Sample records for marine life criteria

  1. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation An Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, Arpad; Chester, Mikhail

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selection in Life-Cycle Inventories Using Hybrid Approaches,and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses,Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation

  2. Phenotypic plasticity in two marine snails: constraints superseding life history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collyer, Michael

    Biological Laboratory, Go¨teborg University, Stromstad, Sweden Department of Ecology, Evolution of Correspondence: Johan Hollander, Tja¨rno¨ Marine Biological Laboratory, Go¨teborg University, S-452 96 Stromstad

  3. Marines in gray: the birth, life and death of the Confederate States Marine Corps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivdo, Michael E.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores and provides analysis on several areas of study related to the history of the Confederate States Marine Corps that have long been neglected. It examines the military and political processes that were ...

  4. Marines in gray: the birth, life and death of the Confederate States Marine Corps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivdo, Michael E.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    11 strategy considerations played a central role in the creation, maintenance, and employment of the South?s Marines. 12 Endnotes 1 Joseph G. Dawson, III, ?With Fidelity and Effectiveness: Archibald Henderson?s Lasting Legacy..., became increasingly valued by its parent (the Navy) and by the country at large. Capitalizing on the long tenure of its fifth Commandant, Brevet Brigadier General Archibald Henderson, the Marine Corps? operational versatility and proven performance...

  5. The ecology, life history, and phylogeny of the marine thecate heterotrophic dinoflagellates Protoperidinium and Diplopsalidaceae (Dinophyceae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gribble, Kristin Elizabeth

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine thecate heterotrophic dinoflagellates likely play an important role in the consumption of primary productivity and in the trophic structure of the plankton, yet we know little about these species. This thesis expanded ...

  6. OBIS-USA: A Data-Sharing Legacy of the Census of Marine Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sedberry, George R.; Fautin, Daphne G.; Feldman, Michael; Fornwal, Mark D.; Goldstein, Philip; Guralnick, Robert P.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on biological collections in marine waters of the United States and other areas where US investigators have collected data and, in some instances, specimens. OBIS-USA delivers its data to OBIS international, which then delivers its data to the Global...

  7. Fire protection design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, national Fire Protection Association Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard, along with other delineated criteria, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  8. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Life-cycle Assessment (LCA)comprehensive life-cycle assessment (LCA) models to quantifyUCB-ITS-VWP-2007-7 Life-cycle Assessment (LCA) The vehicles,

  9. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Life-Cycle Model of an Automobile, Environmental Science &Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail,Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail,

  10. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pomper, S.D. , Life Cycle Inventory of a Generic U.S. Family2007. [EEA 2006] Emission Inventory Guidebook, ActivitiesVolume I: National Lighting Inventory and Energy Consumption

  11. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Life-cycle Assessment (LCA)..comprehensive life-cycle assessment (LCA) models to quantifyat each stage. Life-cycle Assessment (LCA) The vehicles,

  12. Iron and the ecology of marine microbes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ventouras, Laure-Anne

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron is a cofactor of a number biochemical reactions that are essential for life. In the marine environment, this micronutrient is a scarce resource that limits processes of global importance such as photosynthesis and ...

  13. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE’s Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.

  14. Ecology to evolution, marine biology to molecular biology: Oxford's prestigious Life Science journals uncover the extraordinary scope of life on our planet. Our diverse range of titles includes Annals of Botany, the Journal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    service including offsite access (46 titles) 1. Forest & Conservation History and Environmental History Review merged in 1996 to become Environmental History 2. Previously named Journal of Electron Microscopy library. The Oxford Journals Life Sciences Collection 2014 Impact Factors taken from the 2012 Journal

  15. Redefining design criteria for Pu-238 gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, S.V.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Enclosures for confinement of special nuclear materials (SNM) have evolved into the design of gloveboxes. During the early stages of glovebox technology, established practices and process operation requirements defined design criteria. Proven boxes that performed and met or exceeded process requirements in one group or area, often could not be duplicated in other areas or processes, and till achieve the same success. Changes in materials, fabrication and installation methods often only met immediate design criteria. Standardization of design criteria took a big step during creation of ``Special-Nuclear Materials R and D Laboratory Project, Glovebox standards``. The standards defined design criteria for every type of process equipment in its most general form. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) then and now has had great success with Pu-238 processing. However with ever changing Environment Safety and Health (ES and H) requirements and Ta-55 Facility Configuration Management, current design criteria are forced to explore alternative methods of glovebox design fabrication and installation. Pu-238 fuel processing operations in the Power Source Technologies Group have pushed the limitations of current design criteria. More than half of Pu-238 gloveboxes are being retrofitted or replaced to perform the specific fuel process operations. Pu-238 glovebox design criteria are headed toward process designed single use glovebox and supporting line gloveboxes. Gloveboxes that will house equipment and processes will support TA-55 Pu-238 fuel processing needs into the next century and extend glovebox expected design life.

  16. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Life-Cycle Model of an Automobile, Environmental Science &Cycle Assessment of Automobile/Fuel Options, EnvironmentalCycle Energy Analysis for Automobiles, Society of Automotive

  17. Water Quality Criteria Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    APPENDIX G Water Quality Criteria CONTENTS Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798 EPA's Water Quality Criteria and Standards Plan -- Priorities for the Future............................798 Compilation of Recommended Water Quality Criteria and EPA's Process for Deriving New

  18. Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential Network | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential Network...

  19. DOE Standard: Fire protection design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of this Standard reflects the fact that national consensus standards and other design criteria do not comprehensively or, in some cases, adequately address fire protection issues at DOE facilities. This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard replaces certain mandatory fire protection requirements that were formerly in DOE 5480.7A, ``Fire Protection``, and DOE 6430.1A, ``General Design Criteria``. It also contains the fire protection guidelines from two (now canceled) draft standards: ``Glove Box Fire Protection`` and ``Filter Plenum Fire Protection``. (Note: This Standard does not supersede the requirements of DOE 5480.7A and DOE 6430.1A where these DOE Orders are currently applicable under existing contracts.) This Standard, along with the criteria delineated in Section 3, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  20. Search Criteria Health Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Search Criteria Location: Distance: Health Plan: Provider Type: San Diego, CA 92103 Within 10 miles another provider, you are seeking care from that provider, not from Anthem Blue Cross. The provider benefit decisions only and are not the provision of medical care. Anthem Blue Cross is not responsible for

  1. Education Criteria for Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    and business assistance to smaller manufacturers; and the Technology Innovation Program, which provides cost to the foundation. National Institute of Standards and Technology The National Institute of Standards and Technology, standards, and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life. NIST

  2. Health Care Criteria for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    tance to smaller manufacturers; and the Technology Innovation Program, which provides cost-shared awards. National Institute of Standards and Technology The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life. NIST carries out its

  3. Electronic Records Management Software Applications Design Criteria...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electronic Records Management Software Applications Design Criteria Standard Electronic Records Management Software Applications Design Criteria Standard This Standard is reissued...

  4. FHR Generic Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, G.F.; Holcomb, D.E.; Cetiner, S.M.

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide an initial, focused reference to the safety characteristics of and a licensing approach for Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs). The document does not contain details of particular reactor designs nor does it attempt to identify or classify either design basis or beyond design basis accidents. Further, this document is an initial attempt by a small set of subject matter experts to document the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs for a larger audience. The document is intended to help in setting the safety and licensing research, development, and demonstration path forward. Input from a wider audience, further technical developments, and additional study will be required to develop a consensus position on the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs. This document begins with a brief overview of the attributes of FHRs and then a general description of their anticipated safety performance. Following this, an overview of the US nuclear power plant approval process is provided that includes both test and power reactors, as well as the role of safety standards in the approval process. The document next describes a General Design Criteria (GDC)–based approach to licensing an FHR and provides an initial draft set of FHR GDCs. The document concludes with a description of a path forward toward developing an FHR safety standard that can support both a test and power reactor licensing process.

  5. Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering within naval architecture and marine engineering and marine engineering problems; an ability to apply basic knowledge in fluid mechanics, dynamicsNaval Architecture and Marine Engineering Undergraduate Program The University of Michigan #12

  6. MultiCriteria Clustering & Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libre de Bruxelles, Université

    An Extension of the K-Means' algorithm MultiCriteria Ordered Clustering 6 MCDA Classification : Sorting MCDACriteria Comparison : motivation A MCDA approach for grouping problems 5 MCDA Clustering Multicriteria Clustering

  7. An evaluation of EPA`s proposed national sediment quality criteria applied to Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gries, T.H. [Washington Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed national marine and freshwater sediment quality criteria for five chemicals of concern: acenaphthene, dieldrin, endrin, fluoranthene and phenanthrene. The criteria values EPA developed were based on an equilibrium partitioning approach and are normalized to the organic carbon of the sediment. The Department of Ecology compared the proposed national marine sediment criteria for the three PAH compounds to Washington`s Sediment Management Standards (173-204 WAC), most of which were derived using the empirical ``Apparent Effects Threshold`` approach. The number of stations in Puget Sound exceeding the State`s chemical Sediment Quality Standards (SQS) was 1.7--8.1 times greater those exceeding the proposed criteria. It also appeared from early results that the latter were less sensitive predictors of stations known to exhibit significant adverse biological effects. Thus, the proposed criteria may not be as effective as the SQS when used as a regulatory tool to screen for biological effects in Puget Sound. These and other findings will be presented which generally support the EPA Science Advisory Board recommendation to use proposed national criteria in conjunction with other chemical and biological sediment quality indicators to make regulatory decisions.

  8. Nuclear Reactor Safety Design Criteria

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes nuclear safety criteria applicable to the design, fabrication, construction, testing, and performance requirements of nuclear reactor facilities and safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) within these facilities. Cancels paragraphs 8a and 8b of DOE 5480.6. Cancels DOE O 5480.6 in part. Certified 11-18-10.

  9. Neutron Detector Gamma Insensitivity Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Stephens, Daniel L.

    2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The shortage of 3He has triggered the search for an effective alternative neutron detection technology for radiation portal monitor applications. Any new detection technology must satisfy two basic criteria: 1) it must meet the neutron detection efficiency requirement, and 2) it must be insensitive to gamma ray interference at a prescribed level, while still meeting the neutron detection requirement. It is the purpose of this document to define this latter criterion.

  10. Introduction: The Ecological Consequences of a Bipartite Life History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, Mark H.

    Introduction: The Ecological Consequences of a Bipartite Life History The vast majority of demersal ecology of marine fishes are strik- ing. In marked contrast with the life history of terrestrial ver perception for coral reef fishes by Cowen et al., 2000; Cowen, 2002; Leis and McCormick, 2002; Planes, 2002

  11. Multiple criteria minimum spanning trees Pedro Cardoso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    Multiple criteria minimum spanning trees Pedro Cardoso M´ario Jesus ´Alberto M´arquez Abstract The NP multiple criteria minimum spanning tree as several applications into the network design problems criteria minimum spanning trees. There are several geometric network design and application problems

  12. Department of Residential Life Revised Conduct and Contractual Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Department of Residential Life Revised Conduct and Contractual Process Appeal Does Not Meet Criteria Process Complete: Sanctions administered by appropriate staff. Student complies and vacates. Case Declines Administrative Decision Appeals Conduct Board Decision Decision Final; Process Complete Process

  13. Evaluation Criteria for PDIL Proposal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13Evacuation EmergencyCloudSat, ARM, andCriteria

  14. DddD Is a CoA-Transferase/Lyase Producing Dimethyl Sulfide in the Marine Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tawfik, Dan S.

    features. The Marinomonas DddD gene14,15 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Purification using an NDddD Is a CoA-Transferase/Lyase Producing Dimethyl Sulfide in the Marine Environment Uria/year) and mediates a wide range of processes from regulating marine life forms to cloud formation. Nonetheless, none

  15. San Nicolas Marine Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    College of Creative Studies 555 465 Housing & Residential Services 411 429LOT 3 LOT 9 LOT 7 LOT 23 LOT 27 Lehmann Concert Hall Multi- Cultural Theater Corwin Pavillion University House Centennial House Marine Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration (CCBER) manages and restores the campus natural areas

  16. Biogeography of Marine Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biogeography of Marine Algae David J Garbary, St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia and vicariance in establishing distributions and as factors associated with speciation. Since eukaryotic algae. There are many species that are virtually cosmopolitan (e.g. the green alga Enteromorpha intestinalis, the red

  17. Life sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, L. (ed.)

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs. (MHB)

  18. Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy...

  19. Marin County- Solar Access Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marin County's Energy Conservation Code is designed to assure new subdivisions provide for future passive or natural heating or cooling opportunities in the subdivision to the extent feasible. ...

  20. Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings, and cities.

  1. Original article Variability of digestibility criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Variability of digestibility criteria in maize elite hybrids submitted of various in vitro digestibility criteria used to estimate genotypic variation in silage maize elite hybrids and in vitro digestibility of whole-plant and cell-walls were pre- dicted by near infra-red reflectance

  2. Criteria for Car Parking Allocation System Criteria for Car Parking Allocation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    . The sharing of car parking spaces is encouraged. It should be noted that both (or all) members of staffCriteria for Car Parking Allocation System Criteria for Car Parking Allocation System 2014-15 Criteria for Car Parking All #12;The issue and control of car parking permits is vested in Estates Services

  3. Criteria for exact qudit universality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennen, Gavin K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Atomic Physics Division, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8420 (United States); O'Leary, Dianne P. [University of Maryland, Department of Computer Science, Collge Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); National Institute of Standards and Technology, Mathematical and Computational Sciences Division, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8910 (United States); Bullock, Stephen S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Mathematical and Computational Sciences Division, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8910 (United States)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe criteria for implementation of quantum computation in qudits. A qudit is a d-dimensional system whose Hilbert space is spanned by states vertical bar 0>, vertical bar 1>, ..., vertical bar d-1>. An important earlier work [A. Muthukrishnan and C.R. Stroud, Jr., Phys. Rev. A 62, 052309 (2000)] describes how to exactly simulate an arbitrary unitary on multiple qudits using a 2d-1 parameter family of single qudit and two qudit gates. That technique is based on the spectral decomposition of unitaries. Here we generalize this argument to show that exact universality follows given a discrete set of single qudit Hamiltonians and one two-qudit Hamiltonian. The technique is related to the QR-matrix decomposition of numerical linear algebra. We consider a generic physical system in which the single qudit Hamiltonians are a small collection of H{sub jk}{sup x}=({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}(vertical bar k>

  4. Life Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us count theLienert namedLife Sciences Life

  5. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateECEnergyInvestigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural Health Monitoring Presented at GMREC METS Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural...

  7. Marine Biology International Journal on Life in Oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    . Godfrey · Brendan J. Godley · Lucy A. Hawkes · Thomas M. Murphy · Kristina L. Williams · Matthew J. Witt Department of Natural Resources, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464, USA e-mail: dubosegriffin@seaturtle.org Present

  8. Lenfest Ocean Program: Protecting Ocean Life Through Marine Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    shows that human consumption of seafood in Peru-- including anchovies and all other fish species--generates more than twice the domestic revenue and three times the jobs as the production of fishmeal and fish oil. Fishing in Peru is often associated with industrial-scale catch of anchovies. This fishery lands

  9. California Marine Life Protection Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass16 2013Management86Use PlanningOpen

  10. Ambient Air Quality Criteria (Manitoba, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Manitoba Ambient Air Quality Criteria schedule lists maximum time-based pollutant concentration levels for the protection and preservation of ambient air quality within the Province of Manitoba...

  11. Storage management solutions Buyer's guide: purchasing criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storage management solutions Buyer's guide: purchasing criteria Manage your storage to meet service storage environment cohesively As new guidelines or regulations surface, storage administrators receive increasing numbers of requests for change (RFCs) in storage provisioning. Simultaneously, routine changes

  12. Opening criteria for accelerated paving techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jason Leonard

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of field and lab research provides a synopsis of the experimentation used to develop design guidelines for opening criteria. This section includes crack surveys, coring tests, FWD testing, maturity testing, penetration testing and consistency testing...

  13. Facility Representative Program, Criteria & Review Approach Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person.

  14. Natural phenomena hazards site characterization criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The criteria and recommendations in this standard shall apply to site characterization for the purpose of mitigating Natural Phenomena Hazards (wind, floods, landslide, earthquake, volcano, etc.) in all DOE facilities covered by DOE Order 5480.28. Criteria for site characterization not related to NPH are not included unless necessary for clarification. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology, and geotechnical studies.

  15. Marine Scotland | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group JumpNew Hampshire:Marin Energy AuthorityMarineMarine

  16. CRAD, Assessment Criteria and Guidelines for Determining the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Criteria and Guidelines for Determining the Adequacy of Software Used in the Safety Analysis and Design of Defense Nuclear Facilities CRAD, Assessment Criteria and Guidelines for...

  17. Readiness Review Training - Development of Criteria And Review...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Development of Criteria And Review Approach Documents Readiness Review Training - Development of Criteria And Review Approach Documents November 8-9, 2010 Readiness Review Training...

  18. Handling Strategies for Import Containers at Marine Terminals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Castilho, Bernardo; Daganzo, Carlos F.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Containers at Marine Terminals Bemardo De Castilho Carlos F.Import Containers at Marine Terminals Bernardo De CastilhoFOR IMPORT AT MARINE TERMINALS CONTAINERS BERNARDO DE

  19. ABOUT THE JOURNAL Marine Resource Economics publishes creative and scholarly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    biodiversity, marine and coastal recreation, marine pollution, offshore oil and gas, seabed mining, renewable pollution, coastal and marine recreation, ocean energy resources, coastal climate adaptation, ecosystem

  20. Climate sensitivity of marine energy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Gareth P; Wallace, Robin

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine energy has a significant role to play in lowering carbon emissions within the energy sector. Paradoxically, it may be susceptible to changes in climate that will result from rising carbon emissions. Wind patterns are expected to change...

  1. Geobiology of marine magnetotactic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Sheri Lynn

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) biomineralize intracellular membrane-bound crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4), and are abundant in the suboxic to anoxic zones of stratified marine environments worldwide. Their ...

  2. Prognostics of PEM fuel cell in a particle filtering framework Marine Jouin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Prognostics of PEM fuel cell in a particle filtering framework Marine Jouin , Rafael Gouriveau.jouin@femto-st.fr Abstract Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) suffer from a limited lifespan, which impedes of the proposed approach. Keywords: Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, Prognostics, Remaining useful life

  3. Statistical criteria for characterizing irradiance time series.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and examine several statistical criteria for characterizing time series of solar irradiance. Time series of irradiance are used in analyses that seek to quantify the performance of photovoltaic (PV) power systems over time. Time series of irradiance are either measured or are simulated using models. Simulations of irradiance are often calibrated to or generated from statistics for observed irradiance and simulations are validated by comparing the simulation output to the observed irradiance. Criteria used in this comparison should derive from the context of the analyses in which the simulated irradiance is to be used. We examine three statistics that characterize time series and their use as criteria for comparing time series. We demonstrate these statistics using observed irradiance data recorded in August 2007 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and in June 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  4. Development of structural design criteria for ITER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, S.

    1998-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The irradiation environment experienced by the in-vessel components of fusion reactors such as HER presents structural design challenges not envisioned in the development of existing structural design criteria such as the ASME Code or RCC-MR. From the standpoint of design criteria, the most significant issues stem from the irradiation-induced changes in material properties, specifically the reduction of ductility, strain hardening capability, and fracture toughness with neutron irradiation. Recently, Draft 7 of the interim ITER structural design criteria (ISDC), which provide new rules for guarding against such problems, was released for trial use by the ITER designers. The new rules, which were derived from a simple model based on the concept of elastic follow up factor, provide primary and secondary stress limits as functions of uniform elongation and ductility. The implication of these rules on the allowable surface heat flux on typical first walls made of type 316 stainless steel and vanadium alloys are discussed.

  5. Criteria for safety-related operator actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, L.H.; Haas, P.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety-Related Operator Actions (SROA) Program was designed to provide information and data for use by NRC in assessing the performance of nuclear power plant (NPP) control room operators in responding to abnormal/emergency events. The primary effort involved collection and assessment of data from simulator training exercises and from historical records of abnormal/emergency events that have occurred in operating plants (field data). These data can be used to develop criteria for acceptability of the use of manual operator action for safety-related functions. Development of criteria for safety-related operator actions are considered.

  6. Snell Envelope with Small Probability Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Moral, Pierre, E-mail: Pierre.Del-Moral@inria.fr; Hu, Peng, E-mail: Peng.Hu@inria.fr [Universite de Bordeaux I, Centre INRIA Bordeaux et Sud-Ouest and Institut de Mathematiques de Bordeaux (France); Oudjane, Nadia, E-mail: Nadia.Oudjane@edf.fr [EDF R and D Clamart (France)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new algorithm to compute the Snell envelope in the specific case where the criteria to optimize is associated with a small probability or a rare event. This new approach combines the Stochastic Mesh approach of Broadie and Glasserman with a particle approximation scheme based on a specific change of measure designed to concentrate the computational effort in regions pointed out by the criteria. The theoretical analysis of this new algorithm provides non asymptotic convergence estimates. Finally, the numerical tests confirm the practical interest of this approach.

  7. Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

  8. Proliferation resistance criteria for fissile material disposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, D.A.; Fearey, B.L.; Markin, J.T.; Rutherford, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Duggan, R.A.; Jaeger, C.D.; Mangan, D.L.; Moya, R.W.; Moore, L.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strait, R.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 National Academy of Sciences study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} defined options for reducing the national and international proliferation risks of materials declared excess to the nuclear weapons program. This report proposes criteria for assessing the proliferation resistance of these options. The criteria are general, encompassing all stages of the disposition process from storage through intermediate processing to final disposition including the facilities, processing technologies and materials, the level of safeguards for these materials, and the national/subnational threat to the materials.

  9. 324 Building safety basis criteria document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEFFEN, J.M.

    1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety Basis Criteria document describes the proposed format, content, and schedule for the preparation of an updated Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and Operational Safety Requirements document (OSR) for the 324 Building. These updated safety authorization basis documents are intended to cover stabilization and deactivation activities that will prepare the facility for turnover to the Environmental Restoration Contractor for final decommissioning. The purpose of this document is to establish the specific set of criteria needed for technical upgrades to the 324 Facility Safety Authorization Basis, as required by Project Hanford Procedure HNF-PRO-705, Safety Basis Planning, Documentation, Review, and Approval.

  10. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  11. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

  12. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University...

  13. Biocomplexity in a highly migratory pelagic marine fish, Atlantic herring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruzzante, Daniel E.

    , Denmark 4 Tja¨rno¨ Marine Biological Laboratory, Department of Marine Ecology, Go¨teborg University, Stro¨mstad

  14. clock period selection method slack minimization criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    An optimal clock period selection method based on slack minimization criteria En­Shou Chang Daniel the effect of clock slack on the performance of designs and present an algorithm to find a slack]: allocation, scheduling and binding. The purpose of alloca­ tion is to determine the number of resources

  15. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  16. Dependability characteristics and safety criteria for an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Roger

    in centralized control. Such systems are referred to as Automatic Train Control (ATC) systems [1]. For simplicityDependability characteristics and safety criteria for an embedded distributed brake control system distributed brake control system in railway freight trains ROGER JOHANSSON1 Department of Electrical

  17. Criteria for Practical Fusion Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Criteria for Practical Fusion Power Systems: Report from the EPRI Fusion Panel By Jack Kaslow1 development of commercially vi- able fusion systems, the Electric Power Re- search Institute (EPRI) -- the R developers toward practical power systems that can obtain the financial, public, and regulatory support

  18. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the second report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of tidal power plants deployed in Tacoma Narrows, Washington. The Narrows contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other tidal power sites and serves as a representative case study. Tidal power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize impacts, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informs the process of selecting representative tidal power devices. The selection criteria is that such devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development including Verdant Power, which has demonstrated an array of turbines in the East River of New York, Clean Current, which has demonstrated a device off Race Rocks, BC, and OpenHydro, which has demonstrated a device at the European Marine Energy Test Center and is on the verge of deploying a larger device in the Bay of Fundy. MCT demonstrated their device both at Devon (UK) and Strangford Narrows (Northern Ireland). Furthermore OpenHydro, CleanCurrent, and MCT are the three devices being installed at the Minas Passage (Canada). Environmental effects will largely scale with the size of tidal power development. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nom

  19. Marine biogeochemistry of mercury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, G.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Noncontaminating sample collection and handling procedures and accurate and sensitive analysis methods were developed to measure sub-picomolar Hg concentrations in seawater. Reliable and diagnostic oceanographic Hg distributions were obtained, permitting major processes governing the marine biogeochemistry of Hg to be identified. Mercury concentrations in the northwest Atlantic, central Pacific, southeast Pacific, and Tasman Sea ranged from 0.5 to 12 pM. Vertical Hg distributions often exhibited a maximum within or near the main thermocline. At similar depths, Hg concentrations in the northwest Atlantic Ocean were elevated compared to the N. Pacific Ocean. This pattern appears to result from a combination of enhanced supply of Hg to the northwest Atlantic by rainfall and scavenging removal along deep water circulation pathways. These observations are supported by geochemical steady-state box modelling which predicts a relatively short mean residence time for Hg in the oceans; demonstrating the reactive nature of Hg in seawater and precluding significant involvement in nutrient-type recyclic. Evidence for the rapid removal of Hg from seawater was obtained at two locations. Surface seawater Hg measurements along 160/sup 0/ W (20/sup 0/N to 20/sup 0/S) showed a depression in the equatorial upwelling area which correlated well with the transect region exhibiting low /sup 234/Th//sup 238/U activity ratios. This relationship implies that Hg will be scavenged and removed from surface seawater in biologically productive oceanic zones. Further, a broad minimum in the vertical distribution of Hg was observed to coincide with the intense oxygen minimum zone in the water column in coastal waters off Peru.

  20. Understanding the Effects of Marine Biodiversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stachowicz, Jay

    and negative effects on herbivores. Recognizing that marine and terrestrial approaches to understandingUnderstanding the Effects of Marine Biodiversity on Communities and Ecosystems John J. Stachowicz,1 There is growing interest in the effects of changing marine biodi- versity on a variety of community properties

  1. Protecting Life on Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to thePeter B. Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to theof Protecting Life on Earth is “to explain to an intelligent

  2. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

  3. Packaging Design Criteria for the MCO Cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FLANAGAN, B.D.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 2,100 metric tons of unprocessed, irradiated, nuclear fuel elements are presently stored in the K Basins (including approximately 700 additional elements from the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant, N Reactor, and 327 Laboratory). To permit cleanup of the K Basins and fuel conditioning, the fuel will be transported from the 100 K Area to a Canister Storage Building (CSB) in the 200 East Area. The purpose of this packaging design criteria is to provide criteria for the design, fabrication, and use of a packaging system to transport the large quantities of irradiated nuclear fuel elements positioned within Multi-canister Overpacks. Concurrent with the K Basin cleanup, 72 Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 fuel assemblies will be transported from T Plant to the CSB to provide space at T Plant for K Basin sludge canisters.

  4. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

  5. Functional Area Criteria & Review Approach Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CRADS provided on this page are provided as examples of functional area Objectives and Criteria used to evaluate how requirements are meet. They are only examples and should not be utilized as is. In accordance with DOE Standard 3006-2010, CRADs should be developed by team members to reflect the specifics of the proposed review (i.e., breadth and depth) as defined in the approved Plan of Action.

  6. Environmental life cycle assessment as a decision making tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    2011 Environmental impact categories Global warming (99 %) Acidification Ozone depletion Photo oxidant · Environmental Life Cycle Assessment · Operation of the Argentinean Electricity Network · Conclusions #12;PASI minimization 2 1 2 1 2 1 CC)(1Z ** Global criteria method p *** * p *** * C-C CC - Z

  7. Acceptance Criteria Framework for Autonomous Biological Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzenitis, J M

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to examine a set of user acceptance criteria for autonomous biological detection systems for application in high-traffic, public facilities. The test case for the acceptance criteria was the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) operating in high-traffic facilities in New York City (NYC). However, the acceptance criteria were designed to be generally applicable to other biological detection systems in other locations. For such detection systems, ''users'' will include local authorities (e.g., facility operators, public health officials, and law enforcement personnel) and national authorities [including personnel from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the BioWatch Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)]. The panel members brought expertise from a broad range of backgrounds to complete this picture. The goals of this document are: (1) To serve as informal guidance for users in considering the benefits and costs of these systems. (2) To serve as informal guidance for developers in understanding the needs of users. In follow-up work, this framework will be used to systematically document the APDS for appropriateness and readiness for use in NYC.

  8. Modelling Marine Ecosystems Mick Follows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    , Massachusetts Institute of Technology http://ocean.mit.edu/~mick/Downloads.html #12;What is the marine ecosystem limited Light limited Reveals environmental regulation of primary production #12;coccolithophores (CaCO3 of organic carbon Current Question: What regulatesC

  9. 4, 81110, 2008 Modeling marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Discussion EGU Abstract When dating marine samples with 14 C, the reservoir-age effect is usually assumed and effect in paleoclimate data. We used a5 global ocean circulation model forced by transient atmospheric., 2004a). Regional reservoir-age anomalies for the time before nuclear weapon tests25 are mainly known

  10. Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    German, A.; Siddiqui, A.; Dakin, B.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Allen Gilliland of One Sky Homes collaborated on a marine climate retrofit project designed to meet both Passive House (PH) and Building America (BA) program standards. The scope included sealing, installing wall, roof and floor insulation (previously lacking), replacing windows, upgrading the heating and cooling system, and installing.

  11. ACCESSCCESS MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuschin, Martin

    OPENPEN ACCESSCCESS MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 458: 39­52, 2012 doi: 10 and the instability or unpre- dictability of disturbance. Global warming is expec- ted to increase the vulnerability. 2010, Gruber 2011). Much of the available information about the impact on benthic systems comes

  12. Ocean Currents, Marine Debris, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    paper bag cardboard box milk carton tin can styrofoam buoys Aluminum can 6-pack ring plastic bottles #12: styrofoam buoys 200 ­ 400 yrs: Aluminum can 400 yrs: 6-pack ring 450 yrs: plastic bottles #12;Biological ·!Up to 80% of marine debris is plastic United Nations Environment Programme #12;How does debris get

  13. Energy: It is life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arques, P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationships that seem to exist between energy and man are presented in this paper. Habitually, social coefficients are connected to the gross domestic product; some parameters with correlations are: birth rate, infant mortality rate, death rate, literacy, etc. Along with energy these define the optimal energy consumption per capita; the author presents the correlation between these parameters and energy consumed per capita. There exists a high correlation between energy consumption per capita and gross domestic product per capita. The set of parameters considered are correlated with similar values relative to these two parameters. Using data collected on a group of the different countries of the world, a table of 165 countries and 22 variables has been drawn up. From the [Country x variable] matrix, a correlation table is calculated and a factorial analysis is applied to this matrix. The first factorial plan comprises 57% of the information contained in this table. Results from this first factorial plan are presented. These parameters are analyzed: influence of a country's latitude on its inhabitants' consumption; relationship between consumed energy and gross domestic product; women's fertility rate; birth rate per 1000 population; sex ratio; life expectancy at birth; rate of literacy; death rate; population growth rate. Finally, it is difficult to define precise criteria for: an optimal distribution of population according to age, but with a power consumed of above 300 W per capita, the population becomes younger; the birth rate per 1000 population; the total fertility rate per woman; the population growth rate. The authors determine that optimal energy is approximately between 200 W and 677 W inclusive.

  14. Incorporating Life Cycle Assessment into the LEED Green Building Rating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Incorporating Life Cycle Assessment into the LEED Green Building Rating System by Michael Supervisory Committee Incorporating Life Cycle Assessment into the LEED Green Building Rating System and regional product criteria within the LEED Green Building rating system are not based on comprehensive

  15. Shells of crabs like these may be the key to prolonging the life of microbial fuel cells that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shells of crabs like these may be the key to prolonging the life of microbial fuel cells that power/06/ 070604123858.htm Marine Sediment Microbial Fuel Cells Get A Nutritional Boost ScienceDaily (June 11, 2007) -- Discarded crab and lobster shells may be the key to prolonging the life of microbial fuel cells that power

  16. Automated Validation of Trusted Digital Repository Assessment Criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, MacKenzie

    The RLG/NARA trusted digital repository (TDR) certification checklist defines a set of assessment criteria for preservation environments. The criteria can be mapped into data management policies that define how a digital ...

  17. Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria is to establish a minimum State Criteria under the Mississippi Solid Waste Law for all solid waste management...

  18. Concerns in Marine Renewable Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharon Kramer, Mirko Previsic, Peter Nelson, Sheri Woo

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    To accelerate the adoption of these emerging marine hydrokinetic technologies, navigational and environmental issues and concerns must be identified and addressed. As hydrokinetic projects move forward, various stakeholders will need to be engaged; one of the key issues that project proponents face as they engage stakeholders is that many conflicting uses and environmental issues are not well-understood. Much of this lack of understanding comes from a limited understanding of the technologies themselves. To address this issue, in September 2008, RE Vision consulting, LLC, was selected by the Department of Energy, under their market acceleration program, to apply a scenario-based assessment approach to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector. The goal was to improve understanding of potential environmental and navigation impacts of these technologies and focus stakeholders on the critical issues. To meet this goal, the study established baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios captured variations in technical approaches and deployment scales and thus grounded the analysis in realistic constraints. The work conducted under this award provides an important foundation to other market acceleration activities carried out by the DoE and other stakeholders in this sector. The scenarios were then evaluated using a framework developed by H.T. Harvey & Associates to identify and characterize key environmental concerns and uncertainties. In collaboration with PCCI and the U.S. Coast Guard, navigation issues were assessed and guidelines developed to assure the safe operation of these systems. Finally, the work highlights “next steps” to take to continue development and adoption of marine hydrokinetic energy. Throughout the project, close collaboration with device developers, project developers and regulatory stakeholders was pursued to ensure that assumptions and constraints are realistic. Results concur with most of the permitting hurdles experienced by on-going projects in the U.S., and specific recommendations are provided for identifying and addressing them. While many areas of further research were identified, the study did not identify any major “show-stopper,” largely because these technologies have a relatively low environmental risk-profile if compared to other activities routinely permitted in the marine environment. The frameworks and representative scenarios developed provide an objective and transparent tool for stakeholders, regulators and developers to assist in the decision-making process for siting wave and tidal energy plants, and meet our goal of improving understanding between all stakeholders. The final product consists of three reports: Report 1 - Wave Energy Scenarios This report includes: - A technology characterization of four different wave energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations - A site characterization of two potential deployment sites located in Hawaii and California - Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities - Navigational demarcation requirements - Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts Report 2 - Tidal Energy Scenarios This report includes: - A technology characterization of three tidal energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations. - A site characterization of one potential deployment location in the Puget Sound, Washington - Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities - Navigational demarcation requirements - Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts Report 3 - Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This report describes frameworks for identifying key environmental effects and applies them to the wave and tidal energy deployment scenarios described in the first two reports. It highlights critical issues and recommendations for future research

  19. Structural acceptance criteria Remote Handling Building Tritium Extraction Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertz, G.

    1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This structural acceptance criteria contains the requirements for the structural analysis and design of the Remote Handling Building (RHB) in the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF). The purpose of this acceptance criteria is to identify the specific criteria and methods that will ensure a structurally robust building that will safely perform its intended function and comply with the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) structural requirements.

  20. Multiple Criteria Analysis and Water Resources Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    risk Quality of life Health Noncancer risk Costs Cost Technology availability Health risk Testing Management factors Environmental quality Treatment Chemical performance Fairness Cost of technology & Management 48:6, 2005 · Evaluation of drinking water treatment technology: An entropy-based fuzzy application

  1. FRACTURE FAILURE CRITERIA OF SOFC PEN STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Qu, Jianmin

    2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal stresses and warpage of the PEN are unavoidable due to the temperature changes from the stress-free sintering temperature to room temperature and mismatch of the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of various layers in the PEN structures of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) during the PEN manufacturing process. In the meantime, additional mechanical stresses will also be created by mechanical flattening during the stack assembly process. The porous nature of anode and cathode in the PEN structures determines presence of the initial flaws and crack on the interfaces of anode/electrolyte/cathode and in the interior of the materials. The sintering/assembling induced stresses may cause the fracture failure of PEN structure. Therefore, fracture failure criteria for SOFC PEN structures is developed in order to ensure the structural integrity of the cell and stack of SOFC. In this paper, the fracture criteria based on the relationship between the critical energy release rate and critical curvature and maximum displacement of the warped cells caused by the temperature changes as well as mechanical flattening process is established so that possible failure of SOFC PEN structures may be predicted deterministically by the measurement of the curvature and displacement of the warped cells.

  2. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  3. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: ? DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste ? DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) ? DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) ? U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  4. Yield criteria for quasibrittle and frictional materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davide Bigoni; Andrea Piccolroaz

    2010-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A new yield/damage function is proposed for modelling the inelastic behaviour of a broad class of pressure-sensitive, frictional, ductile and brittle-cohesive materials. The yield function allows the possibility of describing a transition between the shape of a yield surface typical of a class of materials to that typical of another class of materals. This is a fundamental key to model the behaviour of materials which become cohesive during hardening (so that the shape of the yield surface evolves from that typical of a granular material to that typical of a dense material), or which decrease cohesion due to damage accumulation. The proposed yield function is shown to agree with a variety of experimental data relative to soil, concrete, rock, metallic and composite powders, metallic foams, porous metals, and polymers. The yield function represents a single, convex and smooth surface in stress space approaching as limit situations well-known criteria and the extreme limits of convexity in the deviatoric plane. The yield function is therefore a generalization of several criteria, including von Mises, Drucker-Prager, Tresca, modified Tresca, Coulomb-Mohr, modified Cam-clay, and --concerning the deviatoric section-- Rankine and Ottosen. Convexity of the function is proved by developing two general propositions relating convexity of the yield surface to convexity of the corresponding function. These propositions are general and therefore may be employed to generate other convex yield functions.

  5. BULLETIN OF MARINE SCIENCE, 84(1): 2542, 2009 25Bulletin of Marine Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Michael C.

    interactions with a diverse group of marine organisms. Facili- tated by a modified dorsal fin in the form fishes, sharks, rays, marine mammals, and reptiles. Most echeneids attach to the external surface

  6. University Life Strategic Plan UNIVERSITY LIFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the demands of work, social responsibility, and life in an ever-changing global society. Through a range well-being, post-graduation success Increased retention and timely degree completion Increased Engagement) #12;2 University Life is committed to preparing students for the demands of work, social

  7. BULLETIN OF MARINE SCIENCE, 75(2): 295320, 2004 295Bulletin of Marine Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

    BULLETIN OF MARINE SCIENCE, 75(2): 295­320, 2004 295Bulletin of Marine Science © 2004 Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science of the University of Miami LARGE-SCALE ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS SCIENCE, VOL. 75, NO. 2, 2004296 removed permanently, leaving little or no vegetation buffer between

  8. The marine biogeochemistry of zinc isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Seth G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc (Zn) stable isotopes can record information about important oceanographic processes. This thesis presents data on Zn isotopes in anthropogenic materials, hydrothermal fluids and minerals, cultured marine phytoplankton, ...

  9. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  10. Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................... 3 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center..........4 Oregon Sea Grant.....................................21 B. Federal and State Agencies Environmental Protection Agency PacificCoastalEcologyBranch, Western

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Marine Energy Technology Symposium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marine Energy Technology Symposium Wave Energy Resource Characterization at US Test Sites On September 16, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News &...

  12. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: marine hydrokinetic reference models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marine hydrokinetic (MHK) reference models (RMs) for wave energy converters and tidal, ocean, and river current energy converters. The RMP team includes a partnership between...

  14. A review of macroscopic ductile failure criteria.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corona, Edmundo; Reedlunn, Benjamin

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work was to describe several of the ductile failure criteria com- monly used to solve practical problems. The following failure models were considered: equivalent plastic strain, equivalent plastic strain in tension, maximum shear, Mohr- Coulomb, Wellman's tearing parameter, Johnson-Cook and BCJ MEM. The document presents the main characteristics of each failure model as well as sample failure predic- tions for simple proportional loading stress histories in three dimensions and in plane stress. Plasticity calculations prior to failure were conducted with a simple, linear hardening, J2 plasticity model. The resulting failure envelopes were plotted in prin- cipal stress space and plastic strain space, where the dependence on stress triaxiality and Lode angle are clearly visible. This information may help analysts select a ductile fracture model for a practical problem and help interpret analysis results.

  15. Technical guidance for siting criteria development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, D.C.; Sprung, J.L.; Alpert, D.J.; Diegert, K.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Ritchie, L.T.; Strip, D.R.; Johnson, J.D.; Hansen, K.; Robinson, J.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical guidance to support the formulation and comparison of possible siting criteria for nuclear power plants has been developed in four areas: (1) consequences of hypothetical severe nuclear-power-plant accidents, (2) characteristics of population distributions about current reactor sites, (3) site availability within the continental United States, and (4) socioeconomic impacts of reactor siting. The impact on consequences of source-term magnitude, meteorology, population distribution, and emergency response have been analyzed. Population distributions about current sites were analyzed to identify statistical characteristics, time trends, and regional differences. A site-availability data bank was constructed for the continential United States. The data bank contains information about population densities, seismicity, topography, water availability, and land-use restrictions. Finally, the socioeconomic impacts of rural-industrialization projects, energy boomtowns, and nuclear power plants were examined to determine their nature, magnitude, and dependence on site demography and remoteness.

  16. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and Environmental Effects Research Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and...

  17. amchitka marine environment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    monitor and assess radioactivity in the marine environment for its protection, and use nuclear techniques and environmental isotopes to understand better and assess marine...

  18. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK)...

  19. arctic marine ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine...

  20. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potentials and Policies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine...

  1. New Request for Information on Strategy to Advance the Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Request for Information on Strategy to Advance the Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Industry New Request for Information on Strategy to Advance the Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy...

  2. Housing and Residential Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    1 Housing and Residential Life Guidebook 2014-2015 LivingCampus #12;2 fau.edu/housing Welcome! The Housing & Residential Life staff is excited that you've moved home! Florida Atlantic University residence halls and apartments are your home for the 2014-2015 school year. The Housing & Residential Life staff

  3. Life Cycle Cost Estimate

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

  4. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program. The program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new technologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity.

  5. CANARY CURRENT LARGE MARINE ECOSYSTEM (CCLME) PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 CANARY CURRENT LARGE MARINE ECOSYSTEM (CCLME) PROJECT CCLME Inception Workshop 2-3 November 2010. Two possible case studies are presented: the Imraguen social-ecosystem of the Banc d'Arguin National Park, the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate

  6. Introduction Marine protected areas (MPA's) are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    67(1) 1 Introduction Marine protected areas (MPA's) are an important tool for managing fisheries protected area is "any area of the marine environ- ment that has been reserved by Federal, State, tribal, territorial, or local laws or regulations to provide lasting protection for part or all of the natural

  7. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria, December 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office waste acceptance criteria. The waste acceptance criteria provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed waste for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites for storage or disposal.

  8. A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

  9. Oregon Procedure and Criteria for Hazardous Waste Treatment,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Procedure and Criteria for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage or Disposal Permits Fact Sheet Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  10. Inelastic analysis acceptance criteria for radioactive material transportation containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.; Ludwigsen, J.S.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design criteria currently used in the design of radioactive material (RAM) transportation containers are taken from the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME, 1992). These load-based criteria are ideally suited for pressure vessels where the loading is quasistatic and all stresses are in equilibrium with externally applied loads. For impact events, the use of load-based criteria is less supportable. Impact events tend to be energy controlled, and thus, energy-based acceptance criteria would appear to be more appropriate. Determination of an ideal design criteria depends on what behavior is desired. Currently there is not a design criteria for inelastic analysis for RAM nation packages that is accepted by the regulatory agencies. This lack of acceptance criteria is one of the major factors in limiting the use of inelastic analysis. In this paper inelastic analysis acceptance criteria based on stress and strain-energy density will be compared for two stainless steel test units subjected to impacts onto an unyielding target. Two different material models are considered for the inelastic analysis, a bilinear fit of the stress-strain curve and a power law hardening model that very closely follows the stress-strain curve. It is the purpose of this paper to stimulate discussion and research into the area of strain-energy density based inelastic analysis acceptance criteria.

  11. Engineering Design and Safety Basis Inspection Criteria, Inspection...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to this is our commitment to enhance our program. Therefore, we have developed the Engineering Design and Safety Basis Inspection Criteria, Inspection Activities, and Lines of...

  12. Suspect Counterfeit Items Criteria Review and Approach Document...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SuspectCounterfeit Items Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD) NNSANevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Phase 1 - Management Performance Objective:...

  13. Facility Energy Management Guidelines and Criteria for Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Guidelines and criteria describe meeting requirements within Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007), including defining facilities covered by...

  14. 2015 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards Criteria and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Criteria and Guidelines for the Federal Energy and Water Management Awards U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program By A. Author, B....

  15. Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Cinq-Mars; Timothy Burke; Dr. James Irish; Brian Gustafson; Dr. James Kirtley; Dr. Aiman Alawa

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: � Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. � Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. � Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. � Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. � Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. � Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. � Completed final reporting and deliverables

  16. Psuty, N.P., Steinberg, P.E., and Wright, D.J., in press, Coastal and marine geography in Gaile, G.L. and Willmott, C.J. (Eds.), Geography in America at the Dawn of the 21st Century, New York: Oxford University Press, Spring 2002.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    for marine mineral extraction, heightened understanding of the role of marine life in maintaining the global. Climatologists are investigating the sea in order to understand processes like El Niño, remote sensing experts bridge these literatures to examine human/physical process interaction in coastal systems. Coastal

  17. Battery Technology Life Verification Test Manual Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon P. Christophersen

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Technology Life Verification Test (TLVT) Manual is to help guide developers in their effort to successfully commercialize advanced energy storage devices such as battery and ultracapacitor technologies. The experimental design and data analysis discussed herein are focused on automotive applications based on the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) electric vehicle, hybrid electric vehicle, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (EV, HEV, and PHEV, respectively) performance targets. However, the methodology can be equally applied to other applications as well. This manual supersedes the February 2005 version of the TLVT Manual (Reference 1). It includes criteria for statistically-based life test matrix designs as well as requirements for test data analysis and reporting. Calendar life modeling and estimation techniques, including a user’s guide to the corresponding software tool is now provided in the Battery Life Estimator (BLE) Manual (Reference 2).

  18. Molecular mechanisms of urea uptake in marine diatoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Katherine Elizabeth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Genomic Insights into Marine Microalgae. ” Annual Review ofof Biodiesel Fuel from Microalgae." ACS Symposium Series.

  19. Z .Marine Chemistry 70 2000 257275 www.elsevier.nlrlocatermarchem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Laodong

    and trace organic con- Ztaminants in marine environments Bruland et al., 1991; Honeyman and Santschi, 1992

  20. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access The model marine diatom Thalassiosira

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julius, Matthew L.

    the first diatom genome, from a marine strain of Thalassiosira pseudonana (Hus- tedt) Hasle et Heimdal

  1. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort-AC02-05CH11231. #12;Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering thermal comfort through a different low energy space conditioning mechanism than would otherwise

  2. NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimke, J.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves literature survey of technologies to perform the nitrate to hydroxide conversion, selection of the most promising technologies, preparation of a flowsheet and design of a system. The most promising technologies are electrochemical reduction of nitrates and chemical reduction with hydrogen or ammonia. The primary reviewed technologies are listed and they aredescribed in more detail later in the report: (1) Electrochemical destruction; (2) Chemical reduction with agents such as ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen; (3) Hydrothermal reduction process; and (4) Calcination. Only three of the technologies on the list have been demonstrated to generate usable amounts of caustic; electrochemical reduction and chemical reduction with ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen and hydrothermal reduction. Chemical reduction with an organic reactant such as formic acid generates carbon dioxide which reacts with caustic and is thus counterproductive. Treatment of nitrate with aluminum or other active metals generates a solid product. High temperature calcination has the potential to generate sodium oxide which may be hydrated to sodium hydroxide, but this is unproven. The following criteria were developed to evaluate the most suitable option. The numbers in brackets after the criteria are relative weighting factors to account for importance: (1) Personnel exposure to radiation for installation, routine operation and maintenance; (2) Non-radioactive safety issues; (3) Whether the technology generates caustic and how many moles of caustic are generated per mole of nitrate plus nitrite decomposed; (4) Whether the technology can handle nitrate and nitrite at the concentrations encountered in waste; (5) Maturity of technology; (6) Estimated annual cost of operation (labor, depreciation, materials, utilities); (7) Capital cost; (8) Selectivity to nitrogen as decomposition product (other products are flammable and/or toxic); (9) Impact of introduced species; (10) Selectivity for destruction of nitrate vs. nitrite; and (11) Cost of deactivation and demolition. Each technology was given a score from one

  3. Advanced Neutron Source radiological design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, J.L.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The operation of the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) facility will present a variety of radiological protection problems. Because it is desired to design and operate the ANS according to the applicable licensing standards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), it must be demonstrated that the ANS radiological design basis is consistent not only with state and Department of Energy (DOE) and other usual federal regulations, but also, so far as is practicable, with NRC regulations and with recommendations of such organizations as the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Also, the ANS radiological design basis is in general to be consistent with the recommendations of authoritative professional and scientific organizations, specifically the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). As regards radiological protection, the principal goals of DOE regulations and guidance are to keep occupational doses ALARA [as low as (is) reasonably achievable], given the current state of technology, costs, and operations requirements; to control and monitor contained and released radioactivity during normal operation to keep public doses and releases to the environment ALARA; and to limit doses to workers and the public during accident conditions. Meeting these general design objectives requires that principles of dose reduction and of radioactivity control by employed in the design, operation, modification, and decommissioning of the ANS. The purpose of this document is to provide basic radiological criteria for incorporating these principles into the design of the ANS. Operations, modification, and decommissioning will be covered only as they are affected by design.

  4. Dynamic energy budgets and bioaccumulation : a model for marine mammals and marine mammal populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klanjš?ek, Tin

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy intake of individuals affects growth of organisms and, therefore, populations. Persistent lipophilic toxicants acquired with the energy can bioaccumulate and harm individuals. Marine mammals are particularly vulnerable ...

  5. The biogeochemistry of marine particulate trace metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohnemus, Daniel Chester

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine particles include all living and non-living solid components of seawater, representing an extremely dynamic and chemically diverse mixture of phases. The distributions of these phases are poorly constrained and ...

  6. Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches,...

  7. Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................... 4 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center..........5 Oregon Sea Grant.....................................................................18 College of Veterinary Medicine............................................19 B. Federal and State Agencies Environmental Protection Agency...................................... 20 Pacific Coastal Ecology

  8. Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................... 4 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center..........5 Oregon Sea Grant of Biomedical Sciences.....................................22 B. Federal and State Agencies Environmental Protection Agency...................................23 PacificCoastalEcologyBranch, Western Ecology Division

  9. Channel incision in Rodeo Creek, Marin County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bass, Phoebe; Choy, Min

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Wetlands of Rodeo Creek in the Marin Headlands,channel. Cross Section 3 Rodeo Creek is 5 ft wide at Cross1.55 ft deep. Here, Rodeo Creek is a small channel running

  10. A new reef marine reserve in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A new reef marine reserve in the southern Arabian Gulf ­ Jebel Ali (Dubai, United Arab Emirates) Just in time to make a major contribution to IYOR, Dubai municipality (United Arab Emirates) declared

  11. Phosphorus physiology of the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orchard, Elizabeth Duncan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Primary producers play a critical role in the oceanic food chain and the global cycling of carbon. The marine diazotroph Trichodesmium is a major contributor to both primary production and nitrogen fixation in the tropical ...

  12. Marin County- Wood Stove Replacement Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The County of Marin has created a rebate program to encourage homeowners to remove or replace non-EPA certified wood-burning heaters (wood stoves and fireplace inserts) with cleaner burning stoves...

  13. Adaptive sampling in autonomous marine sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eickstedt, Donald Patrick

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, an innovative architecture for real-time adaptive and cooperative control of autonomous sensor platforms in a marine sensor network is described in the context of the autonomous oceanographic network scenario. ...

  14. Genetic Algorithms Artificial Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Melanie

    of artificial systems is an important component of artificial life, providing an important modeling tool of evolution in artificial-life systems. GAs have been used both as tools for solving practical problems a system with lifelike properties, even though this is certainly an important role for GAs in artificial

  15. Genetic Algorithms Artificial Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephanie

    systems tremendously. Likewise, evolution of artificial systems is an important component of artificial) are currently the most promi­ nent and widely used models of evolution in artificial­life systems. GAs have beenGenetic Algorithms and Artificial Life Melanie Mitchell Santa Fe Institute 1660 Old Pecos Tr

  16. Photovoltaics Life Cycle Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (air, water, solid) M, Q E PV array Photovoltaic modules Balance of System (BOS) (Inverters & Environmental Engineering Department Columbia University and National Photovoltaic (PV) EHS Research Center Brookhaven National Laboratory www.clca.columbia.edu www.pv.bnl.gov #12;2 The Life Cycle of PVThe Life Cycle

  17. Marine geology of the Bay of Campeche

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creager, Joe S.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY /i & L IBRRAYA B/ iA&Co MARINE GEOLOGY OP SHE BAT OF CAMPECHE A Dissertation By JOE SCOTT CREAGER ? ? ? Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August, 1958 Major Subject: Geological Oceanography MARINE GEOLOGY OF THE BAT OF CAMPECHE A Dissertation By JOE SCOTT CREAGEB Approved as to style and content by: JLN. Chairman of Committee Heady Department...

  18. DEPARTMENT OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE Residential Life Staff Manual.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missouri-Rolla, University of

    1 Appendix A DEPARTMENT OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE Residential Life Staff Manual. Residential Life Program Listing #12;2 MISSOURI S&T RESIDENTIAL LIFE DEPARTMENT Staff Resource Manual 2010--2012 Department of Residential Life Mission: To create educational environments emphasizing learning and development. Service

  19. Life Before Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei A. Sharov; Richard Gordon

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An extrapolation of the genetic complexity of organisms to earlier times suggests that life began before the Earth was formed. Life may have started from systems with single heritable elements that are functionally equivalent to a nucleotide. The genetic complexity, roughly measured by the number of non-redundant functional nucleotides, is expected to have grown exponentially due to several positive feedback factors: gene cooperation, duplication of genes with their subsequent specialization, and emergence of novel functional niches associated with existing genes. Linear regression of genetic complexity on a log scale extrapolated back to just one base pair suggests the time of the origin of life 9.7 billion years ago. This cosmic time scale for the evolution of life has important consequences: life took ca. 5 billion years to reach the complexity of bacteria; the environments in which life originated and evolved to the prokaryote stage may have been quite different from those envisaged on Earth; there was no intelligent life in our universe prior to the origin of Earth, thus Earth could not have been deliberately seeded with life by intelligent aliens; Earth was seeded by panspermia; experimental replication of the origin of life from scratch may have to emulate many cumulative rare events; and the Drake equation for guesstimating the number of civilizations in the universe is likely wrong, as intelligent life has just begun appearing in our universe. Evolution of advanced organisms has accelerated via development of additional information-processing systems: epigenetic memory, primitive mind, multicellular brain, language, books, computers, and Internet. As a result the doubling time of complexity has reached ca. 20 years. Finally, we discuss the issue of the predicted technological singularity and give a biosemiotics perspective on the increase of complexity.

  20. Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits in mixed fluvial-shallow marine sedimentary sequences, South Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, S.S.; Smith, R.B.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium deposits in the South Texas Uranium Region are classical roll-type deposits that formed at the margin of tongues of altered sandstone by the encroachment of oxidizing, uraniferous solutions into reduced aquifers containing pyrite and, in a few cases, carbonaceous plant material. Many of the uranium deposits in South Texas are dissimilar from the roll fronts of the Wyoming basins. The host sands for many of the deposits contain essentially no carbonaceous plant material, only abundant disseminated pyrite. Many of the deposits do not occur at the margin of altered (ferric oxide-bearing) sandstone tongues but rather occur entirely within reduced, pyurite-bearing sandstone. The abundance of pyrite within the sands probably reflects the introduction of H/sub 2/S up along faults from hydrocarbon accumulations at depth. Such introductions before ore formation prepared the sands for roll-front development, whereas post-ore introductions produced re-reduction of portions of the altered tongue, leaving the deposit suspended in reduced sandstone. Evidence from three deposits suggests that ore formation was not accompanied by the introduction of significant amounts of H/sub 2/S.

  1. Wind Turbine Design Guideline DG03: Yaw and Pitch Rolling Bearing Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, T.; Rumbarger, J. H.; Butterfield, C. P.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the design criteria, calculation methods, and applicable standards recommended for use in performance and life analyses of ball and roller (rolling) bearings for yaw and pitch motion support in wind turbine applications. The formulae presented here for rolling bearing analytical methods and bearing-life ratings are consistent with methods in current use by wind turbine designers and rolling-bearing manufacturers.

  2. Empirical, probabilistic, and modelling approaches to assess cross-media impacts to marine sediments at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohrer, W.L.; Vita, C.L. [URS Consultants, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Schrock, W. [Navy, Poulsbo, WA (United States). Engineering Field Activity Northwest; Leicht, G. [Navy, Bremerton, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredge spoils, industrial fill, and liquid wastes from the 1940s to 1970s have resulted in inorganic and organic contamination of soils, groundwater, and marine sediments near the U.S.S. Missouri and Charleston Beach parking lots at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), in Bremerton, Washington. Extensive collection of environmental data from several studies including the recently completed Remedial Investigation conducted under CERCLA have confirmed contaminant levels above federal risk screening levels and state regulatory criteria for several heavy metals and organic compounds, including pesticides and PCBs. Although the correlation between contamination in marine sediments and those in on-shore fill appears to be strong, there is little evidence that a viable transport pathway currently exists from soils to groundwater and thence to sediments. Several methods used to estimate chemical mass flux from soil to groundwater to sediments and marine waters of Sinclair Inlet are corroborative in this regard. Nonetheless, this result is vexing because present groundwater concentrations exceed ARARs, yet are below levels of concern in terms of mass flux to marine waters. Despite the marginal risks posed by groundwater, various remedial alternatives, including perimeter containment using a subsurface waste-stabilized containment wall, were evaluated to determine whether chemical flux could be reduced to levels below those observed at the present time. Three-dimensional flow modelling and transport modelling also confirmed that chemical fluxes were limited in magnitude and could be addressed with more conventional remedial approaches.

  3. BULLETIN OF MARINE SCIENCE, 81(1): 2135, 2007 21Bulletin of Marine Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durako, Michael J.

    School of Marine and Atmospheric Science of the University of Miami CARBON ShARINg ThROUgh phy ABSTRACT Carbon sharing among ramets of the clonal marine angiosperm Halophila john- sonii Eiseman-supplied greenhouse facility in Wilmington, North Car- olina. different ramets along four-ramet segments (genets) were

  4. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear waste: repository performance and development criteria. Public draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, DOE/NWTS-33(3) is one of a series of documents to establish the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program criteria for mined geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. For both repository performance and repository development it delineates the criteria for design performance, radiological safety, mining safety, long-term containment and isolation, operations, and decommissioning. The US Department of Energy will use these criteria to guide the development of repositories to assist in achieving performance and will reevaluate their use when the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues radioactive waste repository rules.

  5. A Criteria Catalog Based Methodology for Analyzing Service Management Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processes, using the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) as a best practices database, is presented (ITIL) recommendations [8]. The criteria catalog itself serves as a domain­specific (re- garding

  6. A Criteria Catalog Based Methodology for Analyzing Service Management Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processes, using the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) as a best practices database, is presented the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) recommendations [8]. The criteria catalog itself serves as a domain--specific (re

  7. The retrofitting of existing buildings for seismic criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besing, Christa, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the process for retrofitting a building for seismic criteria. It explains the need for a new, performance-based design code to provide a range of acceptable building behavior. It then outlines the ...

  8. Criteria Review and Approach Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Criteria Review and Approach Document (EA CRAD 31-07, Rev. 0) December 4, 2014 CRAD, Nuclear Reactor Facility Operations - December 4, 2014 (EA CRAD 31-08, Rev. 0) CRAD,...

  9. Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water were created to embody both state and federal law. State law mandates the protection of public health and welfare and the...

  10. Criteria to determine gas reserves using short time buildup tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerini Franchina, Agostino

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Member) Robert R. Berg (Member) Kenneth R. Hall (interim Head of Department) December 1991 ABSTRACT Criteria to Determine Gas Reserves Using Short Time Buildup Tests. ( December 1991 ) Agostino Guerini Franchina, Ingeniero de Petroleo...

  11. aguda current criteria: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshop 3 May 8, 2000 12;ISLAND EVOLUTION EQUATION - 2 1. Starting 2 Current World Enviroment Vol. 2(1), 61-66 (2007) Water quality criteria and Arpa river water of CiteSeer...

  12. Reportable Nuclide Criteria for ORNL Radioactive Waste Management Activities - 13005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Kip; Forrester, Tim [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008 MS-6322, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008 MS-6322, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Saunders, Mark [Fairfield Services Group, PO Box 31468, KNOxville, TN 37930 (United States)] [Fairfield Services Group, PO Box 31468, KNOxville, TN 37930 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee generates numerous radioactive waste streams. Many of those streams contain a large number of radionuclides with an extremely broad range of concentrations. To feasibly manage the radionuclide information, ORNL developed reportable nuclide criteria to distinguish between those nuclides in a waste stream that require waste tracking versus those nuclides of such minimal activity that do not require tracking. The criteria include tracking thresholds drawn from ORNL onsite management requirements, transportation requirements, and relevant treatment and disposal facility acceptance criteria. As a management practice, ORNL maintains waste tracking on a nuclide in a specific waste stream if it exceeds any of the reportable nuclide criteria. Nuclides in a specific waste stream that screen out as non-reportable under all these criteria may be dropped from ORNL waste tracking. The benefit of these criteria is to ensure that nuclides in a waste stream with activities which meaningfully affect safety and compliance are tracked, while documenting the basis for removing certain isotopes from further consideration. (authors)

  13. Strain-Based Acceptance Criteria for Energy-Limited Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer D. Snow; Dana K. Morton

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code was primarily written with stress-based acceptance criteria. These criteria are applicable to force, displacement, and energy-controlled loadings and ensure a factor of safety against failure. However, stress-based acceptance criteria are often quite conservative for one time energy-limited events such as accidental drops and impacts. For several years, the ASME Working Group on Design of Division 3 Containments has been developing the Design Articles for Section III, Division 3, “Containments for Transportation and Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Material and Waste,” and has wanted to establish strain-based acceptance criteria for accidental drops of containments. This Division 3 working group asked the Working Group on Design Methodology (WGDM) to assist in developing these strain-based acceptance criteria. This paper discusses the current proposed strain-based acceptance criteria, associated limitations of use, its background development, and the current status.

  14. Every sign of life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerasimov, Vadim, 1969-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Every Sign of Life introduces an approach to and motivational schema for personal health monitoring. It is an exploration of how to make information collected by personal health-monitoring devices fun and engaging, and ...

  15. Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Design Criteria and Explosive Safety Criteria Guide for Use with DOE O 420.1, Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides guidance on the application of requirements for nonreactor nuclear facilities and explosives facilities of Department of Energy (DOE) O 420.1, Facility Safety, Section 4.1, Nuclear and Explosives Safety Design Criteria. No cancellation.

  16. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear waste: program objectives, functional requirements, and system performance criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the present time, final repository criteria have not been issued by the responsible agencies. This document describes general objectives, requirements, and criteria that the DOE intends to apply in the interim to the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program. These objectives, requirements, and criteria have been developed on the basis of DOE's analysis of what is needed to achieve the National objective of safe waste disposal in an environmentally acceptable and economic manner and are expected to be consistent with anticipated regulatory standards. The qualitative statements in this document address the broad issues of public and occupational health and safety, institutional acceptability, engineering feasibility, and economic considerations. A comprehensive set of criteria, general and project specific, of which these are a part, will constitute a portion of the technical basis for preparation and submittal by the DOE of formal documents to support future license applications for nuclear waste repositories.

  17. Life Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David; Krishnan, Nikhil

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are shown. Keywords- Life Cycle Assessment (LCA); Life Cycleindustry, and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is emerging as a

  18. Commissioning tools for life-cycle building performance assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, M.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses information systems for building life-cycle performance analysis and the use of computer-based commissioning tools within this context. There are many reasons why buildings do not perform in practice as well as intended at the design stage. One reason is the lack of commissioning. A second reason is that design intent is not well documented, and performance targets for building components and systems are not well specified. Thus, criteria for defining verification and functional tests is unclear. A third reason is that critical information is often lost throughout the building life-cycle, which causes problems such as misunderstanding of operational characteristics and sequences and reduced overall performance. The life-cycle building performance analysis tools project discussed in this paper are focused on chillers and cooling systems.

  19. Physiological, ecological, and evolutionary studies of trace metal homeostasis in marine microbes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dupont, Christopher Lee

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    growth of several marine microalgae with urea serving asgrowth of several marine microalgae with urea serving as

  20. CEC-500-2010-FS-XXX Life-Cycle Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CEC-500-2010-FS-XXX Life-Cycle Energy Assessment of Smart Growth Strategies TRANSPORTATION ENERGY growth strategies at reducing energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and criteria pollutants remains. · An analysis of local planning and policy options for reducing embedded energy in the transport system

  1. The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

  2. alaskan marine populations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OIL University (OSU) at Corvallis to contin ue research on the effects of oil spills on fish, shellfish, marine 2 Recovery Trends in Marine Mammal Populations Anna M. Magera1...

  3. Transformations of mercury in the marine water column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munson, Kathleen M. (Kathleen May)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methylation of mercury (Hg) in the marine water column has been hypothesized to serve as the primary source of the bioaccumulating chemical species monomethylmercury (MMHg) to marine food webs. Despite decades of research ...

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marine Ice Nuclei Collections ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) 2012.10.01, Lewis, AMF Comments? We would love to...

  5. Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marine Seep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifer, Ira; Boles, J R; Luyendyk, B P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007, Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marine2007, Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a MarineTides and the emission of oil and gas from an abandoned oil

  6. Sea surface wave reconstruction from marine radar images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Yusheng, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-band marine radar is one type of remote sensing technology which is being increasingly used to measure sea surface waves nowadays. In this thesis, how to reconstruct sea surface wave elevation maps from X-band marine ...

  7. Comparative genomics reveals evidence of marine adaptation in Salinispora species.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penn, Kevin; Jensen, Paul R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orcutt B, et al: Ecological genomics of marine roseobacters.1037-1042. Penn and Jensen BMC Genomics 2012, 13:86 http://and Jensen: Comparative genomics reveals evidence of marine

  8. Drug Discovery and Development from Marine Biology-Based Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Drug Discovery and Development from Marine Biology- Based Research Oceanyx Pharmaceuticals is a novel drug discovery and development company that leverages marine biology-based natural identified two lead candidates, largazole and apratoxin, as potential drug candidates for the treatment

  9. Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marine Seep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifer, Ira; Boles, J R; Luyendyk, B P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with offshore oil production, Geology, 27(11), 1047-1050,Coal Oil Point, California, Marine and Petroleum Geology 22(

  10. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rooker, Jay R.

    into the offshore marine environment (Biggs & Ressler 2001, Biggs et al. 2008). Assessing the importance of non

  11. Homomorphic deconvolution of marine magnetic anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Leo David

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HOMOMORPIIIC DECONVOLUT ION OF MAR INE MAGNETIC ANOMAL I ES A Thesis by LEO DAVID JONES Submitted to the Graduate Colleoe of Texas Ahhi Unis ars i ty in partial fulfillment of the requirement for tne degree MASTEP, OF SCIENCE December 1975... Major Subject: Geophysics HOMOMORPHIC DECONVOLUT ION OF MARINE MAGNETIC ACNOMALIES A Thesis by LEO DAVID JONES Approved es to sty1e and content by: r"hi ~f C itt: Ch h~7 December 1976 ABSTRACT Homomorpi;ic Deconvolution of Marine Magnetic...

  12. Development of an automatic marine corer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman, Richard Joseph

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Texas A&M Automatic Marine Corer was continued in June, 1971. The ob]ectives of. this development phase of the corer were (a) to evaluate components within the unit with special consideration given to strength, longevity and ease of production.... The present work will be referred to as Phase III. The ob)ectives of Phase III were the further development of the Texas A&M Automatic Marine Corer. In particular, these ob]ectives were (a) to evaluate components within the unit with special con...

  13. Marine Lubes Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group JumpNew Hampshire:Marin Energy AuthorityMarine Lubes

  14. Marine Lubricants | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group JumpNew Hampshire:Marin Energy AuthorityMarine

  15. The Production of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons by Marine Plankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Production of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons by Marine Plankton Stephanie Lyn Shaw Center for Global://web.mit.edu/cgcs/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 The Production of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons by Marine Plankton by Stephanie of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons by Marine Plankton by Stephanie Lyn Shaw Submitted to the Department of Earth

  16. SUNLIGHT TRANSMISSION THROUGH DESERT DUST AND MARINE AEROSOLS: DIFFUSE LIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUNLIGHT TRANSMISSION THROUGH DESERT DUST AND MARINE AEROSOLS: DIFFUSE LIGHT CORRECTIONS TO SUN transmission through desert dust and marine aerosols: Diffuse light corrections to Sun photometry 2004; published 27 April 2004. [1] Desert dust and marine aerosols are receiving increased scientific

  17. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maldonado, Manuel

    (Escherichia coli and Vibrio anguillarum), and 1 marine yeast Rhodotorula sp. All 3 microbes were ingestedMARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 403: 75­89, 2010 doi: 10.3354/meps08411, Spain 2 Marine Bioproducts Engineering Group, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academic

  18. TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE -MARINE DIESEL MECHANICS Lewisporte -April 16, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE - MARINE DIESEL MECHANICS Lewisporte - April 16, 2012 March 19, 2012 Monday - Lewisporte April 30, 2012 Monday Last date for Marine Diesel Mechanics students to register or add courses Last date for Marine Diesel Mechanics students to drop courses and receive 100% refund of tuition fees

  19. Biosorption of Lead and Nickel by Biomass of Marine Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Biosorption of Lead and Nickel by Biomass of Marine Algae Z.R. Holan and B. Volesky" Department 22, 1993 Screening tests of different marine algae biomass types revealed a high passive biosorptive uptake of lead up to 270 mg Pb/g of biomass in some brown marine algae. Members of the order Fucales

  20. Emissions and Performance Tradeoffs for Advanced Marine Diesel Propulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    is designed that reduces smoke generation on an experimental marine Diesel engine equipped with a variable and emission generation in marine diesel propulsion. In comparison to the MIMO controller we considerEmissions and Performance Tradeoffs for Advanced Marine Diesel Propulsion Anna Stefanopoulouy

  1. Thermodynamic Origin of Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaelian, K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the thermodynamic function of life may shed light on its origin. Out of equilibrium structuring in space and time is contingent on continuous entropy production. Entropy production is a measure of the rate of the natural tendency of Nature to explore all available microstates. The process producing the greatest amount of entropy in the biosphere is the absorption and transformation of sunlight, leading to the transpiration of water by plants and cyanobacteria. Here we hypothesize that life began, and exists today, as a dynamic catalyst for the absorption and transformation of sunlight into heat, which could then be efficiently harvested by the water cycle, hurricanes, and ocean and wind currents. RNA and DNA are the most efficient of all known molecules for absorbing the ultraviolet light that could have penetrated the dense early atmosphere, and are extremely rapid in transforming this light into heat that can be readily absorbed by liquid water. The origin and evolution of life was thus driven...

  2. Falcon: automated optimization method for arbitrary assessment criteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Tser-Yuan (Livermore, CA); Moses, Edward I. (Livermore, CA); Hartmann-Siantar, Christine (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FALCON is a method for automatic multivariable optimization for arbitrary assessment criteria that can be applied to numerous fields where outcome simulation is combined with optimization and assessment criteria. A specific implementation of FALCON is for automatic radiation therapy treatment planning. In this application, FALCON implements dose calculations into the planning process and optimizes available beam delivery modifier parameters to determine the treatment plan that best meets clinical decision-making criteria. FALCON is described in the context of the optimization of external-beam radiation therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), but the concepts could also be applied to internal (brachytherapy) radiotherapy. The radiation beams could consist of photons or any charged or uncharged particles. The concept of optimizing source distributions can be applied to complex radiography (e.g. flash x-ray or proton) to improve the imaging capabilities of facilities proposed for science-based stockpile stewardship.

  3. Developing and testing an operational framework for assessing quality of life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahy, F. [Department of Geography, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: frances.fahy@nuigalway.ie; O Cinneide, M. [Department of Geography, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Difficulties with operationalising the concept of sustainable development have generated much debate, and have stimulated a good deal of research on the challenging task of assessing progress towards that goal. This paper focuses on quality of life, as one discourse in the sustainable development literature, and reports on the development and testing of an operational framework for the assessment of quality of life in an urban setting. Core principles of sustainable development are translated into a set of operational criteria for investigating quality of life. The process of formulating these criteria and the manner in which they may be linked to policy and practice are outlined. The application of the framework is demonstrated by reference to the experience of implementing it in an urban centre in Ireland.

  4. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Mahlon Heileson

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

  5. "What Are Marines For?" The United States Marine Corps in the Civil War Era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivdo, Michael Edward

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation provides analysis on several areas of study related to the history of the United States Marine Corps in the Civil War Era. One element scrutinizes the efforts of Commandant Archibald Henderson to transform the Corps into a more...

  6. "What Are Marines For?" The United States Marine Corps in the Civil War Era 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivdo, Michael Edward

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation provides analysis on several areas of study related to the history of the United States Marine Corps in the Civil War Era. One element scrutinizes the efforts of Commandant Archibald Henderson to transform ...

  7. Evolving treatment plan quality criteria from institution-specific experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruan, D.; Shao, W.; DeMarco, J.; Tenn, S.; King, C.; Low, D.; Kupelian, P.; Steinberg, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The dosimetric aspects of radiation therapy treatment plan quality are usually evaluated and reported with dose volume histogram (DVH) endpoints. For clinical practicality, a small number of representative quantities derived from the DVH are often used as dose endpoints to summarize the plan quality. National guidelines on reference values for such quantities for some standard treatment approaches are often used as acceptance criteria to trigger treatment plan review. On the other hand, treatment prescription and planning approaches specific to each institution warrants the need to report plan quality in terms of practice consistency and with respect to institution-specific experience. The purpose of this study is to investigate and develop a systematic approach to record and characterize the institution-specific plan experience and use such information to guide the design of plan quality criteria. In the clinical setting, this approach will assist in (1) improving overall plan quality and consistency and (2) detecting abnormal plan behavior for retrospective analysis. Methods: The authors propose a self-evolving methodology and have developed an in-house prototype software suite that (1) extracts the dose endpoints from a treatment plan and evaluates them against both national standard and institution-specific criteria and (2) evolves the statistics for the dose endpoints and updates institution-specific criteria. Results: The validity of the proposed methodology was demonstrated with a database of prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy cases. As more data sets are accumulated, the evolving institution-specific criteria can serve as a reliable and stable consistency measure for plan quality and reveals the potential use of the ''tighter'' criteria than national standards or projected criteria, leading to practice that may push to shrink the gap between plans deemed acceptable and the underlying unknown optimality. Conclusions: The authors have developed a rationale to improve plan quality and consistency, by evolving the plan quality criteria from institution-specific experience, complementary to national standards. The validity of the proposed method was demonstrated with a prototype system on prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) cases. The current study uses direct and indirect DVH endpoints for plan quality evaluation, but the infrastructure proposed here applies to general outcome data as well. The authors expect forward evaluation together with intelligent update based on evidence-based learning, which will evolve the clinical practice for improved efficiency, consistency, and ultimately better treatment outcome.

  8. Proliferation resistance criteria for fissile material disposition issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutherford, D.A.; Fearey, B.L.; Markin, J.T.; Close, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tolk, K.M.; Mangan, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 National Acdaemy of Sciences study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium`` defined options for reducing the national and international proliferation risks of materials declared excess to the nuclear weapons program. This paper proposes criteria for assessing the proliferation resistance of these options as well defining the ``Standards`` from the report. The criteria are general, encompassing all stages of the disposition process from storage through intermediate processing to final disposition including the facilities, processing technologies and materials, the level of safeguards for these materials, and the national/subnational threat to the materials.

  9. Criteria for safe storage of plutonium metals and oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This standard establishes safety criteria for safe storage of plutonium metals and plutonium oxides at DOE facilities; materials packaged to meet these criteria should not need subsequent repackaging to ensure safe storage for at least 50 years or until final disposition. The standard applied to Pu metals, selected alloys (eg., Ga and Al alloys), and stabilized oxides containing at least 50 wt % Pu; it does not apply to Pu-bearing liquids, process residues, waste, sealed weapon components, or material containing more than 3 wt % {sup 238}Pu. Requirements for a Pu storage facility and safeguards and security considerations are not stressed as they are addressed in detail by other DOE orders.

  10. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  11. Experts Offer Marines Energy-Efficiency Advice

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As an early adopter of cutting-edge technologies, the United States military is pioneering energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies in the field. Recently, the Commandant of the United States Marine Corps sent a team to visit bases and camps in Afghanistan to assess and make recommendations on the supply and use of energy and water.

  12. Marine Fisheries On the cover, top to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Fisheries ~@WD@W On the cover, top to bollom: Yelloweye rock fish, Sebastes ruberrimus Maturity and Fecundity in the Rockfishes, Sebastes spp., a Review Joy Clark, Wade Griffin, Jerry Clark.25 foreign. Publication of material from sources outside the NMFS is not an endorsement and the NMFS

  13. Life Sciences Shared Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    Life Sciences Shared Resources Cancer.Dartmouth.eduMarch 2012 201202-19201202-19 #12;SHARED RESOURCES MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT TEAM: Mark Israel, MD Director, Norris Cotton Cancer Center Bob Gerlach, MPA Associate Director, Norris Cotton Cancer Center CraigTomlinson, PhD Associate Director for Shared Resources

  14. Life cycle assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, M.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a technical, data-based and holistic approach to define and subsequently reduce the environmental burdens associated with a product, process, or activity by identifying and quantifying energy and material usage and waste discharges, assessing the impact of those wastes on the environment, and evaluating and implementing opportunities to effect environmental improvements. The assessment includes the entire life-cycle of the product, process or activity encompassing extraction and processing of raw materials, manufacturing, transportation and distribution, use/reuse, recycling and final disposal. LCA is a useful tool for evaluating the environmental consequences of a product, process, or activity, however, current applications of LCA have not been performed in consistent or easily understood ways. This inconsistency has caused increased criticism of LCA. The EPA recognized the need to develop an LCA framework which could be used to provide consistent use across the board. Also, additional research is needed to enhance the understanding about the steps in the performance of an LCA and its appropriate usage. This paper will present the research activities of the EPA leading toward the development of an acceptable method for conducting LCA`s. This research has resulted in the development of two guidance manuals. The first manual is intended to be a practical guide to conducting and interpreting the life-cycle inventory. A nine-step approach to performing a comprehensive inventory is presented along with the general issues to be addressed. The second manual addresses life-cycle design.

  15. Ice Nuclei in Marine Air: Biogenic Particles or Dust?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Hoose, C.; Poschl, U.; Lawrence, M.

    2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice nuclei impact clouds, but their sources and distribution in the atmosphere are still not well known. Particularly little attention has been paid to IN sources in marine environments, although evidence from field studies suggests that IN populations in remote marine regions may be dominated by primary biogenic particles associated with sea spray. In this exploratory model study, we aim to bring attention to this long-neglected topic and identify promising target regions for future field campaigns. We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated marine biogenic immersion IN distributions and dust immersion IN distributions, we predict strong regional differences in the importance of marine biogenic IN relative to dust IN. Our analysis suggests that marine biogenic IN are most likely to play a dominant role in determining IN concentrations in near-surface-air over the Southern Ocean, so future field campaigns aimed at investigating marine biogenic IN should target that region. Climate related changes in the abundance and emission of biogenic marine IN could affect marine cloud properties, thereby introducing previously unconsidered feedbacks that influence the hydrological cycle and the Earth’s energy balance. Furthermore, marine biogenic IN may be an important aspect to consider in proposals for marine cloud brightening by artificial sea spray production.

  16. Drake Equation for the Multiverse: From the String Landscape to Complex Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo Gleiser

    2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that selection criteria usually referred to as "anthropic conditions" for the existence of intelligent (typical) observers widely adopted in cosmology amount only to preconditions for primitive life. The existence of life does not imply in the existence of intelligent life. On the contrary, the transition from single-celled to complex, multi-cellular organisms is far from trivial, requiring stringent additional conditions on planetary platforms. An attempt is made to disentangle the necessary steps leading from a selection of universes out of a hypothetical multiverse to the existence of life and of complex life. It is suggested that what is currently called the "anthropic principle" should instead be named the "prebiotic principle."

  17. Design Criteria for Bagless Transfer System (BTS) Packaging System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RISENMAY, H.R.

    2000-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the criteria for the design and installation of a Bagless Transfer System (BTS); Blend, Sieve and Balance Equipment; and Supercritical Fluid Extraction System (SFE). The project consists of 3 major modules: (1) Bagless Transfer System (BTS) Module; (2) Blend, Sieve and Balance Equipment; and (3) Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) Module.

  18. Telecommunications Networks Planning and Evaluation with Techno-Economic Criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    Telecommunications Networks Planning and Evaluation with Techno-Economic Criteria Dimitris: Techno-economic Analysis, Telecommunications, Demand Forecast, Real Options, Game Theory, Investments in this paper). Techno-economic methodology The techno-economic evaluation of the case studies has been carried

  19. MULTIAREA SYSTEM RELIABILITY: THE ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF SYSTEM SECURITY CRITERIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    MULTIAREA SYSTEM RELIABILITY: THE ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF SYSTEM SECURITY CRITERIA BY TEOMAN GULER B assessment studies and the quantification of the economics of secure power system operations security and the economics of secure operations in the competitive market environment. The advent

  20. Conflicts between optimality criteria for block designs with low replication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, R. A.

    Conflicts between optimality criteria for block designs with low replication R. A. Bailey r.a.bailey@qmul.ac.uk International Biometric Congress, Florianopolis, 2010 Ongoing joint work with Alia Sajjad and Peter Cameron 1/18 #12;What makes a block design good for experiments? I have v treatments that I want to compare. I have

  1. Conflicts between optimality criteria for block designs with low replication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, R. A.

    .a.bailey@qmul.ac.uk Ongoing joint work with Alia Sajjad and Peter Cameron 1/32 #12;What makes a block design goodConflicts between optimality criteria for block designs with low replication R. A. Bailey r for experiments? I have v treatments that I want to compare. I have b blocks, with space for k treatments (not

  2. Accessing Heritage Documents according to Space Criteria within Digital Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Accessing Heritage Documents according to Space Criteria within Digital Libraries Christophe, Geographic Information Retrieval and Visualization, Non-Structured Documents, Digital Libraries, Cultural on digital libraries and proposes to extend the basic services of existing Library Management System with new

  3. Multi-Evidence, Multi-Criteria, Lazy Associative Document Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaki, Mohammed Javeed

    Multi-Evidence, Multi-Criteria, Lazy Associative Document Classification Adriano Velosoa , Wagner to be applied at classification time. Our method is able to perform evidence enhancement by link forwarding approach using documents from the ACM Digital Library and from a Brazilian Web directory. Our approach

  4. Safety Criteria and Safety Lifecycle for Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Tim

    Safety Criteria and Safety Lifecycle for Artificial Neural Networks Zeshan Kurd, Tim Kelly and Jim. The paper also presents a safety lifecycle for artificial neural networks. This lifecycle focuses, knowledge. INTRODUCTION Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are used in many safety-related applications

  5. Evaluation Criteria for Human-Automation Performance Birsen Donmez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    , Standardization, Theory. Keywords Metric Quality, Human Supervisory Control, Validity, Statistics, Experiments. 1Evaluation Criteria for Human-Automation Performance Metrics Birsen Donmez MIT Dept. of Aero(617)252-1512 missyc@mit.edu ABSTRACT Previous research has identified broad metric classes for human- automation

  6. Macroscopic yield criteria for plastic anisotropic materials containing spheroidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Macroscopic yield criteria for plastic anisotropic materials containing spheroidal voids Vincent-Leblond-Devaux's (GLD) analysis of an rigid-ideal plastic (von Mises) spheroidal volume containing a confocal spheroidal of the proposed approximate yield criterion for plastic anisotropic media containing non-spherical voids

  7. Defect in lung growth* Comparative study of three diagnostic criteria.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Defect in lung growth* Comparative study of three diagnostic criteria. P. DECHELOTTE, A. LABBE, O and fetuses (49 pathological cases and 25 controls) to detect defects in lung growth. In each case lung disease. RA count is low in lung hypoplasia but is not an entirely reliable diagnostic criterion since

  8. Interim performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBlasio, R.; Forman, S.; Hogan, S.; Nuss, G.; Post, H.; Ross, R.; Schafft, H.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a response to the Photovoltaic Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590) which required the generation of performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. Since the document is evolutionary and will be updated, the term interim is used. More than 50 experts in the photovoltaic field have contributed in the writing and review of the 179 performance criteria listed in this document. The performance criteria address characteristics of present-day photovoltaic systems that are of interest to manufacturers, government agencies, purchasers, and all others interested in various aspects of photovoltaic system performance and safety. The performance criteria apply to the system as a whole and to its possible subsystems: array, power conditioning, monitor and control, storage, cabling, and power distribution. They are further categorized according to the following performance attributes: electrical, thermal, mechanical/structural, safety, durability/reliability, installation/operation/maintenance, and building/site. Each criterion contains a statement of expected performance (nonprescriptive), a method of evaluation, and a commentary with further information or justification. Over 50 references for background information are also given. A glossary with definitions relevant to photovoltaic systems and a section on test methods are presented in the appendices. Twenty test methods are included to measure performance characteristics of the subsystem elements. These test methods and other parts of the document will be expanded or revised as future experience and needs dictate.

  9. Retrocommissioning Case Study - Applying Building Selection Criteria for Maximum Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luskay, L.; Haasl, T.; Irvine, L.; Frey, D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RETROCOMMISSIONING CASE STUDY ?Applying Building Selection Criteria for Maximum Results? Larry Luskay, Tudi Haasl, Linda Irvine Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Portland, Oregon Donald Frey Architectural Energy Corporation Boulder.... The building was retrocommissioned by Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. (PECI), in conjunction with Architectural Energy Corporation (AEC). The building-specific goals were: 1) Obtain cost-effective energy savings from optimizing operation...

  10. Manufacturing time operators: Covariance, selection criteria, and examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegerfeldt, G. C. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, DE-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Muga, J. G.; Munoz, J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, ES-48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide the most general forms of covariant and normalized time operators and their probability densities, with applications to quantum clocks, the time of arrival, and Lyapunov quantum operators. Examples are discussed of the profusion of possible operators and their physical meaning. Criteria to define unique, optimal operators for specific cases are given.

  11. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act and Marine Mammal Protection Act. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two laws governing activities in the marine environment are considered in this Reference Book. The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA, P.L. 92-532) regulates ocean dumping of waste, provides for a research program on ocean dumping, and provides for the designation and regulation of marine sanctuaries. The Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA, P.L. 92-522) establishes a federal program to protect and manage marine mammals. The Fishery Conservation and Management Act (FCMA, P.L. 94-265) establishes a program to regulate marine fisheries resources and commercial marine fishermen. Because the Department of Energy (DOE) is not engaged in any activities that could be classified as fishing under FCMA, this Act and its regulations have no implications for the DOE; therefore, no further consideration of this Act is given within this Reference Book. The requirements of the MPRSA and the MMPA are discussed in terms of their implications for the DOE.

  12. Evolution of Life on Earth EVOLUTION OF LIFE ON EARTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Yancy

    Evolution of Life on Earth #12;EVOLUTION OF LIFE ON EARTH #12;Earth ~4.5 billion years ago A bad day .... #12;Old (Archean) Rocks #12;4.4 Billion year old Zircon Earth was temperate and had water 4.4 billion years ago! #12;#12;EVOLUTION OF LIFE ON EARTH #12;Making Organic Molecules : Miller & Urey Famous

  13. Marine invertebrate-microbial bioactive metabolite symbioses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Koty

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system during embryonic development, but symbionts occur in low numbers in other parts of the colony and in other stages of the life cycle.

  14. To Collaborative LIfe Sciences Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    To Collaborative LIfe Sciences Building To Professional Development Center Collaborative Life Sciences Building SW MEADE SW PORTER SW M OODY I-5 To Main Campus To South Waterfront I-405 Collaborative Life Sciences Building 0650 SW Meade St. Academic & Student Recreation Center (ASRC) C8 Art Building

  15. QUALITY of LIFE 2009 Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUALITY of LIFE in Hawai`i 2009 Report Center on the Family University of Hawai`i Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism #12;2 QUALITY OF LIFE IN HAWAI`I The QOL framework organizations. For more detail, see the full report: Quality of Life in Hawai`i, 2009 Report: Framework

  16. Inversion of marine magnetic anomalies by deconvolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry, Dennis Lee

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard L. Carlson Dr. Phillip D. Rabinowitz Marine magnetic anomalies can be expressed as a convolution between the equivalent magnetic line source in the oceanic crust and a transfer function. The transfer function contains..., with the resulting anomaly still exhibiting sharp reversals. This is compatible with the results of magnetic studies of ophiolites and dredged oceanic rocks, which indicate that a smoothly varying source is more probable than a block model for the generation...

  17. Probabilistic finite element analysis of marine risers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leder, H. Vern

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review 1. 2 Research Study 10 2 FORMULATION OF THE SECOND ? MOMENT ANALYSIS METHOD 13 2. 1 Finite Element Equations 2. 2 Random Vector Formulation 2. 3 The Correlation Function 2. 4 Random Field Discretization 2. 5 Taylor Series Expansion 2. 6... ILLUSTRATIVE EXAMPLE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 APPLICATION OF PROBABILISTIC FINITE ELEMENT METHODS TO MARINE RISER ANALYSES 4. 1 Finite Element Model . 4. 1. 1 Formulation of the Equation of Motion 4. 1. 2 Finite Element Discretization 4. 1. 3...

  18. acr appropriateness criteria: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    important key to improve human life. Due to the global warming and pollution, the new energy source is developed. Photovoltaic is one of these sources that growth in recent...

  19. Top marine predators track Lagrangian coherent structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Tew Kai; V. Rossi; J. Sudre; H. Weimerskirch; C. Lopez; E. Hernandez-Garcia; F. Marsac; V. Garcon

    2009-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Meso- and submesoscales (fronts, eddies, filaments) in surface ocean flow have a crucial influence on marine ecosystems. Their dynamics partly control the foraging behaviour and the displacement of marine top predators (tuna, birds, turtles, and cetaceans). In this work we focus on the role of submesoscale structures in the Mozambique Channel on the distribution of a marine predator, the Great Frigatebird. Using a newly developed dynamical concept, namely the Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponent (FSLE), we have identified Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) present in the surface flow in the Channel over a 2-month observation period (August and September 2003). By comparing seabirds' satellite positions with LCSs locations, we demonstrate that frigatebirds track precisely these structures in the Mozambique Channel, providing the first evidence that a top predator is able to track these FSLE ridges to locate food patches. After comparing bird positions during long and short trips, and different parts of these trips, we propose several hypotheses to understand how frigatebirds can follow these LCSs. The birds might use visual and/or olfactory cues and/or atmospheric current changes over the structures to move along these biological corridors. The birds being often associated to tuna schools around foraging areas, a thorough comprehension of their foraging behaviour and movement during the breeding season is crucial not only to seabirds' ecology but also to an appropriate ecosystemic approach of fisheries in the Channel.

  20. MCO combustible gas management leak test acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHERRELL, D.L.

    1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed multi-canister overpacks (MCO) were evaluated to ensure that MCOs can be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCO's or within their surroundings. The document concludes that the integrated leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs (1 x 10{sup -5} std cc/sec and 1 x 10{sup -7} std cc/sec, respectively) are adequate to meet all current and foreseeable needs of the project, including capability to demonstrate compliance with the NFPA 60 Paragraph 3-3 requirement to maintain hydrogen concentrations [within the air atmosphere CSB tubes] t or below 1 vol% (i.e., at or below 25% of the LFL).

  1. Self-Consistent Criteria for Evaluation of Neutron Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry H.F,Newlon C.E.,Knight J.R.

    2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    New safe interaction criteria for containers of fissionable materials handled at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant have been developed on the basis of an interaction theory using the basic concepts of a safe solid angle subtended by interacting containers, and the multiplication factor as determined by two-group theory for an individually safe containers The calculated results agree satisfactorily with experimental data obtained with identical interacting units involving both cylinders and slabs containing highly enriched uranium, the core compositions of which were varied between H/U-235 atomic ratios of 44.3 and 337. The application of the derived interaction criteria to items containing material with low moderation or low U-235 assay, and to containers for which nuclear safety is dependent upon control of the U-235 mass or U-235 concentration is discussed.

  2. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

  3. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

  4. PUGET SOUND AND WILLAPA BAY GUIDE TO THE MARINE LIFE OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruesink, Jennifer

    ' of the ocean. Like all seaweeds, they are rootless, obtaining nutrients directly from the water. The bull kelp the mainland and islands. Hummingbirds buzz across the water at a furious pace! Kelps are the `trees

  5. Berkeley Lab scientists develop criteria for $20 million energy challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Labs Iain Walker and his colleagues in environmental energy research helped the Siebel Foundation develop the criteria for its Energy Free Home Challenge, which comes with a $20 million global incentive prize. The Challenge is a competition to create a new generation of systems and technologies for practical homes that realize a net-zero, non-renewable energy footprint without increasing the cost of ownership. It is open to everyone everywhere — university teams to handymen and hobbyists.

  6. Berkeley Lab scientists develop criteria for $20 million energy challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Labs Iain Walker and his colleagues in environmental energy research helped the Siebel Foundation develop the criteria for its Energy Free Home Challenge, which comes with a $20 million global incentive prize. The Challenge is a competition to create a new generation of systems and technologies for practical homes that realize a net-zero, non-renewable energy footprint without increasing the cost of ownership. It is open to everyone everywhere ? university teams to handymen and hobbyists.

  7. Published in Artificial Life V: Proc. Fifth Inter. Conf. on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems, Nara, Japan, May, 1996. Perception and Learning in Artificial Animals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terzopoulos, Demetri

    Systems, Nara, Japan, May, 1996. Perception and Learning in Artificial Animals Demetri Terzopoulos, Tamer active perception system that enables artificial marine animals to navigate purposefully throughPublished in Artificial Life V: Proc. Fifth Inter. Conf. on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living

  8. A new approach to criteria for health risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickett, Jeffery, E-mail: J.Spickett@curtin.edu.au [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Katscherian, Dianne [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia); Western Australian Department of Health WA, PO Box 8172, Perth Business Centre WA 6849 (Australia); Goh, Yang Miang [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a developing component of the overall impact assessment process and as such needs access to procedures that can enable more consistent approaches to the stepwise process that is now generally accepted in both EIA and HIA. The guidelines developed during this project provide a structured process, based on risk assessment procedures which use consequences and likelihood, as a way of ranking risks to adverse health outcomes from activities subjected to HIA or HIA as part of EIA. The aim is to assess the potential for both acute and chronic health outcomes. The consequences component also identifies a series of consequences for the health care system, depicted as expressions of financial expenditure and the capacity of the health system. These more specific health risk assessment characteristics should provide for a broader consideration of health consequences and a more consistent estimation of the adverse health risks of a proposed development at both the scoping and risk assessment stages of the HIA process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A more objective approach to health risk assessment is provided. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for the consequences for chronic and acute impacts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for the consequences on the health care system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An objective set of criteria for event frequency that could impact on health. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The approach presented is currently being trialled in Australia.

  9. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the ESPDP is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. The results of the technical and licensing evaluations are presented in this report. The purpose, background, and organization of the ESPDP is delineated in Section 1. Section 11 contains flowcharts defining siting application requirements, environmental report requirements, and emergency planning/preparedness requirements for ALWRS. The licensing and technical review results are presented in Section III.

  10. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  11. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  12. Life Sciences Division Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us count theLienert namedLife Sciences

  13. Microbial metatranscriptomics in a permanent marine oxygen minimum zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank J.

    Simultaneous characterization of taxonomic composition, metabolic gene content and gene expression in marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) has potential to broaden perspectives on the microbial and biogeochemical dynamics ...

  14. adriatic sea marine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Biodiversity (Sponges and Invertebrates) in the Adriatic Sea in Rovinj (Croatia) CiteSeer Summary: Nature, especially the marine environment, provides the most...

  15. Analytical Framework to Evaluate Emission Control Systems for Marine Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaram, Varalakshmi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. , Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals. March 31stfrom a large ship diesel engine. Atmos. Environ. 2009, 43 (low-speed marine diesel engine. Aerosol Sci. Technol. 2007,

  16. Bacterial and Protozoal Contamination of Nearshore Marine Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwill, Rob; Conrad, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tate. Reducing microbial contamination in storm runoff fromManagement of microbial contamination in storm runoff fromBacterial and Protozoal Contamination of Nearshore Marine

  17. Turkey Marine Lubricants Market is Expected to Reach USD 177...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    base oil production is anticipated to hinder the overall market growth. As, Group I base oil form one of the impeccable raw materials required for manufacturing marine lubricants....

  18. MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haven, Kendall F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design Parameters Marine Biomass Production Sea Farmof Various Types of Biomass . Biomethanation Parameters.Proceedings, Fuels from Biomass Symposium. University of

  19. arctic marine sediments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be actively ventilated Poggiale, Jean-Christophe 65 The resistance of recent marine carbonate sediments to solution Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ? Lucina pensylvanica...

  20. Marine Natural Products: Synthesis, Niche Environments, and Chemical Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Laura Margaret

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    marine- derived antibiotics which displayed specificity for Gram-negative pathogens rather than acting as a broad spectrum antibiotic, Escherichia coli (

  1. arctic marine environment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Technology, Cambridge, MA Patrikalakis, Nicholas M. 4 UiT The Arctic University of Norway Fakultet for biovitenskap, fiskeri og konomi -Inst. for arktisk og marin biologi...

  2. Analytical Framework to Evaluate Emission Control Systems for Marine Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaram, Varalakshmi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    engines operating with heavy fuel oils. J. Aerosol Sci 1998,from high-sulfur heavy fuel oil to lower-sulfur marineHeavy Fuel Oil .

  3. Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from concept studies and component design research to prototype development and in-water device testing. This unprecedented level of funding will advance the ability of marine and...

  4. affects marine carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon fiber surface treatments, namely Polyhedral (more) Vinci, Chris J. 2010-01-01 2 Global Warming and Marine Carbon Cycle Feedbacks on Geosciences Websites Summary: Global...

  5. arctic marine oil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Other threats to Beaufort Sea marine bird populations include oil spills, global warming, coastal development, and contaminants. Certain threats can be managed at a local...

  6. Resolution of reservoir scale electrical anisotropy from marine CSEM data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the field data to accurately model potential reservoirs andreservoir scale electrical anisotropy from marine CSEM datathe reservoir target can be determined from seismic data or

  7. arctic marine food: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine Food Web: Trophic Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Perfluoroalkyl...

  8. Summary of New DOE-STD-1020-2011 NPH Analysis and Design Criteria...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EAC-Eng-author-title-8-11142011 Extreme straight-line wind, tornado, and hurricane design criteria of STD-1020-2011 are somewhat different from current criteria For...

  9. Site selection criteria in community shopping centers : implications for real estate developers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brubaker, Benjamin T., 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate retail site selection criteria in community centers and ascertain the implications of these criteria for the retail real estate developer. Historically, real estate developers ...

  10. Wind load comparison for the ASCE standard 7 and the Hanford site design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giller, R.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides calculations and discussions to compare Hanford Site wind load criteria with the current national standard for wind loads (ASCE 7, 1995). Site criteria uses the 1988 edition ASCE 7.

  11. Commissioning to Meet Space Qualification Criteria vs. Energy Consumption Optimization Focused Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sellers, D.; Irvine, L.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many cases, the commissioning process is driven by space quality criteria rather than by energy consumption and optimization criteria. This is especially true for the HVAC systems serving clean rooms in the semi-conductor and pharmaceuticals...

  12. Environmentally Benign and Permanent Modifications to Prevent Biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Zhang

    2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Semprus Biosciences is developing environmentally benign and permanent modifications to prevent biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Biofouling, including growth on external surfaces by bacteria, algae, barnacles, mussels, and other marine organisms, accumulate quickly on MHK devices, causing mechanical wear and changes in performance. Biofouling on crucial components of hydrokinetic devices, such as rotors, generators, and turbines, imposes substantial mass and hydrodynamic loading with associated efficiency loss and maintenance costs. Most antifouling coatings leach toxic ingredients, such as copper and tributyltin, through an eroding process, but increasingly stringent regulation of biocides has led to interest in the development of non-biocidal technologies to control fouling. Semprus Biosciences research team is developing modifications to prevent fouling from a broad spectrum of organisms on devices of all shapes, sizes, and materials for the life of the product. The research team designed and developed betaine-based polymers as novel underwater coatings to resist the attachment of marine organisms. Different betaine-based monomers and polymers were synthesized and incorporated within various coating formulations. The formulations and application methods were developed on aluminum panels with required adhesion strength and mechanical properties. The coating polymers were chemically stable under UV, hydrolytic and oxidative environments. The sulfobetaine formulations are applicable as nonleaching and stable underwater coatings. For the first time, coating formulations modified with highly packed sulfobetaine polymers were prepared and demonstrated resistance to a broad spectrum of marine organisms. Assays for comparing nonfouling performance were developed to evaluate protein adsorption and bacteria attachment. Barnacle settlement and removal were evaluated and a 60-day field test was performed. Silicone substrates including a commercial fouling release coating were used for comparison. Compared with the unmodified silicone substrates, the sulfobetaine-modified formulations were able to exhibit a 98% reduction in fibrinogen adsorption, 97.0% (E. coli), 99.6% (S. aureus), and 99.5% (C. lytica) reduction in bacteria attachment, and 100% reduction in barnacles cyprid attachment. In addition to the significant improvement in fouling resistance of various organisms, the 60-day field test also showed an evident efficacy from visual assessment, foul rating, and fouling removal test. The research confirmed that the novel antifouling mechanism of betaine polymers provides a new avenue for marine coating development. The developed coatings out-performed currently used nontoxic underwater coatings in a broad spectrum of fouling resistance. By further developing formulations and processing methods for specific devices, the technology is ready for the next stage of development with demonstration in MHK systems.

  13. POPULATION SIZE AND RECOVERY CRITERIA OF THE THREATENED LAKE ERIE WATERSNAKE: INTEGRATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Richard B.

    numbers at uncensused sites were included (total 5 443 adults). Other criteria for delisting the Lake Erie

  14. The role of siderophores in algal-bacterial interactions in the marine environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, Shady A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the phycosphere of microalgae? , Microb. Ecol. 53, 683-Manual on Harmful Marine Microalgae. (Hallegraeff, G. M. ,Manual on harmful marine microalgae, Vol. 11, UNESCO, Paris.

  15. The role of siderophores in algal-bacterial interactions in the marine environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, Shady Ahmed

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the phycosphere of microalgae? , Microb. Ecol. 53, 683-Manual on harmful marine microalgae, Vol. 11, UNESCO, Paris.Manual on Harmful Marine Microalgae. (Hallegraeff, G. M. ,

  16. Human dimensions perspectives on the impacts of coastal zone marine renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Conway, Flaxen; Hall-Arber, Madeleine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coastal zone marine renewable energy generation. REFERENCESOuter Continental Shelf Renewable Energy Space-Use ConflictsOF COASTAL ZONE MARINE RENEWABLE ENERGY Caroline Pomeroy,

  17. Development of Regional Coastal Ocean Observatories and the Potential Benefits to Marine Sanctuaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moline, Mark

    impacted on global and mesoscale processes in marine ecosystems through fishing, eutrophication, commercial marine sanctuaries, we must elucidate the synergistic interactions between global, mesoscale, and local

  18. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment...

  19. Marine Bio-Nanotechnology: High-Performance Materials from Sponge Silicatein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morse, Daniel E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title: Marine Bio-Nanotechnology: High-Performance MaterialsChemical Biology (2005); Nanotechnology Review (2005, 2006);Marine biotechnology; nanotechnology; sponge; silica;

  20. The Role of the Inner Product in Stopping Criteria for Conjugate Gradient Iterations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holst, Michael J.

    stopping criteria are derived for conjugate gradient (CG) methods, based on iteration parameters criteria, conjugate gradient methods, B-normal matrices 1 Introduction Unlike a direct method, an iterative1 The Role of the Inner Product in Stopping Criteria for Conjugate Gradient Iterations S. F. Ashby

  1. Design and implementation of a marine animal alert system to support Marine Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Fu, Tao; Ren, Huiying; Martinez, Jayson J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Matzner, Shari; Choi, Eric Y.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Power extracted from fast moving tidal currents has been identified as a potential commercial-scale source of renewable energy. Device developers and utilities are pursuing deployment of prototype tidal turbines to assess technology viability, site feasibility, and environmental interactions. Deployment of prototype turbines requires permits from a range of regulatory authorities. Ensuring the safety of marine animals, particularly those under protection of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) and the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 has emerged as a key regulatory challenge for initial MHK deployments. The greatest perceived risk to marine animals is from strike by the rotating blades of tidal turbines. Development of the marine mammal alert system (MAAS) was undertaken to support monitoring and mitigation requirements for tidal turbine deployments. The prototype system development focused on Southern Resident killer whales (SRKW), an endangered population of killer whales that frequents Puget Sound and is intermittently present in the part of the sound where deployment of prototype tidal turbines is being considered. Passive acoustics were selected as the primary means because of the vocal nature of these animals. The MAAS passive acoustic system consists of two-stage process involving the use of an energy detector and a spectrogram-based classifier to distinguish between SKRW’s calls and noise. A prototype consisting of two 2D symmetrical star arrays separated by 20 m center to center was built and evaluated in the waters of Sequim Bay using whale call playback.

  2. GORDON GUNTER NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER conducts fishery and marine resource research supporting NOAA's National Marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . GORDON GUNTER normally operates in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. NOAA Marine and Aviation Ship Displacement: 1,546 tons · Gross Tonnage: 1,904 (Int'l) 1486 (U.S.) · Net Tonnage: 971 tons (U Manufacturer: Markey o Model: COM-7 o Drive: Electric, 7.5 HP o Drum Capacity: 2000 m of .322 EM Cable o

  3. BULLETIN OF MARINE SCIENCE, 77(3): 409423, 2005 409Bulletin of Marine Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    of coastal marine ancestors. A key for the identification of the known species of Exumella is also included distribution and biogeography of the genus are also included. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zooplankton samples were of the Caribbean Basin, including the YP. One of these sites in the central part of the YP was positive

  4. Marine EM Reference Database http://marineemlab.ucsd.edu/~kkey/MarineEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key, Kerry

    ., Ellingsrud, S., and Ursin, B., 2006, De- composition of electromagnetic fields into upgoing and downgoing Underwater Cable System Tokai-SCANNER for Underwater Geophysical Monitoring Utilizing a Decommissioned to document the peer-reviewed published papers that cover any aspect of marine electromagnetic induction

  5. Water quality criteria for colored smokes: 1,4-diamino-2,3-dihydroanthraquinone: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, K.A.; Hovatter, P.S.; Ross, R.H.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The available data on the environmental fate, aquatic toxicity, and mammalian toxicity of 1,4-diamino-2,3-dihydroanthraquinone (DDA), and anthraquinone dye used in violet-colored smoke grenades, were reviewed. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guidelines were used in an attempt to generate water quality criteria for the protection of human health and of aquatic life and its uses. DDA will readily oxidize to 1,4-diaminoanthraquinone (DAA) in air or during combustion of the smoke grenade. The dye is insoluble in water; however, no information is available concerning its transformation or transport in soil, water, and sediments. No data are available concerning the toxic effects of DDA in aquatic organisms; therefore, a Criterion maximum Concentration and a Criterion Continuous Concentration cannot be determined. Toxicity studies following the USEPA guidelines are recommended. DDA is a weak mutagen in the Salmonella Reversin Assay, but the combustion or oxidation product, DAA is a strong mutagen in the same test. Violet smoke is noncarcinogenic in the SENCAR Mouse Skin Tumor Bioassay. 63 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. Water quality criteria for colored smokes: Solvent Green 3: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, K.A.; Hovatter, P.S.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The available data on the environmental fate, aquatic toxicity, and mammalian toxicity of Solvent Green 3, an anthraquinone dye used in colored smoke grenades, were reviewed. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guidelines were used in an attempt to generate water quality criteria for the protection of human health and of aquatic life and its uses. Sufficient data to determine the toxicity of Solvent Green 3 in freshwater aquatic organisms are lacking. The 96-hr TL/sub 50/ for Pimephales promelas is >100 mg/L. Solvent Green 3, at a concentration of 10 mg/L, causes a transient reduction in growth of the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum. No data are available concerning the chronic toxicity or bioaccumulation of Solvent Green 3 in aquatic organisms. No data are available on any of the toxicity parameters for Solvent Green 3 in humans. No data on the pharmacokinetics of Solvent Green 3 administered orally in laboratory animals are available. Solvent Green 3 has a low order of toxicity whether administered by the oral, dermal, or inhalation route. The acute oral LD/sub 50/ is >3.16 g/kg in rats, but may be as high as 15 g/kg, >1 g/kg in dogs, and 10 g/kg in rabbits. Sufficient pertinent data were not available for deriving a water quality criterion for the protection of human health. 83 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, wave energy conversion could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that, due to a lack of technical certainty, many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood,. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based assessment to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector in order to evaluate the potential impact of these technologies on the marine environment and navigation constraints. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental effects and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential range of technical attributes and potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders on the critical issues that need to be addressed. By identifying and addressing navigational and environmental concerns in the early stages of the industry’s development, serious mistakes that could potentially derail industry-wide development can be avoided. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory issues (Pacific Energy Ventures) and navigational issues (PCCI). The results of this study are structured into three reports: (1) Wave power scenario description (2) Tidal power scenario description (3) Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the first report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of wave power plants deployed in Humboldt County, California and Oahu, Hawaii. These two sites contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other wave power sites in the U.S. and serve as representative case studies. Wave power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize potential effects, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informed the process of selecting representative wave power devices. The selection criteria requires that devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties, and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. Table 1 summarizes the selected wave power technologies. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development, but are not directly mentioned here. Many environmental effects will largely scale with the size of the wave power plant. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) a small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial sc

  8. Marine asset security and tracking (MAST) system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, Gregory Richard (Clinton, TN); Smith, Stephen Fulton (Loudon, TN); Moore, Michael Roy (Corryton, TN); Dobson, Eric Lesley (Charleston, SC); Blair, Jeffrey Scott (Charleston, SC); Duncan, Christopher Allen (Marietta, GA); Lenarduzzi, Roberto (Knoxville, TN)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for marine asset security and tracking (MAST). A method includes transmitting identification data, location data and environmental state sensor data from a radio frequency tag. An apparatus includes a radio frequency tag that transmits identification data, location data and environmental state sensor data. Another method includes transmitting identification data and location data from a radio frequency tag using hybrid spread-spectrum modulation. Another apparatus includes a radio frequency tag that transmits both identification data and location data using hybrid spread-spectrum modulation.

  9. Seoul Marine Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformationScottsOklahoma: EnergySeoul Marine Co Ltd Jump to:

  10. Join HERO Mariners vs. Oakland A's

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin HERO Mariners vs. Texas Rangers Sunday

  11. Join HERO Mariners vs. Oakland A's

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin HERO Mariners vs. Texas Rangers

  12. Plymouth Marine Laboratory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, search Name:PipoPleasantonPlug SmartMarine

  13. Structural Determination of Marine Bacteriogenic Manganese Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900SteepStrengthening northernDetermination of Marine

  14. Marine Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconvertersourcesource HistoryMariani EnergyMarinaMarine

  15. Marin Energy Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group JumpNew Hampshire:Marin Energy Authority Jump to:

  16. Marine Hybrid Propulsion | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group JumpNew Hampshire:Marin Energy Authority

  17. Converting repository storage criteria into rules for materials conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, R.; Stegmaier, W. [Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center (Germany)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Productions of waste containers, waste forms and, consequently, waste packages are based on the regulations issued by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment and on the repository storage criteria of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection. Waste treatment facilities must install quality assurance systems and introduce detailed conditioning rules in order to verify these requirements. The conditioning rules incorporate descriptions of all conditioning steps as well as instructions to operators; they are laid down in conditioning manuals. By way of example, the procedure for evaporator concentrate cementation is outlined.

  18. Life Validation Testing Protocol Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Core Life Test Matrices - Minimal - limited by cells, channels, or chambers - Medium - additional conditions with one or two stress factors - Full Factorial - complete...

  19. Recycling and Life Cycle Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Sujit [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter addresses recycling and life cycle considerations related to the growing use of lightweight materials in vehicles. The chapter first addresses the benefit of a life cycle perspective in materials choice, and the role that recycling plays in reducing energy inputs and environmental impacts in a vehicle s life cycle. Some limitations of life cycle analysis and results of several vehicle- and fleet-level assessments are drawn from published studies. With emphasis on lightweight materials such as aluminum, magnesium, and polymer composites, the status of the existing recycling infrastructure and technological challenges being faced by the industry also are discussed.

  20. Profiling clouds' inner life | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    life Released: May 29, 2014 Subgrid modeling pinpoints cloud transformation to uncover true reflective power An accurate understanding of clouds over the ocean is important for...

  1. REVIEW Open Access Toxic marine microalgae and shellfish poisoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Graeme

    REVIEW Open Access Toxic marine microalgae and shellfish poisoning in the British isles: history The relationship between toxic marine microalgae species and climate change has become a high profile and well examine the current state of toxic microalgae species around the UK, in two ways: first we describe

  2. Navy-ship plastic waste recycled into marine pilings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March, F.A. [Seaward International Inc., Clearbrook, VA (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seaward International Inc., developed a new, composite, structurally reinforced, plastic-composite marine piling fabricated from 100 percent recycled plastic. A cooperative research program was begun in 1995 between the Navy and Seaward to develop a use for Navy ships waste plastic as a core in the construction of the marine piling.

  3. CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

  4. Characteristics of cyclic AMP transport by marine bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, J.W.; Azam, F.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uptake and autoradiography experiments with natural populations of marine bacteria, sea water cultures, and cultured isolates showed that the high-affinity cyclic AMP transport system in marine bacteria has stringent structural requirements, is found in a minority of cells in mixed bacterial assemblages, and appears to be related to the culture growth state.

  5. Marine Biofilm Bacteria Evade Eukaryotic Predation by Targeted Chemical Defense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcilwain, Jenny

    for Environmental Biotechnology (to S.K. and C.M.) and by the Centre for Marine Bio-Innovation of the University5 , Staffan Kjelleberg1 1 School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences and Centre for Marine, Guam, United States of America, 5 School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences and Centre

  6. ON CONDITION MONITORING OF EXHAUST VALVES IN MARINE DIESEL ENGINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    ON CONDITION MONITORING OF EXHAUST VALVES IN MARINE DIESEL ENGINES T. L. Fog x L. K. Hansen z , J : Research & Development, MAN B&W Diesel A/S Teglholmsgade 41, DK­2450, Copenhagen SV, Denmark. E­mail: tof­invasive characterisation of ex­ haust valve conditions in large marine diesel engines, were exper­ imentally investigated

  7. IMPLEMENTING MARINE PROTECTED AREAS POLICY: LESSONS FROM CANADA AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i IMPLEMENTING MARINE PROTECTED AREAS POLICY: LESSONS FROM CANADA AND AUSTRALIA by Jodi Stark B: Implementing Marine Protected Areas Policy: Lessons From Canada And Australia Report No. 369 Examining Management Simon Fraser University Date Approved: #12;iii Abstract Canada's Oceans Act and Australia's Oceans

  8. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Graeme

    .g. to expend energy and/or time) so that some kind of ben- efit can be obtained (e.g. improved ranking or exclu, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK 3 National Marine Park of Zakynthos, 1 El. Venizelou Street, 29100 Zakynthos, Greece 4 · Sequential assessment · Evolutionary stable strategy · Territory · Marine · Vertebrate · Reptile Resale

  9. RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 10 Marine Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RETURN TO THE RIVER - 2000 Chapter 10 Marine Environment 367367 Return to Table of Contents Go to Next Chapter CHAPTER 10. THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT "Some might be tempted to attribute all changes that environment allows, management interventions are more important when the ocean environment reduces natural

  10. VOlume 20 Number 3 2004 THE JOURNAL OF MARINE EDUCATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, Mark H.

    VOlume 20 · Number 3 · 2004 THE JOURNAL OF MARINE EDUCATION MARINE PROTECTED AREAS 13 Zoning.g., Yellowstone, Yosemite) in which ecosystems are protected to preserve their natural biodiversity, ecological minimum portion of a stock and provide a "control area" which, when compared to less- protected

  11. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poulin, Robert

    . An increased impact of parasites on amphipod popula- tions with global warming is predicted and the possibleMARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 415: 11­22, 2010 doi: 10.3354/meps08742, particularly global warming, on parasitism should be of major concern. Probably the best-studied marine

  12. Z .Marine Chemistry 74 2001 1528 www.elsevier.nlrlocatermarchem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    Z .Marine Chemistry 74 2001 15­28 www.elsevier.nlrlocatermarchem An intercomparison of small a a ( )Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry MS 25 , Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA that is pro- duced continuously in seawater from its soluble par- Z 9 .ent, uranium-238 t s4.47=10 years

  13. Comparison of PMSG and DFIG for Marine Current Turbine Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Comparison of PMSG and DFIG for Marine Current Turbine Applications S. Benelghali, M.E.H. Benbouzid and J.F. Charpentier Abstract--Emerging technologies for marine current turbine are mainly relevant to works that have been carried out on wind turbines and ship propellers. It is then obvious that many

  14. Nanotechnology for Life Sciences Vol. 4: Nanodevices for Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, William O.

    Nanotechnology for Life Sciences Vol. 4: Nanodevices for Life Sciences Protein-based nanotechnology such as semiconductors into functional materials.11,12 Another example of protein based nanotechnology is the push in nanotechnology18,19 and on applications of kinesin motors in microscale transport.4 Finally, there is a paralle

  15. Safety-related operator actions: methodology for developing criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozinsky, E.J.; Gray, L.H.; Beare, A.N.; Barks, D.B.; Gomer, F.E.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a methodology for developing criteria for design evaluation of safety-related actions by nuclear power plant reactor operators, and identifies a supporting data base. It is the eleventh and final NUREG/CR Report on the Safety-Related Operator Actions Program, conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The operator performance data were developed from training simulator experiments involving operator responses to simulated scenarios of plant disturbances; from field data on events with similar scenarios; and from task analytic data. A conceptual model to integrate the data was developed and a computer simulation of the model was run, using the SAINT modeling language. Proposed is a quantitative predictive model of operator performance, the Operator Personnel Performance Simulation (OPPS) Model, driven by task requirements, information presentation, and system dynamics. The model output, a probability distribution of predicted time to correctly complete safety-related operator actions, provides data for objective evaluation of quantitative design criteria.

  16. Packaging design criteria modified fuel spacer burial box. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, P.F.

    1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Various Hanford facilities must transfer large radioactively contaminated items to burial/storage. Presently, there are eighteen Fuel Spacer Burial Boxes (FSBBs) available on the Hanford Site for transport of such items. Previously, the FSBBS were transported from a rail car to the burial trench via a drag-off operation. To allow for the lifting of the boxes into the burial trench, it will be necessary to improve the packagings lifting attachments and provide structural reinforcement. Additional safety improvements to the packaging system will be provided by the addition of a positive closure system and package ventilation. FSBBs that are modified in such a manner are referred to as Modified Fuel Spacer Burial Boxes (MFSBs). The criteria provided by this PDC will be used to demonstrate that the transfer of the MFSB will provide an equivalent degree of safety as would be provided by a package meeting offsite transportation requirements. This fulfills the onsite transportation safety requirements implemented in WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping. A Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) will be prepared to evaluate the safety of the transfer operation. Approval of the SARP is required to authorize transfer. Criteria are also established to ensure burial requirements are met.

  17. Standard guide for design criteria for plutonium gloveboxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This guide defines criteria for the design of glovebox systems to be used for the handling of plutonium in any chemical or physical form or isotopic composition or when mixed with other elements or compounds. Not included in the criteria are systems auxiliary to the glovebox systems such as utilities, ventilation, alarm, and waste disposal. Also not addressed are hot cells or open-face hoods. The scope of this guide excludes specific license requirements relating to provisions for criticality prevention, hazards control, safeguards, packaging, and material handling. Observance of this guide does not relieve the user of the obligation to conform to all federal, state, and local regulations for design and construction of glovebox systems. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety problems, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user...

  18. Reduction of risk to the marine environment from oilfield chemicals - balancing environmental and technical needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Neill, J.E.; Hill, D.G.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The study argues that the regulation of offshore use of hazardous chemicals for oilfield stimulation and Completion applications is an important but not a total solution to reduce marine pollution from offshore sources. The aim of the study is to demonstrate that for a complete solution, chemical reformulation must be considered hand-in-band with improved operational practices to provide a maximum effect on overall risk reduction. The study is directed at one major service company`s approach to the whole issue of chemical management in the 1990s, based mainly on North Sea experience in cementing, drilling fluid and stimulation activities. Oilfield chemicals are incorporated into a fluid design to solve a specific technical problem in a well, such as well completion, stimulation and damage removal. While it is desirable to replace all the harmful chemicals, the practicalities of doing so are limited if the industry is to continue to produce efficiently. Other alternatives need consideration. By their very chemistry, some chemicals have primary active ingredients which may be harmful if discharged into the environment. Improving the characteristics of chemicals to marine life requires the change of previously acceptable products, such as the elimination of banned materials as well as incorporating components with reduced toxicity and greater biodegradability. The idealistic goal is the immediate replacement of all chemicals by nontoxic, biodegrade alternatives; the practical solution is replacement reformulation where possible and the improved isolation the oilwell and marine environments through improvements in continuous-mix technology along with reduction of the chemicals by better job design.

  19. Potential economic impact of sediment quality criteria on the Army Corps of Engineers O and M dredging program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiley, M.C.; Lunz, J.; Thompson, T.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency has requested public comment on the first five sediment quality criteria (SQC) for the protection of benthic organisms. Aquatic sediments are a sink for water column contaminants that become a source of contamination and adverse effects on benthic organisms, aquatic life, and benthic supported food chains. The proposed criteria are an effort to assess the severity and extent of contamination for risk assessment and remediation, predict future contamination, and prevent contamination in uncontaminated sites. An unanswered question has been the potential economic impact of the SQC implementation on federal regulatory programs involved in aquatic resource protection, contaminated sediment remediation, and dredging and disposal of aquatic sediments. The potential costs have been of primary concern for the Corps of Engineers operation and maintenance dredging program which removes 300 million cubic yards of aquatic sediments from harbors, channels, etc. each year. Sediments found to be contaminated may have to undergo special handling/management practices which add costs to both dredging and disposal. EPA`s goal was to determine the increased percentage of dredged material requiring special handling/management if the SQC were applied under several scenarios, and thus the potential cost increase to dredging programs. The report is a basis for dialogue on the most environmentally and economically sound implementation of the SOC in the dredging program.

  20. Life Choices Student Survey Items

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    by Topical Area: Life Choices Berea-Specific Entering Survey, Fall Term First-Year Students and New Transfers for life-long learning Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP), Entering Fall Term Students 2012, Historical Trends) Please indicate the extent to which each of the following describe you Searching

  1. CONSTRUCTING VIRTUAL HUMAN LIFE SIMULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallmann, Marcelo

    , Virtual Environments, Behavioral Animation, Object Interaction, Python. 1. INTRODUCTION Virtual humanCONSTRUCTING VIRTUAL HUMAN LIFE SIMULATIONS Marcelo Kallmann, Etienne de Sevin and Daniel Thalmann human life simulations. Our main goal is to have virtual human actors living and working autonomously

  2. LIFE SCIENCES & MISSOURI'S ECONOMIC FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    laws and result in civil and/or criminal penalties. #12;Final Report Life Sciences & Missouri their complementary life science efforts. If Missouri fails to join with private sector partners and others from and identified the strategies and actions to address these gaps. What faces Missouri today is this simple fact

  3. Life Cycle Asset Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    (The following directives are deleted or consolidated into this Order and shall be phased out as noted in Paragraph 2: DOE 1332.1A; DOE 4010.1A; DOE 4300.1C; DOE 4320.1B; DOE 4320.2A; DOE 4330.4B; DOE 4330.5; DOE 4540.1C; DOE 4700.1). This Order supersedes specific project management provisions within DOE O 430.1A, LIFE CYCLE ASSET MANAGEMENT. The specific paragraphs canceled by this Order are 6e(7); 7a(3); 7b(11) and (14); 7c(4),(6),(7),(11), and (16); 7d(4) and (8); 7e(3),(10), and (17); Attachment 1, Definitions (item 30 - Line Item Project, item 42 - Project, item 48 - Strategic System); and Attachment 2, Contractor Requirements Document (paragraph 1d regarding a project management system). The remainder of DOE O 430.1A remains in effect. Cancels DOE O 430.1. Canceled by DOE O 413.3.

  4. Bacterial and Protozoal Contamination of Nearshore Marine Environments in California, with Ecologically Sustainable Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwill, Edward R.; Conrad, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title: Reducing microbial contamination in runoff fromBacterial and Protozoal Contamination of Nearshore Marine

  5. Power Smoothing Control in a Grid-Connected Marine Current Turbine System for Compensating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    similar principles in wind generation systems can be applied in marine current turbine (MCT) systems due

  6. Evaluation of defatted and whole algae as feed ingredients for the marine shrimp, litopenaeus vannamei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, J. L. [Texas A& M University; Patnaik, S. [Texas A& M University; Gatlin, III, D. M. [Texas A& M University; Lawrence, A. L. [Texas A& M University

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of defatted and whole algae as feed ingredients for the marine shrimp, litopenaeus vannamei

  7. Public Preferences for Marine Protected Areas Off the U.S. West Coast: The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Protected Areas to "help protect the significant natural and cultural resources within the marinePublic Preferences for Marine Protected Areas Off the U.S. West Coast: The Significance 2014 #12;#12;Public Preferences for Marine Protected Areas Off the U.S. West Coast: The Significance

  8. Droit de l'Environnement marin 1. Qu'est ce que le littoral marin ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boudouresque, Charles F.

    1681 · Code napoléon 1804 · XIX siècle :théorie de l'antipropriétarisme · XX siècle :développement du renouvellement urbain, création des SCOT) Code de l'Environnement, révision (janvier-février 2004) Loi cadre de l Mise en Valeur de laMer) Loi ...parcs nationaux, parcs naturels marins... (14 avril 2006) Principales

  9. Using multiple-criteria methods to evaluate community partitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cazabet, Remy; Takeda, Hideaki

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Community detection is one of the most studied problems on complex networks. Although hundreds of methods have been proposed so far, there is still no universally accepted formal definition of what is a good community. As a consequence, the problem of the evaluation and the comparison of the quality of the solutions produced by these algorithms is still an open question, despite constant progress on the topic. In this article, we investigate how using a multi-criteria evaluation can solve some of the existing problems of community evaluation, in particular the question of multiple equally-relevant solutions of different granularity. After exploring several approaches, we introduce a new quality function, called MDensity, and propose a method that can be related both to a widely used community detection metric, the Modularity, and to the Precision/Recall approach, ubiquitous in information retrieval.

  10. Swing Check Valve Design Criteria and CFD Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallstream, Brian E.; Fricke, Brian A.; Becker, Bryan R. [University of Missouri-Kansas City (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides information on swing check valve selection criteria suitable for nuclear power plant applications. In this project, four swing check valves were analyzed to demonstrate the implementation and application of this information. In this example, swing check valves were selected according to 'ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III' and 'ASME B16.34, Valves Flanged, Threaded, and Welding End'. This paper also discusses the utilization of Computational Fluid Dynamics Software (CFD) as a means to analyze valve design. The use of CFD is a relatively new approach for validation of valve design that is becoming invaluable due to the high cost of physical bench testing. The Instrument Society of America (ISA) Analysis Division and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Computational Fluid Dynamics Technical Committee have taken a proactive approach in setting standards and practices for the use of CFD in design and validation. (authors)

  11. Design criteria Drain Rerouting Project 93-OR-EW-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the design criteria to be used by the architect-engineer (A--E) in the performance of Title I and II design for the Drain Rerouting Project. The Drain Rerouting project at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee will provide the Y-12 Plant with the capability to reroute particular drains within buildings 9202, 9203 and 9995. Process drains that are presently connected to the storm sewer shall be routed to the sanitary sewer to ensure that any objectionable material inadvertently discharged into process drains will not discharge to East Fork Popular Creek (EFPC) without treatment. The project will also facilitate compliance with the Y-12 Plant`s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge permit and allow for future pretreatment of once-through coolant.

  12. Ignition quality determination of marine diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulder, O.L.; Glavincevski, B.; Kassinger, R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ignition quality of heavy marine diesel fuels is considered to be an important parameter. The standard procedures used to quantify this parameter for distillate fuels are not applicable to residual fuels. Proton NMR Spectroscopy was demonstrated to be an effective tool to characterize the ''global'' fuel composition of commercially available fuels covering a wide range of ignition quality. Proton NMR data from these fuels were used to determine a cetane number (CNp) for the heavy fuels using procedures previously reported for distillate fuels. The validity of this instrumental technique for determining CNp was corroborated by actual ASTM D 613 engine tests on a number of commercially available fuels, run as blends with secondary reference fuels. Viscosity and density values of the analyzed heavy fuels were regressed against predicted cetane numbers to obtain a correlation expression.

  13. MAGIC: Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, ER; Wiscombe, WJ; Albrecht, BA; Bland, GL; Flagg, CN; Klein, SA; Kollias, P; Mace, G; Reynolds, RM; Schwartz, SE; Siebesma, AP; Teixeira, J; Wood, R; Zhang, M

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF2) will be deployed aboard the Horizon Lines cargo container ship merchant vessel (M/V) Spirit for MAGIC, the Marine ARM GPCI1 Investigation of Clouds. The Spirit will traverse the route between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii, from October 2012 through September 2013 (except for a few months in the middle of this time period when the ship will be in dry dock). During this field campaign, AMF2 will observe and characterize the properties of clouds and precipitation, aerosols, and atmospheric radiation; standard meteorological and oceanographic variables; and atmospheric structure. There will also be two intensive observational periods (IOPs), one in January 2013 and one in July 2013, during which more detailed measurements of the atmospheric structure will be made.

  14. Life-cycle costing manual for the federal energy management programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruegg, R.T.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual is a guide to understanding the life-cycle costing method and an aid to calculating the measures required for evaluating energy conservation and renewable energy investments in all Federal buildings. It expands upon the life-cycle costing criteria contained in the Program Rules of the Federal Energy Management Program (Subpart A of Part 436, Title 10, U.S. Code of Federal Regulations) and is consistent with those criteria. Its purpose is to facilitate the implementation of the Program Rules by explaining the life-cycle costing method, defining the measures, describing the assumptions and procedures to follow in performing evaluations, and giving examples. It provides worksheets, a computer program, and instructions for calculating the required measurements. The life-cycle costing method and evaluation procedures set forth in the Federal Energy Management Program Rules and described in greater detail in this guide are to be followed by all Federal agenecies for all energy conservation and renewable energy projects undertaken in new and existing buildings and facilities owned or leased by the Federal government, unless specifically exempted. The establishment of the methods and procedures and their use by Federal agencies to evaluate energy conservation and solar energy investments are required by Section 381(a)(2) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6361(a)(2); by Section 10 of Presidential Executive Order 11912, amended; and by Title V of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, 92 Stat. 3275.

  15. Life Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David; Krishnan, Nikhil

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reichl, H. “Life cycle inventory analysis and identificationAllen, D.T. ; “Life cycle inventory development for waferLife Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip Sarah Boyd and David

  16. Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Sarah B.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    yield. A hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) model is used;more accurate life-cycle assessment (LCA) of electronicthe purposes of life-cycle assessment (LCA). While it may be

  17. Recognition Policy-1 SORORITY LIFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    Recognition Policy- 1 & FRATERNITY SORORITY LIFE RECOGNITION POLICY 2013 #12;Recognition Policy- 2 RECOGNITION POLICY FOR FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY DEFINITION Recognition to be granted or rescinded. For the purpose of this recognition policy, the terms "fraternity" and "sorority

  18. Compilation of selected marine radioecological data for the US Subseabed Program: Summaries of available radioecological concentration factors and biological half-lives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, L.S.; Marietta, M.G.; Jackson, D.W.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Subseabed Disposal Program has compiled an extensive concentration factor and biological half-life data base from the international marine radioecological literature. A microcomputer-based data management system has been implemented to provide statistical and graphic summaries of these data. The data base is constructed in a manner which allows subsets to be sorted using a number of interstudy variables such as organism category, tissue/organ category, geographic location (for in situ studies), and several laboratory-related conditions (e.g., exposure time and exposure concentration). This report updates earlier reviews and provides summaries of the tabulated data. In addition to the concentration factor/biological half-life data base, we provide an outline of other published marine radioecological works. Our goal is to present these data in a form that enables those concerned with predictive assessment of radiation dose in the marine environment to make a more judicious selection of data for a given application. 555 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Mapping of complex marine environments using an unmanned surface craft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leedekerken, Jacques Chadwick

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent technology has combined accurate GPS localization with mapping to build 3D maps in a diverse range of terrestrial environments, but the mapping of marine environments lags behind. This is particularly true in shallow ...

  20. Unified command and control for heterogeneous marine sensing networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Henrik

    Successful command and control (C2) of autonomous vehicles poses challenges that are unique to the marine environment, primarily highly restrictive acoustic communications throughput. To address this, the Unified C2 ...

  1. Contributed Paper Investigating Potential for Depensation in Marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    dynamics where rarity is increas- §email b.j.godley@exeter.ac.uk Paper submitted August 21, 2008; revised. D. BELL, J. M. BLUMENTHAL, A. C. BRODERICK, AND B. J. GODLEY § Marine Turtle Research Group

  2. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohmann, Kenneth J.

    .g. Dawson et al. 2005, Godley et al. 2010, White et al. 2010, Casabianca et al. 2012). For decades, marine of currents has led biologists © Inter-Research 2012 · www.int-res.com*Email: sabrina

  3. Norm G. Hall Western Australian Marine Research laboratories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norm G. Hall Western Australian Marine Research laboratories Perth, Western Australia 6020, Western Australia. 61 50. Australia Ian C. Potter* School of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Murdoch University. Murdoch, Western Australia. 6 J50, Australia Comparisons between generalized growth

  4. Mapping cumulative noise from shipping to inform marine spatial planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Marine Science and Technology, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845, Australia System, AIS), cumulative underwater acoustic energy from shipping was mapped throughout 2008 in the west

  5. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 389: 271­294, 2009 doi: 10.3354/meps08153, partly by mining a wealth of in- formation painstakingly accumulated over past decades on species

  6. Marine vertical cable multiple attenuation beyond up/down separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tran, Andre

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine vertical cable acquisition is an emerging technology. It represents an alternative to surface seismic acquisition in areas congested by platforms or other obstacles. The vertical cable acquisition consists of recording pressure at several...

  7. ARMY, MARINE CORPS, NAVY, AIR FORCE MULTISERVICE TACTICS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ARMY, MARINE CORPS, NAVY, AIR FORCE MULTISERVICE TACTICS, TECHNIQUES, AND PROCEDURES Development and Integration T. L. DAVISON THOMAS J. LOFTUS Captain, US Navy Major General, USAF, MC, CFS Acting Assistant Surgeon General Navy Warfare Development Command Health Care Operations Office

  8. UNIT TYPE MILITARY PROVIDES IIT PROVIDES (Navy/Marines)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    UNIT TYPE MILITARY PROVIDES IIT PROVIDES Naval (Navy/Marines) 4 year­Type 1 Full tuition and fees. Room and board* for all 4 years. Navy (Must be currently enlisted personnel) STA-21 Seaman to Admiral

  9. Mitochondrial genomics and northwestern Atlantic population genetics of marine annelids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennings, Robert M. (Robert Michael)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching goal of this thesis was to investigate marine benthic invertebrate phylogenetics and population genetics, focused on the phylum Annelida. Recent expansions of molecular methods and the increasing diversity ...

  10. Protocols for the Equitable Assessment of Marine Energy Converters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingram, David; Smith, George; Bittencourt-Ferreira, Claudio; Smith, Helen

    This book contains the suite of protocols for the equitable evaluation of marine energy converters (based on either tidal or wave energy) produced by the EquiMar consortium led by the University of Edinburgh. These protocols ...

  11. Greta Smith Aeby Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Greta Smith Aeby Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology PO Box 1346 Kaneohe, HI 96744 Work, TM, Forsman, Rogers, A, Sanciangco, J, Sheppard, A, Sheppard, C, Smith, J, Stuart, S, Turak, E, Veron, J, Wallace, C

  12. Managing for ocean biodiversity to sustain marine ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palumbi, Stephen R.; Sandifer, Paul A.; Allan, J. David; Beck, Michael W.; Fautin, Daphne G.; Fogarty, Michael J.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Incze, Lewis S.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.; Norse, Elliott; Stachowicz, John J.; Wall, Diana H.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing a complex ecosystem to balance delivery of all of its services is at the heart of ecosystem-based management. But how can this balance be accomplished amidst the conflicting demands of stakeholders, managers, and policy makers? In marine...

  13. Field Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Investigations And Temperature-Gradient Drilling At Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center (Mcagcc), Twenty-Nine Palms, Ca Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  14. Auxiliary metabolic genes in viruses infecting marine cyanobacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Luke Richard

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine viruses shape the diversity and biogeochemical role of their microbial hosts. Cyanophages that infect the cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus often carry metabolic genes not found in other bacteriophages. ...

  15. Computational Analysis of Merchant Marine GPS Data* CASOS Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    . Keywords: Geospatial analysis, network analysis, clustering * This work was supported in partComputational Analysis of Merchant Marine GPS Data* CASOS Technical Report George B. Davis ISRI - Institute for Software Research International CASOS - Center for Computational Analysis

  16. Iron limitation and the role of Siderophores in marine Synechococcus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivers, Adam R. (Adam Reid)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine cyanobacteria in the genus Synechococcus are widely distributed and contribute significantly to global primary productivity. In many parts of the ocean their growth is limited by a lack of iron, an essential nutrient ...

  17. Metatranscriptomic analysis of autonomously collected and preserved marine bacterioplankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottesen, Elizabeth

    Planktonic microbial activity and community structure is dynamic, and can change dramatically on time scales of hours to days. Yet for logistical reasons, this temporal scale is typically under-sampled in the marine ...

  18. Marine Corps Leadership Lessons for the Workplace: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiechmann, Jeff R.

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Marine Corps is a military organization and institution recognized for the past 236 years as the nation’s finest fighting force. Their structure, traditions, and approach to leadership are emulated worldwide as the model...

  19. Microbial production and consumption of marine dissolved organic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Jamie William

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine phytoplankton are the principal producers of oceanic dissolved organic matter (DOM), the organic substrate responsible for secondary production by heterotrophic microbes in the sea. Despite the importance of DOM in ...

  20. Design of a Computerized Energy Management System for Marine Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, B. D.; Perry, L. W.; Gerloff, G. W.; Heller, R. P.; Pankonien, G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer-based energy management system for marine applications is presented. The problem of fuel-management for large diesel engines on board ship is discussed. The design of the computer hardware and software are presented including...

  1. Genomes of marine cyanopodoviruses reveal multiple origins of diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labrie, Simon J.

    The marine cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus are highly abundant in the global oceans, as are the cyanophage with which they co-evolve. While genomic analyses have been relatively extensive for cyanomyoviruses, ...

  2. Collaborative multi-vehicle localization and mapping in marine environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, J. F.

    This paper explains an application scenario of collaborative multi-vehicle simultaneous localization and mapping algorithm (CSLAM) in a marine environment using autonomous surface crafts (ASCs) in order to validate its ...

  3. Characteristics of a Marine Stratocumulus to Cumulus Cloud Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapalac, Allison

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The studies in this thesis aim to improve the overall understanding of the characteristics of the marine stratocumulus to shallow cumulus transition over the southeast Pacific Ocean. This study uses observations from CloudSat and CALIPSO satellite...

  4. MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haven, Kendall F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that the use of sewage as a kelp nutrient source can, in theused to enrich the kelp with nutrient rich deep ocean water.Supplements Marine Kelp C0 2 Water/ Nutrients Production

  5. MARINE KELP: ENERGY RESOURCE IN THE COASTAL ZONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be r--+ Marine Kelp C0 2 Water/ Nutrients Production Systemabundance of nutrient-rich water needed for kelp growth andand nutrient levels. While artificial upwelling may sup- port increased biological production in the kelp

  6. Chemical Composition and Cloud Nucleation Ability of Marine Aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Chunhua

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is focused on the chemical composition and cloud nucleation ability of marine aerosol based on two cruise researches over Pacific Ocean and North Atlantic Ocean respectively. Implications of CLAW hypothesis and the factors influencing its...

  7. Curriculum Vitae Christien Laber Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , B.S., Marine Science, summa cum laude Internships: 2010: Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU: Induction into Phi Sigma Tau ­ International Philosophy Honors Society 2008: Induction into Rider University

  8. Design of a Computerized Energy Management System for Marine Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, B. D.; Perry, L. W.; Gerloff, G. W.; Heller, R. P.; Pankonien, G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer-based energy management system for marine applications is presented. The problem of fuel-management for large diesel engines on board ship is discussed. The design of the computer hardware and software are presented including...

  9. Harvesting Energy from the Marine Sediment-Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, I. Gary

    , New Jersey 08901 Pairs of platinum mesh or graphite fiber-based electrodes, one embedded in marine by seawater batteries, it is calculated that optimized power supplies based on the phenomenon demonstrated

  10. Infrastructure for large-scale tests in marine autonomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hummel, Robert A. (Robert Andrew)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the development of infrastructure for research with large-scale autonomous marine vehicle fleets and the design of sampling trajectories for compressive sensing (CS). The newly developed infrastructure ...

  11. The marine biogeochemistry of dissolved and colloidal iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica Nicole

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron is a redox active trace metal micronutrient essential for primary production and nitrogen acquisition in the open ocean. Dissolved iron (dFe) has extremely low concentrations in marine waters that can drive phytoplankton ...

  12. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Alumni Organization With a special presentation. Agricultural Research and Extension Center With updates from: Alan Grant, Dean, College of Agriculture and Life

  13. Functional requirements and technical criteria for the 241-SY-101 RAPID mitigation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ERHART, M.F.

    1999-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides functional, performance, and design criteria for the RAPID Mitigation System. In addition, critical interface, design assumptions, and analytical requirements are identified.

  14. Brittle Failure Design Criteria for Ductile Cast Iron Spent-Fuel

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for Ductile and Brittle Failure Design Criteria for Ductile Cast Iron Spent-Fuel Shipping Containers This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an...

  15. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regnier, Cindy

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    including cost, energy and thermal comfort analysis, whichfor greatest energy benefits, prioritize thermal comfortSetting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use

  16. Iridium in marine organisms from the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Mona Cara

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plants. The marine biosphere can be dismissed as an immediate Ir source for K-T boundary sediments, however a gradual process involving carbonate dissolution should not be ruled out. ACKNOWLEDG~ I thank Dr. B. J, Presley for serving as my committee.... DISCUSSION, . 41 44 50 Bioaccumulation of Ir in Marine Organisms. Iridium at the K-T Boundary: Two Possible Crustal Sources. . . . . . CONCLUSIONS . . 50 55 65 REFERENCES . . APPENDIX A. APPENDIX B, APPENDIX C APPENDIX D. 67 74 76 77 79...

  17. Report for Natural England in fulfilment of contract MAR09-02-004 Methods for managing Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    for establishing and managing a marine protected area system in the UK. Report for Natural England. 49 pages MCS Marine Conservation Society MNR Marine Nature Reserve MPA Marine Protected Area MSP Marine Spatial Conservation Area WCPA World Commission on Protected Areas WWF World Wide Fund for Nature #12;- 3 - Contents

  18. Performance objectives and criteria for conducting DOE environmental audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the Performance Objectives and Criteria (POC) that have been developed for environmental audits and assessments conducted by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. The Environmental POC can serve multiple purposes. Primarily, they are to serve as guidelines for the technical specialists conducted the audits and assessments, and for the team management. The POC can also serve as supporting documents for training of technical discipline specialists and Team Leaders and as bases for DOE programs and field offices and contractors conducting audit or assessment activities or improving environmental protection programs. It must be recognized that not all of the POC will necessarily apply to all DOE facilities. The users of this document must rely upon their knowledge of the facility and their professional judgment, or the judgment of qualified environmental professionals to determine the applicability of each POC. The POC cover eleven technical disciplines: air; surface water and drinking water quality; groundwater; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; radiation; quality assurance; inactive waste sites and releases; ecological and cultural resources; the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); and environmental management systems.

  19. Hazard classification criteria for non-nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahn, J.A.; Walker, S.A.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories` Integrated Risk Management Department has developed a process for establishing the appropriate hazard classification of a new facility or operation, and thus the level of rigor required for the associated authorization basis safety documentation. This process is referred to as the Preliminary Hazard Screen. DOE Order 5481.1B contains the following hazard classification for non-nuclear facilities: high--having the potential for onsite or offsite impacts to large numbers of persons or for major impacts to the environment; moderate--having the potential for considerable onsite impacts but only minor offsite impacts to people or the environment; low--having the potential for only minor onsite and negligible offsite impacts to people or the environment. It is apparent that the application of such generic criteria is more than likely to be fraught with subjective judgment. One way to remove the subjectivity is to define health and safety classification thresholds for specific hazards that are based on the magnitude of the hazard, rather than on a qualitative assessment of possible accident consequences. This paper presents the results of such an approach to establishing a readily usable set of non-nuclear facility hazard classifications.

  20. Labs21 Environmental Performance Criteria: Toward 'LEED (trademark) for Labs'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Lintner, William; Wirdzek, Phil

    2002-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory facilities present a unique challenge for energy efficient and sustainable design, with their inherent complexity of systems, health and safety requirements, long-term flexibility and adaptability needs, energy use intensity, and environmental impacts. The typical laboratory is about three to five times as energy intensive as a typical office building and costs about three times as much per unit area. In order to help laboratory stakeholders assess the environmental performance of their laboratories, the Labs21 program, sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy, is developing the Environmental Performance Criteria (EPC), a point-based rating system that builds on the LEED(TM) rating system. Currently, LEED(TM) is the primary tool used to rate the sustainability of commercial buildings. However, it lacks some attributes essential to encouraging the application of sustainable design principles to laboratory buildings. Accordingly, the EPC has additions and modifications to the prerequisites and credits in each of the six sections of LEED(TM). It is being developed in a consensus-based approach by a diverse group of architects, engineers, consulting experts, health & safety personnel and facilities personnel. This report describes the EPC version 2.0, highlighting the underlying technical issues, and describes implications for the development of a LEED version for Laboratories.

  1. Criteria for mixing rules application for inhomogeneous astrophysical grains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napoleon Maron; Olaf Maron

    2008-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis presented in this paper verifies which of the mixing rules are best for real components of interstellar dust in possible wide range of wavelengths.The DDA method with elements of different components with various volume fractions has been used. We have considered 6 materials: ice, amorphous carbon, graphite, SiC, silicates and iron, and the following mixing rules: Maxwell-Garnett, Bruggeman, Looyenga, Hanay and Lichtenecker which must satisfy rigorous bounds. The porous materials have also been considered. We have assumed simplified spatial distribution, shape and size of inclusions. The criteria given by \\citet{draine1988} have been used to determine the range of wavelengths for the considered mixtures in order to calculate the ${\\rm Q_{ext}}$ using the DDA. From all chosen mixing rules for the examined materials in majority of cases (13 out of 20) the best results have been obtained using the Lichtenecker mixing rule. In 5 cases this rule is better for some volume fraction of inclusions.

  2. Structural design criteria for high heat flux components.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, S.

    1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The high temperature design rules of the ITER Structural Design Criteria (ISDC), are applied to first wall designs with high heat flux. The maximum coolant pressure and surface heat flux capabilities are shown to be determined not only by the mechanical properties of the first wall material but also by the details of the blanket design. In a high power density self-cooled lithium blanket, the maximum primary stress in the first wall is controlled by many of the geometrical parameters of the blanket, such as, first wall span, first wall curvature, first wall thickness, side wall thickness, and second wall thickness. The creep ratcheting lifetime of the first wall is also shown to be controlled by many of the same geometrical parameters as well as the coolant temperature. According to most high temperature design codes, the time-dependent primary membrane stress allowable are based on the average temperature (ignoring thermal stress). Such a procedure may sometimes be unconservative, particularly for embrittled first walls with large temperature gradients. The effect of secondary (thermal) stresses on the accumulation of creep deformation is illustrated with a vanadium alloy flat plate first wall design.

  3. Sources and composition of submicron organic mass in marine aerosol particles: Marine Aerosol Organic Mass Composition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Frossard, Amanda A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Elliott, Scott M.; Bates, Timothy S.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have proposed a variety of interpretations of the sources and composition of atmospheric marine aerosol particles (aMA) based on a range of physical and chemical measurements collected during open-ocean research cruises. To investigate the processes that affect marine organic particles, this study uses the characteristic functional group composition (from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy) of aMAP from five ocean regions to show that: (i) The organic functional group composition of aMAP that can be identified as atmospheric primary marine (ocean-derived) aerosol (aPMA) is 65±12% hydroxyl, 21±9% alkane, 6±6% amine, and 7±8% carboxylic acid functional groups. Contributions from photochemicalmore »reactions add carboxylic acid groups (15%-25%), shipping effluent in seawater and ship emissions add additional alkane groups (up to 70%), and coastal emissions mix in alkane and carboxylic acid groups from coastal pollution sources. (ii) The organic composition of aPMA is nearly identical to model generated primary marine aerosol particles (gPMA) from bubbled seawater (55% hydroxyl, 32% alkane, and 13% amine functional groups), indicating that its overall functional group composition is the direct consequence of the organic constituents of the seawater source. (iii) While the seawater organic functional group composition was nearly invariant across all three ocean regions studied, the gPMA alkane group fraction increased with chlorophyll-a concentrations (r = 0.79). gPMA from productive seawater had a larger fraction of alkane functional groups (35%) compared to gPMA from non-productive seawater (16%), likely due to the presence of surfactants in productive seawater that stabilize the bubble film and lead to preferential drainage of the more soluble (lower alkane group fraction) organic components. gPMA has a hydroxyl group absorption peak location characteristic of monosaccharides and disaccharides, where the seawater OM hydroxyl group peak location is closer to that of polysaccharides. This may result from the larger saccharides preferentially remaining in the seawater during gPMA and aPMA production« less

  4. Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Sarah B.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Abatement Environmental impactLife-cycle Environmental Impacts . . . . . . . LCA of

  5. Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Sarah B.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SemiconductorThe Semiconductor Industry: Size, Growth andSemiconductor Life-cycle Environmental Impacts . . . . . . .

  6. The Hartford Life and Accident Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Hartford Life and Accident Insurance Company Group Numbers Basic Term Life - 677984 Basic by The Hartford Life and Accident Insurance Company. (Referred to as The Hartford or Hartford.) General from an accident, the benefit will be equal to $140,000 ($70,000 basic group term life PLUS $70

  7. Fire safety of LPG in marine transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinsen, W.E.; Johnson, D.W.; Welker, J.R.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains an analytical examination of cargo spill and fire hazard potential associated with the marine handling of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as cargo. Principal emphasis was on cargo transfer operations for ships unloading at receiving terminals, and barges loading or unloading at a terminal. Major safety systems, including emergency shutdown systems, hazard detection systems, and fire extinguishment and control systems were included in the analysis. Spill probabilities were obtained from fault tree analyses utilizing composite LPG tank ship and barge designs. Failure rates for hardware in the analyses were generally taken from historical data on similar generic classes of hardware, there being very little historical data on the specific items involved. Potential consequences of cargo spills of various sizes are discussed and compared to actual LPG vapor cloud incidents. The usefulness of hazard mitigation systems (particularly dry chemical fire extinguishers and water spray systems) in controlling the hazards posed by LPG spills and spill fires is also discussed. The analysis estimates the probability of fatality for a terminal operator is about 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -5/ per cargo transfer operation. The probability of fatality for the general public is substantially less.

  8. [Last updated 6-4-13] Recommended Criteria and Essential Learning Outcomes for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    focus, with a minimum of 25 hours of project-based community engagement by each student in the course. 2 for All Service-Learning Courses 1) Include assessment criteria for student learning as well as assessment[Last updated 6-4-13] Recommended Criteria and Essential Learning Outcomes for Service-Learning

  9. Multi Criteria Analysis for bioenergy systems assessments Thomas Buchholz a,, Ewald Rametsteiner b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Multi Criteria Analysis for bioenergy systems assessments Thomas Buchholz a,Ã?, Ewald Rametsteiner b Available online 11 November 2008 Keywords: Multi Criteria Analysis Bioenergy Sustainability a b s t r a c t Sustainable bioenergy systems are, by definition, embedded in social, economic, and environmental contexts

  10. MULTI-CRITERIA SEARCH ALGORITHM: AN EFFICIENT APPROXIMATE K-NN ALGORITHM FOR IMAGE RETRIEVAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MULTI-CRITERIA SEARCH ALGORITHM: AN EFFICIENT APPROXIMATE K-NN ALGORITHM FOR IMAGE RETRIEVAL Mehdi-NN search in large scale image databases, based on top-k multi-criteria search tech- niques. The method retrieval, stor- age requirements and update cost. The search algorithm delivers ap- proximate results

  11. Design and Production Interface in Lean Production: A Performance Improvement Criteria Proposition Proceedings IGLC `98

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommelein, Iris D.

    Design and Production Interface in Lean Production: A Performance Improvement Criteria Proposition Proceedings IGLC `98 DESIGN AND PRODUCTION INTERFACE IN LEAN PRODUCTION: A PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT CRITERIA PROPOSITION Eduardo L. Isatto1 and Carlos T. Formoso2 ABSTRACT Failures on transferring Japanese production

  12. Criteria for Selection of a COTS Real-Time Operating System: a Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beus-Dukic, Ljerka

    . The choices made for the criteria template used in our survey are briefly explained in the following sections1 Criteria for Selection of a COTS Real-Time Operating System: a Survey Ljerka Beus-Dukic School to provide the answers. The paper presents the results of this survey. The first section briefly describes

  13. DESIGNING BOTTLE PRODUCTS USING ENVIRONMENTAL CRITERIA Dr. Nicholas Bilalis, Dr. Evan Diamadopoulos, Vassilis Kouroublakis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis, Antoniadis

    cycle has a reasonable impact to the environment. More materials (metal, glass, plastic) per bottle lead1 DESIGNING BOTTLE PRODUCTS USING ENVIRONMENTAL CRITERIA Dr. Nicholas Bilalis, Dr. Evan criteria. This paper reports on the development of a methodology for designing bottles using specific

  14. Spent nuclear fuel project criteria document -- Cold Vacuum Drying Facility phase 2 safety analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1998-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The criteria document provides the criteria and guidance for developing the SNF CVDF Phase 2 SAR. This SAR will support the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office decision to authorize the procurement, installation, and installation acceptance testing of the CVDF systems.

  15. Criteria for Preparing and Packaging Plutonium Metals and Oxides for Long-Term Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Standard provides criteria for packaging of plutonium metals and stabilized oxides for storage periods of at least 50 years. To meet the criteria, plutonium-bearing materials must be in stable forms and be packaged in containers designed to maintain their integrity both under normal storage conditions and during anticipated handling accidents.

  16. Maps, Networks and a Sea That Won’t Conform: Thinking Critically About Marine Spatial Planning in Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Glen

    Scotland has adopted marine spatial planning (MSP) as a key instrument of its National Marine Plan. This follows a global trend in shifting marine governance techniques. MSP is turn away from sectoral governance of the sea ...

  17. The Influence of Metal Pollution on the Immune System A Potential Stressor for Marine Mammals in the North Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kakuschke, Antje; Prange, Andreas

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Northern Europe. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 48, 992-997.seals in captivity. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 56, 764-769.herring and cod. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 13, 391-393.

  18. Review of public comments on proposed seismic design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Shaukat, S.K.; Chokshi, N.C.; Bagchi, G.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the first quarter of 1988, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) prepared a proposed Revision 2 to the NUREG-0800 Standard Review Plan (SRP) Sections 2.5.2 (Vibratory Ground Motion), 3.7.1 (Seismic Design Parameters), 3.7.2 (Seismic Systems Analysis) and 3.7.3 (Seismic Subsystem Analysis). The proposed Revision 2 to the SRP was a result of many years' work carried out by the NRC and the nuclear industry on the Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-40: ''Seismic Design Criteria.'' The background material related to NRC's efforts for resolving the A-40 issue is described in NUREG-1233. In June 1988, the proposed Revision 2 of the SRP was issued by NRC for public review and comments. Comments were received from Sargent and Lundy Engineers, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Stevenson and Associates, Duke Power Company, General Electric Company and Electric Power Research Institute. In September 1988, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and its consultants (C.J. Costantino, R.P. Kennedy, J. Stevenson, M. Shinozuka and A.S. Veletsos) were requested to carry out a review of the comments received from the above six organizations. The objective of this review was to assist the NRC staff with the evaluation and resolution of the public comments. This review was initiated during October 1988 and it was completed on January 1989. As a result of this review, a set of modifications to the above mentioned sections of the SRP were recommended by BNL and its consultants. This paper summarizes the recommended modifications. 4 refs.

  19. SESE Source From life in pools to life on planets?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    environments. Hot springs may be similar in temperature and conditions to potential life-harbor- ing Yellowstone spring has a high temperature source pool (about 93C), which can flow into channels that become progressively cooler as the water and moves away from the hot source. This natural spring water forced upward

  20. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  1. Commercial marine vessel contributions to emission inventories. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to conduct a survey of emissions from combustion engines associates with non-road vehicles and stationary sources. Among the emission source categories under scrutiny of the EPA are commercial marine vessels. This group of sources includes revenue vessels operated on US ports and waterways in such diverse pursuits as international and domestic trade, port and ship service, offshore and coastal industry, and passenger transport. For the purposes of the study, EPA is assessing commercial marine vessel operations at selected ports around the country which are characterized by a high level of commercial marine vessel activity. Booz-Allen has been retained by the EPA to assist in developing emission inventories from marine vessels for up to six ports, based on vessel arrival/departure data, are believed to exhibit high levels of marine generated emissions. Booz-Allen developed a listing of the top 20 major ports in terms of total vessel activity (as measured by annual tonnage of cargo and annual vessel calls).

  2. Powering the Future with LIFE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E I; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Leveraging the National Ignition Facility to meet the climate-energy challenge; (2) The journal into a new era of scientific discoveries; and (3) Safe and sustainable energy with LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy).

  3. THINGCAMPUS LIFE FROM DUSKTO DAWN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Marla

    FINANCIAL PLANNING FREE BOOK OFFER! www.clearsight.ca/uoft/offer INVESTMENT AND RETIREMENT PLANNING EXCLUSIVELY FOR U OFT ALUMNI Smart Choices Pay Off At Every Stage ofYour Life With Clearsight you get GIFTS Restoring Convocation Hall 53 ALUMNI NOTES Living off the Grid 56 CALENDAR 57 PUZZLE 59 CAMPUS

  4. ONESTEPinthe NIGHT might SAVEyour LIFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ejiri, Shinji

    sometimes discourage theft. Period: October 2010 - September 2011 2010 10 2011 9 #12;Say NO to illegal drugs Illegal drugs can ruin your life! Drug dependence can lead to financial troubles and violence, destroying changes. MDMA There are various types of illegal drugs Illegal drugs include amphetamines, marijuana

  5. Data Quality Objectives for WTP Feed Acceptance Criteria - 12043

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arakali, Aruna V.; Benson, Peter A.; Duncan, Garth; Johnston, Jill C.; Lane, Thomas A.; Matis, George; Olson, John W. [Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (United States); Banning, Davey L.; Greer, Daniel A.; Seidel, Cary M.; Thien, Michael G. [Hanford Tank Operations Contractor - Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is under construction for the U.S. Department of Energy by Bechtel National, Inc. and subcontractor URS Corporation (contract no. DE-AC27-01RV14136). The plant when completed will be the world's largest nuclear waste treatment facility. Bechtel and URS are tasked with designing, constructing, commissioning, and transitioning the plant to the long term operating contractor to process the legacy wastes that are stored in underground tanks (from nuclear weapons production between the 1940's and the 1980's). Approximately 56 million gallons of radioactive waste is currently stored in these tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. There are three major WTP facilities being constructed for processing the tank waste feed. The Pretreatment (PT) facility receives feed where it is separated into a low activity waste (LAW) fraction and a high level waste (HLW) fraction. These fractions are transferred to the appropriate (HLW or LAW) facility, combined with glass former material, and sent to high temperature melters for formation of the glass product. In addition to PT, HLW and LAW, other facilities in WTP include the Laboratory (LAB) for analytical services and the Balance of Facilities (BOF) for plant maintenance, support and utility services. The transfer of staged feed from the waste storage tanks and acceptance in WTP receipt vessels require data for waste acceptance criteria (WAC) parameters from analysis of feed samples. The Data Quality Objectives (DQO) development was a joint team effort between WTP and Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) representatives. The focus of this DQO effort was to review WAC parameters and develop data quality requirements, the results of which will determine whether or not the staged feed can be transferred from the TOC to WTP receipt vessels. The approach involved systematic planning for data collection consistent with EPA guidance for the seven-step DQO process. Data quality requirements for sample collection and analysis of all WAC parameters were specified during the DQO process. There were eighteen key parameters identified with action limits to ensure the feed transfer and receipt would not exceed plant design, safety, permitting, and processing requirements. The remaining WAC parameters were grouped in the category for obtaining data according to WTP contract specifications, regulatory reporting requirements, and for developing the feed campaign processing sequence. (authors)

  6. Marine Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS), Field Development System-1 (FDS-1) assessment: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, L W; Hunt, S T; Savage, S F [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); McLaughlin, P D; Shepard, A P; Worl, J C [Battelle Seattle Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following appendices contain the detailed analysis data for the questionnaires and various FDS-1 after action reports submitted to the Marine Corps Systems Command (MARCORSYSCOM) Marine Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS) Systems' Engineer.

  7. Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems enrichment, or eutrophication, can lead to highly undesirable changes in ecosystem structure and function eutrophication in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. We present two brief case studies (one

  8. Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

  9. Marine Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS) Field Development System-1 (FDS-1) assessment: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, L.W.; Hunt, S.T.; Savage, S.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); McLaughlin, P.D.; Shepdard, A.P.; Worl, J.C. (Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United State Marine Corps (USMC) is continuing the development and fielding of the Marine Corps Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS), a system which exists in varying states of development, fielding, or modernization. MTACCS is currently composed of the following components: Tactical Combat Operations System (TCO) for ground command and control (C2), Intelligence Analysis System (IAS) with a Genser terminal connected to a TCO workstation for intelligence C2, Marine Integrated Personnel System (MIPS) and a TCO workstation using the Marine Combat Personnel System (MCPERS) software for personnel C2, Marine Integrated Logistics System (MILOGS) which is composed of the Landing Force Asset Distribution System (LFADS), the Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) II, and a TCO terminal using the Marine Combat Logistics System (MCLOG) for logistics C2, Marine Corps Fire Support System (MCFSS) for fire support C2, and Advanced Tactical Air Command Central (ATACC) and the Improved Direct Air Support Central for aviation C2.

  10. Marine renewable energy: potential benefits to biodiversity? An urgent call for research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    Marine renewable energy: potential benefits to biodiversity? An urgent call for research Richard 1 Centre for Ecology and Conservation and Peninsula Research Institute for Marine Renewable Energy driver. In response, many governments have initiated programmes of energy production from renewable

  11. Siderophore Production by Marine alpha-proteobacterium Ochrobactrum sp. SP18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jessica E.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E.L. , Smith, G. , and Bruland, K.W. (2001) Marine Chemistry129. Rue, E.L. and Bruland, K.W. (1995) Marine Chemistry117 – 138. Rue, E.L. and Bruland, K.W. (1997) Limnology and

  12. First Use of Mobile Peer-to-Peer Network Technology on a Marine Animal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    First Use of Mobile Peer-to-Peer Network Technology on a Marine Animal First Use of Mobile Peer-to-Peer Network Technology on a Marine Animal Carl Meyer, Yannis Papastamatiou, Laurent Dagorn* and Kim Holland

  13. A Comparative Study of Modular Axial Flux Podded Generators for Marine Current Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    A Comparative Study of Modular Axial Flux Podded Generators for Marine Current Turbines Sofiane turbines (MCTs). Due to the submarine environment, maintenance operations are very hard, very costly current turbine, axial flux permanent magnet generator, design, optimization. Nomenclature MCT = Marine

  14. Final waste forms project: Performance criteria for phase I treatability studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilliam, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hutchins, D.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chodak, P. III [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the product performance criteria to be used in Phase I of the Final Waste Forms Project. In Phase I, treatability studies will be performed to provide {open_quotes}proof-of-principle{close_quotes} data to establish the viability of stabilization/solidification (S/S) technologies. This information is required by March 1995. In Phase II, further treatability studies, some at the pilot scale, will be performed to provide sufficient data to allow treatment alternatives identified in Phase I to be more fully developed and evaluated, as well as to reduce performance uncertainties for those methods chosen to treat a specific waste. Three main factors influence the development and selection of an optimum waste form formulation and hence affect selection of performance criteria. These factors are regulatory, process-specific, and site-specific waste form standards or requirements. Clearly, the optimum waste form formulation will require consideration of performance criteria constraints from each of the three categories. Phase I will focus only on the regulatory criteria. These criteria may be considered the minimum criteria for an acceptable waste form. In other words, a S/S technology is considered viable only if it meet applicable regulatory criteria. The criteria to be utilized in the Phase I treatability studies were primarily taken from Environmental Protection Agency regulations addressed in 40 CFR 260 through 265 and 268; and Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations addressed in 10 CFR 61. Thus the majority of the identified criteria are independent of waste form matrix composition (i.e., applicable to cement, glass, organic binders etc.).

  15. Origin and Age of the Marine Stygofauna of Lanzarote, Canary Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    . The first marine flows began about 40 m. y. ago, with subaerial flows commencing 11 m. y. (ARANA& CARRACEDO

  16. Journal of Marine Research, 69, 105135, 2011 Effects of surface quasi-geostrophic turbulence on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lapeyre, Guillaume

    . Laboratoire des Sciences de l'Environnement Marin, IUEM, CNRS-UBO-IRD, Place Nicolas Copernic, 29280 Plouzané

  17. Instrumentation for Monitoring around Marine Renewable Energy Converters: Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Polagye, Brian

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Report on workshop held in Seattle for DOE WWPTO on instrument needs for monitoring marine energy devices

  18. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pollution of coastal watersheds can have far-reaching effects on marine ecosystems, for example, the Gulf of Mexico ‘‘

  19. Selection of Model in Developing Information Security Criteria for Smart Grid Security System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Amy Poh Ai

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At present, the "Smart Grid" has emerged as one of the best advanced energy supply chains. This paper looks into the security system of smart grid via the smart planet system. The scope focused on information security criteria that impact on consumer trust and satisfaction. The importance of information security criteria is perceived as the main aspect to impact on customer trust throughout the entire smart grid system. On one hand, this paper also focuses on the selection of the model for developing information security criteria on a smart grid.

  20. Evaluation of proposed German safety criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barsell, A.W.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work reviews proposed safety criteria prepared by the German Bundesministerium des Innern (BMI) for future licensing of gas-cooled high-temperature reactor (HTR) concepts in the Federal Republic of Germany. Comparison is made with US General Design Criteria (GDCs) in 10CFR50 Appendix A and with German light water reactor (LWR) criteria. Implications for the HTR design relative to the US design and safety approach are indicated. Both inherent characteristics and design features of the steam cycle, gas turbine, and process heat concepts are taken into account as well as generic design options such as a pebble bed or prismatic core.

  1. Bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States); [Colby Coll., Waterville, ME (United States); Neff, J. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States); [Battelle Ocean Sciences, Duxbury, MA (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms indicates that there exists a potential for transfer of these contaminants through marine food webs to commercial fisheries products consumed by humans. However, there has been relatively little effort to combine and synthesize data on chemical/biological interactions between benthic animals and seagrasses and the sediments in which they reside on the one hand, and on the chemistry of bioaccumulation on the other. This report provides a conceptual basis for an approach to bioavailability and biomagnification of sediment-bound contaminants that reviews biological and chemical approaches.

  2. Transverse wave loading on partially buried marine pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Richard Edgar

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRANSVERSE WAVE LOADING ON PARTIALLY BURIED MARINE PIPELINES A Thesis by RICHARD EDGAR WEBB Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December l988 Ma)or Subject: Civil Engineering TRANSVERSE WAVE LOADING ON PARTIALLY BURIED MARINE PIPELINES A Thesis bY RICHARD EDGAR WEBB Approved as to style and content by: Derek V. M ris (Chair of Committee) Calvin E. Woods (Member) Norman R...

  3. ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE (ATP) AND DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID (DNA) CONTENT OF MARINE MICROALGAE AND BACTERIA WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE (ATP) AND DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID (DNA) CONTENT OF MARINE MICROALGAE the relationship between DNA and ATP content of marine bacteria and microalgae. This relationship was used. Laboratory-derived DNA:ATP ratios ranged from 8.5 to 33 (wt:wt) for cultures of marine microalgae, and from

  4. Performance Comparison of Three-and Five-Phase Permanent Magnet Generators for Marine Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Turbine Applications Under Open-Circuit Faults Seifeddine Benelghali, Fatiha Mekri, Mohamed Benbouzid a marine current turbine and compared to a classical three-phase generator. For both topologies, a robust generators key features marine applications. Index Terms--Marine Current Turbine MCT), five-phase Permanent

  5. 42 Marine Technology Society Journal A U T H O R S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Heupel, 2004; Sladek- Nowlis & Friedlander, 2004; Wetherbee et al., 2004). Glover's Reef, one of Belize's three oce- anicatolls,isencompassedbyoneofthelarg- est marine reserves (Glover's Reef Marine Reserve Glover's Reef Marine Reserve (GRMR), off the coast of Belize, between May and October, 2004. Although

  6. HMSC Mission Statement The Hatfield Marine Science Center advances the mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    leaders in industry, non-profits and local government, have led to a focused economic development strategy, the Marine Mammal Institute and the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center were established. HMSC infrastructure and the offshore marine renewable energy test berth. Such partnerships are critical

  7. Marine Sanctuaries Conservation Series ONMS-08-07 U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    of National Marine Sanctuaries November 2008 Caribbean Connectivity: Implications for Marine Protected Area in their natural and historical resources and include nearshore and open ocean areas ranging in size from less than vary accordingly. The integration of these programs is fundamental to marine protected area management

  8. A Fault-Tolerant Multiphase Permanent Magnet Generator for Marine Current Turbine Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A Fault-Tolerant Multiphase Permanent Magnet Generator for Marine Current Turbine Applications on offshore wind turbine systems. Marine current turbines are characterized by a very difficult access feature. This paper deals with the use of a PM multiphase marine current turbine generator. With this kind

  9. High-Order Sliding Mode Control of DFIG-Based Marine Current Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    High-Order Sliding Mode Control of DFIG-Based Marine Current Turbine S.E. Ben Elghali1 , M-based marine current turbine. Indeed, to increase the generated power and therefore the efficiency of a marine current turbine, a nonlinear controller has been proposed. DFIG has been already considered for similar

  10. Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

    2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

  11. Nuclear facilities: criteria for the design and operation of ventilation systems for nuclear installations other than nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear facilities: criteria for the design and operation of ventilation systems for nuclear installations other than nuclear reactors

  12. LIFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :1, table is formed from the relations, ... THE INTERNATIONAL ACTUARIAL NOTATION 29 ... International Congress of Actuaries adopted in 1898 a sys- notation ...

  13. All Other Retired Employees Great-West Life is a leading Canadian life and health insurer. Great-West Life's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to you and your family. The Plan is underwritten by #12;Protecting Your Personal Information At Great as life, disability and critical illness insurance for individuals and families. As a leading providerAll Other Retired Employees #12;Great-West Life is a leading Canadian life and health insurer

  14. CC: Security, Residential Life Evacuation Assistance Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    CC: Security, Residential Life Evacuation Assistance Form Voluntary Self-Identification If you have will be kept confidential and used only by Environmental Health and Safety, Residential Life (if applicable

  15. Department of Residential Life University of Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    Department of Residential Life University of Missouri may 11 >> halls close, 5 p.m. summer to June 1). Sign up forms are available at 0780 Defoe-Graham in the Residential Life Administration Office

  16. BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE PROCEDURES FOR THE USE OF HOLIDAY DECORATIONS by the Office of Residential Life. In these instances, candles and incense may never be left unattended and any

  17. BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE PROCEDURES FOR THE USE OF HOLIDAY DECORATIONS in a location established by the Office of Residential Life. In these instances, candles and incense may never

  18. Larger Teaching and Learning Development Projects Proposal Criteria (3 pages maximum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . A. Question(s) to be investigated. (Usually will be focused on student Larger Teaching and Learning Development Projects Proposal Criteria (3 learning) B. General Rationale and Description: Why is this question

  19. Criteria for cesium capsules to be shipped as special form radioactive material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundeen, J.E.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to compile all the documentation which defines the criteria for Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) cesium capsules at the IOTECH facility and Applied Radiant Energy Corporation (ARECO) to be shipped as special form radioactive material in the Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) Cask. The capsules were originally approved as special form in 1975, but in 1988 the integrity of the capsules came into question. WHC developed the Pre-shipment Acceptance Test Criteria for capsules to meet in order to be shipped as special form material. The Department of Energy approved the criteria and directed WHC to ship the capsules at IOTECH and ARECO meeting this criteria to WHC as special form material.

  20. Development of Criteria for Evaluating Urban River Settings for Tourism-Rereation Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunn, C. A.; Hanna, J. W.; Parenzin, A. J.; Blumberg, F. M.

    /business development in other cities, developed physical factor criteria and identified influential action agents. Third, the researchers examined recreation, tourism, land design and planning literature for information of value to this development problem...

  1. Appendix C: Criteria Review and Approach Documents, National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2A "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of a table of National Nuclear Security Administration Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS).

  2. Development of HVAC System Performance Criteria Using Factorial Design and DOE-2 Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, D.; Jones, J. W.; Hunn, B. D.; Banks, J. A.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach is described for the development of Heating, Ventilating, and Air-conditioning (HVAC) System Performance Criteria for the Texas Building Energy Design Standard. This approach integrates a design of experimental methodology and DOE-2...

  3. Solid hosts for dye laser rods: Part 1, Criteria for choosing a host material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, G.F.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will attempt to provide selection criteria for polymers as hosts for flashlamp-pumped dye laser rods. The properties of transparent polymer materials are compared with typical inorganic crystal and glass hosts. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Coevolution and the Web of Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, John N.; Medel, Rodrigo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Web of Life John N. Thompson & Rodrigo Medel Publishedmachines. Because J. N. Thompson (*) Department of Ecology

  5. Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE standard gives design and evaluation criteria for natural phenomena hazards (NPH) effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE 5480.28. Goal of the criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, flooding, etc. They apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities; they may also be used for modification and upgrading of the latter.

  6. Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued an Order 420.1 which establishes policy for its facilities in the event of natural phenomena hazards (NPH) along with associated NPH mitigation requirements. This DOE Standard gives design and evaluation criteria for NPH effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE Order 420.1 and the associated implementation Guides. These are intended to be consistent design and evaluation criteria for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of these criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. These criteria apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities. They may also be used for modification and upgrading of existing facilities as appropriate. The design and evaluation criteria presented herein control the level of conservatism introduced in the design/evaluation process such that earthquake, wind, and flood hazards are treated on a consistent basis. These criteria also employ a graded approach to ensure that the level of conservatism and rigor in design/evaluation is appropriate for facility characteristics such as importance, hazards to people on and off site, and threat to the environment. For each natural phenomena hazard covered, these criteria consist of the following: Performance Categories and target performance goals as specified in the DOE Order 420.1 NPH Implementation Guide, and DOE-STD-1 021; specified probability levels from which natural phenomena hazard loading on structures, equipment, and systems is developed; and design and evaluation procedures to evaluate response to NPH loads and criteria to assess whether or not computed response is permissible.

  7. A study of selected criteria for real time control of intersections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Elio Joseph

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    criteria, used in the real time computer control of traffic, form the ob)ectives of this thesis. Traffic operations data were obtained from research work carried out on the Dallas Corridor Pro)act and the Houston Surveillance Project where computer... traffic control systems were in operation. Operational criteria, which includee tha prediction and use of vehicle arrivals, progression from intersection to intersection and tha effects of various move- ments wi'thin the intersection, were analyzed...

  8. LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates December 14, 2011 Mike Dunne LLNL #12;NIf-1111-23714.ppt LIFE power plant 2 #12;LIFE delivery timescale NIf-1111-23714.ppt 3 #12;Timely delivery is enabled dpa) § Removes ion threat and mitigates x-ray threat ­ allows simple steel piping § No need

  9. Life Cycle Assessment of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Life Cycle Assessment of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement to Improve Asphalt Pavement Sustainability By Pavement (RAP) Courtesy of http://myconstructionphotos.smugmug.com/ RAP #12;Transport Back to the Plant-melt old binder on the RAP #12;Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) · #12;Asphalt Pavement Life Cycle Road

  10. Residential Life Luggage Program Summer 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Residential Life Luggage Program Summer 2014 International and out-of-state students who should be addressed as follows: Residential Life Luggage Program Physical Plant/CDS University. · Residential Life will not be held responsible for items lost or damaged in handling. We advise against sending

  11. CC: Security, Residential Life Evacuation Assistance Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    CC: Security, Residential Life Evacuation Assistance Form Voluntary Self-Identification If you have will be kept confidential and used only by Environmental Health and Safety, Residential Life (if applicable:_______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ #12;CC: Security, Residential Life If this is a temporary request, please provide a date when

  12. living and learning Department of Residential Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missouri-Columbia, University of

    living and learning Accessible housing at Mizzou Department of Residential Life University is important to us. The Department of Residential Life at MU is committed to providing and improving accessible spaces for students with disabilities. Residential Life will help provide appropriate housing

  13. Sun Life Financial (Sun Life) Benefit Adjudication Effective December 1, 2008, Sun Life became the health and dental benefits carrier for active

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun Life Financial (Sun Life) Benefit Adjudication Effective December 1, 2008, Sun Life became to maintain the level of benefits coverage with Sun Life. Sun Life has identified a number of GWL practices not been processed by Sun Life The Pension & Benefits office was advised by GWL that they would process all

  14. Role of self-propulsion of marine larvae on their probability of contact with a protruding collector located in a sea current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilman, Gregory; Liberzon, Alex; Perkol-Finkel, Shimrit; Benayahu, Yehuda

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Settlement of marine larvae on a substrate is a fundamental problem of marine life. The probability of settlement is one of the quantitative characteristic of the settlement process. The probability of larval contact with a substrate is the upper bound of the probability of settlement. This work addresses the problem of contact probability and contact rate of marine invertebrate larvae with an isolated protruding collector located in an unbounded sea current. There are two common approaches to the problem of contact probability. In one, a collector induces certain cues, which help a larvae find the collector. In such a case, the larva moves towards the collector deliberately, using its navigation and propulsion devices. In the second approach, a larva moves towards a collector as a passive small particle. In this case, the cause of contact of a larva with a collector is a mechanical collision of a small moving body with a large obstacle. We considered a larva which does not know the location of the collector,...

  15. Bryan H. Wood Assistant Deputy Commandant of the Marine Corps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and stations throughout the world and for the operating forces across the U.S. Marine Corps. Mr. Wood advisor to the Commander, Combined Joint Task Force- Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) in Djibouti, Africa. Mr as the Environmental Law Section Head and Senior Associate Counsel (Environment/ Safety), Naval Sea Systems Command

  16. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, David W.

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 427: 29­49, 2011 doi: 10.3354/meps09043 Published April 12 INTRODUCTION The Gulf of Maine (GoM) is a semi-enclosed conti- nental shelf system to storm events in fall; (2) gradual chloro- phyll increases in response to seasonal wind- and cooling

  17. Export of Cadmium and Phytochelatin by the Marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morel, François M. M.

    Export of Cadmium and Phytochelatin by the Marine Diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii J E N N I F E R-phytochelatin complex. We hypothesize that T. weissflogii exports the phytochelatin- cadmium complex as a detoxification the cell since the cadmium exported is available to T. weissflogii and induces phytochelatin synthesis

  18. Mariner's Guide For Hurricane Awareness In The North Atlantic Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariner's Guide For Hurricane Awareness In The North Atlantic Basin Eric J. Holweg eholweg.navy.mil/data/oceans/gulfstream.html Hurricane Preparedness & Tracks: http://www.fema.gov/fema/trop.htm Time Zone Conversions: http.....................................................................................................2 · Tropical Wave · Tropical Disturbance · Tropical Depression · Tropical Storm · Hurricane

  19. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Ransom A.

    of consumers, resources and abiotic factors. Although benthic microalgae can have a pivotal role as primary microalgae (Hille- brand & Sommer 1997). Herbivory on epilithic microal- gae has been studied sporadically concepts with marine benthic microalgae, which are important components of coastal food webs. We manipu

  20. SODIUM CYANIDE AS A FISH POISON Marine Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SODIUM CYANIDE AS A FISH POISON Marine Biological Laboratory APR 2 '^ 1958 WOODS HOLE, MASS CYANIDE AS A FISH POISON By W. R. Bridges Cooperative Fishery Research Laboratory Southern Illinois as a fish poison. At concentrations of 1 p. p.m. sodium cyanide and at a variety of temperature and p

  1. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer E.

    biomass, thus helping to favor corals by preventing the establishment and growth of algae that compete Pacific coral reef Scott L. Hamilton1 , Jennifer E. Smith2 , Nichole N. Price2 , Stuart A. Sandin2,* 1 in biomass, such as inside no- take marine reserves, their foraging activities have been shown to reduce

  2. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Bradley J.

    Marine Research, Underwood Avenue, Floreat, Western Australia, Australia 7 Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 100 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION Cross-habitat exchanges of nutrients and energy (i.e. spatial subsidies) can be of great

  3. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adkins, Jess F.

    3 , Nick C. Wilson4 , Jess Adkins5 1 CSIRO Climate Adaptation Flagship, GPO Box 1538, Hobart and calcite) in the skeletons, shells and tests of marine taxa (Orr et al. 2005, Moy et al. 2009), including, Tasmania 7001, Australia 2 CSIRO Wealth from Oceans Flagship and Antarctic Climate and Ecosystem Co

  4. Thermal and digestive constraints to foraging behaviour in marine mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal and digestive constraints to foraging behaviour in marine mammals David A. S. Rosen1 digestive limitations to food intake and thermoregulation. The ability of an animal to consume sufficient by maximum digestion capacity and the time devoted to digestion). Failure to consume sufficient prey

  5. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Angelicque

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 323: 35­45, 2006 Published October 5 derived from the lit- erature, resultant model solutions allow us to explore the ecological significance, a scenario termed P-mining. Given the temporal phasing of these migrations, our results indicate that while

  6. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, C. Kevin

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 228: 153­163, 2002 Published March 6 of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA 2 Ecology, Behavior and Evolution Section, Division of Biology and non-carnivorous species within climatic zones play an important role in deter- mining

  7. MArine science School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    government management agencies such as the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife--Marine Field Experience (Independent Study) ....... 1 ­ 2 Fisheries FISH F288/BIOL F288--Fish and Fisheries of Alaska........................3 FISH F301--Biology of Fishes

  8. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

    ), and to measure animal distribution and biomass (e.g. Benoit-Bird & Au 2006, Pieper 1979). The first published to compare lunar effects on predator­prey behavior in two marine mammal species Kelly J. Benoit-Bird1 is strongly affected by light, both solar and lunar. Active acoustic approaches were used to observe lunar

  9. Metabolic Engineering for Improved Biofuel Yield in a Marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Metabolic Engineering for Improved Biofuel Yield in a Marine Cyanobacterium/conclusion · future work that will be done to increase biofuel yield #12;Problems? · Many na@al renewable source of energy -Biofuel produc@on from aqua@c photoautotroph

  10. Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Alexandra DeVisser, NAVFAC-EXWC Brian June 10, 2013 #12;Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Objective: Provide location for year-long in Cable, Sound & Sea Technology (SST) Luis A. Vega, HNEI-University of Hawaii Energy Ocean International

  11. Offshore Petroleum Resource Development and Marine Mammals: A Review and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with all phases of petroleum exploration and production. The physical, physiological, and behavioral efOffshore Petroleum Resource Development and Marine Mammals: A Review and Research Recommendations J to cause acute toxicity. However, the long- term effects of accumulation of petroleum basic data needed

  12. Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brody, James P.

    Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem Matthew E. S for the goods and services provided by natural ecosystems. However, relatively few studies have evalu- ated- ity to loss and their contributions to ecosystem functioning. ammonium diversity ecosystem function

  13. Ocean energy projects may menace marine lblumenthal@mcclatchydc.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    from California to Hawaii or Australia to South Africa. Sea turtles hatched on the beaches of Florida travel the currents of the North Atlantic Gyre to Europe, Africa and South America before heading homeOcean energy projects may menace marine migration lblumenthal@mcclatchydc.com Published Monday, Dec

  14. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrier Reef, the second largest barrier reef in the world. Glover's Reef is a remote oceanic atoll, which targeted for conserva- tion in 1993 by the designation of the Glover's Reef Marine Reserve (GRMR). Although at a Caribbean atoll (Glover's Reef, Belize) Ellen K. Pikitch1,4,*, Demian D. Chapman2,4 , Elizabeth A. Babcock3

  15. 2005 Nature Publishing Group Photosynthesis genes in marine viruses yield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    © 2005 Nature Publishing Group Photosynthesis genes in marine viruses yield proteins during host­6 probably influences the genetic and functional diversity of both. For example, photosynthesis genes period. We also show that the expression of host photosynthesis genes declines over the course

  16. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 340: 259­270, 2007 Published June 18 be several warming and cooling periods, spanning sev- eral decades each. This has been documented, for example, in British waters where a cooling trend was detected up to about 1930, followed by a warming

  17. Evolution of Marine Invertebrates and the Burgess Shale Fossils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    Evolution of Marine Invertebrates and the Burgess Shale Fossils Geology 331, Paleontology #12 #12;Burgess Shale Fossils · Most are soft-bodied fossils, a very rare kind of fossilization. · Of today's 32 living phyla, 15 are found in the Burgess Shale. The other 17 are microscopic or too delicate

  18. Wave and Material Properties of Marine Sediments: Theoretical Relationships for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckingham, Michael

    Wave and Material Properties of Marine Sediments: Theoretical Relationships for Geoacoustic and Vibration Research The University, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK Abstract. In recent years, a theory of wave the passage of compressional and shear waves. The theory yields a dispersion pair, representing phase speed

  19. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Matthew

    , Whitmore 1989). In temperate marine communities, where shad- ing by thick canopies of kelp (order multiple kelp canopies on an understory algal assemblage R. P. Clark1, 2,*, M. S. Edwards1, 3 , M. S ABSTRACT: We examined the effects of shade from multiple kelp canopy layers (surface Macrocystis pyrifera

  20. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchette, Carol Anne

    · Kelp · Nutrients · Point Conception Resale or republication not permitted without written consent common among marine algae. Populations of the kelp Egregia menziesii (Turner) Areschoug are known, nutrient-rich water favorable to plant growth, but also by high wave exposure, increasing the likelihood

  1. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stachowicz, Jay

    , and from the bottom up, by reducing the kelp's subsequent ability to acquire nutrients. Because INTRODUCTION Both consumer pressure and nutrient availability are important drivers of benthic marine community interact to influence organisms' distributions and abundances. For example, subsidies of nutrients

  2. 1. Department, Course Number, Title ORE 677, Marine Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    1. Department, Course Number, Title ORE 677, Marine Renewable Energy 2. Designation as a Required. Renewable Energy from the Ocean ­ a Guide to OTEC, W.H. Avery and C. Wu, Oxford University Press, 1994. 2 and tidal resources. 3. An understanding of the role of ocean renewable energy within the current worldwide

  3. Marine Iguanas Older Than Their Islands Jeff Mitton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitton, Jeffry B.

    Marine Iguanas Older Than Their Islands Jeff Mitton Natural Selections (Appeared in the Boulder Camera, December 11, 2009) The Galapagos Islands ride on the Nazca plate, a tectonic plate drifting toward Ecuador at the rate of one and a half inches per year. But the Galapagos Islands will never reach

  4. Exploring a Marine Sanctuary Lab 2 GEO 465/565

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    the Channel Islands National Monument. In 1980, Congress expanded the area being protected to include the rest for the nation's system of marine protected areas, to conserve, protect, and enhance their biodiversity environment, distribution of bioregions, and the natural history of the northern Channel Islands

  5. A Fuzzy Model of Heavy Metal Loadings in Marine Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuncheva, Ludmila I.

    A Fuzzy Model of Heavy Metal Loadings in Marine Environment L.I. Kuncheva1 , J. Wrench2 , L.C. Jain model of the loadings of heavy metals for two coastal areas of the Irish Sea (Liverpool Bay, Morecambe Bay, heavy metal concentrations, index of spa- tial distribution, spatial data analysis. 1

  6. Marine Conservation Science and Policy Service learning Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    1 Marine Conservation Science and Policy Service learning Program Scientists have divided the ocean where light can no longer penetrate. These deep zones are where some of the most bizarre and fascinating in order of depth. Module 1: Ocean and Coastal Habitats Sunshine State Standards SC.912.E.7.2, SC.912.E.7

  7. Place Meaning and Attitudes toward Impacts on Marine Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wynveen, Christopher J.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    has there been much work aimed at understanding these concepts in marine environments. In this dissertation, I began to fill these gaps in the literature through the use of a three- phase multiple-method research design. In the first phase, I conducted...

  8. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yahel, Gitai

    resuspension and organic matter remineralization in coastal marine sediments Gitai Yahel1, 6,*,**, Ruthy Yahel1, Michmoret 40297, Israel ABSTRACT: We quantify sediment resuspension due to groundfish activity in a partly higher over the adjacent anoxic and fishless zone. Sediment resuspension events, mostly by flatfish

  9. Refining 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    Refining 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for marine particulate samples: Storage 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has recently been used to characterize phosphorus.e., no storage, refrigeration, freezing, and oven-drying and grinding) prior to extraction for solution 31 P

  10. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    -scale anthropogenic influences may also play a role. Ocean acidification (high pCO2/low pH), green- house warming marine environment. KEY WORDS: Climate change · CO2 · Ocean acidification · Temperature · Stratification cycle. The atmospheric par- tial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) has risen by >30% due to the burning of fossil

  11. Marine Biology and Ecology Field Course MSL 450 & 651

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikes, Derek S.

    at the advanced understanding of marine organisms in an ecological and evolutionary context. This course includes is on familiarization with Alaska's nearshore flora and fauna, the ecological function of organisms and on ecosystem be useful is an invert zoology book. I don't require it since there are several at the lab you can use

  12. Historical Analysis of Marine Sea Level Pressure and Wind Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PACIFIC WINDS FOR 4 PRODUCTS: Our OI; Da Silva (DS); NCEP-NCAR reanalysis (RA); and FSU subjective pseudo-windstresses lagged autocorrelation for zonal windstress OI DS RA FSU #12;CONCLUSIONS: winds are not that bad! #12;4/30/02 Historical Analysis of Marine Sea Level Pressure and Wind Components: the Good, the Bad

  13. Prospects for Rare Earth Elements From Marine Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prospects for Rare Earth Elements From Marine Minerals Rare earth elements (REEs) compose in the earth's crust. However, because of their geochemical proper es, rare earth elements are typically. Briefing Paper 02/12 Jim Hein | May 2012 www.isa.org.jm Table 1: Rare Earth Elements This paper

  14. Marine controlled-source elec-tromagnetic (CSEM) sounding is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key, Kerry

    to be a useful tool for geo- hazard mitigation via gas hydrate detection. The hydrate target occurs- lower hydrate section. Motivation. Marine gas hydrates can be a problem for development and production of a hydrate layer where solid hydrate exists above and free gas exists below. While seismic meth

  15. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    indicators in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Human Ecologicalindicators in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Human EcologicalI explore how life-cycle assessment (LCA) results can

  16. COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES CHECKSHEET for a MINOR in INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL AND LIFE SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES CHECKSHEET for a MINOR in INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL AND LIFE SCIENCES Offered by Academic Programs in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Effective for Students Graduating 2015 The minor in International Agricultural and Life Sciences focuses on agricultural

  17. Assembling the Marine Metagenome, One Cell at a Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woyke, Tanja; Xie, Gary; Copeland, Alex; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Han, Cliff; Kiss, Hajnalka; Saw, Jimmy H.; Senin, Pavel; Yang, Chi; Chatterji, Sourav; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Sieracki, Michael E.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91percent and 78percent, respectively. Only 0.24percent of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured taxa from a complex microbial community of marine bacterioplankton. A combination of single cell genomics and metagenomics enabled us to analyze the genome content, metabolic adaptations, and biogeography of these taxa.

  18. Importance of life cycle assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridges, J.S.

    1994-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) as a tool to assist the waste professional with integrated waste management. LCA can be the connection between the waste professional and designer/producer to permit the waste professional to encourage the design of products so material recovery is most efficient and markets can be better predicted. The waste professional can better monitor the involvement of the consumer in waste management by using LCA and looking upstream at how the consumer actually reacts to products and packaging. LCA can also help the waste professional better understand the waste stream.

  19. Life Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketing | Department of EnergyLieko EarlefromLife

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of the pancreas: cytomorphological evaluation with emphasis on adequacy assessment, diagnostic criteria and contamination from the gastrointestinal tract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitsuhashi, T; Ghafari, S; Chang, C Y; Gu, M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    criteria and contamination from the gastrointestinal tract 1criteria and contamination from the gastrointestinal tractneoplasms and contamination from the gastrointestinal (GI)