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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Market Designs for High Levels of Variable Generation: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable renewable generation is increasing in penetration in modern power systems, leading to higher variability in the supply and price of electricity as well as lower average spot prices. This raises new challenges, particularly in ensuring sufficient capacity and flexibility from conventional technologies. Because the fixed costs and lifetimes of electricity generation investments are significant, designing markets and regulations that ensure the efficient integration of renewable generation is a significant challenge. This papers reviews the state of play of market designs for high levels of variable generation in the United States and Europe and considers new developments in both regions.

Milligan, M.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Orths, A.; Lynch, M.; Soder, L.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Flexibility Reserve Reductions from an Energy Imbalance Market with High Levels of Wind Energy in the Western Interconnection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The anticipated increase in variable generation in the Western Interconnection (WI) over the next several years has raised concerns about how to maintain system balance, especially in smaller Balancing Areas (BAs). Given renewable portfolio standards in the West, it is possible that more than 50 gigawatts (GW) of wind capacity will be installed by 2020. Significant quantities of solar generation are likely to be added as well. The consequent increase in variability and uncertainty that must be managed by the conventional generation fleet and responsive load make it attractive to consider ways in which Balancing Area Authorities (BAAs) can pool their variability and response resources, thus taking advantage of geographic and temporal diversity to increase overall operational efficiency. Our analysis considers several alternative forms of an Energy Imbalance Market (EIM) that have been proposed in the non-market areas of the WI. The proposed EIM includes two changes in operating practices that independently reduce variability and increase access to responsive resources: BAA cooperation and sub-hourly dispatch. As proposed, the EIM does not consider any form of coordinated unit commitment; however, over time it is possible that BAAs would develop formal or informal coordination plans. This report examines the benefits of several possible EIM implementations, both separately and in concert.

King, J.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; S. Beuning

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Framework for State-Level Renewable Energy Market Potential Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

State-level policymakers are relying on estimates of the market potential for renewable energy resources as they set goals and develop policies to accelerate the development of these resources. Therefore, accuracy of such estimates should be understood and possibly improved to appropriately support these decisions. This document provides a framework and next steps for state officials who require estimates of renewable energy market potential. The report gives insight into how to conduct a market potential study, including what supporting data are needed and what types of assumptions need to be made. The report distinguishes between goal-oriented studies and other types of studies, and explains the benefits of each.

Kreycik, C.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Doris, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Privacy Preserving Smart Metering System Based Retail Level Electricity Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Privacy Preserving Smart Metering System Based Retail Level Electricity Market Cory Thoma, Tao Cui, Student Member, IEEE, Franz Franchetti, Member, IEEE Abstract--Smart metering systems multi-party compu- tation (SMC) based privacy preserving smart metering system. Using the proposed SMC

Franchetti, Franz

5

Bi-level Optimization for Capacity Planning in Industrial Gas Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bi-level Optimization for Capacity Planning in Industrial Gas Markets P. Garcia-Herreros, L. Zhang markets are dynamic: · Suppliers must anticipate demand growth · Most markets are served locally Capacity is incremental( t T, i I ) Demand satisfaction is constraint by capacities( t T, i I ) All markets

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

6

High-Level Waste Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide provides the criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as high-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

7

Machine Learning for Market Microstructure and High Frequency Trading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Machine Learning for Market Microstructure and High Frequency Trading Michael Kearns Yuriy Nevmyvaka 1 Introduction In this chapter, we overview the uses of machine learning for high frequency trading and market microstructure data and problems. Machine learning is a vibrant subfield of computer

Plotkin, Joshua B.

8

Bi-level Optimization for Capacity Planning in Industrial Gas Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bi-level Optimization for Capacity Planning in Industrial Gas Markets P. Garcia-Herreros, E. Arslan are dynamic: · Suppliers must anticipate demand growth · Most markets are served locally Capacity expansion supplier · Set of plants from independent suppliers with limited capacity · Rational markets that select

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

9

Producing and Marketing High-Value Calves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carcasses. Oklahoma State University (Smith et al., 2000) and University of Arkansas (Troxel et al., 2001) researchers conducted livestock market surveys to determine factors that affect value in feeder cattle. Their data indicate that small... cattle that will produce calves with adequate muscling. Body condition. The Oklahoma study found that thin cattle received discounts of $9 to $10 per cwt when compared to cattle of average condition, and that fat cattle received discounts of $6...

Cleere, Jason; Boleman, Larry L.

2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

10

High temperature solar thermal technology: The North Africa Market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature solar thermal (HTST) technology offers an attractive option for both industrialized and non-industrialized countries to generate electricity and industrial process steam. The purpose of this report is to assess the potential market for solar thermal applications in the North African countries of Algeria, Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. North Africa was selected because of its outstanding solar resource base and the variety of applications to be found there. Diminishing oil and gas resources, coupled with expanding energy needs, opens a large potential market for the US industry. The US high temperature solar trough industry has little competition globally and could build a large market in these areas. The US is already familiar with certain solar markets in North Africa due to the supplying of substantial quantities of US-manufactured flat plate collectors to this region.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

ANALYSIS OF FUTURE PRICES AND MARKETS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ANALYSIS OF FUTURE PRICES AND MARKETS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS BY JOSEPH MULHOLLAND temperature superconductors (HTS) may impact the national electrical system over the next 25 years dollars. However, the savings from superconductivity are offset somewhat by the high cost of manufacturing

12

Optimizing High Level Waste Disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If society is ever to reap the potential benefits of nuclear energy, technologists must close the fuel-cycle completely. A closed cycle equates to a continued supply of fuel and safe reactors, but also reliable and comprehensive closure of waste issues. High level waste (HLW) disposal in borosilicate glass (BSG) is based on 1970s era evaluations. This host matrix is very adaptable to sequestering a wide variety of radionuclides found in raffinates from spent fuel reprocessing. However, it is now known that the current system is far from optimal for disposal of the diverse HLW streams, and proven alternatives are available to reduce costs by billions of dollars. The basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider extensive waste form and process technology research and development efforts, which have been conducted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), international agencies and the private sector. Matching the waste form to the waste chemistry and using currently available technology could increase the waste content in waste forms to 50% or more and double processing rates. Optimization of the HLW disposal system would accelerate HLW disposition and increase repository capacity. This does not necessarily require developing new waste forms, the emphasis should be on qualifying existing matrices to demonstrate protection equal to or better than the baseline glass performance. Also, this proposed effort does not necessarily require developing new technology concepts. The emphasis is on demonstrating existing technology that is clearly better (reliability, productivity, cost) than current technology, and justifying its use in future facilities or retrofitted facilities. Higher waste processing and disposal efficiency can be realized by performing the engineering analyses and trade-studies necessary to select the most efficient methods for processing the full spectrum of wastes across the nuclear complex. This paper will describe technologies being evaluated at Idaho National Laboratory and the facilities weve designed to evaluate options and support optimization.

Dirk Gombert

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

High Level Waste System Plan Revision 9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Revision 9 of the High Level Waste System Plan documents the current operating strategy of the HLW System at SRS to receive, store, treat, and dispose of high-level waste.

Davis, N.R.; Wells, M.N.; Choi, A.S.; Paul, P.; Wise, F.E.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

High temperature liquid level sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A length of metal sheathed metal oxide cable is perforated to permit liquid access to the insulation about a pair of conductors spaced close to one another. Changes in resistance across the conductors will be a function of liquid level, since the wetted insulation will have greater electrical conductivity than that of the dry insulation above the liquid elevation.

Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

High Level Waste Management Division High. Level Waste System Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILLAdministration | National|GradientHigh.

16

High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.

McLaren, L.H. (ed.)

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

CERTA, P.J.

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

18

Effectiveness of State-Level Policies on Solar Market Development in Different State Contexts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to public interest in customer-sited distributed solar photovoltaics (PV), state and local policymakers have implemented policy initiatives with the goal of encouraging private investment and building a robust PV market. Policymakers face challenges, including limited budgets and incomplete information about the effectiveness of the various policy options in their specific situation, in crafting and executing policy that supports market development goals. Recent work investigated the effect of the order in which policies are implemented (referred to as 'policy stacking') and the presence of low-cost enabling policies, such as interconnection standards and net metering, can have on the success of states in promoting PV markets. Findings indicate that implementation of interconnection standards and policy related to the valuation of excess electricity (e.g., net metering), along with indicators of long term government support for a solar PV market (e.g., RPS) and a non-policy determinant (population), explain about 70% of the variation among states in new PV capacity. This paper builds on that research to determine the most effective policy strategies for different types of states, as determined by their physical, demographic and macroeconomic context. A number of researchers have investigated the effectiveness of state-level policy using various statistical methods to determine relationships between installed solar PV projects and policy initiatives. In this study, the grouping of states by non-policy factors adds dimension to these analyses by identifying how policies function in different non-policy environments.

Steward, D.; Doris, E.; Krasko, V.; Hillman, D.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

High Efficiency Microturbine Leads to Increased Market Share...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

to Increased Market Share April 18, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Partnering with Capstone Turbine Corporation of Chatsworth, EERE supported microturbine research and development for a...

20

Service-oriented high level architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service-oriented High Level Architecture (SOHLA) refers to the high level architecture (HLA) enabled by Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) and Web Services etc. techniques which supports distributed interoperating services. The detailed comparisons between HLA and SOA are made to illustrate the importance of their combination. Then several key enhancements and changes of HLA Evolved Web Service API are introduced in comparison with native APIs, such as Federation Development and Execution Process, communication mechanisms, data encoding, session handling, testing environment and performance analysis. Some approaches are summarized including Web-Enabling HLA at the communication layer, HLA interface specification layer, federate interface layer and application layer. Finally the problems of current research are discussed, and the future directions are pointed out.

Wang, Wenguang; Li, Qun; Wang, Weiping; Liu, Xichun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

High-Level Waste Melter Study Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.

Perez, Joseph M.; Bickford, Dennis F.; Day, Delbert E.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L.; Marra, Sharon L.; Peeler, David K.; Strachan, Denis M.; Triplett, Mark B.; Vienna, John D.; Wittman, Richard S.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

22

Service Oriented Architecture for High Level Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Standalone high level applications often suffer from poor performance and reliability due to lengthy initialization, heavy computation and rapid graphical update. Service-oriented architecture (SOA) is trying to separate the initialization and computation from applications and to distribute such work to various service providers. Heavy computation such as beam tracking will be done periodically on a dedicated server and data will be available to client applications at all time. Industrial standard service architecture can help to improve the performance, reliability and maintainability of the service. Robustness will also be improved by reducing the complexity of individual client applications.

Chu, Chungming; Chevtsov, Sergei; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC; Shen, Guobao; /Brookhaven

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

High-level waste qualification: Managing uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Qualification of high-level waste implies specifications driven by risk against which performance can be assessed. The inherent uncertainties should be addressed in the specifications and statistical methods should be employed to appropriately manage these uncertainties. Uncertainties exist whenever measurements are obtained, sampling is employed, or processes are affected by systematic or random perturbations. This paper presents the approach and statistical methods currently employed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) to characterize, minimize, and control uncertainties pertinent to a waste-form acceptance specification concerned with product consistency.

Pulsipher, B.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the...

25

Application of Synergistic Technologies to Achieve High Levels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Synergistic Technologies to Achieve High Levels of Gasoline Engine Downsizing Application of Synergistic Technologies to Achieve High Levels of Gasoline Engine Downsizing Discussed...

26

Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean,...

27

Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Merit Review 2014: Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly...

28

High accuracy electronic material level sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The High Accuracy Electronic Material Level Sensor (electronic dipstick) is a sensor based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line or guide wire that is partially immersed in the material being measured; a launcher plate is positioned at the beginning of the guide wire. Reflected pulses are produced at the material interface due to the change in dielectric constant. The time difference of the reflections at the launcher plate and at the material interface are used to determine the material level. Improved performance is obtained by the incorporation of: (1) a high accuracy time base that is referenced to a quartz crystal, (2) an ultrawideband directional sampler to allow operation without an interconnect cable between the electronics module and the guide wire, (3) constant fraction discriminators (CFDs) that allow accurate measurements regardless of material dielectric constants, and reduce or eliminate errors induced by triple-transit or ``ghost`` reflections on the interconnect cable. These improvements make the dipstick accurate to better than 0.1%. 4 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

29

Dynamic modelling of generation capacity investment in electricity markets with high wind penetration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability of liberalised electricity markets to trigger investment in the generation capacity required to maintain an acceptable level of security of supply risk has been - and will continue to be - a topic of much ...

Eager, Daniel

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

30

Umbra's High Level Architecture (HLA) Interface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes Umbra's High Level Architecture HLA library. This library serves as an interface to the Defense Simulation and Modeling Office's (DMSO) Run Time Infrastructure Next Generation Version 1.3 (RTI NG1.3) software library and enables Umbra-based models to be federated into HLA environments. The Umbra library was built to enable the modeling of robots for military and security system concept evaluation. A first application provides component technologies that ideally fit the US Army JPSD's Joint Virtual Battlespace (JVB) simulation framework for Objective Force concept analysis. In addition to describing the Umbra HLA library, the report describes general issues of integrating Umbra with RTI code and outlines ways of building models to support particular HLA simulation frameworks like the JVB.

GOTTLIEB, ERIC JOSEPH; MCDONALD, MICHAEL J.; OPPEL III, FRED J.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The US treasury market in August 1998: untangling the effects of Hong Kong and Russia with high frequency data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Russia announced its default on sovereign bonds. This paper demonstrates that the HKMA interventions had a substantial impact on the outcomes for US Treasury markets during this period. Using a careful analysis of high frequency bond market data, both...

Dungey, Mardi; Goodheart, Charles; Tambakis, Demosthenes N

32

Evolution of Wholesale Electricity Market Design with Increasing Levels of Renewable Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable generation such as wind and photovoltaic solar power has increased substantially in recent years. Variable generation has unique characteristics compared to the traditional technologies that supply energy in the wholesale electricity markets. These characteristics create unique challenges in planning and operating the power system, and they can also influence the performance and outcomes from electricity markets. This report focuses on two particular issues related to market design: revenue sufficiency for long-term reliability and incentivizing flexibility in short-term operations. The report provides an overview of current design and some designs that have been proposed by industry or researchers.

Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Bloom, A.; Botterud, A.; Townsend, A.; Levin, T.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Estate-level facility provision and management in market-rate and resettlement coexisting housing compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Market-rate and resettlement coexisting housing compound (MRCHC) is a special model of mixed-income neighborhood merging with the dilapidated housing renewal in the major cities of China. The provision and management of ...

Bai, Jie, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

High Level Waste ManagemenfDivision ..  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILLAdministration | National|GradientHigh

35

Variation, jumps, market frictions and high frequency data in financial econometrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variation, jumps, market frictions and high frequency data in financial econometrics Ole E the econometrics of non-parametric estimation of the components of the variation of asset prices. This very active and order books. In our view the interaction of the new data sources with new econometric methodology

Wolfe, Patrick J.

36

An Empirical Study of Pricing Strategies in an Online Market with High-Frequency Price Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and British shipping cartels by Scott Morton (1997); research on Edgeworth cycles in retail gasoline pricing pricing data on rivals would not have been viewed as suspicious. The retail gasoline pricing data usedAn Empirical Study of Pricing Strategies in an Online Market with High-Frequency Price Information

Lotko, William

37

Dataflow Transformations in High-level DSP System Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the application that can be analyzed and transformed for effective optimization. Because of the high level of abstraction at which they operate, the transformations employed in this process have a large impact on keyDataflow Transformations in High-level DSP System Design (Invited Paper) Sankalita Saha, Sebastian

Bhattacharyya, Shuvra S.

38

The High-Level Radioactive Waste Act (Manitoba, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manitoba bars the storage of high-level radioactive wastes from spent nuclear fuel, not intended for research purposes, that was produced at a nuclear facility or in a nuclear reactor outside the...

39

High Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1BIntegration of Supply Chains I: Breaking Down Barriers High Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities Kevin Comer, Associate Principal, Antares Group Inc.

40

Survey of National Programs for Managing High-Level Radioactive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of National Programs for Managing High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel A Report to Congress and the Secretary of Energy October 2009 #12 Safety (Germany) Peter De Preter: National Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Preliminary Economics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the potential market for process heat produced by a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), the environmental benefits reduced CO2 emissions will have on these markets, and the typical economics of projects using these applications. It gives examples of HTGR technological applications to industrial processes in the typical co-generation supply of process heat and electricity, the conversion of coal to transportation fuels and chemical process feedstock, and the production of ammonia as a feedstock for the production of ammonia derivatives, including fertilizer. It also demonstrates how uncertainties in capital costs and financial factors affect the economics of HTGR technology by analyzing the use of HTGR technology in the application of HTGR and high temperature steam electrolysis processes to produce hydrogen.

Larry Demick

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion advanced system concepts applicable to small industrial and commercial markets. Topical report, Level 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an overall strategy to promote FBC coal combustion and to improve the marketability of the eastern coals, the US Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Research Center awarded a three level contract to Riley Stoker Corporation to develop advanced Multi Solids Fluidized Bed (MSFB) boiler designs. The first level of this contract targeted the small package boiler (10,000--50,000 lb/hr steam) and industrial size boiler (75,000--150,000 lb/hr steam) markets. Two representative sizes, 30,000 lb/hr and 110,000 lb/hr of steam, were selected for the two categories for a detailed technical and economic evaluation. Technically, both the designs showed promise, however, the advanced industrial design was favored on economic considerations. It was thus selected for further study in the second level of the contract. Results of this Level-2 effort, presented in this report, consisted of testing the design concept in Riley`s 4.4 MBtu/hr pilot MSFB facility located at Riley Research Center in Worcester, Mass. The design and economics of the proof of concept facility developed in Level-1 of the contract were then revised in accordance with the findings of the pilot test program. A host site for commercial demonstration in Level-3 of the contract was also secured. It was determined that co-firing coal in combination with paper de-inking sludge will broaden the applicability of the design beyond conventional markets. International Paper (IP), the largest paper company in the world, is willing to participate in this part of the program. IP has offered its Hammermill operation at Lockhaven, Pa, site of a future paper de-inking plant, for the proof of concept installation. This plant will go in operation in 1994. It is recommended that METC proceed to the commercial demonstration of the design developed. The approach necessary to satisfy the needs of the customer while meeting the objectives of this program is presented along with a recommended plan of action.

Ake, T.R.; Dixit, V.B.; Mongeon, R.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Water borne transport of high level nuclear waste in very deep borehole disposal of high level nuclear waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this report is to examine the feasibility of the very deep borehole experiment and to determine if it is a reasonable method of storing high level nuclear waste for an extended period of time. The objective ...

Cabeche, Dion Tunick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Energy Performance and Comfort Level in High Rise and Highly Glazed Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal and visual comfort in buildings play a significant role on occupants' performance but on the other hand achieving energy savings and high comfort levels can be a quite difficult task especially in high rise buildings with highly glazed...

Bayraktar, M.; Perino, M.; Yilmaz, A. Z.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The level crossing analysis of German stock market index (DAX) and daily oil price time series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The level crossing analysis of DAX and oil price time series are given. We determine the average frequency of positive-slope crossings, $\

Shayeganfar, F; Peinke, J; Tabar, M Reza Rahimi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

An analysis of marketing programs in the Texas Agricultural Extension Service at the county level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

syend 10-19 peroentX A3 syend 20-29 yeroentx 23 spend 30-39 peroentX 5 spend @l-49 percenter -and 6 agents spend 50-$9 ysrssnt-:of- their me&41ms oi marketing piob3sms~ Thus it oan bs sean that cnrer 68 percent of ths agents syend less than 20 per... with Chs ~ of facm okakkccemk esd cacykkkkoe fkxs4 ~ sankdlkge bp ~ ~ as fcdlcwll ~nc ~Ced wiCh ~, Mgk yco~ escoakatel wiCh ~ of hum ok~ end sck~, 85k eod mso~ wash ncemcXlg nssookaCcck wiCh ycodnoCkonc $4 Thksd ploce ~s Cp ~ wacs es ~sc yea~ eesooka...

Clifton, O. B

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

47

High Level Waste Management Division High-Level Waste System Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILLAdministration | National|GradientHigh. H

48

Reliability-Centric High-Level Synthesis , N. Mansouri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reliability-Centric High-Level Synthesis S. Tosun , N. Mansouri , E. Arvas , M. Kandemir-down. As a result, it is becoming necessary to treat reliability as a first-class citizen in system design. In particular, reliability decisions taken early in system design can have significant benefits in terms

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

49

The R Environment A high-level overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The R Environment A high-level overview Deepayan Sarkar Indian Statistical Institute, Delhi 6 October 2010 Deepayan Sarkar The R Environment #12;An article in the New York Times #12;From the article R use it. #12;What exactly is R? R is a language and environment for statistical computing and graphics

Bandyopadhyay, Antar

50

System-Level Virtualization for High Performance Computing Geoffroy Vallee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System-Level Virtualization for High Performance Computing Geoffroy Vall´ee Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA valleegr@ornl.gov Thomas Naughton Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA naughtont@ornl.gov Christian Engelmann Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN

Engelmann, Christian

51

High-Level Synthesis of Digital Microfluidic Biochips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

16 High-Level Synthesis of Digital Microfluidic Biochips FEI SU Intel Corporation and KRISHNENDU CHAKRABARTY Duke University Microfluidic biochips offer a promising platform for massively parallel DNA-generation system-on-chip (SOC) designs that are expected to include microfluidic components. We propose a system

Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

52

Environmental Concerns High nutrient, bacterial and salinity levels--along  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of best management practices are critical to implementing these efforts. Through more than 130Environmental Concerns High nutrient, bacterial and salinity levels--along with low dissolved and participation vital to developing and implementing watershed-protection plans. Economic and Environmental

53

Operational considerations for high level blast furnace fuel injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Injection levels of over 400 lbs/NTHM for coal, over 250 lbs/NTHM for natural gas and over 200 lbs/NTHM for oil have been achieved. Such high levels of fuel injection has a major impact on many aspects of blast furnace operation. In this paper the author begins by reviewing the fundamentals of fuel injection with emphasis on raceway thermochemical phenomena. The operational impacts which are generic to high level injection of any injectant are then outlined. The author will then focus on the particular characteristics of each injectant, with major emphasis on coal and natural gas. Operational considerations for coping with these changes and methods of maximizing the benefits of fuel injection will be reviewed.

Poveromo, J.J. [Quebec Cartier Mining Co., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

On Programming Models for Service-Level High Availability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of existing programming models for service-level high availability and investigates their differences, similarities, advantages, and disadvantages. Its goal is to help to improve reuse of code and to allow adaptation to quality of service requirements by using a uniform programming model description. It further aims at encouraging a discussion about these programming models and their provided quality of service, such as availability, performance, serviceability, usability, and applicability. Within this context, the presented research focuses on providing high availability for services running on head and service nodes of high-performance computing systems.

Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Leangsuksun, Chokchai [ORNL; He, X. [Tennessee Technological University

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Development of a High Performance Air Source Heat Pump for the US Market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat pumps present a significant advantage over conventional residential heating technologies due to higher energy efficiencies and less dependence on imported oil. The US development of heat pumps dates back to the 1930 s with pilot units being commercially available in the 1950 s. Reliable and cost competitive units were available in the US market by the 1960 s. The 1973 oil embargo led to increased interest in heat pumps prompting significant research to improve performance, particularly for cold climate locations. Recent increasing concerns on building energy efficiency and environmental emissions have prompted a new wave of research in heat pump technology with special emphasis on reducing performance degradation at colder outdoor air temperatures. A summary of the advantages and limitations of several performance improvement options sought for the development of high performance air source heat pump systems for cold climate applications is the primary focus of this paper. Some recommendations for a high performance cold climate heat pump system design most suitable for the US market are presented.

Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Iu, Ipseng [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

DOE high-level waste tank safety program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the work was to provide LANL with support to the DOE High-Level Waste Tank Safety Program. This effort included direct support to the DOE High-Level Waste Tank Working Groups, development of a database to track all identified safety issues, development of requirements for waste tank modernization, evaluation of external comments regarding safety-related guidance/instruction developed previously, examination of current federal and state regulations associated with DOE Tank farm operations, and performance of a conduct of operations review. All tasks which were assigned under this Task Order were completed. Descriptions of the objectives of each task and effort performed to complete each objective is provided.

NONE

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Nondestructive examination of DOE high-level waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of DOE sites have buried tanks containing high-level waste. Tanks of particular interest am double-shell inside concrete cylinders. A program has been developed for the inservice inspection of the primary tank containing high-level waste (HLW), for testing of transfer lines and for the inspection of the concrete containment where possible. Emphasis is placed on the ultrasonic examination of selected areas of the primary tank, coupled with a leak-detection system capable of detecting small leaks through the wall of the primary tank. The NDE program is modelled after ASME Section XI in many respects, particularly with respects to the sampling protocol. Selected testing of concrete is planned to determine if there has been any significant degradation. The most probable failure mechanisms are corrosion-related so that the examination program gives major emphasis to possible locations for corrosion attack.

Bush, S.; Bandyopadhyay, K.; Kassir, M.; Mather, B.; Shewmon, P.; Streicher, M.; Thompson, B.; van Rooyen, D.; Weeks, J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING ENABLING ORGANIC HIGH LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste streams planned for generation by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and existing radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) streams containing organic compounds such as the Tank 48H waste stream at Savannah River Site have completed simulant and radioactive testing, respectfully, by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). GNEP waste streams will include up to 53 wt% organic compounds and nitrates up to 56 wt%. Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. provided by organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce NOX in the off-gas to N2 to meet Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during the waste form stabilization process regardless of the GNEP processes utilized and exists in some of the high level radioactive waste tanks at Savannah River Site and Hanford Tank Farms, e.g. organics in the feed or organics used for nitrate destruction. Waste streams containing high organic concentrations cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by pretreatment. The alternative waste stabilization pretreatment process of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operates at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). The FBSR process has been demonstrated on GNEP simulated waste and radioactive waste containing high organics from Tank 48H to convert organics to CAA compliant gases, create no secondary liquid waste streams and create a stable mineral waste form.

Williams, M

2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

59

Handbook of high-level radioactive waste transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Handbook serves as a reference to which state officials and members of the general public may turn for information on radioactive waste transportation and on the federal government`s system for transporting this waste under the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The Handbook condenses and updates information contained in the Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer. It is intended primarily to assist legislators who, in the future, may be called upon to enact legislation pertaining to the transportation of radioactive waste through their jurisdictions. The Handbook is divided into two sections. The first section places the federal government`s program for transporting radioactive waste in context. It provides background information on nuclear waste production in the United States and traces the emergence of federal policy for disposing of radioactive waste. The second section covers the history of radioactive waste transportation; summarizes major pieces of legislation pertaining to the transportation of radioactive waste; and provides an overview of the radioactive waste transportation program developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). To supplement this information, a summary of pertinent federal and state legislation and a glossary of terms are included as appendices, as is a list of publications produced by the Midwestern Office of The Council of State Governments (CSG-MW) as part of the Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Project.

Sattler, L.R.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Technology-to-Market Portfolio  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

BTOs Technology-to-Market (T2M) team drives high impact technologies from R&D to market readiness, preparing these technologies for real building demonstration, market deployment, and ultimately mass-market adoption.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Comments of Santiago Grijalva: High-Level Response to DOE RFI...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Santiago Grijalva: High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Smart Grid Policy Comments of Santiago Grijalva: High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Smart Grid Policy High-Level Response to DOE...

62

CEMENTITIOUS GROUT FOR CLOSING SRS HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS - #12315  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. The closure will also fill, physically stabilize and isolate ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and chemically reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400 to stabilize selected potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted, respectively, to support the mass placement strategy developed by closure operations. Subsequent down selection was based on compressive strength and saturated hydraulic conductivity results. Fresh slurry property results were used as the first level of screening. A high range water reducing admixture and a viscosity modifying admixture were used to adjust slurry properties to achieve flowable grouts. Adiabatic calorimeter results were used as the second level screening. The third level of screening was used to design mixes that were consistent with the fill material parameters used in the F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment which was developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closures.

Langton, C.; Burns, H.; Stefanko, D.

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

63

Abstract--This paper proposes a two-level framework for the operation of a competitive market for reactive power ancillary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the selected reactive power service providers. Index Terms- System operation, ancillary services, electricity reactive power provisions in the context of deregulated electricity markets, namely, reactive power for reactive power ancillary services. It is argued that the first-level, i.e. reactive power procurement

Cañizares, Claudio A.

64

Spanish high level radioactive waste management system issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Empresa Nacional de Residuous Radiactivos, S.A. (ENRESA) was set up in 1984 as a state-owned limited liability company to be responsible for the management of all kinds of radioactive wastes in Spain. This paper provides an overview of the strategy and main lines of action stated in the third General Radioactive Waste Plan, currently in force, for the management of spent nuclear fuel and high-level wastes, as well as an outline of the main related projects, either being developed or foreseen. Aspects concerning the organizational structure, the economic and financing system and the international co-operational are also included.

Ulibarri, A.; Veganzones, A. [ENRESA, Madrid (Spain)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2EnergyDepartment ofNewsNortheast High-Level

66

High-Level Waste Corporate Board, Mark Gilbertson  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable Projects HTSSeparationHelping toLiquidHigh-Level

67

Corrosion and failure processes in high-level waste tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large amount of radioactive waste has been stored safely at the Savannah River and Hanford sites over the past 46 years. The aim of this report is to review the experimental corrosion studies at Savannah River and Hanford with the intention of identifying the types and rates of corrosion encountered and indicate how these data contribute to tank failure predictions. The compositions of the High-Level Wastes, mild steels used in the construction of the waste tanks and degradation-modes particularly stress corrosion cracking and pitting are discussed. Current concerns at the Hanford Site are highlighted.

Mahidhara, R.K.; Elleman, T.S.; Murty, K.L. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

West Valley Demonstration Project High-Level Waste Management  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation | Department ofEnergy Is Everywhere! Webinar: EnergyDRAFT_19507_1 High-Level

69

State-of-the-Art Highly Insulating Window Frames - Research and Market Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the findings of a market and research review related to state-of-the-art highly insulating window frames. The market review focuses on window frames that satisfy the Passivhaus requirements (window U-value less or equal to 0.8 W/m{sup 2}K ), while other examples are also given in order to show the variety of materials and solutions that may be used for constructing window frames with a low thermal transmittance (U-value). The market search shows that several combinations of materials are used in order to obtain window frames with a low U-value. The most common insulating material seems to be Polyurethane (PUR), which is used together with most of the common structural materials such as wood, aluminum, and PVC. The frame research review also shows examples of window frames developed in order to increase the energy efficiency of the frames and the glazings which the frames are to be used together with. The authors find that two main tracks are used in searching for better solutions. The first one is to minimize the heat losses through the frame itself. The result is that conductive materials are replaced by highly thermal insulating materials and air cavities. The other option is to reduce the window frame area to a minimum, which is done by focusing on the net energy gain by the entire window (frame, spacer and glazing). Literature shows that a window with a higher U-value may give a net energy gain to a building that is higher than a window with a smaller U-value. The net energy gain is calculated by subtracting the transmission losses through the window from the solar energy passing through the windows. The net energy gain depends on frame versus glazing area, solar factor, solar irradiance, calculation period and U-value. The frame research review also discusses heat transfer modeling issues related to window frames. Thermal performance increasing measures, surface modeling, and frame cavity modeling are among the topics discussed. The review shows that the current knowledge gives the basis for improving the calculation procedures in the calculation standards. At the same time it is room for improvement within some areas, e.g. to fully understand the natural convection effects inside irregular vertical frame cavities (jambs) and ventilated frame cavities.

Gustavsen, Arild; Jelle, Bjorn Petter; Arasteh, Dariush; Kohler, Christian

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

High-level waste melter alternatives assessment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Program`s (hereafter referred to as HLW Program) Melter Candidate Assessment Activity performed in fiscal year (FY) 1994. The mission of the TWRS Program is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford Site waste (current and future tank waste and encapsulated strontium and cesium isotopic sources) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The goal of the HLW Program is to immobilize the HLW fraction of pretreated tank waste into a vitrified product suitable for interim onsite storage and eventual offsite disposal at a geologic repository. Preparation of the encapsulated strontium and cesium isotopic sources for final disposal is also included in the HLW Program. As a result of trade studies performed in 1992 and 1993, processes planned for pretreatment of tank wastes were modified substantially because of increasing estimates of the quantity of high-level and transuranic tank waste remaining after pretreatment. This resulted in substantial increases in needed vitrification plant capacity compared to the capacity of original Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). The required capacity has not been finalized, but is expected to be four to eight times that of the HWVP design. The increased capacity requirements for the HLW vitrification plant`s melter prompted the assessment of candidate high-capacity HLW melter technologies to determine the most viable candidates and the required development and testing (D and T) focus required to select the Hanford Site HLW vitrification plant melter system. An assessment process was developed in early 1994. This document describes the assessment team, roles of team members, the phased assessment process and results, resulting recommendations, and the implementation strategy.

Calmus, R.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0287 (September 2002) EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition...

72

HLW-OVP-97-0068 High Level Waste Management Division High-Level Waste System Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuided Self-Assembly of GoldHAWCHIGS flux4-00n High Level6

73

Transmutation of high-level radioactive waste - Perspectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a fast neutron spectrum essentially all long-lived actinides (e.g. Plutonium) undergo fission and thus can be transmuted into generally short lived fission products. Innovative nuclear reactor concepts e.g. accelerator driven systems (ADS) are currently in development that foresee a closed fuel cycle. The majority of the fissile nuclides (uranium, plutonium) shall be used for power generation and only fission products will be put into final disposal that needs to last for a historical time scale of only 1000 years. For the transmutation of high-level radioactive waste a lot of research and development is still required. One aspect is the precise knowledge of nuclear data for reactions with fast neutrons. Nuclear reactions relevant for transmutation are being investigated in the framework of the european project ERINDA. First results from the new neutron time-of-flight facility nELBE at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf will be presented.

Junghans, Arnd; Grosse, Eckart; Hannaske, Roland; Kgler, Toni; Massarczyk, Ralf; Schwengner, Ronald; Wagner, Andreas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

PID Performance in the LHCb High Level Trigger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The LHCb High Level Trigger (HLT) incorporates RICH particle identification (PID) calculations that are designed to be faster than those used for the offline reconstruction, which is necessary due to the timing constraints imposed on the HLT. The performance of this faster calculation has been evaluated using $B^+ \\to \\overline{D}^0\\pi^+$ events recorded during 2011 data taking and compared against the performance of the offline calculation. The time taken to calculate PID information in the HLT has been measured both for the configuration used in Run 1, and for configurations approaching that used offline. Similar overall efficiency and misidentification performance is seen in the configurations used offline and in the HLT, though the raw values of PID variables can differ substantially for a given candidate.

Benson, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

High-level waste tank farm set point document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Setpoints for nuclear safety-related instrumentation are required for actions determined by the design authorization basis. Minimum requirements need to be established for assuring that setpoints are established and held within specified limits. This document establishes the controlling methodology for changing setpoints of all classifications. The instrumentation under consideration involve the transfer, storage, and volume reduction of radioactive liquid waste in the F- and H-Area High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Farms. The setpoint document will encompass the PROCESS AREA listed in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (DPSTSA-200-10 Sup 18) which includes the diversion box HDB-8 facility. In addition to the PROCESS AREAS listed in the SAR, Building 299-H and the Effluent Transfer Facility (ETF) are also included in the scope.

Anthony, J.A. III

1995-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

KETUSKY, EDWARD

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

77

Environmental benefits and cost savings through market-based instruments : an application using state-level data from India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper develops a methodology for estimating potential cost savings from the use of market-based instruments (MBIs) when local emissions and abatement cost data are not available. The paper provides estimates of the ...

Gupta, Shreekant

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

High level waste characterization in support of low level waste certification. I. HLW supernate radionuclide characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High Level Waste Programs has radioactive waste storage, treatment and processing facilities that are located in the F and H Areas at the Savannah River Site. These facilities include the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), F and H Area Tank Farms, Extended Sludge Processing (ESP), and In-Tank Precipitation (ITP). Job wastes are generated from operation, maintenance, and construction activities inside radiological areas. These items may have been contaminated with radioactive supernate, salt, and sludge material. Most of these wastes will be disposed of in the E-area Vaults. Therefore, an isotopic and hazardous characterization must be performed. The characterization of HLW supernate radionuclides is discussed in Chapter I. The characterization for salt and sludge phases, which can also contaminate LLW, will be included in other Chapters.

Jamison, M.E.; d`Entremont, P.D.; Clemmons, J.S.; Bess, C.E.; Brown, D.F.

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

79

Ris Energy Report 4 Denmark in a European market 1 Known abroad for being a country with highly efficient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø Energy Report 4 Denmark in a European market 1 4 Known abroad for being a country with highly an environment-friendly position on energy. Since the beginning of the 1990s climate change has been an important driver for Danish energy policy, and as a result the country has taken a robust approach to improving

80

Effective Ancillary Services Market Designs on High Wind Power Penetration Systems: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on how the ancillary service market designs are implemented and how they may require changes on systems with greater penetrations of variable renewable energy suppliers, in particular wind power. Ancillary services markets have been developed in many of the restructured power system regions throughout the world. Ancillary services include the services that support the provision of energy to support power system reliability. The ancillary services markets are tied tightly to the design of the energy market and to the physics of the system and therefore careful consideration of power system economics and engineering must be considered in their design. This paper focuses on how the ancillary service market designs are implemented and how they may require changes on systems with greater penetrations of variable renewable energy suppliers, in particular wind power.

Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Navid, N.; Smith, J. C.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Cementitious Grout for Closing SRS High Level Waste Tanks - 12315  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. Ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks will also be filled to the extent practical. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and to be chemically reducing with a reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400. Grouts with this chemistry stabilize potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted to support the mass placement strategy developed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Closure Operations. Subsequent down selection was based on compressive strength and saturated hydraulic conductivity results. Fresh slurry property results were used as the first level of screening. A high range water reducing admixture and a viscosity modifying admixture were used to adjust slurry properties to achieve flowable grouts. Adiabatic calorimeter results were used as the second level screening. The third level of screening was used to design mixes that were consistent with the fill material parameters used in the F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment which was developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closures. The cement and slag contents of a mix selected for filling Tanks 18-F and 19-F should be limited to no more than 125 and 210 lbs/cyd, respectively, to limit the heat generated as the result of hydration reaction during curing and thereby enable mass pour placement. Trial mixes with water to total cementitious materials ratios of 0.550 to 0.580 and 125 lbs/cyd of cement and 210 lbs/cyd of slag met the strength and permeability requirements. Mix LP no.8-16 was selected for closing SRS Tanks 18-F and 19-F because it meets or exceeds the design requirements with the least amount of Portland cement and blast furnace slag. This grout is expected to flow at least 45 feet. A single point of discharge should be sufficient for unrestricted flow conditions. However, additional entry points should be identified as back-up in case restrictions in the tank impede flow. The LP no.8 series of trial mixes had surprisingly high design compressive strengths (2000 to 4000/5000 psi) which were achieved at extended curing times (28 to 90 days, respectively) given the small amount of Portland cement in the mixes (100 to 185 lbs/cyd). The grouts were flowable structural fills containing 3/8 inch gravel and concrete sand aggregate. These grouts did not segregate and require no compaction. They have low permeabilities (? 10{sup -9} cm/s) and are consequen

Langton, C.A.; Stefanko, D.B.; Burns, H.H. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Waymer, J.; Mhyre, W.B. [URS Quality and Testing (United States); Herbert, J.E.; Jolly, J.C. Jr. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

High Waste Loading Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Aluminum High-Level Waste Streams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILLAdministrationHigh SchoolHighHIGH WASTE

83

The US market for high-temperature superconducting wire in transmission cable applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Telephone interviews were conducted with 23 utility engineers concerning the future prospects for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cables. All have direct responsibility for transmission in their utility, most of them in a management capacity. The engineers represented their utilities as members of the Electric Power Research Institute`s Underground Transmission Task Force (which has since been disbanded). In that capacity, they followed the superconducting transmission cable program and are aware of the cryogenic implications. Nineteen of the 23 engineers stated the market for underground transmission would grow during the next decade. Twelve of those specified an annual growth rate; the average of these responses was 5.6%. Adjusting that figure downward to incorporate the remaining responses, this study assumes an average growth rate of 3.4%. Factors driving the growth rate include the difficulty in securing rights-of-way for overhead lines, new construction techniques that reduce the costs of underground transmission, deregulation, and the possibility that public utility commissions will allow utilities to include overhead costs in their rate base. Utilities have few plans to replace existing cable as preventive maintenance, even though much of the existing cable has exceeded its 40-year lifetime. Ten of the respondents said the availability of a superconducting cable with the same life-cycle costs as a conventional cable and twice the ampacity would induce them to consider retrofits. The respondents said a cable with those characteristics would capture 73% of their cable retrofits.

Forbes, D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal hydrologic calculations estimate the thermal pulse from emplaced waste to be small (less than 20 C at 10 meters from the borehole, for less than a few hundred years), and to result in maximum total vertical fluid movement of {approx}100 m. Reducing conditions will sharply limit solubilities of most dose-critical radionuclides at depth, and high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. For the bounding analysis of this report, waste is envisioned to be emplaced as fuel assemblies stacked inside drill casing that are lowered, and emplaced using off-the-shelf oilfield and geothermal drilling techniques, into the lower 1-2 km portion of a vertical borehole {approx}45 cm in diameter and 3-5 km deep, followed by borehole sealing. Deep borehole disposal of radioactive waste in the United States would require modifications to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and to applicable regulatory standards for long-term performance set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR part 191) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR part 60). The performance analysis described here is based on the assumption that long-term standards for deep borehole disposal would be identical in the key regards to those prescribed for existing repositories (40 CFR part 197 and 10 CFR part 63).

Stein, Joshua S.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Swift, Peter N.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; Bauer, Stephen J.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90/sup 0/C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations.

Mendel, J.E. (compiler)

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

High level waste tank farm setpoint document. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Revision 1 modifies Attachment I of this Technical Report as a result of a meeting which was held Friday, January 27, 1994 between Maintenance, Work Control, and Engineering to discuss report contents. Upon completion of the meeting, the Flow Chart was edited accordingly. Attachment 2 is modified for clerical reasons. Setpoints for nuclear safety-related instrumentation are required for actions determined by the design authorization basis. Minimum requirements need to be established for assuring that setpoints are established and held within specified limits. This document establishes the controlling methodology for changing setpoints of all classifications. The instrumentation under consideration involve the transfer, storage, and volume reduction of radioactive liquid waste in the F- and H-Area High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Fanns. The setpoint document (Appendix 2) will encompass the PROCESS AREA listed in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (DSTSA-200-10 Sup 18) which includes the diversion box HDB-8 facility. In addition to the PROCESS AREAS listed in the SAR, Building 299-H and the Effluent Transfer Facility (ETF) are also included in the scope.

Anthony, J.A. III

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

An Empirical Study of Pricing Strategies in an Online Market with High Frequency Price Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study competition among a score of firms participating in an online market for a commodity-type memory module. Firms were able to adjust prices continuously; prices determined how the firms were ranked and listed (lowest ...

Ellison, Sara Fisher

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

88

A market analysis for high efficiency multi-junction solar cells grown on SiGe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applications, markets and a cost model are presented for III-V multi-junction solar cells built on compositionally graded SiGe buffer layers currently being developed by professors Steven Ringell of Ohio State University ...

Judkins, Zachara Steele

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

JET MIXING ANALYSIS FOR SRS HIGH-LEVEL WASTE RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. The slurry pump may be fixed in position or they may rotate depending on the specific mixing requirements. The high-level waste in Tank 48 contains insoluble solids in the form of potassium tetraphenyl borate compounds (KTPB), monosodium titanate (MST), and sludge. Tank 48 is equipped with 4 slurry pumps, which are intended to suspend the insoluble solids prior to transfer of the waste to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) process. The FBSR process is being designed for a normal feed of 3.05 wt% insoluble solids. A chemical characterization study has shown the insoluble solids concentration is approximately 3.05 wt% when well-mixed. The project is requesting a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) mixing study from SRNL to determine the solids behavior with 2, 3, and 4 slurry pumps in operation and an estimate of the insoluble solids concentration at the suction of the transfer pump to the FBSR process. The impact of cooling coils is not considered in the current work. The work consists of two principal objectives by taking a CFD approach: (1) To estimate insoluble solids concentration transferred from Tank 48 to the Waste Feed Tank in the FBSR process and (2) To assess the impact of different combinations of four slurry pumps on insoluble solids suspension and mixing in Tank 48. For this work, several different combinations of a maximum of four pumps are considered to determine the resulting flow patterns and local flow velocities which are thought to be associated with sludge particle mixing. Two different elevations of pump nozzles are used for an assessment of the flow patterns on the tank mixing. Pump design and operating parameters used for the analysis are summarized in Table 1. The baseline pump orientations are chosen by the previous work [Lee et. al, 2008] and the initial engineering judgement for the conservative flow estimate since the modeling results for the other pump orientations are compared with the baseline results. As shown in Table 1, the present study assumes that each slurry pump has 900 gpm flowrate for the tank mixing analysis, although the Standard Operating Procedure for Tank 48 currently limits the actual pump speed and flowrate to a value less than 900 gpm for a 29 inch liquid level. Table 2 shows material properties and weight distributions for the solids to be modeled for the mixing analysis in Tank 48.

Lee, S.

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

90

High-level waste issues and resolutions document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-Level Waste (HLW) Issues and Resolutions Document recognizes US Department of Energy (DOE) complex-wide HLW issues and offers potential corrective actions for resolving these issues. Westinghouse Management and Operations (M&O) Contractors are effectively managing HLW for the Department of Energy at four sites: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River Site (SRS), West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), and Hanford Reservation. Each site is at varying stages of processing HLW into a more manageable form. This HLW Issues and Resolutions Document identifies five primary issues that must be resolved in order to reach the long-term objective of HLW repository disposal. As the current M&O contractor at DOE`s most difficult waste problem sites, Westinghouse recognizes that they have the responsibility to help solve some of the complexes` HLW problems in a cost effective manner by encouraging the M&Os to work together by sharing expertise, eliminating duplicate efforts, and sharing best practices. Pending an action plan, Westinghouse M&Os will take the initiative on those corrective actions identified as the responsibility of an M&O. This document captures issues important to the management of HLW. The proposed resolutions contained within this document set the framework for the M&Os and DOE work cooperatively to develop an action plan to solve some of the major complex-wide problems. Dialogue will continue between the M&Os, DOE, and other regulatory agencies to work jointly toward the goal of storing, treating, and immobilizing HLW for disposal in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost effective manner.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Yucca Mountain was designated as the site to be investigated as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain site is an undeveloped area located on the southwestern edge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way. If the Yucca Mountain site is found suitable for the repository, rail service is desirable to the Office of Civilian Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because of the potential of rail transportation to reduce costs and to reduce the number of shipments relative to highway transportation. A Preliminary Rail Access Study evaluated 13 potential rail spur options. Alternative routes within the major options were also developed. Each of these options was then evaluated for potential land use conflicts and access to regional rail carriers. Three potential routes having few land use conflicts and having access to regional carriers were recommended for further investigation. Figure 1-1 shows these three routes. The Jean route is estimated to be about 120 miles long, the Carlin route to be about 365 miles long, and Caliente route to be about 365 miles long. The remaining ten routes continue to be monitored and should any of the present conflicts change, a re-evaluation of that route will be made. Complete details of the evaluation of the 13 routes can be found in the previous study. The DOE has not identified any preferred route and recognizes that the transportation issues need a full and open treatment under the National Environmental Policy Act. The issue of transportation will be included in public hearings to support development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) proceedings for either the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility or the Yucca Mountain Project or both.

D.C. Richardson

2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

92

High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 3. Market analysis. Task 8. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to identify and characterize the market potential for the plant by-products - BTX (mixture of benzene, toluene and xylene), phenol, ammonia, sulfur, and sodium sulfate - and to assign value to them. Although traditionally a growth industry, the chemicals market has been generally weakened by the recession, and is experiencing back to back years of declining production. This is due to bad health of specific end uses, such as fertilizer from ammonia. In the long run, this trend is expected to moderate. It is felt that the proposed peat plant has a favorable position in the markets of each of its by-products. This is due to the synergism with nearby industries which are major consumers of these by-products. In the case of sulfur and ammonia, the Red River agricultural area is a large potential market. For sodium sulfate, phenols and perhaps BTX, the nearby paper and timber products industries are large potential markets. The values for these by-products used in the financial analysis were intentionally conservative. This is because of the uncertainty in the quantity and quality. More tests are needed in an integrated facility in order to determine these factors and the variability of each. This is particularly true of the by-product oils which could vary significantly with operating conditions and may even require alternate processing schemes. 18 references, 9 figures, 14 tables.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Development of high-waste loaded high-level nuclear waste glasses for high-temperature melter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the approach taken in formulating glasses that can be processed at 1150 to 1500{degrees}C by applying glass property/composition models developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Compositions and melting temperatures for glasses with high waste loading that are acceptable and able to be processed were determined for two different Hanford waste types. The glasses meet high-level waste glass acceptability criteria and are suitable for processing in a continuous Joule-heated melter.

Kim, D.S.; Hrma, P.; Lamar, D.A.; Elliott, M.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Development of high-waste loaded high-level nuclear waste glasses for high-temperature melter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the approach taken in formulating glasses that can be processed at 1150 to 1500{degrees}C by applying glass property/composition models developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Compositions and melting temperatures for glasses with high waste loading that are acceptable and able to be processed were determined for two different Hanford waste types. The glasses meet high-level waste glass acceptability criteria and are suitable for processing in a continuous Joule-heated melter.

Kim, D.S.; Hrma, P.R.; Lamar, D.A.; Elliott, M.L.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and...

96

An international initiative on long-term behavior of high-level...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

international initiative on long-term behavior of high-level nuclear waste glass. An international initiative on long-term behavior of high-level nuclear waste glass. Abstract:...

97

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual hanford high-level Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

three major facilities are planned: a pretreatment facility, a high-level... -shell tanks) that contain millions of liters of high-level liquid waste. The 400 Area is...

98

Accelerated Weathering of High-Level and Plutonium-bearing Lanthanide...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lanthanide Borosilicate Waste Glasses under Hydraulically Unsaturated Accelerated Weathering of High-Level and Plutonium-bearing Lanthanide Borosilicate Waste...

99

High performance gamma measurements of equipment retrieved from Hanford high-level nuclear waste tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cleanup of high level defense nuclear waste at the Hanford site presents several progressive challenges. Among these is the removal and disposal of various components from buried active waste tanks to allow new equipment insertion or hazards mitigation. A unique automated retrieval system at the tank provides for retrieval, high pressure washing, inventory measurement, and containment for disposal. Key to the inventory measurement is a three detector HPGe high performance gamma spectroscopy system capable of recovering data at up to 90% saturation (200,000 counts per second). Data recovery is based on a unique embedded electronic pulser and specialized software to report the inventory. Each of the detectors have different shielding specified through Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP program. This shielding provides performance over a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude. System description, calibration issues and operational experiences are discussed.

Troyer, G.L.

1997-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

100

Development of Crystal-Tolerant High-Level Waste Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty five glasses were formulated. They were batched from HLW AZ-101 simulant or raw chemicals and melted and tested with a series of tests to elucidate the effect of spinel-forming components (Ni, Fe, Cr, Mn, and Zn), Al, and noble metals (Rh2O3 and RuO2) on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the high-level waste (HLW) melter. In addition, the processing properties of glasses, such as the viscosity and TL, were measured as a function of temperature and composition. Furthermore, the settling of spinel crystals in transparent low-viscosity fluids was studied at room temperature to access the shape factor and hindered settling coefficient of spinel crystals in the Stokes equation. The experimental results suggest that Ni is the most troublesome component of all the studied spinel-forming components producing settling layers of up to 10.5 mm in just 20 days in Ni-rich glasses if noble metals or a higher concentration of Fe was not introduced in the glass. The layer of this thickness can potentially plug the bottom of the riser, preventing glass from being discharged from the melter. The noble metals, Fe, and Al were the components that significantly slowed down or stopped the accumulation of spinel at the bottom. Particles of Rh2O3 and RuO2, hematite and nepheline, acted as nucleation sites significantly increasing the number of crystals and therefore decreasing the average crystal size. The settling rate of ?10-?m crystal size around the settling velocity of crystals was too low to produce thick layers. The experimental data for the thickness of settled layers in the glasses prepared from AZ-101 simulant were used to build a linear empirical model that can predict crystal accumulation in the riser of the melter as a function of concentration of spinel-forming components in glass. The developed model predicts the thicknesses of accumulated layers quite well, R2 = 0.985, and can be become an efficient tool for the formulation of the crystal-tolerant HLW glasses for higher waste loading. A physical modeling effort revealed that the Stokes and Richardson-Zaki equations can be used to adequately predict the accumulation rate of spinel crystals of different sizes and concentrations in the glass discharge riser of HLW melters. The determined shape factor for the glass beads was only 0.73% lower than the theoretical shape factor for a perfect sphere. The shape factor for the spinel crystals matched the theoretically predicted value to within 10% and was smaller than that of the beads, given the larger drag force caused by the larger surface area-to-volume ratio of the octahedral crystals. In the hindered settling experiments, both the glass bead and spinel suspensions were found to follow the predictions of the Richardson-Zaki equation with the exponent n = 3.6 and 2.9 for glass beads and spinel crystals, respectively.

Matyas, Josef; Vienna, John D.; Schaible, Micah J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Arrigoni, Alyssa L.; Tate, Rachel M.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

New Generation Nuclear Plant -- High Level Functions and Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This functions and requirements (F&R) document was prepared for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The highest-level functions and requirements for the NGNP preconceptual design are identified in this document, which establishes performance definitions for what the NGNP will achieve. NGNP designs will be developed based on these requirements by commercial vendor(s).

J. M. Ryskamp; E. J. Gorski; E. A. Harvego; S. T. Khericha; G. A. Beitel

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Production Cost Modeling for High Levels of Photovoltaics Penetration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this report is to evaluate the likely avoided generation, fuels, and emissions resulting from photovoltaics (PV) deployment in several U.S. locations and identify new tools, methods, and analysis to improve understanding of PV impacts at the grid level.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Milford, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE ) GLASSES FOR HANFORDS WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of glass formulation development and melter testing to identify high waste loading glasses to treat high-Al high level waste (HLW) at Hanford. Previous glass formulations developed for this HLW had high waste loadings but their processing rates were lower that desired. The present work was aimed at improving the glass processing rate while maintaining high waste loadings. Glass formulations were designed, prepared at crucible-scale and characterized to determine their properties relevant to processing and product quality. Glass formulations that met these requirements were screened for melt rates using small-scale tests. The small-scale melt rate screening included vertical gradient furnace (VGF) and direct feed consumption (DFC) melter tests. Based on the results of these tests, modified glass formulations were developed and selected for larger scale melter tests to determine their processing rate. Melter tests were conducted on the DuraMelter 100 (DMIOO) with a melt surface area of 0.11 m{sup 2} and the DuraMelter 1200 (DMI200) HLW Pilot Melter with a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}. The newly developed glass formulations had waste loadings as high as 50 wt%, with corresponding Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration in the glass of 26.63 wt%. The new glass formulations showed glass production rates as high as 1900 kg/(m{sup 2}.day) under nominal melter operating conditions. The demonstrated glass production rates are much higher than the current requirement of 800 kg/(m{sup 2}.day) and anticipated future enhanced Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) requirement of 1000 kg/(m{sup 2}.day).

KRUGER AA; BOWAN BW; JOSEPH I; GAN H; KOT WK; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

104

High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable Projects HTSSeparationHelping toLiquid WasteLevel

105

High level of activation Coupled product is very stable, especially  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the cross-linked matrix makes it well-suited for use in large columns. Scaling up a purification with a gel between matrix and activated group is especially suitable for immobilising small proteins and peptides · Fast Flow matrix gives high productivity and is easy to scale up · Comprehensive technical

Lebendiker, Mario

106

Niche Marketing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Niche markets are small, specialized markets for goods or services. Agricultural producers have many opportunities for niche marketing, and this strategy can contribute to the profitability of a firm. Examples of niche markets are included...

McCorkle, Dean; Anderson, David P.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

High Level Architecture (HLA) federation with Umbra and OPNET federates.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Network-centric systems that depend on mobile wireless ad hoc networks for their information exchange require detailed analysis to support their development. In many cases, this critical analysis is best provided with high-fidelity system simulations that include the effects of network architectures and protocols. In this research, we developed a high-fidelity system simulation capability using an HLA federation. The HLA federation, consisting of the Umbra system simulator and OPNET Modeler network simulator, provides a means for the system simulator to both affect, and be affected by, events in the network simulator. Advances are also made in increasing the fidelity of the wireless communication channel and reducing simulation run-time with a dead reckoning capability. A simulation experiment is included to demonstrate the developed modeling and simulation capability.

Oppel, Fred John III; Hart, Brian; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Level Structure of 103Ag at high spins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High spin states in $^{103}$Ag were investigated with the Gammasphere array, using the $^{72}$Ge($^{35}$Cl,$2p2n$)$^{103}$Ag reaction at an incident beam energy of 135 MeV. A $\\Delta J$=1 sequence with predominantly magnetic transitions and two nearly-degenerate $\\Delta J=1$ doublet bands have been observed. The dipole band shows a decreasing trend in the $B(M1)$ strength as function of spin, a well established feature of magnetic bands. The nearly-degenerate band structures satisfy the three experimental signatures of chirality in the nuclei; however microscopic calculations are indicative of a magnetic phenomenon

S. Ray; N. S. Pattabiraman; Krishichayan; A. Chakraborty; S. Mukhopadhyay; S. S. Ghugre; S. N. Chintalapudi; A. K. Sinha; U. Garg; S. Zhu; B. Kharraja; D. Almehed

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

109

High Level Waste Management Division . H L W System Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILLAdministration | National|GradientHigh. H L

110

Marketing Strategy Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the research that has been undertaken as background for preparation of a marketing campaign for middle and high school students to increase interest in national security careers at the National Nuclear Security Administration. This work is a part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), being performed under a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. Previous research on the development of a properly trained and skilled national security workforce has identified a lack of interest by k-12 students in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields. Further, participation in these careers by women and minority populations is limited and is not increasing. Added to this are low educational achievement levels in New Mexico, where the marketing campaign will be deployed.

None

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt % Pu in the glass did not adversely impact glass viscosity (as assessed using Hf surrogate) or glass durability. Finally, evaluation of DWPF glass pour samples that had Pu concentrations below the 897 g/m{sup 3} limit showed that Pu concentrations in the glass pour stream were close to targeted compositions in the melter feed indicating that Pu neither volatilized from the melt nor stratified in the melter when processed in the DWPF melter.

Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

112

Conformance Tool High Level Design Document: IEC 61850 Cyber Security Acceleration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the high level design document for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) IEC 62351-3, 4 and 6 standards conformance test software toolkit.

Edgar, Thomas W.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - aging high-level waste Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

or transportation of high-level radioactive waste... on which the Secretary begins disposal of ... Source: U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Collection: Fission and...

114

3-D MAPPING TECHNOLOGIES FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research investigated four techniques that could be applicable for mapping of solids remaining in radioactive waste tanks at the Savannah River Site: stereo vision, LIDAR, flash LIDAR, and Structure from Motion (SfM). Stereo vision is the least appropriate technique for the solids mapping application. Although the equipment cost is low and repackaging would be fairly simple, the algorithms to create a 3D image from stereo vision would require significant further development and may not even be applicable since stereo vision works by finding disparity in feature point locations from the images taken by the cameras. When minimal variation in visual texture exists for an area of interest, it becomes difficult for the software to detect correspondences for that object. SfM appears to be appropriate for solids mapping in waste tanks. However, equipment development would be required for positioning and movement of the camera in the tank space to enable capturing a sequence of images of the scene. Since SfM requires the identification of distinctive features and associates those features to their corresponding instantiations in the other image frames, mockup testing would be required to determine the applicability of SfM technology for mapping of waste in tanks. There may be too few features to track between image frame sequences to employ the SfM technology since uniform appearance may exist when viewing the remaining solids in the interior of the waste tanks. Although scanning LIDAR appears to be an adequate solution, the expense of the equipment ($80,000-$120,000) and the need for further development to allow tank deployment may prohibit utilizing this technology. The development would include repackaging of equipment to permit deployment through the 4-inch access ports and to keep the equipment relatively uncontaminated to allow use in additional tanks. 3D flash LIDAR has a number of advantages over stereo vision, scanning LIDAR, and SfM, including full frame time-of-flight data (3D image) collected with a single laser pulse, high frame rates, direct calculation of range, blur-free images without motion distortion, no need for precision scanning mechanisms, ability to combine 3D flash LIDAR with 2D cameras for 2D texture over 3D depth, and no moving parts. The major disadvantage of the 3D flash LIDAR camera is the cost of approximately $150,000, not including the software development time and repackaging of the camera for deployment in the waste tanks.

Marzolf, A.; Folsom, M.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

Alternatives Generation and Analysis for Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document addresses the preferred combination of design and operational configurations to provide heat removal from high-level waste tanks during Phase 1 waste feed delivery to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding tank safety requirement limits. An interim decision for the preferred method to remove the heat from the high-level waste tanks during waste feed delivery operations is presented herein.

WILLIS, W.L.

2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Distributed control for reconfigurable FPGA systems: a high-level design approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed control for reconfigurable FPGA systems: a high-level design approach Chiraz Trabelsi to increase design productivity. This approach combines control distribution and high-level modeling in order to decrease design complexity and enhance design reuse and scalability. Control distribution is based

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

117

A Mission Controller for High Level Control of Autonomous and Semi-Autonomous Underwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Mission Controller for High Level Control of Autonomous and Semi-Autonomous Underwater Vehicles to provide high-level control for autonomous and semi- autonomous vehicle operation. The mission controller autonomous AUVs, acoustically controlled AUVs and a new class of hybrid vehicle capable of operating both

Whitcomb, Louis L.

118

An Investigation into the Oxidation State of Molybdenum in Simplified High Level Nuclear Waste Glass Compositions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Investigation into the Oxidation State of Molybdenum in Simplified High Level Nuclear Waste of Mo in glasses containing simplified simulated high level nuclear waste (HLW) streams has been originating from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Experiments using simulated nuclear waste streams

Sheffield, University of

119

Export markets gain strength  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prices for internally traded coal in the USA have reached record levels and the future market fundamentals look very good. This is mainly due to Asian demand. The article discusses recent markets for US coal and summarizes findings of a recent study by Hill & Associates entitled 'International coal trade - supply, demand and prices to 2025'. 1 ref., 2 tabs.

Fiscor, S.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Scoping Economics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NGNP Project has the objective of developing the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology to supply high temperature process heat to industrial processes as a substitute for burning of fossil fuels, such as natural gas. Applications of the HTGR technology that have been evaluated by the NGNP Project for supply of process heat include supply of electricity, steam and high-temperature gas to a wide range of industrial processes, and production of hydrogen and oxygen for use in petrochemical, refining, coal to liquid fuels, chemical, and fertilizer plants.

Larry Demick

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Market Feasibility Study Executive Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

popular areblack,green,andoolongteas.Lesswellknowntypesincludewhiteand Puer tea. There is a high levelA Market Feasibility Study Executive Summary Hawai`i-Grown Tea Pacific Asian Center for Entrepreneurship #12;Overview This report is a feasibility study for developing tea into a viable and sustainable

122

Planning and scheduling of concurrent high-level activities for UUV mission operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops a mission planning and scheduling algorithm that enables a single Unmanned Undersea Vehicle (UUV) to concurrently perform high level activities, while managing various resources in a dynamic ocean ...

Chang, Larry, S. M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

OPERATING EXPERIENCE LEVEL 3, Requalification Test Failure of Certain High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters- Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2014-01 Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information regarding the previous requalification test failure and subsequent successful requalification, of certain high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter models manufactured by Flanders Corporation.

124

How Do High Levels of Wind and Solar Impact the Grid? The Western...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How Do High Levels of Wind and Solar Impact the Grid? The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Debra Lew National Renewable Energy Laboratory Dick Piwko, Nick Miller, Gary...

125

Building a High-Level Dataflow System on top of Map-Reduce: The Pig Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building a High-Level Dataflow System on top of Map-Reduce: The Pig Experience Alan F. Gates, Olga are open-source projects administered by the Apache Software Foundation. This paper describes

Olston, Christopher

126

Brown, Lipton, and the Prospects of High-level IBE Brown's Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brown, Lipton, and the Prospects of High-level IBE Brown's Project With Brown's paper we turn question about the selection procedures which scientists use for identifying those theories which

Fitelson, Branden

127

Design of a high-level waste repository system for the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report presents a conceptual design for a High Level Waste disposal system for fuel discharged by U.S. commercial power reactors, using the Yucca Mountain repository site recently designated by federal legislation. ...

Driscoll, Michael J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Demonstration of Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation Process Using Savannah River Site High Level Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the experimental effort to demonstrate the continuous precipitation of cesium from Savannah River Site High Level Waste using sodium tetraphenylborate. In addition, the experiments examined the removal of strontium and various actinides through addition of monosodium titanate.

Peters, T.B.

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

Risk-informing decisions about high-level nuclear waste repositories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance assessments (PAs) are important sources of information for societal decisions in high-level radioactive waste (HLW) management, particularly in evaluating safety cases for proposed HLW repository development. ...

Ghosh, Suchandra Tina, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Feasibility of lateral emplacement in very deep borehole disposal of high level nuclear waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The U.S. Department of Energy recently filed a motion to withdraw the Nuclear Regulatory Commission license application for the High Level Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. As the U.S. has focused exclusively ...

Gibbs, Jonathan Sutton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

HIGH-LEVEL MULTI-STEP INVERTER OPTIMIZATION, USING A MINIMUM NUMBER OF POWER TRANSISTORS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIGH-LEVEL MULTI-STEP INVERTER OPTIMIZATION, USING A MINIMUM NUMBER OF POWER TRANSISTORS. Juan 56-41-246-999 e-mail lmoran@renoir.die.udec.cl ABSTRACT Multilevel inverters with a large number-5]. Multi-level inverters can operate not only with PWM techniques but also with amplitude modulation (AM

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

132

Idetic: A High-level Synthesis Approach for Enabling Long Computations on Transiently-powered ASICs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that aims to find the checkpoints which incur minimum overhead and minimize recomputation energy cost. We operation, Idetic adaptively adjusts the checkpointing rate based on the available energy level and manufacturing cost, mass production justifies using ASIC solutions. In addition, recent advances in High- Level

133

A critical concern for embedded sys tems is the need to deliver high levels of per  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 A critical concern for embedded sys­ tems is the need to deliver high levels of per­ formance voltage. Because dynam­ ic energy scales quadratically with supply volt­ age, DVS can significantly reduce energy use. 2 Enabling systems to run at multiple fre­ quency and voltage levels is challenging

Mudge, Trevor

134

The tolerance of two varieties of cotton to relatively high levels of sodium and magnesium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE TO'ERANCE OF TNO VARIETIES OF COTTON TO RELATIVELY HIGH LEVELS OF SODIUM AND MAGNESIUM A Tnesis by Msnhar C. Parekh Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...) (Nember) (Nemb ) August 1969 ABSTRACT The Tolerance of Two Varieties of Cotton to Relatively High Levels of Sodium and Magnesium. (August 1969) Masher C. Parekh, B. S. , Gujarat University, Directed by: Dr. H. E. Joham An experiment was conducted...

Parekh, Manhar C

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

135

NONLINEARITY AND MARKET EFFICIENCY IN GCC STOCK MARKETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

): Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), using three robust and highly regarded nonlinearity tests. In addition, the Efficient Market Hypothesis (EMH) was tested in this dissertation for the GCC stock markets using...

Alharbi, Abdullah M. H.

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Enclosure 3 DOE Response to EPA Question Regarding "High-Level Liquid Radioactive Waste"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to date, which is from the definitions in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act: The term "high-level radioactive waste" means-- (A) the highly radioactive material resulting from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel of waste streams as from the applicable definition of HLW in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. 5/11/20051 #12

137

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and K. Porter. 2011. Wind Power and Electricity Markets.41 6. Wind Power Priceat Various Levels of Wind Power Capacity Penetration Wind

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Bargaining and Power in Networks From the book Networks, Crowds, and Markets: Reasoning about a Highly Connected World.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or in organizations. A particular focus is on the way in which power is manifested between pairs of people linkedChapter 12 Bargaining and Power in Networks From the book Networks, Crowds, and Markets: Reasoning's position in a network affects its power in the market. In some cases, we were able to come up with precise

Kleinberg, Jon

139

Determination of total cyanide in Hanford Site high-level wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel ferrocyanide compounds (Na{sub 2-x}Cs{sub x}NiFe (CN){sub 6}) were produced in a scavenging process to remove {sup 137}Cs from Hanford Site single-shell tank waste supernates. Methods for determining total cyanide in Hanford Site high-level wastes are needed for the evaluation of potential exothermic reactions between cyanide and oxidizers such as nitrate and for safe storage, processing, and management of the wastes in compliance with regulatory requirements. Hanford Site laboratory experience in determining cyanide in high-level wastes is summarized. Modifications were made to standard cyanide methods to permit improved handling of high-level waste samples and to eliminate interferences found in Hanford Site waste matrices. Interferences and associated procedure modifications caused by high nitrates/nitrite concentrations, insoluble nickel ferrocyanides, and organic complexants are described.

Winters, W.I. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pool, K.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

200 Market Building  

High Performance Buildings Database

Portland, OR The 200 Market Building is a high-rise built in 1973 and located in downtown Portland, Oregon. It was purchased in 1988 by its current owner, 200 Market Associates, primarily because of its optimal location in Portland's central business district. Since 1989 the building has undergone continuous improvements in multiple phases.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

THE RETRIEVAL KNOWLEDGE CENTER EVALUATION OF LOW TANK LEVEL MIXING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK RETRIEVAL 10516  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Complex has over two-hundred underground storage tanks containing over 80-million gallons of legacy waste from the production of nuclear weapons. The majority of the waste is located at four major sites across the nation and is planned for treatment over a period of almost forty years. The DOE Office of Technology Innovation & Development within the Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) sponsors technology research and development programs to support processing advancements and technology maturation designed to improve the costs and schedule for disposal of the waste and closure of the tanks. Within the waste processing focus area are numerous technical initiatives which included the development of a suite of waste removal technologies to address the need for proven equipment and techniques to remove high level radioactive wastes from the waste tanks that are now over fifty years old. In an effort to enhance the efficiency of waste retrieval operations, the DOE-EM Office of Technology Innovation & Development funded an effort to improve communications and information sharing between the DOE's major waste tank locations as it relates to retrieval. The task, dubbed the Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) was co-lead by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with core team members representing the Oak Ridge and Idaho sites, as well as, site contractors responsible for waste tank operations. One of the greatest challenges to the processing and closure of many of the tanks is complete removal of all tank contents. Sizeable challenges exist for retrieving waste from High Level Waste (HLW) tanks; with complications that are not normally found with tank retrieval in commercial applications. Technologies currently in use for waste retrieval are generally adequate for bulk removal; however, removal of tank heels, the materials settled in the bottom of the tank, using the same technology have proven to be difficult. Through the RKC, DOE-EM funded an evaluation of adaptable commercial technologies that could assist with the removal of the tank heels. This paper will discuss the efforts and results of developing the RKC to improve communications and discussion of tank waste retrieval through a series of meetings designed to identify technical gaps in retrieval technologies at the DOE Hanford and Savannah River Sites. This paper will also describe the results of an evaluation of commercially available technologies for low level mixing as they might apply to HLW tank heel retrievals.

Fellinger, A.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

142

Market Design Test Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power industry restructuring continues to evolve at multiple levels of system operations. At the bulk electricity level, several organizations charged with regional system operation are implementing versions of a Wholesale Power Market Platform (WPMP) in response to U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission initiatives. Recently the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and several regional initiatives have been pressing the integration of demand response as a resource for system operations. These policy and regulatory pressures are driving the exploration of new market designs at the wholesale and retail levels. The complex interplay among structural conditions, market protocols, and learning behaviors in relation to short-term and longer-term market performance demand a flexible computational environment where designs can be tested and sensitivities to power system and market rule changes can be explored. This paper presents the use of agent-based computational methods in the study of electricity markets at the wholesale and retail levels, and distinctions in problem formulation between these levels.

Widergren, Steven E.; Sun, Junjie; Tesfatsion, Leigh

2006-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

143

Phase I high-level waste pretreatment and feed staging plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the preliminary planning basis for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a sufficient quantity of high-level waste feed to the privatization contractor during Phase I. By this analysis of candidate high-level waste feed sources, the initial quantity of high-level waste feed totals more than twice the minimum feed requirements. The flexibility of the current infrastructure within tank farms provides a variety of methods to transfer the feed to the privatization contractor`s site location. The amount and type of pretreatment (sludge washing) necessary for the Phase I processing can be tailored to support the demonstration goals without having a significant impact on glass volume (i.e., either inhibited water or caustic leaching can be used).

Manuel, A.F.

1996-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

144

The Savannah River Site Replacement High Level Radioactive Waste Evaporator Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Replacement High Level Waste Evaporator Project was conceived in 1985 to reduce the volume of the high level radioactive waste Process of the high level waste has been accomplished up to this time using Bent Tube type evaporators and therefore, that type evaporator was selected for this project. The Title I Design of the project was 70% completed in late 1990. The Department of Energy at that time hired an independent consulting firm to perform a complete review of the project. The DOE placed a STOP ORDER on purchasing the evaporator in January 1991. Essentially, no construction was to be done on this project until all findings and concerns dealing with the type and design of the evaporator are resolved. This report addresses two aspects of the DOE design review; (1) Comparing the Bent Tube Evaporator with the Forced Circulation Evaporator, (2) The design portion of the DOE Project Review - concentrated on the mechanical design properties of the evaporator. 1 ref.

Presgrove, S.B. (Bechtel Savannah River, Inc., North Augusta, SC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Savannah River Site Replacement High Level Radioactive Waste Evaporator Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Replacement High Level Waste Evaporator Project was conceived in 1985 to reduce the volume of the high level radioactive waste Process of the high level waste has been accomplished up to this time using Bent Tube type evaporators and therefore, that type evaporator was selected for this project. The Title I Design of the project was 70% completed in late 1990. The Department of Energy at that time hired an independent consulting firm to perform a complete review of the project. The DOE placed a STOP ORDER on purchasing the evaporator in January 1991. Essentially, no construction was to be done on this project until all findings and concerns dealing with the type and design of the evaporator are resolved. This report addresses two aspects of the DOE design review; (1) Comparing the Bent Tube Evaporator with the Forced Circulation Evaporator, (2) The design portion of the DOE Project Review - concentrated on the mechanical design properties of the evaporator. 1 ref.

Presgrove, S.B. [Bechtel Savannah River, Inc., North Augusta, SC (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Market Transformation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its market transformation subprogram.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Solvent extraction in the treatment of acidic high-level liquid waste : where do we stand?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last 15 years, a number of solvent extraction/recovery processes have been developed for the removal of the transuranic elements, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs from acidic high-level liquid waste. These processes are based on the use of a variety of both acidic and neutral extractants. This chapter will present an overview and analysis of the various extractants and flowsheets developed to treat acidic high-level liquid waste streams. The advantages and disadvantages of each extractant along with comparisons of the individual systems are discussed.

Horwitz, E. P.; Schulz, W. W.

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

148

Tradeoffs in the design of a system for high level language interpretation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of designing a system for high-level language interpretation (HLLI) is considered. First, a model of the design process is presented where several styles of design, e.g. turing machine interpretation, CISC architecture interpretation and RISC architecture interpretation are treated uniformly. Second, the most significant characteristics of HLLI are analysed in the context of different design styles, and some guidelines are presented on how to identify the most suitable design style for a given high-level language problem. 12 references.

Osorio, F.C.C.; Patt, Y.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Tank waste remediation system phase I high-level waste feed processability assessment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the effects of feed composition on the Phase I high-level waste immobilization process and interim storage facility requirements for the high-level waste glass.Several different Phase I staging (retrieval, blending, and pretreatment) scenarios were used to generate example feed compositions for glass formulations, testing, and glass sensitivity analysis. Glass models and data form laboratory glass studies were used to estimate achievable waste loading and corresponding glass volumes for various Phase I feeds. Key issues related to feed process ability, feed composition, uncertainty, and immobilization process technology are identified for future consideration in other tank waste disposal program activities.

Lambert, S.L.; Stegen, G.E., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Energy Factors, Leasing Structure and the Market Price of Office Buildings in the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contractual, energy and market-related characteristics. Alocal-level wholesale energy market price dynamics and localof the relationship between energy factor markets, leasing

Jaffee, Dwight M.; Stanton, Richard; Wallace, Nancy E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Energy Factors, Leasing Structure and the Market Price of Office Buildings in the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contractual, energy and market-related characteristics. Alocal-level wholesale energy market price dynamics and localfunction of local energy-market and weather characteristics

Jaffee, Dwight; Stanton, Richard; Wallace, Nancy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

324 Building radiochemical engineering cells, high-level vault, low-level vault, and associated areas closure plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site, located adjacent to and north of Richland, Washington, is operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The 324 Building is located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The 324 Building was constructed in the 1960s to support materials and chemical process research and development activities ranging from laboratory/bench-scale studies to full engineering-scale pilot plant demonstrations. In the mid-1990s, it was determined that dangerous waste and waste residues were being stored for greater than 90 days in the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells (REC) and in the High-Level Vault/Low-Level Vault (HLV/LLV) tanks. [These areas are not Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) permitted portions of the 324 Building.] Through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-89, agreement was reached to close the nonpermitted RCRA unit in the 324 Building. This closure plan, managed under TPA Milestone M-20-55, addresses the identified building areas targeted by the Tri-Party Agreement and provides commitments to achieve the highest degree of compliance practicable, given the special technical difficulties of managing mixed waste that contains high-activity radioactive materials, and the physical limitations of working remotely in the areas within the subject closure unit. This closure plan is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1.0 provides the introduction, historical perspective, 324 Building history and current mission, and the regulatory basis and strategy for managing the closure unit. Chapters 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 discuss the detailed facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring respectively. Chapter 6.0 deals with the closure strategy and performance standard, including the closure activities for the B-Cell, D-Cell, HLV, LLV; piping and miscellaneous associated building areas. Chapter 7.0 addresses the closure activities identified in Chapter 6.0, and also adds information on closure activities for the soil directly beneath the unit, regulated material removed during closure, and the schedule for closure. Chapter 8.0 provides Surveillance, monitoring and post-closure information and Chapter 9.0 provides a list of references used throughout the document.

Barnett, J.M.

1998-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

153

Lead-iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for the disposal of high-level nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste

Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

1984-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

154

Coal markets squeeze producers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supply/demand fundamentals seem poised to keep prices of competing fossil fuels high, which could cushion coal prices, but increased mining and transportation costs may squeeze producer profits. Are markets ready for more volatility?

Ryan, M.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Post-compression of high energy terawatt-level femtosecond pulses and application to high order harmonic generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform a post-compression of high energy pulses by using optical-field ionization of low pressure helium gas in a guided geometry. We apply this approach to a TW chirped-pulse-amplification based Ti:Sapphire laser chain and show that spectral broadening can be controlled both with the input pulse energy and gas pressure. Under optimized conditions, we generate 10 fs pulses at TW level directly under vacuum and demonstrate a high stability of the post compressed pulse duration. These high energy post-compressed pulses are thereafter used to perform high harmonic generation in a loose focusing geometry. The XUV beam is characterized both spatially and spectrally on a single shot basis and structured continuous XUV spectra are observed.

Hort, Ond?ej; Cabasse, Amlie; Petit, Stphane; Mvel, Eric; Descamps, Dominique; Constant, Eric

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Advanced Inverter Functions to Support High Levels of Distributed Solar: Policy and Regulatory Considerations (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper explains how advanced inverter functions (sometimes called 'smart inverters') contribute to the integration of high levels of solar PV generation onto the electrical grid and covers the contributions of advanced functions to maintaining grid stability. Policy and regulatory considerations associated with the deployment of advanced inverter functions are also introduced.

Not Available

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Under Vehicle Perception for High Level Safety Measures Using A Catadioptric Camera System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost. Moreover, displaying the under frames of the vehicles by typical perspective cameras that haveUnder Vehicle Perception for High Level Safety Measures Using A Catadioptric Camera System Caner Sahin and Mustafa Unel Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences Sabanci University Istanbul, Turkey

Yanikoglu, Berrin

158

Sequential Thermo-Hydraulic Modeling of Variably Saturated Flow in High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sequential Thermo-Hydraulic Modeling of Variably Saturated Flow in High-Level Radioactive Waste-Malabry, France Key words: waste repository, geological disposal, thermo- hydraulic modeling Introduction The most developed a sequential model to predict the coupled thermo-hydraulic processes at a cell-scale radioactive

Boyer, Edmond

159

Aspects of High Level Computer Vision Using Fuzzy Sets James M. Keller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was that for pattern recognition, the differences between fuzzy spatial relation definitions was not crucialAspects of High Level Computer Vision Using Fuzzy Sets James M. Keller Computer Engr. & Computer Matsakis@irit.fr Abstract Fuzzy set theory is making many inroads into the handling of uncertainty

Matsakis, Pascal

160

Modeling Mobile Agent Systems with High Level Petri Nets Dianxiang Xu and Yi Deng  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Mobile Agent Systems with High Level Petri Nets Dianxiang Xu and Yi Deng School-based approach for architectural modeling of mobile agent systems. Agent template (net) is proposed to model as a component, consisting of mobility environment (system net), agent templates (agent nets), and internal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Brief Communication High temperature pulses decrease indirect chilling injury and elevate ATP levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brief Communication High temperature pulses decrease indirect chilling injury and elevate ATP: Received 20 December 2009 Accepted 8 March 2010 Available online 15 March 2010 Keywords: ATP Energy supply by determining survival rates and ATP levels for flies that had undergone continuous long-term exposure at 0 °C

Lee Jr., Richard E.

162

Structural integrity and potential failure modes of hanford high-level waste tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural Integrity of the Hanford High-Level Waste Tanks were evaluated based on the existing Design and Analysis Documents. All tank structures were found adequate for the normal operating and seismic loads. Potential failure modes of the tanks were assessed by engineering interpretation and extrapolation of the existing engineering documents.

Han, F.C.

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

Burgard, K.C.

1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

164

Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

Burgard, K.C.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

165

ScriptEase II: Platform Independent Story Creation Using High-Level Patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this bottleneck and ease story cre- ation. ScriptEase II (referred to as SEII) is a game engine inde- pendent toolScriptEase II: Platform Independent Story Creation Using High-Level Patterns Kevin Schenk1 , Adel authors seek new ways to simplify the process of controlling story content using scripts. This paper de

Szafron, Duane

166

Scheduling and Optimizing Stream Programs on Multicore Machines by Exploiting High-Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(SDF) high-level abstraction of stream programs to design adaptive stream programs for energy reduction traffic on the interconnection fabric, such as networks on-chip. While SDF abstractions can help optimize stream programs on multicore machines, SDF is more suitable for describing stream data

167

Low and High-Level Visual Feature Based Apple Detection from Multi-modal Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Low and High-Level Visual Feature Based Apple Detection from Multi-modal Images J. P. Wachs1 , H discusses the development of a machine vision system, capable of recognizing occluded green apples within a tree canopy. This involves the detection of "green" apples within scenes of "green leaves", shadow

Wachs, Juan

168

High-Level Support for Pipeline Parallelism on Many-Core Architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Level Support for Pipeline Parallelism on Many-Core Architectures Siegfried Benkner1 , Enes the pipeline pattern. We propose C/C++ language annotations for specifying pipeline patterns and describe - International European Conference on Parallel and Distributed Computing - 2012 (2012)" #12;support for pipelined

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

169

Unified High-Level Synthesis and Module Placement for Defect-Tolerant Microfluidic Biochips*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

49.2 825 Unified High-Level Synthesis and Module Placement for Defect-Tolerant Microfluidic University, Durham, NC 27708, USA {fs, krish}@ee.duke.edu ABSTRACT Microfluidic biochips promise on the automated design of droplet-based microfluidic biochips. We present a synthesis methodology that unifies

Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

170

GRID superscalar and SAGA: forming a high-level and platform-independent Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GRID superscalar and SAGA: forming a high-level and platform-independent Grid programming Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands {merzky|kielmann}@cs.vu.nl Abstract. The Simple API for Grid Applications (SAGA), as currently standardized within GGF, aims to provide a simple yet powerful Grid API; its

Kielmann, Thilo

171

ILPBased Scheduling with Time and Resource Constraints in High Level Synthesis \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The scheduling problem in high­level synthesis is con­ cerned with sequencing the operators of a control­ constrained scheduling (RCS) minimizes the number of control steps when the number of FU's are fixed; (2) time­constrained scheduling (TCS) minimizes the number of resources when the number of control steps is fixed. We can also

Walker, Robert A.

172

Photoconductivity and luminescence in GaSe crystals at high levels of optical excitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The photoconductivity and luminescence of GaSe layered crystals at high levels of optical excitation are studied experimentally. The specific features observed in the photoconductivity and photoluminescence spectra are controlled by the nonlinear optical absorption in the region of excitonic resonance.

Kyazym-zade, A. G.; Salmanov, V. M., E-mail: vagif_salmanov@yahoo.com; Salmanova, A. A. [Baku State University (Azerbaijan); Alieva, A. M.; Ibaeva, R. Z. [National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Columbia University TRECVID-2005 Video Search and High-Level Feature Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Columbia University TRECVID-2005 Video Search and High-Level Feature Extraction Shih-Fu Chang and Multimedia Lab, Columbia University http://www.ee.columbia.edu/dvmm Oct. 28th 2005 Descriptions of Submitted. Search I_C_2_ColumbiaI1_1: Interactive system, using text search (against ASR/MT), content- based image

Chang, Shih-Fu

174

ABDUCTIVE LOGIC PROGRAMMING Abductive Logic Programming is a high level knowledge representation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABDUCTIVE LOGIC PROGRAMMING Abductive Logic Programming is a high level knowledge representation framework that allows us to solve problems declaratively based on abductive reasoning. It extends normal predicates. Problem solving is effected by deriving hypotheses on these abducible predicates (abductive hy

Moraitis, Pavlos

175

Forward capacity market CONEfusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In ISO New England and PJM it was assumed that sponsors of new capacity projects would offer them into the newly established forward centralized capacity markets at prices based on their levelized net cost of new entry, or ''Net CONE.'' But the FCCMs have not operated in the way their proponents had expected. To clear up the CONEfusion, FCCM designs should be reconsidered to adapt them to the changing circumstances and to be grounded in realistic expectations of market conduct. (author)

Wilson, James F.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

2008 Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program (WIP) Market Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program (WIP) integrates local needs and interests in order to promote markets for energy efficiency (EE) and renewable energy (RE). Its activities are integrative across disparate technologies and market boundaries. In order to analyze the historical performance and forward-looking potential of this broad program, this report assesses market developments and outlooks at the following aggregated levels: states, cities and communities, Indian tribes, and low-income residential efficiency. The analytical goals of the report are to: identify market drivers for EE and RE, paying attention to subsidies, taxes, targets and mandates, environmental policy, energy security, and economic development; assess efficacy of existing policies; discuss challenges and barriers; evaluate high-impact measures for overcoming challenges and barriers; and forecast future market trends.

Doris, E.; Taylor, R.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Lead iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for disposal of high-level nuclear waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90.degree. C., with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10.sup.2 to 10.sup.3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. Lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass can be prepared at temperatures as low as 800.degree. C., since they exhibit very low melt viscosities in the 800.degree. to 1050.degree. C. temperature range. These waste-loaded glasses do not readily devitrify at temperatures as high as 550.degree. C. and are not adversely affected by large doses of gamma radiation in H.sub.2 O at 135.degree. C. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear wasteforms.

Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sales, Brian C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Flexibility Reserve Reductions from an Energy Imbalance Market with High Levels of Wind Energy in the Western Interconnection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds" | National Hansen 1 , M.62Flexibility

179

Market Transformation  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This Fuel Cell Technologies Program fact sheet outlines current status and challenges in the market transformation of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

180

The Accessibility of patient information leaflets concerning cervical cancer - the effect of high leaflet readability level and the reader's level of education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research suggests that many Patient Information Leaflets are written at too high a level for the population to understand. This study took 2 leaflets on Cervical Cancer, with their readability measured using 3 different ...

Gale, Jennifer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Progress of the High Level Waste Program at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13178  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site treats and immobilizes High Level Waste into a durable borosilicate glass for safe, permanent storage. The High Level Waste program significantly reduces environmental risks associated with the storage of radioactive waste from legacy efforts to separate fissionable nuclear material from irradiated targets and fuels. In an effort to support the disposition of radioactive waste and accelerate tank closure at the Savannah River Site, the Defense Waste Processing Facility recently implemented facility and flowsheet modifications to improve production by 25%. These improvements, while low in cost, translated to record facility production in fiscal years 2011 and 2012. In addition, significant progress has been accomplished on longer term projects aimed at simplifying and expanding the flexibility of the existing flowsheet in order to accommodate future processing needs and goals. (authors)

Bricker, Jonathan M.; Fellinger, Terri L.; Staub, Aaron V.; Ray, Jeff W.; Iaukea, John F. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

West Valley demonstration project: alternative processes for solidifying the high-level wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established the West Valley Solidification Project as the result of legislation passed by the US Congress. The purpose of this project was to carry out a high level nuclear waste management demonstration project at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center in West Valley, New York. The DOE authorized the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute, to assess alternative processes for treatment and solidification of the WNYNSC high-level wastes. The Process Alternatives Study is the suject of this report. Two pretreatment approaches and several waste form processes were selected for evaluation in this study. The two waste treatment approaches were the salt/sludge separation process and the combined waste process. Both terminal and interim waste form processes were studied.

Holton, L.K.; Larson, D.E.; Partain, W.L.; Treat, R.L.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Evaluation of systems specified to work at a high level of reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of Systems Specified. to Mork at a High Level of Reliability. (August 1974) I Luc Perrouin, Ingenieur civil des Telecommunications Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. H. 0. Hartley In order to evaluate the reliability of a system to a high... to express my sincerest appreciation and gratitude to Dr. H. 0. Hartley for his patience and understanding during the course of this research and for his invaluable help during my year of study at Texas AQ4 University. I am s1so thankfu1 to the members...

Perrouin, Luc Victor

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

Voluntary Green Power Market Forecast through 2015  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various factors influence the development of the voluntary 'green' power market--the market in which consumers purchase or produce power from non-polluting, renewable energy sources. These factors include climate policies, renewable portfolio standards (RPS), renewable energy prices, consumers' interest in purchasing green power, and utilities' interest in promoting existing programs and in offering new green options. This report presents estimates of voluntary market demand for green power through 2015 that were made using historical data and three scenarios: low-growth, high-growth, and negative-policy impacts. The resulting forecast projects the total voluntary demand for renewable energy in 2015 to range from 63 million MWh annually in the low case scenario to 157 million MWh annually in the high case scenario, representing an approximately 2.5-fold difference. The negative-policy impacts scenario reflects a market size of 24 million MWh. Several key uncertainties affect the results of this forecast, including uncertainties related to growth assumptions, the impacts that policy may have on the market, the price and competitiveness of renewable generation, and the level of interest that utilities have in offering and promoting green power products.

Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Sumner, J.; Kreycik, C.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Hanford Site River Protection Project High-Level Waste Safe Storage and Retrieval  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an update from last year and describes project successes and issues associated with the management and work required to safely store, enhance readiness for waste feed delivery, and prepare for treated waste receipts for the approximately 53 million gallons of mixed and high-level waste currently in aging tanks at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a 560 square-mile area in southeastern Washington State near Richland, Washington.

Aromi, E. S.; Raymond, R. E.; Allen, D. I.; Payne, M. A.; DeFigh-Price, C.; Kristofzski, J. G.; Wiegman, S. A.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

186

Remote Handling Equipment for a High-Level Waste Waste Package Closure System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-level waste will be placed in sealed waste packages inside a shielded closure cell. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has designed a system for closing the waste packages including all cell interior equipment and support systems. This paper discusses the material handling aspects of the equipment used and operations that will take place as part of the waste package closure operations. Prior to construction, the cell and support system will be assembled in a full-scale mockup at INL.

Kevin M. Croft; Scott M. Allen; Mark W. Borland

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

DELPHI expert panel evaluation of Hanford high level waste tank failure modes and release quantities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Failure Modes and Release Quantities of the Hanford High Level Waste Tanks due to postulated accident loads were established by a DELPHI Expert Panel consisting of both on-site and off-site experts in the field of Structure and Release. The Report presents the evaluation process, accident loads, tank structural failure conclusion reached by the panel during the two-day meeting.

Dunford, G.L.; Han, F.C.

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

The dilemma of siting a high-level nuclear waste repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This books presents a siting process that the authors believe will prove successful within the adversarial world that characterizes most attempts to build waste-disposal facilities. They come to the following conclusions: a volunatary siting process stands the best chance of breaking the `not-in-my-backyard` problem; and without public acknowledgement that a facility is needed, any proposal to build a high-level nuclear waste storage facility will meet with opposition.

Easterline, D.; Kunreuther, H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Site High Level Waste Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This criticality safety evaluation covers operations for waste in underground storage tanks at the high-level waste tank farms on the Hanford site. This evaluation provides the bases for criticality safety limits and controls to govern receipt, transfer, and long-term storage of tank waste. Justification is provided that a nuclear criticality accident cannot occur for tank farms operations, based on current fissile material and operating conditions.

ROGERS, C.A.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

190

Demonstrating Reliable High Level Waste Slurry Sampling Techniques to Support Hanford Waste Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capability using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HL W) formulations. This work represents one of the remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. The TOC must demonstrate the ability to adequately mix and sample high-level waste feed to meet the WTP Waste Acceptance Criteria and Data Quality Objectives. The sampling method employed must support both TOC and WTP requirements. To facilitate information transfer between the two facilities the mixing and sampling demonstrations are led by the One System Integrated Project Team. The One System team, Waste Feed Delivery Mixing and Sampling Program, has developed a full scale sampling loop to demonstrate sampler capability. This paper discusses the full scale sampling loops ability to meet precision and accuracy requirements, including lessons learned during testing. Results of the testing showed that the Isolok(R) sampler chosen for implementation provides precise, repeatable results. The Isolok(R) sampler accuracy as tested did not meet test success criteria. Review of test data and the test platform following testing by a sampling expert identified several issues regarding the sampler used to provide reference material used to judge the Isolok's accuracy. Recommendations were made to obtain new data to evaluate the sampler's accuracy utilizing a reference sampler that follows good sampling protocol.

Kelly, Steven E.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

191

Safety analysis report vitrified high level waste type B shipping cask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Safety Analysis Report describes the design, analyses, and principle features of the Vitrified High Level Waste (VHLW) Cask. In preparing this report a detailed evaluation of the design has been performed to ensure that all safety, licensing, and operational goals for the cask and its associated Department of Energy program can be met. The functions of this report are: (1) to fully document that all functional and regulatory requirements of 10CFR71 can be met by the package; and (2) to document the design and analyses of the cask for review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The VHLW Cask is the reusable shipping package designed by GNSI under Department of Energy contract DE-AC04-89AL53-689 for transportation of Vitrified High Level Waste, and to meet the requirements for certification under 10CFR71 for a Type B(U) package. The VHLW cask has been designed as packaging for transport of canisters of Vitrified High Level Waste solidified at Department of Energy facilities.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A Unified Multiple-Level Cache for High Performance Storage Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-level cache hierarchies are widely used in high-performance storage systems to improve I/O performance. However, traditional cache management algorithms are not suited well for such cache organizations. Recently proposed multi-level cache replacement algorithms using aggressive exclusive caching work well with single or multiple-client, low-correlated workloads, but suffer serious performance degradation with multiple-client, high-correlated workloads. In this paper, we propose a new cache management algorithm that handles multi-level buffer caches by forming a unified cache (uCache), which uses both exclusive caching in L2 storage caches and cooperative client caching. We also propose a new local replacement algorithm, Frequency Based Eviction-Reference (FBER), based on our study of access patterns in exclusive caches. Our simulation results show that uCache increases the cumulative cache hit ratio dramatically. Compared to other popular cache algorithms, such as LRU, the I/O response time is improved by up to 46% for low-correlated workloads and 53% for high-correlated workloads.

He, X. [Tennessee Technological University; Ou, Li [Tennessee Technological University; Kosa, Martha J. [Tennessee Technological University; Scott, Steven L [ORNL; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Transformation Market Transformation is based on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Market Transformation Market Transformation is based on the concept that federal support can and reducing high insurance costs. Strategies Market Transformation's primary goal is to accelerate-world implementation Market transformation is built on forming partnerships with stakeholders through- out the country

194

An Engineering Approach to Monitoring Market Power in Restructured Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by resolving the dispatch using the optimal nodal prices as offers with no constraints on capacity. MarketAn Engineering Approach to Monitoring Market Power in Restructured Markets for Electricity C Abstract The high average prices and high volatility of prices in many restructured markets for electricity

195

Reference design and operations for deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reference design and operational procedures for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes have been developed and documented. The design and operations are feasible with currently available technology and meet existing safety and anticipated regulatory requirements. Objectives of the reference design include providing a baseline for more detailed technical analyses of system performance and serving as a basis for comparing design alternatives. Numerous factors suggest that deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is inherently safe. Several lines of evidence indicate that groundwater at depths of several kilometers in continental crystalline basement rocks has long residence times and low velocity. High salinity fluids have limited potential for vertical flow because of density stratification and prevent colloidal transport of radionuclides. Geochemically reducing conditions in the deep subsurface limit the solubility and enhance the retardation of key radionuclides. A non-technical advantage that the deep borehole concept may offer over a repository concept is that of facilitating incremental construction and loading at multiple perhaps regional locations. The disposal borehole would be drilled to a depth of 5,000 m using a telescoping design and would be logged and tested prior to waste emplacement. Waste canisters would be constructed of carbon steel, sealed by welds, and connected into canister strings with high-strength connections. Waste canister strings of about 200 m length would be emplaced in the lower 2,000 m of the fully cased borehole and be separated by bridge and cement plugs. Sealing of the upper part of the borehole would be done with a series of compacted bentonite seals, cement plugs, cement seals, cement plus crushed rock backfill, and bridge plugs. Elements of the reference design meet technical requirements defined in the study. Testing and operational safety assurance requirements are also defined. Overall, the results of the reference design development and the cost analysis support the technical feasibility of the deep borehole disposal concept for high-level radioactive waste.

Herrick, Courtney Grant; Brady, Patrick Vane; Pye, Steven; Arnold, Bill Walter; Finger, John Travis; Bauer, Stephen J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Edgeworth price cycles in retail gasoline markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this dissertation, I present three essays that are motivated by the interesting and dynamic price-setting behavior of firms in Canadian retail gasoline markets. In the first essay, I examine behavior at the market level ...

Noel, Michael David, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

3rd Workshop on System-level Virtualization for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009, Nuremberg, Germany, March 30, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3rd Workshop on System-level Virtualization for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009 for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009, Nuremberg, Germany, March 30, 2009 Outline · Background work #12;3/193rd Workshop on System-level Virtualization for High Performance Computing (HPCVirt) 2009

Engelmann, Christian

198

DESIGN ANALYSIS FOR THE DEFENSE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of ''Design Analysis for the Defense High-Level Waste Disposal Container'' analysis is to technically define the defense high-level waste (DHLW) disposal container/waste package using the Waste Package Department's (WPD) design methods, as documented in ''Waste Package Design Methodology Report'' (CRWMS M&O [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor] 2000a). The DHLW disposal container is intended for disposal of commercial high-level waste (HLW) and DHLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms), placed within disposable canisters. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-managed spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a DHLW disposal container along with HLW forms. The objective of this analysis is to demonstrate that the DHLW disposal container/waste package satisfies the project requirements, as embodied in Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description Document (SDD) (CRWMS M&O 1999a), and additional criteria, as identified in Waste Package Design Sensitivity Report (CRWMS M&Q 2000b, Table 4). The analysis briefly describes the analytical methods appropriate for the design of the DHLW disposal contained waste package, and summarizes the results of the calculations that illustrate the analytical methods. However, the analysis is limited to the calculations selected for the DHLW disposal container in support of the Site Recommendation (SR) (CRWMS M&O 2000b, Section 7). The scope of this analysis is restricted to the design of the codisposal waste package of the Savannah River Site (SRS) DHLW glass canisters and the Training, Research, Isotopes General Atomics (TRIGA) SNF loaded in a short 18-in.-outer diameter (OD) DOE standardized SNF canister. This waste package is representative of the waste packages that consist of the DHLW disposal container, the DHLW/HLW glass canisters, and the DOE-managed SNF in disposable canisters. The intended use of this analysis is to support Site Recommendation reports and to assist in the development of WPD drawings. Activities described in this analysis were conducted in accordance with the Development Plan ''Design Analysis for the Defense High-Level Waste Disposal Container'' (CRWMS M&O 2000c) with no deviations from the plan.

G. Radulesscu; J.S. Tang

2000-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

199

Marketing and Market Transformation | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Market Transformation Marketing and Market Transformation Presents how going green will grow your business, as well as how programs can overcome appraisal challenges....

200

Power marketing and renewable energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power marketing refers to wholesale and retail transactions of electric power made by companies other than public power entities and the regulated utilities that own the generation and distribution lines. The growth in power marketing has been a major development in the electric power industry during the last few years, and power marketers are expected to realize even more market opportunities as electric industry deregulation proceeds from wholesale competition to retail competition. This Topical Issues Brief examines the nature of the power marketing business and its relationship with renewable power. The information presented is based on interviews conducted with nine power marketing companies, which accounted for almost 54% of total power sales by power marketers in 1995. These interviews provided information on various viewpoints of power marketers, their experience with renewables, and their respective outlooks for including renewables in their resource portfolios. Some basic differences exist between wholesale and retail competition that should be recognized when discussing power marketing and renewable power. At the wholesale level, the majority of power marketers stress the commodity nature of electricity. The primary criteria for developing resource portfolios are the same as those of their wholesale customers: the cost and reliability of power supplies. At the retail level, electricity may be viewed as a product that includes value-added characteristics or services determined by customer preferences.

Fang, J.M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Tank waste remediation system high-level waste feed processability assessment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates the effect of feed composition on the performance of the high-level vitrification process. It is assumed in this study that the tank wastes are retrieved and blended by tank farms, producing 12 different blends from the single-shell tank farms, two blends of double-shell tank waste, and a separately defined all-tank blend. This blending scenario was chosen only for evaluating the impact of composition on the volume of high- level waste glass produced. Special glass compositions were formulated for each waste blend based on glass property models and the properties of similar glasses. These glasses were formulated to meet the applicable viscosity, electrical conductivity, and liquidus temperature constraints for the identified candidate melters. Candidate melters in this study include the low-temperature stirred melter, which operates at 1050{degrees}C; the reference Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant liquid-fed ceramic melter, which operates at 1150{degrees}C; and the high-temperature, joule-heated melter and the cold-crucible melter, which operate over a temperature range of 1150{degrees}C to 1400{degrees}C. In the most conservative case, it is estimated that 61,000 MT of glass will be produced if the Site`s high-level wastes are retrieved by tank farms and processed in the reference joule-heated melter. If an all-tank blend was processed under the same conditions, the reference melter would produce 21,250 MT of glass. If cross-tank blending were used, it is anticipated that $2.0 billion could be saved in repository disposal costs (based on an average disposal cost of $217,000 per canister) by blending the S, SX, B, and T Tank Farm wastes with other wastes prior to vitrification. General blending among all the tank farms is expected to produce great potential benefit.

Lambert, S.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Kim, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that cannot be reflected in energy market prices because theor some other form of non-energy market product (e.g. a the per unit of energy market value of solar technologies,

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Production of glycoprotein-deleted rabies viruses for monosynaptic tracing and high-level gene expression in neurons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recombinant rabies viruses rendered replication-deficient by the deletion of their envelope glycoprotein gene are useful tools for neuroscientists, permitting (1) extraordinarily high transgene expression levels within ...

Wickersham, Ian R.

204

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conventional power plants and wind power. IEEE Transactionsplanning with significant wind power generation. IEEEmix with high level of wind power penetration. Applied

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Cost and Pecuniary Economies in Cotton Production and Marketing: A Study of Texas Southern High Plains Cotton Producers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P. Clarke, Director The Texas A&M University System, College Station, Texas CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION 1 Objectives 1 Cost of Production or Economies of Size Studies 2 ECONOMIES OF SIZE 3 Methodology 4 Study Area 4 Procedure 5 INPUT ECONOMIES... of Marketing Economies for Farm Structure 17 TOTAL BENEFITS BY FARM SIZE 17 CONCLUSIONS 19 REFERENCES SUMMARY In recent years, the "family farm" and its chances for survival has emerged as one of the major agricultural policy issues. The decline in farm...

Smith, E.G.; Richardson, J.W.; Knutson, R.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

ASTATINE-211 RADIOCHEMISTRY: THE DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGIES FOR HIGH ACTIVITY LEVEL RADIOSYNTHESIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Targeted radionuclide therapy is emerging as a viable approach for cancer treatment because of its potential for delivering curative doses of radiation to malignant cell populations while sparing normal tissues. Alpha particles such as those emitted by 211At are particularly attractive for this purpose because of their short path length in tissue and high energy, making them highly effective in killing cancer cells. The current impact of targeted radiotherapy in the clinical domain remains limited despite the fact that in many cases, potentially useful molecular targets and labeled compounds have already been identified. Unfortunately, putting these concepts into practice has been impeded by limitations in radiochemistry methodologies. A critical problem is that the synthesis of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals provides additional challenges in comparison to diagnostic reagents because of the need to perform radio-synthesis at high levels of radioactivity. This is particularly important for {alpha}-particle emitters such as 211At because they deposit large amounts of energy in a highly focal manner. The overall objective of this project is to develop convenient and reproducible radiochemical methodologies for the radiohalogenation of molecules with the {alpha}-particle emitter 211At at the radioactivity levels needed for clinical studies. Our goal is to address two problems in astatine radiochemistry: First, a well known characteristic of 211At chemistry is that yields for electrophilic astatination reactions decline as the time interval after radionuclide isolation from the cyclotron target increases. This is a critical problem that must be addressed if cyclotrons are to be able to efficiently supply 211At to remote users. And second, when the preparation of high levels of 211At-labeled compounds is attempted, the radiochemical yields can be considerably lower than those encountered at tracer dose. For these reasons, clinical evaluation of promising 211At-labeled targeted radiotherapeutics currently is a daunting task. Our central hypothesis is that improvements in 211At radiochemistry are critically dependent on gaining an understanding of and compensating for the effects of radiolysis induced by 211At {alpha}-particles. Because of the widespread interest in labeling antibodies, antibody fragments and peptides with 211At, our proposed work plan will initially focus on reagents that we have developed for this purpose. Part of our strategy is the use of synthetic precursors immobilized on polymeric resins or perfluorous and triarylphosphonium supports. Their use could eliminate the need for a purification step to separate unreacted tin precursor from labeled product and hopefully provide a simple kit technology that could be utilized at other institutions. The specific aims of this project are: (1) To optimze methods for 211At production and isolation of 211At from cyclotron targets; (2) To develop convenient and reproducible methodologies for high activity level and high specific activity radiohalogenation of biomolecules with 211At; (3) to develop a procedure for extending the shelf-life of 211At beyond a few hours so that this radionuclide can be utilized at centers remote from its site of production; and (4) to work out high activity level synthesis methods for utilizing support immobilized tin precursors for 211At labeling. If we are successful in achieving our goals, the radiochemical methodologies that are developed could greatly facilitate the use of 211At-labeled targeted cancer therapeutics in patients, even at institutions that are distant from the few sites currently available for 211At production.

MICHAEL R. ZALUTSKY

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

207

Technical Exchange on Improved Design and Performance of High Level Waste Melters - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SIA Radon is responsible for management of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) produced in Central Russia. In cooperation with Minatom organizations Radon carries out R and D programs on treatment of simulated high level waste (HLW) as well. Radon scientists deal with a study of materials for LILW, HLW, and Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) wastes immobilization, and development and testing of processes and technologies for waste treatment and disposal. Radon is mostly experienced in LILW vitrification. This experience can be carried over to HLW vitrification especially in field of melting systems. The melter chosen as a basic unit for the vitrification plant is a cold crucible. Later on Radon experience in LILW vitrification as well as our results on simulated HLW vitrification are briefly described.

SK Sundaram; ML Elliott; D Bickford

1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

208

High Level Waste Tank Closure Project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is making preparations to close two underground high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations and Department of Energy orders. Closure of these two tanks is scheduled for 2004 as the first phase in closure of the eleven 300,000 gallon tanks currently in service at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF) Closure sequence consists of multiple steps to be accomplished through the existing tank riser access points. Currently, the tank risers contain steam and process waste lines associated with the steam jets, corrosion coupons, and liquid level indicators. As necessary, this equipment will be removed from the risers to allow adequate space for closure equipment and activities.

Wessman, D. L.; Quigley, K. D.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

209

Progress in resolving Hanford Site high-level waste tank safety issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interim storage of alkaline, high-level radioactive waste, from two generations of spent fuel reprocessing and waste management activities, has resulted in the accumulation of 238 million liters of waste in Hanford Site single and double-shell tanks. Before the 1990`s, the stored waste was believed to be: (1) chemically unreactive under its existing storage conditions and plausible accident scenarios; and (2) chemically stable. This paradigm was proven incorrect when detailed evaluation of tank contents and behavior revealed a number of safety issues and that the waste was generating flammable and noxious gases. In 1990, the Waste Tank Safety Program was formed to focus on identifying safety issues and resolving the ferrocyanide, flammable gas, organic, high heat, noxious vapor, and criticality issues. The tanks of concern were placed on Watch Lists by safety issue. This paper summarizes recent progress toward resolving Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tank safety issues, including modeling, and analyses, laboratory experiments, monitoring upgrades, mitigation equipment, and developing a strategy to screen tanks for safety issues.

Babad, H.; Eberlein, S.J.; Johnson, G.D.; Meacham, J.E.; Osborne, J.W.; Payne, M.A.; Turner, D.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Experiences with High-Level Programming Directives for Porting Applications to GPUs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HPC systems now exploit GPUs within their compute nodes to accelerate program performance. As a result, high-end application development has become extremely complex at the node level. In addition to restructuring the node code to exploit the cores and specialized devices, the programmer may need to choose a programming model such as OpenMP or CPU threads in conjunction with an accelerator programming model to share and manage the difference node resources. This comes at a time when programmer productivity and the ability to produce portable code has been recognized as a major concern. In order to offset the high development cost of creating CUDA or OpenCL kernels, directives have been proposed for programming accelerator devices, but their implications are not well known. In this paper, we evaluate the state of the art accelerator directives to program several applications kernels, explore transformations to achieve good performance, and examine the expressiveness and performance penalty of using high-level directives versus CUDA. We also compare our results to OpenMP implementations to understand the benefits of running the kernels in the accelerator versus CPU cores.

Hernandez, Oscar R [ORNL; Ding, Wei [University of Houston, Houston; Chapman, Barbara [University of Houston, Houston; Kartsaklis, Christos [ORNL; Sankaran, Ramanan [ORNL; Graham, Richard L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Cost estimate of high-level radioactive waste containers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the bottoms-up cost estimates for fabrication of high-level radioactive waste disposal containers based on the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design (SCP-CD). These estimates were acquired by Babcock and Wilcox (B&S) under sub-contract to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The estimates were obtained for two leading container candidate materials (Alloy 825 and CDA 715), and from other three vendors who were selected from a list of twenty solicited. Three types of container designs were analyzed that represent containers for spent fuel, and for vitrified high-level waste (HLW). The container internal structures were assumed to be AISI-304 stainless steel in all cases, with an annual production rate of 750 containers. Subjective techniques were used for estimating QA/QC costs based on vendor experience and the specifications derived for the LLNL-YMP Quality Assurance program. In addition, an independent QA/QC analysis is reported which was prepared by Kasier Engineering. Based on the cost estimates developed, LLNL recommends that values of $825K and $62K be used for the 1991 TSLCC for the spent fuel and HLW containers, respectively. These numbers represent the most conservative among the three vendors, and are for the high-nickel anstenitic steel (Alloy 825). 6 refs., 7 figs.

Russell, E.W.; Clarke, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Domian, H.A. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)] [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Madson, A.A. [Kaiser Engineers California Corp., Oakland, CA (United States)] [Kaiser Engineers California Corp., Oakland, CA (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

High level seismic/vibrational tests at the HDR: An overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Phase II testing at the HDR Test Facility in Kahl/Main, FRG, two series of high-level seismic/vibrational experiments were performed. In the first of these (SHAG) a coast-down shaker, mounted on the reactor operating floor and capable of generating 1000 tonnes of force, was used to investigate full-scale structural response, soil-structure interaction (SSI), and piping/equipment response at load levels equivalent to those of a design basis earthquake. The HDR soil/structure system was tested to incipient failure exhibiting highly nonlinear response. In the load transmission from structure to piping/equipment significant response amplifications and shifts to higher frequencies occurred. The performance of various pipe support configurations was evaluated. This latter effort was continued in the second series of tests (SHAM), in which an in-plant piping system was investigated at simulated seismic loads (generated by two servo-hydraulic actuators each capable of generating 40 tonnes of force), that exceeded design levels manifold and resulted in considerable pipe plastification and failure of some supports (snubbers). The evaluation of six different support configurations demonstrated that proper system design (for a given spectrum) rather than number of supports or system stiffness is essential to limiting pipe stresses. Pipe strains at loads exceeding the design level eightfold were still tolerable, indicating that pipe failure even under extreme seismic loads is unlikely inspite of multiple support failures. Conservatively, an excess capacity (margin) of at least four was estimated for the piping system, and the pipe damping was found to be 4%. Comparisons of linear and nonlinear computational results with measurements showed that analytical predictions have wide scatter and do not necessarily yield conservative responses, underpredicting, in particular, peak support forces.

Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Schrammel, D.; Malcher, L. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany)); Steinhilber, H. (Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany)); Costello, J.F. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

High level seismic/vibrational tests at the HDR: An overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Phase II testing at the HDR Test Facility in Kahl/Main, FRG, two series of high-level seismic/vibrational experiments were performed. In the first of these (SHAG) a coast-down shaker, mounted on the reactor operating floor and capable of generating 1000 tonnes of force, was used to investigate full-scale structural response, soil-structure interaction (SSI), and piping/equipment response at load levels equivalent to those of a design basis earthquake. The HDR soil/structure system was tested to incipient failure exhibiting highly nonlinear response. In the load transmission from structure to piping/equipment significant response amplifications and shifts to higher frequencies occurred. The performance of various pipe support configurations was evaluated. This latter effort was continued in the second series of tests (SHAM), in which an in-plant piping system was investigated at simulated seismic loads (generated by two servo-hydraulic actuators each capable of generating 40 tonnes of force), that exceeded design levels manifold and resulted in considerable pipe plastification and failure of some supports (snubbers). The evaluation of six different support configurations demonstrated that proper system design (for a given spectrum) rather than number of supports or system stiffness is essential to limiting pipe stresses. Pipe strains at loads exceeding the design level eightfold were still tolerable, indicating that pipe failure even under extreme seismic loads is unlikely inspite of multiple support failures. Conservatively, an excess capacity (margin) of at least four was estimated for the piping system, and the pipe damping was found to be 4%. Comparisons of linear and nonlinear computational results with measurements showed that analytical predictions have wide scatter and do not necessarily yield conservative responses, underpredicting, in particular, peak support forces.

Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schrammel, D.; Malcher, L. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Steinhilber, H. [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany); Costello, J.F. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Market Power in Pollution Permit Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As with other commodity markets, markets for trading pollution permits have not been immune to market power concerns. In this paper, I survey the existing literature on market power in permit trading but also contribute ...

Montero, Juan Pablo

215

Progress in High-Level Waste Tank Cleaning at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is making preparations to close two underground high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations and Department of Energy (DOE) orders. Closure of these two tanks is scheduled for 2004 as the first phase in closure of the eleven 300,000 gallon tanks currently in service at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Design, development, and deployment of a remotely operated tank cleaning system were completed in August 2001. The system incorporates many commercially available components, which have been adapted for application in cleaning high-level waste tanks. The system also uses existing waste transfer technology (steam-jets) to remove tank heel solids from the tank bottoms during the cleaning operations. By using this existing transfer system and commercially available equipment, the cost of developing custom designed cleaning equipment can be avoided. Remotely operated directional spray nozzles, automatic rotating wash balls, video monitoring equipment, decontamination spray-rings, and tank specific access interface devices have been integrated to provide a system that efficiently cleans tank walls and heel solids in an acidic, radioactive environment. This system is also compliant with operational and safety performance requirements at INTEC. Through the deployment of the tank cleaning system, the INEEL High Level Waste Program has demonstrated the capability to clean tanks to meet RCRA clean closure standards and DOE closure performance measures. The tank cleaning system deployed at the INTEC offers unique advantages over other approaches evaluated at the INEEL and throughout the DOE Complex. The system's ability to agitate and homogenize the tank heel sludge will simplify verification-sampling techniques and reduce the total quantity of samples required to demonstrate compliance with the performance standards. This will reduce tank closure budget requirements and improve closure-planning schedules.

Lockie, K. A.; McNaught, W. B.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1) Introduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in Nevada represents the proposed solution to what has been a lengthy national effort to dispose of high-level radioactive waste, waste which must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. This chapter reviews the background of that national effort and includes some discussion of international work in order to provide a more complete framework for the problem of waste disposal. Other chapters provide the regional geologic setting, the geology of the Yucca Mountain site, the tectonics, and climate (past, present, and future). These last two chapters are integral to prediction of long-term waste isolation.

R.A. Levich; J.S. Stuckless

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

217

High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II.

Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

RADIOACTIVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK PITTING PREDICTIONS: AN INVESTIGATION INTO CRITICAL SOLUTION CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests was performed on samples of ASTM A537 carbon steel in support of a probability-based approach to evaluate the effect of chloride and sulfate on corrosion the steel?s susceptibility to pitting corrosion. Testing solutions were chosen to systemically evaluate the influence of the secondary aggressive species, chloride, and sulfate, in the nitrate based, high-level wastes. The results suggest that evaluating the combined effect of all aggressive species, nitrate, chloride, and sulfate, provides a consistent response for determining corrosion susceptibility. The results of this work emphasize the importance for not only nitrate concentration limits, but also chloride and sulfate concentration limits.

Hoffman, E.

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

219

High-Level Functional and Operational Requirements for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facilty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-Level Functional & Operational Requirements for the AFCF -This document describes the principal functional and operational requirements for the proposed Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). The AFCF is intended to be the world's foremost facility for nuclear fuel cycle research, technology development, and demonstration. The facility will also support the near-term mission to develop and demonstrate technology in support of fuel cycle needs identified by industry, and the long-term mission to retain and retain U.S. leadership in fuel cycle operations. The AFCF is essential to demonstrate a more proliferation-resistant fuel cycle and make long-term improvements in fuel cycle effectiveness, performance and economy.

Charles Park

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Collaboration, Automation, and Information Management at Hanford High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), operator of High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Tank Farms at the Hanford Site, is taking an over 20-year leap in technology, replacing systems that were monitored with clipboards and obsolete computer systems, as well as solving major operations and maintenance hurdles in the area of process automation and information management. While WRPS is fully compliant with procedures and regulations, the current systems are not integrated and do not share data efficiently, hampering how information is obtained and managed.

Aurah, Mirwaise Y.; Roberts, Mark A.

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

HLW-OVP-94-00n High Level Waste Management Division HLW System Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuided Self-Assembly of GoldHAWCHIGS flux4-00n High Level

222

High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii CleanHeatinHigh Efficiency|FuelImpactLevel

223

A High-Performance Fortran Code to Calculate Spin- and Parity-Dependent Nuclear Level Densities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A high-performance Fortran code is developed to calculate the spin- and parity-dependent shell model nuclear level densities.The algorithm is based on the extension of methods of statistical spectroscopy and implies exact calculation of the first and second Hamiltonian moments for different configurations at fixed spin and parity. The proton-neutron formalism is used. We have applied the method for calculating the level densities for a set of nuclei in the sd-, pf-, and pf+g9/2 - model spaces. Examples of the calculations for 28Si (in the sd-model space) and 64Ge (in the pf+g9/2-model space) are presented. To illustrate the power of the method we estimate the ground state energy of 64Ge in the larger model space pf+g9/2, which is not accessible to direct shell model diagonalization due to the prohibitively large dimension, by comparing with the nuclear level densities at low excitation energy calculated in the smaller model space pf.

R. Sen'kov; M. Horoi; V. G. Zelevinsky

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

224

A High-Performance Fortran Code to Calculate Spin- and Parity-Dependent Nuclear Level Densities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A high-performance Fortran code is developed to calculate the spin- and parity-dependent shell model nuclear level densities.The algorithm is based on the extension of methods of statistical spectroscopy and implies exact calculation of the first and second Hamiltonian moments for different configurations at fixed spin and parity. The proton-neutron formalism is used. We have applied the method for calculating the level densities for a set of nuclei in the sd-, pf-, and pf+g9/2 - model spaces. Examples of the calculations for 28Si (in the sd-model space) and 64Ge (in the pf+g9/2-model space) are presented. To illustrate the power of the method we estimate the ground state energy of 64Ge in the larger model space pf+g9/2, which is not accessible to direct shell model diagonalization due to the prohibitively large dimension, by comparing with the nuclear level densities at low excitation energy calculated in the smaller model space pf.

Sen'kov, R; Zelevinsky, V G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK CLOSURE PROJECT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is in the process of closing two underground high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations and Department of Energy orders. Closure of these two tanks is scheduled for 2004 as the first phase in closure of the eleven 1.14 million liter (300,000 gallon) tanks currently in service at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF) Closure sequence consists of multiple steps to be accomplished through the existing tank riser access points. Currently, the tank risers contain steam and process waste lines associated with the steam jets, corrosion coupons, and liquid level indicators. As necessary, this equipment will be removed from the risers to allow adequate space for closure equipment and activities. The basic tank closure sequence is as follows: Empty the tank to the residual heel using the existing jets; Video and sample the heel; Replace steam jets with new jet at a lower position in the tank, and remove additional material; Flush tank, piping and secondary containment with demineralized water; Video and sample the heel; Evaluate decontamination effectiveness; Displace the residual heel with multiple placements of grout; and Grout piping, vaults and remaining tank volume. Design, development, and deployment of a remotely operated tank cleaning system were completed in June 2002. The system incorporates many commercially available components, which have been adapted for application in cleaning high-level waste tanks. The system is cost-effective since it also utilizes existing waste transfer technology (steam jets), to remove tank heel solids from the tank bottoms during the cleaning operations. Remotely operated directional spray nozzles, automatic rotating wash balls, video monitoring equipment, decontamination spray-rings, and tank -specific access interface devices have been integrated to provide a system that efficiently cleans tank walls and heel solids in an acidic, radioactive environment. Through the deployment of the tank cleaning system, the INEEL High Level Waste Program has cleaned tanks to meet RCRA clean closure standards and DOE closure performance measures. Design, development, and testing of tank grouting delivery equipment were completed in October 2002. The system incorporates lessons learned from closures at other DOE facilities. The grout will be used to displace the tank residuals remaining after the cleaning is complete. To maximize heel displacement to the discharge pump, grout was placed in a sequence of five positions utilizing two riser locations. The project is evaluating the use of six positions to optimize the residuals removed. After the heel has been removed and the residuals stabilized, the tank, piping, and secondary containment will be grouted.

Quigley, K.D.; Wessman, D

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

226

High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste.

Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter high-level waste solidification technical manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical manual summarizes process and equipment technology developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory over the last 20 years for vitrification of high-level liquid waste by the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process. Pacific Northwest Laboratory experience includes process development and demonstration in laboratory-, pilot-, and full-scale equipment using nonradioactive synthetic wastes. Also, laboratory- and pilot-scale process demonstrations have been conducted using actual high-level radioactive wastes. In the course of process development, more than 26 tonnes of borosilicate glass have been produced in 75 canisters. Four of these canisters contained radioactive waste glass. The associated process and glass chemistry is discussed. Technology areas described include calciner feed treatment and techniques, calcination, vitrification, off-gas treatment, glass containment (the canister), and waste glass chemistry. Areas of optimization and site-specific development that would be needed to adapt this base technology for specific plant application are indicated. A conceptual Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter system design and analyses are provided in the manual to assist prospective users in evaluating the process for plant application, to provide equipment design information, and to supply information for safety analyses and environmental reports. The base (generic) technology for the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process has been developed to a point at which it is ready for plant application.

Larson, D.E. (ed.)

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Adsorption of Ruthenium, Rhodium and Palladium from Simulated High-Level Liquid Waste by Highly Functional Xerogel - 13286  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fission products are generated by fission reactions in nuclear fuel. Platinum group (Pt-G) elements, such as palladium (Pd), rhodium (Rh) and ruthenium (Ru), are also produced. Generally, Pt-G elements play important roles in chemical and electrical industries. Highly functional xerogels have been developed for recovery of these useful Pt-G elements from high - level radioactive liquid waste (HLLW). An adsorption experiment from simulated HLLW was done by the column method to study the selective adsorption of Pt-G elements, and it was found that not only Pd, Rh and Ru, but also nickel, zirconium and tellurium were adsorbed. All other elements were not adsorbed. Adsorbed Pd was recovered by washing the xerogel-packed column with thiourea solution and thiourea - nitric acid mixed solution in an elution experiment. Thiourea can be a poison for automotive exhaust emission system catalysts, so it is necessary to consider its removal. Thermal decomposition and an acid digestion treatment were conducted to remove sulfur in the recovered Pd fraction. The relative content of sulfur to Pd was decreased from 858 to 0.02 after the treatment. These results will contribute to design of the Pt-G element separation system. (authors)

Onishi, Takashi [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan)] [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Koyama, Shin-ichi [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan)] [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University Aramaki-Aza-Aoba 6-6-01-2,Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken, 980-8579 (Japan)] [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University Aramaki-Aza-Aoba 6-6-01-2,Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken, 980-8579 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

NSLS-II HIGH LEVEL APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND CLIENT API DESIGN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. It is an open structure platform, and we try to provide a narrow API set for client application. With this narrow API, existing applications developed in different language under different architecture could be ported to our platform with small modification. This paper describes system infrastructure design, client API and system integration, and latest progress. As a new 3rd generation synchrotron light source with ultra low emittance, there are new requirements and challenges to control and manipulate the beam. A use case study and a theoretical analysis have been performed to clarify requirements and challenges to the high level applications (HLA) software environment. To satisfy those requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture of the software framework is critical for beam commissioning, study and operation. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating, plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service oriented architecture technology. The HLA is combination of tools for accelerator physicists and operators, which is same as traditional approach. In NSLS-II, they include monitoring applications and control routines. Scripting environment is very important for the later part of HLA and both parts are designed based on a common set of APIs. Physicists and operators are users of these APIs, while control system engineers and a few accelerator physicists are the developers of these APIs. With our Client/Server mode based approach, we leave how to retrieve information to the developers of APIs and how to use them to form a physics application to the users. For example, how the channels are related to magnet and what the current real-time setting of a magnet is in physics unit are the internals of APIs. Measuring chromaticities are the users of APIs. All the users of APIs are working with magnet and instrument names in a physics unit. The low level communications in current or voltage unit are minimized. In this paper, we discussed our recent progress of our infrastructure development, and client API.

Shen, G.; Yang; L.; Shroff; K.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

MARKETING APPLICATIONS: Tourism Marketing, Pan-European Marketing and Brand Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Syllabus MARKETING APPLICATIONS: Tourism Marketing, Pan-European Marketing and Brand Management Summer 2011 Alicante, Spain Course MARKETING APPLICATIONS: Tourism Marketing, Pan-European Marketing Objectives This course examines three relevant applications of Marketing principles. Tourism Marketing

Escolano, Francisco

231

Alternatives for high-level waste forms, containers, and container processing systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates alternatives for high-level waste forms, containers, container processing systems, and onsite interim storage. Glass waste forms considered are cullet, marbles, gems, and monolithic glass. Small and large containers configured with several combinations of overpack confinement and shield casks are evaluated for these waste forms. Onsite interim storage concepts including canister storage building, bore holes, and storage pad were configured with various glass forms and canister alternatives. All favorable options include the monolithic glass production process as the waste form. Of the favorable options the unshielded 4- and 7-canister overpack options have the greatest technical assurance associated with their design concepts due to their process packaging and storage methods. These canisters are 0.68 m and 0.54 m in diameter respectively and 4.57 m tall. Life-cycle costs are not a discriminating factor in most cases, varying typically less than 15 percent.

Crawford, T.W.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

232

Conceptual modular description of the high-level waste management system for system studies model development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents modular descriptions of possible alternative components of the federal high-level radioactive waste management system and the procedures for combining these modules to obtain descriptions for alternative configurations of that system. The 20 separate system component modules presented here can be combined to obtain a description of any of the 17 alternative system configurations (i.e., scenarios) that were evaluated in the MRS Systems Studies program (DOE 1989a). First-approximation descriptions of other yet-undefined system configurations could also be developed for system study purposes from this database. The descriptions include, in a modular format, both functional descriptions of the processes in the waste management system, plus physical descriptions of the equipment and facilities necessary for performance of those functions.

McKee, R.W.; Young, J.R.; Konzek, G.J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The effect of high-level waste glass composition on spinel liquidus temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spinel crystals precipitate in high-level waste glasses containing Fe, Cr, Ni , Mn, Zn, and Ru. The liquidus temperature (TL) of spinel as the primary crystallization phase is a function of glass composition and the spinel solubility (c0) is a function of both glass composition and temperature (T). Previously reported models of TL as a function of composition are based on TL measured directly, which requires laborious experimental procedures. Viewing the curve of c0 versus T as the liquidus line allows a significant broadening of the composition region for model fitting. This paper estimates TL as a function of composition based on c0 data obtained with the X-ray diffraction technique.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Matyas, Josef

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Guidelines for development of structural integrity programs for DOE high-level waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Guidelines are provided for developing programs to promote the structural integrity of high-level waste storage tanks and transfer lines at the facilities of the Department of Energy. Elements of the program plan include a leak-detection system, definition of appropriate loads, collection of data for possible material and geometric changes, assessment of the tank structure, and non-destructive examination. Possible aging degradation mechanisms are explored for both steel and concrete components of the tanks, and evaluated to screen out nonsignificant aging mechanisms and to indicate methods of controlling the significant aging mechanisms. Specific guidelines for assessing structural adequacy will be provided in companion documents. Site-specific structural integrity programs can be developed drawing on the relevant portions of the material in this document.

Bandyopadhyay, K.; Bush, S.; Kassir, M.; Mather, B.; Shewmon, P.; Streicher, M.; Thompson, B.; Rooyen, D. van; Weeks, J.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Overview of Hanford Site High-Level Waste Tank Gas and Vapor Dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Site processes associated with the chemical separation of plutonium from uranium and other fission products produced a variety of volatile, semivolatile, and nonvolatile organic and inorganic waste chemicals that were sent to high-level waste tanks. These chemicals have undergone and continue to undergo radiolytic and thermal reactions in the tanks to produce a wide variety of degradation reaction products. The origins of the organic wastes, the chemical reactions they undergo, and their reaction products have recently been examined by Stock (2004). Stock gives particular attention to explaining the presence of various types of volatile and semivolatile organic species identified in headspace air samples. This report complements the Stock report by examining the storage of volatile and semivolatile species in the waste, their transport through any overburden of waste to the tank headspaces, the physical phenomena affecting their concentrations in the headspaces, and their eventual release into the atmosphere above the tanks.

Huckaby, James L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Droppo, James G.; Meacham, Joseph E.

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

The effect of high-level waste glass composition on spinel liquidus temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spinel crystals precipitate in high-level waste glasses containing Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn, and Ru. The liquidus temperature (T{sub L}d) of spinel as the primary crystallization phase is a function of glass composition, and the spinel solubility (c{sub o}) is a function of both glass composition and temperature (T). Previously reported models of T{sub L} as a function of composition are based on T{sub L} measured directly, which requires laborious experimental procedures. Viewing the curve of c{sub o} versus T as the liquidus line allows a significant broadening of the composition region for model fitting. This paper estimates T{sub L} as a function of composition based on c{sub o} data obtained with the X-ray diffraction technique.

Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hrma, Pavel [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Operating experience during high-level waste vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of operational experiences, component and system performance, and lessons learned associated with the operation of the Vitrification Facility (VF) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The VF was designed to convert stored high-level radioactive waste (HLW) into a stable waste form (borosilicate glass) suitable for disposal in a federal repository. Following successful completion on nonradioactive test, HLW processing began in July 1995. Completion of Phase 1 of HLW processing was reached on 10 June 1998 and represented the processing of 9.32 million curies of cesium-137 (Cs-137) and strontium-90 (Sr-90) to fill 211 canisters with over 436,000 kilograms of glass. With approximately 85% of the total estimated curie content removed from underground waste storage tanks during Phase 1, subsequent operations will focus on removal of tank heel wastes.

Valenti, P.J.; Elliott, D.I.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

C-106 High-Level Waste Solids: Washing/Leaching and Solubility Versus Temperature Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the Hanford tank C-106 high-level waste (HLW) solids. The objective of this work was to determine the composition of the C-106 solids remaining after washing with 0.01M NaOH or leaching with 3M NaOH. Another objective of this test was to determine the solubility of various C-106 components as a function of temperature. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-8,Rev. 0, Determination of the Solubility of HLW Sludge Solids. The test went according to plan, with only minor deviations from the test plan. The deviations from the test plan are discussed in the experimental section.

GJ Lumetta; DJ Bates; PK Berry; JP Bramson; LP Darnell; OT Farmer III; LR Greenwood; FV Hoopes; RC Lettau; GF Piepel; CZ Soderquist; MJ Steele; RT Steele; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

239

Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This EIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternatives for managing high-level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW) and newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in liquid and solid forms. This EIS also analyzes alternatives for the final disposition of HLW management facilities at the INEEL after their missions are completed. After considering comments on the Draft EIS (DOE/EIS-0287D), as well as information on available treatment technologies, DOE and the State of Idaho have identified separate preferred alternatives for waste treatment. DOE's preferred alternative for waste treatment is performance based with the focus on placing the wastes in forms suitable for disposal. Technologies available to meet the performance objectives may be chosen from the action alternatives analyzed in this EIS. The State of Idaho's Preferred Alternative for treating mixed transuranic waste/SBW and calcine is vitrification, with or without calcine separations. Under both the DOE and State of Idaho preferred alternatives, newly generated liquid waste would be segregated after 2005, stored or treated directly and disposed of as low-level, mixed low-level, or transuranic waste depending on its characteristics. The objective of each preferred alternative is to enable compliance with the legal requirement to have INEEL HLW road ready by a target date of 2035. Both DOE and the State of Idaho have identified the same preferred alternative for facilities disposition, which is to use performance-based closure methods for existing facilities and to design new facilities consistent with clean closure methods.

N /A

2002-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Summary Of Cold Crucible Vitrification Tests Results With Savannah River Site High Level Waste Surrogates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cold crucible inductive melting (CCIM) technology successfully applied for vitrification of low- and intermediate-level waste (LILW) at SIA Radon, Russia, was tested to be implemented for vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) stored at Savannah River Site, USA. Mixtures of Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) and 4 (SB4) waste surrogates and borosilicate frits as slurries were vitrified in bench- (236 mm inner diameter) and full-scale (418 mm inner diameter) cold crucibles. Various process conditions were tested and major process variables were determined. Melts were poured into 10L canisters and cooled to room temperature in air or in heat-insulated boxes by a regime similar to Canister Centerline Cooling (CCC) used at DWPF. The products with waste loading from ~40 to ~65 wt.% were investigated in details. The products contained 40 to 55 wt.% waste oxides were predominantly amorphous; at higher waste loadings (WL) spinel structure phases and nepheline were present. Normalized release values for Li, B, Na, and Si determined by PCT procedure remain lower than those from EA glass at waste loadings of up to 60 wt.%.

Stefanovsky, Sergey; Marra, James; Lebedev, Vladimir

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

242

International program to study subseabed disposal of high-level radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the international program to study seabed disposal of nuclear wastes. Its purpose is to inform legislators, other policy makers, and the general public as to the history of the program, technological requirements necessary for feasibility assessment, legal questions involved, international coordination of research, national policies, and research and development activities. Each of these major aspects of the program is presented in a separate section. The objective of seabed burial, similar to its continental counterparts, is to contain and to isolate the wastes. The subseabed option should not be confuesed with past practices of ocean dumping which have introduced wastes into ocean waters. Seabed disposal refers to the emplacement of solidified high-level radioactive waste (with or without reprocessing) in certain geologically stable sediments of the deep ocean floor. Specially designed surface ships would transport waste canisters from a port facility to the disposal site. Canisters would be buried from a few tens to a few hundreds of meters below the surface of ocean bottom sediments, and hence would not be in contact with the overlying ocean water. The concept is a multi-barrier approach for disposal. Barriers, including waste form, canister, ad deep ocean sediments, will separate wastes from the ocean environment. High-level wastes (HLW) would be stabilized by conversion into a leach-resistant solid form such as glass. This solid would be placed inside a metallic canister or other type of package which represents a second barrier. The deep ocean sediments, a third barrier, are discussed in the Feasibility Assessment section. The waste form and canister would provide a barrier for several hundred years, and the sediments would be relied upon as a barrier for thousands of years. 62 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

Carlin, E.M.; Hinga, K.R.; Knauss, J.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat transfer and glass melting rate. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of {approx}1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HLW waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150 C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage. The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulfur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in wasteloading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected that these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by about 25% or more.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT W; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I; BARDAKCI T; GAN H; GONG W; CHAUDHURI M

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

244

MARKETING APPLICATIONS: International Marketing, Marketing in the EU and Tourism Marketing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MARKETING APPLICATIONS: International Marketing, Marketing in the EU and Tourism Marketing Summer Union and Tourism Marketing Professors Juan L. Nicolau. University of Alicante. JL.Nicolau@ua.es María principles: 1) Tourism Marketing, which focuses on the tourism marketing and its singular traits, explores

Escolano, Francisco

245

A COMPARISON OF HANFORD AND SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH-LEVEL WASTES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is a simple comparison of high-level waste from plutonium production stored in tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Savannah River principally used the PUREX process for plutonium separation. Hanford used the PUREX, Bismuth Phosphate, and REDOX processes, and reprocessed many wastes for recovery of uranium and fission products. Thus, Hanford has 55 distinct waste types, only 17 of which could be at Savannah River. While Hanford and Savannah River wastes both have high concentrations of sodium nitrate, caustic, iron, and aluminum, Hanford wastes have higher concentrations of several key constituents. The factors by which average concentrations are higher in Hanford salt waste than in Savannah River waste are 67 for {sup 241}Am, 4 for aluminum, 18 for chromium, 10 for fluoride, 8 for phosphate, 6 for potassium, and 2 for sulfate. The factors by which average concentrations are higher in Hanford sludges than in Savannah River sludges are 3 for chromium, 19 for fluoride, 67 for phosphate, and 6 for zirconium. Waste composition differences must be considered before a waste processing method is selected: A method may be applicable to one site but not to the other.

HILL RC PHILIP; REYNOLDS JG; RUTLAND PL

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

246

Turbulent Flame Speeds and NOx Kinetics of HHC Fuels with Contaminants and High Dilution Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report documents the technical results of the 3-year project entitled, Turbulent Flame Speeds and NOx Kinetics of HHC Fuels with Contaminants and High Dilution Levels, funded under the NETL of DOE. The research was conducted under six main tasks: 1) program management and planning; 2) turbulent flame speed measurements of syngas mixtures; 3) laminar flame speed measurements with diluents; 4) NOx mechanism validation experiments; 5) fundamental NOx kinetics; and 6) the effect of impurities on NOx kinetics. Experiments were performed using primary constant-volume vessels for laminar and turbulent flame speeds and shock tubes for ignition delay times and species concentrations. In addition to the existing shock- tube and flame speed facilities, a new capability in measuring turbulent flame speeds was developed under this grant. Other highlights include an improved NOx kinetics mechanism; a database on syngas blends for real fuel mixtures with and without impurities; an improved hydrogen sulfide mechanism; an improved ammonia kintics mechanism; laminar flame speed data at high pressures with water addition; and the development of an inexpensive absorption spectroscopy diagnostic for shock-tube measurements of OH time histories. The Project Results for this work can be divided into 13 major sections, which form the basis of this report. These 13 topics are divided into the five areas: 1) laminar flame speeds; 2) Nitrogen Oxide and Ammonia chemical kinetics; 3) syngas impurities chemical kinetics; 4) turbulent flame speeds; and 5) OH absorption measurements for chemical kinetics.

Peterson, Eric; Krejci, Michael; Mathieu, Olivier; Vissotski, Andrew; Ravi, Sankat; Plichta, Drew; Sikes, Travis; Levacque, Anthony; Camou, Alejandro; Aul, Christopher

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

Advanced Inverter Technology for High Penetration Levels of PV Generation in Distribution Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This subcontract report was completed under the auspices of the NREL/SCE High-Penetration Photovoltaic (PV) Integration Project, which is co-funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the California Solar Initiative (CSI) Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD&D) program funded by the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and managed by Itron. This project is focused on modeling, quantifying, and mitigating the impacts of large utility-scale PV systems (generally 1-5 MW in size) that are interconnected to the distribution system. This report discusses the concerns utilities have when interconnecting large PV systems that interconnect using PV inverters (a specific application of frequency converters). Additionally, a number of capabilities of PV inverters are described that could be implemented to mitigate the distribution system-level impacts of high-penetration PV integration. Finally, the main issues that need to be addressed to ease the interconnection of large PV systems to the distribution system are presented.

Schauder, C.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ternative Approaches for Power Capacity Markets, Papers andprof id=pjoskow. Capacity Markets for Electricity [13]Utility Commission- Capacity Market Questions, available at

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Introduction to Futures Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An introduction to futures markets, this publication describes the history of the markets, defines terminology and offers advice on how to use futures effectively in farm marketing programs....

Mintert, James R.; Welch, Mark

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

250

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mix with high level of wind power penetration. Appliedof large amounts of wind power on design and operation ofNetworks for Offshore Wind Power Plant, Quebec, Canada, Oct.

Mills, Andrew D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Wind and Solar Power in California. Doctor of Philosophy,high-quality solar resource hubs in California with someCSP at low solar penetration levels in California is found

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

HIGH TEMPERATURE CONDUCTIVITY PROBE FOR MONITORING CONTAMINATION LEVELS IN POWER PLANT BOILER WATER.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A high temperature/high pressure flow through probe was designed to measure high temperature electrical conductivity of aqueous (aq) dilute electrolyte solutions, an application which can (more)

Hipple, Sarah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Evolution of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rezessy. 2010. Energy Service Companies Market in Europe-rank high in ESCO market activity; energy offices in these2007. Achievable Market Potential for Energy Efficiency in

Goldman, Charles A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Supplement Analysis for the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 2002, DOE issued the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) (DOE 2002) that provided an analysis of the potential environmental consequences of alternatives/options for the management and disposition of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW), High-Level Waste (HL W) calcine, and HLW facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), now known as the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and referred to hereafter as the Idaho Site. Subsequent to the issuance of the Final EIS, DOE included the requirement for treatment of SBW in the Request for Proposals for Environmental Management activities on the Idaho Site. The new Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) Contractor identified Steam Reforming as their proposed method to treat SBW; a method analyzed in the Final EIS as an option to treat SBW. The proposed Steam Reforming process for SBW is the same as in the Final EIS for retrieval, treatment process, waste form and transportation for disposal. In addition, DOE has updated the characterization data for both the HLW Calcine (BBWI 2005a) and SBW (BBWI 2004 and BBWI 2005b) and identified two areas where new calculation methods are being used to determine health and safety impacts. Because of those changes, DOE has prepared this supplement analysis to determine whether there are ''substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns'' or ''significant new circumstances or information'' within the meaning of the Council of Environmental Quality and DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9 (c) and 10 CFR 1021.314) that would require preparation of a Supplemental EIS. Specifically, this analysis is intended to determine if: (1) the Steam Reforming Option identified in the Final EIS adequately bounds impacts from the Steam Reforming Process proposed by the new ICP Contractor using the new characterization data, (2) the new characterization data is significantly different than the data presented in the Final EIS, (3) the new calculation methods present a significant change to the impacts described in the Final EIS, and (4) would the updated characterization data cause significant changes in the environmental impacts for the action alternatives/options presented in the Final EIS. There are no other aspects of the Final EIS that require additional review because DOE has not identified any additional new significant circumstances or information that would warrant such a review.

N /A

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Granite disposal of U.S. high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the feasibility of disposing U.S. high-level radioactive waste in granite several hundred meters below the surface of the earth. The U.S. has many granite formations with positive attributes for permanent disposal. Similar crystalline formations have been extensively studied by international programs, two of which, in Sweden and Finland, are the host rocks of submitted or imminent repository license applications. This report is enabled by the advanced work of the international community to establish functional and operational requirements for disposal of a range of waste forms in granite media. In this report we develop scoping performance analyses, based on the applicable features, events, and processes (FEPs) identified by international investigators, to support generic conclusions regarding post-closure safety. Unlike the safety analyses for disposal in salt, shale/clay, or deep boreholes, the safety analysis for a mined granite repository depends largely on waste package preservation. In crystalline rock, waste packages are preserved by the high mechanical stability of the excavations, the diffusive barrier of the buffer, and favorable chemical conditions. The buffer is preserved by low groundwater fluxes, favorable chemical conditions, backfill, and the rigid confines of the host rock. An added advantage of a mined granite repository is that waste packages would be fairly easy to retrieve, should retrievability be an important objective. The results of the safety analyses performed in this study are consistent with the results of comprehensive safety assessments performed for sites in Sweden, Finland, and Canada. They indicate that a granite repository would satisfy established safety criteria and suggest that a small number of FEPs would largely control the release and transport of radionuclides. In the event the U.S. decides to pursue a potential repository in granite, a detailed evaluation of these FEPs would be needed to inform site selection and safety assessment.

Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Lee, Joon H.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Goldstein, Barry; Hansen, Francis D.; Price, Ronald H.; Lord, Anna Snider

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Predicting market power in wholesale electricity markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting market power in wholesale electricity markets#3; David M Newbery Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge August 26, 2008 Abstract The traditional measure of market power is the HHI, which gives implausible results given the low... elasticity of demand in electricity spot markets, unless it is adapted to take account of contracting. In its place the Residual Supply Index has been proposed as a more suitable index to measure potential market power in electricity markets, notably...

Newbery, David

257

HIGH-LEVEL WASTE FEED CERTIFICATION IN HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. DOE's River Protection Project (RPP) mission modeling and WTP facility modeling assume that individual 3785 cubic meter (l million gallon) HLW feed tanks are homogenously mixed, representatively sampled, and consistently delivered to the WTP. It has been demonstrated that homogenous mixing ofHLW sludge in Hanford DSTs is not likely achievable with the baseline design thereby causing representative sampling and consistent feed delivery to be more difficult. Inconsistent feed to the WTP could cause additional batch-to-batch operational adjustments that reduce operating efficiency and have the potential to increase the overall mission length. The Hanford mixing and sampling demonstration program will identify DST mixing performance capability, will evaluate representative sampling techniques, and will estimate feed batch consistency. An evaluation of demonstration program results will identify potential mission improvement considerations that will help ensure successful mission completion. This paper will discuss the history, progress, and future activities that will define and mitigate the mission risk.

THIEN MG; WELLS BE; ADAMSON DJ

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

258

Sedimentation behavior of noble metal particles in simulated high-level waste borosilicate glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solubility of noble metal elements (NME) in the melted borosilicate glass is much smaller than its normal concentration of the high level liquid waste. Thus most of NME show small particles in the melted glass and tend to sediment in the bottom region of the vitrification melter due to their higher density than that of glass. Experiments of the sedimentation of NME particles in the melted glass were carried out under static condition. Three conditions of initial NME concentration (1.1, 3.0, 6.1 wt % with an equivalent for each oxide) in the simulated glass were set and held at 1100 C. degrees up to 2880 hours. The specimen with 1.1 wt % initial NME concentration indicated zone settling, and the settling rate of the interface is constant: 2.4 mm/h. This sedimentation behavior is the type of rapid settling. Following the rapid settling, the settling rate goes gradually slower; this is the type of compressive settling. The specimens with 3.0 wt % and 6.1 wt % initial NME concentration showed compression settling from the beginning. From the settling curve of the interface, the maximum concentration of NME in sediment was estimated to be around 23- 26 wt %. Growth of NME particles was observed by holding at 1100 C. degrees for up to 2880 hours. The viscosity becomes higher as NME concentration increases and the dependence on shear rate becomes simultaneously stronger. The effect of the particle growth to viscosity appears to be not significant.

Nakajima, M.; Ohyama, K.; Morikawa, Y.; Miyauchi, A.; Yamashita, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1109 (Japan); Komamine, S.; Ochi, E. [Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited, Bussan-Bldg. Bekkan, 1-1-5 Nishi-Shinbashi Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0003 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

ESTIMATING HIGH LEVEL WASTE MIXING PERFORMANCE IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of high level waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tank Operations Contractor (TOC), Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is currently demonstrating mixing, sampling, and batch transfer performance in two different sizes of small-scale DSTs. The results of these demonstrations will be used to estimate full-scale DST mixing performance and provide the key input to a programmatic decision on the need to build a dedicated feed certification facility. This paper discusses the results from initial mixing demonstration activities and presents data evaluation techniques that allow insight into the performance relationships of the two small tanks. The next steps, sampling and batch transfers, of the small scale demonstration activities are introduced. A discussion of the integration of results from the mixing, sampling, and batch transfer tests to allow estimating full-scale DST performance is presented.

THIEN MG; GREER DA; TOWNSON P

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

260

Analyses of high-level radioactive glasses and sludges at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reliable analyses of high level radioactive glass and sludge are necessary for successful operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This facility will convert the radioactive waste sludges at SRS into durable borosilicate glasses for final disposal in a geologic repository. Analyses that are crucial to DWPF operation and repository acceptance of the glass are measurement of the radioactive and nonradioactive composition of the waste sludges and final glasses and measurement of the Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio in a vitrified sample of melter feed. These measurements are based on the remote dissolutions of the glass and sludge followed by appropriate chemical analyses. Glasses are dissolved by a peroxide fusion method and a method using HF, HNO{sub 3}, H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, and HCl acids where the solutions are heated in a microwave oven. The resulting solutions are analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) for nonradioactive elements and appropriate counting techniques for radioactive elements. Results for two radioactive glasses containing actual radioactive waste are also presented. Sludges are dissolved by the Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} fusion method and an aqua regia method. 8 refs., 4 tabs.

Coleman, C.J.; Bibler, N.E.; Dewberry, R.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

US Department of Energy Storage of Spent Fuel and High Level Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This paper provides an overview of the Department of Energy's (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) storage management. Like commercial reactor fuel, DOE's SNF and HLW were destined for the Yucca Mountain repository. In March 2010, the DOE filed a motion with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to withdraw the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain. A new repository is now decades away. The default for the commercial and DOE research reactor fuel and HLW is on-site storage for the foreseeable future. Though the motion to withdraw the license application and delay opening of a repository signals extended storage, DOE's immediate plans for management of its SNF and HLW remain the same as before Yucca Mountain was designated as the repository, though it has expanded its research and development efforts to ensure safe extended storage. This paper outlines some of the proposed research that DOE is conducting and will use to enhance its storage systems and facilities.

Sandra M Birk

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

TWRS retrieval and disposal mission, immobilized high-level waste storage plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project plan has a two fold purpose. First, it provides a plan specific to the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Immobilized High-Level Waste (EMW) Storage Subproject for the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) that meets the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-90-01 (Ecology et al. 1996) and is consistent with the project plan content guidelines found in Section 11.5 of the Tri-Party Agreement action plan. Second, it provides an upper tier document that can be used as the basis for future subproject line item construction management plans. The planning elements for the construction management plans are derived from applicable U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) planning guidance documents (DOE Orders 4700.1 (DOE 1992a) and 430.1 (DOE 1995)). The format and content of this project plan are designed to accommodate the plan`s dual purpose. A cross-check matrix is provided in Appendix A to explain where in the plan project planning elements required by Section 11.5 of the Tri-Party Agreement are addressed.

Calmus, R.B.

1998-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

SUMO, System performance assessment for a high-level nuclear waste repository: Mathematical models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following completion of the preliminary risk assessment of the potential Yucca Mountain Site by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in 1988, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) requested the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL to develop an integrated system model and computer code that provides performance and risk assessment analysis capabilities for a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The system model that has been developed addresses the cumulative radionuclide release criteria established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and estimates population risks in terms of dose to humans. The system model embodied in the SUMO (System Unsaturated Model) code will also allow benchmarking of other models being developed for the Yucca Mountain Project. The system model has three natural divisions: (1) source term, (2) far-field transport, and (3) dose to humans. This document gives a detailed description of the mathematics of each of these three divisions. Each of the governing equations employed is based on modeling assumptions that are widely accepted within the scientific community.

Eslinger, P.W.; Miley, T.B.; Engel, D.W.; Chamberlain, P.J. II

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Oxidative Alkaline leaching of Americium from simulated high-level nuclear waste sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidative alkaline leaching has been proposed to pre-treat the high-level nuclear waste sludges to remove some of the problematic (e.g., Cr) and/or non-radioactive (e.g., Na, Al) constituents before vitrification. It is critical to understand the behavior of actinides, americium and plutonium in particular, in oxidative alkaline leaching. We have studied the leaching behavior of americium from four different sludge simulants (BiPO{sub 4}, BiPO{sub 4 modified}, Redox, PUREX) using potassium permanganate and potassium persulfate in alkaline solutions. Up to 60% of americium sorbed onto the simulants is leached from the sludges by alkaline persulfate and permanganate. The percentage of americium leached increases with [NaOH] (between 1.0 and 5.0 M). The initial rate of americium leaching by potassium persulfate increases in the order BiPO{sub 4} sludge < Redox sludge < PUREX sludge. The data are most consistent with oxidation of Am{sup 3+} in the sludge to either AmO{sub 2}{sup +} or AmO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in solution. Though neither of these species is expected to exhibit long-term stability in solution, the potential for mobilization of americium from sludge samples would have to be accommodated in the design of any oxidative leaching process for real sludge samples.

Reed, Wendy A.; Garnov, Alexander Yu.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Bond, Andrew H.

2004-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

265

Alternate approaches to verifying the structural adequacy of the Defense High Level Waste Shipping Cask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the early 1980s, the US Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) initiated a project to develop a safe and efficient transportation system for defense high level waste (DHLW). A long-standing objective of the DHLW transportation project is to develop a truck cask that represents the leading edge of cask technology as well as one that fully complies with all applicable DOE, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations. General Atomics (GA) designed the DHLW Truck Shipping Cask using state-of-the-art analytical techniques verified by model testing performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The analytical techniques include two approaches, inelastic analysis and elastic analysis. This topical report presents the results of the two analytical approaches and the model testing results. The purpose of this work is to show that there are two viable analytical alternatives to verify the structural adequacy of a Type B package and to obtain an NRC license. It addition, this data will help to support the future acceptance by the NRC of inelastic analysis as a tool in packaging design and licensing.

Zimmer, A.; Koploy, M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

High-Level Waste Tank Cleaning and Field Characterization at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is nearing completion of radioactive high-level waste (HLW) retrieval from its storage tanks and subsequent vitrification of the HLW into borosilicate glass. Currently, 99.5% of the sludge radioactivity has been recovered from the storage tanks and vitrified. Waste recovery of cesium-137 (Cs-137) adsorbed on a zeolite media during waste pretreatment has resulted in 97% of this radioactivity being vitrified. Approximately 84% of the original 1.1 x 1018 becquerels (30 million curies) of radioactivity was efficiently vitrified from July 1996 to June 1998 during Phase I processing. The recovery of the last 16% of the waste has been challenging due to a number of factors, primarily the complex internal structural support system within the main 2.8 million liter (750,000 gallon) HLW tank designated 8D-2. Recovery of this last waste has become exponentially more challenging as less and less HLW is available to mobilize and transfer to the Vitrification Facility. This paper describes the progressively more complex techniques being utilized to remove the final small percentage of radioactivity from the HLW tanks, and the multiple characterization technologies deployed to determine the quantity of Cs-137, strontium-90 (Sr-90), and alpha-transuranic (alpha-TRU) radioactivity remaining in the tanks.

Drake, J. L.; McMahon, C. L.; Meess, D. C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

267

PERFORMANCE OF A BURIED RADIOACTIVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS AFTER 24 YEARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radioactive high level waste glass was made in 1980 with Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 15 waste. This glass was buried in the SRS burial ground for 24 years but lysimeter data was only available for the first 8 years. The glass was exhumed and analyzed in 2004. The glass was predicted to be very durable and laboratory tests confirmed the durability response. The laboratory results indicated that the glass was very durable as did analysis of the lysimeter data. Scanning electron microscopy of the glass burial surface showed no significant glass alteration consistent with the results of the laboratory and field tests. No detectable Pu, Am, Cm, Np, or Ru leached from the glass into the surrounding sediment. Leaching of {beta}/{delta} from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs in the glass was diffusion controlled. Less than 0.5% of the Cs and Sr in the glass leached into the surrounding sediment, with >99% of the leached radionuclides remaining within 8 centimeters of the glass pellet.

Jantzen, C; Daniel Kaplan, D; Ned Bibler, N; David Peeler, D; John Plodinec, J

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

268

Wildlife Photography Market Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

programs to reach existing groups such as photography clubs. Joining tourism organizations is also likely to be helpful. Private Landowners? Responses The data gathered from the landowners? survey responses illustrates the limited nature of wildlife... wildlife photography, most have not yet reached the levels desired by operators. This is partly due to a lack of development as a tourism enterprise, which includes marketing and well-defined operational limits.It does seem that satisfaction is very...

Phillips, Miles

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

269

Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: technology development - annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a collection of annotated bibliographies for documents prepared under the Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification (Plant) Program. The bibliographies are for documents from Fiscal Year 1983 through Fiscal Year 1995, and include work conducted at or under the direction of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The bibliographies included focus on the technology developed over the specified time period for vitrifying Hanford pretreated high-level waste. The following subject areas are included: General Documentation; Program Documentation; High-Level Waste Characterization; Glass Formulation and Characterization; Feed Preparation; Radioactive Feed Preparation and Glass Properties Testing; Full-Scale Feed Preparation Testing; Equipment Materials Testing; Melter Performance Assessment and Evaluations; Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter; Cold Crucible Melter; Stirred Melter; High-Temperature Melter; Melter Off-Gas Treatment; Vitrification Waste Treatment; Process, Product Control and Modeling; Analytical; and Canister Closure, Decontamination, and Handling

Larson, D.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Shale disposal of U.S. high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the feasibility of high-level radioactive waste disposal in shale within the United States. The U.S. has many possible clay/shale/argillite basins with positive attributes for permanent disposal. Similar geologic formations have been extensively studied by international programs with largely positive results, over significant ranges of the most important material characteristics including permeability, rheology, and sorptive potential. This report is enabled by the advanced work of the international community to establish functional and operational requirements for disposal of a range of waste forms in shale media. We develop scoping performance analyses, based on the applicable features, events, and processes identified by international investigators, to support a generic conclusion regarding post-closure safety. Requisite assumptions for these analyses include waste characteristics, disposal concepts, and important properties of the geologic formation. We then apply lessons learned from Sandia experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Project and the Yucca Mountain Project to develop a disposal strategy should a shale repository be considered as an alternative disposal pathway in the U.S. Disposal of high-level radioactive waste in suitable shale formations is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable and self-sealing, conditions are chemically reducing, and sorption tends to prevent radionuclide transport. Vertically and laterally extensive shale and clay formations exist in multiple locations in the contiguous 48 states. Thermal-hydrologic-mechanical calculations indicate that temperatures near emplaced waste packages can be maintained below boiling and will decay to within a few degrees of the ambient temperature within a few decades (or longer depending on the waste form). Construction effects, ventilation, and the thermal pulse will lead to clay dehydration and deformation, confined to an excavation disturbed zone within a few meters of the repository, that can be reasonably characterized. Within a few centuries after waste emplacement, overburden pressures will seal fractures, resaturate the dehydrated zones, and provide a repository setting that strongly limits radionuclide movement to diffusive transport. Coupled hydrogeochemical transport calculations indicate maximum extents of radionuclide transport on the order of tens to hundreds of meters, or less, in a million years. Under the conditions modeled, a shale repository could achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios. The performance analyses described here are based on the assumption that long-term standards for disposal in clay/shale would be identical in the key aspects, to those prescribed for existing repository programs such as Yucca Mountain. This generic repository evaluation for shale is the first developed in the United States. Previous repository considerations have emphasized salt formations and volcanic rock formations. Much of the experience gained from U.S. repository development, such as seal system design, coupled process simulation, and application of performance assessment methodology, is applied here to scoping analyses for a shale repository. A contemporary understanding of clay mineralogy and attendant chemical environments has allowed identification of the appropriate features, events, and processes to be incorporated into the analysis. Advanced multi-physics modeling provides key support for understanding the effects from coupled processes. The results of the assessment show that shale formations provide a technically advanced, scientifically sound disposal option for the U.S.

Sassani, David Carl; Stone, Charles Michael; Hansen, Francis D.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Martinez, Mario J.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Gaither, Katherine N.; Holland, John Francis; Brady, Patrick Vane

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

ROAD MAP FOR DEVELOPMENT OF CRYSTAL-TOLERANT HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is building a Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is being temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. This road map guides the research and development for formulation and processing of crystaltolerant glasses, identifying near- and long-term activities that need to be completed over the period from 2014 to 2019. The primary objective is to maximize waste loading for Hanford waste glasses without jeopardizing melter operation by crystal accumulation in the melter or melter discharge riser. The potential applicability to the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will also be addressed in this road map. The planned research described in this road map is motivated by the potential for substantial economic benefits (significant reductions in glass volumes) that will be realized if the current constraints (T1% for WTP and TL for DWPF) are approached in an appropriate and technically defensible manner for defense waste and current melter designs. The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal-tolerant high-level waste (HLW) glasses targeting high waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. The modeling effort will be an iterative process, where model form and a broader range of conditions, e.g., glass composition and temperature, will evolve as additional data on crystal accumulation are gathered. Model validation steps will be included to guide the development process and ensure the value of the effort (i.e., increased waste loading and waste throughput). A summary of the stages of the road map for developing the crystal-tolerant glass approach, their estimated durations, and deliverables is provided.

Fox, K.; Peeler, D.; Herman, C.

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Mercury Reduction and Removal from High Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 12511  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site during production of enriched uranium and plutonium required by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. One of the constituents in the nuclear waste is mercury, which is present because it served as a catalyst in the dissolution of uranium-aluminum alloy fuel rods. At high temperatures mercury is corrosive to off-gas equipment, this poses a major challenge to the overall vitrification process in separating mercury from the waste stream prior to feeding the high temperature melter. Mercury is currently removed during the chemical process via formic acid reduction followed by steam stripping, which allows elemental mercury to be evaporated with the water vapor generated during boiling. The vapors are then condensed and sent to a hold tank where mercury coalesces and is recovered in the tank's sump via gravity settling. Next, mercury is transferred from the tank sump to a purification cell where it is washed with water and nitric acid and removed from the facility. Throughout the chemical processing cell, compounds of mercury exist in the sludge, condensate, and off-gas; all of which present unique challenges. Mercury removal from sludge waste being fed to the DWPF melter is required to avoid exhausting it to the environment or any negative impacts to the Melter Off-Gas system. The mercury concentration must be reduced to a level of 0.8 wt% or less before being introduced to the melter. Even though this is being successfully accomplished, the material balances accounting for incoming and collected mercury are not equal. In addition, mercury has not been effectively purified and collected in the Mercury Purification Cell (MPC) since 2008. A significant cleaning campaign aims to bring the MPC back up to facility housekeeping standards. Two significant investigations are being undertaken to restore mercury collection. The SMECT mercury pump has been removed from the tank and will be functionally tested. Also, research is being conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory to determine the effects of antifoam addition on the behavior of mercury. These path forward items will help us better understand what is occurring in the mercury collection system and ultimately lead to an improved DWPF production rate and mercury recovery rate. (authors)

Behrouzi, Aria [Savannah River Remediation, LLC (United States); Zamecnik, Jack [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Potential Application Of Radionuclide Scaling Factors To High Level Waste Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production sources, radiological properties, relative solubilities in waste, and laboratory analysis techniques for the forty-five radionuclides identified in Hanford?s Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Feed Acceptance Data Quality Objectives (DQO) document are addressed in this report. Based on Savannah River Site (SRS) experience and waste characteristics, thirteen of the radionuclides are judged to be candidates for potential scaling in High Level Waste (HLW) based on the concentrations of other radionuclides as determined through laboratory measurements. The thirteen radionuclides conducive to potential scaling are: Ni-59, Zr-93, Nb-93m, Cd-113m, Sn-121m, Sn-126, Cs-135, Sm-151, Ra-226, Ra-228, Ac-227, Pa-231, and Th-229. The ability to scale radionuclides is useful from two primary perspectives: 1) it provides a means of checking the radionuclide concentrations that have been determined by laboratory analysis; and 2) it provides a means of estimating radionuclide concentrations in the absence of a laboratory analysis technique or when a complex laboratory analysis technique fails. Along with the rationale for identifying and applying the potential scaling factors, this report also provides examples of using the scaling factors to estimate concentrations of radionuclides in current SRS waste and into the future. Also included in the report are examples of independent laboratory analysis techniques that can be used to check results of key radionuclide analyses. Effective utilization of radionuclide scaling factors requires understanding of the applicable production sources and the chemistry of the waste. As such, the potential scaling approaches identified in this report should be assessed from the perspective of the Hanford waste before reaching a decision regarding WTP applicability.

Reboul, S. H.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

Design and performance of atomizing nozzles for spray calcination of high-level wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key aspect of high-level liquid-waste spray calcination is waste-feed atomization by using air atomizing nozzles. Atomization substantially increases the heat transfer area of the waste solution, which enhances rapid drying. Experience from the spray-calciner operations has demonstrated that nozzle flow conditions that produce 70-..mu.. median-volume-diameter or smaller spray droplets are required for small-scale spray calciners (drying capacity less than 80 L/h). For large-scale calciners (drying capacity greater than 300 L/h), nozzle flow conditions that produce 100-..mu.. median-volume-diameter or smaller spray droplets are required. Mass flow ratios of 0.2 to 0.4, depending on nozzle size, are required for proper operation of internal-mix atomizing nozzles. Both internal-mix and external-mix nozzles have been tested at PNL. Due to the lower airflow requirements and fewer large droplets produced, the internal-mix nozzle has been chosen for primary development in the spray calciner program at PNL. Several nozzle air-cap materials for internal-mix nozzles have been tested for wear resistance. Results show that nozzle air caps of stainless steel and Cer-vit (a machineable glass ceramic) are suceptible to rapid wear by abrasive slurries, whereas air caps of alumina and reaction-bonded silicon nitride show only slow wear. Longer-term testing is necessary to determine more accurately the actual frequency of nozzle replacement. Atomizing nozzle air caps of alumina are subject to fracture from thermal shock, whereas air caps of silicon nitride and Cer-vit are not. Fractured nozzles are held in place by the air-cap retaining ring and continue to atomize satisfactorily. Therefore, fractures caused by thermal shocking do not necessarily result in nozzle failure.

Miller, F.A.; Stout, L.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Low-temperature lithium diffusion in simulated high-level boroaluminosilicate nuclear waste glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchange is recognized as an integral, if underrepresented, mechanism influencing glass corrosion. However, due to the formation of various alteration layers in the presence of water, it is difficult to conclusively deconvolute the mechanisms of ion exchange from other processes occurring simultaneously during corrosion. In this work, an operationally inert non-aqueous solution was used as an alkali source material to isolate ion exchange and study the solid-state diffusion of lithium. Specifically, the experiments involved contacting glass coupons relevant to the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste, SON68 and CJ-6, which contained Li in natural isotope abundance, with a non-aqueous solution of 6LiCl dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide at 90 C for various time periods. The depth profiles of major elements in the glass coupons were measured using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Lithium interdiffusion coefficients, DLi, were then calculated based on the measured depth profiles. The results indicate that the penetration of 6Li is rapid in both glasses with the simplified CJ-6 glass (D6Li ? 4.0-8.0 10-21 m2/s) exhibiting faster exchange than the more complex SON68 glass (DLi ? 2.0-4.0 10-21 m2/s). Additionally, sodium ions present in the glass were observed to participate in ion exchange reactions; however, different diffusion coefficients were necessary to fit the diffusion profiles of the two alkali ions. Implications of the diffusion coefficients obtained in the absence of alteration layers to the long-term performance of nuclear waste glasses in a geological repository system are also discussed.

Neeway, James J.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gin, Stephane; Wang, Zhaoying; Zhu, Zihua; Ryan, Joseph V.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Evaluation of West Valley High-Level Waste Tank Lay-Up Strategies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the task summarized in this paper was to demonstrate a methodology for evaluating alternative strategies for preclosure lay-up of the two high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). Lay-up is defined as the period between operational use of tanks for waste storage and final closure. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to separate the environmental impact statement (EIS) for completion of closure of the WVDP into two separate EISs. The first EIS will cover only waste management and decontamination. DOE expects to complete this EIS in about 18 months. The second EIS will cover final decommissioning and closure and may take up to five years to complete. This approach has been proposed to expedite continued management of the waste and decontamination activities in advance of the final EIS and its associated Record of Decision on final site closure. Final closure of the WVDP site may take 10 to 15 years; therefore, the tanks need to be placed in a safe, stable condition with minimum surveillance during an extended lay-up period. The methodology developed for ranking the potential strategies for lay-up of the WVDP tanks can be used to provide a basis for a decision on the preferred path forward. The methodology is also applicable to determining preferred lay-up approaches at other DOE sites. Some of the alternative strategies identified for the WVDP should also be considered for implementation at the other DOE sites. Each site has unique characteristics that would require unique considerations for lay-up.

McClure, L. W.; Henderson, J. C.; Elmore, M. R.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

277

Application of Quantitative NDE Techniques to High Level Waste Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As various issues make the continued usage of high-level waste storage tanks attractive, there is an increasing need to sharpen the assessment of their structural integrity. One aspect of a structural integrity program, nondestructive evaluation, is the focus of this paper. In September 2000, a program to support the sites was initiated jointly by Tanks Focus Area and Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technologies Crosscutting Program of the Office of Environmental Management, Department of Energy (DOE). The vehicle was the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, one of the National Science Foundation's Industry/University Cooperative Research Centers that is operated in close collaboration with the Ames Laboratory, USDOE. The support activities that have been provided by the center will be reviewed. Included are the organization of a series of annual workshops to allow the sites to share experiences and develop coordinated approaches to common problems, the development of an electronic source of relevant information, and assistance of the sites on particular technical problems. Directions and early results on some of these technical assistance projects are emphasized. Included are the discussion of theoretical analysis of ultrasonic wave propagation in curved plates to support the interpretation of tandem synthetic aperture focusing data to detect flaws in the knuckle region of double shell tanks; the evaluation of guided ultrasonic waves, excited by couplant free, electromagnetic acoustic transducers, to rapidly screen for inner wall corrosion in tanks; the use of spread spectrum techniques to gain information about the structural integrity of concrete domes; and the use of magnetic techniques to identify the alloys used in the construction of tanks.

Thompson, R. B.; Rehbein, D. K.; Bastiaans, G.; Terry, M.; Alers, R.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

278

Independent Assessment of the Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Salt Disposition Alternatives Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Independent Project Evaluation (IPE) Team assessment of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company High-Level Waste Salt Disposition Systems Engineering (SE) Team's deliberations, evaluations, and selections. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company concluded in early 1998 that production goals and safety requirements for processing SRS HLW salt to remove Cs-137 could not be met in the existing In-Tank Precipitation Facility as currently configured for precipitation of cesium tetraphenylborate. The SE Team was chartered to evaluate and recommend an alternative(s) for processing the existing HLW salt to remove Cs-137. To replace the In-Tank Precipitation process, the Savannah River Site HLW Salt Disposition SE Team downselected (October 1998) 140 candidate separation technologies to two alternatives: Small-Tank Tetraphenylborate (TPB) Precipitation (primary alternative) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Nonelutable Ion Exchange (backup alternative). The IPE Team, commissioned by the Department of Energy, concurs that both alternatives are technically feasible and should meet all salt disposition requirements. But the IPE Team judges that the SE Team's qualitative criteria and judgments used in their downselection to a primary and a backup alternative do not clearly discriminate between the two alternatives. To properly choose between Small-Tank TPB and CST Ion Exchange for the primary alternative, the IPE Team suggests the following path forward: Complete all essential R and D activities for both alternatives and formulate an appropriate set of quantitative decision criteria that will be rigorously applied at the end of the R and D activities. Concurrent conceptual design activities should be limited to common elements of the alternatives.

J. T. Case (DOE-ID); M. L. Renfro (INEEL)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

ENHANCED DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER THROUGHPUT STUDIES: SRNL GLASS SELECTION STRATEGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has authorized a team of glass formulation and processing experts at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) at Catholic University of America to develop a systematic approach to increase high level waste melter throughput (by increasing waste loading with minimal or positive impacts on melt rate). This task is aimed at proof-of-principle testing and the development of tools to improve waste loading and melt rate, which will lead to higher waste throughput. Four specific tasks have been proposed to meet these objectives (for details, see WSRC-STI-2007-00483): (1) Integration and Oversight, (2) Crystal Accumulation Modeling (led by PNNL)/Higher Waste Loading Glasses (led by SRNL), (3) Melt Rate Evaluation and Modeling, and (4) Melter Scale Demonstrations. Task 2, Crystal Accumulation Modeling/Higher Waste Loading Glasses is the focus of this report. The objective of this study is to provide supplemental data to support the possible use of alternative melter technologies and/or implementation of alternative process control models or strategies to target higher waste loadings (WLs) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)--ultimately leading to higher waste throughputs and a reduced mission life. The glass selection strategy discussed in this report was developed to gain insight into specific technical issues that could limit or compromise the ability of glass formulation efforts to target higher WLs for future sludge batches at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These technical issues include Al-dissolution, higher TiO{sub 2} limits and homogeneity issues for coupled-operations, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} solubility, and nepheline formation. To address these technical issues, a test matrix of 28 glass compositions has been developed based on 5 different sludge projections for future processing. The glasses will be fabricated and characterized based on the protocols outlined in the SRNL Task and Quality Assurance (QA) plan.

Raszewski, F; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

280

Production of a High-Level Waste Glass from Hanford Waste Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HLW glass was produced from a HLW sludge slurry (Envelope D Waste), eluate waste streams containing high levels of Cs-137 and Tc-99, solids containing both Sr-90 and transuranics (TRU), and glass-forming chemicals. The eluates and Sr-90/TRU solids were obtained from ion-exchange and precipitation pretreatments, respectively, of other Hanford supernate samples (Envelopes A, B and C Waste). The glass was vitrified by mixing the different waste streams with glass-forming chemicals in platinum/gold crucibles and heating the mixture to 1150 degree C. Resulting glass analyses indicated that the HLW glass waste form composition was close to the target composition. The targeted waste loading of Envelope D sludge solids in the HLW glass was 30.7 wt percent, exclusive of Na and Si oxides. Condensate samples from the off-gas condenser and off-gas dry-ice trap indicated that very little of the radionuclides were volatilized during vitrification. Microstructure analysis of the HLW glass using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX) showed what appeared to be iron spinel in the HLW glass. Further X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the presence of nickel spinel trevorite (NiFe2O4). These crystals did not degrade the leaching characteristics of the glass. The HLW glass waste form passed leach tests that included a standard 90 degree C Product Consistency Test (PCT) and a modified version of the United States Environmental Protection Agency Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

Crawford, C.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Farrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.; Bibler, N.E.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

SAMPLE INTERNSHIP DESCRIPTION NOT CURRENTLY OPEN FOR INFORMATION ONLY Marketing & Communications Internship Sustainability Outreach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the student's school schedule, must be available Mon-Fri business hours. 8 hours per week to start. Location audit Directing marketing efforts to target neighborhoods Promoting sustainability program We'd rather,) and online resources Highly motivated self-starter and high energy level with demonstrated ability to take

282

Market Organization and Efficiency in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Market Organization and Efficiency in Electricity Markets Erin T. Mansur and Matthew W. White October 2007 ­ Draft Abstract Electricity markets exhibit two different forms of organization costs. Our analysis points to the merits of organized market institutions for electricity, a central

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

283

Preliminary Technology Maturation Plan for Immobilization of High-Level Waste in Glass Ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technology maturation plan (TMP) was developed for immobilization of high-level waste (HLW) raffinate in a glass ceramics waste form using a cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM). The TMP was prepared by the following process: 1) define the reference process and boundaries of the technology being matured, 2) evaluate the technology elements and identify the critical technology elements (CTE), 3) identify the technology readiness level (TRL) of each of the CTEs using the DOE G 413.3-4, 4) describe the development and demonstration activities required to advance the TRLs to 4 and 6 in order, and 5) prepare a preliminary plan to conduct the development and demonstration. Results of the technology readiness assessment identified five CTEs and found relatively low TRLs for each of them: Mixing, sampling, and analysis of waste slurry and melter feed: TRL-1 Feeding, melting, and pouring: TRL-1 Glass ceramic formulation: TRL-1 Canister cooling and crystallization: TRL-1 Canister decontamination: TRL-4 Although the TRLs are low for most of these CTEs (TRL-1), the effort required to advance them to higher values. The activities required to advance the TRLs are listed below: Complete this TMP Perform a preliminary engineering study Characterize, estimate, and simulate waste to be treated Laboratory scale glass ceramic testing Melter and off-gas testing with simulants Test the mixing, sampling, and analyses Canister testing Decontamination system testing Issue a requirements document Issue a risk management document Complete preliminary design Integrated pilot testing Issue a waste compliance plan A preliminary schedule and budget were developed to complete these activities as summarized in the following table (assuming 2012 dollars). TRL Budget Year MSA FMP GCF CCC CD Overall $M 2012 1 1 1 1 4 1 0.3 2013 2 2 1 1 4 1 1.3 2014 2 3 1 1 4 1 1.8 2015 2 3 2 2 4 2 2.6 2016 2 3 2 2 4 2 4.9 2017 2 3 3 2 4 2 9.8 2018 3 3 3 3 4 3 7.9 2019 3 3 3 3 4 3 5.1 2020 3 3 3 3 4 3 14.6 2021 3 3 3 3 4 3 7.3 2022 3 3 3 3 4 3 8.8 2023 4 4 4 4 4 4 9.1 2024 5 5 5 5 5 5 6.9 2025 6 6 6 6 6 6 6.9 CCC = canister cooling and crystallization; FMP = feeding, melting, and pouring; GCF = glass ceramic formulation; MSA = mixing, sampling, and analyses. This TMP is intended to guide the development of the glass ceramics waste form and process to the point where it is ready for industrialization.

Vienna, John D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, G L.

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Reevaluation Of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria For Potential Cost Savings At The Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form.

Ray, J. W.; Marra, S. L.; Herman, C. C.

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

285

Reevaluation of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria for Potential Cost Savings at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13598  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form. (authors)

Ray, J.W. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation (United States); Marra, S.L.; Herman, C.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Vitrification and testing of a Hanford high-level waste sample. Part 1: Glass fabrication, and chemical and radiochemical analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford radioactive tank waste will be separated into low-activity waste and high-level waste that will both be vitrified into borosilicate glasses. To demonstrate the feasibility of vitrification and the durability of the high-level waste glass, a high-level waste sample from Tank AZ-101 was processed to glass in a hot cell and analyzed with respect to chemical composition, radionuclide content, waste loading, and the presence of crystalline phases and then tested for leachability. The glass was analyzed with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, ? energy spectrometry, ? spectrometry, and liquid scintillation counting. The WISE Uranium Project calculator was used to calculate the main sources of radioactivity to the year 3115. The observed crystallinity and the results of leachability testing of the glass will be reported in Part 2 of this paper.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Bates, Derrick J.; Bredt, Paul; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Smith, H D.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A Deeply Pipelined CABAC Decoder for HEVC Supporting Level 6.2 High-tier Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) is the latest video coding standard that specifies video resolutions up to 8K Ultra-HD (UHD) at 120 fps to support the next decade of video applications. This results in high-throughput ...

Chen, Yu-Hsin

288

Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Tank Closure Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) predecessor agency, established the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, in the early 1950s. The primary mission of SRS was to produce nuclear materials for national defense. With the end of the Cold War and the reduction in the size of the United States stockpile of nuclear weapons, the SRS mission has changed. While national defense is still an important facet of the mission, SRS no longer produces nuclear materials and the mission is focused on material stabilization, environmental restoration, waste management, and decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are no longer needed. As a result of its nuclear materials production mission, SRS generated large quantities of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The HLW resulted from dissolving spent reactor fuel and nuclear targets to recover the valuable radioactive isotopes. DOE had stored the HLW in 51 large underground storage tanks located in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms at SRS. DOE has emptied and closed two of those tanks. DOE is treating the HLW, using a process called vitrification. The highly radioactive portion of the waste is mixed with a glass like material and stored in stainless steel canisters at SRS, pending shipment to a geologic repository for disposal. This process is currently underway at SRS in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The HLW tanks at SRS are of four different types, which provide varying degrees of protection to the environment due to different degrees of containment. The tanks are operated under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA) and DOE Orders issued under the AEA. The tanks are permitted by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) under South Carolina wastewater regulations, which require permitted facilities to be closed after they are removed from service. DOE has entered into an agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and SCDHEC to close the HLW tanks after they have been removed from service. Closure of the HLW tanks would comply with DOE's responsibilities under the AEA and the South Carolina closure requirements and be carried out under a schedule agreed to by DOE, EPA, and SCDHEC. There are several ways to close the HLW tanks. DOE has prepared this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to ensure that the public and DOE's decision makers have a thorough understanding of the potential environmental impacts of alternative means of closing the tanks. This Summary: (1) describes the HLW tanks and the closure process, (2) describes the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process that DOE is using to aid in decision making, (3) summarizes the alternatives for closing the HLW tanks and identifies DOE.s preferred alternative, and (4) identifies the major conclusions regarding environmental impacts, areas of controversy, and issues that remain to be resolved as DOE proceeds with the HLW tank closure process.

N /A

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Thermal-mechanical modeling of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level radioactive waste, including spent nuclear fuel, in deep (3 to 5 km) boreholes is a potential option for safely isolating these wastes from the surface and near-surface environment. Existing drilling technology permits reliable and cost-effective construction of such deep boreholes. Conditions favorable for deep borehole disposal in crystalline basement rocks, including low permeability, high salinity, and geochemically reducing conditions, exist at depth in many locations, particularly in geologically stable continental regions. Isolation of waste depends, in part, on the effectiveness of borehole seals and potential alteration of permeability in the disturbed host rock surrounding the borehole. Coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic processes induced by heat from the radioactive waste may impact the disturbed zone near the borehole and borehole wall stability. Numerical simulations of the coupled thermal-mechanical response in the host rock surrounding the borehole were conducted with three software codes or combinations of software codes. Software codes used in the simulations were FEHM, JAS3D, Aria, and Adagio. Simulations were conducted for disposal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies and for the higher heat output of vitrified waste from the reprocessing of fuel. Simulations were also conducted for both isotropic and anisotropic ambient horizontal stress in the host rock. Physical, thermal, and mechanical properties representative of granite host rock at a depth of 4 km were used in the models. Simulation results indicate peak temperature increases at the borehole wall of about 30 C and 180 C for disposal of fuel assemblies and vitrified waste, respectively. Peak temperatures near the borehole occur within about 10 years and decline rapidly within a few hundred years and with distance. The host rock near the borehole is placed under additional compression. Peak mechanical stress is increased by about 15 MPa (above the assumed ambient isotropic stress of 100 MPa) at the borehole wall for the disposal of fuel assemblies and by about 90 MPa for vitrified waste. Simulated peak volumetric strain at the borehole wall is about 420 and 2600 microstrain for the disposal of fuel assemblies and vitrified waste, respectively. Stress and volumetric strain decline rapidly with distance from the borehole and with time. Simulated peak stress at and parallel to the borehole wall for the disposal of vitrified waste with anisotropic ambient horizontal stress is about 440 MPa, which likely exceeds the compressive strength of granite if unconfined by fluid pressure within the borehole. The relatively small simulated displacements and volumetric strain near the borehole suggest that software codes using a nondeforming grid provide an adequate approximation of mechanical deformation in the coupled thermal-mechanical model. Additional modeling is planned to incorporate the effects of hydrologic processes coupled to thermal transport and mechanical deformation in the host rock near the heated borehole.

Arnold, Bill Walter; Hadgu, Teklu

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Effect of residual gases in high vacuum on the energy-level alignment at noble metal/organic interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy-level alignment at metal/organic interfaces has traditionally been studied using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). However, since most devices are fabricated in high vacuum (HV), these studies do not accurately reflect the interfaces in real devices. We demonstrate, using UPS measurements of samples prepared in HV and UHV and current-voltage measurements of devices prepared in HV, that the small amounts of residual gases that are adsorbed on the surface of clean Cu, Ag, and Au (i.e., the noble metals) in HV can significantly alter the energy-level alignment at metal/organic interfaces.

Helander, M. G.; Wang, Z. B.; Lu, Z. H.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Diagnosing Market Power in California's Deregulated Wholesale Electricity Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in dereg- ulated wholesale electricity markets," RANDin California's Deregulated Wholesale Electricity MarketEffective competition in wholesale electricity markets is

Borenstein, Severin; Bushnell, James; Wolak, Frank

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Role of Congress in the High Level Radioactive Waste Odyssey: The Wisdom and Will of the Congress - 13096  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Congress has had a dual role with regard to high level radioactive waste, being involved in both its creation and its disposal. A significant amount of time has passed between the creation of the nation's first high level radioactive waste and the present day. The pace of addressing its remediation has been highly irregular. Congress has had to consider the technical, regulatory, and political issues and all have had specific difficulties. It is a true odyssey framed by an imperative and accountability, by a sense of urgency, by an ability or inability to finish the job and by consequences. Congress had set a politically acceptable course by 1982. However, President Obama intervened in the process after he took office in January 2009. Through the efforts of his Administration, by the end of 2012, the US government has no program to dispose of high level radioactive waste and no reasonable prospect of a repository for high level radioactive waste. It is not obvious how the US government program will be reestablished or who will assume responsibility for leadership. The ultimate criteria for judging the consequences are 1) the outcome of the ongoing NRC's Nuclear Waste Confidence Rulemaking and 2) the concomitant permissibility of nuclear energy supplying electricity from operating reactors in the US. (authors)

Vieth, Donald L. [DOE/NVOO Project Manager for Yucca Mountain, 1982 thru 1987, 1154 Cheltenham Place, Maineville, OH 45039 (United States)] [DOE/NVOO Project Manager for Yucca Mountain, 1982 thru 1987, 1154 Cheltenham Place, Maineville, OH 45039 (United States); Voegele, Michael D. [Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office, 7404 Oak Grove Ave, Las Vegas, NV 89117 (United States)] [Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office, 7404 Oak Grove Ave, Las Vegas, NV 89117 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Marketing Strategy and Implementation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the preparation of materials for the marketing campaign that has been designed for middle and high school students in New Mexico to increase interest in participation in national security careers at the National Nuclear Security Administration. The materials and the marketing campaign build on the research that was previously completed, as well as the focus groups that were conducted. This work is a part of the National Nuclear Security Preparedness Project (NSPP). Previous research included outcome analysis to determine appropriate marketing strategies. The analysis was based upon focus groups with middle school and high school students, student interactions, and surveys completed by students to understand and gauge student interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) subjects, interest in careers at NNSA, future job considerations, and student desire to pursue post-secondary education. Further, through the focus groups, students were asked to attend a presentation on NNSA job opportunities and employee requirements. The feedback received from the students was utilized to develop the focus and components of a marketing campaign divided into DISCO (Discovering Intelligence and Security Career Opportunities) for the middle school age group and DISCO..Your Way! for high school age groups. Both campaigns have an intertwined message that focuses on the education of students in the various national security career opportunities at NNSA using the STEM concepts and the notion that almost any career they can think of has a fit within NNSA. Further, a special emphasis has been placed on the importance of obtaining a national security clearance when working at NNSA and the steps that will need to be taken during middle school, high school, and college to be allowed this opportunity.

None

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

THE STRUCTURAL CHEMISTRY OF MOLYBDENUM IN MODEL HIGH LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES, INVESTIGATED BY MO K-EDGE X-RAY ABSORPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE STRUCTURAL CHEMISTRY OF MOLYBDENUM IN MODEL HIGH LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES, INVESTIGATED of molybdenum in model UK high level nuclear waste glasses was investigated by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Molybdenum K-edge XAS data were acquired from several inactive simulant high level nuclear waste

Sheffield, University of

296

LEVEL OF HIGH-SENSITIVITY C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN SAUDI PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC STABLE CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is an independent predictor of future cardiovascular events and it predicts risk of incident hypertension and diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine the serum levels of the circulating acute-phase reactant high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in Saudi patients with chronic stable Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). Methods: This cross

J Ayub; Med Coll Abbottabad; Syed Shahid Habib

297

Crystallization In High Level Waste (HLW) Glass Melters: Operational Experience From The Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

processing strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal tolerant high level waste (HLW) glasses targeting higher waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. This report provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with scaled melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by K-3 refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. This report includes a review of the crystallization observed with the scaled melters and the full scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2). Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for WTP. Operation of the first and second (current) DWPF melters has demonstrated that the strategy of using a liquidus temperature predictive model combined with a 100 C offset from the normal melter operating temperature of 1150 C (i.e., the predicted liquidus temperature (TL) of the glass must be 1050 C or less) has been successful in preventing any detrimental accumulation of spinel in the DWPF melt pool, and spinel has not been observed in any of the pour stream glass samples. Spinel was observed at the bottom of DWPF Melter 1 as a result of K-3 refractory corrosion. Issues have occurred with accumulation of spinel in the pour spout during periods of operation at higher waste loadings. Given that both DWPF melters were or have been in operation for greater than 8 years, the service life of the melters has far exceeded design expectations. It is possible that the DWPF liquidus temperature approach is conservative, in that it may be possible to successfully operate the melter with a small degree of allowable crystallization in the glass. This could be a viable approach to increasing waste loading in the glass assuming that the crystals are suspended in the melt and swept out through the riser and pour spout. Additional study is needed, and development work for WTP might be leveraged to support a different operating limit for the DWPF. Several recommendations are made regarding considerations that need to be included as part of the WTP crystal tolerant strategy based on the DWPF development work and operational data reviewed here. These include: Identify and consider the impacts of potential heat sinks in the WTP melter and glass pouring system; Consider the contributions of refractory corrosion products, which may serve to nucleate additional crystals leading to further accumulation; Consider volatilization of components from the melt (e.g., boron, alkali, halides, etc.) and determine their impacts on glass crystallization behavior; Evaluate the impacts of glass REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) conditions and the distribution of temperature within the WTP melt pool and melter pour chamber on crystal accumulation rate; Consider the impact of precipitated crystals on glass viscosity; Consider the impact of an accumulated crystalline layer on thermal convection currents and bubbler effectiveness within the melt pool; Evaluate the impact of spinel accumulation on Joule heating of the WTP melt pool; and Include noble metals in glass melt experiments because of their potential to act as nucleation site

Fox, K. M.

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Multi-objective Optimization for Pricing System Security in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

marginal prices throughout the system. Keywords--Electricity markets, locational marginal prices, maximum1 Multi-objective Optimization for Pricing System Security in Electricity Markets Federico Milano while yielding better market conditions through increased transaction levels and improved locational

Cañizares, Claudio A.

299

POMDP Planning for High Level UAV Decisions: Search vs. Strike Doug Schesvold, Jingpeng Tang, Benzir Md Ahmed, Karl Altenburg,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POMDP Planning for High Level UAV Decisions: Search vs. Strike Doug Schesvold, Jingpeng Tang Vehicles (UAVs). The type of UAV modeled is a flying munition with a limited fuel supply. The UAV is destroyed when it strikes a target. When a UAV detects a target, a decision has to be made whether

Nygard, Kendall E.

300

High level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 6) outlines the standards and requirements for the sections on: Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Research and Development and Experimental Activities, and Nuclear Safety.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Foreign programs for the storage of spent nuclear power plant fuels, high-level waste canisters and transuranic wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The various national programs for developing and applying technology for the interim storage of spent fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and TRU wastes are summarized. Primary emphasis of the report is on dry storage techniques for uranium dioxide fuels, but data are also provided concerning pool storage.

Harmon, K.M.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A three-level buck converter to regulate a high-voltage DC-to-AC inverter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A three-level buck converter is designed and analyzed, and shown to be suitable as a high-voltage down converter as a pre-regulation stage for a 600 watt DC-to-AC power inverter. Topology selection for the inverter is ...

Schrock, Kenneth C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

A critical concern for embedded sys-tems is the need to deliver high levels of per-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 A critical concern for embedded sys- tems is the need to deliver high levels of per- formance proces- sor utilization and allows a corresponding reduction in supply voltage. Because dynam- ic energy scales quadratically with supply volt- age, DVS can significantly reduce energy use.2 Enabling systems

Mudge, Trevor

304

EIS-0063: Waste Management Operations, Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High Level Radioactive Waste Storage, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the existing tank design and consider additional specific design and safety feature alternatives for the thirteen tanks being constructed for storage of defense high-level radioactive liquid waste at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This statement supplements ERDA-1538, "Final Environmental Statement on Waste Management Operation."

305

Sustained high levels of neuregulin-1 in the longest-lived rodents; a key determinant of rodent longevity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustained high levels of neuregulin-1 in the longest-lived rodents; a key determinant of rodent 31905, Israel Summary Naked mole-rats (Heterocephalus glaber), the longest-lived rodents, live 7% of their lives. Little is known about the mechanisms that allow them to delay the aging process and live so long

Huchon, Dorothée

306

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 4) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Radiation Protection and Operations.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 2) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Quality Assurance, Training and Qualification, Emergency Planning and Preparedness, and Construction.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

High-spin level structure of {sup 115}Rh: Evolution of triaxiality in odd-even Rh isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-spin excited states in the neutron-rich nucleus {sup 115}Rh have been identified for the first time by studying prompt {gamma} rays from the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf with the Gammasphere detector array. A new yrast band and a sideband are built in {sup 115}Rh. This level scheme is proposed to be built on the 7/2{sup +} ground state. The existence of a large signature splitting and an yrare band in {sup 115}Rh shows typical features of a triaxially deformed nucleus. The rigid triaxial rotor plus particle model is used to interpret the level structure of {sup 115}Rh. The level energies, the {gamma} branching ratios, the large signature splitting in the yrast band, and the inverted signature splitting in the yrare band in {sup 115}Rh are reproduced very well. Strong K mixing occurs in {sup 115}Rh at high spin.

Liu, S. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); UNIRIB/Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Brewer, N. T.; Hwang, J. K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Gelberg, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Cologne (Germany); Gu, L.; Yeoh, E. Y.; Zhu, S. J. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, Y. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Rasmussen, J. O. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ma, W. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi 39762 (United States); Daniel, A. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Ter-Akopian, G. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Potential role of ABC-assisted repositories in U.S. plutonium and high-level waste disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper characterizes the issues involving deep geologic disposal of LWR spent fuel rods, then presents results of an investigation to quantify the potential role of Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) in an integrated national nuclear materials and high level waste disposition strategy. The investigation used the deep geological repository envisioned for Yucca Mt., Nevada as a baseline and considered complementary roles for integrated ABC transmutation systems. The results indicate that although a U.S. geologic waste repository will continue to be required, waste partitioning and accelerator transmutation of plutonium, the minor actinides, and selected long-lived fission products can result in the following substantial benefits: plutonium burndown to near zero levels, a dramatic reduction of the long term hazard associated with geologic repositories, an ability to place several-fold more high level nuclear waste in a single repository, electricity sales to compensate for capital and operating costs.

Berwald, David; Favale, Anthony; Myers, Timothy; McDaniel, Jerry [Grumman Aerospace Corporation, Bethpage New York 11714 (United States); Bechtel Corporation, 50 Beal St., San Francisco, California 94105 (United States)

1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

INTERNATIONAL STUDY OF ALUMINUM IMPACTS ON CRYSTALLIZATION IN U.S. HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to develop glass formulations for (Department of Energy) DOE waste streams with high aluminum concentrations to avoid nepheline formation while maintaining or meeting waste loading and/or waste throughput expectations as well as satisfying critical process and product performance related constraints. Liquidus temperatures and crystallization behavior were carefully characterized to support model development for higher waste loading glasses. The experimental work, characterization, and data interpretation necessary to meet these objectives were performed among three partnering laboratories: the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Projected glass compositional regions that bound anticipated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Hanford high level waste (HLW) glass regions of interest were developed and used to generate glass compositions of interest for meeting the objectives of this study. A thorough statistical analysis was employed to allow for a wide range of waste glass compositions to be examined while minimizing the number of glasses that had to be fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. The glass compositions were divided into two sets, with 45 in the test matrix investigated by the U.S. laboratories and 30 in the test matrix investigated by KRI. Fabrication and characterization of the US and KRI-series glasses were generally handled separately. This report focuses mainly on the US-series glasses. Glasses were fabricated and characterized by SRNL and PNNL. Crystalline phases were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the quenched and canister centerline cooled (CCC) glasses and were generally iron oxides and spinels, which are not expected to impact durability of the glass. Nepheline was detected in five of the glasses after the CCC heat treatment. Chemical composition measurements for each of the glasses were conducted following an analytical plan. A review of the individual oxides for each glass revealed that there were no errors in batching significant enough to impact the outcome of the study. A comparison of the measured compositions of the replicates indicated an acceptable degree of repeatability as the percent differences for most of the oxides were less than 5% and percent differences for all of the oxides were less than 10 wt%. Chemical durability was measured using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). All but two of the study glasses had normalized leachate for boron (NL [B]) values that were well below that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) reference glass. The two highest NL [B] values were for the CCC versions of glasses US-18 and US-27 (10.498 g/L and 15.962 g/L, respectively). Nepheline crystallization was identified by qualitative XRD in five of the US-series glasses. Each of these five glasses (US-18, US-26, US-27, US-37 and US-43) showed a significant increase in NL [B] values after the CCC heat treatment. This reduction in durability can be attributed to the formation of nepheline during the slow cooling cycle and the removal of glass formers from the residual glass network. The liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) of each glass in the study was determined by both optical microscopy and XRD methods. The correlation coefficient of the measured XRD TL data versus the measured optical TL data was very good (R{sup 2} = 0.9469). Aside from a few outliers, the two datasets aligned very well across the entire temperature range (829 C to 1312 C for optical data and 813 C to 1310 C for XRD crystal fraction data). The data also correlated well with the predictions of a PNNL T{sub L} model. The correlation between the measured and calculated data had a higher degree of merit for the XRD crystal fraction data than for the optical data (higher R{sup 2} value of 0.9089 versus 0.8970 for the optical data). The SEM-EDS analysis of select samples revealed the presence of undissolved RuO{sub 2} in all glasses due to the low solubility of RuO{sub 2} in borosilicate glass. These

Fox, K; David Peeler, D; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P; James Marra, J

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

311

High Level Power Analysis for Embedded DSP Software Johann LAURENT Nathalie JULIEN Eric MARTIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on power consumption optimization for DSP which operate at the instruction level [2], we have chosen applications, power dissipation is currently a major parameter. Power consumption optimization allows to reduce-known that algorithm transformations are more efficient than technologic optimizations [1]; furthermore

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

312

Petroleum Marketing Monthly, April 1995, with data for January 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

International crude oil prices rose moderately in January 1995, under the combined influences of lower production and higher demand. Crude oil output both from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and from non-OPEC nations declined from December levels due to a variety of causes, including severe weather in the North Sea and a platform explosion offshore Nigeria. At the same time, strong demand, especially from Asia, revised buying patterns and tightened markets worldwide. In the United States, reformulated gasoline (RFG) remained the dominant market influence, with the official start of the program at the retail level on January 1. Repercussions from the {open_quotes}opting out{close_quotes} of counties in Pennsylvania, New York, and Maine in December continued to disrupt supply patterns and confuse markets. Gasoline prices spiked at mid-month, but ended near where they began, while distillate prices declined due to warm weather and high inventories. A sharp seasonal decline in motor gasoline volumes led total refiner sales of the major petroleum products down 5.9 percent from December levels. January market and sales activity for crude oil and the principal petroleum products is summarized in the following sections.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Nordic Market Report 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...........................................................................23 6 WHOLESALE POWER MARKET.................................................24 6.1 PRICE DEVELOPMENT.........................................................................................................................37 6.7 WHOLESALE POWER MARKET: CONCLUSIONS-FUNCTIONING NORDIC WHOLESALE MARKET WITH COMPETITIVE PRICES...................47 9.3 RELIABLE SUPPLY ....................................................................

314

Implementation of RFID in a low volume high flexibility assembly plant : item-level tagging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The implementation of an RFID checkpoint system in a low volume high flexibility assembly plant, aimed at tracking the flow of parts within the facility, was studied. A pilot revealed the suitability of the technology to ...

Koniski, Cyril (Cyril A.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Establishing an inventory management process to meet high customer service levels in a vaccines organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inventory management is a complex aspect of Supply Chain Management that is frequently discussed and debated due to the fact that it has a high impact on customer satisfaction as well as financial performance. This thesis ...

Wonsowicz, Johanna Christine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Measuring Unilateral Market Power in Wholesale Electricity Markets: The California Market 1998 - 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Californias Restructured Wholesale Electricity Market,Remedies for California Wholesale Electric Markets (IssuedUnilateral Market Power in Wholesale Electricity Markets:

Wolak, Frank

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Transparent Symmetric Active/Active Replication for Service-Level High Availability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As service-oriented architectures become more important in parallel and distributed computing systems, individual service instance reliability as well as appropriate service redundancy becomes an essential necessity in order to increase overall system availability. This paper focuses on providing redundancy strategies using service-level replication techniques. Based on previous research using symmetric active/active replication, this paper proposes a transparent symmetric active/active replication approach that allows for more reuse of code between individual service-level replication implementations by using a virtual communication layer. Service- and client-side interceptors are utilized in order to provide total transparency. Clients and servers are unaware of the replication infrastructure as it provides all necessary mechanisms internally.

Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Leangsuksun, Chokchai [Louisiana Tech University; He, X. [Tennessee Technological University

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A High-Performance Algorithm to Calculate Spin- and Parity-Dependent Nuclear Level Densities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new algorithm for calculating the spin- and parity-dependent shell model nuclear level densities using the moments method in the proton-neutron formalism is presented. A new, parallelized code based on this algorithm was developed and tested using up to 4000 cores for a set of nuclei from the sd-, pf-, and pf + g9/2 - model spaces. By comparing the nuclear level densities at low excitation energy for a given nucleus calculated in two model spaces, such as pf and pf + g9/2, one could estimate the ground state energy in the larger model space, which is not accessible to direct shell model calculations due to the unmanageable dimension. Examples for the ground state energies of for 64Ge and 68Se in the pf + g9/2 model space are presented.

R. A. Sen'kov; M. Horoi

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

319

A High-Performance Algorithm to Calculate Spin- and Parity-Dependent Nuclear Level Densities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new algorithm for calculating the spin- and parity-dependent shell model nuclear level densities using the moments method in the proton-neutron formalism is presented. A new, parallelized code based on this algorithm was developed and tested using up to 4000 cores for a set of nuclei from the sd-, pf-, and pf + g9/2 - model spaces. By comparing the nuclear level densities at low excitation energy for a given nucleus calculated in two model spaces, such as pf and pf + g9/2, one could estimate the ground state energy in the larger model space, which is not accessible to direct shell model calculations due to the unmanageable dimension. Examples for the ground state energies of for 64Ge and 68Se in the pf + g9/2 model space are presented.

Sen'kov, R A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

High level waste storage tanks 242-A evaporator standards/requirement identification document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, the Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RIDS) for the subject facility, represents the necessary and sufficient requirements to provide an adequate level of protection of the worker, public health and safety, and the environment. It lists those source documents from which requirements were extracted, and those requirements documents considered, but from which no requirements where taken. Documents considered as source documents included State and Federal Regulations, DOE Orders, and DOE Standards

Biebesheimer, E.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Biofuels Market Opportunities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 2CFostering Technology Adoption II: Expanding the Pathway to Market Biofuels Market Opportunities John Eichberger, Vice President Government Relations, National Association of Convenience Stores

322

Non-local Higgs actions: Tree-level electroweak constraints and high-energy unitarity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider electroweak symmetry breaking by a certain class of non-local Higgs sectors. Extending previous studies employing the Mandelstam condition, a straight Wilson line is used to make the Higgs action gauge invariant. We show the unitarization of vector-boson scattering for a wide class of non-local actions, but find that the Wilson-line model leads to tree-level corrections to electroweak precision observables, which restrict the parameter space of the model. We also find that Unhiggs models cannot address the hierarchy problem, once the parameters are expressed in terms of low-energy observables.

M. Beneke; P. Knechtges; A. Mck

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

323

Hydrostatic Level Sensors as High Precision Ground Motion Instrumentation for Tevatron and Other Energy Frontier Accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particle accelerators require very tight tolerances on the alignment and stability of their elements: magnets, accelerating cavities, vacuum chambers, etc. In this article we describe the Hydrostatic Level Sensors (HLS) for very low frequency measurements used in a variety of facilities at Fermilab. We present design features of the sensors, outline their technical parameters, describe their test and calibration procedures, discuss different regimes of operation and give few illustrative examples of the experimental data. Detail experimental results of the ground motion measurements with these detectors will be presented in subsequent papers.

Volk, James; Hansen, Sten; Johnson, Todd; Jostlein, Hans; Kiper, Terry; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Chupyra, Andrei; Kondaurov, Mikhail; Medvedko, Anatoly; Parkhomchuk, Vasily; Singatulin, Shavkat

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Survey of the degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidation and atmospheric corrosion data suggest that addition of Cr provides the greatest improvement in oxidation resistance. Cr-bearing cast irons are resistant to chloride environments and solutions containing strongly oxidizing constituents. Weathering steels, including high content and at least 0.04% Cu, appear to provide adequate resistance to oxidation under temperate conditions. However, data from long-term, high-temperature oxidation studies on weathering steels were not available. From the literature, it appears that the low alloy steels, plain carbon steels, cast steels, and cast irons con-ode at similar rates in an aqueous environment. Alloys containing more than 12% Cr or 36% Ni corrode at a lower rate than plain carbon steels, but pitting may be worse. Short term tests indicate that an alloy of 9Cr-1Mo may result in increased corrosion resistance, however long term data are not available. Austenitic cast irons show the best corrosion resistance. A ranking of total corrosion performance of the materials from most corrosion resistant to least corrosion resistant is: Austenitic Cast Iron; 12% Cr = 36% Ni = 9Cr-1Mo; Carbon Steel = Low Alloy Steels; and Cast Iron. Since the materials to be employed in the Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) waste package are considered to be corrosion allowance materials, the austenitic cast irons, high Cr steels, high Ni steels and the high Cr-Mo steels should not be considered as candidates for the outer containment barrier. Based upon the oxidation and corrosion data available for carbon steels, low alloy steels, and cast irons, a suitable list of candidate materials for a corrosion allowance outer barrier for an ACD waste package could include, A516, 2.25%Cr -- 1%Mo Steel, and A27.

Vinson, D.W.; Nutt, W.M.; Bullen, D.B. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Regions in Energy Market Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explores the different options for spatial resolution of an energy market model--and the advantages and disadvantages of models with fine spatial resolution. It examines different options for capturing spatial variations, considers the tradeoffs between them, and presents a few examples from one particular model that has been run at different levels of spatial resolution.

Short, W.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

High Performance Zero-Bleed CLSM/Grout Mixes for High-Level Waste Tank Closures Strategic Research and Development - FY99 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program, SRD-99-08, was to design and test suitable materials, which can be used to close high-level waste tanks at SRS. Fill materials can be designed to perform several functions including chemical stabilization and/or physical encapsulation of incidental waste so that the potential for transport of contaminants into the environment is reduced. Also they are needed to physically stabilize the void volume in the tanks to prevent/minimize future subsidence and inadvertent intrusion. The intent of this work was to develop a zero-bleed soil CLSM (ZBS-CLSM) and a zero-bleed concrete mix (ZBC) which meet the unique placement and stabilization/encapsulation requirements for high-level waste tank closures. These mixes in addition to the zero-bleed CLSM mixes formulated for closure of Tanks 17-F and 20-F provide design engineers with a suite of options for specifying materials for future tank closures.

Langton, C.A.

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

327

Materials performance in a high-level radioactive waste vitrification system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is a Department of Energy Facility designed to vitrify highly radioactive waste. An extensive materials evaluation program has been completed on key components in the DWPF after twelve months of operation using nonradioactive simulated wastes. Results of the visual inspections of the feed preparation system indicate that the system components, which were fabricated from Hastelloy C-276, should achieve their design lives. Significant erosion was observed on agitator blades that process glass frit slurries; however, design modifications should mitigate the erosion. Visual inspections of the DWPF melter top head and off gas components, which were fabricated from Inconel 690, indicated that varying degrees of degradation occurred. Most of the components will perform satisfactorily for their two year design life. The components that suffered significant attack were the borescopes, primary film cooler brush, and feed tubes. Changes in the operation of the film cooler brush and design modifications to the feed tubes and borescopes is expected to extend their service lives to two years. A program to investigate new high temperature engineered materials and alloys with improved oxidation and high temperature corrosion resistance will be initiated.

Imrich, K.J.; Chandler, G.T.

1996-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

328

Deployment of High Resolution Real-Time Distribution Level Metering on Maui: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to support the ongoing Maui Smart Grid demonstration project advanced metering has been deployed at the distribution transformer level in Maui Electric Company's Kihei Circuit on the Island of Maui. This equipment has been custom designed to provide accurately time-stamped Phasor and Power Quality data in real time. Additionally, irradiance sensors have been deployed at a few selected locations in proximity to photovoltaic (PV) installations. The received data is being used for validation of existing system models and for impact studies of future system hardware. Descriptions of the hardware and its installation, and some preliminary metering results are presented. Real-time circuit visualization applications for the data are also under development.

Bank, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Development of a High Resolution, Real Time, Distribution-Level Metering System and Associated Visualization, Modeling, and Data Analysis Functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL is developing measurement devices and a supporting data collection network specifically targeted at electrical distribution systems to support research in this area. This paper describes the measurement network which is designed to apply real-time and high speed (sub-second) measurement principles to distribution systems that are already common for the transmission level in the form of phasor measurement units and related technologies.

Bank, J.; Hambrick, J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Use of depleted uranium metal as cask shielding in high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE has amassed over 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium from its uranium enrichment operations. Rather than dispose of this depleted uranium as waste, this study explores a beneficial use of depleted uranium as metal shielding in casks designed to contain canisters of vitrified high-level waste. Two high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal shielded cask systems are analyzed. The first system employs a shielded storage and disposal cask having a separate reusable transportation overpack. The second system employs a shielded combined storage, transport, and disposal cask. Conceptual cask designs that hold 1, 3, 4 and 7 high-level waste canisters are described for both systems. In all cases, cask design feasibility was established and analyses indicate that these casks meet applicable thermal, structural, shielding, and contact-handled requirements. Depleted uranium metal casting, fabrication, environmental, and radiation compatibility considerations are discussed and found to pose no serious implementation problems. About one-fourth of the depleted uranium inventory would be used to produce the casks required to store and dispose of the nearly 15,400 high-level waste canisters that would be produced. This study estimates the total-system cost for the preferred 7-canister storage and disposal configuration having a separate transportation overpack would be $6.3 billion. When credits are taken for depleted uranium disposal cost, a cost that would be avoided if depleted uranium were used as cask shielding material rather than disposed of as waste, total system net costs are between $3.8 billion and $5.5 billion.

Yoshimura, H.R.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; McAllaster, M.E. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A postmortem assessment of environmental compliance of a high-level radioactive waste repository, Hanford Site, Washington  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the engineered barrier and the accessible environment. The concept of geochemical retarda'tion has been analyzed by Domenico et al. (1988) from a regulatory point of view and the following discussion is a summary of their work. As discussed previously, a...A POSTMORTEM ASSESSMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE OF A HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORY, HANFORD SITE, WASHINGTON A Thesis by RUDOLF HARALD WILHELM PETRINI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A & M University in partial...

Petrini, Rudolf Harald Wilhelm

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

The impact of a deregulated European electricity market on Volvo in Sweden  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The member countries within the European Union (EU) have agreed to open all national electricity markets for competition, starting January 1, 1999. The electricity market in Sweden is deregulated since January 1, 1996. The deregulation of the electricity markets will gradually shift the electricity price levels in different countries towards an equal price level, which will most likely be close to the levels on the Continental Europe. A deregulated European electricity market may change the competition situation for Swedish industries dramatically. The capacity in electric generation with low operating costs in Sweden has led to very low electricity prices and high usage level compared to other EU countries. The consumption level of electric energy per capita is nearly three times higher in Sweden than the average per capita EU usage. The high level of electricity consumption is typical also of industrial customers in Sweden. Studies of Volvo Car Corporation have shown that the Volvo car plant in Torslanda, Sweden utilizes substantially more electric energy per manufactured car than the Volvo car plant in Gent, Belgium. A method is developed to transform the Torslanda plant from a low energy efficiency state to a higher energy efficiency state by modeling. The method is based on the Life Cycle Cost (LCC) concept and includes optimization models of the two plants with mixed integer linear programming (MILP).

Dag, S.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VC i (q): generator i ? I convex piecewise-linear variablegenerators in the power market is evaluated using a simplified, linearthat treats generators as a continuous resource (i.e. linear

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

ALPHN: A computer program for calculating ([alpha], n) neutron production in canisters of high-level waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rate of neutron production from ([alpha], n) reactions in canisters of immobilized high-level waste containing borosilicate glass or glass-ceramic compositions is significant and must be considered when estimating neutron shielding requirements. The personal computer program ALPHA calculates the ([alpha], n) neutron production rate of a canister of vitrified high-level waste. The user supplies the chemical composition of the glass or glass-ceramic and the curies of the alpha-emitting actinides present. The output of the program gives the ([alpha], n) neutron production of each actinide in neutrons per second and the total for the canister. The ([alpha], n) neutron production rates are source terms only; that is, they are production rates within the glass and do not take into account the shielding effect of the glass. For a given glass composition, the user can calculate up to eight cases simultaneously; these cases are based on the same glass composition but contain different quantities of actinides per canister. In a typical application, these cases might represent the same canister of vitrified high-level waste at eight different decay times. Run time for a typical problem containing 20 chemical species, 24 actinides, and 8 decay times was 35 s on an IBM AT personal computer. Results of an example based on an expected canister composition at the Defense Waste Processing Facility are shown.

Salmon, R.; Hermann, O.W.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

ALPHN: A computer program for calculating ({alpha}, n) neutron production in canisters of high-level waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rate of neutron production from ({alpha}, n) reactions in canisters of immobilized high-level waste containing borosilicate glass or glass-ceramic compositions is significant and must be considered when estimating neutron shielding requirements. The personal computer program ALPHA calculates the ({alpha}, n) neutron production rate of a canister of vitrified high-level waste. The user supplies the chemical composition of the glass or glass-ceramic and the curies of the alpha-emitting actinides present. The output of the program gives the ({alpha}, n) neutron production of each actinide in neutrons per second and the total for the canister. The ({alpha}, n) neutron production rates are source terms only; that is, they are production rates within the glass and do not take into account the shielding effect of the glass. For a given glass composition, the user can calculate up to eight cases simultaneously; these cases are based on the same glass composition but contain different quantities of actinides per canister. In a typical application, these cases might represent the same canister of vitrified high-level waste at eight different decay times. Run time for a typical problem containing 20 chemical species, 24 actinides, and 8 decay times was 35 s on an IBM AT personal computer. Results of an example based on an expected canister composition at the Defense Waste Processing Facility are shown.

Salmon, R.; Hermann, O.W.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Thermal and Radiolytic Gas Generation in Hanford High-Level Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 177 underground storage tanks containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Some of these wastes are known to generate and retain large quantities of flammable gases consisting of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Because these gases are flammable and have the potential for rapid release, the gas generation rate for each tank must be determined to establish the flammability hazard (Johnson et al. 1997). An understanding of gas generation is important to operation of the waste tanks for several reasons. First, knowledge of the overall rate of generation is needed to verify that any given tank has sufficient ventilation to ensure that flammable gases are maintained at a safe level within the dome space. Understanding the mechanisms for production of the various gases is important so that future waste operations do not create conditions that promote the production of hydrogen, ammonia, and nitrous oxide. Studying the generation of gases also provides important data for the composition of the gas mixture, which in turn is needed to assess the flammability characteristics. Finally, information about generation of gases, including the influence of various chemical constituents, temperature, and dose, would aid in assessing the future behavior of the waste during interim storage, implementation of controls, and final waste treatment. This paper summarizes the current knowledge of gas generation pathways and discusses models used in predicting gas generation rates from actual Hanford radioactive wastes. A comparison is made between measured gas generation rates and rates by the predictive models.

Bryan, Samuel A.; Pederson, Larry R.; King, C. M.

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Building the institutional capacity for managing commercial high-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In July 1981, the Office of Nuclear Waste Management of the Department of Energy contracted with the National Academy of Public Administration for a study of institutional issues associated with the commercial radioactive waste management program. The two major sets of issues which the Academy was asked to investigate were (1) intergovernmental relationships, how federal, state, local and Indian tribal council governments relate to each other in the planning and implementation of a waste management program, and (2) interagency relationships, how the federal agencies with major responsibilities in this public policy arena interact with each other. The objective of the study was to apply the perspectives of public administration to a difficult and controversial question - how to devise and execute an effective waste management program workable within the constraints of the federal system. To carry out this task, the Academy appointed a panel composed of individuals whose background and experience would provide the several types of knowledge essential to the effort. The findings of this panel are presented along with the executive summary. The report consists of a discussion of the search for a radioactive waste management strategy, and an analysis of the two major groups of institutional issues: (1) intergovernmental, the relationship between the three major levels of government; and (2) interagency, the relationships between the major federal agencies having responsibility for the waste management program.

None

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Price distortions in the commodity futures markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Speculation is not monolithic; it comes in many forms. A certain level of speculation is required for commodity futures markets to function. On the other hand, certain types of trading activities by speculators may damage ...

Helfrich, Devin B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Power System Security in Market Clearing and Dispatch Mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

congestion" levels, which have a direct effect on market transactions and energy prices. Thus, when result in curtailment of power transactions and increased prices for most market participants. System1 Power System Security in Market Clearing and Dispatch Mechanisms Claudio A. Ca~nizares, Senior

Cañizares, Claudio A.

340

Chapter 4. Participating in Markets for Electrical Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4. Participating in Markets for Electrical Energy 1 #12;Previously: we have discussed on the wholesale market and sell it a fixed price at the retail level. The quantity-weighted average price at which the basic principles of electricity markets. Now: we discuss the decisions that generators, consumers

Ernst, Damien

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Obligation Sharing, and Energy Markets on Mitigating Ramping2). In regions with fast energy markets (~5 minute real timebeing faced with high energy market prices if they do not

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Reactor Testing and Qualification: Prioritized High-level Criticality Testing Needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were tasked with reviewing possible criticality testing needs to support development of the fission surface power system reactor design. Reactor physics testing can provide significant information to aid in development of technologies associated with small, fast spectrum reactors that could be applied for non-terrestrial power systems, leading to eventual system qualification. Several studies have been conducted in recent years to assess the data and analyses required to design and build a space fission power system with high confidence that the system will perform as designed [Marcille, 2004a, 2004b; Weaver, 2007; Parry et al., 2008]. This report will provide a summary of previous critical tests and physics measurements that are potentially applicable to the current reactor design (both those that have been benchmarked and those not yet benchmarked), summarize recent studies of potential nuclear testing needs for space reactor development and their applicability to the current baseline fission surface power (FSP) system design, and provide an overview of a suite of tests (separate effects, sub-critical or critical) that could fill in the information database to improve the accuracy of physics modeling efforts as the FSP design is refined. Some recommendations for tasks that could be completed in the near term are also included. Specific recommendations on critical test configurations will be reserved until after the sensitivity analyses being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are completed (due August 2011).

S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner; G. Harms; S. Bailey

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Optimization of time-based rates in forward energy markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a new two-step design approach of Time-Based Rate (TBR) programs for markets with a high penetration of variable energy sources such as wind power. First, an optimal market time horizon must be determined ...

Wang, J.

344

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors

Lawrence, C B

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

A Low-Tech, Low-Budget Storage Solution for High Level Radioactive Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for safe, secure, and economical storage of radioactive material becomes increasingly important as beneficial uses of radioactive material expand (increases inventory), as political instability rises (increases threat), and as final disposal and treatment facilities are delayed (increases inventory and storage duration). Several vendor-produced storage casks are available for this purpose but are often costly due to the required design, analyses, and licensing costs. Thus the relatively high costs of currently accepted storage solutions may inhibit substantial improvements in safety and security that might otherwise be achieved. This is particularly true in areas of the world where the economic and/or the regulatory infrastructure may not provide the means and/or the justification for such an expense. This paper considers a relatively low-cost, low-technology radioactive material storage solution. The basic concept consists of a simple shielded storage container that can be fabricated locally using a steel pipe and a corrugated steel culvert as forms enclosing a concrete annulus. Benefits of such a system include 1) a low-tech solution that utilizes materials and skills available virtually anywhere in the world, 2) a readily scalable design that easily adapts to specific needs such as the geometry and radioactivity of the source term material), 3) flexible placement allows for free-standing above-ground or in-ground (i.e., below grade or bermed) installation, 4) the ability for future relocation without direct handling of sources, and 5) a long operational lifetime . Le mieux est lennemi du bien (translated: The best is the enemy of good) applies to the management of radioactive materials particularly where the economic and/or regulatory justification for additional investment is lacking. Development of a low-cost alternative that considerably enhances safety and security may lead to a greater overall risk reduction than insisting on solutions that remain economically and/or politically out of reach.

Brett Carlsen; Ted Reed; Todd Johnson; John Weathersby; Joe Alexander; Dave Griffith; Douglas Hamelin

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Markets for small-scale, advanced coal-combustion technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the potential of using US-developed advanced coal technologies (ACTs) for small combustors in foreign markets; in particular, the market potentials of the member countries of the Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) were determined. First, the United States and those OECD countries with very low energy demands were eliminated. The remaining 15 countries were characterized on the basis of eight factors that would influence their decision to use US ACTs: energy plan and situation, dependence on oil and gas imports, experience with coal, residential/commercial energy demand, industrial energy demand, trade relationship with the United States, level of domestic competition with US ACT manufacturers, and environmental pressure to use advanced technology. Each country was rated high, medium-high, low-medium, or low on each factor, based on statistical and other data. The ratings were then used to group the countries in terms of their relative market potential (good, good but with impediments, or limited). The best potential markets appear to be Spain, Italy, turkey, Greece, and Canada. 25 refs., 1 fig., 37 tabs.

Placet, M.; Kenkeremath, L.D.; Streets, D.G.; Dials, G.E.; Kern, D.M.; Nehring, J.L.; Szpunar, C.B.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

PREPARING URBAN STUDENTS FOR COLLEGE-LEVEL WRITING: A NARRATIVE INQUIRY AND SPATIAL ANALYSIS OF TWO HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH TEACHERS' PROFESSIONAL KNOWLEDGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This qualitative study was a narrative inquiry (Clandinin & Connelly, 2006) into the storied landscapes of high school teachers' experiences and knowledge as they prepared their urban high school students for college level ...

Burdick, Melanie Nichole

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

348

Market Power in California's Gasoline Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Price Study Kayser, Hilke A. , 2000. Gasoline Demand andCar Choice: Estimating Gasoline Demand Using HouseholdIN GASOLINE MARKETS.

Borenstein, Severin; Bushnell, James; Lewis, Matthew

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Estimating market potential for reducing customer peak loads through photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past studies have quantified photovoltaics` (PV) peak load matching capability on a utility-wide scale. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the number of utility subloads (e.g., customers, substations) whose peak loads are well matched with solar availability. A simple tool based on the utility scale load-PV match is developed to estimate the market size of customer scale PV applications with high load-PV matches. Illustrative examples of customer owned PV economics are also provided. The authors show that (1) the market size of high load matching PV applications on the subload scale is significant even within utility systems whose load requirements are not particularly well matched with PV output; and (2) the cost of PV as a peak shaving resource for utility customers is approaching competitive levels.

Bryan, J. [Citizens Advisory Panel, Central Islip, NY (United States); Perez, R. [Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Propane Market Outlook Assessment of Key Market Trends, Threats...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

markets have become more pronounced. 2 2010 Propane Market Outlook Update 1 Introduction Energy markets are changing at an unprecedented pace. These changes have had dramatic...

351

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparisons based on levelized cost of energy (LCOE)). AUnserved Energy Levelized cost of energy Loss of loadmetrics like the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) or the cost

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Applications of Nash Equilibria In Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

customers in smaller quantities on the retail electricity market. #12;Clearing Price Auctions determine in the stack, while high price offers are promising during peak demand. The electricity price is thereforeApplications of Nash Equilibria In Electricity Markets Term Paper Seminar Electrical Power Networks

Lavaei, Javad

353

Preliminary Waste Form Compliance Plan for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory High-Level Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has specific technical and documentation requirements for high-level waste (HLW) that is to be placed in a federal repository. This document describes in general terms the strategy to be used at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that vitrified HLW, if produced at the INEEL, meets these requirements. Waste form, canister, quality assurance, and documentation specifications are discussed. Compliance strategy is given, followed by an overview of how this strategy would be implemented for each specification.

B. A. Staples; T. P. O'Holleran

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Comments on a paper tilted `The sea transport of vitrified high-level radioactive wastes: Unresolved safety issues`  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cited paper estimates the consequences that might occur should a purpose-built ship transporting Vitrified High Level Waste (VHLW) be involved in a severe collision that causes the VHLW canisters in one Type-B package to spill onto the floor of a major ocean fishing region. Release of radioactivity from VHLW glass logs, failure of elastomer cask seals, failure of VHLW canisters due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and the probabilities of the hypothesized accident scenario, of catastrophic cask failure, and of cask recovery from the sea are all discussed.

Sprung, J.L.; McConnell, P.E.; Nigrey, P.J.; Ammerman, D.J. [and others

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

High-Performance Algorithm for Calculating Non-Spurious Spin- and Parity-Dependent Nuclear Level Densities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new high-performance algorithm for calculating the spin- and parity-dependent shell model nuclear level densities using methods of statistical spectroscopy in the proton-neutron formalism was recently proposed. When used in valence spaces that cover more than one major harmonic oscillator shell, this algorithm mixes the genuine intrinsic states with spurious center-of-mass excitations. In this paper we present an advanced algorithm, based on the recently proposed statistical moments method, that eliminates the spurious states. Results for unnatural parity states of several sd-shell nuclei are presented and compared with those of exact shell model calculations and experimental data.

R. A. Sen'kov; M. Horoi; V. G. Zelevinsky

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

356

High-Performance Algorithm for Calculating Non-Spurious Spin- and Parity-Dependent Nuclear Level Densities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new high-performance algorithm for calculating the spin- and parity-dependent shell model nuclear level densities using methods of statistical spectroscopy in the proton-neutron formalism was recently proposed. When used in valence spaces that cover more than one major harmonic oscillator shell, this algorithm mixes the genuine intrinsic states with spurious center-of-mass excitations. In this paper we present an advanced algorithm, based on the recently proposed statistical moments method, that eliminates the spurious states. Results for unnatural parity states of several sd-shell nuclei are presented and compared with those of exact shell model calculations and experimental data.

Sen'kov, R A; Zelevinsky, V G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Development of integraded mechanistically-based degradation-mode models for performance assessment of high-level waste containers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-tayer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 825, 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as A516 Gr 55 or Monel 400. At the present time, Alloy C- 22 and A516 Gr 55 are favored.

Farmer, J. C., LLNL

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Intellectual Property for Market Innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rents Market Innovation Parameter Gross social benefit Lowour model. Market Innovation Figure 6: Social benefit whererights for market innovations can increase social welfare by

Duffy, John F; Abramawitz, Micheal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

2012 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study. Regions with fast energy markets, for example, mightdevelopment of an Energy Imbalance Market that would beginreal-time energy imbalance market providing centralized,

Wiser, Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study. Regions with fast energy markets, for example, changeis set aside in one energy market interval is then releasedto be dispatched in a later energy market interval, whereas

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Technologies Market Report References Acker, T. 2007.Industry Annual Market Report: Year Ending 2009. Washington,AWEA Mid-Year 2010 Market Report. Washington, DC: American

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

2012 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado: Xcel Energy. 2012 Wind Technologies Market ReportOperator. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report Chadbourne &Power Company. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report EnerNex

Wiser, Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Adapted from Chappell et al., [1999]. For an exception, see Turner & Turner, [1998], which describes a high level multi-agent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of their environment than how individualagent bodies interact with the medium in which they move. This means describes a high level multi-agent simulator called CoDA. 1 An Environment for High-Level Multiple AUV environment for multiple distributedinteractingVIPs. Fundamentalto the CADCON idea is the notionthat

364

A One System Integrated Approach to Simulant Selection for Hanford High Level Waste Mixing and Sampling Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capabilities using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This represents one of the largest remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. Previous testing has focused on very specific TOC or WTP test objectives and consequently the simulants were narrowly focused on those test needs. A key attribute in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2010-2 is to ensure testing is performed with a simulant that represents the broad spectrum of Hanford waste. The One System Integrated Project Team is a new joint TOC and WTP organization intended to ensure technical integration of specific TOC and WTP systems and testing. A new approach to simulant definition has been mutually developed that will meet both TOC and WTP test objectives for the delivery and receipt of HLW. The process used to identify critical simulant characteristics, incorporate lessons learned from previous testing, and identify specific simulant targets that ensure TOC and WTP testing addresses the broad spectrum of Hanford waste characteristics that are important to mixing, sampling, and transfer performance are described.

Thien, Mike G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Barnes, Steve M. [URS, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

A One System Integrated Approach to Simulant Selection for Hanford High Level Waste Mixing and Sampling Tests - 13342  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capabilities using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This represents one of the largest remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. Previous testing has focused on very specific TOC or WTP test objectives and consequently the simulants were narrowly focused on those test needs. A key attribute in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2010-2 is to ensure testing is performed with a simulant that represents the broad spectrum of Hanford waste. The One System Integrated Project Team is a new joint TOC and WTP organization intended to ensure technical integration of specific TOC and WTP systems and testing. A new approach to simulant definition has been mutually developed that will meet both TOC and WTP test objectives for the delivery and receipt of HLW. The process used to identify critical simulant characteristics, incorporate lessons learned from previous testing, and identify specific simulant targets that ensure TOC and WTP testing addresses the broad spectrum of Hanford waste characteristics that are important to mixing, sampling, and transfer performance are described. (authors)

Thien, Mike G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O Box 850, Richland WA, 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O Box 850, Richland WA, 99352 (United States); Barnes, Steve M. [Waste Treatment Plant, 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland WA 99354 (United States)] [Waste Treatment Plant, 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland WA 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

RECENT PROCESS AND EQUIPMENT IMPROVEMENTS TO INCREASE HIGH LEVEL WASTE THROUGHPUT AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began stabilizing high level waste (HLW) in a glass matrix in 1996. Over the past few years, there have been several process and equipment improvements at the DWPF to increase the rate at which the high level waste can be stabilized. These improvements have either directly increased waste processing rates or have desensitized the process to upsets, thereby minimizing downtime and increasing production. Improvements due to optimization of waste throughput with increased HLW loading of the glass resulted in a 6% waste throughput increase based upon operational efficiencies. Improvements in canister production include the pour spout heated bellows liner (5%), glass surge (siphon) protection software (2%), melter feed pump software logic change to prevent spurious interlocks of the feed pump with subsequent dilution of feed stock (2%) and optimization of the steam atomized scrubber (SAS) operation to minimize downtime (3%) for a total increase in canister production of 12%. A number of process recovery efforts have allowed continued operation. These include the off gas system pluggage and restoration, slurry mix evaporator (SME) tank repair and replacement, remote cleaning of melter top head center nozzle, remote melter internal inspection, SAS pump J-Tube recovery, inadvertent pour scenario resolutions, dome heater transformer bus bar cooling water leak repair and new Infra-red camera for determination of glass height in the canister are discussed.

Odriscoll, R; Allan Barnes, A; Jim Coleman, J; Timothy Glover, T; Robert Hopkins, R; Dan Iverson, D; Jeff Leita, J

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Relative yields of U-235 fission products measured in a high level radioactive sludge at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at Savannah River Site. The 42 fision products make up 98% of the waste sludge. We used inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for the analysis. The relative yields for most of the fission products are in complete agreement with the known relative yields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. Disagreements can be reconciled based on the chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses. This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 (98%) of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at the Savannah River Site. We analyzed the sludge with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy. The relative yields for most of the fission products agree completely with the known relative vields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric: branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. The chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses explain the differences in the measured and calculated results.

Bibler, N.E.; Coleman, C.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Kinard, W.F. [Charleston Coll., SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Relative yields of U-235 fission products measured in a high level radioactive sludge at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at Savannah River Site. The 42 fision products make up 98% of the waste sludge. We used inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for the analysis. The relative yields for most of the fission products are in complete agreement with the known relative yields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. Disagreements can be reconciled based on the chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses. This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 (98%) of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at the Savannah River Site. We analyzed the sludge with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy. The relative yields for most of the fission products agree completely with the known relative vields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric: branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. The chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses explain the differences in the measured and calculated results.

Bibler, N.E.; Coleman, C.J. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Kinard, W.F. (Charleston Coll., SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Design and operating features of the high-level waste vitrification system for the West Valley demonstration project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A liquid-fed joule-heated ceramic melter system is the reference process for immobilization of the high-level liquid waste in the US and several foreign countries. This system has been under development for over ten years at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and other national laboratories operated for the US Department of Energy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory contributed to this research through its Nuclear Waste Treatment Program and used applicable data to design and test melters and related systems using remote handling of simulated radioactive wastes. This report describes the equipment designed in support of the high-level waste vitrification program at West Valley, New York. Pacific Northwest Laboratory worked closely with West Valley Nuclear Services Company to design a liquid-fed ceramic melter, a liquid waste preparation and feed tank and pump, an off-gas treatment scrubber, and an enclosed turntable for positioning the waste canisters. Details of these designs are presented including the rationale for the design features and the alternatives considered.

Siemens, D.H.; Beary, M.M.; Barnes, S.M.; Berger, D.N.; Brouns, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.; Jones, R.M.; Peters, R.D.; Peterson, M.E.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Indirect Learning: How Emerging- Market Firms Grow in Developed Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-market competitors such as Nokia- Siemens Networks (operating in China). Drawing on these arguments, we hypothesize the following: H2a: Emerging-market firms that have greater exposure to developed-market competitors in their domestic market exhibit greater...

Banerjee, Sourindra; Prabhu, Jaideep C.; Chandy, Rajesh K.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Understanding Competitive Pricing and Market Power in Wholesale Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Market Power in Wholesale Electricity Markets SeverinM a r k e t Power i n Wholesale Electricity Markets Severinthe competitiveness of the wholesale electricity market i n

Borenstein, Severin

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Developing a Marketing Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing a good marketing plan will help you identify and quantify costs, set price goals, determine potential price outlook, examine production and price risk, and develop a strategy for marketing your crop. This publication describes...

Bevers, Stan; Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; McCorkle, Dean

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

373

Marketing alternative fueled automobiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marketing alternative fueled vehicles is a difficult challenge for automakers. The foundation of the market, the terms of competition, and the customer segments involved are still being defined. But automakers can draw ...

Zheng, Alex (Yi Alexis)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

From the flea market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is about marketplaces in general, and one flea market in particular. It explores some of the physical potentials the market has for generating a building and some of the social implications of a controversy ...

Krasnow, Ariel Rebecca

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Essays in incomplete markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis studies the macroeconomics of incomplete markets. Chapter 1 studies the effects of capital taxation in a dynamic heterogeneous-agent economy with uninsurable entrepreneurial risk. Unlike either the complete-markets ...

Panousi, Vasia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Measuring Market Inefficiencies in California's Restructured Wholesale Electricity Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behavior In Califor- nia's Wholesale Electricity Marketin deregu- lated wholesale electricity markets," RANDin Californias Restructured Wholesale Electricity Market

Borenstein, Severin; Bushnell, Jim; Wolak, Frank A.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Market behavior under partial price controls: the case of the retail gasoline market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of firm-specific controls on the price of gasoline during 1979 and 1980, at both the wholesale and the retail level, dramatically affected the retail market for gasoline. The most visible effect was a diversity of monetary prices across service stations within particular retail market areas. Price could no longer play its usual role in clearing the retail market for gasoline. Queues and other changes in quality of service at stations arose to maintain the balance of market demand and supply. This report examines the behavior of an otherwise competitive market in the presence of such regulation-induced nonprice phenomena. In such a market, consumers consider both monetary prices and costs imposed by queues in deciding where to buy gasoline and how much to buy. Using a price-theoretic model of behavior, this paper predicts how various changes in effective price regulation affect consumers. 14 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

Camm, F.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Some Materials Degradation Issues in the U.S. High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository Study (The Yucca Mountain Project)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safe disposal of radioactive waste requires that the waste be isolated from the environment until radioactive decay has reduced its toxicity to innocuous levels for plants, animals, and humans. All of the countries currently studying the options for disposing of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) have selected deep geologic formations to be the primary barrier for accomplishing this isolation. In U.S.A., the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) designated Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the potential site to be characterized for high-level nuclear waste (HLW) disposal. Long-term containment of waste and subsequent slow release of radionuclides into the geosphere will rely on a system of natural and engineered barriers including a robust waste containment design. The waste package design consists of a highly corrosion resistant Ni-based Alloy 22 cylindrical barrier surrounding a Type 316 stainless steel inner structural vessel. The waste package is covered by a mailbox-shaped drip shield composed primarily of Ti Grade 7 with Ti Grade 24 structural support members. The U.S. Yucca Mountain Project has been studying and modeling the degradation issues of the relevant materials for some 20 years. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation processes based on the past 20 years studies on Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) materials degradation issues with focus on interaction between the in-drift environmental conditions and long-term materials degradation of waste packages and drip shields within the repository system during the 10,000 years regulatory period. This paper provides an overview of the current understanding of the likely degradation behavior of the waste package and drip shield in the repository after the permanent closure of the facility. The degradation scenario discussed in this paper include aging and phase instability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen induced cracking of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys. The effects of microbial activity and radiation on degradation of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys are also discussed. Further, for titanium alloys, the effects of fluorides, bromides, calcium ions, and galvanic coupling to less noble metals are further considered. It is concluded that, as far as materials degradation is concerned, the materials and design adopted in the U.S. Yucca Mountain Project will provide sufficient safety margins within the 10,000-years regulatory period.

F. Hua; P. Pasupathi; N. Brown; K. Mon

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

379

Mergers in the GB Electricity Market: effects on Retail Charges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-efficiency as variables relating to price and profitability. The retail electricity market is a case in point, as highMergers in the GB Electricity Market: effects on Retail Charges N° 2006-08 Mai 2006 Evens SALIES OFCE hal-00972962,version1-3Apr2014 #12;Mergers in the GB Electricity Market: effects on Retail Charges

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

380

Approximate hedging problem with transaction costs in stochastic volatility markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approximate hedging problem with transaction costs in stochastic volatility markets Thai Huu Nguyen stochastic volatility markets with transaction costs using a new form for enlarged volatility in Leland between the present setting and high frequency markets with transaction costs. Possibilities to improve

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Market dynamics driven by the decisionmaking power producers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the market place. The market clearing mechanism is based on the locational marginal price scheme. A model. In such a case, the prices at the nodes of the network reflect the marginal cost of production and the marginal inspiration for restructuring electricity systems is to achieve highly competitive markets with prices close

Tesfatsion, Leigh

382

CSEM WP 117 Vertical Integration in Restructured Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Markets (CSEM) Working Paper Series. CSEM is a program of the University of California Energy Institute wholesale elec- tricity markets in several U.S. states and in other countries. Policy makers believed producers' interest in setting high prices: Producers sell into the wholesale market and also are required

California at Berkeley. University of

383

Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many countries--reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems--are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy (RE) on the grid. Australia (South Australia), Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Spain, and the United States (Colorado and Texas), for example, have effectively integrated variable RE utilizing diverse approaches. Analysis of the results from these case studies reveals a wide range of mechanisms that can be used to accommodate high penetrations of variable RE (e.g., from new market designs to centralized planning). Nevertheless, the myriad approaches collectively suggest that governments can best enable variable RE grid integration by implementing best practices in five areas of intervention: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations.

Not Available

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

May market review. [Spot market prices for uranium (1993)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven uranium transactions totalling nearly three million pounds equivalent U3O8 were reported during May, but only two, totalling less than 200 thousand pounds equivalent U3O8, involved concentrates. As no discretionary buying occurred during the month, and as near-term supply and demand were in relative balance, prices were steady, while both buyers and sellers appeared to be awaiting some new market development to signal the direction of future spot-market prices. The May 31, 1993, Exchange Value and the Restricted American market Penalty (RAMP) for concentrates were both unchanged at $7.10, and $2.95 per pound U3O8, respectively. NUEXCO's judgement was that transactions for significant quantities of uranium concentrates that were both deliverable in and intended for consumption in the USA could have been concluded on May 31 at $10.05 per pound U3O8. Two near-term concentrate transactions were reported in which one US utility purchased less than 200 thousand pounds equivalent U3O8 from two separate sellers. These sales occurred at price levels at or near the May 31 Exchange Value plus RAMP. No long-term uranium transactions were reported during May. Consequently, the UF6 Value decreased $0.20 to $24.30 per kgU as UF6, reflecting some weakening of the UF6 market outside the USA.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

Huber, Heinz J.

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

386

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator standards/requirements identification document (S/RID), Vol. 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Requirements Identification Document (RID) describes an Occupational Health and Safety Program as defined through the Relevant DOE Orders, regulations, industry codes/standards, industry guidance documents and, as appropriate, good industry practice. The definition of an Occupational Health and Safety Program as specified by this document is intended to address Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendations 90-2 and 91-1, which call for the strengthening of DOE complex activities through the identification and application of relevant standards which supplement or exceed requirements mandated by DOE Orders. This RID applies to the activities, personnel, structures, systems, components, and programs involved in maintaining the facility and executing the mission of the High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Seismic design and evaluation guidelines for the Department of Energy high-level waste storage tanks and appurtenances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides guidelines for the design and evaluation of underground high-level waste storage tanks due to seismic loads. Attempts were made to reflect the knowledge acquired in the last two decades in the areas of defining the ground motion and calculating hydrodynamic loads and dynamic soil pressures for underground tank structures. The application of the analysis approach is illustrated with an example. The guidelines are developed for specific design of underground storage tanks, namely double-shell structures. However, the methodology discussed is applicable for other types of tank structures as well. The application of these and of suitably adjusted versions of these concepts to other structural types will be addressed in a future version of this document.

Bandyopadhyay, K.; Cornell, A.; Costantino, C.; Kennedy, R.; Miller, C.; Veletsos, A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Preliminary total-system analysis of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The placement of high-level radioactive wastes in mined repositories deep underground is considered a disposal method that would effectively isolate these wastes from the environment for long periods of time. This report describes modeling performed at PNL for Yucca Mountain between May and November 1991 addressing the performance of the entire repository system related to regulatory criteria established by the EPA in 40 CFR Part 191. The geologic stratigraphy and material properties used in this study were chosen in cooperation with performance assessment modelers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Sandia modeled a similar problem using different computer codes and a different modeling philosophy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory performed a few model runs with very complex models, and SNL performed many runs with much simpler (abstracted) models.

Eslinger, P.W.; Doremus, L.A.; Engel, D.W.; Miley, T.B.; Murphy, M.T.; Nichols, W.E.; White, M.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Langford, D.W.; Ouderkirk, S.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

PHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF VITREOUS STATE LABORATORY AY102/C106 AND AZ102 HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER FEED SIMULANTS (U)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to characterize and report specified physical properties and pH of simulant high level waste (HLW) melter feeds (MF) processed through the scaled melters at Vitreous State Laboratories (VSL). The HLW MF simulants characterized are VSL AZ102 straight hydroxide melter feed, VSL AZ102 straight hydroxide rheology adjusted melter feed, VSL AY102/C106 straight hydroxide melter feed, VSL AY102/C106 straight hydroxide rheology adjusted melter feed, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) AY102/C106 precipitated hydroxide processed sludge blended with glass former chemicals at VSL to make melter feed. The physical properties and pH were characterized using the methods stated in the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) characterization procedure (Ref. 7).

Hansen, E

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

A guide for the ASME code for austenitic stainless steel containment vessels for high-level radioactive materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and fabrication criteria recommended by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for high-level radioactive materials containment vessels used in packaging is found in Section III, Division 1, Subsection NB of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. This Code provides material, design, fabrication, examination, and testing specifications for nuclear power plant components. However, many of the requirements listed in the Code are not applicable to containment vessels made from austenitic stainless steel with austenitic or ferritic steel bolting. Most packaging designers, engineers, and fabricators are intimidated by the sheer volume of requirements contained in the Code; consequently, the Code is not always followed and many requirements that do apply are often overlooked during preparation of the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) that constitutes the basis to evaluate the packaging for certification.

Raske, D.T.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Market review - Market values summary/October market review/current market data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article is the October 1995 uranium market summary. In this reporting period, there were four transactions in the natural uranium market, no activity in the spot UF6 market, no activity in the spot conversion market, and only a single activity in the enrichment services market. Spot uranium volume dropped sharply, and active uranium supply rose. The rise in demand, however, more than offset this increase. Unrestricted exchange prices rose slightly, as did the unrestricted UF6 value. All other prices remained steady.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Performance of the online track reconstruction and impact on hadronic triggers at the CMS High Level Trigger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The trigger systems of the LHC detectors play a crucial role in determining the physics capabilities of the experiments. A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with the detector readout, offline storage and analysis capabilities. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level 1 (L1) Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS reconstruction and analysis software running on a computer farm. The software-base HLT requires a trade-off between the complexity of the algorithms, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. This is going to be even more challenging during Run II, with a higher centre-of-mass energy, a higher instantaneous luminosity and pileup, and the impact of out-of-time pileup due to the 25 ns bunch spacing. The online algorithms need to be optimised for such a complex environment in order to keep the output rate under control without impacting the physics efficiency of the online selection. Tracking, for instance, will play an even more important role in the event reconstruction. In this poster we will present the performance of the online track and vertex reconstruction algorithms, and their impact on the hadronic triggers that make use of b-tagging and of jets reconstructed with the Particle Flow technique. We will show the impact of these triggers on physics performance of the experiment, and the latest plans for improvements in view of the Run II data taking in 2015.

Valentina Gori

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

393

Electronic couplings for molecular charge transfer: Benchmarking CDFT, FODFT, and FODFTB against high-level ab initio calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a database (HAB11) of electronic coupling matrix elements (H{sub ab}) for electron transfer in 11 ?-conjugated organic homo-dimer cations. High-level ab inito calculations at the multireference configuration interaction MRCI+Q level of theory, n-electron valence state perturbation theory NEVPT2, and (spin-component scaled) approximate coupled cluster model (SCS)-CC2 are reported for this database to assess the performance of three DFT methods of decreasing computational cost, including constrained density functional theory (CDFT), fragment-orbital DFT (FODFT), and self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding (FODFTB). We find that the CDFT approach in combination with a modified PBE functional containing 50% Hartree-Fock exchange gives best results for absolute H{sub ab} values (mean relative unsigned error = 5.3%) and exponential distance decay constants ? (4.3%). CDFT in combination with pure PBE overestimates couplings by 38.7% due to a too diffuse excess charge distribution, whereas the economic FODFT and highly cost-effective FODFTB methods underestimate couplings by 37.6% and 42.4%, respectively, due to neglect of interaction between donor and acceptor. The errors are systematic, however, and can be significantly reduced by applying a uniform scaling factor for each method. Applications to dimers outside the database, specifically rotated thiophene dimers and larger acenes up to pentacene, suggests that the same scaling procedure significantly improves the FODFT and FODFTB results for larger ?-conjugated systems relevant to organic semiconductors and DNA.

Kubas, Adam; Blumberger, Jochen, E-mail: j.blumberger@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hoffmann, Felix [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lehrstuhl fr Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universitt Bochum, Universittsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Heck, Alexander; Elstner, Marcus [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Fritz-Haber-Weg 6, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Fritz-Haber-Weg 6, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Oberhofer, Harald [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Munich, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)] [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Munich, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

Marketing Milk Under Federal Orders in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but not excessive, supply to meet the demands of the market-including the necessary reserve supply -that is, at economic values. Milk marketing history has shown that supply or demand char- acteristics, or the general level of prices can !3 - TABLE 4. PERCENT... specifies that milk prices are e i reported paid or to be paid for milk oil based on 4 percent butterfat, it to convert the price announced cent butterfat milk to a value per huna? weight for 4.0 percent milk. The art:] price reported to the market...

Stelly, Randall

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

National survey of crystalline rocks and recommendations of regions to be explored for high-level radioactive waste repository sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reconnaissance of the geological literature on large regions of exposed crystalline rocks in the United States provides the basis for evaluating if any of those regions warrant further exploration toward identifying potential sites for development of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The reconnaissance does not serve as a detailed evaluation of regions or of any smaller subunits within the regions. Site performance criteria were selected and applied insofar as a national data base exists, and guidelines were adopted that relate the data to those criteria. The criteria include consideration of size, vertical movements, faulting, earthquakes, seismically induced ground motion, Quaternary volcanic rocks, mineral deposits, high-temperature convective ground-water systems, hydraulic gradients, and erosion. Brief summaries of each major region of exposed crystalline rock, and national maps of relevant data provided the means for applying the guidelines and for recommending regions for further study. It is concluded that there is a reasonable likelihood that geologically suitable repository sites exist in each of the major regions of crystalline rocks. The recommendation is made that further studies first be conducted of the Lake Superior, Northern Appalachian and Adirondack, and the Southern Appalachian Regions. It is believed that those regions could be explored more effectively and suitable sites probably could be found, characterized, verified, and licensed more readily there than in the other regions.

Smedes, H.W.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Marketing and Market Transformation | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopment Accident Tolerant Fuel:Market Transformation Marketing

397

Fundamental properties of monolithic bentonite buffer material formed by cold isostatic pressing for high-level radioactive waste repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methods of fabrication, handling, and emplacement of engineered barriers used in a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste should be planned as simply as possible from the engineering and economic viewpoints. Therefore, a new concept of a monolithic buffer material around a waste package have been proposed instead of the conventional concept with the use of small blocks, which would decrease the cost for buffer material. The monolithic buffer material is composed of two parts of highly compacted bentonite, a cup type body and a cover. As the forming method of the monolithic buffer material, compaction by the cold isostatic pressing process (CIP) has been employed. In this study, monolithic bentonite bodies with the diameter of about 333 mm and the height of about 455 mm (corresponding to the approx. 1/5 scale for the Japanese reference concept) were made by the CIP of bentonite powder. The dry densities: {rho}d of the bodies as a whole were measured and the small samples were cut from several locations to investigate the density distribution. The swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity as function of the monolithic body density for CIP-formed specimens were also measured. High density ({rho}d: 1.4--2.0 Mg/m{sup 3}) and homogeneous monolithic bodies were formed by the CIP. The measured results of the swelling pressure (3--15 MPa) and hydraulic conductivity (0.5--1.4 x 10{sup {minus}13} m/s) of the specimens were almost the same as those for the uniaxial compacted bentonite in the literature. It is shown that the vacuum hoist system is an applicable handling method for emplacement of the monolithic bentonite.

Kawakami, S.; Yamanaka, Y.; Kato, K.; Asano, H.; Ueda, H.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed action to construct, operate, monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository at Yucca Mountainfor the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level...

399

Testing for market integration crude oil, coal, and natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prompted by the contemporaneous spike in coal, oil, and natural gas prices, this paper evaluates the degree of market integration both within and between crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets. Our approach yields parameters that can be readily tested against a priori conjectures. Using daily price data for five very different crude oils, we conclude that the world oil market is a single, highly integrated economic market. On the other hand, coal prices at five trading locations across the United States are cointegrated, but the degree of market integration is much weaker, particularly between Western and Eastern coals. Finally, we show that crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets are only very weakly integrated. Our results indicate that there is not a primary energy market. Despite current price peaks, it is not useful to think of a primary energy market, except in a very long run context.

Bachmeier, L.J.; Griffin, J.M. [Texas A& amp; M Univ, College Station, TX (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

MesoNetHS: A Mesoscopic Simulation Model of a Router-Level Internet-like Network with High Speed TCP Replacements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MesoNetHS: A Mesoscopic Simulation Model of a Router-Level Internet-like Network with High Speed TCP Replacements MesoNetHS is a mesoscopic (medium scale) simulation model of a router-level Internet of a larger transfer and associated multiplier on file size. During simulation, model state is captured

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Whither Goeth the Stock Market? The Dow Jones Industrial average rose back above its September 11th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the adequacy of current accounting standards. The financial-market bubble burst, however, well before September. For example, during the final phases of the recent high-tech, dot-com stock market boom, the market value

Ahmad, Sajjad

402

Geographic market delineation in LMP electric power markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has jurisdiction over sales of electric generation assets in the United States, and it has found that generation on the high-priced side of transmission constraints provides competition for generators on the low-priced side. This article shows that this reasoning is correct in locational marginal price (LMP) electric power markets now prevalent in the U.S. (author)

Morris, John R.; Accordino, Megan H.

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

April market review. [Spot market prices for uranium (1993)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spot market price for uranium outside the USA weakened further during April, and at month end, the NUEXCO Exchange Value had fallen $0.35, to $7.10 per pound U3O8. This is the lowest Exchange Value observed in nearly twenty years, comparable to Values recorded during the low price levels of the early 1970s. The Restricted American Market Penalty (RAMP) for concentrates increased $0.40, to $2.95 per pound U3O8. Transactions for significant quantities of uranium concentrates that are both deliverable in and intended for consumption in the USA could have been concluded on April 30 at $10.05 per pound U3O8, up $0.05 from the sum of corresponding March Values. Four near-term concentrates transactions were reported, totalling nearly 1.5 million pounds equivalent U3O8. One long-term sale was reported. The UF6 Value also declined, as increased competition among sellers led to a $0.50 decrease, to $24.50 per kgU as UF6. However, the RAMP for UF6 increased $0.65, to $5.90 per kgU as UF6, reflecting an effective US market level of $30.40 per kgU. Two near term transactions were reported totalling approximately 1.1 million pounds equivalent U3O8. In total, eight uranium transactions totalling 28 million pounds equivalent U3O8 were reported, which is about average for April market activity.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Early containment of high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream in clay-bearing blended cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Portland cement blended with fly ash and attapulgite clay was mixed with high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream at a one-to-one weight ratio. Mixtures were adiabatically and isothermally cured at various temperatures and analyzed for phase composition, total alkalinity, pore solution chemistry, and transport properties as measured by impedance spectroscopy. Total alkalinity is characterized by two main drops. The early one corresponds to a rapid removal of phosphorous, aluminum, sodium, and to a lesser extent potassium solution. The second drop from about 10 h to 3 days is mainly associated with the removal of aluminum, silicon, and sodium. Thereafter, the total alkalinity continues descending, but at a lower rate. All pastes display a rapid flow loss that is attributed to an early precipitation of hydrated products. Hemicarbonate appears as early as one hour after mixing and is probably followed by apatite precipitation. However, the former is unstable and decomposes at a rate that is inversely related to the curing temperature. At high temperatures, zeolite appears at about 10 h after mixing. At 30 days, the stabilized crystalline composition Includes zeolite, apatite and other minor amounts of CaCO{sub 3}, quartz, and monosulfate Impedance spectra conform with the chemical and mineralogical data. The normalized conductivity of the pastes shows an early drop, which is followed by a main decrease from about 12 h to three days. At three days, the permeability of the cement-based waste as calculated by Katz-Thompson equation is over three orders of magnitude lower than that of ordinary portland cement paste. However, a further decrease in the calculated permeability is questionable. Chemical stabilization is favorable through incorporation of waste species into apatite and zeolite.

Kruger, A.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Olson, R.A.; Tennis, P.D. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Center for Advanced Cement-Based Materials] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Assessment of degradation concerns for spent fuel, high-level wastes, and transuranic wastes in monitored retrievalbe storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been concluded that there are no significant degradation mechanisms that could prevent the design, construction, and safe operation of monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facilities. However, there are some long-term degradation mechanisms that could affect the ability to maintain or readily retrieve spent fuel (SF), high-level wastes (HLW), and transuranic wastes (TRUW) several decades after emplacement. Although catastrophic failures are not anticipated, long-term degradation mechanisms have been identified that could, under certain conditions, cause failure of the SF cladding and/or failure of TRUW storage containers. Stress rupture limits for Zircaloy-clad SF in MRS range from 300 to 440/sup 0/C, based on limited data. Additional tests on irradiated Zircaloy (3- to 5-year duration) are needed to narrow this uncertainty. Cladding defect sizes could increase in air as a result of fuel density decreases due to oxidation. Oxidation tests (3- to 5-year duration) on SF are also needed to verify oxidation rates in air and to determine temperatures below which monitoring of an inert cover gas would not be required. Few, if any, changes in the physical state of HLW glass or canisters or their performance would occur under projected MRS conditions. The major uncertainty for HLW is in the heat transfer through cracked glass and glass devitrification above 500/sup 0/C. Additional study of TRUW is required. Some fraction of present TRUW containers would probably fail within the first 100 years of MRS, and some TRUW would be highly degraded upon retrieval, even in unfailed containers. One possible solution is the design of a 100-year container. 93 references, 28 figures, 17 tables.

Guenther, R.J.; Gilbert, E.R.; Slate, S.C.; Partain, W.L.; Divine, J.R.; Kreid, D.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Marketing Quality Energy Awareness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

employee participation that improved energy efficiency 15%. The plan was successfully introduced on a test basis in two manufacturing locations and now is a part of overall operations. The marketing concepts aided in determining who was the customer...MARKETING QUALITY ENERGY AWARENESS LONITA J. FORTIER Engineering Technologist 3M Company Saint Paul, Minnesota ABSTRACT Marketing and quality concepts were utilized in developing an employee awareness plan to facilitate long term...

Fortier, L. J.

407

Geographic market suitability analysis for low- and intermediate-temperature solar IPH systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies of the industrial market for solar energy systems have considered the level of solar radiation as the main determinant of geographic markets in the US. This study evaluates geographical markets extensively based on such criteria as output of different types of low- and intermediate-temperature solar thermal collectors, air quality constraints for competitive fuels, state solar tax incentives, fuel costs, low industrial use of coal, high industrial growth areas, and industry energy consumption in different parts of the US. Market suitability analysis and mapping techniques, refined in the past 20 years by land use planners, were used to evaluate geographical markets. A computer-aided system, Generalized Map Analysis Planning System (GMAPS), performed interactive, cellular, computer mapping, and composite mapping. Results indicate that the US Southwest and West are the most attractive geographical markets for solar IPH, based on an equal weighting of the evaluation criteria. The West North-Central and East South-Central regions appear to have the least attractive markets. Specific areas within states where solar IPH systems have distinct marketing advantages also are apparent from the composite maps. However, when different weights are assigned to the various criteria, the results change significantly for some regions of the country, such as the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and West South-Central 2 regions. The results of this work will become less valid in the future as state incentives for solar IPH, air quality regulations, and the status of competitive fuels all change. Volume I contains study results and maps.

Turner, A.K.; Weber, J.C.; DeAngelis, M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Market Power in Electricity Markets: Beyond Concentration Measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PWP-059r Market Power in Electricity Markets: Beyond Concentration Measures Severin Borenstein.ucei.berkeley.edu/ucei #12;PWP-059r Market Power in Electricity Markets: Beyond Concentration Measures Severin Borenstein, James Bushnell, and Christopher R. Knittel1 February 1999 Abstract The wave of electricity market

California at Berkeley. University of

409

California's Evolving Energy Market California Power Market Symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Minute Market, 5-minute market · Real-time fixed hourly-intertie transactions settled as price takersCalifornia's Evolving Energy Market California Power Market Symposium Portland, Oregon September 5, 2013 K ith CKeith Casey Vice President Market & Infrastructure Development California ISO #12

410

Equity markets and economic development: Does the primary market matter?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the secondary market transactions. In addition, from a macroeconomics perspectivea transaction on a stockEquity markets and economic development: Does the primary market matter? Andriansyaha,b,*and George and secondary equity markets in economic growth. In contrast to standard literature consideringsecondary market

411

Vertical Integration and Market Power in Electricity Markets Seamus Hogan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the resulting wholesale market risks, which risks are further exacerbated by competition. Such contracts markets with improved wholesale market risk management, but also reduced wholesale market power. This paper develops shares in wholesale and retail markets. In general, firms whose share of generating capacity is higher

Hickman, Mark

412

Computing the Electricity Market Equilibrium: Uses of market equilibrium models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Computing the Electricity Market Equilibrium: Uses of market equilibrium models Ross Baldick Abstract--In this paper we consider the formulation and uses of electric- ity market equilibrium models. Keywords--Electricity market, Equilibrium models I. INTRODUCTION Electricity market equilibrium modelling

Baldick, Ross

413

Market Acceleration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fact sheet summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its market acceleration subprogram.

Not Available

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

415

Self-irradiation damage of a curium-doped titanate ceramic containing sodium-rich high level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the polyphase titanate ceramic containing sodium-rich simulated high-level nuclear waste doped with 0.69 wt% of {sup 244}Cm to accelerate long-term self-irradiation due to {alpha} decays. {alpha} autoradiography showed that {alpha} emissions were almost uniformly distributed throughout the curium-doped samples on a {gt} 20{mu}m scale although micropore surfaces and titanium oxide agglomerates were free of {alpha} emitting nuclides. The phase assemblage of the curium-doped titanate ceramic included freudenbergite and loveringite in addition to the more abundant oxide phases: hollandite, perovskite, and zirconolite. Accumulation of {alpha} decays was accompanied by a gradual decrease in density. The increment of density was {minus}1% after an equivalent age of 5000 yr. Leach tests showed a slight rend toward higher total release of curium with equivalent age. The release of soluble nonradioactive elements (e.g., Na, Cs, Sr, and Ca) in the oldest specimens (equivalent age, 2000 yr) varied from specimen to specimen but, on average, were higher than specimens that had suffered a lower radiation dose.

Miyazaki, T. (Second Dept. of Nuclear Business, Ibaraki Center, Chiyoda Maintenance Ltd., Asahi, Kashima, Ibaraki 314-14 (JP)); White, T.J. (Electron Microscope Centre, Univ. of Queensland, St. Lucia, Brisbane 4067 (AU)); Mitamura, H.; Matsumoto, S.; Nukaga, K.; Togashi, Y.; Sagawa, T.; Tashiro, S. (Dept. of Environmental Safety Research, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-11 (JP)); Levins, D.M. (Environmental Science Program, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights Research Lab., Lucas Heights, New South Wales (AU)); Kikuchi, A. (Dept. of Reactor Fuel Examination, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-11 (JP))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Application of single ion activity coefficients to determine solvent extraction mechanism for components of high level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TRUEX solvent extraction process is being developed to remove and concentrate transuranic (TRU) elements from high-level and TRU radioactive wastes currently stored at US Department of Energy sites. Phosphoric acid is one of the chemical species of concern at the Hanford site where bismuth phosphate was used to recover plutonium. The mechanism of phosphoric acid extraction with TRUEX-NPH solvent at 25{degrees}C was determined by phosphoric acid distribution ratios, which were measured by using phosphoric acid radiotracer and a variety of aqueous phases containing different concentrations of nitric acid and nitrate ions. A model was developed for predicting phosphoric acid distribution ratios as a function of the thermodynamic activities of nitrate ion and hydrogen ion. The Generic TRUEX Model (GTM) was used to calculate these activities based on the Bromley method. The derived model supports CMPO and TBP extraction of a phosphoric acid-nitric acid complex and a CMPO-phosphoric acid complex in TRUEX-NPH solvent.

Nunez, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Seismic design and evaluation guidelines for the Department of Energy High-Level Waste Storage Tanks and Appurtenances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides seismic design and evaluation guidelines for underground high-level waste storage tanks. The guidelines reflect the knowledge acquired in the last two decades in defining seismic ground motion and calculating hydrodynamic loads, dynamic soil pressures and other loads for underground tank structures, piping and equipment. The application of the guidelines is illustrated with examples. The guidelines are developed for a specific design of underground storage tanks, namely double-shell structures. However, the methodology discussed is applicable for other types of tank structures as well. The application of these and of suitably adjusted versions of these concepts to other structural types will be addressed in a future version of this document. The original version of this document was published in January 1993. Since then, additional studies have been performed in several areas and the results are included in this revision. Comments received from the users are also addressed. Fundamental concepts supporting the basic seismic criteria contained in the original version have since then been incorporated and published in DOE-STD-1020-94 and its technical basis documents. This information has been deleted in the current revision.

Bandyopadhyay, K.; Cornell, A.; Costantino, C.; Kennedy, R.; Miller, C.; Veletsos, A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Waste to Yucca Mountain: The Next Step in Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the U.S. Department of Energy's ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada,'' the Department states that certain broad transportation-related decisions can be made. These include the choice of a mode of transportation nationally (mostly legal-weight truck or mostly rail) and in Nevada (mostly rail, mostly legal-weight truck, or mostly heavy-haul truck with use of an associated intermodal transfer station), as well as the choice among alternative rail corridors or heavy-haul truck routes with use of an associated intermodal transfer station in Nevada. Although a rail line does not service the Yucca Mountain site, the Department has identified mostly rail as its preferred mode of transportation, both nationally and in the State of Nevada. If mostly rail is selected for Nevada, the Department would then identify a preference for one of the rail corridors in consultation with affected stakeholders, particularly the State of Nevada. DOE would then select the rail corridor and initiate a process to select a specific rail alignment within the corridor for the construction of a rail line. Five proposed rail corridors were analyzed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement. The assessment considered the impacts of constructing a branch rail line in the five 400-meter (0.25mile) wide corridors. Each corridor connects the Yucca Mountain site with an existing mainline railroad in Nevada.

Sweeney, Robin L,; Lechel, David J.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

419

APPLICATION OF A THIN FILM EVAPORATOR SYSTEM FOR MANAGEMENT OF LIQUID HIGH-LEVEL WASTES AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A modular, transportable evaporator system, using thin film evaporative technology, is planned for deployment at the Hanford radioactive waste storage tank complex. This technology, herein referred to as a wiped film evaporator (WFE), will be located at grade level above an underground storage tank to receive pumped liquids, concentrate the liquid stream from 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.4 and then return the concentrated solution back into the tank. Water is removed by evaporation at an internal heated drum surface exposed to high vacuum. The condensed water stream will be shipped to the site effluent treatment facility for final disposal. This operation provides significant risk mitigation to failure of the aging 242-A Evaporator facility; the only operating evaporative system at Hanford maximizing waste storage. This technology is being implemented through a development and deployment project by the tank farm operating contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), for the Office of River Protection/Department of Energy (ORP/DOE), through Columbia Energy & Environmental Services, Inc. (Columbia Energy). The project will finalize technology maturity and install a system at one of the double-shell tank farms. This paper discusses results of pre-project pilot-scale testing by Columbia Energy and ongoing technology maturation development scope through fiscal year 2012, including planned additional pilot-scale and full-scale simulant testing and operation with actual radioactive tank waste.

TEDESCHI AR; WILSON RA

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

420

Annotated bibliography for the design of waste packages for geologic disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography identifies documents that are pertinent to the design of waste packages for geologic disposal of nuclear waste. The bibliography is divided into fourteen subject categories so that anyone wishing to review the subject of leaching, for example, can turn to the leaching section and review the abstracts of reports which are concerned primarily with leaching. Abstracts are also cross referenced according to secondary subject matter so that one can get a complete list of abstracts for any of the fourteen subject categories. All documents which by their title alone appear to deal with the design of waste packages for the geologic disposal of spent fuel or high-level waste were obtained and reviewed. Only those documents which truly appear to be of interest to a waste package designer were abstracted. The documents not abstracted are listed in a separate section. There was no beginning date for consideration of a document for review. About 1100 documents were reviewed and about 450 documents were abstracted.

Wurm, K.J.; Miller, N.E.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

US DOE-AECL cooperative program for development of high-level radioactive waste container fabrication, closure, and inspection techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) plan to initiate a cooperative research program on development of manufacturing processes for high-level radioactive waste containers. This joint program will benefit both countries in the development of processes for the fabrication, final closure in a hot-cell, and certification of the containers. Program activity objectives can be summarized as follows: to support the selection of suitable container fabrication, final closure, and inspection techniques for the candidate materials and container designs that are under development or are being considered in the US and Canadian repository programs; and to investigate these techniques for alternate materials and/or container designs, to be determined in future optimization studies relating to long-term performance of the waste packages. The program participants will carry out this work in a conditional phased approach, and the scope of work for subsequent years will evolve subject to developments in earlier years. The overall term of this cooperative program is planned to run roughly three years. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

Russell, E.W.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Marketing Communications Plan for SKC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and many already have. Companies with revenues less than $100 million are more likely in UC planning stages. More than 70 percent of companies in high-tech, financial services and healthcare sectors plan to invest in UC, a significantly greater propensity... office, and there are many UC firms active in the Midwest and Southeast states in which SKC operates. 19 Key finding: Marketing communications does not create differentiation. SKC and its competitors sound very similar in terms of key messages...

Cofer, Katie; Hester, Mai; Gregory, Chris; Schaub, Jenni

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

423

Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Most cancer types of the NCI60 have sub-sets of cell lines with high GHR expression. GHR is highly expressed in melanoma cell lines. GHR is elevated in advanced stage IV metastatic tumors vs. stage III. GH treatment of metastatic melanoma cell lines alters growth and cell signaling. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institutes NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on this data, GH could be a new therapeutic target in melanoma.

Sustarsic, Elahu G. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States) [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Junnila, Riia K. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States)] [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Kopchick, John J., E-mail: kopchick@ohio.edu [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States)

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

424

A Structural Model of Markets in Madagascari J.S. Butler and Christine Moserii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capacity for identifying the factors contributing to market integration or to high transfer costs1 A Structural Model of Markets in Madagascari J.S. Butler and Christine Moserii June 2009 i Model of Markets in Madagascar Abstract Market efficiency and price transmission across space

Krivobokova, Tatyana

425

Energy Efficiency Market Sustainable Business Planning | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficiency Market Sustainable Business Planning Energy Efficiency Market Sustainable Business Planning Energy Efficiency Market Sustainable Business Planning, a presentation...

426

PERFORMING DIAGNOSTICS ON THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE VISION BEAM LINE TO ELIMINATE HIGH VIBRATION LEVELS AND PROVIDE A SUSTAINABLE OPERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides variable energy neutrons for a variety of experiments. The neutrons proceed down beam lines to the experiment hall, which houses a variety of experiments and test articles. Each beam line has one or more neutron choppers which filter the neutron beam based on the neutron energy by using a rotating neutron absorbing material passing through the neutron beam. Excessive vibration of the Vision beam line, believed to be caused by the T0 chopper, prevented the Vision beam line from operating at full capacity. This problem had been addressed several times by rebalancing/reworking the T0 beam chopper but the problem stubbornly persisted. To determine the cause of the high vibration, dynamic testing was performed. Twenty-seven accelerometer and motor current channels of data were collected during drive up, drive down, coast down, and steady-state conditions; resonance testing and motor current signature analysis were also performed. The data was analyzed for traditional mechanical/machinery issues such as misalignment and imbalance using time series analysis, frequency domain analysis, and operating deflection shape analysis. The analysis showed that the chopper base plate was experiencing an amplified response to the excitation provided by the T0 beam chopper. The amplified response was diagnosed to be caused by higher than expected base plate flexibility, possibly due to improper grouting or loose floor anchors. Based on this diagnosis, a decision was made to dismantle the beam line chopper and remount the base plate. Neutron activation of the beam line components make modifications to the beam line especially expensive and time consuming due to the radiation handling requirements, so this decision had significant financial and schedule implications. It was found that the base plate was indeed loose because of improper grouting during its initial installation. The base plate was modified by splitting it into multiple sections, isolating the T0 chopper from the rest of the beam line, and each section was then reinstalled and re-grouted. After these modifications, the vibration levels were reduced by a factor of 30. The reduction in vibration level was sufficient to allow the Vision beam line to operate at full capacity for the first time since its completed construction date.

Van Hoy, Blake W [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

GRADUATE FACULTY-STUDENT PROJECT: School of Management Development Office: Marketing and Development Intern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GRADUATE FACULTY-STUDENT PROJECT: School of Management Development Office: Marketing at: Email address: Anticipated Graduation Date: GRADUATE FACULTY-STUDENT PROJECT: (Only graduate level students may be considered for this project) School of Management Development Office: Marketing

Suzuki, Masatsugu

428

Market Research Berkeley FIRST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between home size and energy use 3 Total Market potential in the next 3 years3.Total Market potential;4 Purchase factors (211 responses) In the recent past, when you have been offered services by solar electric for other reasons (please specify) 22.5% 45 Comments: Poor paybackComments: Poor payback Trees shades my

Kammen, Daniel M.

429

Deployment & Market Transformation (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL's deployment and market transformation (D and MT) activities encompass the laboratory's full range of technologies, which span the energy efficiency and renewable energy spectrum. NREL staff educates partners on how they can advance sustainable energy applications and also provides clients with best practices for reducing barriers to innovation and market transformation.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

[alpha]-Decay damage effects in curium-doped titanate ceramic containing sodium-free high-level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A polyphase titanate ceramic incorporating sodium-free simulated high-level nuclear waste was doped with 0.91 wt% of [sup 224]Cm to accelerate the effects of long-term self-irradiation arising from [alpha] decays. The ceramic included three main constituent minerals: hollandite, perovskite, and zirconolite, with some minor phases. Although hollandite showed the broadening of its X-ray diffraction lines and small lattice parameter changes during damage in growth, the unit cell was substantially unaltered. Perovskite and zirconolite, which are the primary hosts of curium, showed 2.7% and 2.6% expansions, respectively, of their unit cell volumes after a dose of 12 [times] 10[sup 17] [alpha] decays[center dot]g[sup [minus]1]. Volume swelling due to damage in growth caused an exponential (almost linear) decrease in density, which reached 1.7% after a dose of 12.4 [times] 10[sup 17] [alpha] decays[center dot]g[sup [minus]1]. Leach tests on samples that had incurred doses of 2.0 [times] 10[sup 17] and 4.5 [times] 10[sup 17] [alpha] decays[center dot]g[sup [minus]1] showed that the rates of dissolution of cesium and barium were similar to analogous leach rates from the equivalent cold ceramic, while strontium and calcium leach rates were 2--15 times higher. Although the cerium, molybdenum, strontium, and calcium leach rates in the present material were similar to those in the curium-doped sodium-bearing titanate ceramic reported previously, the cesium leach rate was 3--8 times lower.

Mitamura, Hisayoshi; Matsumoto, Seiichiro; Tsuboi, Takashi; Hashimoto, Masaaki; Togashi, Yoshihiro; Kanazawa, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan)); Stewart, M.W.A.; Vance, E.R.; Hart, K.P.; Ball, C.J. (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Lucas Heights, New South Wales (Australia). Lucas Heights Research Labs.); White, T.J.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Radioactive waste from transmutation of technetium: a model for anticipating characteristics of high level waste from transmutation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At this early stage in the conceptualization of fuel treatment and radioisotope transmutation for the disposition of nuclear wastes, it is possible to anticipate some characteristics of the waste stream resulting from the deployment of advanced technologies. Fission products and actinides cannot be completely destroyed by transmutation even with continuous purification and recycle. This is demonstrated for technetium in this analysis, but is true for all radioisotopes. Also, some of the reaction products are themselves long-lived radioactive isotopes. The purification and recycle steps produce nuclear wastes that must be planned for geologic disposal. Five radioisotopes have been identified to be produced in abundance by transmutation of technetium using fast neutrons. Four of these isotopes may be more benign than the original technetium-99 because of their longer half lives. However, one isotope, molybdenum-93 with a half life of four thousand years, may be troublesome. All of the isotopes arising from the transmutation process that end up in high level waste must be examined in terms of their behavior in geologic disposal. In selecting goals for chemical separations, the technologists must consider the entire cycle of separation and transmutation before applying the performance expected in a single separation to implications concerning a repository. A separation efficiency of 0.95 can translate into the disposal of as much as 30 to 60 percent of the technetium in the repository if down stream losses are not controlled. In this case, the treatment may have little impact on anticipated off site radiation from technetium. The destruction of technetium through continuous recycle requires the cost of increased neutron dose and increased space in reactors that must be considered in design of fuel treatment systems. (authors)

Seitz, M.G. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Washington DC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Branch technical position on the use of expert elicitation in the high-level radioactive waste program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Should the site be found suitable, DOE will apply to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for permission to construct and then operate a proposed geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain. In deciding whether to grant or deny DOE`s license application for a geologic repository, NRC will closely examine the facts and expert judgment set forth in any potential DOE license application. NRC expects that subjective judgments of individual experts and, in some cases, groups of experts, will be used by DOE to interpret data obtained during site characterization and to address the many technical issues and inherent uncertainties associated with predicting the performance of a repository system for thousands of years. NRC has traditionally accepted, for review, expert judgment to evaluate and interpret the factual bases of license applications and is expected to give appropriate consideration to the judgments of DOE`s experts regarding the geologic repository. Such consideration, however, envisions DOE using expert judgments to complement and supplement other sources of scientific and technical information, such as data collection, analyses, and experimentation. In this document, the NRC staff has set forth technical positions that: (1) provide general guidelines on those circumstances that may warrant the use of a formal process for obtaining the judgments of more than one expert (i.e., expert elicitation); and (2) describe acceptable procedures for conducting expert elicitation when formally elicited judgments are used to support a demonstration of compliance with NRC`s geologic disposal regulation, currently set forth in 10 CFR Part 60. 76 refs.

Kotra, J.P.; Lee, M.P.; Eisenberg, N.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); DeWispelare, A.R. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Survey of waste package designs for disposal of high-level waste/spent fuel in selected foreign countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a survey of the waste package strategies for seven western countries with active nuclear power programs that are pursuing disposal of spent nuclear fuel or high-level wastes in deep geologic rock formations. Information, current as of January 1989, is given on the leading waste package concepts for Belgium, Canada, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All but two of the countries surveyed (France and the UK) have developed design concepts for their repositories, but none of the countries has developed its final waste repository or package concept. Waste package concepts are under study in all the countries surveyed, except the UK. Most of the countries have not yet developed a reference concept and are considering several concepts. Most of the information presented in this report is for the current reference or leading concepts. All canisters for the wastes are cylindrical, and are made of metal (stainless steel, mild steel, titanium, or copper). The canister concepts have relatively thin walls, except those for spent fuel in Sweden and Germany. Diagrams are presented for the reference or leading concepts for canisters for the countries surveyed. The expected lifetimes of the conceptual canisters in their respective disposal environment are typically 500 to 1,000 years, with Sweden's copper canister expected to last as long as one million years. Overpack containers that would contain the canisters are being considered in some of the countries. All of the countries surveyed, except one (Germany) are currently planning to utilize a buffer material (typically bentonite) surrounding the disposal package in the repository. Most of the countries surveyed plan to limit the maximum temperature in the buffer material to about 100{degree}C. 52 refs., 9 figs.

Schneider, K.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Silviera, D.J.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Tuning of deep level emission in highly oriented electrodeposited ZnO nanorods by post growth annealing treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly dense and c-axis oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods with hexagonal wurtzite facets were deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrates by a simple and cost-effective electrodeposition method at low bath temperature (80?C). The as-grown samples were then annealed at various temperatures (T{sub A}?=?100500?C) in different environments (e.g., zinc, oxygen, air, and vacuum) to understand their photoluminescence (PL) behavior in the ultra-violet (UV) and the visible regions. The PL results revealed that the as-deposited ZnO nanorods consisted of oxygen vacancy (V{sub O}), zinc interstitial (Zn{sub i}), and oxygen interstitial (O{sub i}) defects and these can be reduced significantly by annealing in different environments at optimal annealing temperatures. However, the intensity of deep level emission increased for T{sub A} greater than the optimized values for the respective environments due to the introduction of various defect centers. For example, for T{sub A}???450?C in the oxygen and air environments, the density of O{sub i} defects increased, whereas, the green emission associated with V{sub O} is dominant in the vacuum annealed (T{sub A}?=?500?C) ZnO nanorods. The UV peak red shifted after the post-growth annealing treatments in all the environments and the vacuum annealed sample exhibited highest UV peak intensity. The observations from the PL data are supported by the micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present study gives new insight into the origin of different defects that exist in the electrodeposited ZnO nanorods and how these defects can be precisely controlled in order to get the desired emissions for the opto-electronic applications.

Simimol, A. [Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Surface Engineering Division CSIR-National Aerospace Laboratories, Post Bag No. 1779, Bangalore 560017 (India); Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Calicut 673601 (India); Manikandanath, N. T.; Chowdhury, Prasanta; Barshilia, Harish C., E-mail: harish@nal.res.in [Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Surface Engineering Division CSIR-National Aerospace Laboratories, Post Bag No. 1779, Bangalore 560017 (India); Anappara, Aji A. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Calicut 673601 (India)

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

435

What can we learn from high-frequency appliance-level energy metering? Results from a field experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the household electricity consumption in the EU, potentialon household electricity consumption: a tool for savinghousehold level daily electricity consumption collected from

Chen, VL; Delmas, MA; Kaiser, WJ; Locke, SL

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Interaction Between Carbon Markets and Renewable Energy Markets (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster, submitted for the CU Energy Initiative/NREL Symposium on October 3, 2006 in Boulder, Colorado, discusses the interaction between carbon markets and renewable energy markets.

Carroll, G. L.; Milford, J.; Bird, L.

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

437

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011. North America Wind Energy Market Forecast: 20112025.study. Regions with fast energy markets, for example, changea sub-hourly, real-time energy market providing centralized,

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Reliability and competitive electricity markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite all of the talk about ?deregulation? of the electricity sector, a large number of non-market mechanisms have been imposed on emerging competitive wholesale and retail markets. These mechanisms include spot market ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ET2/TL-08-1474. May 19, 2010 Wind Technologies Market ReportIndustry Annual Market Report: Year Ending 2010. Washington,Quarter 2011 Market Report. Washington, D.C. : American Wind

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Banking on Solar: An Analysis of Banking Opportunities in the U.S. Distributed Photovoltaic Market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a high-level overview of the developing U.S. solar loan product landscape, from both a market and economic perspective. It covers current and potential U.S. solar lending institutions; currently available loan products; loan program structures and post-loan origination options; risks and uncertainties of the solar asset class as it pertains to lenders; and an economic analysis comparing loan products to third party-financed systems in California.

Feldman, D.; Lowder, T.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the status of the U.S. wind energy industry market in 2011; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the status of the U.S. wind energy industry market in 2010; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

New Market Tax Credit (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Illinois New Markets Development Program provides supplemental funding for investment entities that have been approved for the Federal New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) program. This program will...

444

2012 Wind Technologies Market Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the status of the U.S. wind energy industry market in 2012; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.; Barbose, G.; Darghouth, N.; Hoen, B.; Mills, A.; Weaver, S.; Porter, K.; Buckley, M.; Fink, S.; Oteri, F.; Tegen, S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Modeling the U.S. Rooftop Photovoltaics Market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global rooftop PV markets are growing rapidly, fueled by a combination of declining PV prices and several policy-based incentives. The future growth, and size, of the rooftop market is highly dependent on continued PV cost reductions, financing options, net metering policy, carbon prices and future incentives. Several PV market penetration models, sharing a similar structure and methodology, have been developed over the last decade to quantify the impacts of these factors on market growth. This study uses a geospatially rich, bottom-up, PV market penetration model--the Solar Deployment Systems (SolarDS) model developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory--to explore key market and policy-based drivers for residential and commercial rooftop PV markets. The identified drivers include a range of options from traditional incentives, to attractive customer financing options, to net metering and carbon policy.

Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Analysis of High-Penetration Levels of Photovoltaics into the Distribution Grid on Oahu, Hawaii: Detailed Analysis of HECO Feeder WF1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable generation is growing at a rapid rate due to the incentives available and the aggressive renewable portfolio standard targets implemented by state governments. Distributed generation in particular is seeing the fastest growth among renewable energy projects, and is directly related to the incentives. Hawaii has the highest electricity costs in the country due to the high percentage of oil burning steam generation, and therefore has some of the highest penetration of distributed PV in the nation. The High Penetration PV project on Oahu aims to understand the effects of high penetration PV on the distribution level, to identify penetration levels creating disturbances on the circuit, and to offer mitigating solutions based on model results. Power flow models are validated using data collected from solar resources and load monitors deployed throughout the circuit. Existing interconnection methods and standards are evaluated in these emerging high penetration scenarios. A key finding is a shift in the level of detail to be considered and moving away from steady-state peak time analysis towards dynamic and time varying simulations. Each level of normal interconnection study is evaluated and enhanced to a new level of detail, allowing full understanding of each issue.

Stewart, E.; MacPherson, J.; Vasilic, S.; Nakafuji, D.; Aukai, T.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

CSEM WP 121 Speculative Trading and Market Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decisions and price levels in New York's deregulated electricity market. For the ?rst two years of its of electricity. During this pe- riod, the forward price of electricity in western New York was signi and spot markets for electricity, resulting in the forward price being higher than the expected spot price

California at Berkeley. University of

448

Market Design: Lecture 1 NICOLE IMMORLICA, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nature of exchange (vs. commodiEes markets where agent sells wheat and buy tractors although wheat-buyer doesn't sell tractors and tractor-seller doesn't buy wheat) firms workers #12;Example: entry-level labor markets NaEonal Residency

Immorlica, Nicole

449

Wintertime high-altitude surface energy balance of a Bolivian glacier, Illimani, 6340 m above sea level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wintertime high-altitude surface energy balance of a Bolivian glacier, Illimani, 6340 m above sea] The objective of this study is to evaluate the surface energy balance (SEB) of a cold, high-altitude tropical, high altitude, sublimation, turbulent fluxes, net all-wave radiation, energy balance Citation: Wagnon

Berthier, Etienne

450

Strategic Behavior in Spot Markets for Electricity when Load is Stochastic Department of Agricultural, Resource, and Managerial Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategic Behavior in Spot Markets for Electricity when Load is Stochastic T.D. Mount Department of market power to raise prices above competitive levels in the UK market for electricity has been discussed in an electricity market. In spite of this abundant evidence, regulators in the USA have been relatively unconcerned

451

The Effect of Set Induction on student knowledge, attitude, and engagement levels of high school agricultural science students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to determine if applying set induction to the beginning of a lesson would have an effect on student knowledge, attitude, and/or engagement levels throughout the lesson. Researchers addressed specific objectives...

Johnston, Tiffany Sarah Lavern

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

452

SUPERGLASS. Engineering field tests - Phase 3. Production, market planning, and product evaluation for a high-thermal-performance insulating glass design utilizing HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEAT MIRROR transparent window insulation consists of a clear polyester film two mils (.002'') thick with a thin, clear low-emissivity (.15) coating deposited on one side by state-of-the-art vacuum deposition processes. This neutral-colored invisible coating reflects long-wave infrared energy (heat). When mounted by being stretched with a 1/2'' air-gap on each side of the film, the resulting unit reduces heat loss by 60% compared to dual insulating glass. Southwall Corporation produces HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation and markets it to manufacturers of sealed insulating glass (I.G.) units and window and building manufacturers who make their own I.G. These companies build and sell the SUPERGLASS sealed glazing units. Units made and installed in buildings by six customers were visited. These units were located in many geographic regions, including the Pacific Northwest, Rocky Mountains, New England, Southeast, and West Coast. As much as could be obtained of their history was recorded, as was their current condition and performance. These units had been in place from two weeks to over a year. All of the units were performing thermally very well, as measured by taking temperature profiles through them and through adjacent conventional I.G. units. Some units had minor visual defects (attributed to I.G. assembly techniques) which are discussed in detail. Overall occupant acceptance was enthusiastically positive. In addition to saving energy, without compromise of optical quality or appearance, the product makes rooms with large glazing areas comfortable to be in in cold weather. All defects observed were present when built; there appears to be no in-field degradation of quality at this time.

Tilford, C L

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Environmental evaluation of alternatives for long-term management of Defense high-level radioactive wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the selection of a strategy for the long-term management of the defense high-level wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). This report describes the environmental impacts of alternative strategies. These alternative strategies include leaving the calcine in its present form at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), or retrieving and modifying the calcine to a more durable waste form and disposing of it either at the INEL or in an offsite repository. This report addresses only the alternatives for a program to manage the high-level waste generated at the ICPP. 24 figures, 60 tables.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Performance assessment of the direct disposal in unsaturated tuff or spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste owned by USDOE: Volume 2, Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This assessment studied the performance of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a hypothetical repository in unsaturated tuff. The results of this 10-month study are intended to help guide the Office of Environment Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE) on how to prepare its wastes for eventual permanent disposal. The waste forms comprised spent fuel and high-level waste currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Hanford reservations. About 700 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of the waste under study is stored at INEL, including graphite spent nuclear fuel, highly enriched uranium spent fuel, low enriched uranium spent fuel, and calcined high-level waste. About 2100 MTHM of weapons production fuel, currently stored on the Hanford reservation, was also included. The behavior of the waste was analyzed by waste form and also as a group of waste forms in the hypothetical tuff repository. When the waste forms were studied together, the repository was assumed also to contain about 9200 MTHM high-level waste in borosilicate glass from three DOE sites. The addition of the borosilicate glass, which has already been proposed as a final waste form, brought the total to about 12,000 MTHM.

Rechard, R.P. [ed.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

TRANSMISSION EFFECTS IN MARKET POWER ANALYSIS OF ELECTRICITY MARKETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRANSMISSION EFFECTS IN MARKET POWER ANALYSIS OF ELECTRICITY MARKETS Thomas J. Overbye George Gross-weber@uiuc.edu Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 ABSTRACT This paper discusses the assessment of market power in bulk electricity markets, with the explicit

Gross, George

456

Diagnosing Unilateral Market Power in Electricity Reserves Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to diagnose allocative ine ciencies in the state's wholesale reserve markets. Material that has been largely in the state's energy markets (Hildebrandt [2001]; She rin [2001]; Borenstein, Bushnell and Wolak [2002Diagnosing Unilateral Market Power in Electricity Reserves Market Christopher R. Knittel

Rothman, Daniel

457

Essays in capital markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis consists of three essays in capital markets. The first essay presents a dynamic asset pricing model with heterogeneously informed agents. Unlike previous research, the general case where differential information ...

Makarov, Igor, 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Energy Market Outlook  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Energy Market Outlook: Helping Customers Meet Their Diverse Energy Goals, held on May 22-23, 2013 in San Francisco, California.

459

Petroleum marketing annual 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysis, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the fob and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Annual. For this production, all estimates have been recalculated since their earlier publication in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM). These calculations made use of additional data and corrections that were received after the PMM publication date.

NONE

1995-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

460

Northwest Energy Market Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is considering the design for a within-hour energy market, called a security constrained economic dispatch (SCED), for a subset of NWPP balancing areas. BPA is launching a public...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "markets high levels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Organizing a Marketing Club  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

media. It is best to already have the next meeting (organizational meeting) scheduled so that the marketing workshop participants can be in- formed during the workshop. Organizational Meeting The organizational meeting is likely the most important...

Smith, Jackie; Waller, Mark L.; Anderson, Carl; Welch, Mark

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

462

Why Markets Make Mistakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many models of markets are based on assumptions of rationality, transparency, efficiency, and homogeneity in various combinations. They assume, at least implicitly, that decision makers understand the structure of the ...

Weil, Henry Birdseye

2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

463

Petroleum Marketing Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 2.9MB . . Front Matter . Petroleum Marketing Annual Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents PDF . . Highlights ....

464

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Released: August 29, 2008 Petroleum Marketing Annual --- Full report in PDF (1.2 MB) Summary Statistics Summary Statistics Tables PDF 1 Crude Oil Prices PDF TXT 1A Refiner...

465

Petroleum Marketing Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 1.2MB . Front Matter . Petroleum Marketing Annual Cover Page, Preface, and Table of Contents PDF . Highlights . Petroleum...

466

Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 1.2MB . . Front Matter . Petroleum Marketing Annual Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents PDF . . Highlights ....

467

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Released: August 27, 2009 Petroleum Marketing Annual --- Full report in PDF (1.2 MB) Summary Statistics Summary Statistics Tables PDF 1 Crude Oil Prices PDF TXT 1A Refiner...

468

Petroleum Marketing Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 2.9MB . . Front Matter . Petroleum Marketing Annual Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents PDF . . Highlights ....

469

Petroleum Marketing Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 1.2MB . Front Matter . Petroleum Marketing Annual Cover Page, Preface, and Table of Contents PDF . Highlights . Petroleum...

470

The effect of different levels of forage and fish meal on the live performance and rumen volatile fatty acid concentation of heifers fed high molasses diets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a high molasses diet is of critical economical and nutritional importance. Developing an appropriate system of feeding high levels of molasses (B5/. or more of the ration) to cattle could drastically change the horizons of cattle feeding... of molasses as the major energy source in beef cattle fattening rations. In recent years Preston and co-worl ers undertook the feeding of molasses-urea mixtures, first as a supplement to ad libitum grain feeding. Later they developed a feeding system...

Estrada, Sergio

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Market review - market values summary/February market review/current market data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article is the February 1996 uranium market report. As reflected by the rising demand and decreasing supply of uranium, prices for UF6 and U3O8 increased. Separation services and conversion services prices remained constant. Data is presented for the recent trades, blocks or uranium for sale or loan, inquiries to purchase or borrow uranium, SWUs available and inquiries to purchase SWUs, and market values of U3O8 and UF6 expressed in selected currencies.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Marketing Plan for the National Security Technology Incubator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This marketing plan was developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project by the Arrowhead Center of New Mexico State University. The vision of the National Security Technology Incubator program is to be a successful incubator of technologies and private enterprise that assist the NNSA in meeting new challenges in national safety and security. The plan defines important aspects of developing the incubator, such as defining the target market, marketing goals, and creating strategies to reach the target market while meeting those goals. The three main marketing goals of the incubator are: 1) developing marketing materials for the incubator program; 2) attracting businesses to become incubator participants; and 3) increasing name recognition of the incubator program on a national level.

None

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

473

2010 Solar Technologies Market Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010 Solar Technologies Market Report details the market conditions and trends for photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. Produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the report provides a comprehensive over