and 8% in Australasia, Europe, and South Africa. Of the 6.5-GW project pipeline in the United States, 4.3 GW have power purchase agreements (PPAs). The PPAs comprise 41% parabolic trough, 40% power tower, and 19% dish-engine systems.

Price, S.; Margolis, R.; Barbose, G.; Bartlett, J.; Cory, K.; Couture, T.; DeCesaro, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Frickel, M.; Hemmeline, C.; Mendelsohn, T.; Ong, S.; Pak, A.; Poole, L.; Peterman, C.; Schwabe, P.; Soni, A.; Speer, B.; Wiser, R.; Zuboy, J.; James, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A review of market monitoring activities at U.S. independent system operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Policymakers have increasingly recognized the structural impediments to effective competition in electricity markets, which has resulted in a renewed emphasis on the need for careful market design and market monitoring in wholesale and retail electricity markets. In this study, we review the market monitoring activities of four Independent System Operators in the United States, focusing on such topics as the organization of an independent market monitoring unit (MMU), the role and value of external market monitors, performance metrics and indices to aid in market analysis, issues associated with access to confidential market data, and market mitigation and investigation authority. There is consensus across the four ISOs that market monitoring must be organizationally independent from market participants and that ISOs should have authority to apply some degree of corrective actions on the market, though scope and implementation differ across the ISOs. Likewise, current practices regarding access to confidential market data by state energy regulators varies somewhat by ISO. Drawing on our interviews and research, we present five examples that illustrate the impact and potential contribution of ISO market monitoring activities to enhance functioning of wholesale electricity markets. We also discuss several key policy and implementation issues that Western state policymakers and regulators should consider as market monitoring activities evolve in the West.

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Goldman, Charles; Bartholomew, Emily

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

NASA Web Site Privacy and Important Notices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NASA Web Privacy Policy NASA Web Privacy Policy Thank you for visiting NASA and reviewing our policy notices. We have integrated these statements into a single posting for ease of use. The following links will help you navigate to a specific section: Privacy Policy Security Notice Accessibility Statement Linking Policy and Disclaimer of Endorsement Privacy Policy This notice provides NASA's policy regarding the nature, purpose, use and sharing of any information collected via this Web site. The information you provide on a NASA Web site will be used only for its intended purpose. We will protect your information consistent with the principles of the Privacy Act, the e-Government act of 2002, the Federal Records Act, and as applicable, the Freedom of Information Act. Submitting information is strictly voluntary. By doing so, you are giving

400

EIA-DOE Vehicle Choice and Markets Technical Workshop  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DOE Vehicle Choice and Markets Technical Workshop 1 DOE Vehicle Choice and Markets Technical Workshop 1 January 2013 EIA-DOE Vehicle Choice and Markets Technical Workshop Meeting Summary The Department of Energy (DOE) and Energy Information Administration (EIA) held a workshop on January 25th, 2013 in Detroit, MI with marketing and automotive industry experts to discuss and better understand consumer acceptance of hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles. The workshop focused on recent survey analyses, market representation, state of the art modeling, and comparisons of projected model results. This event provided a rare and insightful opportunity to compare and contrast our understanding and representation of vehicle markets and vehicle choice modeling with our nation's automotive leaders to assure that EIA's future projections and policy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energy Savings Certificate Markets: Opportunities and Implementation Barriers  

SciTech Connect

Early experiences with energy savings certificates (ESCs) have revealed their merits and the challenges associated with them. While in the United States ESC markets have yet to gain significant traction, lessons can be drawn from early experiences in the states of Connecticut and New York, as well as from established markets in Italy, France, and elsewhere. The staying power of European examples demonstrates that ESCs can help initiate more efficiency projects. This article compares ESCs with renewable energy certificates (RECs), looks at the unique opportunities and challenges they present, and reviews solutions and best practices demonstrated by early ESC markets. Three major potential ESC market types are also reviewed: compliance, voluntary, and carbon. Additionally, factors that will benefit ESC markets in the United States are examined: new state EEPS policies, public interest in tools to mitigate climate change, and the growing interest in a voluntary market for ESCs.

Friedman, B.; Bird, L.; Barbose, G.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Market Trend  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

mrktrend.gif (2686 bytes) mrktrend.gif (2686 bytes) Economic Activity International Oil Markets Energy Demand Electricity Oil & Natural Gas Coal Emissions The projections in AEO99 are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend forecasts, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. EIA does not propose, advocate, or speculate on future legislative and regulatory changes. All laws are assumed to remain as currently enacted; however, the impacts of emerging regulatory changes, when defined, are reflected. Because energy markets are complex, models are simplified representations of energy production and consumption, regulations, and producer and consumer behavior. Projections are highly dependent on the data, methodologies, model structures,

403

Site decommissioning management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Related Data Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Data Sites Related Data Sites CDIAC has listed the following Web sites because these sites offer high-quality data sets (not available through CDIAC) from a variety of global-change themes. These links will take you outside of CDIAC, therefore, we are not responsible for the content or intent of these outside links. This list is not intended to be comprehensive, but we do hope you find it useful if you cannot find what you are looking for here at CDIAC. Multi-Agency Sites Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS) GCDIS is a collection of distributed information systems operated by government agencies involved in global change research. GCDIS provides global change data to scientists and researchers, policy makers, educators, industry, and the public at large and includes multidisciplinary data from

405

Diagnosing Unilateral Market Power in Electricity Reserves Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Machado, M.P. , Bilateral Market Power and VerticalSpanish Electricity Spot Market, 2004, CEMFI Working PaperEquilibrium in Electricity Markets, 2004, Journal of

Knittel, Christopher R; Metaxoglou, Konstantinos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Market versus Non-Market Assignment of Initial Ownership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Each According To? Markets, Tournaments, and the MatchingIntervention on Housing Markets in Korea, mimeo, Sogang1993), Moving toward a Market for Spectrum, Regu- lation,

Che, Yeon-Koo; Gale, Ian

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Diagnosing Unilateral Market Power in Electricity Reserves Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cal- ifornia Power Exchange Energy Markets: Prepared for theCalifornias Wholesale Energy Market, 2001, Department ofpower in the states energy markets (Hildebrandt [2001];

Knittel, Christopher R; Metaxoglou, Konstantinos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Market for all Farmers: Market Institutions and Smallholder Participation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information, such as market information systems and gradesIn many countries, market information systems perform poorlyagencies to collect reliable market information. Following

Gabre-Madhin, Eleni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems...

410

How Dynamic Consumer Response, Competitor Response, Company Support, and Company Inertia Shape Long-Term Marketing Effectiveness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term marketing effectiveness is a high-priority research topic for managers, and emerges from the complex interplay among dynamic reactions of several market players. This paper introduces restricted policy simulations to distinguish four dynamic ... Keywords: company inertia and support, dynamic consumer and competitor response, impulse-response functions, long-term marketing effectiveness, policy simulation restrictions, postpromotion dip, vector autoregressive (VAR) models

Koen Pauwels

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Understanding and Informing the Policy Environment: State-Level Renewable Fuels Standards  

SciTech Connect

Renewable fuels standard (RFS) policies are becoming a popular public policy mechanism for developing the market for renewable fuels in the transportation sector. During the past decade, U.S. states and several countries began implementing these more market-based (less command and control) policies to support increased biofuels production and use. This paper presents an overview of current and proposed U.S. state-level policies, as well as selected electric sector policies and international fuel standard policies. Current U.S. state-level renewable fuel policies list drivers including an improved economy and environment, as well as fuel self-sufficiency. Best practices and experience from an evaluation of renewable portfolio standards (RPS) in the United States and international RFS policies can inform U.S. state-level policy by illustrating the importance of policy flexibility, binding targets, effective cost caps, and tradable permits. Understanding and building on the experiences from these previous policies can improve the policy mechanism and further develop a market for renewable fuels to meet the goals of improved economy, environment, and fuel self-sufficiency.

Brown, E.; Cory, K.; Arent, D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Workforce Restructuring Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document provides revised and consolidated policy and models intended to facilitate contractor workforce restructuring activities.

413

Optimization Online - Survivable Energy Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 9, 2006... at the same time, the dayahead energy market and the reserve market in order to price through the market, beside energy, the overall cost of...

414

Reliability and Competitive Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Behavior in a Competitive Electricity Market, InternationalDemand Response in Electricity Markets, Hewlett FoundationGreen, R. (1999) The Electricity Contract Market in England

Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study. Regions with fast energy markets, for example, changeis set aside in one energy market interval is then releasedto be dispatched in a later energy market interval, whereas

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Wood pellet market and trade: a global perspective  

SciTech Connect

This perspective provides an overview of wood pellet markets in a number of countries of high significance, together with an inventory of market factors and relevant past or existing policies. In 2010, the estimated global wood pellet production and consumption were close to 14.3 Mt (million metric tonnes) and 13.5 Mt, respectively, while the global installed production capacity had reached over 28 Mt. Two types of pellets are mainly traded (i) for residential heating and (ii) for large-scale district heating or co-fi ring installations. The EU was the primary market, responsible for nearly 61% and 85% of global production and consumption, respectively in 2010. EU markets were divided according to end use: (i) residential and district heating, (ii) power plants driven market, (iii) mixed market, and (iv) export-driven countries. North America basically serves as an exporter, but also with signifi cant domestic consumption in USA. East Asia is predicted to become the second-largest consumer after the EU in the near future. The development perspective in Latin America remains unclear. Five factors that determine the market characteristics are: (i) the existence of coal-based power plants, (ii) the development of heating systems, (iii) feedstock availability, (iv) interactions with wood industry, and (v) logistics factor. Furthermore, intervention policies play a pivotal role in market development. The perspective of wood pellets industry was also analyzed from four major aspects: (i) supply potential, (ii) logistics issues, (iii) sustainability considerations, and (iv) technology development.

Chun Sheng Goh; Martin Junginger; Maurizio Cocchi; Didier Marchal; Daniela Thran; Christiane Hennig; Jussi Heinimo; Lars Nikolaisen; Peter-Paul Schouwenberg; Douglas Bradley; J. Richard Hess; Jacob J. Jacobson; Leslie Ovard; Michael Deutmeyer

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report Title 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2011 Authors Wiser, Ryan H., and Mark Bolinger Tertiary Authors Darghouth, Naïm, Kevin Porter, Michael Buckley, Sari Fink, Russell Raymond, Frank Oteri, Galen L. Barbose, Joachim Seel, Andrew D. Mills, and Ben Hoen Pagination 98 Date Published 06/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, power system economics, renewable energy, wind power Abstract The U.S. wind power industry experienced a trying year in 2010, with a significant reduction in new builds compared to both 2008 and 2009. The delayed impact of the global financial crisis, relatively low natural gas and wholesale electricity prices, and slumping overall demand for energy countered the ongoing availability of existing federal and state incentives for wind energy deployment. The fact that these same drivers did not impact capacity additions in 2009 can be explained, in part, by the "inertia" in capital-intensive infrastructure investments: 2009 capacity additions were largely determined by decisions made prior to the economy-wide financial crisis that was at its peak in late 2008 and early 2009, whereas decisions on 2010 capacity additions were often made at the height of the financial crisis. Cumulative wind power capacity still grew by a healthy 15% in 2010, however, and most expectations are for moderately higher wind power capacity additions in 2011 than witnessed in 2010, though those additions are also expected to remain below the 2009 high.

418

2010 Northwest Federal Market Assessment Report  

SciTech Connect

The primary intent of this market assessment is to provide insights on the effectiveness of current energy efficiency and renewable energy program offerings available to Federal sites in the region. The level of detail, quality and currency of the data used in this market assessment varies significantly by Federal agency and energy efficiency service provider. Limited access to some Federal sites, limited availability of key points of contact, time/resource constraints, and other considerations limited the total number of Federal agencies and energy efficiency service providers participating in the survey.

Scanlon, Tim; Sandusky, William F.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) Agency/Company /Organization: Brookhaven National Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.iea-etsap.org/web/Markal.asp Cost: Paid OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool References: MARKAL website[1] Related Tools Ventana's Energy, Environment, Economy-Society (E3S) Model Ex Ante Appraisal Carbon-Balance Tool (EX-ACT) General Equilibrium Model for Economy - Energy - Environment (GEM-E3) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS An integrated energy systems modeling platform that can be used to analyze

420

MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) (Redirected from MARKAL) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) Agency/Company /Organization: Brookhaven National Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.iea-etsap.org/web/Markal.asp Cost: Paid OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool References: MARKAL website[1] Related Tools Ventana's Energy, Environment, Economy-Society (E3S) Model Ex Ante Appraisal Carbon-Balance Tool (EX-ACT) General Equilibrium Model for Economy - Energy - Environment (GEM-E3) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Structural Features that Contribute to Market Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we report an experiment that examines a primary concern of policy makers: how a structural feature of electric power networks can contribute to the exercise of market power by well-positioned players in deregulated markets. One such feature is the distribution of ownership of a given set of generating assets. For example, two large firms could be allocated baseload and intermediate generators such that either firm would be willing to withhold unilaterally the capacity of its intermediate generators from the market, to benefit from the supra-competitive prices which would result from only selling its baseload units. Conversely, ownership of the some of the intermediate generators from each of these firms could be transferred to two other firms, so that no one firm can unilaterally restrict output to spawn supra-competitive prices.

Stephen J. Rassenti; Vernon L. Smith; Bart J. Wilson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Advanced Modeling of Renewable Energy Market Dynamics: May 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a year-long academic project, presenting selected techniques for analysis of market growth, penetration, and forecasting applicable to renewable energy technologies. Existing mathematical models were modified to incorporate the effects of fiscal policies and were evaluated using available data. The modifications were made based on research and classification of current mathematical models used for predicting market penetration. An analysis of the results was carried out, based on available data. MATLAB versions of existing and new models were developed for research and policy analysis.

Evans, M.; Little, R.; Lloyd, K.; Malikov, G.; Passolt, G.; Arent, D.; Swezey, B.; Mosey, G.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Nordic Market Report 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

....................................................................17 5 ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION..................................................19 5.1 TRANSMISSION..............................................................................................20 5.3 ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION: CONCLUSIONSNordic Market Report 2009 Development in the Nordic Electricity Market Report 4/2009 #12;Nordic

424

Marketing alternative fueled automobiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marketing alternative fueled vehicles is a difficult challenge for automakers. The foundation of the market, the terms of competition, and the customer segments involved are still being defined. But automakers can draw ...

Zheng, Alex (Yi Alexis)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

2025 Power Marketing Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and is in the process of developing a plan for marketing and allocating LAP hydroelectric power after the FES contracts expire. We call this plan our 2025 Power Marketing...

426

From the flea market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is about marketplaces in general, and one flea market in particular. It explores some of the physical potentials the market has for generating a building and some of the social implications of a controversy ...

Krasnow, Ariel Rebecca

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Solar Photovoltaics Market Update, Volume 5: Q1 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 5 of EPRI's quarterly Solar PV Market Update provides continued insight into some of the front line trends that are afoot throughout the photovoltaic segment. Like previous Updates, it synthesizes primary as well as secondary data from multiple sources in an effort to highlight economic, policy, and technology developments that are likely to impact utility solar PV investment and planning efforts. Specifically, this report examines global PV installation and market issues, providing key ...

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

428

Exploring Alternative Wholesale Electricity Market Structures for California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The California Energy Commission workshop, Exploring Alternative Wholesale Electricity Market Structures for California, brought together a broad spectrum of industry stakeholders to evaluate alternative power market structures for their ability to reduce price volatility and ensure reliable energy service. This document includes workshop papers, presentations, and panel discussions. This information can help energy planners, regulators, and policy makers understand the lessons of the California power cr...

2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

429

NNSA Policies | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

content > NNSA Policies content > NNSA Policies NNSA Policies Review the various NNSA and Department of Energy policies for additional information. Website Policy Accessibility The U.S. Department of Energy is committed to providing access to our Web pages for individuals with disabilities. To meet this commitment, this site is built to comply with the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. Section 508 requires that individuals with disabilities, who are members of the public seeking information or services from us, have access to and use of information and data that is comparable to that provided to the public who are not individuals with disabilities, unless an undue burden would be imposed on us. Section 508 also requires us to ensure that Federal employees with disabilities have access to and use

430

CRB Policy Flashes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRB Policy Flashes CRB Policy Flashes CRB Policy Flashes In addition to granting certifications for DOE project management personnel, the Board is also tasked with developing and updating the policies that define the requisite knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to fulfill the Departmental mission for the effective management of capital asset projects as defined in DOE O 413.3B. To that end, the Board also establishes PMCDP certification requirements and publishes them in the Certification and Equivalency Guideline. In an effort to better inform the various participating program offices of changes within the PMCDP and the various certification requirements needed for each level of PMCDP certification, the Board publishes policy flash documents that are available for download here on the PMCDP Web site. New

431

Transformation of California's Residential Photovoltaics Market Through Third-Party Ownership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Third-party photovoltaics (PV) ownership is a rapidly growing market trend, where commercial companies own and operate customer-sited PV systems and lease PV equipment or sell PV electricity to the building occupant. Third-party PV companies can reduce or eliminate up-front adoption costs, reduce technology risk and complexity by monitoring system performance, and can repackage the PV value proposition by showing cost savings in the first month of ownership rather than payback times on the order of a decade. We find that the entrance of third-party business models in southern California residential PV markets has enticed a new demographic to adopt PV systems that is more highly correlated to younger, less affluent, and less educated populations than the demographics correlated to purchasing PV systems. By enticing new demographics to adopt PV, we find that third-party PV products are likely increasing total PV demand rather than gaining market share entirely at the expense of existing customer owned PV demand. We also find that mean population demographics are good predictors of third-party and customer owned PV adoption, and mean voting trends on California carbon policy (Proposition 23) are poor predictors of PV adoption.

Drury, E.; Miller, M.; Macal, C. M.; Graziano, D. J.; Heimiller, D.; Ozik, J.; Perry, T. D.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Publicly Backed Guarantees as Policy Instruments to Promote Clean Energy |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Publicly Backed Guarantees as Policy Instruments to Promote Clean Energy Publicly Backed Guarantees as Policy Instruments to Promote Clean Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Publicly Backed Guarantees as Policy Instruments to Promote Clean Energy Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: sefi.unep.org/fileadmin/media/sefalliance/docs/specialised_research/gu Publicly Backed Guarantees as Policy Instruments to Promote Clean Energy Screenshot References: Publicly Backed Guarantees as Policy Instruments to Promote Clean Energy[1] Summary "This report reviews experiences with the use of Publicly Backed Guarantees

433

Energy Tax Policies and Inter-Jurisdictional Challenges | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Tax Policies and Inter-Jurisdictional Challenges Energy Tax Policies and Inter-Jurisdictional Challenges Energy Tax Policies and Inter-Jurisdictional Challenges March 22, 2012 New Orleans, Louisiana The Roosevelt Hotel The Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Energy Forum on "Energy Tax Policies and Inter-Jurisdictional Challenges" was held March 22, 2012, in New Orleans, Louisiana. The forum provided an opportunity for tribal leaders and federal agencies to directly converse with each others regarding best practices in renewable energy investment and overcoming tax policy barriers, and get real-time market snapshots of: Renewable energy investment challenges Alternative energy tribal ownership opportunities Tax policy and inter-jurisdictional challenges This is one in a series of Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic

434

Steam driven markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The market for steam equipment has been relatively level. Looking ahead, manufacturers anticipate steady market growth worldwide. Steam equipment manufacturers share a similar view of the market for next few years - upward. The steady upward climb is being attributed to a number of factors that will benefit steam turbine and heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) makers.

Anderson, J.L.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Cross-Market Discounts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Firms in several markets attract consumers by offering discounts in other unrelated markets. This promotion strategy, which we call cross-market discounts, has been successfully adopted in the last few years by many grocery retailers in ... Keywords: competition, fuelperks!, game theory, nonlinear pricing, retail promotions

Marcel Goi?; Kinshuk Jerath; Kannan Srinivasan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Market Research Berkeley FIRST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Research Berkeley FIRST i dDevi Prasad Dt: 03/25/2008 #12;2 Customer Survey Goalsy 1 has > 50% natural gas component ( l di l t i h ) 38 9% 82 d t(excluding electric charges) 38.9% 82 Determine market barriers and purchase factors1.Determine market barriers and purchase factors 2.Relation

Kammen, Daniel M.

437

Attachment B: Other AIP Program Policies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B: Other AIP Program Policies B: Other AIP Program Policies Attachment B: Other AIP Program Policies Other AIP Program Policies Question #1: What is the role of local governments in AIP program emergency management planning activities? Answer: As indicated in the suggested model provisions related to emergency response in Attachment E, it is DOE policy that AIP provisions regarding emergency management planning activities encourage active participation by applicable local governments. Question #2: Which AIP provisions should be addressed through the development of site-specific procedures and protocol? Answer: Generally, site-specific procedures and protocols should be developed to address AIP program concerns that must be tailored to site conditions, such as: State generation of hazardous and/or radioactive wastes; on-site

438

Evolution of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evolution of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Evolution of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008 Title Evolution of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008 Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Larsen, Peter H., Charles A. Goldman, and Andrew Satchwell Date Published 07/2012 Type Pre-print of article submitted for publication to Energy Policy. Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, renewable energy: policy Abstract This is a pre-print version of an article published in the journal Energy Policy: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421512007173 Attachment Size Report PDF 548.25 KB Presentation PDF 934.31

439

Those who don't know : modernity, risk, and transition in Hanoi's local markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

My research is about the particular effects of Vietnam's economic liberalization program (known as "doi moi") on the local food and market system in Hanoi. Doi moi policies, which began in the late 1980s, have instituted ...

Hiesinger, Margaret Amalia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Solid Waste Policies (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policies (Iowa) Policies (Iowa) Solid Waste Policies (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources This statute establishes the support of the state for alternative waste management practices that reduce the reliance upon land disposal and incorporate resource recovery. Cities and counties are required to establish and operate a comprehensive solid waste reduction program. These regulations discuss land application of processed wastes as well as requirements for sanitary landfills and for groundwater monitoring near land disposal sites

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Policy  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Federal, Federal, State, & Local Printable Version Bookmark and Share Economic Development Policy Cap & Trade State Implementation Plans Supplemental Environmental Projects Resources & Tools Public Lands Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Wind Policy Federal, state, and local policies play an important role in wind energy development. More than 20 states have established renewable portfolio standards that require electricity providers to obtain a portion of their power from renewable sources. More than 15 states have established renewable energy funds that provide financial incentives and other types of support for wind energy development. In addition, voluntary consumer decisions to purchase green power can provide an important revenue stream

442

State and Regional Policy Assistance - Program Activities | Department of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State and Regional Policy Assistance - State and Regional Policy Assistance - Program Activities State and Regional Policy Assistance - Program Activities Providing Technical Assistance to States and Regions The Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program responds to both immediate and long-terms needs of states, regions, and other organizations to implement policy and market solutions that bring about improved demand response, energy efficiency, renewable energy, and transmission utilization. Examples include: Supporting efforts by the Western Governors' Association (WGA), its subsidiary Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB), and related ad-hoc subregional groups in the West as they work toward greater regional coordination and planning of regional electric infrastructure. (see Sample Products and Related Links or FY2003 Grants for details.)

443

The effect of the transmission grid on market power  

SciTech Connect

If competition could extend without hindrance through the entire extent of an electrically connected power grid, the US would have just two electricity markets, each with a uniform price. These markets would be competitive indeed. Unfortunately, losses and congestion present barriers to competition and thereby provide the likelihood of significantly increased market power. This paper begins the analysis of congestion as it affects the physical extent of markets and thereby affects the degree of market power. This is new territory; very little has previously been written in this area. Although the theoretical developments reported here rely on complex economic analysis, and although the market behaviors described are extremely subtle, several broad generalizations relevant to policy analysis can be made. From these generalizations one major policy conclusion can be drawn: In an unregulated market it will be socially beneficial to build a grid that is more robust than what is optimal in a regulated environment. Unused capacity may be needed. For a line to support full competition it may need to have a capacity that is much greater than the flow that will take place on it under full competition. Markets do not have sharp boundaries. Even with only one line the two busses may be in different regions, the same region, or partially in each other`s region. Increasing capacity is more effective on a small line. If connecting two busses with a very strong line will reduce market power, then the first MW of connecting capacity will have the most impact and each additional MW will have less. A congested line will cut a market into two non-competing regions. In each region the generators will markup according to the elasticity of the demand in only their region. A generator may reduce output in order to congest a line and increase its market power.

Stoft, S.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The wind energy integration, transmission, and policy2012, however, federal policy towards wind energy remainsin federal policy towards wind energy after 2012 places such

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The wind energy integration, transmission, and policyPTC. Moreover, federal policy towards wind energy remainsand policy announcements demonstrate accelerated activity in the offshore wind energy

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Tax Incentives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a policy tool, state tax incentives can be structured to help states meet clean energy goals. Policymakers often use state tax incentives in concert with state and federal policies to support renewable energy deployment or reduce market barriers. This analysis used case studies of four states to assess the contributions of state tax incentives to the development of renewable energy markets. State tax incentives that are appropriately paired with complementary state and federal policies generally provide viable mechanisms to support renewable energy deployment. However, challenges to successful implementation of state tax incentives include serving project owners with limited state tax liability, assessing appropriate incentive levels, and differentiating levels of incentives for technologies with different costs. Additionally, state tax incentives may result in moderately higher federal tax burdens. These challenges notwithstanding, state tax incentives that consider certain policy design characteristics can support renewable energy markets and state clean energy goals.The scale of their impact though is directly related to the degree to which they support the renewable energy markets for targeted sectors and technologies. This report highlights important policy design considerations for policymakers using state tax incentives to meet clean energy goals.

Lantz, E.; Doris, E.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Market Transformation Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transformation Market Transformation is based on the concept that federal support can catalyze a market to achieve economic and environmental benefits that can reduce costs through economies of scale. Adoption of fuel cells in emerging markets expands the growth of green jobs, with new opportunities in manufacturing, fuel cell maintenance and support systems, and domestic hydrogen fuel production and delivery. By providing reliable field operations data and increasing user confidence, early market deployments help overcome non-technical challenges like developing appropriate safety codes and standards and reducing high insurance costs. Strategies Market Transformation's primary goal is to accelerate the expansion of hydrogen and fuel cell use by lowering the life

448

Collusion MARKET PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advocates of deregulating electricity markets claimed that allowing competition would benefit consumers by increasing efficiency and reducing costs. They viewed electricity as a commodity much like any other, and overlooked the ways in which electricitys many distinct features hinder the development of competitive market structures. While competitive features were introduced into electricity markets in the last 10 years, the necessary elements for the market structure of competitionlarge number of sellers, ease of entry, and transparency of informationare still not in place. 1 This bibliography was prepared as an addendum to the 2006 Performance Review of Electric Power Markets

Kenneth Rose, Ph.D.; Karl Meeusen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Lawrence Berkeley National Lab/ Site Specific Safety Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab/ Site Specific Safety Plan Lab/ Site Specific Safety Plan Site Specific Safety Plan Site Specific Safety Plan shall contain at a minimum: List by name & phone numbers the following person who will be on the project: Submit: Name of the On-site Superintendent & Phone. Submit: Name of the On-site Health and Safety Representative & Phone. Submit: Name of the person who is responsible for the implementation of safety plan. Submit: Resume & qualification of the person who is responsible for implantation of this projects safety plan. Include OSHA certifications. Submit: The companies' Policy statement on environment, safety and health. Submit: The companies' Policy on substance abuse and testing policy.

450

Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program, Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Goals of the site operator program include field evaluation of electric vehicles (EVs) in real-world applications and environments, advancement of electric vehicle technologies, development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant EV use, and increasing the awareness and acceptance of EVs by the public. The site operator program currently consists of 11 participants under contract and two other organizations with data-sharing agreements with the program. The participants (electric utilities, academic institutions, Federal agencies) are geographically dispersed within US and their vehicles see a broad spectrum of service conditions. Current EV inventories of the site operators exceeds 250 vehicles. Several national organizations have joined DOE to further the introduction and awareness of EVs, including: (1) EVAmerica (a utility program) and DOE conduct performance and evaluation tests to support market development for EVs; (2) DOE, DOT, the Electric Transportation Coalition, and the Electric Vehicle Association of the Americas are conducting a series of workshops to encourage urban groups in Clean Cities (a DOE program) to initiate the policies and infrastructure development necessary to support large-scale demonstrations, and ultimately the mass market use, of EVs. Current focus of the program is collection and dissemination of EV operations and performance data to aid in the evaluation of real- world EV use. This report contains several sections with vehicle evaluation as a focus: EV testing results, energy economics of EVs, and site operators activities.

Francfort, J.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bassett, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Briasco, S. [Los Angeles City Dept. of Water and Power, CA (United States)] [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012 and 2013 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012 and 2013 A stuy of the potential impact of commerical markets of the Department of Energy's authoriziaton of uranium transfers to fund accelerated cleanup activities at the Portsmouth Site in Piketon, Ohio ERI_2142_07_1001_DOE_Potential_Market_Impact_Dec2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012, and 2013 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of

452

The SO2 Allowance Trading System: The Ironic History of a Grand Policy Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two decades have passed Two decades have passed since the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 launched a grand experiment in market-based environmental policy: the SO2 cap-and-trade system. That system performed well but ...

Schmalensee, Richard

453

Energy Policy 35 (2007) 47204729 Should we drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information and provides original analysis. We apEnergy Policy 35 (2007) 4720­4729 Should we drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge $123 billion to extract and bring to market. The difference, $251 billion, would generate social

Kotchen, Matthew J.

454

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E?ect of Biofuels on Crude Oil Markets. Agbioforum, 2010(Price elasticity of demand for crude oil: estimates for 23of alter- natives to crude oil. These policies are viewed as

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. Zilberman. The E?ect of Biofuels on Crude Oil Markets.Lapan and G.C. Moschini. Biofuels policies and welfare: IsInvestment in Advanced Biofuels. Annual Review of Resource

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Industrial energy efficiency policy in China  

SciTech Connect

Chinese industrial sector energy-efficiency policy has gone through a number of distinct phases since the founding of the People s Republic in 1949. An initial period of energy supply growth in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s was followed by implementation of significant energy efficiency programs in the 1980s. Many of these programs were dismantled in the 1990s during the continuing move towards a market-based economy. In an effort to once again strengthen energy efficiency, the Chinese government passes the Energy Conservation Law in 1997 which provides broad guidance for the establishment of energy efficiency policies. Article 20 of the Energy Conservation Law requires substantial improvement in industrial energy efficiency in the key energy-consuming industrial facilities in China. This portion of the Law declares that ''the State will enhance energy conservation management in key energy consuming entities.'' In 1999, the industrial sector consumed nearly 30 EJ, or 76 percent of China's primary energy. Even though primary energy consumption has dropped dramatically in recent years, due mostly to a decline in coal consumption, the Chinese government is still actively developing an overall policy for energy efficiency in the industrial sector modeled after policies in a number of industrialized countries. This paper will describe recent Chinese government activities to develop industrial sector energy-efficiency targets as a ''market-based'' mechanism for improving the energy efficiency of key industrial facilities.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan; Yun, Jiang

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Nevada | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

> About Us > Our Operations > NNSA Office of General Counsel > National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) > NEPA Reading Room > Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement...

458

Forestry Policies (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forestry Policies (Tennessee) Forestry Policies (Tennessee) Forestry Policies (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Developer Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Tennessee Department of Agriculture Tennessee's forests are managed by the Department of Agriculture, Forestry Division. In 2010 the Division issued its Statewide Forest Action Plan, which includes a section detailing the bio-energy and biofuels potential and goals for the state, and quantifies among other things the potential energy from forest biomass: http://www.tn.gov/agriculture/publications/forestry/TN-FAP.pdf The document also specifies the goal of expanding markets for biomass forest products, to address several different issues including decline in

459

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. wind power industry experienced yet another record year in 2009, once again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, 2009 was a year of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting the wind power industry and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry toward continued aggressive expansion. The year 2010, meanwhile, is anticipated to be one of some retrenchment, with expectations for fewer wind power capacity additions than seen in 2009. The rapid pace of development and change within the industry has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace, yet the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the fourth in an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the United States wind power market, with a particular focus on 2009.

Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

CHAPTER 6: Wind Power Markets  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Foreword January 2009 Foreword January 2009 i FOREWORD New technologies will be a critical component-perhaps the critical component-of our efforts to tackle the related challenges of energy security, climate change, and air pollution, all the while maintaining a strong economy. But just developing new technologies is not enough. Our ability to accelerate the market penetration of clean energy, enabling, and other climate-related technologies will have a determining impact on our ability to slow, stop, and reverse the growth in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Title XVI, Subtitle A, of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) directs the Administration to report on its strategy to promote the commercialization and deployment (C&D) of GHG intensity-reducing technologies and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets siting policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

2008 Geothermal Technologies Market Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes market-wide trends for the geothermal industry throughout 2008 and the beginning of 2009. It begins with an overview of the U.S. DOE's Geothermal Technology Program's (GTP's) involvement with the geothermal industry and recent investment trends for electric generation technologies. The report next describes the current state of geothermal power generation and activity within the United States, costs associated with development, financing trends, an analysis of the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), and a look at the current policy environment. The report also highlights trends regarding direct use of geothermal energy, including geothermal heat pumps (GHPs). The final sections of the report focus on international perspectives, employment and economic benefits from geothermal energy development, and potential incentives in pending national legislation.

Cross, J.; Freeman, J.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Framework for State-Level Renewable Energy Market Potential Studies  

SciTech Connect

State-level policymakers are relying on estimates of the market potential for renewable energy resources as they set goals and develop policies to accelerate the development of these resources. Therefore, accuracy of such estimates should be understood and possibly improved to appropriately support these decisions. This document provides a framework and next steps for state officials who require estimates of renewable energy market potential. The report gives insight into how to conduct a market potential study, including what supporting data are needed and what types of assumptions need to be made. The report distinguishes between goal-oriented studies and other types of studies, and explains the benefits of each.

Kreycik, C.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Doris, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

ORNL/TM-2007/094 Integrated Analysis of Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORNL/TM-2007/094 Integrated Analysis of Market Transformation Scenarios with HyTrans June 2007 of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1 Science and Technology Division INTEGRATED ANALYSIS OF MARKET TRANSFORMATION SCENARIOS WITH HYTRANS David

464

The U.S. Market Potential for Microturbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microturbines may have potential economic applications as on-site power generation sources for commercial and industrial sector customers because of their low cost, small size, modularity, and quiet operation. This analysis identifies the most attractive microturbine unit sizes applicable to each of these markets and provides information on which market segments and geographic regions offer the largest opportunities.

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

465

Policy Directive System Policy Review Webinar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in their professional capacity. So .... Fisheries' HQ Communications Office developed a companion policy and guidelines (managed by HQ Comms) #12;Private Sector Certification of Fisheries 30-122 John Butterfield Policy Analysis of certification that were placed on fisheries by 3rd party organizations. · Key Elements - NMFS will: · Respond

466

State policies for geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most prominent geothermal resources in the USA occur in fifteen Gulf and Western states including Alaska and Hawaii. In each state, authority and guidelines have been established for administration of geothermal leasing and for regulation of development. Important matters addressed by these policies include resource definition, leasing provisions, development regulations, water appropriation, and environmental standards. Some other policies that need attention include taxation, securities regulations, and utility regulations. It is concluded that conditions needed for the geothermal industry to pursue large-scale development are consumer (utility) confidence in the resource; equitable tax treatment; prompt exploration of extensive land areas; long and secure tenure for productive properties; prompt facility siting and development; and competitive access to various consumers. With these conditions, the industry should be competitive with other energy sectors and win its share of investment capital. This publication reviews for the states various technical, economic, and institutional aspects of geothermal development. The report summarizes research results from numerous specialists and outlines present state and Federal policies. The report concludes generally that if public policies are made favorable to their development, geothermal resources offer an important energy resource that could supply all new electric capacity for the fifteen states for the next two decades. This energy--100,000 MW--could be generated at prices competitive with electricity from fossil and nuclear power plants. An extensive bibliography is included. (MCW)

Sacarto, D.M.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Kenya-Capital Markets Climate Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya-Capital Markets Climate Initiative Kenya-Capital Markets Climate Initiative Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-Capital Markets Climate Initiative Agency/Company /Organization World Economic Forum Partner UK Department of Energy and Climate Sector Climate Topics Finance, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/cont Country Kenya Eastern Africa References CMCI[1] World Economic Forum[2] The Capital Markets Climate Initiative (CMCI) is a public-private initiative designed to support the scale up of private finance flows for low carbon technologies, solutions and infrastructure in developing economies by: Developing a common understanding amongst policy makers of why and how public sector action can help mobilise private capital and encourage new markets in low carbon investments

468

Mexico-Capital Markets Climate Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-Capital Markets Climate Initiative Mexico-Capital Markets Climate Initiative Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-Capital Markets Climate Initiative Agency/Company /Organization World Economic Forum Partner UK Department of Energy and Climate Sector Climate Topics Finance, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/cont Country Mexico Central America References CMCI[1] World Economic Forum[2] The Capital Markets Climate Initiative (CMCI) is a public-private initiative designed to support the scale up of private finance flows for low carbon technologies, solutions and infrastructure in developing economies by: Developing a common understanding amongst policy makers of why and how public sector action can help mobilise private capital and encourage new markets in low carbon investments

469

India-Capital Markets Climate Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India-Capital Markets Climate Initiative India-Capital Markets Climate Initiative Jump to: navigation, search Name India-Capital Markets Climate Initiative Agency/Company /Organization World Economic Forum Partner UK Department of Energy and Climate Sector Climate Topics Finance, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/cont Country India Southern Asia References CMCI[1] World Economic Forum[2] The Capital Markets Climate Initiative (CMCI) is a public-private initiative designed to support the scale up of private finance flows for low carbon technologies, solutions and infrastructure in developing economies by: Developing a common understanding amongst policy makers of why and how public sector action can help mobilise private capital and encourage new markets in low carbon investments

470

Reforming Power Markets in Developing Countries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reforming Power Markets in Developing Countries Reforming Power Markets in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Reforming Power Markets in Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Renewable Energy Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: siteresources.worldbank.org/INTENERGY/Resources/Energy19.pdf References: Reforming Power Markets in Developing Countries [1] Summary "This paper complements the World Bank's Operational Guidance Note by compiling lessons of this experience that help in applying the Note's guidance. These lessons are taken from the rapidly growing literature on power