National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for marine life criteria

  1. Measuring Coastal Boating Noise to Assess Potential Impacts on Marine Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzner, Shari; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-07-01

    Article requested for submission in Sea Technology Magazine describing the Underwater Noise From Small Boats. An Overlooked Component of the Acoustic Environment in Coastal Areas. Underwater noise and its effects on marine life deserve attention as human activity in the marine environment increases. Noise can affect fish and marine mammals in ways that are physiological, as in auditory threshold shifts, and behavioral, as in changes in foraging habits. One anthropogenic source of underwater noise that has received little attention to date is recreational boating. Coastal areas and archipelago regions, which play a crucial role in the marine ecosystem, are often subject to high levels of boat traffic. In order to better understand the noise produced by a small powerboat, a test was conducted in Sequim Bay, Washington, using an instrumented research vessel and multiple acoustic sensors. The broadband noise and narrowband peak levels were observed from two different locations while the boat was operated under various conditions. The results, combined with background noise levels, sound propagation and local boat traffic patterns, can provide a picture of the total boating noise to which marine life may be subjected.

  2. Fire protection design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, national Fire Protection Association Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard, along with other delineated criteria, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  3. Evaluation Criteria

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Applications must meet the basic eligibility criteria. Final decisions regarding eligibility and compliance will be made by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE).

  4. ARM - Guidelines : Review Criteria

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review Criteria Guidelines Overview Annual Facility Call Small Field Campaigns Review Criteria Expectations for Principal Investigators Forms Propose a Campaign Instrument Support Request (ISR) Form (Word, 89KB) Documentation Steps for Submitting Field Campaign Data and Metadata Field Campaign Guidelines (PDF, 574KB) Guidelines : Review Criteria Proposals will be evaluated based on the following scientific criteria: Scientific and/or technical merit of the project, including the likelihood that

  5. Acceptance Criteria - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G and I clarified requirements throughout the appendices. Appendix I, Table I-1 in the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the "Payload Container Description" removed "208-L (55 gal)...

  6. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE’s Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.

  7. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE’s Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.

  8. DOE Standard: Fire protection design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    The development of this Standard reflects the fact that national consensus standards and other design criteria do not comprehensively or, in some cases, adequately address fire protection issues at DOE facilities. This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard replaces certain mandatory fire protection requirements that were formerly in DOE 5480.7A, ``Fire Protection``, and DOE 6430.1A, ``General Design Criteria``. It also contains the fire protection guidelines from two (now canceled) draft standards: ``Glove Box Fire Protection`` and ``Filter Plenum Fire Protection``. (Note: This Standard does not supersede the requirements of DOE 5480.7A and DOE 6430.1A where these DOE Orders are currently applicable under existing contracts.) This Standard, along with the criteria delineated in Section 3, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  9. Performance Criteria and Evaluation System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-06-18

    The Performance Criteria and Evaluation System (PCES) was developed in order to make a data base of criteria accessible to radiation safety staff. The criteria included in the package are applicable to occupational radiation safety at DOE reactor and nonreactor nuclear facilities, but any data base of criteria may be created using the Criterion Data Base Utiliity (CDU). PCES assists personnel in carrying out oversight, line, and support activities.

  10. Marine Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Services Place: Florida Sector: Services Product: Marine Services is planning tidal energy projects off the coasts of California and Florida. References: Marine...

  11. FHR Generic Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, G.F.; Holcomb, D.E.; Cetiner, S.M.

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of this document is to provide an initial, focused reference to the safety characteristics of and a licensing approach for Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs). The document does not contain details of particular reactor designs nor does it attempt to identify or classify either design basis or beyond design basis accidents. Further, this document is an initial attempt by a small set of subject matter experts to document the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs for a larger audience. The document is intended to help in setting the safety and licensing research, development, and demonstration path forward. Input from a wider audience, further technical developments, and additional study will be required to develop a consensus position on the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs. This document begins with a brief overview of the attributes of FHRs and then a general description of their anticipated safety performance. Following this, an overview of the US nuclear power plant approval process is provided that includes both test and power reactors, as well as the role of safety standards in the approval process. The document next describes a General Design Criteria (GDC)–based approach to licensing an FHR and provides an initial draft set of FHR GDCs. The document concludes with a description of a path forward toward developing an FHR safety standard that can support both a test and power reactor licensing process.

  12. EXPO Award Criteria - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Award Criteria About Us Charging Your Time Committee Members Contact Us Electronic Registration Form Exhibitor and Vendor Information EXPO 2016 Sponsors EXPO Award Criteria Special Events What is EXPO Why Should I Participate in EXPO EXPO Award Criteria Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size WRPS won the awards for Most Interactive and Best Overall booth! WRPS won the awards for Most Interactive and Best Overall booth! WCH won the award for the Kids'

  13. Electronic Records Management Software Applications Design Criteria...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electronic Records Management Software Applications Design Criteria Standard Electronic Records Management Software Applications Design Criteria Standard This Standard is reissued...

  14. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research &...

  15. Ecotoxicology of tropical marine ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, E.C.; Gassman, N.J.; Firman, J.C.; Richmond, R.H.; Power, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    The negative effects of chemical contaminants on tropical marine ecosystems are of increasing concern as human populations expand adjacent to these communities. Watershed streams and ground water carry a variety of chemicals from agricultural, industrial, and domestic activities, while winds and currents transport pollutants from atmospheric and oceanic sources to these coastal ecosystems. The implications of the limited information available on impacts of chemical stressors on mangrove forests, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs are discussed in the context of ecosystem management and ecological risk assessment. Three classes of pollutants have received attention: heavy metals, petroleum, and synthetic organics. Heavy metals have been detected in all three ecosystems, causing physiological stress, reduced reproductive success, and outright mortality in associated invertebrates and fishes. Oil spills have been responsible for the destruction of entire coastal shallow-water communities, with recovery requiring years. Herbicides are particularly detrimental to mangroves and seagrasses and adversely affect the animal-algal symbioses in corals. Pesticides interfere with chemical cues responsible for key biological processes, including reproduction and recruitment of a variety of organisms. Information is lacking with regard to long-term recovery, indicator species, and biomarkers for tropical communities. Critical areas that are beginning to be addressed include the development of appropriate benchmarks for risk assessment, baseline monitoring criteria, and effective management strategies to protect tropical marine ecosystems in the face of mounting anthropogenic disturbance.

  16. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Wind and Water Power Program's current approach to supporting the development and deployment of marine and hydrokinetic technologies.

  17. Evaluation Criteria for PDIL Proposal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Criteria for PDIL Proposal The selection/decision criteria used by the NCPV Business Development Team are the following: 1. Quality and Relevance of the Proposed Technical Plan (30%) * Technology impact with industry and likelihood of success. Demonstrated benefits of success to both the proposer and NREL to meet the DOE SunShot goals. * Proposed task descriptions and time line. Clear demonstration of entrance and exit strategies in the PDIL. * Extent to which the Proposer and NREL can rapidly

  18. The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Communities (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial Communities « Prev Next » Title: The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial Communities Most marine bacteria produce exopolysaccharides (EPS), and bacterial EPS represent an important source of dissolved organic carbon in marine ecosystems. It was proposed that bacterial EPS rich in uronic acid is resistant to mineralization by microbes and

  19. The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial Communities ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL ...

  20. Seawind Marine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seawind Marine Jump to: navigation, search Name: Seawind Marine Place: Plymouth, England, United Kingdom Zip: PL1 5NE Sector: Services, Wind energy Product: Focused on project...

  1. Marine Scotland | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Scotland Place: Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: EH14 1TY Product: Marine science, planning, policy and management body. References: Marine Scotland1 This article is...

  2. Assessment B - Program Criteria | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B - Program Criteria Assessment B - Program Criteria PDF icon Microsoft Word - Assessment-B-ProgramCriteria More Documents & Publications ATTACHMENT A - CHECKLIST FOR SELF ASSESSMENT Assessment C-Site Visit Protocol EERE Program Management Guide - Chapter 2

  3. Life Insurance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Life Insurance Life Insurance A comprehensive benefits package with plan options for health care and retirement to take care of our employees today and tomorrow. Contact Benefits Office (505) 667-1806 Email Life Insurance The Lab offers a variety of life insurance options through The Hartford to help you protect your loved ones. Life insurance provides financial assistance to help cover the rising costs of final expenses and any outstanding debts you leave behind. Resources Rates » Provider

  4. Accident analysis and DOE criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graf, J.M.; Elder, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    In analyzing the radiological consequences of major accidents at DOE facilities one finds that many facilities fall so far below the limits of DOE Order 6430 that compliance is easily demonstrated by simple analysis. For those cases where the amount of radioactive material and the dispersive energy available are enough for accident consequences to approach the limits, the models and assumptions used become critical. In some cases the models themselves are the difference between meeting the criteria or not meeting them. Further, in one case, we found that not only did the selection of models determine compliance but the selection of applicable criteria from different chapters of Order 6430 also made the difference. DOE has recognized the problem of different criteria in different chapters applying to one facility, and has proceeded to make changes for the sake of consistency. We have proposed to outline the specific steps needed in an accident analysis and suggest appropriate models, parameters, and assumptions. As a result we feed DOE siting and design criteria will be more fairly and consistently applied.

  5. Criteria and Review Approach Documents | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Criteria and Review Approach Documents Criteria and Review Approach Documents CRAD Type Criteria and Review Approach Document List

  6. Criteria Review and Approach Documents | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Criteria Review and Approach Documents Criteria Review and Approach Documents CRAD Type Criteria Review and Approach Document List...

  7. Security Enforcement Reporting Criteria | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Enforcement Reporting Criteria Security Enforcement Reporting Criteria January 2012 Mandatory Security Incident Reporting This document provides information and criteria for reporting classified information security incidents and noncompliances to the Department of Energy. A more detailed description of the reporting criteria, requirements, and expectations can be found in the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Enforcement Coordinator Handbook. PDF icon Security Enforcement Reporting

  8. Marine & hydrokinetic technology development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LiVecchi, Al; Jepsen, Richard Alan

    2010-06-01

    The Wind and Water Power Program supports the development of marine and hydrokinetic devices, which capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, the natural flow of water in rivers, and marine thermal gradients, without building new dams or diversions. The program works closely with industry and the Department of Energy's national laboratories to advance the development and testing of marine and hydrokinetic devices. In 2008, the program funded projects to develop and test point absorber, oscillating wave column, and tidal turbine technologies. The program also funds component design, such as techniques for manufacturing and installing coldwater pipes critical for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Rigorous device testing is necessary to validate and optimize prototypes before beginning full-scale demonstration and deployment. The program supports device testing by providing technology developers with information on testing facilities. Technology developers require access to facilities capable of simulating open-water conditions in order to refine and validate device operability. The program has identified more than 20 tank testing operators in the United States with capabilities suited to the marine and hydrokinetic technology industry. This information is available to the public in the program's Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database. The program also supports the development of open-water, grid-connected testing facilities, as well as resource assessments that will improve simulations done in dry-dock and closed-water testing facilities. The program has established two university-led National Marine Renewable Energy Centers to be used for device testing. These centers are located on coasts and will have open-water testing berths, allowing researchers to investigate marine and estuary conditions. Optimal array design, development, modeling and testing are needed to maximize efficiency and electricity generation at marine and hydrokinetic power plants while mitigating nearby and distant impacts. Activities may include laboratory and computational modeling of mooring design or research on device spacing. The geographies, resources, technologies, and even nomenclature of the U.S. marine and hydrokinetic technology industry have yet to be fully understood or defined. The program characterizes and assesses marine and hydrokinetic devices, and then organizes the collected information into a comprehensive and searchable Web-based database, the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. The database, which reflects intergovernmental and international collaboration, provides industry with one of the most comprehensive and up-to-date public resources on marine and hydrokinetic devices.

  9. Nuclear Reactor Safety Design Criteria

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-01-19

    The order establishes nuclear safety criteria applicable to the design, fabrication, construction, testing, and performance requirements of nuclear reactor facilities and safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) within these facilities. Cancels paragraphs 8a and 8b of DOE 5480.6. Cancels DOE O 5480.6 in part. Supersedes DOE 5480.1, dated 1-19-93. Certified 11-18-10.

  10. First State Marine Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State Marine Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name First State Marine Wind Facility First State Marine Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed...

  11. Plymouth Marine Laboratory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Laboratory Jump to: navigation, search Name: Plymouth Marine Laboratory Place: United Kingdom Product: Carries out strategic and applied marine research. References:...

  12. Leviathan Marine Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Development Jump to: navigation, search Name: Leviathan Marine Development Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.leviathanenergy.com This company is listed in the...

  13. Marin Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 94901 Sector: Solar Product: Marin Solar is a residential installer of photovoltaic systems. References: Marin Solar1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  14. 2015 Marine Energy Technology Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 3rd Annual Marine Energy Technology Symposium (METS) will be held as part of the inaugural International Marine Energy Conference. This conference takes place April 27-29, 2015, at the Capital...

  15. Technical Qualification Program Accreditation Objectives and Criteria |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Objectives and Criteria Technical Qualification Program Accreditation Objectives and Criteria The program clearly identifies and documents the process used to demonstrate employee technical competence. PDF icon TQP Accreditation Objectives and Criteria More Documents & Publications Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Sandia Site Office - 2012 Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Richland Operations Office - 2014 Technical

  16. Earthquake design criteria for small hydro projects in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, P.P.; McCandless, D.H.; Asce, M.

    1995-12-31

    The definition of the seismic environment and seismic design criteria of more than twenty small hydro projects in the northern part of the island of Luzon in the Philippines took a special urgency on the wake of the Magnitude 7.7 earthquake that shook the island on July 17, 1990. The paper describes the approach followed to determine design shaking level criteria at each hydro site consistent with the seismic environment estimated at that same site. The approach consisted of three steps: (1) Seismicity: understanding the mechanisms and tectonic features susceptible to generate seismicity and estimating the associated seismicity levels, (2) Seismic Hazard: in the absence of an accurate historical record, using statistics to determine the expected level of ground shaking at a site during the operational 100-year design life of each Project, and (3) Criteria Selection: finally and most importantly, exercising judgment in estimating the final proposed level of shaking at each site. The resulting characteristics of estimated seismicity and seismic hazard and the proposed final earthquake design criteria are provided.

  17. Protocol, Inspection Criteria - April 23, 2008 | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Protocol, Inspection Criteria - April 23, 2008 Protocol, Inspection Criteria - April 23, 2008 April 23, 2008 Inspection Criteria, Activities, and Lines of Inquiry, April 23, 2008...

  18. Marine botany. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawes, C.J.

    1998-12-01

    Marine plants are a diverse group that include unicellular algae, seaweeds, seagrasses, salt marshes, and mangrove forests. They carry out a variety of ecological functions and serve as the primary producers in coastal wetlands and oceanic waters. The theme that connects such a wide variety of plants is their ecology, which was also emphasized in the 1981 edition. The goal of this revision is to present taxonomic, physiological, chemical, and ecological aspects of marine plants, their adaptations, and how abiotic and biotic factors interact in their communities. The data are presented in a concise, comparative manner in order to identify similarities and differences between communities such as salt marsh and mangroves or subtidal seaweeds and seagrasses. To accomplish this, the text is organized into five chapters that introduce the marine habitats, consider abiotic and biotic factors, and anthropogenic influences on the communities followed by seven chapters that deal with microalgae, seaweeds, salt marshes, mangroves, seagrasses, and coral reefs. Two appendixes are included; one presents simple field techniques and the other is a summary of seaweed uses.

  19. Proposal Writing Guidelines and Scoring Criteria

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    when the reasons for choosing a specific beamline are clearly stated, e.g., unique features, required resolution, higher flux, etc. Criteria for Evaluating the Scientific...

  20. Vermont Small Hydropower Assistance Program Screening Criteria...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Vermont Small Hydropower Assistance Program Screening Criteria Summary and Application InstructionsPermitting...

  1. Range Design Criteria- June 4, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains the currently-approved firearms "Range Design Criteria" referred to on DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations

  2. Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy...

  3. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office Environmental...

  4. WPN 99-7- WAP Eligibility Criteria

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To provide states with guidance on the interpretation of certain eligibility criteria for use in the low-income Weatherization Assistance Program.

  5. Nuclear Safety Reporting Criteria | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    safety noncompliances into the Department of Energy's Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS). ... to Occurrence Report-Based Noncompliance Tracking System Reporting Criteria Safety and ...

  6. California Marine Life Protection Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ActLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014 Legal Citation California Fish and Game Code Section 2850 et seq. DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:...

  7. EO 13158: Marine Protected Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Executive Order will help protect the significant natural and cultural resources within the marine environment for the benefit of present and future generations by strengthening and expanding...

  8. Marin County- Solar Access Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marin County's Energy Conservation Code is designed to assure new subdivisions provide for future passive or natural heating or cooling opportunities in the subdivision to the extent feasible. ...

  9. International Marine Renewable Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The International Marine Renewable Energy Conference (IMREC) offers researchers, technology developers, policy makers, NGOs, and industry representatives the opportunity to discuss financing...

  10. Water quality criteria for colored smokes: Solvent Yellow 33, Final report. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, K.A.; Hovatter, P.S.

    1987-11-01

    The available data on the environmental fate, aquatic toxicity, and mammalian toxicity of Solvent Yellow 33, a quinoline dye used in colored smoke grenades, were reviewed. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guidelines were used in an attempt to generate water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life and its use and of human health. 87 refs., 2 figs., 13 tabs.

  11. Resolute Marine Energy Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resolute Marine Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Resolute Marine Energy Inc Address: 3 Post Office Square 3rd floor Place: Massachusetts Country: United States Zip:...

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contents 1 Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization 2 CurrentTidalRiverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  13. Marine Hydroelectric Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Marine Hydroelectric Company Address: 24040 Camino Del Avion A 107 Place: Monarch Beach Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Year Founded: 1983 Phone...

  14. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry. PDF icon Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and ...

  15. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Computer Modeling Workshop The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy...

  16. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet) Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet) This fact sheet describes the Wind and Water Power Program's current approach to...

  17. Seoul Marine Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seoul Marine Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Seoul Marine Co Ltd Place: Gwangju, Korea (Republic) Sector: Solar Product: Korea-based solar project developer. References:...

  18. Facility Representative Program, Criteria & Review Approach Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person.

  19. Generalized Lawson Criteria for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tipton, Robert E.

    2015-08-27

    The Lawson Criterion was proposed by John D. Lawson in 1955 as a general measure of the conditions necessary for a magnetic fusion device to reach thermonuclear ignition. Over the years, similar ignition criteria have been proposed which would be suitable for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) designs. This paper will compare and contrast several ICF ignition criteria based on Lawson’s original ideas. Both analytical and numerical results will be presented which will demonstrate that although the various criteria differ in some details, they are closely related and perform similarly as ignition criteria. A simple approximation will also be presented which allows the inference of each ignition parameter directly from the measured data taken on most shots fired at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with a minimum reliance on computer simulations. Evidence will be presented which indicates that the experimentally inferred ignition parameters on the best NIF shots are very close to the ignition threshold.

  20. Natural phenomena hazards site characterization criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The criteria and recommendations in this standard shall apply to site characterization for the purpose of mitigating Natural Phenomena Hazards (wind, floods, landslide, earthquake, volcano, etc.) in all DOE facilities covered by DOE Order 5480.28. Criteria for site characterization not related to NPH are not included unless necessary for clarification. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology, and geotechnical studies.

  1. Criteria for SES Positions | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Services » Executive Resources » Senior Executive Service (SES) » Criteria for SES Positions Criteria for SES Positions Initial career appointments to the SES must be made following competitive merit staffing requirements. Agencies must announce SES vacancies that will be filled by initial career appointment to at least all Federal civil service employees. Vacancies are published on the USAJOBS Veteran's preference does not apply to SES selections. An Executive Resources Board (ERB) is

  2. Electronic Records Management Software Applications Design Criteria

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Standard | Department of Energy Electronic Records Management Software Applications Design Criteria Standard Electronic Records Management Software Applications Design Criteria Standard This Standard is reissued under the authority of DoD Directive 5015.2, "Department of DefenseRecords Management Program," March 6, 2000, (Reference (a)) which provides implementing and procedural guidance on the management of records in the Department of Defense. PDF icon Electronic Records

  3. DOE Tour of Zero: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes DOE Tour of Zero: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes Addthis 1 of 10 Clifton View Homes built this 2,408-square-foot zero energy home in Coupeville, Washington, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 10 The ultra-efficient home has 7.84 kW of solar electric panels on the roof, which contribute to zero utility bills for the homeowners. The roof is built with structural insulated panels (SIPs) that

  4. Facility Energy Management Guidelines and Criteria for Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Management Guidelines and Criteria for Energy and Water Evaluations in Covered Facilities Facility Energy Management Guidelines and Criteria for Energy and Water Evaluations...

  5. February 23, 2016 Webinar - Multi-Criteria Decisional Analyses...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3, 2016 Webinar - Multi-Criteria Decisional Analyses: Methodology and Case Studies February 23, 2016 Webinar - Multi-Criteria Decisional Analyses: Methodology and Case Studies ...

  6. Statistical criteria for characterizing irradiance time series.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-10-01

    We propose and examine several statistical criteria for characterizing time series of solar irradiance. Time series of irradiance are used in analyses that seek to quantify the performance of photovoltaic (PV) power systems over time. Time series of irradiance are either measured or are simulated using models. Simulations of irradiance are often calibrated to or generated from statistics for observed irradiance and simulations are validated by comparing the simulation output to the observed irradiance. Criteria used in this comparison should derive from the context of the analyses in which the simulated irradiance is to be used. We examine three statistics that characterize time series and their use as criteria for comparing time series. We demonstrate these statistics using observed irradiance data recorded in August 2007 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and in June 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  7. Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellefson, M.D.

    1998-07-01

    Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities.

  8. Aseismic design criteria for uranium enrichment plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beavers, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper technological, economical, and safety issues of aseismic design of uranium enrichment plants are presented. The role of management in the decision making process surrounding these issues is also discussed. The resolution of the issues and the decisions made by management are controlling factors in developing aseismic design criteria for any facility. Based on past experience in developing aseismic design criteria for the GCEP various recommendations are made for future enrichment facilities, and since uranium enrichment plants are members of the nuclear fuel cycle the discussion and recommendations presented herein are applicable to other nonreactor nuclear facilities.

  9. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-07-01

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

  10. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-10-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  11. History and Evolution of the Johnson Criteria.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjaardema, Tracy A.; Smith, Collin S.; Birch, Gabriel Carisle

    2015-07-01

    The Johnson Criteria metric calculates probability of detection of an object imaged by an optical system, and was created in 1958 by John Johnson. As understanding of target detection has improved, detection models have evolved to better model additional factors such as weather, scene content, and object placement. The initial Johnson Criteria, while sufficient for technology and understanding at the time, does not accurately reflect current research into target acquisition and technology. Even though current research shows a dependence on human factors, there appears to be a lack of testing and modeling of human variability.

  12. Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-17

    This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

  13. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Form Edit History Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Jump to: navigation, search Add a Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Input the name of your Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  14. Modeling transport and dilution of produced water and the resulting uptake and biomagnification in marine biota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rye, H.; Reed, M.; Slagstad, D.

    1996-12-31

    The paper explains the numerical modelling efforts undertaken in order to study possible marine biological impacts caused by releases of produced water from the Haltenbanken area outside the western coast of Norway. Acute effects on marine life from releases of produced water appear to be relatively small and confined to areas rather lose to the release site. Biomagnification may however be experienced for relatively low concentrations at larger distances from the release point. Such effects can he modeled by performing a step-wise approach which includes: The use of 3-D hydrodynamic models to determine the ocean current fields; The use of 3-D multi-source numerical models to determine the concentration fields from the produced water releases, given the current field; and The use of biologic models to simulate the behavior of and larvae (passive marine biota) and fish (active marine biota) and their interaction with the concentration field. The paper explains the experiences gained by using this approach for the calculation of possible influences on marine life below the EC{sub 50} or LC{sub 50} concentration levels. The models are used for simulating concentration fields from 5 simultaneous sources at the Haltenbank area and simulation of magnification in some marine species from 2 simultaneous sources in the same area. Naphthalenes and phenols, which are both present in the produced water, were used as the chemical substances in the simulations.

  15. IHE material qualification tests description and criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slape, R J

    1984-06-01

    This report describes the qualification tests presently being used at Pantex Plant, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory that are required by the Department of Energy prior to the approval for an explosive as an Insensitive High Explosive (IHE) material. The acceptance criteria of each test for IHE qualification is also discussed. 5 references, 10 figures.

  16. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  17. FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assessment Guidance and Criteria FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria This document establishes the guidance and criteria for conducting internal and independent Federal Technical Capability Assessments within the Department. The requirements of this document are applicable to those organizations having safety responsibilities for defense nuclear facilities. This includes both headquarters and field organizations. Regardless of the type of assessment conducted, the objectives and criteria

  18. Pure Marine Gen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gen Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pure Marine Gen Place: Belfast, United Kingdom Zip: BT3 9DTN Product: Northern Ireland-based wave project developer. References: Pure Marine...

  19. marine energy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    marine energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 15 July, 2014 - 07:07 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine...

  20. Marine Mammal Protection Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Mammal Protection Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Marine Mammal Protection ActLegal Abstract The...

  1. Marine One Landing Exercise at Argonne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-20

    Marine One and its support helicopters conduct a landing exercise at Argonne prior to the President's visit.

  2. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Computer Modeling Workshop | Department of Energy Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be

  3. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-09-03

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

  4. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-01-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

  5. Packaging design criteria for the MCO cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, W.S.

    1996-04-29

    Approximately 2,100 metric tons of unprocessed, irradiated nuclear fuel elements are presently stored in the K Basins (including possibly 700 additional elements from PUREX, N Reactor, and 327 Laboratory). The basin water, particularly in the K East Basin, contains significant quantities of dissolved nuclear isotopes and radioactive fuel corrosion particles. To permit cleanup of the K Basins and fuel conditioning, the fuel will be transported from the 100 K Area to a Canister Storage Building (CSB) in the 200 East area. In order to initiate K Basin cleanup on schedule, the two-year fuel-shipping campaign must begin by December 1997. The purpose of this packaging design criteria is to provide criteria for the design, fabrication, and use of a packaging system to transport the large quantities of irradiated nuclear fuel elements positioned within Multiple Canister Overpacks.

  6. Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    German, A.; Siddiqui, A.; Dakin, B.

    2014-11-01

    The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Allen Gilliland of One Sky Homes collaborated on a marine climate retrofit project designed to meet both Passive House (PH) and Building America (BA) program standards. The scope included sealing, installing wall, roof and floor insulation (previously lacking), replacing windows, upgrading the heating and cooling system, and installing.

  7. Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    German, A.; Siddiqui, A.; Dakin, B.

    2014-11-01

    The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Allen Gilliland of One Sky Homes collaborated on a marine climate retrofit project designed to meet both Passive House (PH) and Building America program standards. The scope included sealing, installing wall, roof and floor insulation (previously lacking), replacing windows, upgrading the heating and cooling system, and installing mechanical ventilation.

  8. Application Content and Evaluation Criteria/Process

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Evaluation Criteria/Process Reginald Tyler Golden Field Office Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Application Content o Separate Applications for Each Major Topic o Title Should Identify the Topic Area o Application - SF 424 o Budget File - SF 424A o Project Summary - 1 page, non-proprietary Project Narrative o Provide clear description of the technical concept and how you plan to accomplish the work. o Include a description of the relevance of and justification for

  9. Proposal Writing Guidelines and Scoring Criteria

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proposal Writing Guidelines and Scoring Criteria Print Principal Investigator The proposal form asks for the names and contact information of the experiment leader completing the form and the Principal Investigator (PI). The PI is the leader and the individual responsible for the group, and the experiment leader is often the person completing the proposal form. In this way the ALS would like to encourage postdocs and students to gain experience in submitting proposals as the experiment leader,

  10. Functional Area Criteria & Review Approach Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CRADS provided on this page are provided as examples of functional area Objectives and Criteria used to evaluate how requirements are meet. They are only examples and should not be utilized as is. In accordance with DOE Standard 3006-2010, CRADs should be developed by team members to reflect the specifics of the proposed review (i.e., breadth and depth) as defined in the approved Plan of Action.

  11. Microsoft Word - Assessment-B-ProgramCriteria

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ATTACHMENT B PROGRAM ASSESSMENT CRITERIA Identify the following for all sites: Program Management * Number FTE's devoted to Records Management o Full-time Federal and Contractor o Part-time Federal and Contractor Percent of time spent on Records Management duties * Percentage of time each Records Management employee is assigned to: o Program Management o Operations Training/Assistance Schedule Application Records Holding/Storage Area Activities EEOICPA Claims * Monthly Claim Volume Other,

  12. Acceptance Criteria Framework for Autonomous Biological Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzenitis, J M

    2006-12-12

    The purpose of this study was to examine a set of user acceptance criteria for autonomous biological detection systems for application in high-traffic, public facilities. The test case for the acceptance criteria was the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) operating in high-traffic facilities in New York City (NYC). However, the acceptance criteria were designed to be generally applicable to other biological detection systems in other locations. For such detection systems, ''users'' will include local authorities (e.g., facility operators, public health officials, and law enforcement personnel) and national authorities [including personnel from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the BioWatch Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)]. The panel members brought expertise from a broad range of backgrounds to complete this picture. The goals of this document are: (1) To serve as informal guidance for users in considering the benefits and costs of these systems. (2) To serve as informal guidance for developers in understanding the needs of users. In follow-up work, this framework will be used to systematically document the APDS for appropriateness and readiness for use in NYC.

  13. Concerns in Marine Renewable Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Sharon; Previsic, Mirko; Nelson, Peter; Woo, Sheri

    2010-06-17

    To accelerate the adoption of these emerging marine hydrokinetic technologies, navigational and environmental issues and concerns must be identified and addressed. As hydrokinetic projects move forward, various stakeholders will need to be engaged; one of the key issues that project proponents face as they engage stakeholders is that many conflicting uses and environmental issues are not well-understood. Much of this lack of understanding comes from a limited understanding of the technologies themselves. To address this issue, in September 2008, RE Vision consulting, LLC, was selected by the Department of Energy, under their market acceleration program, to apply a scenario-based assessment approach to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector. The goal was to improve understanding of potential environmental and navigation impacts of these technologies and focus stakeholders on the critical issues. To meet this goal, the study established baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios captured variations in technical approaches and deployment scales and thus grounded the analysis in realistic constraints. The work conducted under this award provides an important foundation to other market acceleration activities carried out by the DOE and other stakeholders in this sector. The scenarios were then evaluated using a framework developed by H.T. Harvey & Associates to identify and characterize key environmental concerns and uncertainties. In collaboration with PCCI and the U.S. Coast Guard, navigation issues were assessed and guidelines developed to assure the safe operation of these systems. Finally, the work highlights “next steps” to take to continue development and adoption of marine hydrokinetic energy. Throughout the project, close collaboration with device developers, project developers and regulatory stakeholders was pursued to ensure that assumptions and constraints are realistic. Results concur with most of the permitting hurdles experienced by on-going projects in the U.S., and specific recommendations are provided for identifying and addressing them. While many areas of further research were identified, the study did not identify any major show-stoppers, largely because these technologies have a relatively low environmental risk-profile if compared to other activities routinely permitted in the marine environment. The frameworks and representative scenarios developed provide an objective and transparent tool for stakeholders, regulators and developers to assist in the decision-making process for siting wave and tidal energy plants, and meet our goal of improving understanding between all stakeholders. The final product consists of three reports: Report 1 - Wave Energy Scenarios. This report includes: A technology characterization of four different wave energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations; A site characterization of two potential deployment sites located in Hawaii and California; Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities; Navigational demarcation requirements; and, Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts. Report 2 - Tidal Energy Scenarios. This report includes: A technology characterization of three tidal energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations; A site characterization of one potential deployment location in the Puget Sound, Washington; Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities; Navigational demarcation requirements; and, Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts.Report 3 - Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns. This report describes frameworks for identifying key environmental effects and applies them to the wave and tidal energy deployment scenarios described in the first two reports. It highlights critical issues and recommendations for future research.

  14. Machine plumbness criteria: Interim technology release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The objective of this technology release is to define the maximum allowable deviation from plumb of the centrifuge machine and to recommend machine installation techniques to achieve the specified criteria. The centrifuge feature used as a reference for plumbness is the casing centerline as defined by a line drawn between the theoretical centers of the top and bottom flange faces. In practice, this measurement is accomplished by using specified casing flange diameters or bolt patterns as the reference points. The criterion adopted for GCEP is that each machine shall be plumb within 0.5 in. over the length of the casing as initially installed. Over a long period of time the plumbness is allowed to degrade to 1.0 in. This standard should be achievable using the currently planned installation techniques and within a time limit consistent with GCEP operational objectives. For development testing, centrifuge machines are meticulously adjusted using a plumb bob to achieve a plumbness with 1/8 in. About one to two days are required to complete the installation. This level of effort is justified for a development machine especially where baseline data is being gathered. A more reasonable standard with a corresponding reduction in installation time is required for GCEP. The specified criteria of 0.5 in. maximum out-of-plumb at time of installation and 1.0 in., ultimate, are believed to be a reasonable compromise. Machine design features or operating modes that are dependent on vertical alignment were examined to assess the impact of the selected plumbness criteria. Machine performance and design requirements are defined in the applicable technology release documents.

  15. 309 Facility deactivation and decommisioning Criteria Completion Check Lists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornwell, B.C.

    1996-02-01

    To facilitate and track completion of the 309 Facility turnover criteria completion an Applicability Matrix and Criteria Completion Check Lists were prepared. The applicability matrix documents the required turnover criteria for a given area in the facility or scope of work. The applicable criteria is selected for 16 different areas. For each area a completion checklist is provided to document completion of a requirement by WHC and the Environmental Restoration Contractor.

  16. DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for DOE Facilities | Department of Energy 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities, provides criteria and guidance for the analysis and design of facility structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that are necessary to implement the

  17. Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentbioenergy-and-food-security-criteria- Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This...

  18. Structural acceptance criteria Remote Handling Building Tritium Extraction Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertz, G.

    1999-12-16

    This structural acceptance criteria contains the requirements for the structural analysis and design of the Remote Handling Building (RHB) in the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF). The purpose of this acceptance criteria is to identify the specific criteria and methods that will ensure a structurally robust building that will safely perform its intended function and comply with the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) structural requirements.

  19. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: • DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste • DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) • DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) • U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  20. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-02-28

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  1. FRACTURE FAILURE CRITERIA OF SOFC PEN STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Qu, Jianmin

    2007-04-30

    Thermal stresses and warpage of the PEN are unavoidable due to the temperature changes from the stress-free sintering temperature to room temperature and mismatch of the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of various layers in the PEN structures of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) during the PEN manufacturing process. In the meantime, additional mechanical stresses will also be created by mechanical flattening during the stack assembly process. The porous nature of anode and cathode in the PEN structures determines presence of the initial flaws and crack on the interfaces of anode/electrolyte/cathode and in the interior of the materials. The sintering/assembling induced stresses may cause the fracture failure of PEN structure. Therefore, fracture failure criteria for SOFC PEN structures is developed in order to ensure the structural integrity of the cell and stack of SOFC. In this paper, the fracture criteria based on the relationship between the critical energy release rate and critical curvature and maximum displacement of the warped cells caused by the temperature changes as well as mechanical flattening process is established so that possible failure of SOFC PEN structures may be predicted deterministically by the measurement of the curvature and displacement of the warped cells.

  2. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy & Hydrokinetic » Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization With more than 50% of the population living within 50 miles of coastlines, there is vast potential to provide clean, renewable electricity to communities and cities across the United States using marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies. In order to understand the full potential for future electricity production that

  3. A review of macroscopic ductile failure criteria.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corona, Edmundo; Reedlunn, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work was to describe several of the ductile failure criteria com- monly used to solve practical problems. The following failure models were considered: equivalent plastic strain, equivalent plastic strain in tension, maximum shear, Mohr- Coulomb, Wellman's tearing parameter, Johnson-Cook and BCJ MEM. The document presents the main characteristics of each failure model as well as sample failure predic- tions for simple proportional loading stress histories in three dimensions and in plane stress. Plasticity calculations prior to failure were conducted with a simple, linear hardening, J2 plasticity model. The resulting failure envelopes were plotted in prin- cipal stress space and plastic strain space, where the dependence on stress triaxiality and Lode angle are clearly visible. This information may help analysts select a ductile fracture model for a practical problem and help interpret analysis results.

  4. Technical guidance for siting criteria development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, D.C.; Sprung, J.L.; Alpert, D.J.; Diegert, K.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Ritchie, L.T.; Strip, D.R.; Johnson, J.D.; Hansen, K.; Robinson, J.

    1982-12-01

    Technical guidance to support the formulation and comparison of possible siting criteria for nuclear power plants has been developed in four areas: (1) consequences of hypothetical severe nuclear-power-plant accidents, (2) characteristics of population distributions about current reactor sites, (3) site availability within the continental United States, and (4) socioeconomic impacts of reactor siting. The impact on consequences of source-term magnitude, meteorology, population distribution, and emergency response have been analyzed. Population distributions about current sites were analyzed to identify statistical characteristics, time trends, and regional differences. A site-availability data bank was constructed for the continential United States. The data bank contains information about population densities, seismicity, topography, water availability, and land-use restrictions. Finally, the socioeconomic impacts of rural-industrialization projects, energy boomtowns, and nuclear power plants were examined to determine their nature, magnitude, and dependence on site demography and remoteness.

  5. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Characterization 2 CurrentTidalRiverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization To find out more...

  6. Hawaii National Marine Renewable Energy Center (HINMREC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocheleau, Richard

    2011-09-27

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review in which the principal investigator discusses project progress to develop in-water testing facility for marine and hydrokinetics energy devices.

  7. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-29

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  8. Sandia Energy - Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turbine Foil Structural Health Monitoring Presented at GMREC METS Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power News News & Events Systems Analysis Investigations on Marine...

  9. Shafir Civil Marine Engineering | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shafir Civil & Marine Engineering Place: Israel Sector: Services Product: Services include infrastructure works, contracting, bridge...

  10. Marine Renewable Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Marine Renewable Technologies Address: 319 Business Lane Suite 1000 Ashland VA 23005 Place: Ashland Zip: 23005 Region: United States...

  11. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  12. Marine Current Turbines Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Kingdom Zip: BS34 8PD Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Product: Developer of tidal stream turbine technology for exploiting flowing water in general and tidal streams in...

  13. Sustainable Marine Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kingdom Zip: PO32 6RF Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic, Renewable Energy Product: PLAT-O Year Founded: 2012 Phone Number: 019833297145 Website: www.sustainablemarine.com...

  14. Marine Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Marine Energy Corporation Abbreviation: MEC Address: 1308 Waugh Drive PMB 465 Place: Houston, Texas Country: United States...

  15. 2010 MARINE MICROBES GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE (JULY 4-9, 2010 - TILTON SCHOOL, TILTON NH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kirchman

    2010-04-09

    Marine microbes include representatives from all three kingdoms of life and collectively carry out virtually all forms of metabolisms found on the planet. Because of this metabolic and genetic diversity, these microbes mediate many of the reactions making up global biogeochemical cycles which govern the flow of energy and material in the biosphere. The goal of this conference is to bring together approaches and concepts from studies of microbial evolution, genomics, ecology, and oceanography in order to gain new insights into marine microbes and their biogeochemical functions. The integration of scales, from genes to global cycles, will result in a better understanding of marine microbes and of their contribution to the carbon cycle and other biogeochemical processes.

  16. A Review of Battery Life-Cycle Analysis. State of Knowledge and Critical Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, J. L.; Gaines, L.

    2010-10-01

    This report examines battery life-cycle assessments with a focus on cradle-to-gate (CTG) energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria emissions. This includes battery manufacturing and as the production of materials that make up batteries. The report covers both what is known about battery life cycles, as well as what needs to be established for better environmental evaluations.

  17. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01

    This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program. The program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new technologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity.

  18. U.S. Marine Corp Logistics Base | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Corp Logistics Base Jump to: navigation, search Name U.S. Marine Corp Logistics Base Facility U.S. Marine Corp Logistics Base Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind...

  19. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the second report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of tidal power plants deployed in Tacoma Narrows, Washington. The Narrows contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other tidal power sites and serves as a representative case study. Tidal power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize impacts, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informs the process of selecting representative tidal power devices. The selection criteria is that such devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development including Verdant Power, which has demonstrated an array of turbines in the East River of New York, Clean Current, which has demonstrated a device off Race Rocks, BC, and OpenHydro, which has demonstrated a device at the European Marine Energy Test Center and is on the verge of deploying a larger device in the Bay of Fundy. MCT demonstrated their device both at Devon (UK) and Strangford Narrows (Northern Ireland). Furthermore OpenHydro, CleanCurrent, and MCT are the three devices being installed at the Minas Passage (Canada). Environmental effects will largely scale with the size of tidal power development. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) an early, small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial scale plant. For the three technologies and scales at the selected site, this results in a total of nine deployment scenarios outlined in the report.

  20. Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Cinq-Mars; Timothy Burke; Dr. James Irish; Brian Gustafson; Dr. James Kirtley; Dr. Aiman Alawa

    2011-09-01

    A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: � Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. � Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. � Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. � Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. � Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. � Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. � Completed final reporting and deliverables

  1. Life Cycle Cost Estimate

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

  2. Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Renewable Energy Center Jump to: navigation, search Name: Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center Address: 4000 15th Ave Place: Seattle, Washington Zip: 98105...

  3. Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit The Alliance for Residential ...

  4. MHK Technologies/Blue Motion Energy marine turbine | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Motion Energy marine turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Blue Motion Energy marine turbine.jpg Technology Profile...

  5. DOE Announces Webinars on Instrumentation for Monitoring Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    renewable energy converters, characterizing the distribution and habitat use of marine animals in the vicinity of the converters, and measuring sound produced by marine...

  6. 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine Corps Recruit San Diego 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Marine Corps Recruit San Diego PDF icon fewm13usmcmcdepotsandiegohighres.pdf PDF icon ...

  7. ARM - Field Campaign - Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsMarine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) Campaign Links MAGIC Website ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds...

  8. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles The ...

  9. Aviation Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aviation Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Aviation Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd Region: United Kingdom Sector:...

  10. Sandia Energy - Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marine Hydrokinetic Coatings Initiated at PNNL's Sequim Bay Sandia's Materials & Manufacturing Reliability Program has begun testing their novel marine hydrokinetic (MHK)...

  11. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and Environmental Effects Research Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and...

  12. UK Centre for Marine Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Centre for Marine Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: UK Centre for Marine Renewable Energy Place: United Kingdom Sector: Renewable Energy Product: UK Centre for...

  13. A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

    1992-04-01

    Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

  14. Energy Department Announces More Stringent Criteria for ENERGY STAR®

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Refrigerators | Department of Energy Stringent Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Refrigerators Energy Department Announces More Stringent Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Refrigerators August 3, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced increased energy efficient criteria for refrigerators carrying the ENERGY STAR® label. In order to qualify, full-size refrigerators must be a minimum of 20 percent more efficient than current federal energy efficiency

  15. Department of Energy Announces More Stringent Energy Efficient Criteria for

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ENERGY STAR® Dishwashers | Department of Energy Stringent Energy Efficient Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Dishwashers Department of Energy Announces More Stringent Energy Efficient Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Dishwashers March 2, 2006 - 11:39am Addthis More Efficient Dishwashers Estimated to Save Consumers over $26 Million Annually WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced more stringent energy efficient criteria for dishwashers carrying the ENERGY STAR® label that

  16. Department of Energy Announces Tougher Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Clothes

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Washers | Department of Energy Tougher Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Clothes Washers Department of Energy Announces Tougher Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Clothes Washers March 30, 2005 - 11:09am Addthis New Standards Estimated to Save Consumers over $52.8 Million Annually WASHINGTON, D.C. - In a continuing effort to improve America's energy conservation, the U.S. Department of Energy today announced more stringent criteria for clothes washers carrying the ENERGY STAR® label. The new, tougher

  17. February 23, 2016 Webinar - Multi-Criteria Decisional Analyses: Methodology

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Case Studies | Department of Energy 3, 2016 Webinar - Multi-Criteria Decisional Analyses: Methodology and Case Studies February 23, 2016 Webinar - Multi-Criteria Decisional Analyses: Methodology and Case Studies Performance & RIsk Assessment (P&RA) Community of Practice (CoP) Webinar - February 23, 2016 - Multi-Criteria Decisional Analyses: Methodology and Case Studies (Dr. Igor Linkov and Mr. Matthew Bates, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers). Video recording of the presentaion

  18. Facility Energy Management Guidelines and Criteria for Energy and Water

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Evaluations in Covered Facilities | Department of Energy Facility Energy Management Guidelines and Criteria for Energy and Water Evaluations in Covered Facilities Facility Energy Management Guidelines and Criteria for Energy and Water Evaluations in Covered Facilities Guidelines and criteria describe meeting requirements within Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007), including defining facilities covered by the provision, designating facility energy

  19. Worker Safety and Health Reporting Criteria | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    January 1, 2012 Worker Safety and Health Noncompliances Associated With Occurrences(DOE Order 232.2) These tables provide the criteria for reporting worker safety and health noncompliances into the Department of Energy's Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS). A more detailed description of the NTS reporting criteria and expectations can be found in the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Enforcement Coordinator Handbook. PDF icon Worker Safety and Health Reporting Criteria More Documents &

  20. Readiness Review Training- Development of Criteria And Review Approach Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slides used for November 8-9, 2010 Readiness Review Training - Development of Criteria And Review Approach Documents at the Idaho National Laboratory.

  1. Natural Phenomena Hazard Analysis and Design Criteria for Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazard Analysis and Design Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities by Diane Johnson This Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012,...

  2. CO - Floodplain Stormwater and Criteria Manual | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This webpage provides the floodplain stormwater and criteria in Colorado. Author Colorado Water Conservation Board - Department of Natural Resources Published Colorado Water...

  3. Criteria and Indicators for Sustainable Woodfuels | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type: Guidemanual Website: www.fao.orgdocrep012i1673ei1673e00.pdf Criteria and Indicators for Sustainable Woodfuels Screenshot References: Sustainable Woodfuels1...

  4. Oregon Procedure and Criteria for Hazardous Waste Treatment,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Procedure and Criteria for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage or Disposal Permits Fact Sheet Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  5. Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development's Criteria...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    case-by-case basis and focus on direct and indirect impacts of a substantial nature. Use of these criteria further implements any applicable state and federal review...

  6. Texas PUCT Substantive Rule 25.101, Certification Criteria, Electric...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Texas PUCT Substantive Rule 25.101, Certification Criteria, Electric Substantive Rules Jump...

  7. NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimke, J.

    2011-02-01

    This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves literature survey of technologies to perform the nitrate to hydroxide conversion, selection of the most promising technologies, preparation of a flowsheet and design of a system. The most promising technologies are electrochemical reduction of nitrates and chemical reduction with hydrogen or ammonia. The primary reviewed technologies are listed and they aredescribed in more detail later in the report: (1) Electrochemical destruction; (2) Chemical reduction with agents such as ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen; (3) Hydrothermal reduction process; and (4) Calcination. Only three of the technologies on the list have been demonstrated to generate usable amounts of caustic; electrochemical reduction and chemical reduction with ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen and hydrothermal reduction. Chemical reduction with an organic reactant such as formic acid generates carbon dioxide which reacts with caustic and is thus counterproductive. Treatment of nitrate with aluminum or other active metals generates a solid product. High temperature calcination has the potential to generate sodium oxide which may be hydrated to sodium hydroxide, but this is unproven. The following criteria were developed to evaluate the most suitable option. The numbers in brackets after the criteria are relative weighting factors to account for importance: (1) Personnel exposure to radiation for installation, routine operation and maintenance; (2) Non-radioactive safety issues; (3) Whether the technology generates caustic and how many moles of caustic are generated per mole of nitrate plus nitrite decomposed; (4) Whether the technology can handle nitrate and nitrite at the concentrations encountered in waste; (5) Maturity of technology; (6) Estimated annual cost of operation (labor, depreciation, materials, utilities); (7) Capital cost; (8) Selectivity to nitrogen as decomposition product (other products are flammable and/or toxic); (9) Impact of introduced species; (10) Selectivity for destruction of nitrate vs. nitrite; and (11) Cost of deactivation and demolition. Each technology was given a score from one

  8. MERGING CRITERIA FOR GIANT IMPACTS OF PROTOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genda, H.; Kokubo, E.; Ida, S.

    2012-01-10

    At the final stage of terrestrial planet formation, known as the giant impact stage, a few tens of Mars-sized protoplanets collide with one another to form terrestrial planets. Almost all previous studies on the orbital and accretional evolution of protoplanets in this stage have been based on the assumption of perfect accretion, where two colliding protoplanets always merge. However, recent impact simulations have shown that collisions among protoplanets are not always merging events, that is, two colliding protoplanets sometimes move apart after the collision (hit-and-run collision). As a first step toward studying the effects of such imperfect accretion of protoplanets on terrestrial planet formation, we investigated the merging criteria for collisions of rocky protoplanets. Using the smoothed particle hydrodynamic method, we performed more than 1000 simulations of giant impacts with various parameter sets, such as the mass ratio of protoplanets, {gamma}, the total mass of two protoplanets, M{sub T}, the impact angle, {theta}, and the impact velocity, v{sub imp}. We investigated the critical impact velocity, v{sub cr}, at the transition between merging and hit-and-run collisions. We found that the normalized critical impact velocity, v{sub cr}/v{sub esc}, depends on {gamma} and {theta}, but does not depend on M{sub T}, where v{sub esc} is the two-body escape velocity. We derived a simple formula for v{sub cr}/v{sub esc} as a function of {gamma} and {theta} (Equation (16)), and applied it to the giant impact events obtained by N-body calculations in the previous studies. We found that 40% of these events should not be merging events.

  9. Application Content and Evaluation Criteria/Process | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Presentation on Application Content and Evaluation Criteria/Process presented at the PEM fuel cell pre-solicitation meeting held May 26, 2005 in Arlington, VA. PDF icon fc_wrkshp_reg.pdf More Documents & Publications Application Content and Evaluation Criteria/Process Microsoft Word - aDE-FOA-0000096.rtf Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc

  10. Ecological Research Division, Marine Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    This report presents program summaries of the various projects sponsored during 1979 by the Marine Research Program of the Ecological Research Division. Program areas include the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on the marine environment; a study of the baseline ecology of a proposed OTEC site near Puerto Rico; the environmental impact of offshore geothermal energy development; the movement of radionuclides through the marine environment; the environmental aspects of power plant cooling systems; and studies of the physical and biological oceangraphy of the continental shelves bordering the United States.

  11. Life Extension Program

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    en NNSA, Air Force Complete Successful B61-12 Life Extension Program Development Flight Test at Tonopah Test Range http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleases...

  12. Life Extension Programs

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B61-12 Life Extension Program Milestone: First Full-System Mechanical Environment Test Completed Successfully http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesb61lep

  13. Multi-criteria assessment of socio-environmental aspects in shrinking cities. Experiences from eastern Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schetke, Sophie Haase, Dagmar

    2008-10-15

    Demographic change and economic decline produce modified urban land use pattern and densities. Compared to the beginning of the 90s after the German reunification, nowadays massive housing and commercial vacancies followed by demolition and perforation come to pass in many cities of the former GDR. In consequence, a considerable surplus of urban brownfields has been created. Furthermore, the decline in the urban fabric affects social infrastructure and urban greenery of local neighbourhoods. Here, urban planning enters into 'uncharted territory' since it needs to assess the socio-environmental impact of shrinkage. In order to carry out such an evaluation quantitatively, a multi-criteria assessment scheme (MCA) was developed and applied. Firstly, we identified infrastructure and land use changes related to vacancy and demolition. Secondly, demolition scenarios for the coming 20 years were applied in order to give an idea for a long-term monitoring approach at the local district level. A multi-criteria indicator matrix quantifies the socio-environmental impact on both urban greenery and residents. Using it, we set demolition scenarios against urban 'quality of life' targets. Empirical evidence comes from Leipzig, in eastern Germany, a representative case study for urban shrinkage processes. The results show that shrinkage implies socio-environmental changes of residential livelihoods, however, does not simply increase or decrease the overall urban quality of life. The integrated assessment of all indicators identifies environmental and social opportunities, as well as the challenges a shrinking city is faced with.

  14. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry.

  15. Energy Department Announces $22 Million for Marine Energy Demonstration and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Monitoring Technology Projects | Department of Energy 2 Million for Marine Energy Demonstration and Environmental Monitoring Technology Projects Energy Department Announces $22 Million for Marine Energy Demonstration and Environmental Monitoring Technology Projects March 2, 2016 - 8:40am Addthis Image courtesy the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory. Image courtesy the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Sciences

  16. The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial Communities

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial Communities CrossMark click for updates n OPEN ACCESS Citation: Zhang Z, Chen Y, Wang R, Cai R, Fu Y, Jiao N (2015) The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial Communities. PLoS ONE 10(11): e0142690. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0142690 Editor: Antonietta Quigg, Texas A&M University at Galveston, UNITED STATES Received: March 18,2015 Accepted: October 26,2015 Published: November 16,2015

  17. Jack-up rig for marine drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, S. R.

    1981-05-26

    This invention relates to a mobile drilling platform of the jack -up type equipped with a special system which allows the said drilling platform to work as a drilling derrick and alternatively as a hoisting crane rig for marine service.

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - MASRAD: Marine Aerosol Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsMASRAD: Marine Aerosol Properties Campaign Links AMF Point Reyes Website Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA....

  19. General Engineer (Marine & Hydrokinetic Engineer) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engineer) General Engineer (Marine & Hydrokinetic Engineer) Submitted by admin on Sat, 2016-01-16 00:16 Job Summary Organization Name Department Of Energy Agency SubElement...

  20. Structural Determination of Marine Bacteriogenic Manganese Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determination of Marine Bacteriogenic Manganese Oxides John R. Bargar1, Samuel M. Webb2, and Bradley M. Tebo2 1Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 2Oregon Health and Sciences University Figure 1. Top: Half of the Earth's annual photosynthetic CO2 fixation budget is attributable to oceanic phytoplankton. Mangan-ese required for this photo-synthetic activity is derived largely from bacteriogenic man-ganese oxides. Bottom: man-ganese oxides precipitated around a spore (cell) of the marine

  1. Bibliography of marine turtles in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, S.F.

    1981-07-01

    Information on the organisms at proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites is required to assess the potential impacts of OTEC power plant operations. This bibliography is the product of a literature survey on marine turtles at two proposed OTEC sites in Hawaii. The OTEC sites are located off Keahole Point, Hawaii and Kahe Point, Oahu. The references included in this bibliography provide information on the distribution, ecology and biology of marine turtles in Hawaii.

  2. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Hydrokinetic Technologies Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program efforts to develop advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. PDF icon mhk_factsheet.pdf More Documents & Publications Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Fact Sheet Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Wind and Water Power Program

  3. Executive Order 13158-Marine Protected Areas | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    58-Marine Protected Areas Executive Order 13158-Marine Protected Areas This Executive Order will help protect the significant natural and cultural resources within the marine environment for the benefit of present and future generations by strengthening and expanding the Nation's system of marine protected areas (MPAs). PDF icon Executive Order 13158-Marine Protected Areas More Documents & Publications EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection ARPA-E Technical Support Memo Appendices Microsoft Word

  4. Guides and Case Studies for Marine Climates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine Climates Guides and Case Studies for Marine Climates Map of the Marine Climate Zone of the United States. This zone contains the far western Pacific coast stretching from the Canadian border to mid-California. The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a series of best practices and case studies to help builders improve whole-house energy performance in buildings found in marine climates. Best Practice Guides 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in Marine Climate - Volume 11 Optimized Climate

  5. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Resources Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Resources Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy technologies convert the energy of waves, tides, and river and ocean currents into electricity. The Department of Energy's "Marine and Hydrokinetic 101" video explains how these technologies work and highlights some of the Water Power Program's efforts in R&D in this area. Learn where marine and hydrokinetic technology research and testing is being done

  6. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations: Marine and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrokinetic Technologies | Department of Energy Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies The U.S. Department of Energy Water Power Program conducted the 2014 peer review meeting on marine and hydrokinetic technologies February 24-27. The compiled 2014 Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Peer Review Presentations listed below are available for download. Introduction Marine and Hydrokinetics

  7. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Addthis Description See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities. Topic Water Text Version Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy video. The words "Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy" appear onscreen. Montage of renewable energy

  8. Battery Technology Life Verification Test Manual Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon P. Christophersen

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this Technology Life Verification Test (TLVT) Manual is to help guide developers in their effort to successfully commercialize advanced energy storage devices such as battery and ultracapacitor technologies. The experimental design and data analysis discussed herein are focused on automotive applications based on the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) electric vehicle, hybrid electric vehicle, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (EV, HEV, and PHEV, respectively) performance targets. However, the methodology can be equally applied to other applications as well. This manual supersedes the February 2005 version of the TLVT Manual (Reference 1). It includes criteria for statistically-based life test matrix designs as well as requirements for test data analysis and reporting. Calendar life modeling and estimation techniques, including a user’s guide to the corresponding software tool is now provided in the Battery Life Estimator (BLE) Manual (Reference 2).

  9. Battery Life Data Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    The FreedomCar Partnership has established life goals for batteries. Among them is a 15 year calendar life. The software and the underlying methodology attempt to predict cell and battery life using, at most, two years of test data. The software uses statistical models based on data from accelerated aging experiments to estimate cell life. The life model reflects the average cell performance under a given set of stress conditions with time. No specific form ofmore » the life model is assumed. The software will fit the model to experimental data. An error model, reflecting the cell-to-cell variability and measurement errors, is included in the software. Monte Carlo simulations, based on the developed models, are used to assess Lack-of-fit and develop uncertainty limis for the average cell life. The software has three operating modes: fit only, fit and simulation and simulation only. The user is given these options by means of means and alert boxes.« less

  10. Federal Energy and Water Management Awards Criteria Briefing Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar provides an overview of the 2015 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards criteria and eligibility requirements, as well as tips on how to prepare nomination narratives to achieve better scores.

  11. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear waste: repository performance and development criteria. Public draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-07-01

    This document, DOE/NWTS-33(3) is one of a series of documents to establish the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program criteria for mined geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. For both repository performance and repository development it delineates the criteria for design performance, radiological safety, mining safety, long-term containment and isolation, operations, and decommissioning. The US Department of Energy will use these criteria to guide the development of repositories to assist in achieving performance and will reevaluate their use when the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues radioactive waste repository rules.

  12. Entanglement criteria via concave-function uncertainty relations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Yichen

    2010-07-15

    A general theorem as a necessary condition for the separability of quantum states in both finite and infinite dimensional systems, based on concave-function uncertainty relations, is derived. Two special cases of the general theorem are stronger than two known entanglement criteria based on the Shannon entropic uncertainty relation and the Landau-Pollak uncertainty relation, respectively; other special cases are able to detect entanglement where some famous entanglement criteria fail.

  13. Proposed 708 Criteria and Procedures for DOE Contractor Employee Protection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program | Department of Energy Proposed 708 Criteria and Procedures for DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program Proposed 708 Criteria and Procedures for DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program In the control and management of its nuclear weapon maintenance and environmental cleanup sites, research and development laboratories, test sites, and other Government-owned or -leased facilities, the DOE is responsible for safeguarding public and employee health and safety; ensuring compliance

  14. Los Alamos Waste Acceptance Criteria | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Waste Acceptance Criteria Los Alamos Waste Acceptance Criteria This document was used to determine facts and conditions during the Department of Energy Accident Investigation Board's investigation into the radiological release event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Additional documents referenced and listed in the Phase 2 Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on February 14, 2014, report in Attachment F. Bibliography and References, are available on various public

  15. Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 | Department of Energy Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation

  16. Criteria for Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Training Programs

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reaffirmed June 2013 DOE STANDARD CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION OF NUCLEAR FACILITY TRAINING PROGRAMS (Formerly Titled: Guidelines for Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Training Programs) U.S. Department of Energy FSC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS DOE HDBK-1070-94 Errata June 2013 Table of Changes Page/Section Change Cover Criteria for Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Training Programs Page ii This document is available on the

  17. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Marine Drive by Clifton View...

  18. Strain-Based Acceptance Criteria for Energy-Limited Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer D. Snow; Dana K. Morton

    2009-07-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code was primarily written with stress-based acceptance criteria. These criteria are applicable to force, displacement, and energy-controlled loadings and ensure a factor of safety against failure. However, stress-based acceptance criteria are often quite conservative for one time energy-limited events such as accidental drops and impacts. For several years, the ASME Working Group on Design of Division 3 Containments has been developing the Design Articles for Section III, Division 3, “Containments for Transportation and Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Material and Waste,” and has wanted to establish strain-based acceptance criteria for accidental drops of containments. This Division 3 working group asked the Working Group on Design Methodology (WGDM) to assist in developing these strain-based acceptance criteria. This paper discusses the current proposed strain-based acceptance criteria, associated limitations of use, its background development, and the current status.

  19. Reportable Nuclide Criteria for ORNL Waste Management Activities - 13005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Kip; Forrester, Tim; Saunders, Mark Edward

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee generates numerous radioactive waste streams. Many of those streams contain a large number of radionuclides with an extremely broad range of concentrations. To feasibly manage the radionuclide information, ORNL developed a reportable nuclide criteria to distinguish between those nuclides in a waste stream that require waste tracking versus those nuclides of such minimal activity that do not require tracking. The criteria include tracking thresholds drawn from ORNL onsite management requirements, transportation requirements, and relevant treatment and disposal facility acceptance criteria. As a management practice, ORNL maintains waste tracking on a nuclide in a specific waste stream if it exceeds any of the reportable nuclide criteria. Nuclides in a specific waste stream that screen out as non-reportable under all these criteria may be dropped from ORNL waste tracking. The benefit of this criteria is to ensure that nuclides in a waste stream with activities which meaningfully affect safety and compliance are tracked, while documenting the basis for removing certain isotopes from further consideration.

  20. Reportable Nuclide Criteria for ORNL Radioactive Waste Management Activities - 13005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Kip; Forrester, Tim; Saunders, Mark

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee generates numerous radioactive waste streams. Many of those streams contain a large number of radionuclides with an extremely broad range of concentrations. To feasibly manage the radionuclide information, ORNL developed reportable nuclide criteria to distinguish between those nuclides in a waste stream that require waste tracking versus those nuclides of such minimal activity that do not require tracking. The criteria include tracking thresholds drawn from ORNL onsite management requirements, transportation requirements, and relevant treatment and disposal facility acceptance criteria. As a management practice, ORNL maintains waste tracking on a nuclide in a specific waste stream if it exceeds any of the reportable nuclide criteria. Nuclides in a specific waste stream that screen out as non-reportable under all these criteria may be dropped from ORNL waste tracking. The benefit of these criteria is to ensure that nuclides in a waste stream with activities which meaningfully affect safety and compliance are tracked, while documenting the basis for removing certain isotopes from further consideration. (authors)

  1. Life Extension Programs

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    in the U.S. and abroad.

    B61-12 Life Extension Program Undergoes First Full-Scale Wind Tunnel Test http:www.nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleaseswindtunnel

  2. Battery Life Predictive Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-12-31

    The Software consists of a model used to predict battery capacity fade and resistance growth for arbitrary cycling and temperature profiles. It allows the user to extrapolate from experimental data to predict actual life cycle.

  3. Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Design Criteria and Explosive Safety Criteria Guide for Use with DOE O 420.1, Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-03-28

    This Guide provides guidance on the application of requirements for nonreactor nuclear facilities and explosives facilities of Department of Energy (DOE) O 420.1, Facility Safety, Section 4.1, Nuclear and Explosives Safety Design Criteria. No cancellation.

  4. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear waste: program objectives, functional requirements, and system performance criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-04-01

    At the present time, final repository criteria have not been issued by the responsible agencies. This document describes general objectives, requirements, and criteria that the DOE intends to apply in the interim to the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program. These objectives, requirements, and criteria have been developed on the basis of DOE's analysis of what is needed to achieve the National objective of safe waste disposal in an environmentally acceptable and economic manner and are expected to be consistent with anticipated regulatory standards. The qualitative statements in this document address the broad issues of public and occupational health and safety, institutional acceptability, engineering feasibility, and economic considerations. A comprehensive set of criteria, general and project specific, of which these are a part, will constitute a portion of the technical basis for preparation and submittal by the DOE of formal documents to support future license applications for nuclear waste repositories.

  5. Preface to Special Topic: Marine Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinto, F. T.; Iglesias, G.; Santos, P. R.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2015-12-30

    Marine renewable energy (MRE) is generates from waves, currents, tides, and thermal resources in the ocean. MRE has been identified as a potential commercial-scale source of renewable energy. This special topic presents a compilation of works selected from the 3rd IAHR Europe Congress, held in Porto, Portugal, in 2014. It covers different subjects relevant to MRE, including resource assessment, marine energy sector policies, energy source comparisons based on levelized cost, proof-of-concept and new-technology development for wave and tidal energy exploitation, and assessment of possible inference between wave energy converters (WEC).

  6. Empirical, probabilistic, and modelling approaches to assess cross-media impacts to marine sediments at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohrer, W.L.; Vita, C.L.; Schrock, W.; Leicht, G.

    1996-12-31

    Dredge spoils, industrial fill, and liquid wastes from the 1940s to 1970s have resulted in inorganic and organic contamination of soils, groundwater, and marine sediments near the U.S.S. Missouri and Charleston Beach parking lots at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), in Bremerton, Washington. Extensive collection of environmental data from several studies including the recently completed Remedial Investigation conducted under CERCLA have confirmed contaminant levels above federal risk screening levels and state regulatory criteria for several heavy metals and organic compounds, including pesticides and PCBs. Although the correlation between contamination in marine sediments and those in on-shore fill appears to be strong, there is little evidence that a viable transport pathway currently exists from soils to groundwater and thence to sediments. Several methods used to estimate chemical mass flux from soil to groundwater to sediments and marine waters of Sinclair Inlet are corroborative in this regard. Nonetheless, this result is vexing because present groundwater concentrations exceed ARARs, yet are below levels of concern in terms of mass flux to marine waters. Despite the marginal risks posed by groundwater, various remedial alternatives, including perimeter containment using a subsurface waste-stabilized containment wall, were evaluated to determine whether chemical flux could be reduced to levels below those observed at the present time. Three-dimensional flow modelling and transport modelling also confirmed that chemical fluxes were limited in magnitude and could be addressed with more conventional remedial approaches.

  7. Anticipating Potential Waste Acceptance Criteria for Defense Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P.; Lord, M.E.; Stockman, C.T.; McCurley, R.D.

    1997-12-31

    The Office of Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and disposal of DOE owned defense spent nuclear fuel and high level waste (DSNF/DHLW). A desirable option, direct disposal of the waste in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, depends on the final waste acceptance criteria, which will be set by DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). However, evolving regulations make it difficult to determine what the final acceptance criteria will be. A method of anticipating waste acceptance criteria is to gain an understanding of the DOE owned waste types and their behavior in a disposal system through a performance assessment and contrast such behavior with characteristics of commercial spent fuel. Preliminary results from such an analysis indicate that releases of 99Tc and 237Np from commercial spent fuel exceed those of the DSNF/DHLW; thus, if commercial spent fuel can meet the waste acceptance criteria, then DSNF can also meet the criteria. In large part, these results are caused by the small percentage of total activity of the DSNF in the repository (1.5%) and regulatory mass (4%), and also because commercial fuel cladding was assumed to provide no protection.

  8. 50 CFR 18 - Marine Mammals | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    50 CFR 18 - Marine Mammals Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 50 CFR 18 - Marine MammalsLegal Abstract These...

  9. Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry Webinar...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry Webinar Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry Webinar December 10, 2015 8:30AM to 10:00AM PST As...

  10. Scotrenewables Wind Power and Marine Power Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Power and Marine Power Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Scotrenewables Wind Power and Marine Power Ltd Place: Orkey, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: KW16 3AW Sector:...

  11. Global Marine Renewable Energy Conference (GMREC) | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Marine Renewable Energy Conference (GMREC) Home > Groups > Water Power Forum Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 3 April, 2013 - 14:26 The 6th annual Global Marine...

  12. European Marine Energy Centre Ltd EMEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Energy Centre Ltd EMEC Jump to: navigation, search Name: European Marine Energy Centre Ltd (EMEC) Place: Stromness, United Kingdom Zip: KW16 3AW Product: EMEC aims to...

  13. The Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: The Marine Mammal Protection Act of...

  14. Evaluation of HEPA filter service life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fretthold, J.K.; Stithem, A.R.

    1997-07-14

    Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), has approximately 10,000 High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters installed in a variety of filter plenums. These ventilation/filtration plenum systems are used to control the release of airborne particulate contaminates to the environment during normal operations and potential accidents. This report summarizes the results of destructive and non-destructive tests on HEPA filters obtained from a wide variety of ages and service conditions. These tests were performed to determine an acceptable service life criteria for HEPA filters used at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). A total of 140 filters of various ages (1972 to 1996) and service history (new, aged unused, used) were tested. For the purpose of this report, filter age from manufacture date/initial test date to the current sample date was used, as opposed to the actual time a filter was installed in an operating system.

  15. Title 44 Part 60 Criteria for Land Management and Use | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Title 44 Part 60 Criteria for Land Management and UseLegal Abstract Sets forth the criteria by which the Federal Insurance Administrator will determine the adequacy...

  16. Field Mapping At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen & Mariner, 2010...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen & Mariner, 2010) Exploration Activity Details...

  17. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects, Fiscal Years 2008-2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-03-24

    This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects from 2008 to 2014.

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marine & Hydrokinetic » Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Learn about the basic technologies and key terms used to describe marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Wave Image of the motion of a bottom-mounted point absorber responding to a passing wave to generate energy from the waves. Point Absorber Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave

  19. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Industry | Department of Energy Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry March 15, 2016 11:00AM to 12:30PM EDT On February 24, 2016, Environmental Interactions of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies hosted workshops on environmental impacts of marine renewable energy, in advance of the 2016 International Conference on Ocean Energy in

  20. Marine Corps Base Quantico Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lighting |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Quantico Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lighting Marine Corps Base Quantico Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lighting Marine Corps Base Quantico (MCBQ) in Virginia Marine Corps Base Quantico (MCBQ) in Virginia Document provides an overview of how the Marine Corps Base Quantico (MCBQ) achieved 85% energy savings in parking lighting at one of its parking lots as part of a major overhaul of its outdoor lighting (replacing 2,000 fixtures with light-emitting diode lights),

  1. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development The Water Power Program's marine and hydrokinetic research and development (R&D) efforts focus on advancing technologies that capture energy from the nation's oceans and rivers. Unlike hydropower, marine and hydrokinetics represent an emerging industry with hundreds of potentially viable technologies. The program is

  2. Work/Life Balance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workplace » Work/Life Balance /careers/_assets/images/careers-icon.jpg Work/Life Balance Explore the multiple dimensions of a career at Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. What our employees say: Health & Wellness "The Lab pays 80 percent of my family's medical premiums with Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico." Retirement & Savings "With the Lab matching my

  3. Falcon: automated optimization method for arbitrary assessment criteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Tser-Yuan (Livermore, CA); Moses, Edward I. (Livermore, CA); Hartmann-Siantar, Christine (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    FALCON is a method for automatic multivariable optimization for arbitrary assessment criteria that can be applied to numerous fields where outcome simulation is combined with optimization and assessment criteria. A specific implementation of FALCON is for automatic radiation therapy treatment planning. In this application, FALCON implements dose calculations into the planning process and optimizes available beam delivery modifier parameters to determine the treatment plan that best meets clinical decision-making criteria. FALCON is described in the context of the optimization of external-beam radiation therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), but the concepts could also be applied to internal (brachytherapy) radiotherapy. The radiation beams could consist of photons or any charged or uncharged particles. The concept of optimizing source distributions can be applied to complex radiography (e.g. flash x-ray or proton) to improve the imaging capabilities of facilities proposed for science-based stockpile stewardship.

  4. Photovoltaic module certification/laboratory accreditation criteria development: Implementation handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterwald, C.R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Hammond, R.L.; Wood, B.D.; Backus, C.E.; Sears, R.L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Zerlaut, G.A. [SC-International, Inc., Tempe, AZ (United States); D`Aiello, R.V. [RD Associates, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This document covers the second phase of a two-part program. Phase I provided an overview of the structure and function of typical product certification/laboratory accreditation programs. This report (Phase H) provides most of the draft documents that will be necessary for the implementation of a photovoltaic (PV) module certification/laboratory accreditation program. These include organizational documents such as articles of incorporation, bylaws, and rules of procedure, as well as marketing and educational program documents. In Phase I, a 30-member criteria development committee was established to guide, review and reach a majority consensus regarding criteria for a PV certification/laboratory accreditation program. Committee members represented PV manufacturers, end users, standards and codes organizations, and testing laboratories. A similar committee was established for Phase II; the criteria implementation committee consisted of 29 members. Twenty-one of the Phase I committee members also served on the Phase II committee, which helped to provide program continuity during Phase II.

  5. Commissioning tools for life-cycle building performance assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, M.A.

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses information systems for building life-cycle performance analysis and the use of computer-based commissioning tools within this context. There are many reasons why buildings do not perform in practice as well as intended at the design stage. One reason is the lack of commissioning. A second reason is that design intent is not well documented, and performance targets for building components and systems are not well specified. Thus, criteria for defining verification and functional tests is unclear. A third reason is that critical information is often lost throughout the building life-cycle, which causes problems such as misunderstanding of operational characteristics and sequences and reduced overall performance. The life-cycle building performance analysis tools project discussed in this paper are focused on chillers and cooling systems.

  6. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Mahlon Heileson

    2006-10-01

    The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

  7. National Marine Renewable Energy Center (UH) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Marine Renewable Energy Center (UH) National Marine Renewable Energy Center (UH) National Marine Renewable Energy Center (UH) Office presentation icon 21_hinmrec_university_of_hawaii_rocheleau.ppt More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: EV Project: Solar-Assisted Charging Demo Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Emerging Lighting Technology

  8. Method for disconnecting a marine drilling riser assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beynet, P.A.

    1990-03-27

    This patent describes a method for disconnecting a marine riser assembly extending from a surface facility to a subsea wellhead. The marine riser assembly comprising a marine riser connected to a subsea wellhead utilizing a wellhead connector having an internal shoulder positioned above an upper edge of the subsea wellhead and having connector dogs for releaseably connecting the wellhead connector to the subsea wellhead.

  9. Experts Offer Marines Energy-Efficiency Advice

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As an early adopter of cutting-edge technologies, the United States military is pioneering energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies in the field. Recently, the Commandant of the United States Marine Corps sent a team to visit bases and camps in Afghanistan to assess and make recommendations on the supply and use of energy and water.

  10. How to Apply the National Register Criteria for Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of properties recognized to have national, state, or local significance in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering, and culture. To guide the selection of properties included in the National Register, the National Park Service (NPS) has developed the National Register Criteria for Evaluation. This bulletin explains how the NPS applies these criteria in evaluating the wide range of properties that may be significant in local, state, and national history. It should be used by anyone who must decide if a particular property qualifies for the National Register.

  11. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2006-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  12. Photovoltaic module certification/laboratory accreditation criteria development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterwald, C.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Hammond, R.L.; Wood, B.D.; Backus, C.E.; Sears, R.L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Zerlaut, G.A. [SC-International Inc., Phoenix, AZ (United States); D`Aiello, R.V. [RD Associates, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This document provides an overview of the structure and function of typical product certification/laboratory accreditation programs. The overview is followed by a model program which could serve as the basis for a photovoltaic (PV) module certification/laboratory accreditation program. The model covers quality assurance procedures for the testing laboratory and manufacturer, third-party certification and labeling, and testing requirements (performance and reliability). A 30-member Criteria Development Committee was established to guide, review, and reach a majority consensus regarding criteria for a PV certification/laboratory accreditation program. Committee members represented PV manufacturers, end users, standards and codes organizations, and testing laboratories.

  13. Evolving treatment plan quality criteria from institution-specific experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruan, D.; Shao, W.; DeMarco, J.; Tenn, S.; King, C.; Low, D.; Kupelian, P.; Steinberg, M.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric aspects of radiation therapy treatment plan quality are usually evaluated and reported with dose volume histogram (DVH) endpoints. For clinical practicality, a small number of representative quantities derived from the DVH are often used as dose endpoints to summarize the plan quality. National guidelines on reference values for such quantities for some standard treatment approaches are often used as acceptance criteria to trigger treatment plan review. On the other hand, treatment prescription and planning approaches specific to each institution warrants the need to report plan quality in terms of practice consistency and with respect to institution-specific experience. The purpose of this study is to investigate and develop a systematic approach to record and characterize the institution-specific plan experience and use such information to guide the design of plan quality criteria. In the clinical setting, this approach will assist in (1) improving overall plan quality and consistency and (2) detecting abnormal plan behavior for retrospective analysis. Methods: The authors propose a self-evolving methodology and have developed an in-house prototype software suite that (1) extracts the dose endpoints from a treatment plan and evaluates them against both national standard and institution-specific criteria and (2) evolves the statistics for the dose endpoints and updates institution-specific criteria. Results: The validity of the proposed methodology was demonstrated with a database of prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy cases. As more data sets are accumulated, the evolving institution-specific criteria can serve as a reliable and stable consistency measure for plan quality and reveals the potential use of the ''tighter'' criteria than national standards or projected criteria, leading to practice that may push to shrink the gap between plans deemed acceptable and the underlying unknown optimality. Conclusions: The authors have developed a rationale to improve plan quality and consistency, by evolving the plan quality criteria from institution-specific experience, complementary to national standards. The validity of the proposed method was demonstrated with a prototype system on prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) cases. The current study uses direct and indirect DVH endpoints for plan quality evaluation, but the infrastructure proposed here applies to general outcome data as well. The authors expect forward evaluation together with intelligent update based on evidence-based learning, which will evolve the clinical practice for improved efficiency, consistency, and ultimately better treatment outcome.

  14. Life With Energy

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students will describe ways in which technology affects the environment, both negatively and positively, and identify different forms of energy and their advantages/disadvantages. They will also determine the benefits as well as the environmental harms of using energy to improve our quality of life.

  15. The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

    2012-11-28

    Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

  16. Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy The documents included in this listing are additional references not included in the Phase 2 Radiological Release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Attachment F: Bibliography and References report. The documents were examined and used to develop the final report. PDF icon Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

  17. Durability-based design criteria for an automotive structural composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; Brinkman, C.R.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.; Yahr, G.T.

    1998-11-01

    Before composite structures can be widely used in automotive applications, their long-term durability must be assured. The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was established by the US Department of Energy to help provide that assurance. The project is closely coordinated with the Automotive Composites Consortium. The experimentally-based, durability-driven design criteria described in this paper are the result of the initial project thrust. The criteria address a single reference composite, which is an SRIM (Structural Reaction Injection Molded) polyurethane, reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass fibers. The durability issues addressed include the effects of cyclic and sustained loadings, temperature, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) on strength, stiffness, and deformation. The criteria provide design analysis guidance, a multiaxial strength criterion, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loading, and damage tolerance design guidance. Environmental degradation factors and the degrading effects of prior loadings are included. Efforts are currently underway to validate the criteria by application to a second random-glass-fiber composite. Carbon-fiber composites are also being addressed.

  18. Design Criteria for Bagless Transfer System (BTS) Packaging System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RISENMAY, H.R.

    2000-04-26

    This document provides the criteria for the design and installation of a Bagless Transfer System (BTS); Blend, Sieve and Balance Equipment; and Supercritical Fluid Extraction System (SFE). The project consists of 3 major modules: (1) Bagless Transfer System (BTS) Module; (2) Blend, Sieve and Balance Equipment; and (3) Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) Module.

  19. Interim performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBlasio, R.; Forman, S.; Hogan, S.; Nuss, G.; Post, H.; Ross, R.; Schafft, H.

    1980-12-01

    This document is a response to the Photovoltaic Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590) which required the generation of performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. Since the document is evolutionary and will be updated, the term interim is used. More than 50 experts in the photovoltaic field have contributed in the writing and review of the 179 performance criteria listed in this document. The performance criteria address characteristics of present-day photovoltaic systems that are of interest to manufacturers, government agencies, purchasers, and all others interested in various aspects of photovoltaic system performance and safety. The performance criteria apply to the system as a whole and to its possible subsystems: array, power conditioning, monitor and control, storage, cabling, and power distribution. They are further categorized according to the following performance attributes: electrical, thermal, mechanical/structural, safety, durability/reliability, installation/operation/maintenance, and building/site. Each criterion contains a statement of expected performance (nonprescriptive), a method of evaluation, and a commentary with further information or justification. Over 50 references for background information are also given. A glossary with definitions relevant to photovoltaic systems and a section on test methods are presented in the appendices. Twenty test methods are included to measure performance characteristics of the subsystem elements. These test methods and other parts of the document will be expanded or revised as future experience and needs dictate.

  20. Criteria Review and Approach Documents, National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2A "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of National Nuclear Security Administration Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS). CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs.

  1. Criteria & Review Approach Documents, National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2A "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of a table of National Nuclear Security Administration Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) with links to the CRADs. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs.

  2. Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), DOE/WIPP-069, was initially developed by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Steering Committee to provide performance requirements to ensure public health and safety as well as the safe handling of transuranic (TRU) waste at the WIPP. This revision updates the criteria and requirements of previous revisions and deletes those which were applicable only to the test phase. The criteria and requirements in this document must be met by participating DOE TRU Waste Generator/Storage Sites (Sites) prior to shipping contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste forms to the WIPP. The WIPP Project will comply with applicable federal and state regulations and requirements, including those in Titles 10, 40, and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). The WAC, DOE/WIPP-069, serves as the primary directive for assuring the safe handling, transportation, and disposal of TRU wastes in the WIPP and for the certification of these wastes. The WAC identifies strict requirements that must be met by participating Sites before these TRU wastes may be shipped for disposal in the WIPP facility. These criteria and requirements will be reviewed and revised as appropriate, based on new technical or regulatory requirements. The WAC is a controlled document. Revised/changed pages will be supplied to all holders of controlled copies.

  3. Application Content and Evaluation Criteria/Process | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    This presentation by Jill Gruber of the DOE Golden Field Office was given at the Manufacturing Pre-Solicitation Workshop in Arlington, Va., on May 18, 2007. PDF icon manufacturing_foa_gruber.pdf More Documents & Publications Application Content and Evaluation Criteria/Process Manufacturing Pre-Solicitation Transcript Microsoft Word - rDE-FOA-0000080.rtf

  4. Ice Nuclei in Marine Air: Biogenic Particles or Dust?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Hoose, C.; Poschl, U.; Lawrence, M.

    2013-01-11

    Ice nuclei impact clouds, but their sources and distribution in the atmosphere are still not well known. Particularly little attention has been paid to IN sources in marine environments, although evidence from field studies suggests that IN populations in remote marine regions may be dominated by primary biogenic particles associated with sea spray. In this exploratory model study, we aim to bring attention to this long-neglected topic and identify promising target regions for future field campaigns. We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated marine biogenic immersion IN distributions and dust immersion IN distributions, we predict strong regional differences in the importance of marine biogenic IN relative to dust IN. Our analysis suggests that marine biogenic IN are most likely to play a dominant role in determining IN concentrations in near-surface-air over the Southern Ocean, so future field campaigns aimed at investigating marine biogenic IN should target that region. Climate related changes in the abundance and emission of biogenic marine IN could affect marine cloud properties, thereby introducing previously unconsidered feedbacks that influence the hydrological cycle and the Earth’s energy balance. Furthermore, marine biogenic IN may be an important aspect to consider in proposals for marine cloud brightening by artificial sea spray production.

  5. Criteria and Guidelines for the Federal Energy and Water Management Awards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document outlines the 2015 criteria and guidelines for the Federal Energy and Water Management Awards.

  6. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; Wong, Chee -Hong; Jimenez, Valeria; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Reistetter, Emily N.; van Baren, Marijke J.; et al

    2014-09-29

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (<2 µm cell diameter). Together with phytochromes identified from other prasinophyte lineages, we establish that prasinophyte and streptophyte phytochromes share core light-input and signaling-output domain architectures except for the loss of C-terminal response regulator receiver domains in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Phylogenetic reconstructions robustly support the presence ofmore » phytochrome in the common progenitor of green algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. The expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.« less

  7. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; Wong, Chee -Hong; Jimenez, Valeria; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Reistetter, Emily N.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Price, Dana C.; Wei, Chia -Lin; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Lagarias, J. Clark; Worden, Alexandra Z.

    2014-09-29

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (<2 µm cell diameter). Together with phytochromes identified from other prasinophyte lineages, we establish that prasinophyte and streptophyte phytochromes share core light-input and signaling-output domain architectures except for the loss of C-terminal response regulator receiver domains in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Phylogenetic reconstructions robustly support the presence of phytochrome in the common progenitor of green algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. The expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.

  8. biofouling studies on Sandia's marine hydrokinetic coatings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biofouling studies on Sandia's marine hydrokinetic coatings - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense

  9. Navy/Marine Engineering Command Visits Sandia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Navy/Marine Engineering Command Visits Sandia - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  10. Biofuels in Defense, Aviation, and Marine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Defense, Aviation, and Marine Bioenergy Technologies Office Peer Review Zia Haq U.S. Department of Energy March 24, 2015 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office DPA Initiative Goals * In June 2011, Secretaries of Agriculture, Energy, and Navy signed MOU to commit $510M (up to $170M from each agency) to produce hydrocarbon jet and diesel biofuels in the near-term. This initiative sought to achieve: o Multiple, commercial scale integrated biorefineries o Cost-competitive biofuel with conventional

  11. Workshop to develop deep-life continental scientific drilling projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieft, T. L.; Onstott, T. C.; Ahonen, L.; Aloisi, V.; Colwell, F. S.; Engelen, B.; Fendrihan, S.; Gaidos, E.; Harms, U.; Head, I.; Kallmeyer, J.; Kiel Reese, B.; Lin, L.-H.; Long, P. E.; Moser, D. P.; Mills, H.; Sar, P.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Stan-Lotter, H.; Wagner, D.; Wang, P.-L.; Westall, F.; Wilkins, M. J.

    2015-05-29

    The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) has long espoused studies of deep subsurface life, and has targeted fundamental questions regarding subsurface life, including the following: "(1) What is the extent and diversity of deep microbial life and what are the factors limiting it? (2) What are the types of metabolism/carbon/energy sources and the rates of subsurface activity? (3) How is deep microbial life adapted to subsurface conditions? (4) How do subsurface microbial communities affect energy resources? And (5) how does the deep biosphere interact with the geosphere and atmosphere?" (Horsfield et al., 2014) Many ICDP-sponsored drilling projects have included a deep-life component; however, to date, not one project has been driven by deep-life goals, in part because geomicrobiologists have been slow to initiate deep biosphere-driven ICDP projects. Therefore, the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) recently partnered with the ICDP to sponsor a workshop with the specific aim of gathering potential proponents for deep-life-driven ICDP projects and ideas for candidate drilling sites. Twenty-two participants from nine countries proposed projects and sites that included compressional and extensional tectonic environments, evaporites, hydrocarbon-rich shales, flood basalts, Precambrian shield rocks, subglacial and subpermafrost environments, active volcano–tectonic systems, megafan deltas, and serpentinizing ultramafic environments. The criteria and requirements for successful ICDP applications were presented. Deep-life-specific technical requirements were discussed and it was concluded that, while these procedures require adequate planning, they are entirely compatible with the sampling needs of other disciplines. As a result of this workshop, one drilling workshop proposal on the Basin and Range Physiographic Province (BRPP) has been submitted to the ICDP, and several other drilling project proponents plan to submit proposals for ICDP-sponsored drilling workshops in 2016.

  12. Workshop to develop deep-life continental scientific drilling projects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kieft, T. L.; Onstott, T. C.; Ahonen, L.; Aloisi, V.; Colwell, F. S.; Engelen, B.; Fendrihan, S.; Gaidos, E.; Harms, U.; Head, I.; et al

    2015-05-29

    The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) has long espoused studies of deep subsurface life, and has targeted fundamental questions regarding subsurface life, including the following: "(1) What is the extent and diversity of deep microbial life and what are the factors limiting it? (2) What are the types of metabolism/carbon/energy sources and the rates of subsurface activity? (3) How is deep microbial life adapted to subsurface conditions? (4) How do subsurface microbial communities affect energy resources? And (5) how does the deep biosphere interact with the geosphere and atmosphere?" (Horsfield et al., 2014) Many ICDP-sponsored drilling projects have includedmore » a deep-life component; however, to date, not one project has been driven by deep-life goals, in part because geomicrobiologists have been slow to initiate deep biosphere-driven ICDP projects. Therefore, the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) recently partnered with the ICDP to sponsor a workshop with the specific aim of gathering potential proponents for deep-life-driven ICDP projects and ideas for candidate drilling sites. Twenty-two participants from nine countries proposed projects and sites that included compressional and extensional tectonic environments, evaporites, hydrocarbon-rich shales, flood basalts, Precambrian shield rocks, subglacial and subpermafrost environments, active volcano–tectonic systems, megafan deltas, and serpentinizing ultramafic environments. The criteria and requirements for successful ICDP applications were presented. Deep-life-specific technical requirements were discussed and it was concluded that, while these procedures require adequate planning, they are entirely compatible with the sampling needs of other disciplines. As a result of this workshop, one drilling workshop proposal on the Basin and Range Physiographic Province (BRPP) has been submitted to the ICDP, and several other drilling project proponents plan to submit proposals for ICDP-sponsored drilling workshops in 2016.« less

  13. 100,000 hour design life of turbo compressor packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-20

    Many turbomachinery manufacturers and operators typically quote 100,000 hours as a design limit for service life of turbo compressor components. The Pipeline Research Committee initiated this study to review the life limiting criteria for certain critical components and determine if the design target of 100,000 hours can be safely and reliably met or extended with special component management practices. The first phase of the project was to select the turbomachinery components that would be included in the review. Committee members were surveyed with a detailed questionnaire designed to identify critical components based on: high hours (e.g. at or approaching 100,000 hours) the most common engine types operated by the member organizations, and the components of greatest concern from a risk and expense point of view. The selection made covers a wide range of engine types that are of interest to most of the committee companies. This selection represents some 78% of the high hour units operated by the committee and includes components from GE Frame 3 and Frame 5, Solar Saturn, Rolls Royce Avon, and Cooper RT56 engines. The report goes into detail regarding the various damage mechanism which can be the main life limiting factor of the component; creep, fatigue, environmental attack, wear and microstructure instability. For each of the component types selected, the study identifies the life limiting criteria and outlines how the components may be managed for extended life. Many of the selected components can be reliably operated beyond 100,000 hours by following the management practices set out in the report.

  14. LIFE IC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: S60 5WG Product: LIFE-IC is a UK national resource centre for the development of all new energy technology innovations. References: LIFE-IC1 This article is a stub. You can...

  15. Development of thermal performance criteria for residential passive solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabatiuk, P.A.; Cassel, D.E.; McCabe, M.; Scarbrough, C.

    1980-01-01

    In support of the development of thermal performance criteria for residential passive solar buildings, thermal design characteristics and anticipated performance for 266 projects in the HUD Passive Residential Design Competition and the HUD Cycle 5 Demonstration Program were analyzed. These passive residences are located in all regions of the United States requiring space heating, and they represent a variety of passive solar system types including direct gain, indirect gain, and solarium (isolated gain) systems. The results of this statistical analysis are being used to develop proposed minimum acceptable levels of thermal performance for passive solar buildings for the residential performance criteria. A number of performance measures were examined, including net solar contribution, solar fraction, and auxiliary energy use. These and other design and climate-related parameters were statistically correlated using the DATAPLOT computer program and standard statistical analysis techniques.

  16. Berkeley Lab scientists develop criteria for $20 million energy challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain

    2013-05-29

    Berkeley Labs Iain Walker and his colleagues in environmental energy research helped the Siebel Foundation develop the criteria for its Energy Free Home Challenge, which comes with a $20 million global incentive prize. The Challenge is a competition to create a new generation of systems and technologies for practical homes that realize a net-zero, non-renewable energy footprint without increasing the cost of ownership. It is open to everyone everywhere ? university teams to handymen and hobbyists.

  17. UNDERSTANDING SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA FOR JAPANESE NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    UNDERSTANDING SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA FOR JAPANESE NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Y.J. Park and C.H. Hofmayer Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, Long Island, New York 11973 J.F. Costello U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, D.C. 20555 ABSTRACT This paper summarizes the results of recent survey studies on the seismic design practice for nuclear power plants in Japan. The seismic design codes and standards for both nuclear as well as non- nuclear structures have been reviewed and summarized.

  18. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Review Criteria For CNMS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Proposals REVIEW CRITERIA FOR CNMS RESEARCH PROPOSALS The CNMS expects high-impact, peer-reviewed scientific or technological publications to result from all user research projects. PIs and reviewers should keep this in mind when proposing or evaluating research projects. SCIENTIFIC MERIT - Definitions of Ratings (scale 1 to 5) 5 -Extraordinary The proposal involves cutting-edge research of great scientific importance. Proposed research will significantly advance knowledge in a

  19. Berkeley Lab scientists develop criteria for $20 million energy challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain

    2009-01-01

    Berkeley Labs Iain Walker and his colleagues in environmental energy research helped the Siebel Foundation develop the criteria for its Energy Free Home Challenge, which comes with a $20 million global incentive prize. The Challenge is a competition to create a new generation of systems and technologies for practical homes that realize a net-zero, non-renewable energy footprint without increasing the cost of ownership. It is open to everyone everywhere — university teams to handymen and hobbyists.

  20. Criteria for Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Training Programs

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reaffirmed July 2014 DOE STANDARD CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION OF NUCLEAR FACILITY TRAINING PROGRAMS (Formerly Titled: Guidelines for Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Training Programs) U.S. Department of Energy FSC-6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS DOE-STD-1070-94 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1070-94

  1. DOE Standard Natural Phenomena Hazards Site Characterization Criteria

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2-94 March 1994 Change Notice No. 1 January 1996 Reaffirmed with Errata April 2002 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS SITE CHARACTERIZATION CRITERIA U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Environment Safety and Health Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of

  2. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  3. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-11

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  4. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The primary objective of the ESPDP is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. The results of the technical and licensing evaluations are presented in this report. The purpose, background, and organization of the ESPDP is delineated in Section 1. Section 11 contains flowcharts defining siting application requirements, environmental report requirements, and emergency planning/preparedness requirements for ALWRS. The licensing and technical review results are presented in Section III.

  5. A new approach to criteria for health risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickett, Jeffery; Katscherian, Dianne; Goh, Yang Miang

    2012-01-15

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a developing component of the overall impact assessment process and as such needs access to procedures that can enable more consistent approaches to the stepwise process that is now generally accepted in both EIA and HIA. The guidelines developed during this project provide a structured process, based on risk assessment procedures which use consequences and likelihood, as a way of ranking risks to adverse health outcomes from activities subjected to HIA or HIA as part of EIA. The aim is to assess the potential for both acute and chronic health outcomes. The consequences component also identifies a series of consequences for the health care system, depicted as expressions of financial expenditure and the capacity of the health system. These more specific health risk assessment characteristics should provide for a broader consideration of health consequences and a more consistent estimation of the adverse health risks of a proposed development at both the scoping and risk assessment stages of the HIA process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A more objective approach to health risk assessment is provided. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for the consequences for chronic and acute impacts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for the consequences on the health care system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for event frequency that could impact on health. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The approach presented is currently being trialled in Australia.

  6. The hazardous priority substances in Italy: National rules and environmental quality standard in marine environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maggi, Chiara Onorati, Fulvio Lamberti, Claudia Virno Cicero, Anna Maria

    2008-01-15

    Article number 16 of the Water Framework Directive (Directive 2000/60/EC) lays down the community strategy for establishment of harmonised quality standards for the priority substances and other substances posing a significant risk to the aquatic environment. In order to achieve the protection objectives of the Directive 2000/60/EC, the Italian Ministry of the Environment proposed the quality standards for surface water, sediments and biota related to the priority substances listed in the decision No. 2455/2001/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of November 20 (2001) [Decision N. 2455/2001/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 November 2001. The list of priority substances in the field of water policy and amending Directive 2000/60/EC. Official Journal of the European Communities, 15.12.2001, p. 5]. Particularly, for the protection of the marine environment, the proposed Italian rules state that, from 1 January 2021, the concentrations of the hazardous priority substances in Italian marine and lagoon waters must be near the natural background for natural substances, like metals, and near zero for the anthropogenic one. According to Directive 2000/60/EC, the Italian Ministry of Environment issued in 2003 Decree 367 in which has derived 160 Environmental Quality Standard (EQS) for water and 27 Environmental Quality Objective (EQO) for sediment of marine coastal area, lagoons and coastal ponds. Biota quality standards have still to be fixed. The paper illustrates the criteria applied for the definition of the quality standards and some comments are presented.

  7. Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hydrokinetic General Engineer | Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and Hydrokinetic General Engineer Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and Hydrokinetic General Engineer January 11, 2016 - 5:07pm Addthis The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office is seeking applicants for a new position available within the office. See below for more information. Job title: General Engineer-Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK)

  8. Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (OSUUW) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (OSUUW) Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (OSUUW) Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (OSUUW) Office presentation icon 22_nnmrec_batten_final.ppt More Documents & Publications NREL - FY09 Lab Call: Supporting Research and Testing for MHK Presentation from the 2011 Water Program Peer Review FY 09 Lab Call: Research & Assessment for MHK Development 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled

  9. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstrations at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) | Department of Energy Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) March 24, 2014 - 12:27pm Addthis On March 24, 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a Notice of Intent to issue a funding opportunity titled "Competitive Marine

  10. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    University Consortium | Department of Energy Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium March 21, 2014 - 4:05am Addthis On March 21, 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a Notice of Intent to issue a funding opportunity titled "Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Research and Development University Consortium." The goal of this funding opportunity is to leverage

  11. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Monitoring Technologies and Field Testing Opportunities | Department of Energy Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental Monitoring Technologies and Field Testing Opportunities Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental Monitoring Technologies and Field Testing Opportunities June 22, 2015 - 12:13pm Addthis The Energy Department's Water Power Program is seeking feedback from the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry, academia, research

  12. Funding Opportunity Announcement for a Marine and Hydrokinetic Development

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    University Consortium | Department of Energy a Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium Funding Opportunity Announcement for a Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium April 10, 2014 - 10:27am Addthis On April 10, 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a $4 million funding opportunity titled "Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium." This funding opportunity is supporting the advancement of wave and tidal energy

  13. Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda MHK-Summit-Agenda.jpg PDF icon Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development 2016 Agenda More Documents & Publications Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop Agenda CX-005184: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011388: Categorical

  14. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Projects Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's marine and hydrokinetic projects from fiscal years 2008 to 2014. PDF icon 2008-2014 Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Projects More Documents & Publications NREL - FY09 Lab Call: Supporting Research and Testing for MHK Presentation from the 2011 Water Program Peer Review Water Power Program: 2011 Peer Review Report Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on

  15. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development and Testing | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Technology Development and Testing Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development and Testing The Water Power Program supports the development of marine and hydrokinetic devices, which capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, the natural flow of water in rivers, and marine thermal gradients, without building new dams or diversions. In order to meet its generation goals, the program supports the design, development, testing, and demonstration of technologies that can capture

  16. DOE Announces Marine and Hydrokinetic Open Data Effort | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy DOE Announces Marine and Hydrokinetic Open Data Effort DOE Announces Marine and Hydrokinetic Open Data Effort April 10, 2014 - 3:39pm Addthis In an effort to improve future data management and access, DOE's Water Power Program is standing up a Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) Data Repository to manage the receipt, protection, and dissemination of scientific and technical data generated by DOE funded awards. Capabilities of the proposed MHK Data Repository include: Secure and intuitive

  17. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technologies Fact Sheet Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Fact Sheet This fact sheet describes the Wind and Water Power Program's current approach to supporting the development and deployment of marine and hydrokinetic technologies. PDF icon Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Fact Sheet More Documents & Publications 47688.pdf Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP) Leading the Nation in Clean Energy Deployment

  18. The Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Marine Animals Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As electricity is generated at sea by marine renewable energy technologies, it must be transported back to shore through undersea cables. As electricity is transmitted through the cables,...

  19. Hawaii Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers What does this project do? Marine Corps Base Hawaii replaced roofs on two buildings with polyvinyl chloride membrane 'cool' roofs and solar...

  20. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS)." ... development, prepared to build and test technology at close to full-scale in the ...

  1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Policies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potentials and Policies...

  2. Marine Hybrid Propulsion Market Revenue is anticipated to Reach...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ferry operators are the major adopters of marine hybrid propulsion systems across the world. These vessels primarily operate in coastal areas and inland waterways, where emission...

  3. Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As the marine renewable energy industry progresses, it is imperative for regulators and project developers to identify ways to address and cope with environmental uncertainties while still enabling...

  4. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar: Assessment and ... laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable ...

  5. MHK Projects/Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University of Michigan < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  6. Marine Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association MHFCA | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association MHFCA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Marine Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association (MHFCA) Place: Leipzig, Germany Zip: D-04318 Sector: Hydro,...

  7. Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM2) Development and Marine Ice...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM2) Development and Marine Ice Sheet Simulations Citation ... Sponsoring Org: DOELANL Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: ...

  8. Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies to capture energy from waves and currents. ... Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power Riding the Clean Energy ...

  9. DOE Announces Webinars on Instrumentation for Monitoring Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Announces Webinars on Instrumentation for Monitoring Marine Renewable Energy Devices, Energy Efficiency in Correctional Facilities, and More DOE Announces Webinars on...

  10. New Request for Information on Strategy to Advance the Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 12, 2015 - 2:00pm Addthis The Energy Department's Water Power Program is seeking feedback from the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry, academia, research laboratories, ...

  11. Request for Information Regarding the Testing of Marine and Hydrokinet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 14, 2015 - 10:30am Addthis The Energy Department's Water Power Program is seeking information from the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry, academia, research ...

  12. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 22, 2015 - 12:13pm Addthis The Energy Department's Water Power Program is seeking feedback from the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry, academia, research laboratories, ...

  13. The Radiative Role of Free Tropospheric Aerosols and Marine Clouds...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: The Radiative Role of Free Tropospheric Aerosols and Marine Clouds over the Central North Atlantic Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Radiative Role...

  14. Marine Projects International Ltd MPI formerly Mayflower Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Projects International Ltd MPI formerly Mayflower Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Marine Projects International Ltd (MPI) (formerly Mayflower Energy Ltd) Place: United...

  15. Hawaii Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hawaii Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs Hawaii Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs April 2, 2010 - 2:42pm Addthis Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers What does this project do? Marine Corps Base Hawaii replaced roofs on two buildings with polyvinyl chloride membrane 'cool' roofs and solar panels. The new roofs saves $20,000 a year in energy costs. Built on the end of the Mokapu Peninsula on Oahu's northeast coast, the Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) at Kaneohe Bay gets plenty of sunlight. But

  16. Geothermometry At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Mariner...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California R.O. Fournier, Michael L. Sorey, Robert H. Mariner, Alfred H. Truesdell (1979) Chemical and Isotopic Prediction of Aquifer Temperatures in the Geothermal System at Long...

  17. Design and implementation of a marine animal alert system to support Marine Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Fu, Tao; Ren, Huiying; Martinez, Jayson J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Matzner, Shari; Choi, Eric Y.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-08-08

    Power extracted from fast moving tidal currents has been identified as a potential commercial-scale source of renewable energy. Device developers and utilities are pursuing deployment of prototype tidal turbines to assess technology viability, site feasibility, and environmental interactions. Deployment of prototype turbines requires permits from a range of regulatory authorities. Ensuring the safety of marine animals, particularly those under protection of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) and the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 has emerged as a key regulatory challenge for initial MHK deployments. The greatest perceived risk to marine animals is from strike by the rotating blades of tidal turbines. Development of the marine mammal alert system (MAAS) was undertaken to support monitoring and mitigation requirements for tidal turbine deployments. The prototype system development focused on Southern Resident killer whales (SRKW), an endangered population of killer whales that frequents Puget Sound and is intermittently present in the part of the sound where deployment of prototype tidal turbines is being considered. Passive acoustics were selected as the primary means because of the vocal nature of these animals. The MAAS passive acoustic system consists of two-stage process involving the use of an energy detector and a spectrogram-based classifier to distinguish between SKRW’s calls and noise. A prototype consisting of two 2D symmetrical star arrays separated by 20 m center to center was built and evaluated in the waters of Sequim Bay using whale call playback.

  18. Marine asset security and tracking (MAST) system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, Gregory Richard; Smith, Stephen Fulton; Moore, Michael Roy; Dobson, Eric Lesley; Blair, Jeffrey Scott; Duncan, Christopher Allen; Lenarduzzi, Roberto

    2008-07-01

    Methods and apparatus are described for marine asset security and tracking (MAST). A method includes transmitting identification data, location data and environmental state sensor data from a radio frequency tag. An apparatus includes a radio frequency tag that transmits identification data, location data and environmental state sensor data. Another method includes transmitting identification data and location data from a radio frequency tag using hybrid spread-spectrum modulation. Another apparatus includes a radio frequency tag that transmits both identification data and location data using hybrid spread-spectrum modulation.

  19. Wind load comparison for the ASCE standard 7 and the Hanford site design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giller, R.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-16

    This document provides calculations and discussions to compare Hanford Site wind load criteria with the current national standard for wind loads (ASCE 7, 1995). Site criteria uses the 1988 edition ASCE 7.

  20. Criteria for Packaging and Storing Uranium-233-Bearing Materials

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3028-2000 July 2000 DOE STANDARD CRITERIA FOR PACKAGING AND STORING URANIUM-233-BEARING MATERIALS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S.

  1. Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1020-2012 December 2012 _________________ Supersedes DOE-STD-1020-2002 DOE STANDARD Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1020-2012 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1020-2012 i

  2. DOE-STD-1066-99; Fire Protection Design Criteria

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6-99 July 1999 Superseding DOE-STD-1066-97 DOE STANDARD FIRE PROTECTION DESIGN CRITERIA U.S. Department of Energy AREA FIRP Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce,

  3. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

  4. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2013-02-01

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

  5. Coiled tubing working life prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.

    1995-12-31

    Failure of coiled tubing, due to the repeated bending and plastic deformation of coiled tubing on and off the reel and gooseneck, is of great concern in coiled tubing operations. This paper discusses the coiled tubing working life based on one of the coiled tubing life models published in the literature, and compares the results with other models. Certain agreements are found among these models. A group of curves is presented to illustrate the coiled tubing working life affected by coiled tubing size and wall thickness, internal pressure, yield strength, reel diameter, gooseneck radius, operation condition (corrosion) and butt-welded connection (stress concentration). The results show that coiled tubing life can be greatly increased by increasing CT wall thickness and CT strength, while the coiled tubing working life decreases under high internal pressure, corrosion, and butt-weld conditions. These curves can be easily used in estimating coiled tubing life for the field use.

  6. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Chopped-Glass-Fiber Automotive Structural Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battiste, R.L.; Corum, J.M.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.

    1999-11-01

    This report provides recommended durability-based design criteria for a chopped-glass-fiber reinforced polymeric composite for automotive structural applications. The criteria closely follow the framework of an earlier criteria document for a continuous-strand-mat (CSM) glass-fiber reference composite. Together these design criteria demonstrate a framework that can be adapted for future random-glass-fiber composites for automotive structural applications.

  7. Life Events | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Life Events Life Events Life Events is a listing of common events that may occur during or after your Federal career. It's divided into three sections: me/my family, job, and retirement. When you click on a question, you will see what actions you may need to take for each of the following programs: Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program, Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program (FEDVIP), Federal Flexible Spending Account Program (FSAFEDS), Federal Long Term Care Insurance

  8. Identification of an Archean marine oxygen oasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riding, Dr Robert E; Fralick, Dr Philip; Liang, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    The early Earth was essentially anoxic. A number of indicators suggest the presence of oxygenic photosynthesis 2700 3000 million years (Ma) ago, but direct evidence for molecular oxygen (O2) in seawater has remained elusive. Here we report rare earth element (REE) analyses of 2800 million year old shallowmarine limestones and deep-water iron-rich sediments at Steep Rock Lake, Canada. These show that the seawater from which extensive shallow-water limestones precipitated was oxygenated, whereas the adjacent deeper waters where iron-rich sediments formed were not. We propose that oxygen promoted limestone precipitation by oxidative removal of dissolved ferrous iron species, Fe(II), to insoluble Fe(III) oxyhydroxide, and estimate that at least 10.25 M oxygen concentration in seawater was required to accomplish this at Steep Rock. This agrees with the hypothesis that an ample supply of dissolved Fe(II) in Archean oceans would have hindered limestone formation. There is no direct evidence for the oxygen source at Steep Rock, but organic carbon isotope values and diverse stromatolites in the limestones suggest the presence of cyanobacteria. Our findings support the view that during the Archean significant oxygen levels first developed in protected nutrient-rich shallow marine habitats. They indicate that these environments were spatially restricted, transient, and promoted limestone precipitation. If Archean marine limestones in general reflect localized oxygenic removal of dissolved iron at the margins of otherwise anoxic iron-rich seas, then early oxygen oases are less elusive than has been assumed.

  9. Technology development: HEPA filter service life test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirchner, K.N.; Cummings, K.G.; Leck, W.C.; Fretthold, J.K.

    1995-05-31

    Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (the Site) has approximately 10,000 High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters installed in a variety of filter plenums. These ventilation/filtration plenum systems are used to control the release of airborne particulate contaminates to the environment during normal operations and also during potential design-based accidents. The operational integrity of the HEPA filter plenums is essential to maintaining the margins of safety as required by building specific Final Safety Analysis Reports (FSARS) for protection of the public and environment. An Unreviewed Safety Question Determination (USQD), USDQ-RFP94.0615-ARS, was conducted in 1994 addressing the potential inadequacy of the safety envelope for Protected Area building HEPA plenums. While conducting this USQD, questions were raised concerning the maximum service life criteria for HEPA filters. Accident scenarios in existing FSARs identify conditions that could potentially cause plugging or damage of down stream HEPA filters as a result of impaction from failed filters. Additionally, available data indicates that HEPA filters experience structural degradation due to the effects of age. The Unresolved Safety Question (USQ) compensatory measures thus require testing and analysis of used HEPA filters in order to determine and implement service life criteria.

  10. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. marine energy industry is actively pursuing development of offshore wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems. Experience in the wind energy sector demonstrates that new technology development requires thorough measurement and characterization of the environmental conditions prevalent at installation sites and of technology operating in the field. Presently, there are no turn-key instrumentation system solutions that meet the measurement needs of the marine energy industry. The 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop brought together technical experts from government laboratories, academia, and industry representatives from marine energy, wind, offshore oil and gas, and instrumentation developers to present and discuss the instrumentation needs of the marine energy industry. The goals of the meeting were to: 1. Share the latest relevant knowledge among technical experts; 2. Review relevant state-of-the-art field measurement technologies and methods; 3. Review lessons learned from recent field deployments; 4. Identify synergies across different industries; 5. Identify gaps between existing and needed instrumentation capabilities; 6. Understand who are the leading experts; 7. Provide a forum where stakeholders from the marine energy industry could provide substantive input in the development of new marine energy field deployable instrumentation packages.

  11. Development of Marine Thermoelectric Heat Recovery Systems | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Discusses benefits of integration of thermoelectrics into the marine industry, research program milestones, and prototype TEG design and integration PDF icon wallace.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Marine Thermoelectric Heat Recovery Systems PACCAR/Hi-Z Thermoelectric Generator Project Vehicular Thermoelectric Applications Session DEER 2009

  12. Development of Marine Thermoelectric Heat Recovery Systems | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Thermoelectric generator prototypes are evaluated in a dedicated hybrid vessel test platform fabricated from an encapsulated lifeboat to optimize performance and reliability for marine industry applications PDF icon wallace.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Marine Thermoelectric Heat Recovery Systems Vehicular Thermoelectrics: The New Green Technology Bi-directional dc-dc Converter

  13. Environmentally Benign and Permanent Modifications to Prevent Biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Zhang

    2012-04-19

    Semprus Biosciences is developing environmentally benign and permanent modifications to prevent biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Biofouling, including growth on external surfaces by bacteria, algae, barnacles, mussels, and other marine organisms, accumulate quickly on MHK devices, causing mechanical wear and changes in performance. Biofouling on crucial components of hydrokinetic devices, such as rotors, generators, and turbines, imposes substantial mass and hydrodynamic loading with associated efficiency loss and maintenance costs. Most antifouling coatings leach toxic ingredients, such as copper and tributyltin, through an eroding process, but increasingly stringent regulation of biocides has led to interest in the development of non-biocidal technologies to control fouling. Semprus Biosciences research team is developing modifications to prevent fouling from a broad spectrum of organisms on devices of all shapes, sizes, and materials for the life of the product. The research team designed and developed betaine-based polymers as novel underwater coatings to resist the attachment of marine organisms. Different betaine-based monomers and polymers were synthesized and incorporated within various coating formulations. The formulations and application methods were developed on aluminum panels with required adhesion strength and mechanical properties. The coating polymers were chemically stable under UV, hydrolytic and oxidative environments. The sulfobetaine formulations are applicable as nonleaching and stable underwater coatings. For the first time, coating formulations modified with highly packed sulfobetaine polymers were prepared and demonstrated resistance to a broad spectrum of marine organisms. Assays for comparing nonfouling performance were developed to evaluate protein adsorption and bacteria attachment. Barnacle settlement and removal were evaluated and a 60-day field test was performed. Silicone substrates including a commercial fouling release coating were used for comparison. Compared with the unmodified silicone substrates, the sulfobetaine-modified formulations were able to exhibit a 98% reduction in fibrinogen adsorption, 97.0% (E. coli), 99.6% (S. aureus), and 99.5% (C. lytica) reduction in bacteria attachment, and 100% reduction in barnacles cyprid attachment. In addition to the significant improvement in fouling resistance of various organisms, the 60-day field test also showed an evident efficacy from visual assessment, foul rating, and fouling removal test. The research confirmed that the novel antifouling mechanism of betaine polymers provides a new avenue for marine coating development. The developed coatings out-performed currently used nontoxic underwater coatings in a broad spectrum of fouling resistance. By further developing formulations and processing methods for specific devices, the technology is ready for the next stage of development with demonstration in MHK systems.

  14. Life Cycle Asset Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-10-14

    (The following directives are deleted or consolidated into this Order and shall be phased out as noted in Paragraph 2: DOE 1332.1A; DOE 4010.1A; DOE 4300.1C; DOE 4320.1B; DOE 4320.2A; DOE 4330.4B; DOE 4330.5; DOE 4540.1C; DOE 4700.1). This Order supersedes specific project management provisions within DOE O 430.1A, LIFE CYCLE ASSET MANAGEMENT. The specific paragraphs canceled by this Order are 6e(7); 7a(3); 7b(11) and (14); 7c(4),(6),(7),(11), and (16); 7d(4) and (8); 7e(3),(10), and (17); Attachment 1, Definitions (item 30 - Line Item Project, item 42 - Project, item 48 - Strategic System); and Attachment 2, Contractor Requirements Document (paragraph 1d regarding a project management system). The remainder of DOE O 430.1A remains in effect. Cancels DOE O 430.1. Canceled by DOE O 413.3.

  15. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment...

  16. MAGIC: Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, ER; Wiscombe, WJ; Albrecht, BA; Bland, GL; Flagg, CN; Klein, SA; Kollias, P; Mace, G; Reynolds, RM; Schwartz, SE; Siebesma, AP; Teixeira, J; Wood, R; Zhang, M

    2012-10-03

    The second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF2) will be deployed aboard the Horizon Lines cargo container ship merchant vessel (M/V) Spirit for MAGIC, the Marine ARM GPCI1 Investigation of Clouds. The Spirit will traverse the route between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii, from October 2012 through September 2013 (except for a few months in the middle of this time period when the ship will be in dry dock). During this field campaign, AMF2 will observe and characterize the properties of clouds and precipitation, aerosols, and atmospheric radiation; standard meteorological and oceanographic variables; and atmospheric structure. There will also be two intensive observational periods (IOPs), one in January 2013 and one in July 2013, during which more detailed measurements of the atmospheric structure will be made.

  17. Labs21 environmental performance criteria Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul A.

    2002-10-01

    Laboratory facilities present a unique challenge for energy efficient and sustainable design, with their inherent complexity of systems, health and safety requirements, long-term flexibility and adaptability needs, energy use intensity, and environmental impacts. The typical laboratory is about five times as energy intensive as a typical office building and costs about three times as much per unit area. The Labs21 Environmental Performance Criteria (EPC) is a rating system for use by laboratory building project stakeholders to assess the environmental performance of laboratory facilities. Currently, the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED{trademark} Rating System is the primary tool used. However, LEED{trademark} was designed for U.S. commercial office buildings and as such, lacks some attributes essential to the sustainable design of this unique and complex building type. To facilitate widespread use and to avoid ''re-inventing the wheel'' this effort builds on the existing LEED{trademark} Rating System 2.0.

  18. Fusion Blanket Coolant Section Criteria, Methodology, and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMuth, J. A.; Meier, W. R.; Jolodosky, A.; Frantoni, M.; Reyes, S.

    2015-10-02

    The focus of this LDRD was to explore potential Li alloys that would meet the tritium breeding and blanket cooling requirements but with reduced chemical reactivity, while maintaining the other attractive features of pure Li breeder/coolant. In other fusion approaches (magnetic fusion energy or MFE), 17Li- 83Pb alloy is used leveraging Pb’s ability to maintain high TBR while lowering the levels of lithium in the system. Unfortunately this alloy has a number of potential draw-backs. Due to the high Pb content, this alloy suffers from very high average density, low tritium solubility, low system energy, and produces undesirable activation products in particular polonium. The criteria considered in the selection of a tritium breeding alloy are described in the following section.

  19. Methods and criteria for safety analysis (FIN L2535)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    In response to the NRC request for a proposal dated October 20, 1992, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) submit this proposal to provide contractural assistance for FIN L2535, ``Methods and Criteria for Safety Analysis,`` as specified in the Statement of Work attached to the request for proposal. The Statement of Work involves development of safety analysis guidance for NRC licensees, arranging a workshop on this guidance, and revising NRC Regulatory Guide 3.52. This response to the request for proposal offers for consideration the following advantages of WSRC in performing this work: Experience, Qualification of Personnel and Resource Commitment, Technical and Organizational Approach, Mobilization Plan, Key Personnel and Resumes. In addition, attached are the following items required by the NRC: Schedule II, Savannah River Site - Job Cost Estimate, NRC Form 189, Project and Budget Proposal for NRC Work, page 1, NRC Form 189, Project and Budget Proposal for NRC Work, page 2, Project Description.

  20. Criteria for the evaluation of a dilute decontamination demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FitzPatrick, V.F.; Divine, J.R.; Hoenes, G.R.; Munson, L.F.; Card, C.J.

    1981-12-01

    This document provides the prerequisite technical information required to evaluate and/or develop a project to demonstrate the dilute chemical decontamination of the primary coolant system of light water reactors. The document focuses on five key areas: the basis for establishing programmatic prerequisites and the key decision points that are required for proposal evaluation and/or RFP (Request for Proposal) issuance; a technical review of the state-of-the-art to identify the potential impacts of a reactor's primary-system decontamination on typical BWR and PWR plants; a discussion of the licensing, recertification, fuel warranty, and institutional considerations and processes; a preliminary identification and development of the selection criteria for the reactor and the decontamination process; and a preliminary identification of further research and development that might be required.

  1. Environmental Effects of Marine Energy Development Around the World. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, L.; Whiting, J.; Geerlofs, S.; Grear, M.; Blake, K.; Coffey, A.; Massaua, M.; Brown-Saracino, J.; Battey, H.

    2013-01-01

    This Annex IV report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment addressing the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines, the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals, and the effects of energy removal on physical systems.

  2. Evaluation of defatted and whole algae as feed ingredients for the marine shrimp, litopenaeus vannamei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, J. L.; Patnaik, S.; Gatlin, III, D. M.; Lawrence, A. L.

    2012-06-13

    Evaluation of defatted and whole algae as feed ingredients for the marine shrimp, litopenaeus vannamei

  3. Program Evaluation: Program Life Cycle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In general, different types of evaluation are carried out over different parts of a program's life cycle (e.g., Creating a program, Program is underway, or Closing out or end of program)....

  4. Life Sciences | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Life Sciences Having a healthy impact on energy, medicine and the environment Argonne National Laboratory's life sciences research has yielded a portfolio of advanced technologies that are having a profound impact on medical technologies and therapies, energy production and sustainability, and bioremediation. Argonne's roster of world-class biology and environmental scientists develop viable technologies - from cancer therapies and antibody engineering to biological methane production and

  5. Photovoltaics: Life-cycle Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis V. M.; Kim, H.C.

    2009-10-02

    Life-cycle analysis is an invaluable tool for investigating the environmental profile of a product or technology from cradle to grave. Such life-cycle analyses of energy technologies are essential, especially as material and energy flows are often interwoven, and divergent emissions into the environment may occur at different life-cycle-stages. This approach is well exemplified by our description of material and energy flows in four commercial PV technologies, i.e., mono-crystalline silicon, multi-crystalline silicon, ribbon-silicon, and cadmium telluride. The same life-cycle approach is applied to the balance of system that supports flat, fixed PV modules during operation. We also discuss the life-cycle environmental metrics for a concentration PV system with a tracker and lenses to capture more sunlight per cell area than the flat, fixed system but requires large auxiliary components. Select life-cycle risk indicators for PV, i.e., fatalities, injures, and maximum consequences are evaluated in a comparative context with other electricity-generation pathways.

  6. Stirling engine: Available tools for long-life assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halford, G.R.; Bartolotta, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented for the durability approaches applicable to long-time life assessment of Stirling engine hot-section components. The crucial elements are experimental techniques for generating long-time materials property data (both monotonic and cyclic flow and failure properties); analytic representations of slow strain rate material stress-strain response characteristics (monotonic and cyclic constitutive relations) at high temperatures and low stresses and strains; analytic creep-fatigue-environmental interaction life prediction methods applicable to long lifetimes at high temperatures and small stresses and strains; and experimental verification of life predictions. Long-lifetime design criteria for materials of interest are woefully lacking. Designing against failures due to creep, creep-rupture, fatigue, environmental attack, and creep-fatigue-environmental interaction will require considerable extrapolation. Viscoplastic constitutive models and time-temperature parameters will have to be calibrated for the hot-section materials of interest. Analysis combined with limited verification testing in a short-time regime will be required to build confidence in long-lifetime durability models.

  7. Stirling engine---available tools for long-life assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halford, G.R.; Bartolotta, P.A. )

    1991-01-05

    A review is presented of the durability approaches applicable to long-time life assessment of Stirling engine hot-section components. The crucial elements are: (i) experimental techniques for generating long-time materials property data (both monotonic and cyclic flow and failure properties), (ii) analytic representations of slow strain rate material stress-strain response characteristics (monotonic and cyclic constitutive relations) at high temperatures and low stresses and strains, (iii) analytic creep-fatigue-environmental interaction life prediction methods applicable to long lifetimes at high temperatures and small stresses and strains, and (iv) experimental verification of life predictions. Long-lifetime design criteria for materials of interest are woefully lacking. Designing against failures due to creep, creep-rupture, fatigue, environmental attack, and creep-fatigue-environmental interaction will require considerable extrapolation. Viscoplastic constitutive models and time-temperature parameters will have to be calibrated for the hot-section materials of interest. Analysis combined with limited verification testing in a short-time regime will be required to build confidence in long-term durability models. A strong need exists for improved long-lifetime durability models.

  8. Peninsula Research Institute for Marine Renewable Energy PRIMaRE...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy PRIMaRE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Peninsula Research Institute for Marine Renewable Energy (PRIMaRE) Place: United Kingdom Sector: Renewable Energy Product: UK-based...

  9. Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (Mcagcc), Twenty-Nine Palms, Ca Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  10. Orkney Marine Energy Test Centre | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Centre Jump to: navigation, search Name: Orkney Marine Energy Test Centre Place: Orkney, United Kingdom Zip: KW16 3AW Product: Its aim is to stimulate and accelerate the...

  11. ARM - Field Campaign - Marine ARM GPCI Investigations of Clouds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Marine ARM GPCI Investigations of Clouds (MAGIC): Cloud Properties from Zenith...

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - MArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsMArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP Campaign Links Science Plan AMF Point Reyes Website AMF Point Reyes Data Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data...

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - Marine ARM GPCI Investigations of Clouds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Marine ARM GPCI Investigations of Clouds (MAGIC): Parsivel Disdrometer support for...

  14. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Field Measurements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department’s Water Power Program is seeking feedback from the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry regarding the verification and validation of advanced open source MHK design tools and models.

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - Marine ARM GPCI Investigations of Clouds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Browse Data Related Campaigns Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) 2012.10.01, Lewis, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at...

  16. Harboring Pollution: Air Quality Impacts of Marine Ports | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Harboring Pollution: Air Quality Impacts of Marine Ports Harboring Pollution: Air Quality Impacts of Marine Ports 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: National Resources Defense Council PDF icon 2004_deer_bailey.pdf More Documents & Publications Cleaning Up Diesel Engines South Coast AQMD Clean Transportation Programs Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility

  17. Marine Corps Base Quantico Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lighting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Marine Corps Base Quantico Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lighting LED Parking Lighting in Federal Facilities FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM With technical assistance from the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Marine Corps Base Quantico (MCBQ) recently undertook a major overhaul of its outdoor lighting, boosting safety and security throughout the site, while cutting energy costs and earning a national award in the process. The MCBQ replaced nearly 2,000 old and ineffcient street

  18. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Assesses Risks for Marine Vessel

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Traffic and Wind Energy Development | Department of Energy Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Assesses Risks for Marine Vessel Traffic and Wind Energy Development Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Assesses Risks for Marine Vessel Traffic and Wind Energy Development September 12, 2014 - 12:08pm Addthis The nationwide demand for energy is fueling development of sustainable offshore wind resources. To reach the strong and steady offshore wind resources, the Bureau of Ocean Energy

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet The following online information resources are designed to provide the public access to information pertaining to MHK technologies, projects, and research. PDF icon Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resourses Categorizing and Evaluating

  20. Marine and Hydrokinetic Market Acceleration and Deployment | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Market Acceleration and Deployment Marine and Hydrokinetic Market Acceleration and Deployment Photo of several men on a floating platform that is lowering monitoring tools into the ocean. Though marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy is still in its infancy, the program is developing a robust portfolio of projects to accelerate wave, tidal and current project deployments and development of the MHK market in general. These projects include project siting activities, market assessments,

  1. DOE Announces Webinars on Residential Energy Efficiency, Marine and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hydrokinetic Technology Development Risk Management, and More | Department of Energy Residential Energy Efficiency, Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development Risk Management, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Residential Energy Efficiency, Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development Risk Management, and More December 10, 2014 - 8:29am Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies, to

  2. Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton Fact sheet describes the Energy savings Performance Contract (ESPC) Success Story on how a comprehensive effort cuts energy use by 44% at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton in Camp Pendleton, California. PDF icon espc_ss_pendleton.pdf More Documents & Publications 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Jeff Allen 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Appendices) Camp Pendleton Saves 91% in Parking Lot Lighting

  3. Labs21 Environmental Performance Criteria: Toward 'LEED (trademark) for Labs'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Lintner, William; Wirdzek, Phil

    2002-10-14

    Laboratory facilities present a unique challenge for energy efficient and sustainable design, with their inherent complexity of systems, health and safety requirements, long-term flexibility and adaptability needs, energy use intensity, and environmental impacts. The typical laboratory is about three to five times as energy intensive as a typical office building and costs about three times as much per unit area. In order to help laboratory stakeholders assess the environmental performance of their laboratories, the Labs21 program, sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy, is developing the Environmental Performance Criteria (EPC), a point-based rating system that builds on the LEED(TM) rating system. Currently, LEED(TM) is the primary tool used to rate the sustainability of commercial buildings. However, it lacks some attributes essential to encouraging the application of sustainable design principles to laboratory buildings. Accordingly, the EPC has additions and modifications to the prerequisites and credits in each of the six sections of LEED(TM). It is being developed in a consensus-based approach by a diverse group of architects, engineers, consulting experts, health & safety personnel and facilities personnel. This report describes the EPC version 2.0, highlighting the underlying technical issues, and describes implications for the development of a LEED version for Laboratories.

  4. Concepts and criteria for evaluating topsoil substitutes: The Texas experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askenasy, P.; Senkayi, A.L.; Joseph, W.L.

    1997-12-31

    Presented in this paper are: (1) historical background, (2) Federal and State regulatory basis and authority, and (3) justification for selected criteria and parameters which are currently used to evaluate the quality of topsoil-substitute materials and postmine soils in Texas. The specific parameters and concepts discussed include (1) acid- and toxic-forming materials (AFM and TFM), (2) quantification procedures for AFM and TFM, (3) procedures used to identify topsoil substitutes that are {open_quotes}equal to or more suitable than{close_quotes} existing premine native soils, and (4) current interpretations of what is meant by {open_quotes}the best available material to support revegetation{close_quotes} of surface-mined areas. To support these interpretations, reference is made throughout the paper to relevant sections of the (1) Texas Coal Mining Regulations (TCMR), (2) Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA), and (3) Federal regulations promulgated by the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) to implement SMCRA. The success of the Texas reclamation program, as indicated by the quality of the reclaimed soils is also discussed. This success is partly attributed to the rigorous application of the quantification concepts and parameters discussed in this paper.

  5. U.S. Department of Energy Implements More Stringent Criteria for ENERGY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    STAR® Clothes Washers, Expands CFL Program | Department of Energy More Stringent Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Clothes Washers, Expands CFL Program U.S. Department of Energy Implements More Stringent Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Clothes Washers, Expands CFL Program March 7, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced more stringent criteria for clothes washers and expanded the categories of compact fluorescent lightbulbs (CFL) under the ENERGY

  6. Sources and composition of submicron organic mass in marine aerosol particles: Marine Aerosol Organic Mass Composition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Frossard, Amanda A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Elliott, Scott M.; Bates, Timothy S.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    2014-11-26

    Recent studies have proposed a variety of interpretations of the sources and composition of atmospheric marine aerosol particles (aMA) based on a range of physical and chemical measurements collected during open-ocean research cruises. To investigate the processes that affect marine organic particles, this study uses the characteristic functional group composition (from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy) of aMAP from five ocean regions to show that: (i) The organic functional group composition of aMAP that can be identified as atmospheric primary marine (ocean-derived) aerosol (aPMA) is 65±12% hydroxyl, 21±9% alkane, 6±6% amine, and 7±8% carboxylic acid functional groups. Contributions from photochemicalmore »reactions add carboxylic acid groups (15%-25%), shipping effluent in seawater and ship emissions add additional alkane groups (up to 70%), and coastal emissions mix in alkane and carboxylic acid groups from coastal pollution sources. (ii) The organic composition of aPMA is nearly identical to model generated primary marine aerosol particles (gPMA) from bubbled seawater (55% hydroxyl, 32% alkane, and 13% amine functional groups), indicating that its overall functional group composition is the direct consequence of the organic constituents of the seawater source. (iii) While the seawater organic functional group composition was nearly invariant across all three ocean regions studied, the gPMA alkane group fraction increased with chlorophyll-a concentrations (r = 0.79). gPMA from productive seawater had a larger fraction of alkane functional groups (35%) compared to gPMA from non-productive seawater (16%), likely due to the presence of surfactants in productive seawater that stabilize the bubble film and lead to preferential drainage of the more soluble (lower alkane group fraction) organic components. gPMA has a hydroxyl group absorption peak location characteristic of monosaccharides and disaccharides, where the seawater OM hydroxyl group peak location is closer to that of polysaccharides. This may result from the larger saccharides preferentially remaining in the seawater during gPMA and aPMA production« less

  7. Implementing marine organic aerosols into the GEOS-Chem model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meskhidze, N.

    2015-03-17

    Marine-sourced organic aerosols (MOAs) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem (Global Earth Observing System Chemistry) model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large underprediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Modelmore » predictions were also in good agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOAs observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOAs have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having >10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.« less

  8. Implementing marine organic aerosols into the GEOS-Chem model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meskhidze, N.

    2014-09-09

    Marine organic aerosols (MOA) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large underprediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Model predictions were also in goodmore » agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOA observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOA have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having > 10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly-emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.« less

  9. Fire safety of LPG in marine transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinsen, W.E.; Johnson, D.W.; Welker, J.R.

    1980-08-01

    This report contains an analytical examination of cargo spill and fire hazard potential associated with the marine handling of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as cargo. Principal emphasis was on cargo transfer operations for ships unloading at receiving terminals, and barges loading or unloading at a terminal. Major safety systems, including emergency shutdown systems, hazard detection systems, and fire extinguishment and control systems were included in the analysis. Spill probabilities were obtained from fault tree analyses utilizing composite LPG tank ship and barge designs. Failure rates for hardware in the analyses were generally taken from historical data on similar generic classes of hardware, there being very little historical data on the specific items involved. Potential consequences of cargo spills of various sizes are discussed and compared to actual LPG vapor cloud incidents. The usefulness of hazard mitigation systems (particularly dry chemical fire extinguishers and water spray systems) in controlling the hazards posed by LPG spills and spill fires is also discussed. The analysis estimates the probability of fatality for a terminal operator is about 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -5/ per cargo transfer operation. The probability of fatality for the general public is substantially less.

  10. Criteria for Selection of Seed Motions to Envelop Design Response Spectra

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Criteria for Selection of Seed Motions to Envelop Design Response Spectra DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Workshop October 25, 2011 Michael Costantino, Thomas Houston, Greg Mertz, Andrew Maham

  11. U.S. Department of Energy Implements Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Water

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heaters | Department of Energy Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Water Heaters U.S. Department of Energy Implements Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Water Heaters April 1, 2008 - 2:48pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced new ENERGY STAR® criteria for water heaters, the first in the history of the program. According to DOE projections, by the end of the fifth year in effect, the new water heater criteria are expected to save Americans approximately $780 million

  12. NIF Functional Requirements and Primary Criteria Rev. 1.8 September...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: NIF Functional Requirements and Primary Criteria Rev. 1.8 September 2006 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NIF Functional Requirements and Primary...

  13. NIF Functional Requirements and Primary Criteria Rev. 1.8 September...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: NIF Functional Requirements and Primary Criteria Rev. 1.8 September 2006 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NIF Functional Requirements and Primary ...

  14. Work & Life at Munich | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work & Life at Munich Work & Life at Munich Living at Germany's Cosmopolitan Crossroads offers easy access to outdoor pursuits in the Alps and travel throughout Europe. Click to...

  15. The Fate of Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide in Natural Marine Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zilian; Chen, Yi; Wang, Rui; Cai, Ruanhong; Fu, Yingnan; Jiao, Nianzhi; Quigg, Antonietta

    2015-11-16

    Most marine bacteria produce exopolysaccharides (EPS), and bacterial EPS represent an important source of dissolved organic carbon in marine ecosystems. It was proposed that bacterial EPS rich in uronic acid is resistant to mineralization by microbes and thus has a long residence time in global oceans. To confirm this hypothesis, bacterial EPS rich in galacturonic acid was isolated from Alteromonas sp. JL2810. The EPS was used to amend natural seawater to investigate the bioavailability of this EPS by native populations, in the presence and absence of ammonium and phosphate amendment. The data indicated that the bacterial EPS could not be completely consumed during the cultivation period and that the bioavailability of EPS was not only determined by its intrinsic properties, but was also determined by other factors such as the availability of inorganic nutrients. During the experiment, the humic-like component of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) was freshly produced. Bacterial community structure analysis indicated that the class Flavobacteria of the phylum Bacteroidetes was the major contributor for the utilization of EPS. This report is the first to indicate that Flavobacteria are a major contributor to bacterial EPS degradation. Finally, the fraction of EPS that could not be completely utilized and the FDOM (e.g., humic acid-like substances) produced de novo may be refractory and may contribute to the carbon storage in the oceans.

  16. Identification and Prioritization of Analysis Cases for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Risk Screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-06-16

    In this report we describe the development of the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), a risk-informed analytical process for estimating the environmental risks associated with the construction and operation of marine and hydrokinetic energy generation projects. The development process consists of two main phases of analysis. In the first phase, preliminary risk analyses will take the form of screening studies in which key environmental impacts and the uncertainties that create risk are identified, leading to a better-focused characterization of the relevant environmental effects. Existence of critical data gaps will suggest areas in which specific modeling and/or data collection activities should take place. In the second phase, more detailed quantitative risk analyses will be conducted, with residual uncertainties providing the basis for recommending risk mitigation and monitoring activities. We also describe the process used for selecting three cases for fiscal year 2010 risk screening analysis using the ERES. A case is defined as a specific technology deployed in a particular location involving certain environmental receptors specific to that location. The three cases selected satisfy a number of desirable criteria: 1) they correspond to real projects whose deployment is likely to take place in the foreseeable future; 2) the technology developers are willing to share technology and project-related data; 3) the projects represent a diversity of technology-site-receptor characteristics; 4) the projects are of national interest, and 5) environmental effects data may be available for the projects.

  17. Compilation of selected marine radioecological data for the US Subseabed Program: Summaries of available radioecological concentration factors and biological half-lives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, L.S.; Marietta, M.G.; Jackson, D.W.

    1987-04-01

    The US Subseabed Disposal Program has compiled an extensive concentration factor and biological half-life data base from the international marine radioecological literature. A microcomputer-based data management system has been implemented to provide statistical and graphic summaries of these data. The data base is constructed in a manner which allows subsets to be sorted using a number of interstudy variables such as organism category, tissue/organ category, geographic location (for in situ studies), and several laboratory-related conditions (e.g., exposure time and exposure concentration). This report updates earlier reviews and provides summaries of the tabulated data. In addition to the concentration factor/biological half-life data base, we provide an outline of other published marine radioecological works. Our goal is to present these data in a form that enables those concerned with predictive assessment of radiation dose in the marine environment to make a more judicious selection of data for a given application. 555 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, wave energy conversion could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that, due to a lack of technical certainty, many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood,. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based assessment to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector in order to evaluate the potential impact of these technologies on the marine environment and navigation constraints. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental effects and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential range of technical attributes and potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders on the critical issues that need to be addressed. By identifying and addressing navigational and environmental concerns in the early stages of the industry’s development, serious mistakes that could potentially derail industry-wide development can be avoided. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory issues (Pacific Energy Ventures) and navigational issues (PCCI). The results of this study are structured into three reports: (1) Wave power scenario description (2) Tidal power scenario description (3) Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the first report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of wave power plants deployed in Humboldt County, California and Oahu, Hawaii. These two sites contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other wave power sites in the U.S. and serve as representative case studies. Wave power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize potential effects, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informed the process of selecting representative wave power devices. The selection criteria requires that devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties, and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. Table 1 summarizes the selected wave power technologies. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development, but are not directly mentioned here. Many environmental effects will largely scale with the size of the wave power plant. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) a small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial scale plant. It is important to understand that the purpose of this study was to establish baseline scenarios based on basic device data that was provided to use by the manufacturer for illustrative purposes only.

  19. Data Quality Objectives for WTP Feed Acceptance Criteria - 12043

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arakali, Aruna V.; Benson, Peter A.; Duncan, Garth; Johnston, Jill C.; Lane, Thomas A.; Matis, George; Olson, John W.; Banning, Davey L.; Greer, Daniel A.; Seidel, Cary M.; Thien, Michael G.

    2012-07-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is under construction for the U.S. Department of Energy by Bechtel National, Inc. and subcontractor URS Corporation (contract no. DE-AC27-01RV14136). The plant when completed will be the world's largest nuclear waste treatment facility. Bechtel and URS are tasked with designing, constructing, commissioning, and transitioning the plant to the long term operating contractor to process the legacy wastes that are stored in underground tanks (from nuclear weapons production between the 1940's and the 1980's). Approximately 56 million gallons of radioactive waste is currently stored in these tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. There are three major WTP facilities being constructed for processing the tank waste feed. The Pretreatment (PT) facility receives feed where it is separated into a low activity waste (LAW) fraction and a high level waste (HLW) fraction. These fractions are transferred to the appropriate (HLW or LAW) facility, combined with glass former material, and sent to high temperature melters for formation of the glass product. In addition to PT, HLW and LAW, other facilities in WTP include the Laboratory (LAB) for analytical services and the Balance of Facilities (BOF) for plant maintenance, support and utility services. The transfer of staged feed from the waste storage tanks and acceptance in WTP receipt vessels require data for waste acceptance criteria (WAC) parameters from analysis of feed samples. The Data Quality Objectives (DQO) development was a joint team effort between WTP and Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) representatives. The focus of this DQO effort was to review WAC parameters and develop data quality requirements, the results of which will determine whether or not the staged feed can be transferred from the TOC to WTP receipt vessels. The approach involved systematic planning for data collection consistent with EPA guidance for the seven-step DQO process. Data quality requirements for sample collection and analysis of all WAC parameters were specified during the DQO process. There were eighteen key parameters identified with action limits to ensure the feed transfer and receipt would not exceed plant design, safety, permitting, and processing requirements. The remaining WAC parameters were grouped in the category for obtaining data according to WTP contract specifications, regulatory reporting requirements, and for developing the feed campaign processing sequence. (authors)

  20. Powering the Future with LIFE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E I; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2009-04-28

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Leveraging the National Ignition Facility to meet the climate-energy challenge; (2) The journal into a new era of scientific discoveries; and (3) Safe and sustainable energy with LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy).

  1. Assessing the Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development on Marine and Estuarine Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-07-30

    The world’s oceans and estuaries offer an enormous potential to meet the nation’s growing demand for energy. The use of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices to harness the power of wave and tidal energy could contribute significantly toward meeting federal- and state-mandated renewable energy goals while supplying a substantial amount of clean energy to coastal communities. Locations along the eastern and western coasts of the United States between 40° and 70° north latitude are ideal for MHK deployment, and recent estimates of energy potential for the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California suggest that up to 25 gigawatts could be generated from wave and tidal devices in these areas. Because energy derived from wave and tidal devices is highly predictable, their inclusion in our energy portfolio could help balance available sources of energy production, including hydroelectric, coal, nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, and others.

  2. Evaluation of Hose in Hose Transfer Line Service Life for Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TORRES, T.D.

    2000-08-24

    RPP-6153, Engineering Task Plan for Hose-in-Hose Transfer System for the Interim Stabilization Program, defines the programmatic goals, functional requirements, and technical criteria for the development and subsequent installation of transfer line equipment to support Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program. RPP-6028, Specification for Hose in Hose Transfer Lines for Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program, has been issued to define the specific requirements for the design, manufacture, and verification of transfer line assemblies for specific waste transfer applications. Included in RPP-6028 are tables defining the chemical constituents of concern to which transfer lines will be exposed. Current Interim Stabilization Program planning forecasts that the at-grade transfer lines will be required to convey pumpable waste for as much as three years after commissioning. Prudent engineering dictates that the equipment placed in service have a working life in excess of this forecasted time period, with some margin to allow for future adjustments to the planned schedule. This document evaluates the effective service life of the Hose-in-Hose Transfer Lines, based on information submitted by the manufacturer and published literature. The effective service life of transfer line assemblies is a function of several factors. Foremost among these are process fluid characteristics, ambient environmental conditions, and the manufacturer's stated shelf life. This evaluation examines the manufacturer's certification of shelf life, the manufacturer's certifications of chemical compatibility with waste, and published literature on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on the mechanical properties of elastomeric materials to evaluate transfer line service life.

  3. Waste management project's alternatives: A risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karmperis, Athanasios C.; Sotirchos, Anastasios; Aravossis, Konstantinos; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P.

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the evaluation of a waste management project's alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a novel risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the RBMCA the evaluation criteria are based on the quantitative risk analysis of the project's alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Correlation between the criteria weight values and the decision makers' risk preferences is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preference to the multi-criteria against the one-criterion evaluation process is discussed. - Abstract: This paper examines the evaluation of a waste management project's alternatives through a quantitative risk analysis. Cost benefit analysis is a widely used method, in which the investments are mainly assessed through the calculation of their evaluation indicators, namely benefit/cost (B/C) ratios, as well as the quantification of their financial, technical, environmental and social risks. Herein, a novel approach in the form of risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) is introduced, which can be used by decision makers, in order to select the optimum alternative of a waste management project. Specifically, decision makers use multiple criteria, which are based on the cumulative probability distribution functions of the alternatives' B/C ratios. The RBMCA system is used for the evaluation of a waste incineration project's alternatives, where the correlation between the criteria weight values and the decision makers' risk preferences is analyzed and useful conclusions are discussed.

  4. Bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, B.; Neff, J.

    1993-09-01

    The bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms indicates that there exists a potential for transfer of these contaminants through marine food webs to commercial fisheries products consumed by humans. However, there has been relatively little effort to combine and synthesize data on chemical/biological interactions between benthic animals and seagrasses and the sediments in which they reside on the one hand, and on the chemistry of bioaccumulation on the other. This report provides a conceptual basis for an approach to bioavailability and biomagnification of sediment-bound contaminants that reviews biological and chemical approaches.

  5. Various mortars for anti-fouling purposes in marine environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tomoka; Miura, Yoko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Hirai, Nobumitsu; Yokoyama, Seiji

    2014-02-20

    The antifouling properties for some mortars with steel making slags were investigated by real marine immersion tests and a unique laboratory acceleration tests with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactors. Mortars mixed with steel making slags containing abundant iron elements tended to form biofilm and also bifouling. The two kinds of biofilm formation tests were used in this study. Real immersion in marine environments and laboratory test with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactor. The former evaluated the biofouling characteristics more properly, while the latter did the biofilm formation characteristics more effectively.

  6. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  7. Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This Revision 4 of the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), WIPP-DOE-069, identifies and consolidates existing criteria and requirements which regulate the safe handling and preparation of Transuranic (TRU) waste packages for transportation to and emplacement in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This consolidation does not invalidate any existing certification of TRU waste to the WIPP Operations and Safety Criteria (Revision 3 of WIPP-DOE--069) and/or Transportation: Waste Package Requirements (TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging [SARP]). Those documents being consolidated, including Revision 3 of the WAC, currently support the Test Phase.

  8. Take Marine Mammals Permit Application Form 3-200-43 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library Form: Take Marine Mammals Permit Application Form 3-200-43 Abstract Federal Fish and Wildlife permit application form for take TakeImportTransportExport of Marine...

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine Drive and Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine Drive and Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock ...

  10. Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, ...

  11. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data The Wind Program hosted a...

  12. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and Environmental Effects Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marine renewable energy test centers around the world have been successful in testing new technologies to ensure devices perform up to standards and are able to survive in the marine environment....

  13. DOE Tour of Zero: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes DOE Tour of Zero: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes 1 of 10 Clifton View Homes built this 2,408-square-foot zero energy home in Coupeville,...

  14. Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ADCLES Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences The CLES Directorate is home to world class capabilities in chemistry, bioscience, and earth and environmental sciences. Structural protein research Structural protein research A wide range of protein folding research Field Instrument Deployments and Operations (FIDO) Field Instrument Deployments and Operations (FIDO) Atmospheric science research Quantum Dots Quantum Dots Quantum dot research for energy and light Contact Us Associate Director Nan Sauer

  15. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies | Department of Energy Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies This report focuses on potential impacts of marine and hydrokinetic technologies to aquatic environments (i.e. rivers, estuaries, and oceans), fish and fish habitats, ecological relationships, and other marine and freshwater

  16. Instrumentation for Monitoring around Marine Renewable Energy Converters: Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Polagye, Brian

    2014-01-31

    Report on workshop held in Seattle for DOE WWPTO on instrument needs for monitoring marine energy devices

  17. Summary of New DOE-STD-1020-2011 NPH Analysis and Design Criteria...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE-STD-1020-2012 Critical Issues in NPH Categorization and Limit State Selection of ...

  18. Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, Marcus Bianchi

    2010-08-01

    This document provides an example procedure for establishing acceptance-range criteria to assess results from software undergoing BESTEST-EX. This example method for BESTEST-EX is a modified version of the method described in HERS BESTEST.

  19. Title 43 CFR 1610.4-2 Development of Planning Criteria | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 43 CFR 1610.4-2 Development of Planning CriteriaLegal Abstract 1610.4-2 Development of...

  20. Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Regulators Workshop: Lessons from Wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, E. Ian

    2015-09-03

    Ian Baring-Gould presented these lessons learned from wind energy to an audience of marine hydrokinetic regulators. Lessons learned spanned the areas of technology advances, using collaborative approaches to involve key stakeholders; using baseline studies to measure and prioritize wildlife impacts, and look at avoidance and mitigation options early in the process.

  1. Identifying How Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices Affect Aquatic Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G. F.; Copping, Andrea E.; Roberts, Jesse

    2011-04-24

    Significant research is under way to determine the potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy systems. This research, being guided and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, is intended to address knowledge gaps and facilitate installation and operation of these systems.

  2. OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY AND NORTHWEST NATIONAL MARINE RENEWABLE ENERGY CENTER

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY AND NORTHWEST NATIONAL MARINE RENEWABLE ENERGY CENTER WAVE ENERGY TEST PROJECT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT June 2012 DOE/EA-1917 U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 NNMREC and OSU Wave Energy Test Project Draft Environmental Assessment i June 2012 Contents List of Tables .......................................................................................................................................... iv List of

  3. Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Types of Coverage Available Basic Life Basic life is based on your annual basic rate ... FEGLI insurance is a term insurance policy and has no cash value. Optional Insurance There ...

  4. Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This DOE standard gives design and evaluation criteria for natural phenomena hazards (NPH) effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE 5480.28. Goal of the criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, flooding, etc. They apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities; they may also be used for modification and upgrading of the latter.

  5. Design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system to ensure limitation of core damage. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deane, N.A.; Atcheson, D.B.

    1981-09-01

    Safety-based functional requirements and design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system (SASS) are derived in accordance with LOA-2 success criteria and reliability goals. The design basis transients have been defined and evaluated for the CDS Phase II design, which is a 2550 MWt mixed oxide heterogeneous core reactor. A partial set of reactor responses for selected transients is provided as a function of SASS characteristics such as reactivity worth, trip points, and insertion times.

  6. Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act Advisory Exemptions How to Submit a FOIA Request Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria Electronic Reading Room ISC Conventional Reading Rooms Reference Links Privacy Act NEPA Documents Contact Information Integrated Support Center Roxanne Purucker U.S. Department of Energy 9800 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 P: (630) 252-2110 Don F. Thress, Jr. U.S. Department of

  7. Natural Phenomena Hazard Analysis and Design Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-08-03

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities, provides criteria and guidance for the analysis and design of facility structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that are necessary to implement the requirements of DOE Order (O) 420.1C, Facility Safety, and to ensure that the SSCs will be able to effectively perform their intended safety functions under the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPHs).

  8. Preliminary/Sample Residential EE Loan Term Sheet and Underwriting Criteria

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Appendix A of the Clean Energy Finance Guide, 3rd Edition) | Department of Energy Preliminary/Sample Residential EE Loan Term Sheet and Underwriting Criteria (Appendix A of the Clean Energy Finance Guide, 3rd Edition) Preliminary/Sample Residential EE Loan Term Sheet and Underwriting Criteria (Appendix A of the Clean Energy Finance Guide, 3rd Edition) Provides a sample or preliminary term sheet for single family residential energy efficiency loans. Author: Energy Efficiency Finance Corp.

  9. Nuclear Safety Research and Development Proposal Review and Prioritization and Criteria

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Safety Research and Development Proposal Review and Prioritization Process and Criteria Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Office of Environment, Health, Safety, and Security U.S. Department of Energy December 2015 NSR&D Proposal Review and Prioritization Process and Criteria 2 | P a g e Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program 1. Introduction Per the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program

  10. Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.

    2012-07-06

    Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

  11. Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Life Cycle and Overlap Structure Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National Laboratory...

  12. Licensable Life Science Technologies | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Licensable Life Science Technologies A selection of biology-based technologies available for licensing PDF icon licensable_biological_technologies

  13. Technical Basis for Certification of Seismic Design Criteria for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brouns, Thomas M.; Rohay, Alan C.; Youngs, Robert R.; Costantino, Carl J.; Miller, Lewis F.

    2008-02-28

    In August 2007, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman approved the final seismic and ground motion criteria for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site. Construction of the WTP began in 2002 based on seismic design criteria established in 1999 and a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis completed in 1996. The design criteria were re-evaluated in 2005 to address questions from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB), resulting in an increase by up to 40% in the seismic design basis. DOE announced in 2006 the suspension of construction on the pretreatment and high-level waste vitrification facilities within the WTP to validate the design with more stringent seismic criteria. In 2007, the U.S. Congress mandated that the Secretary of Energy certify the final seismic and ground motion criteria prior to expenditure of funds on construction of these two facilities. With the Secretary’s approval of the final seismic criteria this past summer, DOE authorized restart of construction of the pretreatment and high-level waste vitrification facilities.

  14. Assembling The Marine Metagenome, One Cell At A Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Gang; Han, Shunsheng; Kiss, Hajnalka; Saw, Jimmy; Senin, Pavel; Woyke, Tanja; Copeland, Alex; Gonzalez, Jose; Chatterji, Sourav; Cheng, Jan - Fang; Eisen, Jonathan A; Sieracki, Michael E; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2008-01-01

    The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91% and 78%, respectively. Only 0.24% of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured taxa from a complex microbial community of marine bacterioplankton. A combination of single cell genomics and metagenomics enabled us to analyze the genome content, metabolic adaptations, and biogeography of these taxa.

  15. Assembling the Marine Metagenome, One Cell at a Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woyke, Tanja; Xie, Gary; Copeland, Alex; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Han, Cliff; Kiss, Hajnalka; Saw, Jimmy H.; Senin, Pavel; Yang, Chi; Chatterji, Sourav; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Sieracki, Michael E.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2010-06-24

    The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91percent and 78percent, respectively. Only 0.24percent of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured taxa from a complex microbial community of marine bacterioplankton. A combination of single cell genomics and metagenomics enabled us to analyze the genome content, metabolic adaptations, and biogeography of these taxa.

  16. Title: The Life-cycle

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Life-cycle of Operons Authors: Morgan N. Price, Adam P. Arkin, and Eric J. Alm Author affiliation: Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Berkeley CA, USA and the Virtual Institute for Microbial Stress and Survival. A.P.A. is also affiliated with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the UC Berkeley Dept. of Bioengineering. Corresponding author: Eric Alm, ejalm@lbl.gov, phone 510-486-6899, fax 510-486-6219, address Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 977-152, Berkeley, CA 94720

  17. Technical Basis for Certification of Seismic Design Criteria for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brouns, T.M.; Rohay, A.C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Youngs, R.R. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States); Costantino, C.J. [C.J. Costantino and Associates, Valley, NY (United States); Miller, L.F. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    In August 2007, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman approved the final seismic and ground motion criteria for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. Construction of the WTP began in 2002 based on seismic design criteria established in 1999 and a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis completed in 1996. The design criteria were reevaluated in 2005 to address questions from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB), resulting in an increase by up to 40% in the seismic design basis. DOE announced in 2006 the suspension of construction on the pretreatment and high-level waste vitrification facilities within the WTP to validate the design with more stringent seismic criteria. In 2007, the U.S. Congress mandated that the Secretary of Energy certify the final seismic and ground motion criteria prior to expenditure of funds on construction of these two facilities. With the Secretary's approval of the final seismic criteria in the summer of 2007, DOE authorized restart of construction of the pretreatment and high-level waste vitrification facilities. The technical basis for the certification of seismic design criteria resulted from a two-year Seismic Boreholes Project that planned, collected, and analyzed geological data from four new boreholes drilled to depths of approximately 1400 feet below ground surface on the WTP site. A key uncertainty identified in the 2005 analyses was the velocity contrasts between the basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds below the WTP. The absence of directly-measured seismic shear wave velocities in the sedimentary interbeds resulted in the use of a wider and more conservative range of velocities in the 2005 analyses. The Seismic Boreholes Project was designed to directly measure the velocities and velocity contrasts in the basalts and sediments below the WTP, reanalyze the ground motion response, and assess the level of conservatism in the 2005 seismic design criteria. The characterization and analysis effort included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties (including uncertainties) of the basalt/interbed sequences, 2) confirmation of the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the core-hole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole, and 3) prediction of ground motion response to an earthquake using newly acquired and historic data. The data and analyses reflect a significant reduction in the uncertainty in shear wave velocities below the WTP and result in a significantly lower spectral acceleration (i.e., ground motion). The updated ground motion response analyses and corresponding design response spectra reflect a 25% lower peak horizontal acceleration than reflected in the 2005 design criteria. These results provide confidence that the WTP seismic design criteria are conservative. (authors)

  18. Life extension system for fossil power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isreb, M.

    1996-11-01

    A general, multi-disciplinary life extension system for new and existing power plants has been absent in the literature. The present paper presents a general, multi-disciplinary life extension system for new and existing fossil power plants. The paper formulates the optimization problem framework for plants` components. The paper discusses the framework of the iterative process, objective functions, plant components, life extension constraints, new life or remnant life parameters and optimization techniques. Other system attributes discussed in the paper include: design invariant parameters, relationships between plant components and objective functions and a strategy for system sizing and simulation.

  19. Technology development life cycle processes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, David Franklin

    2013-05-01

    This report and set of appendices are a collection of memoranda originally drafted in 2009 for the purpose of providing motivation and the necessary background material to support the definition and integration of engineering and management processes related to technology development. At the time there was interest and support to move from Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) Level One (ad hoc processes) to Level Three. As presented herein, the material begins with a survey of open literature perspectives on technology development life cycles, including published data on %E2%80%9Cwhat went wrong.%E2%80%9D The main thrust of the material presents a rational expose%CC%81 of a structured technology development life cycle that uses the scientific method as a framework, with further rigor added from adapting relevant portions of the systems engineering process. The material concludes with a discussion on the use of multiple measures to assess technology maturity, including consideration of the viewpoint of potential users.

  20. Federal Employee Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) Federal Employee Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) The Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) Program is a group term life insurance program for Federal and Postal employees and retirees. The Office of Personnel Management administers the Program and sets the premiums. OPM has a contract with the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company (MetLife) to provide this life insurance. The MetLife has an office called Office of Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance

  1. Life Cycle Modeling of Propulsion Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Life Cycle Modeling of Propulsion Materials Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle ...

  2. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Rosen, Robert S. (San Ramon, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  3. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Rosen, Robert S.

    2005-04-19

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  4. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER's mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  5. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER`s mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  6. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Rosen, R.S.

    1998-06-30

    A cartridge primer is described which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML`s would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers. 10 figs.

  7. The use of information technology security assessment criteria to protect specialized computer systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lykov, V.A.; Shein, A.V.; Piskarev, A.S.; Devaney, D.M.; Melton, R.B.; Hunteman, W.J.; Prommel, J.M.; Rothfuss, J.S.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the information security assessment criteria used in Russia and compare it with that used in the United States. The computer system security assessment criteria utilized by the State Technical Commission of Russia and similar criteria utilized by the US Department of Defense (TCSEC) are intended for the development and implementation of proven methods for achieving a required level of information security. These criteria are utilized, first and foremost, when conducting certification assessments of general purpose systems. The Russian Federation is creating specialized systems for nuclear material control and accountancy (MC and A) within the framework of the international laboratory-to-laboratory collaboration. Depending on the conditions in which the MC and A system is intended to operate, some of the criteria and the attendant certification requirements may exceed those established or may overlap the requirements established for attestation of such systems. In this regard it is possible to modify the certification and attestation requirements depending on the conditions in which a system will operate in order to achieve the ultimate goal--implementation of the systems in the industry.

  8. Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring Presented at GMREC METS Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural Health Monitoring Presented at GMREC METS - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power &

  9. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development Risk Management Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development Risk Management Framework David Snowberg and Jochem Weber Link to Risk Register Template Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-63258 September 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No.

  10. JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide Marshall Goldberg MRG & Associates Nevada City, California Mirko Previsic RE Vision Consulting Sacramento, California Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-50402 April 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 *

  11. Notice of Intent to Fund Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 1:15am Addthis The Water Power Program recently issued a Notice of Intent for a funding opportunity expected to be posted early in 2014, pending congressional appropriations. The Notice of Intent, titled "Environmental Stewardship for Renewable Energy Technologies: Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Environmental and Resource Characterization Instrumentation," intends to support the development of instrumentation, associated processing tools, and integration of

  12. Notice of Intent to Fund Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 2:00am Addthis The Water Power Program recently issued a Notice of Intent for a funding opportunity expected to be posted early in 2014, pending congressional appropriations. The Notice of Intent, titled "Environmental Stewardship for Renewable Energy Technologies: Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Environmental and Resource Characterization Instrumentation," intends to support the development of instrumentation, associated processing tools, and integration of

  13. Criteria Document for B-plant Surveillance and Maintenance Phase Safety Basis Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHWEHR, B.A.

    1999-08-31

    This document is required by the Project Hanford Managing Contractor (PHMC) procedure, HNF-PRO-705, Safety Basis Planning, Documentation, Review, and Approval. This document specifies the criteria that shall be in the B Plant surveillance and maintenance phase safety basis in order to obtain approval of the DOE-RL. This CD describes the criteria to be addressed in the S&M Phase safety basis for the deactivated Waste Fractionization Facility (B Plant) on the Hanford Site in Washington state. This criteria document describes: the document type and format that will be used for the S&M Phase safety basis, the requirements documents that will be invoked for the document development, the deactivated condition of the B Plant facility, and the scope of issues to be addressed in the S&M Phase safety basis document.

  14. Suppression criteria of parasitic mode oscillations in a gyrotron beam tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Udaybir; Sinha, A. K.; Singh, T. P.

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents the design criteria of the parasitic mode oscillations suppression for a periodic, ceramic, and copper loaded gyrotron beam tunnel. In such a type of beam tunnel, the suppression of parasitic mode oscillations is an important design problem. A method of beam-wave coupling coefficient and its mathematical formulation are presented. The developed design criteria are used in the beam tunnel design of a 42 GHz gyrotron to be developed for the Indian TOKAMAK system. The role of the thickness and the radius of the beam tunnel copper rings to obtain the developed design criteria are also discussed. The commercially available electromagnetic code CST and the electron trajectory code EGUN are used for the simulations.

  15. Bioaccumulation factor of {sup 137}Cs in some marine biotas from West Bangka Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suseno, Heny

    2014-03-24

    Radionuclides may be released from nuclear facilities to the marine environment. Concentrations of radionuclides within marine biotic systems can be influenced by a number of factors, including the type of biota, its source, the radionuclide, and specific characteristics of the sampled specimens and the marine environment (salinity, etc.). The bioconcentration factor for a marine organism is the ratio of the concentration of a radionuclide in that organism to the concentration found in its marine water environment - under conditions of equilibrium. Information on the bioaccumulation of Cs-137 in marine organisms is required to risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health. Bioaccumulation of Cs was investigated in marine biota from west Bangka such as Marine cat fish (Arius thalassinus), Baramundi (Lates calcarifer), Mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson), Striped eel catfish (Plotosus lineatus), eel tailed fish (Euristhmus microceps), Yellowtail fusilier (Caesio erythrogaster), Coastal crab (Scylla sp), White shrimp (Penaeus merguiensis) and marine bivalve mollusk (Anadara granosa). Muscle of these marine biota, sediments and water were assayed for Cs-137 by HPGe gamma spectrometer. The bioaccumulation factor for fishes were calculated by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in water. The bioaccumulation factor for mollusks were calculates by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in sediments. The bioaccumulation factor were range 4.99 to 136.34.

  16. Fire and Life Safety Information - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fire Department Fire and Life Safety Information Hanford Fire Department Hanford Fire Department Home About Hanford Fire Department Fire and Life Safety Information Hot Links to Cool Spots Contact Hanford Fire Department Fire and Life Safety Information Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Fire Extinguishers Fire Extinguisher PDF, 182 Kb Fire Extinguishers - Fast Facts (PDF) PDF, 182 Kb Fire Extinguishers - U.S Fire Administration Website PDF, 182 Kb

  17. Life Cycle Inventory Database | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Past Projects » Life Cycle Inventory Database Life Cycle Inventory Database The U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database serves as a central repository for information about the total energy and resource impacts of developing and using various commercial building materials, components, and assemblies. The database helps manufacturers, building designers, and developers select energy-efficient and environmentally friendly materials, products, and processes for their projects based on the

  18. How to Apply the National Register Criteria for Evaluation (NPS, 1990, revised 1997)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of properties recognized to have national, state, or local significance in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering, and culture. To guide the selection of properties included in the National Register, the National Park Service (NPS) has developed the National Register Criteria for Evaluation. This bulletin explains how the NPS applies these criteria in evaluating the wide range of properties that may be significant in local, state, and national history. It should be used by anyone who must decide if a particular property qualifies for the National Register.

  19. NIF Functional Requirements and Primary Criteria Rev. 1.8 September 2006

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: NIF Functional Requirements and Primary Criteria Rev. 1.8 September 2006 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NIF Functional Requirements and Primary Criteria Rev. 1.8 September 2006 Authors: Patterson, R ; Samuelson, S Publication Date: 2014-09-29 OSTI Identifier: 1165807 Report Number(s): LLNL-TR-661755 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  20. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC), Rev. 7-01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-05-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NTSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal.

  1. Design criteria for the light duty utility arm system end effectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pardini, A.F.

    1995-01-03

    This document provides the criteria for the design of end effectors that will be used as part of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. The LDUA System consists of a deployment vehicle, a vertical positioning mast, a light duty multi-axis robotic arm, a tank riser interface and confinement, a tool interface plate, a control system, and an operations control trailer. The criteria specified in this document will apply to all end effector systems being developed for use on or with the LDUA system at the Hanford site. The requirement stipulated in this document are mandatory.

  2. How to Apply the National Register Criteria for Evaluation (NPS, 1997)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of properties recognized to have national, state, or local significance in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering, and culture. To guide the selection of properties included in the National Register, the National Park Service (NPS) has developed the National Register Criteria for Evaluation. This bulletin explains how the NPS applies these criteria in evaluating the wide range of properties that may be significant in local, state, and national history. It should be used by anyone who must decide if a particular property qualifies for the National Register.

  3. Patent: Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes | DOEpatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes Citation Details Title: Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes

  4. Building America Best Practices Series Volume 11. Builders Challenge Guide to 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Marine Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Cole, Pamala C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Love, Pat M.

    2010-09-01

    This best practices guide is the eleventh in a series of guides for builders produced by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America Program. This guide book is a resource to help builders design and construct homes that are among the most energy-efficient available, while addressing issues such as building durability, indoor air quality, and occupant health, safety, and comfort. With the measures described in this guide, builders in the marine climate (portions of Washington, Oregon, and California) can achieve homes that have whole house energy savings of 40% over the Building America benchmark (a home built to mid-1990s building practices roughly equivalent to the 1993 Model Energy Code) with no added overall costs for consumers. These best practices are based on the results of research and demonstration projects conducted by Building America’s research teams. The guide includes information for managers, designers, marketers, site supervisors, and subcontractors, as well as case studies of builders who are successfully building homes that cut energy use by 40% in the marine climate. This document is available on the web at www.buildingamerica.gov. This report was originally cleared 06-29-2010. This version is Rev 1 cleared in Nov 2010. The only change is the reference to the Energy Star Windows critieria shown on pg 8.25 was updated to match the criteria - Version 5.0, 04/07/2009, effective 01/04/2010.

  5. Extend the Operating Life of Your Motor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In such cases, motor life can be extended by purchasing special motors, such as those conforming to the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 841 specifcations, ...

  6. Life Extension Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Life Extension Programs Life Extension Programs NNSA, Air Force Complete Successful B61-12 Life Extension Program Development Flight Test at Tonopah Test Range WASHINGTON - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and United States Air Force completed the third development flight test of a non-nuclear B61-12 nuclear gravity bomb at Tonopah Test Sandia California works on nuclear weapon W80-4 Life Extension Program The W80-4 mechanical team at Sandia National Laboratories reviews the

  7. Life Extension Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The term "life extension program (LEP)" means a program to repairreplace components of nuclear weapons to ensure the ability to meet military requirements. By extending the ...

  8. Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power L-CAT).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andruski, Joel; Drennen, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The Power Systems L-CAT is a high-level dynamic model that calculates levelized production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (using either imported (LNGCC) or domestic natural gas (NGCC)), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind. All of the fossil fuel technologies also include an option for including carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. The fossil fuel options are based on detailed life cycle analysis reports conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). For each of these technologies, NETL's detailed LCAs include consideration of five stages associated with energy production: raw material acquisition (RMA), raw material transport (RMT), energy conversion facility (ECF), product transportation and distribution (PT&D), and end user electricity consumption. The goal of the NETL studies is to compare existing and future fossil fuel technology options using a cradle-to-grave analysis. The NETL reports consider constant dollar levelized cost of delivered electricity, total plant costs, greenhouse gas emissions, criteria air pollutants, mercury (Hg) and ammonia (NH3) emissions, water withdrawal and consumption, and land use (acreage).

  9. Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technology Development | Department of Energy 7 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development September 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced selections for more than $37 million in funding to accelerate the technological and commercial readiness of emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, which seek to

  10. U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Marine Corps Beaufort Air Station's energy and water savings accomplishments. PDF icon usmc_energysavings.pdf More Documents & Publications Ameresco ESCO Qualification Sheet Energy Savings Performance Contract Success Stories Food and Drug Administration White Oak Campus Environmental Stewardship

  11. Energy Department Awards $10.5 Million for Next-Generation Marine Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems | Department of Energy Energy Department Awards $10.5 Million for Next-Generation Marine Energy Systems Energy Department Awards $10.5 Million for Next-Generation Marine Energy Systems December 28, 2015 - 2:21pm Addthis The Energy Department today announced six organizations selected to receive up to $10.5 million to support the design and operation of innovative marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) systems through survivability and reliability-related improvements. As part of its MHK

  12. Energy Department Announces $10.5 Million for Next-Generation Marine Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems | Department of Energy $10.5 Million for Next-Generation Marine Energy Systems Energy Department Announces $10.5 Million for Next-Generation Marine Energy Systems April 28, 2015 - 10:00am Addthis The Energy Department today announced $10.5 million in available funding to support the design and operation of innovative marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) systems through survivability and reliability-related testing of these systems. Such advances will help these devices harness even more

  13. Canister storage building compliance assessment SNF project NRC equivalency criteria - HNF-SD-SNF-DB-003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLACK, D.M.

    1999-08-11

    This document presents the Project's position on compliance with the SNF Project NRC Equivalency Criteria--HNF-SD-SNF-DE-003, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Path Forward Additional NRC Requirements. No non-compliances are shown The compliance statements have been reviewed and approved by DOE. Open items are scheduled to be closed prior to project completion.

  14. Updating of Safety Criteria for Basic Diagnostic Indicators of Dam at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, L. A.; Skvortsova, A. E.

    2013-09-15

    Values of diagnostic indicators [K]-limitations placed on radial displacements and turn angles of horizontal sections of the dam - which are permitted for each upper-pool level within the range from 520 to 539 m are determined and proposed for inclusion in the Declaration of Safety. Empirical relationships used to develop safety criteria K1 and K2 are modified.

  15. Functional Design Criteria plutonium stabilization and handling (PUSH) project W-460

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NELSON, D.W.

    1999-09-02

    This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) contains information to guide the design of the Stabilization and Packaging Equipment necessary to oxidize and package the remaining plutonium-bearing Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) currently in the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) inventory. The FDC also guides the design of vault modifications to allow storage of 3013 packages of stabilized SNM for up to 50 years.

  16. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of Category 1 fuel cycle facility physical security plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1991-10-01

    This NUREG document presents criteria developed from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for the evaluation of physical security plans submitted by Category 1 fuel facility licensees. Category 1 refers to those licensees who use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material.

  17. Canister storage building compliance assessment DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLACK, D.M.

    1999-08-12

    This document presents the Project's position on compliance with DOE Order 6430.1A ''General Design Criteria.'' No non-compliances are shown. The compliance statements have been reviewed and approved by DOE. Open items are scheduled to be closed prior to project completion.

  18. HEV America End of Life Test Sequence

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    END OF LIFE TEST SEQUENCE Revision 0 September 1, 2006 Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: _______________________________ Date: __________ Roberta Brayer Approved by: _________ _________________________________ Date: _______________ _____ Donald B. Karner ©2005 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved HEV America End of Life Test Sequence Page 1 HEV PERFORMANCE TEST PROCEDURE SEQUENCE The following test sequence shall be used for conduct of HEV America

  19. U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Marine Corps Beaufort Air Station's energy and water savings accomplishments.

  20. MHK Projects/Contra Rotating Marine Turbine CoRMaT | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contra Rotating Marine Turbine CoRMaT < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps...

  1. U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton: Using The Sun For Hot Water And Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-23

    Case study overview of integrated solar hot water/photovoltaic systems at the U.S. Marine Corps Camp Pendleton training pools.

  2. MHK Projects/US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine Corps Base Hawaii MCBH < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map......

  3. U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Marine Corps Beaufort Air Station's energy and water savings accomplishments.

  4. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data | Department of Energy Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. PDF icon Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to

  5. Building America Best Practices Series Volume 8: Builders Challenge Quality Criteria Support Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Bartlett, Rosemarie; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2010-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has posed a challenge to the homebuilding industry—to build 220,000 high-performance homes by 2012. Through the Builders Challenge, participating homebuilders will have an easy way to differentiate their best energy-performing homes from other products in the marketplace, and to make the benefits clear to buyers. This document was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE to provide guidance to U.S. home builders who want to accept the challenge. To qualify for the Builders Challenge, a home must score 70 or less on the EnergySmart Home Scale (E-Scale). The E-scale is based on the well-established Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index, developed by the Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET). The E-scale allows homebuyers to understand – at a glance – how the energy performance of a particular home compares with the performance of others. To learn more about the index and HERS Raters, visit www.natresnet.org. Homes also must meet the Builders Challenge criteria described in this document. To help builders meet the Challenge, guidance is provided in this report for each of the 29 criteria. Included with guidance for each criteria are resources for more information and references for relevant codes and standards. The Builders Challenge Quality Criteria were originally published in Dec. 2008. They were revised and published as PNNL-18009 Rev 1.2 in Nov. 2009. This is version 1.3, published Nov 2010. Changes from the Nov 2009 version include adding a title page and updating the Energy Star windows critiera to the Version 5.0 criteria approved April 2009 and effective January 4, 2010. This document and other information about the Builders Challenge is available on line at www.buildingamerica.gov/challenge.

  6. Argonne works with marine industry on new fuel | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory works with marine industry on new fuel By Greg Cunningham * July 30, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint The battle for cleaner, greener fuels isn't fought solely on land - America's rivers, lakes and surrounding seas are home to 17 million recreational boats keeping more than 75 million weekend warriors afloat each year. All that fun in the sun comes with a cost, however, particularly in terms of burnt fuel and emissions. In an effort to reduce boating's environmental impact, the Department of

  7. JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

    2011-04-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  8. Work and Life Balance | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Balancing Work with Life Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Flex Ability: Balancing Work with Life Achieving work/life balance is a much-talked-about topic. According to GE Healthcare's Kelly Piacsek, "GE hires people for what's inside their head-what they know-and the specific hours you spend at work

  9. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Using smore » atellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl- a ]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between − 0.2 and − 0.6 . Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted sea salt aerosol optical depth, AOD diff ) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550 nm AOD diff (sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl- a ] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl- a ] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.« less

  10. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop: April 5-7, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. marine energy industry is actively pursuing development of offshore wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems. Experience in the wind energy sector demonstrates that new technology development requires thorough measurement and characterization of the environmental conditions prevalent at installation sites and of technology operating in the field. Presently, there are no turn-key instrumentation system solutions that meet the measurement needs of the marine energy industry. The 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop brought together technical experts from government laboratories, academia, and industry representatives from marine energy, wind, offshore oil and gas, and instrumentation developers to present and discuss the instrumentation needs of the marine energy industry. The goals of the meeting were to: (1) Share the latest relevant knowledge among technical experts; (2) Review relevant state-of-the-art field measurement technologies and methods; (3) Review lessons learned from recent field deployments; (4) Identify synergies across different industries; (5) Identify gaps between existing and needed instrumentation capabilities; (6) Understand who are the leading experts; (7) Provide a forum where stakeholders from the marine energy industry could provide substantive input in the development of new marine energy field deployable instrumentation packages.

  11. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies, Compiled Presentations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    This document represents a collection of all presentations given during the EERE Wind and Water Power Program's 2014 Marine and Hydrokinetic Peer Review. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate DOE-funded hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic R&D projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Water Power Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

  12. Instrumentation for Monitoring around Marine Renewable Energy Converters: Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polagye, B. L.; Copping, A. E.; Brown-Saracino, J.; Suryan, R.; Kramer, S.; Smith, C.

    2014-01-14

    To better understand the state of instrumentation and capabilities for monitoring around marine energy converters, the U.S. Department of Energy directed Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Washington to convene an invitation-only workshop of experts from around the world to address instrumentation needs.

  13. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Chris; Yatsandra, Oyola; Mayes, Richard; none,; Gill, Gary; Li-Jung, Kuo; Wood, Jordana; Sadananda, Das

    2014-04-30

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  14. SEA effectiveness criteria-equally valid in all countries? The case of Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Thomas B. . E-mail: fischer@liverpool.ac.uk; Gazzola, Paola

    2006-05-15

    Recent years have seen the introduction of various sets of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) effectiveness criteria in the professional international literature. Content analysis of key international SEA publications suggest that these have been developed based on the experiences of a selected number of countries only, and to date, the question whether they are fully valid in all systems and countries world-wide has not been addressed sufficiently, yet. In this context, the paper discusses the validity of effectiveness criteria for Italy, a country from which authors have only contributed to a very limited extent to the international SEA literature. It is concluded that, particularly in the light of experiences with a 'flexible', but ineffective EIA system, in Italy SEA needs to be applied in a systematic and rigorous manner, aided by strong enforcement mechanisms.

  15. Development of design criteria for a high pressure vessel construction code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mraz, G.J.

    1987-05-01

    Out of concern for public safety, most legal jurisdictions now require unfired pressure vessel construction to comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Because the present two divisions of Section VIII of that Code are not well suited for high pressure design, a new division is needed. The currently anticipated main design criteria of the proposed division are full plastic flow or full overstrain pressure, stress intensity in the bore, fatigue, and fracture mechanics. The rules are expected to allow better utilization of high strength steels already included in the present Section VIII. At the same time materials of even higher strength are introduced. The benefits of compressive prestress are recognized. Construction methods allowing it's achievement, such as autofrettage, shrink fitting and wire winding are included. Reasons for selection of the criteria are given.

  16. Summary of the Advanced Reactor Design Criteria (ARDC) Phase 2 Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holbrook, Mark Raymond

    2015-09-01

    This report provides an end-of-year summary reflecting the progress and status of proposed regulatory design criteria for advanced non-LWR designs in accordance with the Level 3 milestone in M3AT-15IN2001017 in work package AT-15IN200101. These criteria have been designated as ARDC, and they provide guidance to future applicants for addressing the GDC that are currently applied specifically to LWR designs. The report provides a summary of Phase 2 activities related to the various tasks associated with ARDC development and the subsequent development of example adaptations of ARDC for Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) and modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) designs.

  17. Basic criteria for formation of growth twins in high stacking fault energy metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, K. Y.; Zhang, X. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Bufford, D.; Chen, Y.; Liu, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Wang, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2013-10-28

    Nanotwinned metals received significant interest lately as twin boundaries may enable simultaneous enhancement of strength, ductility, thermal stability, and radiation tolerance. However, nanotwins have been the privilege of metals with low-to-intermediate stacking fault energy (SFE). Recent scattered studies show that nanotwins could be introduced into high SFE metals, such as Al. In this paper, we examine several sputter-deposited, (111) textured Ag/Al, Cu/Ni, and Cu/Fe multilayers, wherein growth twins were observed in Al, Ni, and face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe. The comparisons lead to two important design criteria that dictate the introduction of growth twins in high SFE metals. The validity of these criteria was then examined in Ag/Ni multilayers. Furthermore, another twin formation mechanism in high SFE metals was discovered in Ag/Ni system.

  18. Updating the LED Life Cycle Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Part 2: LED Manufacturing and Performance 7 Goal of the New Study Review new literature on the life- cycle assessment of LED products. Determine if newer A-19 products...

  19. Work & Life at Niskayuna | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work & Life at Niskayuna Living in New York's Tech Valley provides easy access to arts, culture and the great outdoors. Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)...

  20. Life at Argonne | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply for a Job Connect with Argonne LinkedIn Facebook Twitter YouTube Google+ More Social Media Life at Argonne What's it like to work at Argonne? You've come to a place...

  1. Techno-Economics & Life Cycle Assessment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, A.; Davis, R.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the techno-economic analysis (TEA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) capabilities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and describes the value of working with NREL on TEA and LCA.

  2. Life-Cycle Analysis of Geothermal Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The results and tools from this project will help GTP and stakeholders determine and communicate GT energy and GHG benefits and water impacts. The life-cycle analysis (LCA) approach is taken to address these effects.

  3. Work-Life Balance | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to my work, and when I go home, I'm able to have a life outside work. I used to play soccer, so I'm looking to join a women's soccer team in the Chicago suburbs." - Emily...

  4. Life Extension Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Alvin Leung and Matt H. B61-12 Life Extension Program Undergoes First Full-Scale Wind Tunnel Test WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)...

  5. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Quasi-Isotropic Carbon-Fiber Automotive Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corum, J.M.

    2002-04-17

    This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a quasi-isotropic carbon-fiber composite for possible automotive structural applications. The composite, which was made by a rapid molding process suitable for high-volume automotive applications, consisted of continuous Thornel T300 fibers (6K tow) in a Baydur 420 IMR urethane matrix. The reinforcement was in the form of four {+-}45{sup o} stitch-bonded mats in the following layup: [0/90{sup o}/{+-}45{sup o}]{sub S}. This material is the second in a progression of three candidate thermoset composites to be characterized and modeled as part of an Oak Ridge National Laboratory project entitled Durability of Carbon-Fiber Composites. The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies and is closely coordinated with the industry Automotive Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design data and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for large automotive structural components. This document is in two parts. Part I provides the design criteria, and Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects on deformation, strength, and stiffness of cyclic and sustained loads, operating temperature, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris). Guidance is provided for design analysis, time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage tolerance design guidance, including the effects of holes. Chapter 6 provides a brief summary of the design criteria.

  6. Development of biological criteria for the design of advanced hydropower turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ?ada, Glenn F.; Coutant, Charles C.; Whitney, Richard R.

    1997-03-01

    A review of the literature related to turbine-passage injury mechanisms suggests the following biological criteria should be considered in the design of new turbines: (1) pressure; (2) cavitation; (3) shear and turbulence; and (4) mechanical injury. Based on the study’s review of fish behavior in relation to hydropower facilities, it provides a number of recommendations to guide both turbine design and additional research.

  7. Application of Negligible Creep Criteria to Candidate Materials for HTGR Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jetter, Robert I; Sham, Sam; Swindeman, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Two of the proposed High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) under consideration for a demonstration plant have the design object of avoiding creep effects in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) during normal operation. This work addresses the criteria for negligible creep in Subsection NH, Division 1 of the ASME B&PV (Boiler and Pressure Vessel) Code, Section III, other international design codes and some currently suggested criteria modifications and their impact on permissible operating temperatures for various reactor pressure vessel materials. The goal of negligible creep could have different interpretations depending upon what failure modes are considered and associated criteria for avoiding the effects of creep. It is shown that for the materials of this study, consideration of localized damage due to cycling of peak stresses results in a lower temperature for negligible creep than consideration of the temperature at which the allowable stress is governed by creep properties. In assessing the effect of localized cyclic stresses it is also shown that consideration of cyclic softening is an important effect that results in a higher estimated temperature for the onset of significant creep effects than would be the case if the material were cyclically hardening. There are other considerations for the selection of vessel material besides avoiding creep effects. Of interest for this review are (1) the material s allowable stress level and impact on wall thickness (the goal being to minimize required wall thickness) and (2) ASME Code approval (inclusion as a permitted material in the relevant Section and Subsection of interest) to expedite regulatory review and approval. The application of negligible creep criteria to two of the candidate materials, SA533 and Mod 9Cr-1Mo (also referred to as Grade 91), and to a potential alternate, normalized and tempered 2 Cr-1Mo, is illustrated and the relative advantages and disadvantages of the materials are discussed.

  8. SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION SYSTEM DESIGN: A CASE STUDY COMPARING VACUUM AND POREGAS VELOCITY CUTOFF CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K; Ralph Nichols, R

    2006-07-24

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) systems are typically designed based on the results of a vadose zone pumping test (transient or steady state) using a pressure criteria to establish the zone of influence (ZOI). A common problem associated with pressure based SVE design is overestimating the ZOI of the extraction well. The vacuum criteria commonly used to establish the boundary of the ZOI results in large areas with very low pore velocities and thus long cleanup times. As a result, design strategies based upon critical pore gas velocity (CPGV) have increased in popularity. The CPGV is used in an effort to loosely incorporate the effects of mass transfer limitations into the design of SVE systems. Critical pore gas velocity designs use a minimum pore gas velocity rather than minimum vacuum to identify the extent of the treatment zone of an SVE system. The CPGV is typically much larger than the pore gas velocity at the perimeter of vacuum based (ZOI) designs resulting in shorter cleanup times. In this paper, we report the results of testing performed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to determine the influence of a vapor extraction well based upon both a pressure and pore gas velocity design criteria. Results from this testing show that a SVE system designed based upon a CPGV is more robust and will have shorter cleanup times due to increased flow throughout the treatment zone. Pressure based SVE design may be appropriate in applications where soil gas containment is the primary objective; however, in cases where the capture and removal of contaminated soil gas is the primary objective, CPGV is a better design criteria.

  9. Brittle Failure Design Criteria for Ductile Cast Iron Spent-Fuel

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recommendations for Ductile and Brittle Failure Design Criteria for Ductile Cast Iron Spent-Fuel Shipping Containers This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

  10. USE OF LEAD SHIELDING Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USE OF LEAD SHIELDING Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC) Container ID: Waste profile: NOTE: If dose rate is < 5 mrem/hr at 30 cm from the standard waste package, lead shielding is unacceptable. Dose rate of loaded waste package without lead shielding: mrem/hr @ 30 cm (attach calculations) Describe lead shielding: Basis for demonstrating lead is not excessive (attached calculations, e.g. Microshield analysis, or attach dose rate survey): Maximum lead shielded

  11. Facility Energy Management Guidelines and Criteria for Energy and Water Evaluations in Covered Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facility Energy Management Guidelines and Criteria for Energy and Water Evaluations in Covered Facilities (42 U.S.C. 8253 Subsection (f), Use of Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Federal Buildings) 25 November 2008 I. Background A. Authority Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) amends section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, by adding a new subsection (f) Use of Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Federal Buildings (42 U.S.C.

  12. Criteria for the selection of corrosion inhibitors for Arctic and subsea high velocity flowlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, J.A.; Ahn, Y.S.

    1999-11-01

    Qualifying corrosion inhibitors for use in high velocity multiphase flowlines in arctic or subsea environments is discussed. The tests include high velocity flow loop corrosion tests, pumpability through 0.125 (0.318 cm) inch capillary at low temperatures, compatibility with Nylon 11, emulsion tendency testing, and partitioning characteristics. Laboratory and field data show the importance for using the above criteria for inhibitor selection.

  13. Guidance for Developing Principal Design Criteria for Advanced (Non-Light Water) Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holbrook, Mark; Kinsey, Jim

    2015-03-01

    In July 2013, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a joint initiative to address a key portion of the licensing framework essential to advanced (non-light water) reactor technologies. The initiative addressed the “General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,” Appendix A to10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 50, which were developed primarily for light water reactors (LWRs), specific to the needs of advanced reactor design and licensing. The need for General Design Criteria (GDC) clarifications in non-LWR applications has been consistently identified as a concern by the industry and varied stakeholders and was acknowledged by the NRC staff in their 2012 Report to Congress1 as an area for enhancement. The initiative to adapt GDC requirements for non-light water advanced reactor applications is being accomplished in two phases. Phase 1, managed by DOE, consisted of reviews, analyses and evaluations resulting in recommendations and deliverables to NRC as input for NRC staff development of regulatory guidance. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed this technical report using technical and reactor technology stakeholder inputs coupled with analysis and evaluations provided by a team of knowledgeable DOE national laboratory personnel with input from individual industry licensing consultants. The DOE national laboratory team reviewed six different classes of emerging commercial reactor technologies against 10 CFR 50 Appendix A GDC requirements and proposed guidance for their adapted use in non-LWR applications. The results of the Phase 1 analysis are contained in this report. A set of draft Advanced Reactor Design Criteria (ARDC) has been proposed for consideration by the NRC in the establishment of guidance for use by non-LWR designers and NRC staff. The proposed criteria were developed to preserve the underlying safety bases expressed by the original GDC, and recognizing that advanced reactors may take advantage of various new passive and inherent safety features different from those associated with LWRs.

  14. Criteria for Selection of Seed Motions to Envelop Design Response Spectra

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Criteria for Selection of Seed Motions to Envelop Design Response Spectra DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Workshop October 25, 2011 Michael Costantino, Thomas Houston, Greg Mertz, Andrew Maham CJCAssociates Introduction * Recently, CJC&A has performed several studies regarding seed record selection used in the development of acceleration time histories for input into seismic analyses. - Primary issue - how does the seed record affect computed structural response. * This presentation is the

  15. Protective Action Criteria (PAC) with AEGLs, ERPGs, & TEELs: Rev. 27 for Chemicals of Concern- March 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Temporary Emergency Exposure Limit (TEEL) data set has a new name; it is now called the Protective Action Criteria (PAC) dataset. While the PAC dataset continues to present the latest TEEL values (as developed by Doug Craig and his SCAPA team), the intent of the new name is to emphasize that the data set also includes available Acute Exposure Guideline Level (AEGL) and Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) values.

  16. DOE Standard Fire Protection Design Criteria DOE-STD-1006-97

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6-97 March 1997 DOE STANDARD FIRE PROTECTION DESIGN CRITERIA U.S. Department of Energy AREA GDRQ Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to the Department of Energy (DOE), DOE contractors and the public from the DOE Office of Worker Health and Safety, Bellemead Building, 19901 Germantown Road, Germantown, MD 20874-1290; (301) 903-4794. TABLE OF

  17. DOE-STD-0100T; DOE Standard Licensed Reactor Nuclear Safety Criteria Applicable to DOE Reactors

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    00T November 1993 Superseding DOE/NE-0100T April 1991 DOE STANDARD LICENSED REACTOR NUCLEAR SAFETY CRITERIA APPLICABLE TO DOE REACTORS U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 AREA SAFT DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly frorn the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific

  18. DOE-STD-1023-95; Natural Phenomena Hazards Assessment Criteria

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3-95 March 1995 Change Notice No. 1 January 1996 Reaffirmed with Errata April 2002 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS ASSESSMENT CRITERIA U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Environment Safety and Health Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800)

  19. DOE-STD-4001-2000; Design Criteria Standard for Electronic Records Management Software Applications

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4001-2000 March 2000 DOE STANDARD DESIGN CRITERIA STANDARD FOR ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS U.S. Department of Energy AREA INFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public

  20. DOE-STD-1023-95; Natural Phenomena Hazards Assessment Criteria

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1023-95 March 1995 Change Notice No. 1 January 1996 Reaffirmed with Errata April 2002 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS ASSESSMENT CRITERIA U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Environment Safety and Health Technical Information Services, U.S. Department

  1. 2008 Marine Microbes Gordon Research Conference (July 13-17, 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kirchman

    2009-09-16

    Marine microbes are very abundant and diverse. They play significant roles in all element cycles, both quantitatively and qualitatively. However, they are little known, as the continuous series of surprising discoveries in the last few years shows. In the present conference the main focus will be on how these microbes interact: with other cells of their own species, with other microbes and with large living beings, from biofilms to symbiants. Another important topic will be the exploration of marine microbial diversity based on the recently developed sequencing approaches and on efforts to obtain marine organisms in pure cultures. This conference will be the third in the Marine Microorganisms series. We hope it will contribute to enlarge the community of marine microbiologists and help in pointing the future directions of research even more than the two previous meetings.

  2. Prospective Life Cycle and Technology Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prospective Life Cycle and Technology Analysis Advanced Manufacturing Office Peer Review May 28, 2015 Diane J. Graziano E. Masanet R. Huang M.E. Riddle This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. DOE-AMO Analysis Summary - ANL/NU * Quantifying, from a life-cycle perspective, the enabling effects of advanced manufacturing in achieving AMO's mission for energy savings across the economy * Assessing net energy, emissions, and economic

  3. NREL: Energy Analysis: Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life cycle assessment (LCA) harmonization helps lenders, utility executives, and lawmakers get the best, most precise information on greenhouse gas emissions from various sources of energy. LCA has been used to estimate and compare GHG emissions from utility-scale power systems for three decades, often with considerable variability in results. Harmonization provides more exact estimates of greenhouse-gas emissions for renewable and conventional electricity

  4. Operational-Condition-Independent Criteria Dedicated to Monitoring Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, W.; Sheng, S.; Court, R.

    2012-08-01

    To date the existing wind turbine condition monitoring technologies and commercially available systems have not been fully accepted for improving wind turbine availability and reducing their operation and maintenance costs. One of the main reasons is that wind turbines are subject to constantly varying loads and operate at variable rotational speeds. As a consequence, the influences of turbine faults and the effects of varying load and speed are coupled together in wind turbine condition monitoring signals. So, there is an urgent need to either introduce some operational condition de-coupling procedures into the current wind turbine condition monitoring techniques or develop a new operational condition independent wind turbine condition monitoring technique to maintain high turbine availability and achieve the expected economic benefits from wind. The purpose of this paper is to develop such a technique. In the paper, three operational condition independent criteria are developed dedicated for monitoring the operation and health condition of wind turbine generators. All proposed criteria have been tested through both simulated and practical experiments. The experiments have shown that these criteria provide a solution for detecting both mechanical and electrical faults occurring in wind turbine generators.

  5. Development of criteria used to establish a background environmental monitoring station

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Snyder, Sandra F.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Rishel, Jeremy P.

    2015-03-02

    It is generally considered necessary to measure concentrations of contaminants-of-concern at a background location when conducting atmospheric environmental surveillance. This is because it is recognized that measurements of background concentrations can enhance interpretation of environmental monitoring data. Despite the recognized need for background measurements, there is little published guidance available that describes how to identify an appropriate atmospheric background monitoring location. This paper develops generic criteria that can guide the decision making process for identifying suitable locations for background atmospheric monitoring station. Detailed methods for evaluating some of these criteria are also provided and a case study for establishment ofmore » an atmospheric background surveillance station as part of an environmental surveillance program is described. While the case study focuses on monitoring for radionuclides, the approach is equally valid for any airborne constituent being monitored. The case study shows that implementation of the developed criteria can result in a good, defensible choice for a background atmospheric monitoring location.« less

  6. A Framework for Human Performance Criteria for Advanced Reactor Operational Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques V Hugo; David I Gertman; Jeffrey C Joe

    2014-08-01

    This report supports the determination of new Operational Concept models needed in support of the operational design of new reactors. The objective of this research is to establish the technical bases for human performance and human performance criteria frameworks, models, and guidance for operational concepts for advanced reactor designs. The report includes a discussion of operating principles for advanced reactors, the human performance issues and requirements for human performance based upon work domain analysis and current regulatory requirements, and a description of general human performance criteria. The major findings and key observations to date are that there is some operating experience that informs operational concepts for baseline designs for SFR and HGTRs, with the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) as a best-case predecessor design. This report summarizes the theoretical and operational foundations for the development of a framework and model for human performance criteria that will influence the development of future Operational Concepts. The report also highlights issues associated with advanced reactor design and clarifies and codifies the identified aspects of technology and operating scenarios.

  7. Constraining the mSUGRA parameter space through entropy and abundance criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral-Rosetti, Luis G.; Mondragon, Myriam; Nunez, Dario; Sussman, Roberto A.; Zavala, Jesus; Nellen, Lukas

    2007-06-19

    We explore the use of two criteria to constrain the allowed parameter space in mSUGRA models; both criteria are based in the calculation of the present density of neutralinos {chi}0 as Dark Matter in the Universe. The first one is the usual ''abundance'' criterion that requieres that present neutralino relic density complies with 0.0945 < {omega}CDMh2 < 0.1287, which are the 2{sigma} bounds according to WMAP. To calculate the relic density we use the public numerical code micrOMEGAS. The second criterion is the original idea presented in [3] that basically applies the microcanonical definition of entropy to a weakly interacting and self-gravitating gas, and then evaluate the change in entropy per particle of this gas between the freeze-out era and present day virialized structures. An 'entropy consistency' criterion emerges by comparing theoretical and empirical estimates of this entropy. One of the objetives of the work is to analyze the joint application of both criteria, already done in [3], to see if their results, using approximations for the calculations of the relic density, agree with the results coming from the exact numerical results of micrOMEGAS. The main objetive of the work is to use this method to constrain the parameter space in mSUGRA models that are inputs for the calculations of micrOMEGAS, and thus to get some bounds on the predictions for the SUSY spectra.

  8. LIFE Target Fabrication Research Plan Sept 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, R; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S; Montesanti, R; Satcher, J; Spadaccini, C; Rose, K; Wang, M; Hamza, A; Alexander, N; Brown, L; Hund, J; Petzoldt, R; Sweet, W; Goodin, D

    2008-11-10

    The target-system for the baseline LIFE fast-ignition target was analyzed to establish a preliminary estimate for the costs and complexities involved in demonstrating the technologies needed to build a prototype LIFE plant. The baseline fast-ignition target upon which this analysis was developed is shown in Figure 1.0-1 below. The LIFE target-system incorporates requirements for low-cost, high throughput manufacture, high-speed, high accuracy injection of the target into the chamber, production of sufficient energy from implosion and recovery and recycle of the imploded target material residue. None of these functions has been demonstrated to date. Existing target fabrication techniques which lead to current 'hot spot' target costs of {approx}$100,000 per target and at a production rate of 2/day are unacceptable for the LIFE program. Fabrication techniques normally used for low-cost, low accuracy consumer products such as toys must be adapted to the high-accuracy LIFE target. This will be challenge. A research program resulting is the demonstration of the target-cycle technologies needed for a prototype LIFE reactor is expected to cost {approx}$51M over the course of 5 years. The effort will result in targets which will cost an estimated $0.23/target at a rep-rate of 20 Hz or about 1.73M targets/day.

  9. Princeton Power Systems (TRL 5 6 Component)- Marine High-Voltage Power Conditioning and Transmission System with Integrated Energy Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Princeton Power Systems (TRL 5 6 Component) - Marine High-Voltage Power Conditioning and Transmission System with Integrated Energy Storage

  10. A review of battery life-cycle analysis : state of knowledge and critical needs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, J. L.; Gaines, L.; Energy Systems

    2010-12-22

    A literature review and evaluation has been conducted on cradle-to-gate life-cycle inventory studies of lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, sodium-sulfur, and lithium-ion battery technologies. Data were sought that represent the production of battery constituent materials and battery manufacture and assembly. Life-cycle production data for many battery materials are available and usable, though some need updating. For the remaining battery materials, lifecycle data either are nonexistent or, in some cases, in need of updating. Although battery manufacturing processes have occasionally been well described, detailed quantitative information on energy and material flows is missing. For all but the lithium-ion batteries, enough constituent material production energy data are available to approximate material production energies for the batteries, though improved input data for some materials are needed. Due to the potential benefit of battery recycling and a scarcity of associated data, there is a critical need for life-cycle data on battery material recycling. Either on a per kilogram or per watt-hour capacity basis, lead-acid batteries have the lowest production energy, carbon dioxide emissions, and criteria pollutant emissions. Some process-related emissions are also reviewed in this report.

  11. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    reductions in GHG, criteria pollutants and acidification gases and * Development of LCA framework based on ISO standards and LCA technical reports such as 14040, 14044, and...

  12. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2011-11-23

    Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

  13. Marine pipeline dynamic response to waves from directional wave spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambrakos, K.F.

    1982-07-01

    A methodology has been developed to calculate the dynamic probabilistic movement and resulting stresses for marine pipelines subjected to storm waves. A directional wave spectrum is used with a Fourier series expansion to simulate short-crested waves and calculate their loads on the pipeline. The pipeline displacements resulting from these loads are solutions to the time-dependent beam-column equation which also includes the soil resistance as external loading. The statistics of the displacements for individual waves are combined with the wave statistics for a given period of time, e.g. pipeline lifetime, to generate probabilistic estimates for net pipeline movement. On the basis of displacements for specified probability levels the pipeline configuration is obtained from which pipeline stresses can be estimated using structural considerations, e.g. pipeline stiffness, end restraints, etc.

  14. How the Weatherization Assistance Program Changed Jasmine's Life...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How the Weatherization Assistance Program Changed Jasmine's Life How the Weatherization Assistance Program Changed Jasmine's Life February 19, 2015 - 4:45pm Addthis The Rocky...

  15. Life Cycle Assessment of Renewable Hydrogen Production viaWind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Hydrogen Production via WindElectrolysis: Milestone Completion Report Life Cycle ... Analysis Activities at National Renewable Energy Laboratory Life Cycle Assessment of ...

  16. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Polymer Composites Research in the LM ...

  17. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products PDF icon ...

  18. Page 5, Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance (FEGLI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 of 11 Previous Page Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) Initial Enrollment Period All Employees in eligible positions are automatically enrolled in Basic Life...

  19. Bioproduct Life Cycle Analysis with the GREET Model | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioeconomy Bioproduct Life Cycle Analysis with the GREETTM Model Jennifer B. Dunn, Biofuel Life Cycle Analysis Team Lead, Argonne National Laboratory PDF icon ...

  20. LEP: Extending stockpile life | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Life Extension Program allows safe, effective weapons to remain in the stockpile well beyond their original service life. Nuclear weapons are intricate and, in a sense, ...

  1. Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home Our Mission Maintaining the Stockpile Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear weapons are ...

  2. Recommendations for Maximizing Battery Life in Photovoltaic Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Maximizing Battery Life in Photovoltaic Systems: A Review of Lessons Learned Recommendations for Maximizing Battery Life in Photovoltaic Systems: A Review of Lessons ...

  3. Closing the Lithium-ion Battery Life Cycle: Poster handout |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Closing the Lithium-ion Battery Life Cycle: Poster handout Title Closing the Lithium-ion Battery Life Cycle: Poster handout Publication Type Miscellaneous Year of Publication 2014...

  4. Impact of the 3Cs of Batteries on PHEV Value Proposition: Cost, Calendar Life, and Cycle Life (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Smith, K.; Markel, T.

    2009-06-01

    Battery cost, calendar life, and cycle life are three important challenges for those commercializing plug-in hybrid electric vehicles; battery life is sensitive to temperature and solar loading.

  5. Criteria for initiation of delamination in quasi-static punch-shear tests of a carbon-fiber composite material.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, Eric Brian; English, Shawn Allen; Briggs, Timothy

    2015-09-01

    V arious phenomenological delamination initiation criteria are analyzed in quasi - static punch - shear tests conducted on six different geometries. These six geometries are modeled and analyzed using elastic, large - deformation finite element analysis. Analysis output is post - processed to assess different delamination initiation criteria, and their applicability to each of the geometries. These criteria are compared to test results to assess whether or not they are appropriate based on what occurred in testing. Further, examinations of CT scans and ultrasonic images o f test specimens are conducted in the appendix to determine the sequence of failure in each test geometry.

  6. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

    2013-02-01

    The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9–10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways from the workshop and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts, supply discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest what the most pressing MHK technology needs are and how the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources can be utilized to assist the marine energy industry in the most effective manner.

  7. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

    2013-02-01

    The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9-10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community and collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts and discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest how the U.S. Department of Energy and national laboratory resources can be utilized to most effectively assist the marine energy industry.

  8. EA-1965: Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center’s Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE), through its Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO), is proposing to provide federal funding to Florida Atlantic University’s South-East National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU SNMREC) to support the at sea testing of FAU SNMREC’s experimental current generation turbine and the deployment and operation of their Small-Scale Ocean Current Turbine Test Berth, sited on the outer continental shelf (OCS) in waters off the coast of Ft Lauderdale, Florida. SNMREC would demonstrate the test berth site readiness by testing their pilot-scale experimental ocean current turbine unit at that location. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) conducted an Environmental Assessment to analyze the impacts associated with leasing OCS lands to FAU SNMREC, per their jurisdictional responsibilities under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. DOE was a cooperating agency in this process and based on the EA, DOE issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

  9. Integrating a life-cycle assessment with NEPA: Does it make sense?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ECCLESTON, C.H.

    1998-09-03

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 provides the basic national charter for protection of the environment in the US. Today NEPA has provided an environmental policy model which has been emulated by nations around the world. Recently, questions have been raised regarding the appropriateness and under what conditions it makes sense to combine the preparation of a NEPA analysis with the International Organization for Stnadardization (ISO) - 14000 Standards for Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA). This paper advantages a decision making tool consisting of six discrete criteria which can be employed by a user in reaching a decision regarding the integration of NEPA analysis and LCA. Properly applied, this tool should reduce the risk that a LCA may be inappropriately prepared and integrated with a NEPA analysis.

  10. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities in Support of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-09-30

    This fiscal year 2011 progress report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power Task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Objectives for Task 2.1.7 are the following: • to work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process • to work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development • to communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders • to engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which is described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning. As MHK industry partners work with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit, and license MHK technologies, they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under Task 2.1.7 is to understand and work to address these varied interests, reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  11. Development of site-specific soil cleanup criteria: New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veluri, V.R.; Moe, H.J.; Robinet, M.J.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1983-03-01

    The potential human exposure which results from the residual soil radioactivity at a decommissioned site is a prime concern during D and D projects. To estimate this exposure, a pathway analysis approach is often used to arrive at the residual soil radioactivity criteria. The development of such a criteria for the decommissioning of the New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site is discussed. Contamination on this site was spotty and located in small soil pockets spread throughout the site area. Less than 1% of the relevant site area was contaminated. The major contaminants encountered at the site were /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Am, normal and natural uranium, and natural thorium. During the development of the pathway analysis to determine the site cleanup criteria, corrections for the inhomogeneity of the contamination were made. These correction factors and their effect upon the relevant pathway parameters are presented. Major pathways by which radioactive material may reach an individual are identified and patterns of use are specified (scenario). Each pathway is modeled to estimate the transfer parameters along the given pathway, such as soil to air to man, etc. The transfer parameters are then combined with dose rate conversion factors (ICRP 30 methodology) to obtain soil concentration to dose rate conversion factors (pCi/g/mrem/yr). For an appropriate choice of annual dose equivalent rate, one can then arrive at a value for the residual soil concentration. Pathway modeling, transfer parameters, and dose rate factors for the three major pathways; inhalation, ingestion and external exposure, which are important for the NBL site, are discussed.

  12. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine Drive and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock WA | Department of Energy Marine Drive and Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine Drive and Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock WA Case study of two DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom homes in the marine climate that got HERS 39 and 38 without PV or HERS 2-12 and -9 with PV, with 6.5" SIP walls and 10.25" SIP roof; 11.75 ICF around slab, R-20 rigid

  13. Development of a Stand-Alone Urea-SCR System for NOx Reduction in Marine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engines | Department of Energy a Stand-Alone Urea-SCR System for NOx Reduction in Marine Diesel Engines Development of a Stand-Alone Urea-SCR System for NOx Reduction in Marine Diesel Engines Stand-alone urea SCR system was developed for marine diesel engines and showed a 50-percent reduction in NOx. PDF icon deer08_bedick.pdf More Documents & Publications Difficulty of Measuring Emissions from Heavy-Duty Engines Equipped with SCR and DPF Evaluation of 2010 Urea-SCR Technology for

  14. TEE-0072 - In the Matter of B&B Marine, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 - In the Matter of B&B Marine, Inc. TEE-0072 - In the Matter of B&B Marine, Inc. On October 15, 2010, B&B Marine, Inc. (B&B) filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). The firm requests that it be permanently relieved of the requirement to prepare and file the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-782B, entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report." As

  15. DECONTAMINATION CRITERIA FOR THE FORMER KELLEX SITE (PIERPONT PROPERTY) REMEDIAL ACTION,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DECONTAMINATION CRITERIA FOR THE FORMER KELLEX SITE (PIERPONT PROPERTY) REMEDIAL ACTION, JERSEY CITY, NEW JERSEY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASHINGTON, D.C. 2U545 JUNE 196B Current Federal Policy and Guidance The current guidance for Federal decisions affecting the exposure of members of the public in the U.S. remains that recommended by the Federal Radiation'Council (FRC) and issued by the President in 196U. This guidance defines the Radiation Protection Guide as "the radiation dose which

  16. Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0-2002 January 2002 Superseding DOE-STD-1020-94 April 1994 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS DESIGN AND EVALUATION CRITERIA FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375,

  17. DNFSB 2002-1 Software Quality Assurance Improvement Plan Commitment 4.2.1.2: Safety Quality Assurance Plan and Criteria for the Safety Analysis Toolbox Codes

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EH-4.2.1.2-Criteria Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2002-1 Software Quality Assurance Improvement Plan Commitment 4.2.1.2: Software Quality Assurance Plan and Criteria for the Safety Analysis Toolbox Codes U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environment, Safety and Health 1000 Independence Ave., S.W. Washington, DC 20585-2040 November 2003 Software Quality Assurance Criteria for Safety Analysis Codes November 2003 INTENTIONALLY BLANK ii Software Quality Assurance Criteria

  18. Quality of Work Life brochure | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quality of Work Life brochure PDF icon 2013_08_29 hr_worklifepolicies brochure

  19. Developing High Capacity, Long Life Anodes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Life Anodes Developing High Capacity, Long Life Anodes 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon es020_amine_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Developing A New High Capacity Anode With Long Cycle Life Developing High Capacity, Long Life Anodes Development of High Capacity Anode for Li-ion Batteries

  20. Evaluating Effects of Stressors from Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.; Brandt, Charles A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Gill, Gary A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

    2012-09-30

    Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. During FY 2012, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) continued to follow project developments on the two marine and hydrokinetic projects reviewed for Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) screening analysis in FY 2011: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. The ERES project in FY 2012 also examined two stressor–receptor interactions previously identified through the screening process as being of high importance: 1) the toxicity effects of antifouling coatings on MHK devices on aquatic resources and 2) the risk of a physical strike encounter between an adult killer whale and an OpenHydro turbine blade. The screening-level assessment of antifouling paints and coatings was conducted for two case studies: the Snohomish County Public Utility District No. 1 (SnoPUD) tidal turbine energy project in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington, and the Ocean Power Technologies (OPT) wave buoy project in Reedsport, Oregon. Results suggest minimal risk to aquatic biota from antifouling coatings used on MHK devices deployed in large estuaries or open ocean environments. For the strike assessment of a Southern Resident Killer Whale (SRKW) encountering an OpenHydro tidal turbine blade, PNNL teamed with colleagues from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to carry out an analysis of the mechanics and biological consequences of different blade strike scenarios. Results of these analyses found the following: 1) a SRKW is not likely to experience significant tissue injury from impact by an OpenHydro turbine blade; and 2) if whale skin behaves similarly to the materials considered as surrogates for the upper dermal layers of whale skin, it would not be torn by an OpenHydro blade strike. The PNNL/SNL analyses could not provide insight into the potential for more subtle changes to SRKWs from an encounter with a turbine, such as changes in behavior, or inform turbine interactions for other whales or other turbines. These analyses were limited by the available time frame in which results were needed and focused on the mechanical response of whale tissues and bone to blade strike. PNNL proposes that analyses of additional turbine designs and interactions with other marine mammals that differ in size, body conformation, and mass be performed.