National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for marine hydrokinetic energy

  1. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  2. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-29

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  3. Sandia Energy - Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural Health Monitoring Presented at GMREC METS Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power News News & Events Systems Analysis Investigations on...

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects, Fiscal Years 2008-2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-03-24

    This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects from 2008 to 2014.

  5. US Department of Energy (DOE) National Lab Activities in Marine Hydrokinetics: Scaled Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    US Department of Energy (DOE) National Lab Activities in Marine Hydrokinetics: Scaled Model Testing turbines specifically designed by the US Department of Energy for its Marine and Hydrokinetic Research. Keywords-- current energy conversion, performance testing, reference models, marine hydrokinetic

  6. Sandia Energy - Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Water Power Partnership News News & Events Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Coatings Initiated at PNNL's Sequim Bay Previous Next Biofouling...

  7. Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Regulators Workshop: Lessons from Wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, E. Ian

    2015-09-03

    Ian Baring-Gould presented these lessons learned from wind energy to an audience of marine hydrokinetic regulators. Lessons learned spanned the areas of technology advances, using collaborative approaches to involve key stakeholders; using baseline studies to measure and prioritize wildlife impacts, and look at avoidance and mitigation options early in the process.

  8. Sandia Energy - Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Market Acceleration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on aquatic organisms, with early emphasis on the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), acoustic noise from currenttidal, wave and riverine hydrokinetic generators, toxicity...

  9. Sandia Energy - Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News News & Events Systems Analysis Materials Science Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic Coatings Initiated at PNNL's Sequim Bay Previous Next Biofouling Studies...

  10. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Wind and Water Power Program's current approach to supporting the development and deployment of marine and hydrokinetic technologies.

  11. Marine and Hydrokinetic | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChangeMarcMarine andMarine and

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  13. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE’s Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.

  14. Sandia Energy - Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Reference Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &Water Power

  15. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development Technical Support and General Environmental Studies Report on Outreach to Stakeholders for Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2010-01-22

    Report on activities working with stakeholders in the emerging marine and hydrokinetic energy industry during FY09, for DOE EERE Office of Waterpower.

  16. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Devices, Potential Navigational Hazards and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-01

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies. A technical report addressing our findings is available on this Science and Technology Information site under the Product Title, "Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures". This product is a brochure, primarily for project developers, that summarizes important issues in that more comprehensive report, identifies locations where that report can be downloaded, and identifies points of contact for more information.

  17. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  18. Evaluating Effects of Stressors from Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.; Brandt, Charles A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Gill, Gary A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

    2012-09-30

    Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. During FY 2012, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) continued to follow project developments on the two marine and hydrokinetic projects reviewed for Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) screening analysis in FY 2011: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. The ERES project in FY 2012 also examined two stressor–receptor interactions previously identified through the screening process as being of high importance: 1) the toxicity effects of antifouling coatings on MHK devices on aquatic resources and 2) the risk of a physical strike encounter between an adult killer whale and an OpenHydro turbine blade. The screening-level assessment of antifouling paints and coatings was conducted for two case studies: the Snohomish County Public Utility District No. 1 (SnoPUD) tidal turbine energy project in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington, and the Ocean Power Technologies (OPT) wave buoy project in Reedsport, Oregon. Results suggest minimal risk to aquatic biota from antifouling coatings used on MHK devices deployed in large estuaries or open ocean environments. For the strike assessment of a Southern Resident Killer Whale (SRKW) encountering an OpenHydro tidal turbine blade, PNNL teamed with colleagues from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to carry out an analysis of the mechanics and biological consequences of different blade strike scenarios. Results of these analyses found the following: 1) a SRKW is not likely to experience significant tissue injury from impact by an OpenHydro turbine blade; and 2) if whale skin behaves similarly to the materials considered as surrogates for the upper dermal layers of whale skin, it would not be torn by an OpenHydro blade strike. The PNNL/SNL analyses could not provide insight into the potential for more subtle changes to SRKWs from an encounter with a turbine, such as changes in behavior, or inform turbine interactions for other whales or other turbines. These analyses were limited by the available time frame in which results were needed and focused on the mechanical response of whale tissues and bone to blade strike. PNNL proposes that analyses of additional turbine designs and interactions with other marine mammals that differ in size, body conformation, and mass be performed.

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-10

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies, as summarized herein. The contract also required cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and two recipients of awards (Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision) in a sub-topic area to develop a protocol to identify streamlined, best-siting practices. Over the period of this contract, PCCI and our sub-consultants, David Basco, Ph.D., and Neil Rondorf of Science Applications International Corporation, met with USCG headquarters personnel, with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers headquarters and regional personnel, with U.S. Navy regional personnel and other ocean users in order to develop an understanding of existing practices for the identification of navigational impacts that might occur during construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning. At these same meetings, “standard” and potential mitigation measures were discussed so that guidance could be prepared for project developers. Concurrently, PCCI reviewed navigation guidance published by the USCG and international community. This report summarizes the results of this effort, provides guidance in the form of a checklist for assessing the navigational impacts of potential marine and hydrokinetic projects, and provides guidance for improving the existing navigational guidance promulgated by the USCG in Navigation Vessel Inspection Circular 02 07. At the request of the USCG, our checklist and mitigation guidance was written in a generic nature so that it could be equally applied to offshore wind projects. PCCI teleconferenced on a monthly basis with DOE, Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision in order to share information and review work products. Although the focus of our effort was on marine and hydrokinetic technologies, as defined above, this effort drew upon earlier work by the USCG on offshore wind renewable energy installations. The guidance provided herein can be applied equally to marine and hydrokinetic technologies and to offshore wind, which are collectively referred to by the USCG as Renewable Energy Installations.

  20. Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects in Offshore Southeast Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinick, Charles

    2011-09-26

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review in which principal investigator discusses project progess to Investigate areas offshore southeast Florida that appeared most suitable for siting of marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion facilities that may be proposed in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of southeast Florida.

  1. Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. Funding Opportunity Announcement for a Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Announces 7.25 Million for Projects to Advance America's Emerging Marine & Hydrokinetic Industry Energy Department Announces 10 Million for Full-Scale Wave Energy Device Testing...

  3. Assessing the Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development on Marine and Estuarine Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-07-30

    The world’s oceans and estuaries offer an enormous potential to meet the nation’s growing demand for energy. The use of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices to harness the power of wave and tidal energy could contribute significantly toward meeting federal- and state-mandated renewable energy goals while supplying a substantial amount of clean energy to coastal communities. Locations along the eastern and western coasts of the United States between 40° and 70° north latitude are ideal for MHK deployment, and recent estimates of energy potential for the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California suggest that up to 25 gigawatts could be generated from wave and tidal devices in these areas. Because energy derived from wave and tidal devices is highly predictable, their inclusion in our energy portfolio could help balance available sources of energy production, including hydroelectric, coal, nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, and others.

  4. Live Webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test Site Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 from 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT the Water Power Program will hold an informational webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test...

  5. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy (DOE) announced a Notice of Intent to issue a funding opportunity titled "Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Research and Development University Consortium." The goal of...

  6. Funding Opportunity Announcement for a Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a 4 million funding opportunity titled "Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium." This funding opportunity is...

  7. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS)." The goal of this funding opportunity is to collect important performance and...

  8. US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component)- The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component) - The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

  9. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop...

  10. Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Cinq-Mars; Timothy Burke; Dr. James Irish; Brian Gustafson; Dr. James Kirtley; Dr. Aiman Alawa

    2011-09-01

    A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: � Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. � Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. � Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. � Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. � Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. � Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. � Completed final reporting and deliverables

  11. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. International Standards Development for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy - Final Report on Technical Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Neil E.; Busch, Jason; Kimball, Richard

    2011-10-29

    This report summarizes the progress toward development of International Standards for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy, as funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 114. The project has three main objectives: 1. Provide funding to support participation of key U.S. industry technical experts in 6 (originally 4) international working groups and/or project teams (the primary standards-making committees) and to attend technical meetings to ensure greater U.S. involvement in the development of these standards. 2. Provide a report to DOE and industry stakeholders summarizing the IEC standards development process for marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, new international standards and their justifications, and provide standards guidance to industry members. 3. Provide a semi-annual (web-based) newsletter to the marine renewable energy community. The newsletter will educate industry members and stakeholders about the processes, progress, and needs of the US efforts to support the international standards development effort. The newsletter is available at www.TC114.us

  13. Title: Sustainable Communities Based on a New Clean Energy Source -Marine & Hydrokinetic Power: Roosevelt Island and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Title: Sustainable Communities Based on a New Clean Energy Source - Marine & Hydrokinetic Power Earth Hour "a symbol of our commitment to sustainable energy for all," and underscored the need to "fuel in September launched an initiative to achieve universal and sustainable access to this vital resource, called

  14. Request for Information Regarding the Testing of Marine and Hydrokinet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Request for Information Regarding the Testing of Marine and Hydrokinetic Systems Request for Information Regarding the Testing of Marine and Hydrokinetic Systems January 14, 2015 -...

  15. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This fact sheet describes the Wind and Water Power Program's current approach to supporting the development and deployment of marine and hydrokinetic technologies.

  17. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformationMarietta, Georgia:Marine MammalMarine and

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  20. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  1. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  2. Template:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  3. Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and free-flowing rivers represent a promising energy source located close to centers of electricity demand. The Department of Energy is working with industry, universities,...

  4. Simulating Environmental Changes Due to Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    increasing attention upon renewable energy as a global solution to both energy and environmental challenges. Renewable energy sources such as wind power, solar power, or hydroelectric dams are increasingly implemented their potential environmental effects. When MHK devices extract energy from a system, volumetric flows and tidal

  5. Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    will obtain critical technical and cost performance data for one of the most advanced wave energy converters in the U.S. DOE Funding: 2,400,000. Total Project Value:...

  6. Template:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Milestone | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  8. Template:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  10. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  11. Sandia Energy - Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development | Department of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Resources | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergyApril 25,4

  14. Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinick, Charles; Riccobono, Antonino, MS; Messing, Charles G., Ph.D.; Walker, Brian K., Ph.D.; Reed, John K., Ph.D.

    2012-02-28

    Dehlsen Associates, LLC was awarded a grant by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Golden Field Office for a project titled 'Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida,' corresponding to DOE Grant Award Number DE-EE0002655 resulting from DOE funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000069 for Topic Area 2, and it is referred to herein as 'the project.' The purpose of the project was to enhance the certainty of the survey requirements and regulatory review processes for the purpose of reducing the time, efforts, and costs associated with initial siting efforts of marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion facilities that may be proposed in the Atlantic Ocean offshore Southeast Florida. To secure early input from agencies, protocols were developed for collecting baseline geophysical information and benthic habitat data that can be used by project developers and regulators to make decisions early in the process of determining project location (i.e., the siting process) that avoid or minimize adverse impacts to sensitive marine benthic habitat. It is presumed that such an approach will help facilitate the licensing process for hydrokinetic and other ocean renewable energy projects within the study area and will assist in clarifying the baseline environmental data requirements described in the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (formerly Minerals Management Service) final regulations on offshore renewable energy (30 Code of Federal Regulations 285, published April 29, 2009). Because projects generally seek to avoid or minimize impacts to sensitive marine habitats, it was not the intent of this project to investigate areas that did not appear suitable for the siting of ocean renewable energy projects. Rather, a two-tiered approach was designed with the first step consisting of gaining overall insight about seabed conditions offshore southeastern Florida by conducting a geophysical survey of pre-selected areas with subsequent post-processing and expert data interpretation by geophysicists and experienced marine biologists knowledgeable about the general project area. The second step sought to validate the benthic habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data by conducting benthic video and photographic field surveys of selected habitat types. The goal of this step was to determine the degree of correlation between the habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data and what actually exists on the seafloor based on the benthic video survey logs. This step included spot-checking selected habitat types rather than comprehensive evaluation of the entire area covered by the geophysical survey. It is important to note that non-invasive survey methods were used as part of this study and no devices of any kind were either temporarily or permanently attached to the seabed as part of the work conducted under this project.

  15. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof Energy ThisSites |and theDepartmentPROGRAM C L E A N C

  16. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn

    2009-12-01

    This report focuses on potential impacts of marine and hydrokinetic technologies to aquatic environments (i.e. rivers, estuaries, and oceans), fish and fish habitats, ecological relationships, and other marine and freshwater aquatic resources. The report does not address impacts to terrestrial ecosystems and organisms that are common to other electricity-generating technologies (e.g., construction and maintenance of transmission lines) or possible effects on the human environment, including: human use conflicts, aesthetics, viewsheds, noise in the terrestrial environment, light, recreation, transportation, navigation, cultural resources, socioeconomic impacts.

  17. Identification and Prioritization of Analysis Cases for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Risk Screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-06-16

    In this report we describe the development of the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), a risk-informed analytical process for estimating the environmental risks associated with the construction and operation of marine and hydrokinetic energy generation projects. The development process consists of two main phases of analysis. In the first phase, preliminary risk analyses will take the form of screening studies in which key environmental impacts and the uncertainties that create risk are identified, leading to a better-focused characterization of the relevant environmental effects. Existence of critical data gaps will suggest areas in which specific modeling and/or data collection activities should take place. In the second phase, more detailed quantitative risk analyses will be conducted, with residual uncertainties providing the basis for recommending risk mitigation and monitoring activities. We also describe the process used for selecting three cases for fiscal year 2010 risk screening analysis using the ERES. A case is defined as a specific technology deployed in a particular location involving certain environmental receptors specific to that location. The three cases selected satisfy a number of desirable criteria: 1) they correspond to real projects whose deployment is likely to take place in the foreseeable future; 2) the technology developers are willing to share technology and project-related data; 3) the projects represent a diversity of technology-site-receptor characteristics; 4) the projects are of national interest, and 5) environmental effects data may be available for the projects.

  18. Identifying How Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices Affect Aquatic Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G. F.; Copping, Andrea E.; Roberts, Jesse

    2011-04-24

    Significant research is under way to determine the potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy systems. This research, being guided and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, is intended to address knowledge gaps and facilitate installation and operation of these systems.

  19. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

  20. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2013-02-01

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

  1. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities in Support of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-09-30

    This fiscal year 2011 progress report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power Task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Objectives for Task 2.1.7 are the following: • to work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process • to work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development • to communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders • to engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which is described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning. As MHK industry partners work with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit, and license MHK technologies, they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under Task 2.1.7 is to understand and work to address these varied interests, reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  2. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Power Program is seeking feedback from the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry, academia, research laboratories, government agencies, and other stakeholders regarding the...

  3. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects Water Power for a Clean Energy Future...

  4. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and...

  5. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on...

  6. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Computer Modeling Workshop The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy...

  7. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This document described the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program efforts to promote the development and deployment of advanced water power devices.

  8. Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratory |Education at U.S. Universitiesfor NuclearTechnology

  9. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network For Marine And Hydrokinetic Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Peter J.; Edson, Patrick L.

    2013-12-20

    This project saw the completion of the design and development of a second generation, high frequency (90-120 kHz) Subsurface-Threat Detection Sonar Network (SDSN). The system was deployed, operated, and tested in Cobscook Bay, Maine near the site the Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGen™ power unit. This effort resulted in a very successful demonstration of the SDSN detection, tracking, localization, and classification capabilities in a high current, MHK environment as measured by results from the detection and tracking trials in Cobscook Bay. The new high frequency node, designed to operate outside the hearing range of a subset of marine mammals, was shown to detect and track objects of marine mammal-like target strength to ranges of approximately 500 meters. This performance range results in the SDSN system tracking objects for a significant duration - on the order of minutes - even in a tidal flow of 5-7 knots, potentially allowing time for MHK system or operator decision-making if marine mammals are present. Having demonstrated detection and tracking of synthetic targets with target strengths similar to some marine mammals, the primary hurdle to eventual automated monitoring is a dataset of actual marine mammal kinematic behavior and modifying the tracking algorithms and parameters which are currently tuned to human diver kinematics and classification.

  10. EA-1965: Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center’s Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE), through its Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO), is proposing to provide federal funding to Florida Atlantic University’s South-East National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU SNMREC) to support the at sea testing of FAU SNMREC’s experimental current generation turbine and the deployment and operation of their Small-Scale Ocean Current Turbine Test Berth, sited on the outer continental shelf (OCS) in waters off the coast of Ft Lauderdale, Florida. SNMREC would demonstrate the test berth site readiness by testing their pilot-scale experimental ocean current turbine unit at that location. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) conducted an Environmental Assessment to analyze the impacts associated with leasing OCS lands to FAU SNMREC, per their jurisdictional responsibilities under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. DOE was a cooperating agency in this process and based on the EA, DOE issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

  11. Eos, Vol. 93, No. 10, 6 March 2012 Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    convert the kinetic energy of waves and water currents into power to generate electricity. Although and wind energy, they offer electricity consumers situated near coastlines or inland rivers an alternative of harnessing the natural power of water for renewable energy at a competitive cost and without harming

  12. Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

    2013-09-01

    This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

  13. New Request for Information on Strategy to Advance the Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Request for Information on Strategy to Advance the Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Industry New Request for Information on Strategy to Advance the Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy...

  14. Hawaii National Marine Renewable Energy Center (HINMREC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocheleau, Richard

    2011-09-27

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review in which the principal investigator discusses project progress to develop in-water testing facility for marine and hydrokinetics energy devices.

  15. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies, Compiled Presentations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    This document represents a collection of all presentations given during the EERE Wind and Water Power Program's 2014 Marine and Hydrokinetic Peer Review. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate DOE-funded hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic R&D projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Water Power Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

  16. Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Copping, Andrea E.; Marshall, Kathryn E.

    2013-05-20

    Energy generated by the world’s oceans and rivers offers the potential to make substantial contributions to the domestic and global renewable energy supply. However, the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry faces challenges related to siting, permitting, construction, and operation of pilotand commercial-scale facilities. One of the challenges is to understand the potential effects to marine organisms from electromagnetic fields, which are produced as a by-product of transmitting power from offshore to onshore locations through underwater transmission cables. This report documents the progress of the third year of research (fiscal year 2012) to investigate environmental issues associated with marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) generation. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Wind and Water Technologies Office. The report addresses the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on selected marine species where significant knowledge gaps exist. The species studied this fiscal year included one fish and two crustacean species: the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister), and American lobster (Homarus americanus).

  17. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    homes and businesses. http:energy.goveerevideosenergy-101-hydroelectric-power Video Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies...

  18. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    http:energy.goveerevideosenergy-101-hydroelectric-power Video Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the...

  19. Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms – Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kropp, Roy K.

    2011-09-30

    A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science® Databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects of marine renewable energy devices on marine mammals and seabirds were examined to begin the search process (e.g., Boehlert et al. 2008; Thompson et al. 2008; Simas et al. 2009). From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Searches were conducted with reference to the potential effects of offshore wind farms and MHK devices on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that often the potential effects were offered as hypotheses that often were not supported by the presentation of appropriate documentation. Therefore, the search was refined and focused on trying to obtain the necessary information to support or challenge a proposed potential effect to a specific concern. One of the expressed concerns regarding MHK devices is that placing wave parks in coastal waters could compromise the migration patterns of whales. Disruption of the annual migration of the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus), which swims at least 30,000 km on its round trip from breeding grounds in Baja California to feeding areas in the Bering Sea, is of particular concern. Among the hypothesized effects on the migrating gray whales are increased predation risk by constricting migration corridor to between array and shore or by forcing the whales to swim into deeper waters, increased metabolic energy costs and delays in reaching the destinations, and interrupting feeding by blocking access to benthic areas under arrays. The literature search focused on identifying published studies that could provide information to evaluate these concerns. The results were developed into a case study that evaluated the potential effects of the placement of wave parks in coastal waters along the migration route of the gray whale. Wave parks and other MHK arrays may have additional effects on gray whales and other marine mammals, including entanglement in mooring lines and interference with communications among other effects, that were not included in this case study. The case study results were rewritten into a simpler form that would be suitable for placement on a web blog

  20. First Commercial, Grid-Connected, Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy Project...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    First Commercial, Grid-Connected, Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy Project in North America Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) SBIR...

  1. JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

    2011-04-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  2. Live Webinar on the Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development University Consortium

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On April 24, 2014 from 1:00 - 2:30 PM EDT, the Water Power Program will hold a live webinar to provide information to potential applicants for the Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Research and...

  3. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-01-01

    The online information resources included in this fact sheet were developed with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, and are designed to provide the public access to information pertaining to MHK technologies, projects, and research.

  5. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry.

  6. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

    2013-02-01

    The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9-10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community and collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts and discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest how the U.S. Department of Energy and national laboratory resources can be utilized to most effectively assist the marine energy industry.

  7. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

    2013-02-01

    The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9–10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways from the workshop and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts, supply discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest what the most pressing MHK technology needs are and how the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources can be utilized to assist the marine energy industry in the most effective manner.

  8. The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

    2012-11-28

    Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

  9. Sandia Energy - Upgrades to SNL-EFDC: A Tool to Balance Marine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upgrades to SNL-EFDC: A Tool to Balance Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Generation Efficiency with Environmental Response Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power News News & Events...

  10. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HEALTH MONITORING OF MARINE HYDROKINETIC STRUCTURES (91) Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual (40) Flow...

  11. Quadrennial Technology Review 2015: Technology Assessments--Marine and Hydrokinetic Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sam Baldwin, Gilbert Bindewald, Austin Brown, Charles Chen, Kerry Cheung, Corrie Clark, Joe Cresko,

    2015-10-07

    Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies convert the energy of waves, tides, and river and ocean currents into electricity. With more than 50% of the U.S. population living within 50 miles of the nation’s coasts, MHK technologies hold significant potential to supply renewable electricity to consumers in coastal load centers, particularly in the near term in areas with high costs of electricity and longer term in high resource areas in close proximity to major coastal load centers. MHK resource assessments identify a total U.S. technical resource potential of approximately 1250–1850 terawatt-hours (TWh) of generation per year from ocean wave, ocean current, ocean tidal, and river current energy. Of this, the U.S. continental technical resource potential is approximately 500–750 TWh/year. For context, roughly 90,000 homes can be powered by 1 TWh of electricity generation each year. A cost-effective MHK industry could provide a substantial amount of electricity for the nation owing in large part to its unique advantages as a source of energy, including its vast resource potential, its close proximity to major coastal load centers, and its long-term predictability and near-term forecastability.

  12. International Conference on Ocean Energy, 17 October, Dublin US Department of Energy National Lab Activities in Marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    4th International Conference on Ocean Energy, 17 October, Dublin 1 US Department of Energy National Lab Activities in Marine Hydrokinetics: Machine Performance Testing V.S. Neary1, 2 , L.P. Chamorro2 Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technology performance testing in the laboratory and field supports the US

  13. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development Risk Management Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergyApril 25,4 FURTHEREnergyMarine and

  14. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development and Testing | Department of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergyApril 25,4 FURTHEREnergyMarine

  15. Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Task 2.1.1.2: Evaluating Effects of Stressors Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Anderson, Richard M.; Zdanski, Laura C.; Gill, Gary A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

    2011-09-01

    Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases. During FY 2011, two additional cases were added: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two FY 2011 cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted in early FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. “Risk” has two components: (1) The likelihood, or “probability”, of the occurrence of a given interaction or event, and (2) the potential “consequence” if that interaction or event were to occur. During FY 2011, the ERES screening analysis focused primarily on the second component of risk, “consequence”, with focused probability analysis for interactions where data was sufficient for probability modeling. Consequence analysis provides an assessment of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations. Probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors and requires significant data inputs to drive risk models. During FY 2011, two stressor-receptor interactions were examined for the probability of occurrence. The two interactions (spill probability due to an encounter between a surface vessel and an MHK device; and toxicity from anti-biofouling paints on MHK devices) were seen to present relatively low risks to marine and freshwater receptors of greatest concern in siting and permitting MHK devices. A third probability analysis was scoped and initial steps taken to understand the risk of encounter between marine animals and rotating turbine blades. This analysis will be completed in FY 2012.

  16. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies, Wind and Water Power Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and evaluate various technology types. Technology Development, Testing & Deployment Water Power Program projects support the marine and hydro- kinetic technology industry in its...

  17. 2011 Marine Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report; March 1, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y.; Reed, M.; Smith, B.

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the NREL Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop. The objectives for the modeling workshop were to: (1) Review the designs of existing MHK device prototypes and discuss design and optimization procedures; (2) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling techniques and methods presently used for modeling MHK devices; (3) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling methods used in other areas, such as naval architecture and ocean engineering (e.g., oil & gas industry); and (4) Identify the necessary steps to link modeling with other important components that analyze MHK devices (e.g., tank testing, PTO design, mechanical design).

  18. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    into electricity for our homes and businesses. http:energy.goveerevideosenergy-101-hydroelectric-power Video Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy See how marine and...

  19. DOE Announces Marine and Hydrokinetic Open Data Effort | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    innovation, and implementation. DOE's MHK Technology Database moves to the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website where the MHK community now has an interactive database...

  20. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Technology Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulk to 13.1Carbon DioxideHydrokinetic

  1. Funding Opportunity Announcement for a Marine and Hydrokinetic Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping intoandMinimal Cost | Department ofEnergyPart

  2. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof Energy ThisSites |and theDepartmentPROGRAM C L E

  3. DOE Announces Marine and Hydrokinetic Open Data Effort | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle10 DOE ASSESSMENTat LosDepartment of Energy U.

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic Market Acceleration and Deployment | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA PublicLED1,400Manufacturing Office of

  5. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergy Managing Swimming Pool TemperatureWind and Water Power Program effortsof

  6. Notice of Intent to Fund Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailable forSite |n t e g r i t(EIS) andApproachDepartment

  7. Notice of Intent to Fund Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailable forSite |n t e g r i t(EIS)

  8. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryin theNuclear Energy ResearchKansasDepartmentJ u l

  9. Environmentally Benign and Permanent Modifications to Prevent Biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Zhang

    2012-04-19

    Semprus Biosciences is developing environmentally benign and permanent modifications to prevent biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Biofouling, including growth on external surfaces by bacteria, algae, barnacles, mussels, and other marine organisms, accumulate quickly on MHK devices, causing mechanical wear and changes in performance. Biofouling on crucial components of hydrokinetic devices, such as rotors, generators, and turbines, imposes substantial mass and hydrodynamic loading with associated efficiency loss and maintenance costs. Most antifouling coatings leach toxic ingredients, such as copper and tributyltin, through an eroding process, but increasingly stringent regulation of biocides has led to interest in the development of non-biocidal technologies to control fouling. Semprus Biosciences research team is developing modifications to prevent fouling from a broad spectrum of organisms on devices of all shapes, sizes, and materials for the life of the product. The research team designed and developed betaine-based polymers as novel underwater coatings to resist the attachment of marine organisms. Different betaine-based monomers and polymers were synthesized and incorporated within various coating formulations. The formulations and application methods were developed on aluminum panels with required adhesion strength and mechanical properties. The coating polymers were chemically stable under UV, hydrolytic and oxidative environments. The sulfobetaine formulations are applicable as nonleaching and stable underwater coatings. For the first time, coating formulations modified with highly packed sulfobetaine polymers were prepared and demonstrated resistance to a broad spectrum of marine organisms. Assays for comparing nonfouling performance were developed to evaluate protein adsorption and bacteria attachment. Barnacle settlement and removal were evaluated and a 60-day field test was performed. Silicone substrates including a commercial fouling release coating were used for comparison. Compared with the unmodified silicone substrates, the sulfobetaine-modified formulations were able to exhibit a 98% reduction in fibrinogen adsorption, 97.0% (E. coli), 99.6% (S. aureus), and 99.5% (C. lytica) reduction in bacteria attachment, and 100% reduction in barnacles cyprid attachment. In addition to the significant improvement in fouling resistance of various organisms, the 60-day field test also showed an evident efficacy from visual assessment, foul rating, and fouling removal test. The research confirmed that the novel antifouling mechanism of betaine polymers provides a new avenue for marine coating development. The developed coatings out-performed currently used nontoxic underwater coatings in a broad spectrum of fouling resistance. By further developing formulations and processing methods for specific devices, the technology is ready for the next stage of development with demonstration in MHK systems.

  10. River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,EnergyEast Jump to:Ridgway, Colorado:Ristma AG

  11. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES Pursuant toPower WindDepartment of Energy

  12. Simulating Blade-Strike on Fish passing through Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2014-06-16

    The study reported here evaluated the occurrence, frequency, and intensity of blade strike of fish on an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine by using two modeling approaches: a conventional kinematic formulation and a proposed Lagrangian particle- based scheme. The kinematic model included simplifying assumptions of fish trajectories such as distribution and velocity. The proposed method overcame the need for such simplifications by integrating the following components into a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulation, (ii) generation of ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The test conditions to evaluate the blade-strike probability and fish survival rate were: (i) the turbulent environment, (ii) the fish size, and (iii) the approaching flow velocity. The proposed method offered the ability to produce potential fish trajectories and their interaction with the rotating turbine. Depending upon the scenario, the percentile of particles that registered a collision event ranged from 6% to 19% of the released sample size. Next, by using a set of experimental correlations of the exposure-response of living fish colliding with moving blades, the simulated collision data were used as input variables to estimate the survival rate of fish passing through the operating turbine. The resulting survival rates were greater than 96% in all scenarios, which is comparable to or better than known survival rates for conventional hydropower turbines. The figures of strike probability and mortality rate were amplified by the kinematic model. The proposed method offered the advantage of expanding the evaluation of other mechanisms of stress and injury on fish derived from hydrokinetic turbines and related devices.

  13. Sandia Energy - Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Reference Model...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore Wind High-Resolution Computational Algorithms for Simulating Offshore Wind Farms Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors Offshore Wind RD&D:...

  14. Sandia Energy - Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Technology Developmen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and currenttidal power devices. Areas of focus will be on coatings, composites, and molding processes. System Reliability and Survivability Similar to other early stage...

  15. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChangeMarc

  16. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial Report Management ChallengesManufacturingMapandWater Power

  17. Aquamarine Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    House 24 Elder Street Place: Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: EH2 2AF Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Product: Edinburgh-based company that specialises in marine energy...

  18. Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates: Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms - Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Marshall, Kathryn E.; Ward, Jeffrey A.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2012-05-01

    This fiscal year (FY) 2011 progress report (Task 2.1.3 Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.3.1.1 Electromagnetic Fields) describes studies conducted by PNNL as part of the DOE Wind and Water Power Program to examine the potential effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from marine and hydrokinetic devices on aquatic organisms, including freshwater and marine fish and marine invertebrates. In this report, we provide a description of the methods and results of experiments conducted in FY 2010-FY 2011 to evaluate potential responses of selected aquatic organisms. Preliminary EMF laboratory experiments during FY 2010 and 2011 entailed exposures with representative fish and invertebrate species including juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), California halibut (Paralicthys californicus), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister). These species were selected for their ecological, commercial, and/or recreational importance, as well as their potential to encounter an MHK device or transmission cable during part or all of their life cycle. Based on previous studies, acute effects such as mortality were not expected to occur from EMF exposures. Therefore, our measurement endpoints focused on behavioral responses (e.g., detection of EMF, interference with feeding behavior, avoidance or attraction to EMF), developmental changes (i.e., growth and survival from egg or larval stage to juvenile), and exposure markers indicative of physiological responses to stress. EMF intensities during the various tests ranged from 0.1 to 3 millitesla, representing a range of upper bounding conditions reported in the literature. Experiments to date have shown there is little evidence to indicate distinct or extreme behavioral responses in the presence of elevated EMF for the species tested. Several developmental and physiological responses were observed in the fish exposures, although most were not statistically significant. Additional species are currently planned for laboratory testing in the next fiscal year (e.g. an elasmobranch, American lobster) to provide a broader assessment of species important to stakeholders. The collective responses of all species will be assessed in terms of life stage, exposure scenarios, and biological relevance, to address current uncertainties related to effects of EMF on aquatic organisms.

  19. Videos | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    First Day Secretary Moniz Speaks at the 2013 Energy Efficiency Global Forum Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy he Hanford Story Tank Waste Cleanup Energy Innovation Hubs...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code. Marine Hydrokinetic Module User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Scott Carlton; Roberts, Jesse D.

    2014-03-01

    This document describes the marine hydrokinetic (MHK) input file and subroutines for the Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC), which is a combined hydrodynamic, sediment transport, and water quality model based on the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) developed by John Hamrick [1], formerly sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and now maintained by Tetra Tech, Inc. SNL-EFDC has been previously enhanced with the incorporation of the SEDZLJ sediment dynamics model developed by Ziegler, Lick, and Jones [2-4]. SNL-EFDC has also been upgraded to more accurately simulate algae growth with specific application to optimizing biomass in an open-channel raceway for biofuels production [5]. A detailed description of the input file containing data describing the MHK device/array is provided, along with a description of the MHK FORTRAN routine. Both a theoretical description of the MHK dynamics as incorporated into SNL-EFDC and an explanation of the source code are provided. This user manual is meant to be used in conjunction with the original EFDC [6] and sediment dynamics SNL-EFDC manuals [7]. Through this document, the authors provide information for users who wish to model the effects of an MHK device (or array of devices) on a flow system with EFDC and who also seek a clear understanding of the source code, which is available from staff in the Water Power Technologies Department at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  1. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nergy-101-marine-and-hydrokinetic-energy Current search Search found 2 items Water Remove Water filter Energy Sources Remove Energy Sources filter Video Remove Video filter Filter...

  2. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nergy-101-marine-and-hydrokinetic-energy Current search Search found 2 items Water Remove Water filter Energy Sources Remove Energy Sources filter Consumers Remove Consumers filter...

  3. Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. This paper summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30{sup o} of yaw.

  4. Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. It summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30 degrees of yaw.

  5. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities In Support Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment: Task 2.1.7 Permitting and Planning Fiscal Year 2012 Year-End Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Hanna, Luke A.; Judd, Chaeli R.; Blake, Kara M.

    2012-09-01

    This fiscal year 2012 year-end report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the MHK industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, NGOs, and industry. Objectives for 2.1.7 are the following: • To work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process. • To work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development. • To communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders. • To engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which are described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning As the MHK industry works with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit and license MHK technologies they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under 2.1.7 is to understand these varied interests, explore mechanisms to reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately identify pathways to reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  6. Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy Subject: Hearing Examining Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology: Finding the Path to Commercialization...

  7. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    project to benchmark a set of marine and hydrokinetic technologies including current (tidal, open-ocean, and river) turbines and wave energy converters. The objectives of the...

  8. BOEM Issues First Renewable Energy Lease for MHK Technology Testing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) issued the first ever lease to test marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy devices in federal waters to Florida Atlantic University...

  9. Energy Department Announces Funding for Demonstration and Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 million to strengthen the U.S. marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including wave and tidal energy sources. Through the two funding opportunities announced today the...

  10. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nergy-101-marine-and-hydrokinetic-energy Current search Search found 2 items Water Remove Water filter Renewables Remove Renewables filter Video Remove Video filter Filter by...

  11. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nergy-101-marine-and-hydrokinetic-energy Current search Search found 2 items Water Remove Water filter Renewables Remove Renewables filter Consumers Remove Consumers filter Filter...

  12. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nergy-101-marine-and-hydrokinetic-energy Current search Search found 2 items Water Remove Water filter Consumers Remove Consumers filter Filter by Resource Type All Results (2)...

  13. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nergy-101-marine-and-hydrokinetic-energy Current search Search found 2 items Water Remove Water filter Video Remove Video filter Consumers Remove Consumers filter Filter by...

  14. Energy Department Announces $7.25 Million for Projects to Advance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to advance water power as a viable resource for America's clean energy portfolio. Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies convert the energy of waves, tides, rivers, and...

  15. Energy Department Announces $10 Million for Full-Scale Wave Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with the Navy, today announced funding for two companies that will continue to advance marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technology as a viable source for America's clean energy...

  16. Prototype Testing Could Help Prove a Promising Energy Source...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Manager The first third-party-validated, grid-tied wave energy device in North American waters started feeding renewable electricity to...

  17. Energy Department Announces $4 Million for University Consortium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    research universities in the effort to accelerate the development of the emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry in the United States. This funding will support...

  18. Catching a Wave: Innovative Wave Energy Device Surfs for Power...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and cost-effective electricity from clean energy resources, including water. Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, which generate power from waves, tides, or...

  19. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    results of that workshop, focusing on potential effects on freshwater, estuarine, and marine ecosystems, and we describe recent national and international developments....

  20. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-03-01

    Renewable energy technologies offer the promise of non-polluting alternatives to fossil and nuclear-fueled power plants to meet growing demand for electrical energy. Two emerging categories of renewable energy technologies, hydrokinetic and wave energy conversion devices, offer ways to tap the energy of moving water without impoundment (dams) or diversion required by many conventional hydroelectric facilities. These technologies include devices designed for deployment in natural streams, tidal estuaries, ocean currents, and constructed waterways, as well as devices designed to capture the energy of ocean waves. On October 26-28, 2005, 54 representatives from government, non-governmental organizations, and private business met to (1) identify the varieties of hydrokinetic energy and wave technology devices, their stages of development, and the projected cost to bring each to market; (2) identify where these technologies can best operate; (3) identify the potential environmental issues associated with these technologies and possible mitigation measures; (4) develop a list of research needs and/or practical solutions to address unresolved environmental issues. These workshop proceedings include detailed summaries of the 24 presentations made and the discussions that followed.

  1. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesof EnergyY-12 NationalNOHydrogen Maps Below areMaps Marine

  2. Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweizer, Peter E; Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2012-03-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is concern that small, fragile fish early life stages may be unable to avoid being struck by the blades of hydrokinetic turbines, we found no empirical data in the published literature that document survival of earliest life-stage fish in passage by rotor blades. In addition to blade strike, research on passage of fish through conventional hydropower turbines suggested that fish mortalities from passage through the rotor swept area could also occur due to shear stresses and pressure chances in the water column (Cada et al. 1997, Turnpenny 1998). However, for most of the proposed HK turbine designs the rotors are projected to operate a lower RPM (revolutions per minute) than observed from conventional reaction turbines; the associated shear stress and pressure changes are expected to be lower and pose a smaller threat to fish survival (DOE 2009). Only a limited number of studies have been conducted to examine the risk of blade strike from hydrokinetic technologies to fish (Turnpenny et al. 1992, Normandeau et al. 2009, Seitz et al. 2011, EPRI 2011); the survival of drifting or weakly swimming fish (especially early life stages) that encounter rotor blades from hydrokinetic (HK) devices is currently unknown. Our study addressed this knowledge gap by testing how fish larvae and juveniles encountered different blade profiles of hydrokinetic devices and how such encounters influenced survivorship. We carried out a laboratory study designed to improve our understanding of how fish larvae and juvenile fish may be affected by encounters with rotor blades from HK turbines in the water column of river and ocean currents. (For convenience, these early life stages will be referred to as young of the year, YOY). The experiments developed information needed to quantify the risk (both probability and consequences) of rotor-blade strike to YOY fish. In particular, this study attempted to determine whether YOY drifting in a high-velocity flow directly in the path of the blade leading edge will make contact with the rotor blade or will bypass the blade while entrained in the boundary l

  3. Interactions between turbulent open channel flow, power and the wake of an axial-flow marine turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    turbine Leonardo P. Chamorro1 , Craig Hill1 , Vincent Neary2 , Budi Gunawan2 , Roger Arndt1 , Fotis-flow marine hydrokinetic turbines was lacking. Advancing this area of knowledge within the field of marine and hydrokinetic energy research, development, and deployment will lead to more efficient turbine operations

  4. Wave and Hydrokinetics Interest Group 1st Meeting of 2009/2010 Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave and Hydrokinetics Interest Group 1st Meeting of 2009/2010 Year: With a Focus on wave Energy, Inc. All rights reserved. Marine Wave Energy Interest Group · Bill Toman, PG&E WaveConnect Project Manager is Chairman · Agenda 8:30-9:00 USA Project Status: PG&E WaveConnect, OPT Reedsport and Coos Bay

  5. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOAA Fisheries, Washington, DC. Stavrakas is a national energy coordinator at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, DC. Hall is a staff member at the Idaho National...

  6. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummary Areas ofEnergy OnPeter||NEPA/3095 4:00PMSSL IN AMERICA,on

  7. Multnomah County Hydrokinetic Feasibility Study: Final Feasibility Study Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Spain

    2012-03-15

    HDR has completed a study of the technical, regulatory, and economic feasibility of installing hydrokinetic turbines under the Morrison, Broadway, and Sellwood bridges. The primary objective of installing hydrokinetic turbines is a demonstration of in-stream hydrokinetic technologies for public education and outreach. Due to the low gradient of the Lower Willamette and the effects of the tide, velocities in the area in consideration are simply not high enough to economically support a commercial installation. While the velocities in the river may at times provide enough energy for a commercial turbine to reach capacity, the frequency and duration of high flow events which provide suitable velocities is not sufficient to support a commercial hydrokinetic installation. We have observed that over an 11 year period, daily average velocities in the Lower Willamette exceeded a nominal cut-in speed of 0.75 m/s only 20% of the time, leaving net zero power production for the remaining 80% of days. The Sellwood Bridge site was estimated to have the best hydrokinetic resource, with an estimated average annual production of about 9,000 kWh. The estimated production could range from 2,500 kWh to 15,000 kWh. Based on these energy estimates, the amount of revenue generated through either a power purchase agreement (PPA) or recovered through net metering is not sufficient to repay the project costs within the life of the turbine. The hydrokinetic resource at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges is slightly smaller than at the Sellwood Bridge. While the Broadway and Morrison Bridges have existing infrastructure that could be utilized, the project is not expected to generate enough revenue to repay the investment. Despite low velocities and energy production, the sites themselves are favorable for installation of a demonstration or experimental project. With high public interest in renewable energy, the possibility exists to develop a hydrokinetic test site which could provide developers and scientists a location to temporarily deploy and test hydrokinetic devices, and also function as an educational tool for the general public. Bridge piers provide an excellent pre-existing anchor point for hydrokinetic devices, and existing infrastructure at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges may reduce installation costs. Opportunity exists to partner with local universities with engineering and environmental interest in renewable energy. A partnership with Portland State University�¢����s engineering school could provide students with an opportunity to learn about hydrokinetics through senior design projects. Oregon State University and University of Washington, which are partnered through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) to study and test hydrokinetic technology, are also relatively local to the site. In addition to providing an opportunity for both public and private entities to learn technically about in-stream kinetics, this approach will encourage grant funding for outreach, education, and product development, while also serving as a positive community relations opportunity for the County and its partners.

  8. Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices; Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms - Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kropp, Roy K.

    2013-01-01

    A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science® databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on seabirds and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects on seabirds and fish were examined to begin the search process. From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on seabirds and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that the potential effects frequently w

  9. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrderNATIONALof Energy Proceedings of the

  10. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Milestone | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport JumpFlowood,PevafersaMapFile Jump to: navigation,

  11. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport JumpFlowood,PevafersaMapFile Jump to:

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation, searchScotland Jump to: navigation, search Name:

  13. Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to: navigation,Ground GravityLists forsource

  14. Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to: navigation,Ground GravityLists

  15. Sandia Energy - Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni >ScientificApplied TurbulentAssessmentBattery(MHK)

  16. Sandia Energy - Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni >ScientificApplied

  17. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Technology Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy Headquarters Categorical| Department of Energy Cha-Ching!ChapterHydropower

  18. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof Energy ThisSites |and theDepartmentPROGRAM C L E A N C

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof Energy ThisSites |and theDepartmentPROGRAM C L ENo.

  20. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. marine energy industry is actively pursuing development of offshore wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems. Experience in the wind energy sector demonstrates that new technology development requires thorough measurement and characterization of the environmental conditions prevalent at installation sites and of technology operating in the field. Presently, there are no turn-key instrumentation system solutions that meet the measurement needs of the marine energy industry. The 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop brought together technical experts from government laboratories, academia, and industry representatives from marine energy, wind, offshore oil and gas, and instrumentation developers to present and discuss the instrumentation needs of the marine energy industry. The goals of the meeting were to: 1. Share the latest relevant knowledge among technical experts; 2. Review relevant state-of-the-art field measurement technologies and methods; 3. Review lessons learned from recent field deployments; 4. Identify synergies across different industries; 5. Identify gaps between existing and needed instrumentation capabilities; 6. Understand who are the leading experts; 7. Provide a forum where stakeholders from the marine energy industry could provide substantive input in the development of new marine energy field deployable instrumentation packages.

  1. Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S; Gunawan, Budi

    2011-09-01

    In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

  2. Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the BillDepartment ofEnergyJoe25, 2015 EIS-0491:Action

  3. Concerns in Marine Renewable Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharon Kramer, Mirko Previsic, Peter Nelson, Sheri Woo

    2010-06-17

    To accelerate the adoption of these emerging marine hydrokinetic technologies, navigational and environmental issues and concerns must be identified and addressed. As hydrokinetic projects move forward, various stakeholders will need to be engaged; one of the key issues that project proponents face as they engage stakeholders is that many conflicting uses and environmental issues are not well-understood. Much of this lack of understanding comes from a limited understanding of the technologies themselves. To address this issue, in September 2008, RE Vision consulting, LLC, was selected by the Department of Energy, under their market acceleration program, to apply a scenario-based assessment approach to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector. The goal was to improve understanding of potential environmental and navigation impacts of these technologies and focus stakeholders on the critical issues. To meet this goal, the study established baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios captured variations in technical approaches and deployment scales and thus grounded the analysis in realistic constraints. The work conducted under this award provides an important foundation to other market acceleration activities carried out by the DoE and other stakeholders in this sector. The scenarios were then evaluated using a framework developed by H.T. Harvey & Associates to identify and characterize key environmental concerns and uncertainties. In collaboration with PCCI and the U.S. Coast Guard, navigation issues were assessed and guidelines developed to assure the safe operation of these systems. Finally, the work highlights “next steps” to take to continue development and adoption of marine hydrokinetic energy. Throughout the project, close collaboration with device developers, project developers and regulatory stakeholders was pursued to ensure that assumptions and constraints are realistic. Results concur with most of the permitting hurdles experienced by on-going projects in the U.S., and specific recommendations are provided for identifying and addressing them. While many areas of further research were identified, the study did not identify any major “show-stopper,” largely because these technologies have a relatively low environmental risk-profile if compared to other activities routinely permitted in the marine environment. The frameworks and representative scenarios developed provide an objective and transparent tool for stakeholders, regulators and developers to assist in the decision-making process for siting wave and tidal energy plants, and meet our goal of improving understanding between all stakeholders. The final product consists of three reports: Report 1 - Wave Energy Scenarios This report includes: - A technology characterization of four different wave energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations - A site characterization of two potential deployment sites located in Hawaii and California - Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities - Navigational demarcation requirements - Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts Report 2 - Tidal Energy Scenarios This report includes: - A technology characterization of three tidal energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations. - A site characterization of one potential deployment location in the Puget Sound, Washington - Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities - Navigational demarcation requirements - Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts Report 3 - Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This report describes frameworks for identifying key environmental effects and applies them to the wave and tidal energy deployment scenarios described in the first two reports. It highlights critical issues and recommendations for future research

  4. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. Assessment...

  5. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. The assessment provides estimates of the gross, naturally available...

  6. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-EnergyTara Camacho-Lopez2015-04-06T22:15:34+00:00 Placeholder Download Filename...

  7. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technological Cost-Reduction Pathways for Attenuator Wave Energy Converters in the Marine Hydrokinetic EnvironmentTara Camacho-Lopez2015-04-06T22:15:34+00:00 Placeholder Download...

  8. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-12

    This document describes some of the accomplishments of the Department of Energy Water Power Program, and how those accomplishments are supporting the advancement of renewable energy generated using hydropower technologies and marine and hydrokinetic technologies.

  9. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the second report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of tidal power plants deployed in Tacoma Narrows, Washington. The Narrows contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other tidal power sites and serves as a representative case study. Tidal power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize impacts, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informs the process of selecting representative tidal power devices. The selection criteria is that such devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development including Verdant Power, which has demonstrated an array of turbines in the East River of New York, Clean Current, which has demonstrated a device off Race Rocks, BC, and OpenHydro, which has demonstrated a device at the European Marine Energy Test Center and is on the verge of deploying a larger device in the Bay of Fundy. MCT demonstrated their device both at Devon (UK) and Strangford Narrows (Northern Ireland). Furthermore OpenHydro, CleanCurrent, and MCT are the three devices being installed at the Minas Passage (Canada). Environmental effects will largely scale with the size of tidal power development. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nom

  10. Assessment of Tidal Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Development of MHK Module and Analysis of Effects on Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2011-09-01

    In this report we describe (1) the development, test, and validation of the marine hydrokinetic energy scheme in a three-dimensional coastal ocean model (FVCOM); and (2) the sensitivity analysis of effects of marine hydrokinetic energy configurations on power extraction and volume flux in a coastal bay. Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics and Subtask 2.1.2.3, Screening Analysis, for fiscal year 2011 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

  11. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    Water power technologies harness energy from rivers and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses, and can help the United States meet its pressing energy, environmental, and economic challenges. Water power technologies; fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower uses dams or impoundments to store river water in a reservoir. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients.

  12. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop: April 5-7, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. marine energy industry is actively pursuing development of offshore wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems. Experience in the wind energy sector demonstrates that new technology development requires thorough measurement and characterization of the environmental conditions prevalent at installation sites and of technology operating in the field. Presently, there are no turn-key instrumentation system solutions that meet the measurement needs of the marine energy industry. The 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop brought together technical experts from government laboratories, academia, and industry representatives from marine energy, wind, offshore oil and gas, and instrumentation developers to present and discuss the instrumentation needs of the marine energy industry. The goals of the meeting were to: (1) Share the latest relevant knowledge among technical experts; (2) Review relevant state-of-the-art field measurement technologies and methods; (3) Review lessons learned from recent field deployments; (4) Identify synergies across different industries; (5) Identify gaps between existing and needed instrumentation capabilities; (6) Understand who are the leading experts; (7) Provide a forum where stakeholders from the marine energy industry could provide substantive input in the development of new marine energy field deployable instrumentation packages.

  13. Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

    2013-10-01

    Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

  14. 2015 Marine Energy Technology Symposium

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The 3rd Annual Marine Energy Technology Symposium (METS) will be held as part of the inaugural International Marine Energy Conference. This conference takes place April 27-29, 2015, at the Capital...

  15. THORs Power Method for Hydrokinetic Devices - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Turner Hunt; Joel Rumker

    2012-08-08

    Ocean current energy represents a vast untapped source of renewable energy that exists on the outer continental shelf areas of the 5 major continents. Ocean currents are unidirectional in nature and are perpetuated by thermal and salinity sea gradients, as well as coriolis forces imparted from the earth's rotation. This report details THORs Power Method, a breakthrough power control method that can provide dramatic increases to the capacity factor over and above existing marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices employed in the extraction of energy from ocean currents. THORs Power Method represents a constant speed, variable depth operational method that continually locates the ocean current turbine at a depth at which the rated power of the generator is routinely achieved. Variable depth operation is achieved by using various vertical force effectors, including ballast tanks for variable weight, a hydrodynamic wing for variable lift or down force and drag flaps for variable vehicle drag forces.

  16. Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweizer, Peter E; Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2010-05-01

    Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects to animal populations could occur directly (e.g., from strike mortality of individuals) or indirectly (e.g., if the loss of prey species to strike reduces food for predators). Although actively swimming or passively drifting animals may collide with any of the physical structures associated with hydrokinetic devices, turbine rotors are the most likely sources for risk of strike or significant collision (DOE 2009). It is also possible that during a close encounter with a HK device no physical contact will be made between the device and the organism, either because the animal avoids the device by successfully changing its direction of movement, or by successfully evading any moving parts of the device. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waterpower Program to evaluate strike potential and consequences for Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies in rivers and estuaries of the United States. We will use both predictive models and laboratory/field experiments to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of strike at HK projects in rivers. Efforts undertaken at ORNL address three objectives: (1) Assess strike risk for marine and freshwater organisms; (2) Develop experimental procedures to assess the risk and consequences of strike; and (3) Conduct strike studies in experimental flumes and field installations of hydrokinetic devices. During the first year of the study ORNL collected information from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) MHK database about geographical distribution of proposed hydrokinetic projects (what rivers or other types of systems), HK turbine design (horizontal axis, vertical axis, other), description of proposed axial turbine (number of blades, size of blades, rotation rate, mitigation measures), and number of units per project. Where site specific information was available, we compared the location of proposed projects rotors within the channel (e.g., along cutting edge bank, middle of thalweg, near bottom or in midwater) to the general locations of fish in the river (shoreline,

  17. Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, wave energy conversion could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that, due to a lack of technical certainty, many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood,. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based assessment to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector in order to evaluate the potential impact of these technologies on the marine environment and navigation constraints. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental effects and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential range of technical attributes and potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders on the critical issues that need to be addressed. By identifying and addressing navigational and environmental concerns in the early stages of the industry’s development, serious mistakes that could potentially derail industry-wide development can be avoided. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory issues (Pacific Energy Ventures) and navigational issues (PCCI). The results of this study are structured into three reports: (1) Wave power scenario description (2) Tidal power scenario description (3) Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the first report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of wave power plants deployed in Humboldt County, California and Oahu, Hawaii. These two sites contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other wave power sites in the U.S. and serve as representative case studies. Wave power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize potential effects, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informed the process of selecting representative wave power devices. The selection criteria requires that devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties, and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. Table 1 summarizes the selected wave power technologies. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development, but are not directly mentioned here. Many environmental effects will largely scale with the size of the wave power plant. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) a small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial sc

  18. Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish 47fish-hkturbineinteractionseprijacobs...

  19. International Marine Renewable Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The International Marine Renewable Energy Conference (IMREC) offers researchers, technology developers, policy makers, NGOs, and industry representatives the opportunity to discuss financing...

  20. Sandia Energy - Daniel Laird

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia National Laboratories' Water Power Technologies department which includes Marine Hydrokinetic, Conventional Hydro, and Offshore Wind technologies. Daniel joined...

  1. Climate sensitivity of marine energy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Gareth P; Wallace, Robin

    2005-01-01

    Marine energy has a significant role to play in lowering carbon emissions within the energy sector. Paradoxically, it may be susceptible to changes in climate that will result from rising carbon emissions. Wind patterns ...

  2. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummary AreasDepartment of2 (08-93) Previously DOEAbout the

  3. 2014 Renewable Energy Data Book

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Energy Data Book for 2014 provides facts and figures on energy and electricity use, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar power, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, marine and hydrokinetic power, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investment.

  4. 2014 Renewable Energy Data Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beiter, Philipp

    2015-11-01

    The Renewable Energy Data Book for 2014 provides facts and figures on energy and electricity use, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar power, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, marine and hydrokinetic power, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investment.

  5. 2014 Renewable Energy Data Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beiter, Philipp

    2015-11-15

    The Renewable Energy Data Book for 2014 provides facts and figures on energy and electricity use, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar power, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, marine and hydrokinetic power, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investment.

  6. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Initiative TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEM FOR ON-SHORE POWER GENERATION

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom theHighI _s - "U N C- .

  7. MARINE KELP: ENERGY RESOURCE IN THE COASTAL ZONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    2 of the Proceedings MARINE KELP: ENERGY RESOURCE IN THELeone, J. , 1979, Marine Biomass Energy Project, Marineof California. LBL-12224 MARINE KELP: ENERGY RESOURCE IN THE

  8. Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (OSUUW) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (OSUUW) Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (OSUUW) Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (OSUUW)...

  9. OES-IA Annex IV: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices - Report from the Experts’ Workshop September 27th – 28th 2010 Clontarf Castle, Dublin Ireland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; O'Toole, Michael J.

    2010-12-02

    An experts' workshop was convened in Dublin Ireland September 27th – 28th 2010 in support of IEA Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement Annex IV. PNNL was responsible for organizing the content of the workshop, overseeing the contractors (Irish Marine Institute) hosting the event, presenting material on Annex IV and materials applicable to the workshop intent. PNNL is also overseeing a contractor (Wave Energy Center/University of Plymouth – WEC/UP) in the collection and analysis of the Annex IV data. Fifty-eight experts from 8 countries attended the workshop by invitation, spending two days discussing the needs of Annex IV. Presentations by DOE (background on Annex IV), PNNL (process for developing Annex IV; presentation of the draft database for PNNL project, plans for incorporating Annex IV data), WEC/UP on the environmental effect matrix, and four MHK developers (two from the UK, one from Ireland and one from Sweden; each discussing their own projects and lessons learned for measuring and mitigating environmental effects, as well as interactions with consenting [permitting] processes) helped provide background. The workshop participants worked part of the time in the large group and most of the time in four smaller breakout groups. Participants engaged in the process and provided a wealth of examples of MHK environmental work, particularly in the European nations. They provided practical and actionable advice on the following: • Developing the Annex IV database, with specific uses and audiences • Strong consensus that we should collect detailed metadata on available data sets, rather than attempting to draw in copious datasets. The participants felt there would then be an opportunity to then ask for specific set of data as needed, with specific uses and ownership of the data specified. This is particularly important as many data collected, particularly in Europe but also in Canada, are proprietary; developers were not comfortable with the idea of handing over all their environmental effects data, but all said they would entertain the request if they specifics were clear. • The recommendation was to collect metadata via an online interactive form, taking no more than one hour to complete. • Although the idea of cases representing the “best practices” was recognized as useful, the participants pointed out that there are currently so few MHK projects in the water, that any and all projects were appropriate to highlight as “cases”. There was also discomfort at the implication that “best practices” implied “lesser practices”; this being unhelpful to a new and emerging industry. • Workshop participants were asked if they were willing to continue to engage in the Annex IV process; all expressed willingness. The workshop was successful in adequately addressing its objectives and through participation and interaction in the breakout sessions around the various topics. As a result of the workshop, many delegates are now better informed and have a greater understanding of the potential environmental effects of MHK devices on the marine environment. There is now a greater sense of understanding of the issues involved and consensus by those regulators, developers and scientists who attended the workshop. A strong network has also been built over the two days between European and US/Canadian technical experts in wave and tidal energy.

  10. New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmenta...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish...

  11. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume...

  12. Marine Energy Technology Symposium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the measurement period. The results of (1) will directly apply in determining if the energy grade line (EGL) and hydraulic grade line (HGL) altered by HK turbine operation...

  13. Marine Renewable Energy Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigeant, Paul; Miller, John; Howes, Brian; McGowan, Jon G.; Baldwin, Kenneth; Grilli, Annette; Terray, Eugene

    2013-10-08

    Project Goals: The funding provided by this contract supported the following activities: A) Test Site Development; B) Seed Grant Funded Technology Development; C) Stakeholder Activities The first year of funding was dedicated to the formation of the NE MREC University Consortium which was comprised of University of Massachusetts Dartmouth (UMD) and Amherst (UMA), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), University of New Hampshire (UNH), and the University of Rhode Island (URI). The consortium worked together to encourage research and promote benefits of obtaining energy from ocean wind, waves, tides and currents. In addition, NE MREC’s goal was to fund projects aimed at potential test sites with the first year funding going to studies of the potential for tidal device testing in Muskeget Channel, at the General Sullivan Bridge in New Hampshire, and for wave device testing at the proposed National Offshore Renewable Energy Innovation Zone (NOREIZ) located off the Massachusetts coast. The project spanned 4.5 years and addressed three specific tasks that are interrelated but also served as independent investigations.

  14. Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake

    2013-05-01

    This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

  15. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and Environmental Effects Research Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and...

  16. DOE Announces Webinars on Residential Energy Efficiency, Marine and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pState Efficiency, RenewablesLiteracy VirtualHydrokinetic Technology

  17. Sandia Energy - Advanced Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deploying and operating marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Coatings When selecting a coating for a MHK device, developers must consider its ability to withstand aquatic...

  18. Water Power Program: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Pamphlet that describes the Office of EERE's Water Power Program in fiscal year 2009, including the fiscal year 2009 funding opportunities, the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs, the U.S. hydrodynamic testing facilities, and the fiscal year 2008 Advanced Water Projects awards.

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvesting in Minority BanksMANHATTANEnergy Efficiency

  20. 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine Corps Recruit San Diego 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Marine Corps Recruit San Diego fewm13usmcmcdepotsandiegohighres.pdf fewm13usmcmcdepotsandi...

  1. Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polagye, Brian

    2011-11-01

    This presentation from the Water Peer Review highlights one of the program's marine and hyrokinetics environmental projects to determine the likely acoustic effects from a tidal energy device.

  2. Experts Offer Marines Energy-Efficiency Advice

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    As an early adopter of cutting-edge technologies, the United States military is pioneering energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies in the field. Recently, the Commandant of the United States Marine Corps sent a team to visit bases and camps in Afghanistan to assess and make recommendations on the supply and use of energy and water.

  3. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES Pursuant toPower WindDepartment of Energy SiteFee09

  4. Human dimensions perspectives on the impacts of coastal zone marine renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Conway, Flaxen; Hall-Arber, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    coastal zone marine renewable energy generation. REFERENCESOF COASTAL ZONE MARINE RENEWABLE ENERGY Caroline Pomeroy,and implementing marine renewable energy (MRE) development

  5. Sandia Energy - Bernadette Hernandez-Sanchez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. Hernandez-Sanchez is the project lead for the Advanced Materials Program and DOE's Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database (MHTDB). The Advanced Materials Program focuses...

  6. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Senate Committee...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Natural Resourses 2-27-14MikeCarr FT SENR.pdf More Documents & Publications Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)...

  7. OCEANS`13 MTS/IEEE SAN DIEGO, SEPTEMBER 2013 1 Electromechanical Emulation of Hydrokinetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    interesting due to the high power density of river and tidal water currents as well as ocean waves that have Abstract--The pace of research and development efforts to integrate renewable power sources into modern paramount. In particular, hydrokinetic power is appealing due to its high energy density and superior

  8. Effects of Large Energetic Vortices on Axial-Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines B. Gunawan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    Effects of Large Energetic Vortices on Axial-Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines B. Gunawan1 , V.S. Neary1 C production in a model MHK turbine. Results show that the power generated by the turbine is significantly at the centerline of the energy extraction plane, or axial-flow turbine hub elevation, provide high resolution

  9. Hydrokinetic Laboratory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam: Energyarea,MagazineTechnologies

  10. Dynamic energy budgets and bioaccumulation : a model for marine mammals and marine mammal populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klanjš?ek, Tin

    2006-01-01

    Energy intake of individuals affects growth of organisms and, therefore, populations. Persistent lipophilic toxicants acquired with the energy can bioaccumulate and harm individuals. Marine mammals are particularly vulnerable ...

  11. Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry Webinar...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry Webinar Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry Webinar December 10, 2015 8:30AM to 10:00AM PST As...

  12. Energy Department Announces $8 Million to Develop Advanced Components...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    8 million in available funding to spur innovation in next-generation marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) control and component technologies. In the United States, waves, tides, and ocean...

  13. Marin Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChangeMarc MMaries County,MarinSolar

  14. Marine Scotland | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation, searchScotland Jump to: navigation, search Name: Marine

  15. The development of CACTUS : a wind and marine turbine performance simulation code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Murray, Jonathan

    2010-12-01

    CACTUS (Code for Axial and Cross-flow TUrbine Simulation) is a turbine performance simulation code, based on a free wake vortex method, under development at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as part of a Department of Energy program to study marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. The current effort builds upon work previously done at SNL in the area of vertical axis wind turbine simulation, and aims to add models to handle generic device geometry and physical models specific to the marine environment. An overview of the current state of the project and validation effort is provided.

  16. Energy Department Announces $10.5 Million for Next-Generation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 million in available funding to support the design and operation of innovative marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) systems through survivability and reliability-related testing of...

  17. Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

    2008-08-28

    We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates a hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for the Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to a sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support an earlier decoupling of higher $p_{T}$ particles. By performing numerical simulations for various initial conditions and equations of state we identify several characteristic features of the bulk QCD matter evolution preferred in view of the current analysis of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies.

  18. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river...

  19. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies 2012 Project Manager: Paul T. Jacobson 1 Principal Investigators: Stephen V. Amaral 2...

  20. Marine High Voltage Power Conditioning and Transmission System with Integrated Storage DE-EE0003640 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Hoffmann, PhD; Aspinall, Rik

    2012-12-10

    Design, Development, and test of the three-port power converter for marine hydrokinetic power transmission. Converter provides ports for AC/DC conversion of hydrokinetic power, battery storage, and a low voltage to high voltage DC port for HVDC transmission to shore. The report covers the design, development, implementation, and testing of a prototype built by PPS.

  1. Human dimensions perspectives on the impacts of coastal zone marine renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Conway, Flaxen; Hall-Arber, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    coastal zone marine renewable energy generation. REFERENCESOuter Continental Shelf Renewable Energy Space-Use ConflictsOF COASTAL ZONE MARINE RENEWABLE ENERGY Caroline Pomeroy,

  2. Hawaii Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers What does this project do? Marine Corps Base Hawaii replaced roofs on two buildings with polyvinyl chloride membrane 'cool' roofs and solar...

  3. Prey consumption and energy transfer by marine birds in the Gulf of Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, GL; Drew, GS; Jahncke, J; Piatt, JF

    2005-01-01

    Prey consumption and energy transfer by marine birds in thebut they do remove energy from the marine system throughTo determine energy demand by marine birds in the Gulf of

  4. Ocean energy projects may menace marine lblumenthal@mcclatchydc.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Ocean energy projects may menace marine migration lblumenthal@mcclatchydc.com Published Monday, Dec. Scientists increasingly believe these marine creatures and others use the earth's magnetic fields to navigate vast distances. But as the search for green energy turns to the oceans, there are concerns that tidal

  5. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment...

  6. Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns in Marine Renewable Energy Projects- Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharon Kramer; Mirko Previsic; Peter Nelson; Sheri Woo

    2010-06-17

    Marine wave and tidal energy technology could interact with marine resources in ways that are not well understood. As wave and tidal energy conversion projects are planned, tested, and deployed, a wide range of stakeholders will be engaged; these include developers, state and federal regulatory agencies, environmental groups, tribal governments, recreational and commercial fishermen, and local communities. Identifying stakeholders’ environmental concerns in the early stages of the industry’s development will help developers address and minimize potential environmental effects. Identifying important concerns will also assist with streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles by the industry in the U.S. today. In September 2008, RE Vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to conduct a scenario-based evaluation of emerging hydrokinetic technologies. The purpose of this evaluation is to identify and characterize environmental impacts that are likely to occur, demonstrate a process for analyzing these impacts, identify the “key” environmental concerns for each scenario, identify areas of uncertainty, and describe studies that could address that uncertainty. This process is intended to provide an objective and transparent tool to assist in decision-making for siting and selection of technology for wave and tidal energy development. RE Vision worked with H. T. Harvey & Associates, to develop a framework for identifying key environmental concerns with marine renewable technology. This report describes the results of this study. This framework was applied to varying wave and tidal power conversion technologies, scales, and locations. The following wave and tidal energy scenarios were considered: ? 4 wave energy generation technologies ? 3 tidal energy generation technologies ? 3 sites: Humboldt coast, California (wave); Makapu’u Point, Oahu, Hawaii (wave); and the Tacoma Narrows, Washington (tidal) ? 3 project sizes: pilot, small commercial, and large commercial The possible combinations total 24 wave technology scenarios and 9 tidal technology scenarios. We evaluated 3 of the 33 scenarios in detail: 1. A small commercial OPT Power Buoy project off the Humboldt County, California coast 2. A small commercial Pelamis Wave Power P-2 project off Makapu’u Point, Oahu, Hawaii 3. A pilot MCT SeaGen tidal project, sited in the Tacoma Narrows, Washington This framework document used information available from permitting documents that were written to support actual wave or tidal energy projects, but the results obtained here should not be confused with those of the permitting documents1. The main difference between this framework document and permitting documents of currently proposed pilot projects is that this framework identifies key environmental concerns and describes the next steps in addressing those concerns; permitting documents must identify effects, find or declare thresholds of significance, evaluate the effects against the thresholds, and find mitigation measures that will minimize or avoid the effects so they can be considered less-than-significant. Two methodologies, 1) an environmental effects analysis and 2) Raptools, were developed and tested to identify potential environmental effects associated with wave or tidal energy conversion projects. For the environmental effects analysis, we developed a framework based on standard risk assessment techniques. The framework was applied to the three scenarios listed above. The environmental effects analysis addressed questions such as: ? What is the temporal and spatial exposure of a species at a site? ? What are the specific potential project effects on that species? ? What measures could minimize, mitigate, or eliminate negative effects? ? Are there potential effects of the project, or species’ response to the effect, that are highly uncertain and warrant additional study? The second methodology, Raptools, is a collaborative approach useful for evaluating multiple characteristi

  7. Protocols for the Equitable Assessment of Marine Energy Converters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingram, David; Smith, George; Bittencourt-Ferreira, Claudio; Smith, Helen

    This book contains the suite of protocols for the equitable evaluation of marine energy converters (based on either tidal or wave energy) produced by the EquiMar consortium led by the University of Edinburgh. These protocols ...

  8. Resolute Marine Energy Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, New York: EnergyOpen EnergyInformation FishResolar Jump

  9. Marine Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformationMarietta, Georgia: Energy

  10. Sustainable Marine Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEuropeEnergySustainability Center ofCase studies from

  11. Marin Energy Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformationMarietta, Georgia: Energy Resources

  12. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the hydrodynamic forces acting on the hydrokinetic device and the power density and power available over the energy extraction plane (EEP). This data informs the MHK device...

  13. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Plan - DOE Tidal And River Reference Turbines (40) Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual (40)...

  14. Design of a Computerized Energy Management System for Marine Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, B. D.; Perry, L. W.; Gerloff, G. W.; Heller, R. P.; Pankonien, G.

    1982-01-01

    A computer-based energy management system for marine applications is presented. The problem of fuel-management for large diesel engines on board ship is discussed. The design of the computer hardware and software are presented including...

  15. hydrokinetic | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:WizardYatescloud Home Dc's pictureenergygrid

  16. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EXTERNALLY BONDED FBG STRAIN SENSORS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF MARINE HYDROKINETIC STRUCTURESTara Camacho-Lopez2015-04-06T22:15:34+00:00 Placeholder Download Filename...

  17. Environmental Effects of Marine Energy Development Around the World. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, L.; Whiting, J.; Geerlofs, S.; Grear, M.; Blake, K.; Coffey, A.; Massaua, M.; Brown-Saracino, J.; Battey, H.

    2013-01-01

    This Annex IV report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment addressing the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines, the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals, and the effects of energy removal on physical systems.

  18. Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Alexandra DeVisser, NAVFAC-EXWC Brian June 10, 2013 #12;Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Objective: Provide location for year-long in Cable, Sound & Sea Technology (SST) Luis A. Vega, HNEI-University of Hawaii Energy Ocean International

  19. Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment in the Florida Strait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S; Gunawan, Budi; Ryou, Albert S

    2012-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) is assessing and mapping the potential off-shore ocean current hydrokinetic energy resources along the U.S. coastline, excluding tidal currents, to facilitate market penetration of water power technologies. This resource assessment includes information on the temporal and three-dimensional spatial distribution of the daily averaged power density, and the overall theoretical hydrokinetic energy production, based on modeled historical simulations spanning a 7-year period of record using HYCOM-GOM, an ocean current observation assimilation model that generates a spatially distributed three-dimensional representation of daily averaged horizontal current magnitude and direction time series from which power density time series and their statistics can be derived. This study ascertains the deviation of HYCOM-GOM outputs, including transport (flow) and power density, from outputs based on three independent observation sources to evaluate HYCOM-GOM performance. The three independent data sources include NOAA s submarine cable data of transport, ADCP data at a high power density location, and HF radar data in the high power density region of the Florida Strait. Comparisons with these three independent observation sets indicate discrepancies with HYCOM model outputs, but overall indicate that the HYCOM-GOM model can provide an adequate assessment of the ocean current hydrokinetic resource in high power density regions like the Florida Strait. Additional independent observational data, in particular stationary ADCP measurements, would be useful for expanding this model performance evaluation study. ADCP measurements are rare in ocean environments not influenced by tides, and limited to one location in the Florida Strait. HF radar data, although providing great spatial coverage, is limited to surface currents only.

  20. A Review of Energy Storage Technologies for Marine Current Energy Systems A Review of Energy Storage Technologies for Marine Current Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Review of Energy Storage Technologies for Marine Current Energy Systems 1 A Review of Energy reliable, energy storage systems can play a crucial role. In this paper, an overview and the state of art of energy storage technologies are presented. Characteristics of various energy storage technologies

  1. Marine renewable energy: potential benefits to biodiversity? An urgent call for research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    Marine renewable energy: potential benefits to biodiversity? An urgent call for research Richard 1 Centre for Ecology and Conservation and Peninsula Research Institute for Marine Renewable Energy driver. In response, many governments have initiated programmes of energy production from renewable

  2. Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty; Ali, Muhammad; Ravens, Tom

    2013-12-06

    The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment – information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

  3. Bacterial Cellulose Composites Opportunities and Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    infrastructure Hydrokinetic energy, Marine infrastructure Barrier films and coatings Food packaging Organic electronics (PV, OLED) Energy Storage Building envelope: Vacuum...

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8088-2749 ESTONIA 800-011-1105 FINLAND 358-9-5424-7160 0-800-9-19768 FRANCE LYON 33-4-26-03-51-63 080-510-2765 FRANCE MARSEILLE 33-4-86-06-48-63 080-510-2765 FRANCE...

  5. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0800-001-427 TAIWAN 886-2-2795-7391 00801-136-033 THAILAND 001-800-1206-66639 TURKEY 00-800-151-0818 UNITED ARAB EMIRATES 8000-35702389 UNITED KINGDOM BIRMINGHAM...

  6. Request for Information Regarding the Testing of Marine and Hydrokinetic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProject DevelopsforReporting Occupational Radiation

  7. NREL: Water Power Research - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorkingManagement Models andInstrumentation,

  8. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Field Measurements |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7, 2015Verizon and VerizonCells:|ofRequestRequest

  9. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial Report Management

  10. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs Search USAJobs Search The jobsFelixContracts |University Consortium |

  11. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnowRedoxRelatedFraudMonitoring Technologies

  12. Design and implementation of a marine animal alert system to support Marine Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Fu, Tao; Ren, Huiying; Martinez, Jayson J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Matzner, Shari; Choi, Eric Y.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-08-08

    Power extracted from fast moving tidal currents has been identified as a potential commercial-scale source of renewable energy. Device developers and utilities are pursuing deployment of prototype tidal turbines to assess technology viability, site feasibility, and environmental interactions. Deployment of prototype turbines requires permits from a range of regulatory authorities. Ensuring the safety of marine animals, particularly those under protection of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) and the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 has emerged as a key regulatory challenge for initial MHK deployments. The greatest perceived risk to marine animals is from strike by the rotating blades of tidal turbines. Development of the marine mammal alert system (MAAS) was undertaken to support monitoring and mitigation requirements for tidal turbine deployments. The prototype system development focused on Southern Resident killer whales (SRKW), an endangered population of killer whales that frequents Puget Sound and is intermittently present in the part of the sound where deployment of prototype tidal turbines is being considered. Passive acoustics were selected as the primary means because of the vocal nature of these animals. The MAAS passive acoustic system consists of two-stage process involving the use of an energy detector and a spectrogram-based classifier to distinguish between SKRW’s calls and noise. A prototype consisting of two 2D symmetrical star arrays separated by 20 m center to center was built and evaluated in the waters of Sequim Bay using whale call playback.

  13. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities. Water power is the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable energy. Harnessing energy from rivers, manmade waterways, and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses can help secure America's energy future. Water power technologies fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower facilities include run-of-the-river, storage, and pumped storage. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diversion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies obtain energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams and ocean thermal gradients to generate electricity. The United States has abundant water power resources, enough to meet a large portion of the nation's electricity demand. Conventional hydropower generated 257 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity in 2010 and provides 6-7% of all electricity in the United States. According to preliminary estimates from the Electric Power Resource Institute (EPRI), the United States has additional water power resource potential of more than 85,000 megawatts (MW). This resource potential includes making efficiency upgrades to existing hydroelectric facilities, developing new low-impact facilities, and using abundant marine and hydrokinetic energy resources. EPRI research suggests that ocean wave and in-stream tidal energy production potential is equal to about 10% of present U.S. electricity consumption (about 400 terrawatt-hours per year). The greatest of these resources is wave energy, with the most potential in Hawaii, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Water Power Program works with industry, universities, other federal agencies, and DOE's national laboratories to promote the development and deployment of technologies capable of generating environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity from the nation's water resources.

  14. Seoul Marine Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,SageScheucoSedcoInformationManor,OpenSentech Inc JumpMarine

  15. DISCRETE ELEMENT MODELING OF BLADE–STRIKE FREQUENCY AND SURVIVAL OF FISH PASSING THROUGH HYDROKINETIC TURBINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2014-04-17

    Evaluating the consequences from blade-strike of fish on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine blades is essential for incorporating environmental objectives into the integral optimization of machine performance. For instance, experience with conventional hydroelectric turbines has shown that innovative shaping of the blade and other machine components can lead to improved designs that generate more power without increased impacts to fish and other aquatic life. In this work, we used unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbine flow and discrete element modeling (DEM) of particle motion to estimate the frequency and severity of collisions between a horizontal axis MHK tidal energy device and drifting aquatic organisms or debris. Two metrics are determined with the method: the strike frequency and survival rate estimate. To illustrate the procedure step-by-step, an exemplary case of a simple runner model was run and compared against a probabilistic model widely used for strike frequency evaluation. The results for the exemplary case showed a strong correlation between the two approaches. In the application case of the MHK turbine flow, turbulent flow was modeled using detached eddy simulation (DES) in conjunction with a full moving rotor at full scale. The CFD simulated power and thrust were satisfactorily comparable to experimental results conducted in a water tunnel on a reduced scaled (1:8.7) version of the turbine design. A cloud of DEM particles was injected into the domain to simulate fish or debris that were entrained into the turbine flow. The strike frequency was the ratio of the count of colliding particles to the crossing sample size. The fish length and approaching velocity were test conditions in the simulations of the MHK turbine. Comparisons showed that DEM-based frequencies tend to be greater than previous results from Lagrangian particles and probabilistic models, mostly because the DEM scheme accounts for both the geometric aspects of the passage event ---which the probabilistic method does--- as well as the fluid-particle interactions ---which the Lagrangian particle method does. The DEM-based survival rates were comparable to laboratory results for small fish but not for mid-size fish because of the considerably different turbine diameters. The modeling framework can be used for applications that aim at evaluating the biological performance of MHK turbine units during the design phase and to provide information to regulatory agencies needed for the environmental permitting process.

  16. Human dimensions perspectives on the impacts of coastal zone marine renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Conway, Flaxen; Hall-Arber, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    between offshore renewable energy and existing uses on thecoastal zone marine renewable energy generation. REFERENCESOuter Continental Shelf Renewable Energy Space-Use Conflicts

  17. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report AppendicesAVideo »ServicesShale Gas R&D

  18. Human dimensions perspectives on the impacts of coastal zone marine renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Conway, Flaxen; Hall-Arber, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    safety considerations are particularly important in the context of multiple ocean uses including marine renew- able energy production.

  19. Instrumentation for Monitoring around Marine Renewable Energy Converters: Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Polagye, Brian

    2014-01-31

    Report on workshop held in Seattle for DOE WWPTO on instrument needs for monitoring marine energy devices

  20. Marine Mammal Protection Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformationMarietta, Georgia:Marine Mammal Protection

  1. National Marine Fisheries Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation,National Marine Fisheries Service Jump to: navigation,

  2. Plymouth Marine Laboratory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue MountainSchool DistrictPlaxicaSmartMarine

  3. Guides and Case Studies for Marine Climates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContracting Oversight CommitteeandEnergy DryMarine

  4. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and Environmental Effects Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marine renewable energy test centers around the world have been successful in testing new technologies to ensure devices perform up to standards and are able to survive in the marine environment....

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine Drive and Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine Drive and Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock...

  6. Marine Energy Technology Symposium METS2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research was made possible by support from the Department of Energy's EERE Office's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office. The work was supported by Sandia National...

  7. Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y. H.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Previsic, M.; Epler, J.; Lou, J.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy established a reference model project to benchmark a set of marine and hydrokinetic technologies including current (tidal, open-ocean, and river) turbines and wave energy converters. The objectives of the project were to first evaluate the status of these technologies and their readiness for commercial applications. Second, to evaluate the potential cost of energy and identify cost-reduction pathways and areas where additional research could be best applied to accelerate technology development to market readiness.

  8. Remote Monitoring of the Structural Health of Hydrokinetic Composite Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.L. Rovey K. Chandrashekhara

    2012-09-21

    A health monitoring approach is investigated for hydrokinetic turbine blade applications. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs have advantages that include long life in marine environments and great control over mechanical properties. Experimental strain characteristics are determined for static loads and free-vibration loads. These experiments are designed to simulate the dynamic characteristics of hydrokinetic turbine blades. Carbon/epoxy symmetric composite laminates are manufactured using an autoclave process. Four-layer composite beams, eight-layer composite beams, and two-dimensional eight-layer composite blades are instrumented for strain. Experimental results for strain measurements from electrical resistance gages are validated with theoretical characteristics obtained from in-house finite-element analysis for all sample cases. These preliminary tests on the composite samples show good correlation between experimental and finite-element strain results. A health monitoring system is proposed in which damage to a composite structure, e.g. delamination and fiber breakage, causes changes in the strain signature behavior. The system is based on embedded strain sensors and embedded motes in which strain information is demodulated for wireless transmission. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs provide a medium for embedding sensors into the blades for in-situ health monitoring. The major challenge with in-situ health monitoring is transmission of sensor signals from the remote rotating reference frame of the blade to the system monitoring station. In the presented work, a novel system for relaying in-situ blade health measurements in hydrokinetic systems is described and demonstrated. An ultrasonic communication system is used to transmit sensor data underwater from the rotating frame of the blade to a fixed relay station. Data are then broadcast via radio waves to a remote monitoring station. Results indicate that the assembled system can transmit simulated sensor data with an accuracy of ±5% at a maximum sampling rate of 500 samples/sec. A power investigation of the transmitter within the blade shows that continuous max-sampling operation is only possible for short durations (~days), and is limited due to the capacity of the battery power source. However, intermittent sampling, with long periods between samples, allows for the system to last for very long durations (~years). Finally, because the data transmission system can operate at a high sampling rate for short durations or at a lower sampling rate/higher duty cycle for long durations, it is well-suited for short-term prototype and environmental testing, as well as long-term commercially-deployed hydrokinetic machines.

  9. Modules M.Sc. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Title of the module Cell physiology of marine organisms: cellular energy budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    Cell physiology of marine organisms: cellular energy budget and metabolic fingerprinting Term of environmental factors such as temperature on cell metabolism of marine ectothermal organisms - Conceptual Deepening the knowledge of cell physiology of marine ectotherms. Topics will be: - Environmental impact

  10. Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akkelin, S V; Karpenko, Iu A; Sinyukov, Yu M

    2008-01-01

    We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support ...

  11. Shafir Civil Marine Engineering | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for Low EmissionTianhong Silicon Material Co LtdShady

  12. Pure Marine Gen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETE Inc dEAPrysmian JumpOpenformerlyDropGen Jump

  13. Leviathan Marine Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWinds Jump to:LaredoLeelanauLeonics CoEnergy Jump

  14. Marine Hydroelectric Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformationMarietta, Georgia: EnergyHydroelectric

  15. Marine Energy Technology Symposium METS2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergyApril 25,4 FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF

  16. Marine Energy Technology Symposium METS2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergyApril 25,4 FURTHER DEVELOPMENT

  17. U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Marine Corps Beaufort Air Station's energy and water savings accomplishments.

  18. Energy Storage Technologies for Smoothing Power Fluctuations in Marine Current Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Energy Storage Technologies for Smoothing Power Fluctuations in Marine Current Turbines Zhibin Zhou the marine current generation system more reliable, energy storage systems will play a crucial role. In this paper, the power fluctuation phenomenon is described and the state of art of energy storage technologies

  19. High energy density, thin-lm, rechargeable lithium batteries for marine eld operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald Robert

    High energy density, thin-®lm, rechargeable lithium batteries for marine ®eld operations Biying for marines in ®eld operations. With projected practical energy densities exceeding 300 Wh/kg, low safety dimensions are projected to have energy densities exceeding 350 Wh/kg and power densities exceeding 560 W

  20. Instrumentation for Monitoring around Marine Renewable Energy Converters: Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polagye, B. L.; Copping, A. E.; Brown-Saracino, J.; Suryan, R.; Kramer, S.; Smith, C.

    2014-01-14

    To better understand the state of instrumentation and capabilities for monitoring around marine energy converters, the U.S. Department of Energy directed Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Washington to convene an invitation-only workshop of experts from around the world to address instrumentation needs.

  1. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy (DoE) is assessing and mapping the potential off-shore ocean current hydrokinetic energy resources along the U.S. coastline, excluding tidal currents, to facilitate market...

  2. CTR SHEET Sheet 1 of 1 TITLE: Logistic flow DISCIPLINE: Renewable Marine Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of any Renewable Marine Energy (RME) Project installation phase, like any other offshore projectCTR CTR04 CTR SHEET Sheet 1 of 1 TITLE: Logistic flow DISCIPLINE: Renewable Marine Energy ­ Shiping foundations. From a selected project, the student will have to develop an in house tool dedicated to logistic

  3. Marin County, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChangeMarc MMaries County,Marin

  4. Princeton Power Systems (TRL 5 6 Component)- Marine High-Voltage Power Conditioning and Transmission System with Integrated Energy Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Princeton Power Systems (TRL 5 6 Component) - Marine High-Voltage Power Conditioning and Transmission System with Integrated Energy Storage

  5. MARINE KELP: ENERGY RESOURCE IN THE COASTAL ZONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    scrubber, as well as from other phases of processing/conversion, is also unknown. However, since marine

  6. Modeling environmental effects on the size-structured energy flow through marine ecosystems. Part 1: The model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggiale, Jean-Christophe

    Modeling environmental effects on the size-structured energy flow through marine ecosystems. Part 1 size-structured mathematical model of the energy flow through marine ecosystems, based on established the dynamic size-spectrum of marine ecosystems in term of energy con- tent per weight class as well as many

  7. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices ManualTara Camacho-Lopez2015-04-06T22:15:34+00:00 Placeholder Download...

  8. Experimental Design of Hydrokinetic Resource Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy8) WignerEnergyAboutExperimentExperimental419

  9. MHK Projects/US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MHK ProjectsUS Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine Corps Base Hawaii MCBH < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading...

  10. The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2013-09-30

    Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data all add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects, as well as expert opinion of marine environmental research professionals. Cost estimates have been developed at the pilot and commercial scale. The reference model described in this document is an oscillating water column device deployed in Northern California at approximately 50 meters water depth.

  11. Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon: EnergyNongqishiClean CitiesWasco County

  12. UK Centre for Marine Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:TucsonLLC Jump to:UDI Jump to:UGI EnergyUKMarine

  13. National Marine Renewable Energy Center (UH) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartment ofProgram |(Upstate New York)Impact Initiativeover

  14. MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHK ProjectsHawaiiInformationIsland

  15. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.; Kandt, A.; Lisell, L.; Booth, S.; Walker, A.; Roberts, J.; Falcey, J.

    2011-11-01

    DOD's U.S. Pacific Command has partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess opportunities for increasing energy security through renewable energy and energy efficiency in Hawaii installations. NREL selected Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay to receive technical support for net zero energy assessment and planning funded through the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI). NREL performed a comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of MCBH Kaneohe Bay to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and electric vehicle integration. This report summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations.

  16. A new generation of marine turbine that can harness energy from the sea is being developed by Nautricity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    A new generation of marine turbine that can harness energy from the sea is being developed player in the marine tidal energy industry through the application of game-changing technologies designed infancy and neither the wave nor the tidal energy market has consolidated on a single device design

  17. Harvesting Energy from the Marine Sediment-Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, I. Gary

    that the sediment/anode-seawater/cathode configuration constitutes a microbial fuel cell in which power results from that this potential gradient can sustain low-level power for prolonged periods if tapped by a simple fuel cell natural, microbe established, voltage gradients at marine sediment-seawater interfaces in laboratory

  18. Environmental effects of marine energy development around the world. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, Luke; Whiting, Johnathan; Geerlofs, Simon; Grear, Molly; Blake, Kara ); Coffey, Anna; Massaua, Meghan; Brown-Saracino, Jocelyn; Battey, Hoyt )

    2013-01-15

    Annex IV is an international collaborative project to examine the environmental effects of marine energy devices among countries through the International Energy Agency’s Ocean Energy Systems Initiative (OES). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) serves as the Operating Agent for the Annex, in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM; formerly the Minerals Management Service), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Numerous ocean energy technologies and devices are being developed around the world, and the few data that exist about the environmental effects of these technologies are dispersed among countries and developers. The purpose of Annex IV is to facilitate efficient government oversight of the development of ocean energy systems by compiling and disseminating information about the potential environmental effects of marine energy technologies and to identify methods of monitoring for these effects. Beginning in 2010, this three-year effort produced a publicly available searchable online database of environmental effects information (Tethys). It houses scientific literature pertaining to the environmental effects of marine energy systems, as well as metadata on international ocean energy projects and research studies. Two experts’ workshops were held in Dublin, Ireland (September 2010 and October 2012) to engage with international researchers, developers, and regulators on the scope and outcomes of the Annex IV project. Metadata and information stored in the Tethys database and feedback obtained from the two experts’ workshops were used as resources in the development of this report. This Annex IV final report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment that survey, compile, and analyze the best available information in one coherent location. These case studies address 1) the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines; 2) the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals; and 3) the effects of energy removal on physical systems. Each case study contains a description of environmental monitoring efforts and research studies, lessons learned, and analysis of remaining information gaps. The information collected through the Annex IV effort and referenced in this report, can be accessed on the Tethys database at http://mhk.pnnl.gov/wiki/index.php/Tethys_ Home.

  19. Marine Animal Alert System -- Task 2.1.5.3: Development of Monitoring Technologies -- FY 2011 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Myers, Joshua R.; Matzner, Shari; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    The Marine Animal Alert System (MAAS) in development by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is focused on providing elements of compliance monitoring to support deployment of marine hydrokinetic energy devices. An initial focus is prototype tidal turbines to be deployed in Puget Sound in Washington State. The MAAS will help manage the risk of injury or mortality to marine animals from blade strike or contact with tidal turbines. In particular, development has focused on detection, classification, and localization of listed Southern Resident killer whales within 200 m of prototype turbines using both active and passive acoustic approaches. At the close of FY 2011, a passive acoustic system consisting of a pair of four-element star arrays and parallel processing of eight channels of acoustic receptions has been designed and built. Field tests of the prototype system are scheduled for the fourth quarter of calendar year 2011. Field deployment and testing of the passive acoustic prototype is scheduled for the first quarter of FY 2012. The design of an active acoustic system that could be built using commercially available off-the-shelf components from active acoustic system vendors is also in the final stages of design and specification.

  20. Marin County - Green Building Requirements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial Report Management ChallengesManufacturingMapand AprilMarieMarin

  1. DOE Announces Webinars on Residential Energy Efficiency, Marine...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies, to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however,...

  2. The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Wave Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2014-06-30

    Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data all add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects. Costs have been developed at the pilot scale and for commercial arrays for a surge wave energy converter

  3. Funding Opportunity Announcement for Water Power Manufacturing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Water Power Program About the Program Research & Development...

  4. Offshore Resource Assessment and Design Conditions Public Meeting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    & Publications Categorizing and Evaluating the Effects of Stressors (all Conceptual Model work) Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report...

  5. Offshore Resource Assessment and Design Conditions Public Meeting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Resource Assessment and Design Conditions Public Meeting More Documents & Publications Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Before the...

  6. Memorandum of Understanding between the Dept. of Interior and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy and the U.S. Department of the Interior to support offshore wind and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. mouoffshorewindhydrokineticdeployment.pdf More...

  7. DOE Announces Webinars on Solar Program Overview, Best Practices...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    : Marine and Hydrokinetic Systems Performance Advancement Funding Opportunity Announcement Webinar Sponsor: Water Power Program The Energy Department will present a live webinar...

  8. Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active...

  9. DOE in the News: Tidal Power in Maine on PBS Newshour | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Information Regarding a Proposed Funding Opportunity for Administration of the Wave Energy Converter Prize Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  10. U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-01

    Located in the heart of South Carolina, the U.S. Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Beaufort is among the military’s most important installations. Located on 6,900 acres 70 miles southwest of Charleston, the installation has established an energy- and water-saving culture that explores and implements new strategies and management approaches aimed at surpassing presidential mandates.

  11. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Task 2.1.3.2: Effects on Aquatic Organisms: Acoustics/Noise - Fiscal Year 2011 - Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/ Chinook/CKPUG.cfm). Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study (Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.1.3.2: Acoustics) was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m-diameter open-hydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Preliminary results indicate that low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  12. MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHK ProjectsHawaiiInformation

  13. MHK Technologies/Hydrokinetic Power Barge | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHKKembla <Canal Power <GreenHyPEG

  14. Sandia Energy - Numerical Simulations of Hydrokinetics in the Roza Canal,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSampleLignin-FeastingPreviouslyComputational

  15. Sandia Energy - Sandia Releases Open-Source Hydrokinetic Turbine Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput AnalysisSinkhole Officials TurnScienceSpecialistsEffects ofModel,

  16. MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to:Projects/Alaska 31 <

  17. MHK Projects/Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos BayOysterReliance Light

  18. MHK Projects/Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoosSlough BendVidalWoodland Light

  19. MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoosSloughAquantis <Information water

  20. MHK Technologies/In stream River Hydrokinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050Enermar < MHKHydro Helix << MHKITRI WECIn

  1. In-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingREnergyDepartment ofJanuary 19,electrodes |

  2. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Amaral, Stephen V.; Castro-Santos, Theodore; Giza, Dan; Haro, Alexander J.; Hecker, George; McMahon, Brian; Perkins, Norman; Pioppi, Nick

    2012-12-31

    This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

  3. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.; Kandt, A.; Lisell, L.; Booth, S.

    2012-05-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an NREL assessment of Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay to appraise the potential of achieving net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and hydrogen vehicle integration. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Defense's U.S. Pacific Command partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess opportunities for increasing energy security through renewable energy and energy efficiency at Hawaii military installations. DOE selected Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay, to receive technical support for net zero energy assessment and planning funded through the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI). NREL performed a comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of MCBH Kaneohe Bay to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and hydrogen vehicle integration. This paper summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations. The analysis shows that MCBH Kaneohe Bay has the potential to make significant progress toward becoming a net zero installation. Wind, solar photovoltaics, solar hot water, and hydrogen production were assessed, as well as energy efficiency technologies. Deploying wind turbines is the most cost-effective energy production measure. If the identified energy projects and savings measures are implemented, the base will achieve a 96% site Btu reduction and a 99% source Btu reduction. Using excess wind and solar energy to produce hydrogen for a fleet and fuel cells could significantly reduce energy use and potentially bring MCBH Kaneohe Bay to net zero. Further analysis with an environmental impact and interconnection study will need to be completed. By achieving net zero status, the base will set an example for other military installations, provide environmental benefits, reduce costs, increase energy security, and exceed its energy goals and mandates.

  4. Marine defaunation: Animal loss in the global ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCauley, DJ; Pinsky, ML; Palumbi, SR; Estes, JA; Joyce, FH; Warner, RR

    2015-01-01

    to help ensure that marine mining, energy devel- opment, andtidal/wave energy gener- ation, and marine transport is

  5. Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (OSUUW) | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartmentNew JerseyEnergy The city ofAdequacyEnergy Energy

  6. Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    ....................................................... 3 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center..........4 Oregon Sea GrantOregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center 2009 - 2010 Annual Report 2030 SE Marine.....................................2 Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station...........................2 Cooperative Institute

  7. Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    ....................................................... 4 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center..........5 Oregon Sea GrantOregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center 2011 - 2012 Annual Report 2030 SE Marine.................................... 2 Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station...........................2 Cooperative Institute

  8. Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    ....................................................... 4 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center..........5 Oregon Sea GrantOregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center 2008 - 2009 Annual Report 2030 SE Marine.....................................2 Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station...........................2 Cooperative Institute

  9. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Marine Climates; January 2006 - December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.; Hendron, R.; Eastment, M.; Jalalzadeh-Azar, A.

    2006-12-01

    This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Marine Climate Region on a cost-neutral basis.

  10. Connectivity of West Coast Marine Sanctuaries: Tracking Sooty Shearwaters Throughout Dynamic Upwelling Ecosystems in the California Current System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, James; Adams, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Conference Oregon Marine Renewable Energy Environmentalin alternative marine-based energy infrastructure off CA,

  11. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on771/6/14 Contact:NewsWebmaster PleaseSpring 2014HydrogenData

  12. MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haven, Kendall F.

    2011-01-01

    MARINE BIOMASS A marine energy farm is one of the fewTompkins, A. N. , 1978, "Energy from Marine Biomass Project-1978 "A Review of the Energy from Marine Biomass Program",

  13. Guides and Case Studies for Marine Climates | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11, SolarMatFermi NationalannualofandEnergy MapMap

  14. California Marine Life Protection Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: EnergyCalendarCalhounWebpage |Open EnergyCalifornia

  15. Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof Energy ThisSites |and theDepartmentPROGRAM C L E A N

  16. Aviation Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump|LineMaine: EnergyAvanzit SA Jump

  17. 1. Department, Course Number, Title ORE 677, Marine Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and offshore wind power. Prerequisite: ORE 607; basic knowledge of thermodynamics desirable. 4. Prerequisites Status and Future Perspectives, J. Cruz (ed.), Springer, 2008. 4. Wind Energy Explained ­ Theory, Design and engineering criteria to develop functional and efficient electrical power generation from wave, wind, current

  18. Hawai`i Institute of Marine Biology to house state-of-the-art solar energy project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Hawai`i Institute of Marine Biology to house state-of-the-art solar energy project Landmark purchasing agreement (PPA) with SolarCity to provide renewable solar energy to the Hawai`i Institute this one make solar both logical and affordable." Power purchase agreements for renewable energy

  19. The Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) |Information 5thInformationComparisonFacility |1801

  20. Executive Order 13158-Marine Protected Areas | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor InnovativeProcessing22, 2014DepartmentEnvironmental Management

  1. Scotrenewables Wind Power and Marine Power Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgency (IRENA)OptionsEquivalentBScira Offshore Energy JumpWind

  2. Hawaii Marine Base Installs Solar Roofs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡ ¢ £ ¤ ¤ ¥ ¦EnergyAMarine

  3. Sandia Energy - Navy/Marine Engineering Command Visits Sandia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &Water

  4. Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Ravens, Thomas M.; Cunningham, Keith W.; Scott, George

    2012-12-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National Laboratory?s Virtual Hydropower Prospector, Google Earth, and U.S. Geological Survey gages. Data were manually obtained for the eleven largest rivers with average flow rates greater than 10,000 cfs and the resulting estimate of the theoretical resource was expanded to include rivers with discharge between 1,000 cfs and 10,000 cfs based upon the contribution of rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in the contiguous 48 states. Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

  5. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar: Assessment and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, S.; Barnett, J.; Burman, K.; Hambrick, J.; Helwig, M.; Westby, R.

    2010-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) is the largest energy consumer in the U.S. government. Present energy use impacts DoD global operations by constraining freedom of action and self-sufficiency, demanding enormous economic resources, and putting many lives at risk in logistics support for deployed environments. There are many opportunities for DoD to more effectively meet energy requirements through a combination of human actions, energy efficiency technologies, and renewable energy resources. In 2008, a joint initiative was formed between DoD and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to address military energy use. This initiative created a task force comprised of representatives from each branch of the military, the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD), the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to examine the potential for ultra high efficiency military installations. This report presents an assessment of Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Miramar, selected by the task force as the initial prototype installation based on its strong history of energy advocacy and extensive track record of successful energy projects.

  6. Marine Ecosystems Acous&cs Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on marine sanctuaries · Mi@gate noise impacts from oil explora@on and renewable energy distances with lidle energy loss §Higher marine organismsMarine Ecosystems Acous&cs Program Bob Dziak Program PIs: Joseph

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - MVD Hydrokinetics, SW Regional Hydropower Conference, 10 June 2010, rev 1.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganismsnow widely usingOverview ofWeSchoolHydrokinetic

  8. Marine aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, ES

    2009-01-01

    proper- ties found in the marine boundary layer over theand R. E. Larson (1994), Marine boundary layer measurementsand T. Hoffmann (2002), Marine aerosol formation from

  9. Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine B. Gunawan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    plane from upstream to downstream of the turbine at x/D = -10, -5, -3, -2, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model B, Minneapolis, MN 55414. ABSTRACT Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines

  10. Tidal Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stelzenmuller, Nickolas; Aliseda, Alberto; Palodichuk, Michael; Polagye, Brian; Thomson, James; Chime, Arshiya; Malte, Philip

    2014-03-31

    This technical report contains results on the following topics: 1) Testing and analysis of sub-scale hydro-kinetic turbines in a flume, including the design and fabrication of the instrumented turbines. 2) Field measurements and analysis of the tidal energy resource and at a site in northern Puget Sound, that is being examined for turbine installation. 3) Conceptual design and performance analysis of hydro-kinetic turbines operating at high blockage ratio, for use for power generation and flow control in open channel flows.

  11. Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    and feasible alternative, renewable, electrical energy producing subsea system. Index Terms--ocean energy, wave energy, wave energy converter, WEC, electrical energy, alternative energy, hydrokinetic energy on the coasts of the United States the harvesting ocean wave energy is ideal. It is projected that wave energy

  12. Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): Luis A. Vega Ph.D., National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Hawai'i

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .D., National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Hawai'i Copyright 2010, Offshore TechnologyOTC 21016 Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): An Update Luis A. Vega Ph for the production of electricity, desalinated water and energy intensive products. It is postulated that the US

  13. Marine Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaffino, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    this  door. ”   Marine  Biology   I  joined  the  military  RIVERSIDE   Marine  Biology   A Thesis submitted in partialBiology                                                                                                                        

  14. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bear, New Energy Corporation; Mary Ann Adonizio, Verdant Power; Sean Anderton, Ocean Renewable Power Company; Roger Bedard, EPRI (retired); Howard Hanson, Florida Atlantic...

  15. OWEMES -Offshore Wind And Other Marine Renewable Energies In Mediterranean And European Seas Civitavecchia (Italy), 20th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    OWEMES - Offshore Wind And Other Marine Renewable Energies In Mediterranean And European Seas Civitavecchia (Italy), 20th -22th April 2006 How to avoid Biases in Offshore Wind Power Forecasting Lueder von, adaptive system, Neural Network, single site forecast, systematic error Abstract Large-scale offshore wind

  16. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A SOpenAshley, Ohio: Energy-Resource | Open EnergyContinental

  17. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergyNatural GasDepartmentApril2014Federal environmentalLaboratory

  18. New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014Department of EnergyDepartmentPlanned in U.S. Waters

  19. Metaproteomics of a gutless marine worm and its symbiotic microbial community reveal unusual pathways for carbon and energy use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleiner, Manuel; Wentrop, C.; Lott, C.; Teeling, Hanno; Wetzel, Silke; Young, Jacque C; Chang, Y.; Shah, Manesh B; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Zarzycki, Jan; Fuchs, Georg; Markert, Stephanie; Hempel, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Low nutrient and energy availability has led to the evolution of numerous strategies for overcoming these limitations, of which symbiotic associations represent a key mechanism. Particularly striking are the associations between chemosynthetic bacteria and marine animals that thrive in nutrient-poor environments such as the deep-sea because the symbionts allow their hosts to grow on inorganic energy and carbon sources such as sulfide and CO2. Remarkably little is known about the physiological strategies that enable chemosynthetic symbioses to colonize oligotrophic environments. In this study, we used metaproteomics and metabolomics to investigate the intricate network of metabolic interactions in the chemosynthetic association between Olavius algarvensis, a gutless marine worm, and its bacterial symbionts. We propose novel pathways for coping with energy and nutrient limitation, some of which may be widespread in both free-living and symbiotic bacteria. These include (i) a pathway for symbiont assimilation of the host waste products acetate, propionate, succinate and malate, (ii) the potential use of carbon monoxide as an energy source, a substrate previously not known to play a role in marine invertebrate symbioses, (iii) the potential use of hydrogen as an energy source, (iv) the strong expression of high affinity uptake transporters, and (v) novel energy efficient steps in CO2 fixation and sulfate reduction. The high expression of proteins involved in pathways for energy and carbon uptake and conservation in the O. algarvensis symbiosis indicates that the oligotrophic nature of its environment exerted a strong selective pressure in shaping these associations.

  20. Mark Your Calendars: Department of Energy Tribal Summit May 4-5 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial Report ManagementMarine & Hydrokinetic » MarineMarkDepartment

  1. Free Flow Power Partners to Improve Hydrokinetic Turbine Performance and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services » ProgramPolicySenateFlyer, Title VIFormatBlogFred L.Cost

  2. GECCO Ocean Energy System Luis Maristany, Nicole Waters, Billy W. Wells Jr., Mario Suarez, Richard Gestewitz, Alexej Wiest,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    types of materials, supplies, as well as energy; however the exploration of wave energy as a resource Operation) is a wave energy converter that extracts kinetic energy from ocean waves using a rugged, innovative mechanical multi-system. Index Terms--Ocean energy, wave energy, hydrokinetic energy, alternative

  3. Market Drivers for Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial Report ManagementMarine & Hydrokinetic »Market Drivers for

  4. Building America Best Practices Series: Builders Challenge Guide to 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Marine Climate (Volume 11)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2010-09-01

    With the measures described in this guide, builders in the marine climate can build homes that have whole-house energy savings of 40% over the Building America benchmark with no added overall costs for consumers.

  5. ABOUT THE JOURNAL Marine Resource Economics publishes creative and scholarly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    ocean energy sources, marine transportation, coastal land use and climate adaptation, and management pollution, coastal and marine recreation, ocean energy resources, coastal climate adaptation, ecosystemABOUT THE JOURNAL Marine Resource Economics publishes creative and scholarly economic analyses

  6. Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty

    2014-02-05

    Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the FERC pilot project process. The Project compared results obtained from this method to results obtained from other passive hydrophone technologies and to visual observation techniques performed simultaneously. This Final Report makes recommendations on the best practice for future data collection, for ORPC’s work in Cook Inlet specifically, and for tidal power projects in general. This Project developed a marine mammal study design and compared technologies for hydroacoustic and visual data collection with potential for broad application to future tidal and hydrokinetic projects in other geographic areas. The data collected for this Project will support the environmental assessment of future Cook Inlet tidal energy projects, including ORPC’s East Foreland Tidal Energy Project and any tidal energy developments at Fire Island. The Project’s rigorous assessment of technology and methodologies will be invaluable to the hydrokinetic industry for developing projects in an environmentally sound and sustainable way for areas with high marine mammal activity or endangered populations. By combining several different sampling methods this Project will also contribute to the future preparation of a comprehensive biological assessment of ORPC’s projects in Cook Inlet.

  7. Aspects of Apache's Acquisition of Mariner Energy and Selected Devon Energy Assets

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration reviews mergers, acquisitions, and alliances by companies that are respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), or that result in a company that meets the FRS reporting criteria.

  8. Phylogenetic and chemical diversity of marine-derived actinomycetes from Southern California sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prieto-Davó, Alejandra

    2008-01-01

    heterotrophic marine microbes utilizing energy inputs intoenergy obtained from oceanic primary production was being consumed through bacterial (marine

  9. CX-010572: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brown University - Marine Hydro-Kinetic Energy Harvesting Using Cyber-Physical Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/04/2013 Location(s): Rhode Island Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

  10. CX-004836: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Advancement InitiativeCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 12/16/2010Location(s): Lynnwood, WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  11. Observational Studies of Drizzle in Marine Stratocumulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossiter, Dione Lee

    2012-01-01

    the water and energy budgets of the marine boundary layer (water and energy budgets of the stratocumulus-topped marineenergy budgets (both radiation and water) of the stratocumulus-topped marine

  12. Marin County- Solar Access Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Marin County's Energy Conservation Code is designed to assure new subdivisions provide for future passive or natural heating or cooling opportunities in the subdivision to the extent feasible. ...

  13. CHAPTER 2.5 Marine Chemosynthetic Symbioses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank

    , bacteria in marine invertebrate-methanotroph symbioses use meth- ane (CH4) as an energy, electronCHAPTER 2.5 Marine Chemosynthetic Symbioses Marine Chemosynthetic Symbioses COLLEEN M. CAVANAUGH, ZOE P. MCKINESS, IRENE L.G. NEWTON AND FRANK J. STEWART Introduction Bacteria and marine eukaryotes

  14. NREL Furthers U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Miramar's Move Toward Net Zero Energy (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    A 2008 report from the Defense Science Board concluded that critical missions at military bases are facing unacceptable risks from extended power losses. A first step in addressing this concern is to establish military bases that can produce as much energy as they use over the course of a year, a concept known as a "net zero energy installation" (NZEI). The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has helped the U.S. Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Miramar, located north of San Diego, California, as it strives to achieve its NZE goal. In conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), NREL partnered with MCAS Miramar to standardize processes and create an NZEI template for widespread replication across the military.

  15. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Marine Climates; January 2006 - December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership; Building Industry Research Alliance; Building Science Consortium; Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings; Davis Energy Group; IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center; National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    2006-12-01

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Marine Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

  16. Maryland Hybrid Truck Goods Movement Initiative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial Report ManagementMarine & Hydrokinetic »Marketof

  17. Maryland Hybrid Truck Goods Movement Initiative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial Report ManagementMarine & Hydrokinetic »Marketof1 DOE Hydrogen

  18. Maryland Hybrid Truck Goods Movement Initiative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial Report ManagementMarine & Hydrokinetic »Marketof1 DOE Hydrogen0

  19. Massachusetts Middle School Goes Local for PV Solar Energy System |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial Report ManagementMarine & HydrokineticAutomotiveforDepartment of

  20. Massachusetts is Winding the Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial Report ManagementMarine & HydrokineticAutomotiveforDepartmentis

  1. Modeling Tidal Stream Energy Extraction and its Effects on Transport Processes in a Tidal Channel and Bay System Using a Three-dimensional Coastal Ocean Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-02-28

    This paper presents a numerical modeling study for simulating in-stream tidal energy extraction and assessing its effects on the hydrodynamics and transport processes in a tidal channel and bay system connecting to coastal ocean. A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) module was implemented in a three-dimensional (3-D) coastal ocean model using the momentum sink approach. The MHK model was validated with the analytical solutions for tidal channels under one-dimensional (1-D) conditions. Model simulations were further carried out to compare the momentum sink approach with the quadratic bottom friction approach. The effects of 3-D simulations on the vertical velocity profile, maximum extractable energy, and volume flux reduction across the channel were investigated through a series of numerical experiments. 3-D model results indicate that the volume flux reduction at the maximum extractable power predicted by the 1-D analytical model or two-dimensional (2-D) depth-averaged numerical model may be overestimated. Maximum extractable energy strongly depends on the turbine hub height in the water column, and which reaches a maximum when turbine hub height is located at mid-water depth. Far-field effects of tidal turbines on the flushing time of the tidal bay were also investigated. Model results demonstrate that tidal energy extraction has a greater effect on the flushing time than volume flux reduction, which could negatively affect the biogeochemical processes in estuarine and coastal waters that support primary productivity and higher forms of marine life.

  2. Energy Department Awards $10.5 Million for Next-Generation Marine Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities Energy Efficiency Competition |Natural Gas | Department

  3. Energy Department Announces $10.5 Million for Next-Generation Marine Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyInformation Form Employee Information FormJuly 8,Efficiency

  4. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    aviation, marine and rail sectors. Energy use, broken out bysuch as aviation and marine. California’s Energy Future -and marine. We believe that the CEF transportation energy

  5. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    aviation and marine travel are higher than energy efficiencyintensity of the energy sources used in aviation and marineand marine diesel oil) or to other renewable energy sources,

  6. Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Stock Symbol Year founded...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fairbanks Alaska Marine and Hydrokinetic Solar Wind energy Solar PV Solar thermal Wind Hydro Small scale wind turbine up to kW and solar systems distributor http www absak com...

  7. 2015 GRADUATE STUDIES ENVIRONMENTAL FLUID MECHANICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Climate change and impact assessments Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Engi- neering research generated by winds, landslide, avalanche, or earthquake · Marine Hydrokinetic Energy · Circulation2015 GRADUATE STUDIES ENVIRONMENTAL FLUID MECHANICS AND WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING RESEARCH AREAS

  8. 2009 Water Power Peer Review Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Michael; Higgins, Mark; Reed, Mike

    2011-04-01

    This report contains the findings of the 2009 Water Power Peer Review Panel, as well as the Water Power Program's responses to those findings. This Peer Review focused on the Program's marine and hydrokinetic energy projects.

  9. MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHK ProjectsHawaii < MHK ProjectsITRI

  10. Marine Chemistry special issue: The renaissance of radium isotopic tracers in marine processes studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Marine Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA-MEL). There were 26Editorial Marine Chemistry special issue: The renaissance of radium isotopic tracers in marine interpretation and modeling of radium measurements in marine systems as well as perspectives on special

  11. Exceptional Preservation and Substrate Evolution in Early Paleozoic Marine Shelfal Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarhan, Lidya

    2013-01-01

    as higher-energy, nearshore to marginal marine (Juniata,a high-energy, near-shore shallow marine environment (of high-energy flow) are consistent with a marginal marine,

  12. Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig W. Collar

    2012-11-16

    Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy�s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program�s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

  13. Name Name Address Place Zip Category Sector Telephone number...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References AHERC AHERC K Street Nenana Alaska Category Testing Facility Operators Hydro Marine and Hydrokinetic http acep uaf edu facilities tanana river hydrokinetic test...

  14. Evaluation of behaviour and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaral, Stephen; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Cada, Glenn F; Giza, Daniel; Jacobsen, Paul; McMahon, Brian; Pracheil, Brenda M

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HKmore »turbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. Similarly, by combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we derived total passage survival probabilities >0.90 but generally approaching 1.00 across different HK turbine types, fish species, and fish lengths.« less

  15. Evaluation of behavior and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaral, Stephen V.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; ?ada, Glenn F.; Giza, Daniel J.; Jacobson, Paul T.; McMahon, Brian J.; Pracheil, Brenda M.

    2015-02-06

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HKmore »turbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. By combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we derived total passage survival probabilities >0.90 but generally approaching 1.00 across different HK turbine types, fish species, and fish lengths.« less

  16. Marine Fisheries On the cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Fisheries ~@WD@W On the cover: The red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus (NMFS photograph). Articles 56(2), 1994 Sea Turtle Observations at Explosive Removals of Energy Structures Gregg R. Gitschlag AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION D. James Baker, Under Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere National Marine

  17. Human dimensions perspectives on the impacts of coastal zone marine renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Conway, Flaxen; Hall-Arber, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    technology undergoing frequent change. Underwater tur- bines, stationary and floating wind devices, and over 100 wave energy

  18. NREL Developing a Numerical Simulation Tool to Study Hydrokinetic Energy Conversion Devices and Arrays (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01

    New code will help accelerate design improvements by providing a high-fidelity simulation tool to study power performance, structural loading, and the interactions between devices in arrays.

  19. Constrained marine resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Jason Hastings

    2007-01-01

    III Marine protected areas as a risk management tool A.Fishery Populations and Marine Ecosystmes,” Fisheries, 1999,11–25. Neubert, Michael G. , “Marine reserves and optimal

  20. ALASKA MARINE Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALASKA MARINE MAMMAL PROGRAM 2012 #12;2012 Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program Observer Manual Contents Section 1: The Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Marine Mammal Stock Program 1.5 Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program Section 2: The Southeast Alaska Environment 2

  1. Marine Strategy 20142019 1 Marine Strategy 20142019

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Marine Strategy 2014­2019 1 Marine Strategy 2014­2019 Providing Australians with marine environmental intelligence for their safety, sustainability, well-being and prosperity. #12;2 Marine Strategy 2014­2019 #12;Marine Strategy 2014­2019 3 Foreword I am pleased to present the Bureau of Meteorology

  2. Environmental Effects of Sediment Transport Alteration and Impacts on Protected Species: Edgartown Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Stephen B.; Schlezinger, David, Ph.D; Cowles, Geoff, Ph.D; Hughes, Patricia; Samimy; Roland, I.; and Terray, E, Ph.D.

    2012-12-29

    The Islands of Martha�¢����s Vineyard and Nantucket are separated from the Massachusetts mainland by Vineyard and Nantucket Sounds; water between the two islands flows through Muskeget Channel. The towns of Edgartown (on Martha�¢����s Vineyard) and Nantucket recognize that they are vulnerable to power supply interruptions due to their position at the end of the power grid, and due to sea level rise and other consequences of climate change. The tidal energy flowing through Muskeget Channel has been identified by the Electric Power Research Institute as the strongest tidal resource in Massachusetts waters. The Town of Edgartown proposes to develop an initial 5 MW (nameplate) tidal energy project in Muskeget Channel. The project will consist of 14 tidal turbines with 13 providing electricity to Edgartown and one operated by the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth for research and development. Each turbine will be 90 feet long and 50 feet high. The electricity will be brought to shore by a submarine cable buried 8 feet below the seabed surface which will landfall in Edgartown either on Chappaquiddack or at Katama. Muskeget Channel is located between Martha�¢����s Vineyard and Nantucket. Its depth ranges between 40 and 160 feet in the deepest portion. It has strong currents where water is transferred between Nantucket Sound and the Atlantic Ocean continental shelf to the south. This makes it a treacherous passage for navigation. Current users of the channel are commercial and recreational fishing, and cruising boats. The US Coast Guard has indicated that the largest vessel passing through the channel is a commercial scallop dragger with a draft of about 10 feet. The tidal resource in the channel has been measured by the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth and the peak velocity flow is approximately 5 knots. The technology proposed is the helical Gorlov-type turbine positioned with a horizontal axis that is positively buoyant in the water column and held down by anchors. This is the same technology proposed by Ocean Renewable Power Company in the Western Passage and Cobscook Bay near Eastport Maine. The blades rotate in two directions capturing the tides energy both during flood and ebb tides. The turbines will be anchored to the bottom and suspended in the water column. Initial depth of the turbines is expected to be about 25 feet below the surface to avoid impacting navigation while also capturing the strongest currents. The Town of Edgartown was initially granted a Preliminary Permit by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on March 1, 2008, and has recently received a second permit valid through August 2014. The Preliminary Permit gives Edgartown the exclusive right to apply for a power generation license for power generated from the hydrokinetic energy in the water flowing in this area. Edgartown filed a Draft Pilot License Application with FERC on February 1, 2010 and an Expanded Environmental Notification Form with the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Office at the same time. It expects to file a Final License Application in late 2013. Harris Miller Miller & Hanson (HMMH) of Burlington Massachusetts is acting as the Project Manager for the Town of Edgartown and collaborating with other partners of the project including the University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth's Marine Renewable Energy Center and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center. HMMH was awarded a grant under the Department of Energy's Advanced Water Program to conduct marine science and hydrokinetic site-specific environmental studies for projects actively seeking a FERC License. HMMH, on behalf of the Town, is managing this comprehensive study of the marine environment in Muskeget Channel and potential impacts of the tidal project on indicator species and habitats. The University of Massachusetts School of Marine Science and Technology (SMAST) conducted oceanographic studies of tidal currents, tide level, benthic habit

  3. Human dimensions perspectives on the impacts of coastal zone marine renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Conway, Flaxen; Hall-Arber, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    Continental Shelf Renewable Energy Space-Use Conflicts andpotential space-use conflicts between offshore renewablerenewable en- ergy, with their demand for extensive, exclusive space,

  4. Human dimensions perspectives on the impacts of coastal zone marine renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Conway, Flaxen; Hall-Arber, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    floating wind devices, and over 100 wave energy conversionenergy. In coastal areas, the po- tential to harness the clean power of offshore wind,

  5. Newsletter of the Friends of Hatfield Marine Science Center www.hmsc.oregonstate.edu/friends UpwellingUpwellingNewsletter of the Friends of Hatfield Marine Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the September announcement of U.S. Department of Energy support for the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, based at the Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC). The new Northwest Na- tional Marine Renewable Energy Center is one of just two new DOE-funded marine renewable

  6. VI International Conference on Computational Methods in Marine Engineering MARINE 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VI International Conference on Computational Methods in Marine Engineering MARINE 2015 F. Salvatore, R. Broglia and R. Muscari (Eds) SHIP VOYAGE ENERGY EFFICIENCY ASSESSMENT USING SHIP SIMULATORS Ameen.ac.uk, web page: http://www.soton.ac.uk Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Department Faculty

  7. DOE Tour of Zero: Marine Drive by Clifton View Homes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pStateDOE FederalTheof Energy2,408-square-foot zero energy home in

  8. Hawaii Natural Energy Institute Energy Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) · Run-of-river Hydro (limited resource) · Ocean Energy ­ OTEC, Wave (UH National Marine Renewable Energy

  9. Building America Best Practices Series Volume 11. Builders Challenge Guide to 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Marine Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Cole, Pamala C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Love, Pat M.

    2010-09-01

    This best practices guide is the eleventh in a series of guides for builders produced by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America Program. This guide book is a resource to help builders design and construct homes that are among the most energy-efficient available, while addressing issues such as building durability, indoor air quality, and occupant health, safety, and comfort. With the measures described in this guide, builders in the marine climate (portions of Washington, Oregon, and California) can achieve homes that have whole house energy savings of 40% over the Building America benchmark (a home built to mid-1990s building practices roughly equivalent to the 1993 Model Energy Code) with no added overall costs for consumers. These best practices are based on the results of research and demonstration projects conducted by Building America’s research teams. The guide includes information for managers, designers, marketers, site supervisors, and subcontractors, as well as case studies of builders who are successfully building homes that cut energy use by 40% in the marine climate. This document is available on the web at www.buildingamerica.gov. This report was originally cleared 06-29-2010. This version is Rev 1 cleared in Nov 2010. The only change is the reference to the Energy Star Windows critieria shown on pg 8.25 was updated to match the criteria - Version 5.0, 04/07/2009, effective 01/04/2010.

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine Drive and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pStateDOE FederalTheofHeyeck, AEP, Sr.Energy

  11. A white paper on relevant aspects of Population Dynamics, Marine Community Ecology, and Oceanography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Oceanography of Marine Microbes for the Department of Energy Genomes to Life project: CARBON SEQUESTRATIONA white paper on relevant aspects of Population Dynamics, Marine Community Ecology ........................................................................................................7 Introductory Marine Community Ecology

  12. 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Marine Corps Recruit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReport FY2014ConferenceofEnergy Oak2013 EIADepartment of

  13. U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsStateofEnergy Fuel Cell Council: The Voice iiiDepartment

  14. Final Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -EE0003638 Prepared For THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE): MARINE AND HYDROKINETIC INITIATIVE Prepared By MAKAI of the global OTEC resource dwarfs that of other other marine renewable energy technologies, and OTEC powerFinal Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy

  15. Take Marine Mammals Permit Application Form 3-200-43 | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)Model forTechnologies95Symerton,EEconomies in Central Asia

  16. Peninsula Research Institute for Marine Renewable Energy PRIMaRE | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLC Jump to:3 ofAltos delValley ElPemelCompanyLtd

  17. U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof Energy Fish and Wildlife ServiceDepartment of

  18. DOE Announces Webinars on Instrumentation for Monitoring Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Instrumentation for Monitoring Marine Renewable Energy Devices, Energy Efficiency in Correctional Facilities, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Instrumentation for Monitoring...

  19. DOE Announces Webinars on Instrumentation for Monitoring Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Announces Webinars on Instrumentation for Monitoring Marine Renewable Energy Devices, Energy Efficiency in Correctional Facilities, and More DOE Announces Webinars on...

  20. Marine Conservation Resource overexploitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Conservation · Overview · Resource overexploitation % Impacts on target spp % Impacts on non'target spp, % Impacts on community/ecosystem % Marine protected areas Friday: · Global climate change · Invasive species · Solutions · Study Guide: Monday !" April · Discussion: Wednesday# !$ April % Marine

  1. NREL: Wind Research - Meet a Wind Energy Expert Archives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopment of Marine and HydrokineticMarket

  2. NREL: Wind Research - NREL Researchers Advance Wind Energy Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopment of Marine and HydrokineticMarketEngineering

  3. U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsStateofEnergy Fuel Cell Council: The Voice iii

  4. MARINE RESEARCH Volume 56, Number 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    Journal of MARINE RESEARCH Volume 56, Number 1 Enhanced dispersion of near-inertial waves at San Diego, La Jolla, California, 92093- 0230, U.S.A. Journal of Marine Research, 56, 1­40, 1998 1 #12 the near-inertial energy in the mixed layer returns to backgroundlevels on a time scale of ten to twenty

  5. DISTRIBUTED ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE: A PRELIMINARY REPORT, VOLUME I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    Walter Schmitt, Marine Energy Prospects for California,Renewable Energy from the Sea," Marine .Technical Societyenergy resources by Dr. Walter Schmitt of the Institute of Marine

  6. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 382: 211­219, 2009 doi: 10.3354/meps07997 Published April 30 INTRODUCTION Seabirds play critical roles in the transfer of energy and nutrients within marine ecosystems and also between marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Despite decades of intensive study

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Marine flooding event in continental Triassic facies identified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    representing a high-energy event and records exceptional marine flooding in a distal fluvial environmentORIGINAL ARTICLE Marine flooding event in continental Triassic facies identified by a nothosaur Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract Sudden marine flooding within otherwise con- tinental

  8. MARINE MAMMAL SCIENCE, 19(3):515-528 (July2003) 02003 by the Society for Marine Mammalogy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish, Frank

    MARINE MAMMAL SCIENCE, 19(3):515-528 (July2003) 02003 by the Society for Marine Mammalogy;. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- - . . . . . . . . . . _ _ . . _ 5 16 MARINE MAMMAL SCIENCE, VOL. 19,NO.3, 2003 Animals that swim by body and caudal fin propulsion require no additional energy to provide stability and are largely a function of body morphology (Fish 2002

  9. MARINE MAMMAL SCIENCE, 23(3): 707714 (July 2007) C 2007 by the Society for Marine Mammalogy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish, Frank

    MARINE MAMMAL SCIENCE, 23(3): 707­714 (July 2007) C 2007 by the Society for Marine Mammalogy DOI to the resistance of swimming. The high energy demands of rapid swimming require minimization of the resistive out radially (Fig. 2). The combined vertical velocity 707 #12;708 MARINE MAMMAL SCIENCE, VOL. 23, NO

  10. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u tCorporationIt's Bike-to-WorkEnergy|4

  11. Marine Mammals Enact Individual Worlds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delfour, Fabienne

    2010-01-01

    148, Delfour, F. (2006b). Marine mammals in front of thefor the Society for Marine Mammalogy, Quebec City, Canada,image processing in three marine mammal species: Killer

  12. The Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Marine Animals Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As electricity is generated at sea by marine renewable energy technologies, it must be transported back to shore through undersea cables. As electricity is transmitted through the cables,...

  13. MarineSIM: Robot simulation for marine environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senarathne, P. G. C. Namal

    Development of robust navigation algorithms for marine robotics is a challenge faced by many marine robotists. This paper presents MarineSIM, a marine robot simulation platform which provides an infrastructure to easily ...

  14. Live Webinar on the Funding Opportunity for Environmental Stewardship for Renewable Energy Technologies: MHK Environmental and Resource Characterization Instrumentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This FOA will support the development of instrumentation, associated signal processing algorithms or software, and integration of instrumentation packages for monitoring the environmental impacts of marine and hydrokinetic technologies. It will also support the development and testing of sensors, instrumentation, or processing techniques to collect physical data on ocean waves (e.g., height, period, directionality, steepness). Join us for an informational webinar on March 20, 2014. The purpose of this webinar will be to give applicants a chance to ask questions about the FOA process generally. Reserve your webinar seat now at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/553062432

  15. NTINSTITUTEFOR MARINE AND ATM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ~UH-NOAA~ JOI NTINSTITUTEFOR MARINE AND ATM O SPHERICRESEAR CH ACooperativeInstitute forthePacificIslandsRegion JIMAR ~UH-NOAA~ JOI NTINSTITUTEFOR MARINE AND ATM O SPHERICRESEAR CH A Proposal to the National Oceanic

  16. ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    and A. Ghirardi Marine Kelp: Energy Resource in the CoastalREFERENCES J. Leone, Marine Biomass Energy Project, (Newin FY 1981. will MARINE KELP: ENERGY RESOURCE IN THE COASTAL

  17. Marine Science Scholarships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Marine Science Scholarships Complete Scholarship Name Application Deadline Date Contact Name Contact Phone Number Contact E-mail Address Marine Science Endowed Student Support Fund Both incoming and current marine science majors are eligible to apply for these merit-based scholarships. Awards consist

  18. NTINSTITUTEFOR MARINE AND ATM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ~UH-NOAA~ JOI NTINSTITUTEFOR MARINE AND ATM O SPHERICRESEAR CH Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2010 Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research University of Hawai'i at Manoa 1000 Pope Road, MSB For Cooperative Agreements NA17RJ1230, NA09OAR4320075, and NA08OAR4320910 ~UH-NOAA~ JOI NTINSTITUTEFOR MARINE

  19. MARINE RESEARCH Volume 66, Number 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of MARINE RESEARCH Volume 66, Number 1 Mean energy balance in the tropical Pacific Ocean requires energy input from the wind. Previous studies estimate that the mean rate of wind work (or wind global energy input into the ocean circulation, it is also critical in maintaining the east-west tilt

  20. CX-005561: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Support for Marine Hydrokinetic Energy ProjectsCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 04/06/2011Location(s): New HampshireOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  1. ORNL/TM-2011/419 Field Measurements at River and Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    National Laboratory 3 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, University of Washington 4 IIHRORNL/TM-2011/419 Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy

  2. Building America Case Study: Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit, Sunnyvale, California (Fact Sheet), Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels ResearchofDerivativeColdSealed Crawl Spaces withSunnyvale Marine

  3. Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2007-01-01

    house in a Marine climate. Annual Energy Consumptionmarine climate has very little air conditioning - compressor energyEnergy Consumption Relative to Unvented House, kWh Marine -

  4. U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton: Using The Sun For Hot Water And Electricity, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-09-01

    Case study overview of integrated solar hot water/photovoltaic systems at the U.S. Marine Corps Camp Pendleton training pools.

  5. Marine invertebrate-microbial bioactive metabolite symbioses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Koty

    2006-01-01

    a mitochondrial marker. Marine Biology (Berlin) 141(2): 377-Faulkner, D. J. (2002). Marine Natural Products. Nat. Prod.Microbial Diversity of Marine Sponges. Marine Molecular

  6. Minor in Marine Biology Minor in Marine Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Minor in Marine Biology Minor in Marine Biology General Goals of the Minor in Marine Biology About who choose the Minor in Marine Biology will learn about the biology, evolution and ecology of organisms that inhabit these environments and the ecological processes linking them. Marine biology draws

  7. Metagenomic and Metaproteomic Analyses of Symbioses between Bacteria and Gutless Marine Worms (2014 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubilier, Nicole

    2014-03-19

    Nicole Dubilier of the Max Planck Institute speaks at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  8. Energy allocation in juveniles of a warm-temperate reef fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stallings, Christopher D.; Coleman, Felicia C.; Koenig, Christopher C.; Markiewicz, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    both marine and freshwater systems shift energy allocationenergy allocation, or both? the Florida State University Coastal and Marine

  9. Ice Nuclei in Marine Air: Biogenic Particles or Dust?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Hoose, C.; Poschl, U.; Lawrence, M.

    2013-01-11

    Ice nuclei impact clouds, but their sources and distribution in the atmosphere are still not well known. Particularly little attention has been paid to IN sources in marine environments, although evidence from field studies suggests that IN populations in remote marine regions may be dominated by primary biogenic particles associated with sea spray. In this exploratory model study, we aim to bring attention to this long-neglected topic and identify promising target regions for future field campaigns. We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated marine biogenic immersion IN distributions and dust immersion IN distributions, we predict strong regional differences in the importance of marine biogenic IN relative to dust IN. Our analysis suggests that marine biogenic IN are most likely to play a dominant role in determining IN concentrations in near-surface-air over the Southern Ocean, so future field campaigns aimed at investigating marine biogenic IN should target that region. Climate related changes in the abundance and emission of biogenic marine IN could affect marine cloud properties, thereby introducing previously unconsidered feedbacks that influence the hydrological cycle and the Earth’s energy balance. Furthermore, marine biogenic IN may be an important aspect to consider in proposals for marine cloud brightening by artificial sea spray production.

  10. Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Fiscal Year 2011 Report Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-11-01

    Potential environmental effects of offshore wind (OSW) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between OSW installations and avian and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. During FY 2011, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) scientists adapted and applied the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), first developed to examine the effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy devices on aquatic environments, to offshore wind development. PNNL scientists conducted a risk screening analysis on two initial OSW cases: a wind project in Lake Erie and a wind project off the Atlantic coast of the United States near Atlantic City, New Jersey. The screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two OSW cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device, such as alterations in bottom habitats. Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted during FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an assessment of the vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with OSW installations; a probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. As more data become available that document effects of offshore wind farms on specific receptors in U.S. coastal and Great Lakes waters, probability analyses will be performed.

  11. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF JANE LUBCHENCO, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ); liquefied natural gas (LNG); hydropower; offshore and land-based wind power; hydrokinetic ocean energy (wave ON THE CONSOLIDATED LAND, ENERGY, AND AQUATIC RESOURCES ACT OF 2009 BEFORE THE COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES U, including those in ocean-dependent industries such as fishing, marine transportation, and coastal tourism

  12. Offshore Resource Assessment and Design Conditions Public Meeting Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    The Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program hosted a public meeting in June 2011 that focused on the critical meteorological and oceanographic measurements and data needed for successful deployment of offshore renewable energy technologies, including wind and marine and hydrokinetic. The objective was to develop a tactical plan to guide future program investments in filling possible information gaps.

  13. Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering within naval architecture and marine engineering and marine engineering problems; an ability to apply basic knowledge in fluid mechanics, dynamicsNaval Architecture and Marine Engineering Undergraduate Program The University of Michigan #12

  14. Probabilistic Methods for Enhanced Marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Probabilistic Methods for Enhanced Marine Situational Awareness ¡ Charles Bibby Worcester College equipment in the marine environment. My dad's craftsmanship and practical abilities have proved invaluable present a system that uses probabilistic methods for enhanced situational aware- ness in marine

  15. Marine Ecological Processes Online section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Marine Ecological Processes Online section FAS 6272 (3 credits) Fall 2014 Course Description, behavior, population dynamics, and community structure in marine and estuarine ecosystems. Prerequisite will have: · Examined how ecological processes operate in the marine environment · Compared how ecological

  16. A comparison of community and trophic structure in five marine ecosystems based on energy budgets and system metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ecosystem indices (e.g., functional group production, consumption and biomass ratios, cumulative biomass levels, high production and consumption by carnivorous zooplankton, and similar proportions of apex. Commonalities across the ecosystems included overall high primary production and energy flow at low trophic

  17. NATURAL MARINE HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luyendyk, Bruce

    oil and gas (Fischer, 1977).The offshore gaseous seepage is controlled Geology; November 1999; v. 27; no. 11; p. 1047­1050; 4 figures. 1047 Decrease in natural marine hydrocarbon seepage near Coal OilNATURAL MARINE HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE Hydrocarbon seepage from the world's conti- nental shelves

  18. ENERGY ANALYSIS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Various, Various,

    2011-01-01

    A Revi ew of the Energy from Marine Biomass Program,"of converting marine biomass into energy products, to defineenergy technologies which have been included in the solar program: municipal soltd waste, cogeneration, marine

  19. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Graeme

    .g. to expend energy and/or time) so that some kind of ben- efit can be obtained (e.g. improved ranking or exclu, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK 3 National Marine Park of Zakynthos, 1 El. Venizelou Street, 29100 Zakynthos, Greece 4 · Sequential assessment · Evolutionary stable strategy · Territory · Marine · Vertebrate · Reptile Resale

  20. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlik, Joseph

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Published November 2 Defenses of Caribbean sponges.Pawlik* Biological Sciences and Center for Marine Science Research. University of North Carolina at Wilmington. Analyses of ash content, tensile strength, protein, carbohydrate, and lipid content, and total energy

  1. Establishing a Testing Center for Ocean Energy Technologies in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State University (OSU) have partnered with EERE to develop the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC), as one of three National Marine Renewable Energy...

  2. Marine Biology Is Marine Biology right for me?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Marine Biology Is Marine Biology right for me? If you have an interest in learning about life in the sea then Marine Biology may be a good option for you. You will need good time management skills a marine biology degree are wide-ranging and provide a good basis for employment in almost any sector

  3. Marine Policy Challenges in developing China's marine protected area system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Marine Policy Challenges in developing China's marine protected area system Wanfei Qiu a,* , Bin Department of Marine Environment Protection, State Oceanic Administration, No. 1 Fuxingmenwai Avenue, Beijing increases in the coverage of marine protected areas (MPAs) in China, and a total of 158 MPAs have been

  4. Exploring the Deep... Exploring the Ocean Environment Unit 4Marine Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    that consumes other organisms. Figure 2. Simple marine food chain. Arrows represent the transfer of energy fromGEO/OC 103 Exploring the Deep... Lab 7 #12;Exploring the Ocean Environment Unit 4­Marine Productivity 123 Unit 4 Marine Productivity Inthisunit,youwill · Discoverpatternsinglobalprimaryproductivity

  5. Monitoring ship noise to assess the impact of coastal developments on marine mammals q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    Renewable energy AIS data Time-lapse Marine mammals Acoustic disturbance a b s t r a c t The potentialMonitoring ship noise to assess the impact of coastal developments on marine mammals q Nathan D impacts of underwater noise on marine mammals are widely recognised, but uncertainty over variability

  6. Experimental Data and SNL-EFDC Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    Experimental Data and SNL-EFDC Simulations Flow Sensitivity to MHK Energy Generation from Currents, Implications and Future Work Marine hydrokinetic (MHK) projects will generate power from ocean and river currents and tides, thereby altering water velocities and currents in the site's waterway

  7. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife.

  8. Assessing underwater noise levels during pile-driving at an offshore windfarm and its potential effects on marine mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    impacts Renewable energy a b s t r a c t Marine renewable developments have raised concerns over impacts; Gordon et al., 2003). Over the last decade there has been a growing interest in marine renewable energy effects on marine mammals Helen Bailey a,*, Bridget Senior a , Dave Simmons b , Jan Rusin b , Gordon

  9. UNSTRUCTURED MARINE FOOD WEBS AND "POLLUTANT ANALOGUES"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by using real data. Let us first assume that in a food web each transfer of organic material (or energyUNSTRUCTURED MARINE FOOD WEBS AND "POLLUTANT ANALOGUES" JOHN D. ISAACS' ABSTRACT The several envi- ronments. The concentration factor found in the known and describable food chain of the Salton

  10. Marine microbial diversity: can it be determined?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine microbial diversity: can it be determined? Carlos Pedro´ s-Alio´ Institut de Cie`ncies del of magnitude for the total number of microbial species on Earth range from 103 to 109 . Despite global as the recently discovered photoheter- otrophy in the sea) that force a re-evaluation of carbon and energy fluxes

  11. Authors, Titles, and Subjects in the Marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :97 Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC), 4:46 Atomic Energy Commission, U.S., 4:165 Azarovitz Fullerton, 4:13, 19, 31, 49, 60, 62,66, 72, 111, 174 biography, 4:124 Commissioner of U.S. Commission

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Passive Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Marin County- Green Building Requirements Marin County's original Single Family Dwelling Energy...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Marin County- Green Building Requirements Marin County's original Single Family Dwelling Energy Efficiency Ordinance went into effect on January 1, 2003. The building code has...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Water Heat Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Marin County- Green Building Requirements Marin County's original Single Family Dwelling Energy...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Marin County- Green Building Requirements Marin County's original Single Family Dwelling Energy Efficiency...

  16. DOE Announces Webinars on Resources for Tribal Energy Efficiency Projects,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pState Efficiency, RenewablesLiteracy VirtualHydrokinetic TechnologyDeep

  17. Marine Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChangeMarc MMariesTurbinesServices

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    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgency (IRENA)OptionsEquivalentBScirado Brasil Ltda JumpSeawind

  19. California's Energy Future - The View to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Energy System Component Analysis Bin Wind Onshore, shallow offshorewind, solar, biomass, geothermal, hydro, and marine energy offshore.

  20. Paci c Marine Environmental Laboratory Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paci c Marine Environmental Laboratory #12;#12;Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL Laboratory #12;Contents Overview of PMEL's Strategy 1 Laboratory Structure 5 PMEL Themes 7 Climate Research 8 Contents iv #12;The Pacific Marine environMenTal laboraTory (PMEL) is one of seven federal research

  1. A Recognized Leader in Marine & Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    D/Masters Applied Marine Physics Marine & Atmospheric Chemistry Marine Affairs & Policy (Masters Only) MarineA Recognized Leader in Marine & Atmospheric Studies Our graduate program has over 250 students University of MiaMi rosenstiel school of Marine & atMospheric science #12;Miami Ranks #5: fDi Magazine's Top

  2. Undergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Undergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide 2012-2013 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Introduction 2. Degree Programs and Sample Curricula MARINE AFFAIRS ­ B.A.M.A MARINE SCIENCE / BIOLOGY ­ B.S.M.A.S. MARINE SCIENCE / CHEMISTRY ­ B.S.M.A.S. MARINE SCIENCE / GEOLOGY ­ B.S.M.A.S. MARINE SCIENCE / PHYSICS

  3. Marine Ecomechanics Mark W. Denny1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    Marine Ecomechanics Mark W. Denny1 and Brian Gaylord2 1 Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California 93950; email: mwdenny@stanford.edu 2 Bodega Marine Laboratory and Department The Annual Review of Marine Science is online at marine.annualreviews.org This article's doi: 10.1146/annurev-marine

  4. Undergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Undergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide 2013-2014 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Introduction 2. Degree Programs and Sample Curricula MARINE AFFAIRS ­ BAMA MARINE SCIENCE / BIOLOGY ­ BSMAS MARINE SCIENCE / CHEMISTRY ­ BSMAS MARINE SCIENCE / GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES ­ BSMAS MARINE SCIENCE / PHYSICS

  5. Marine Ecological Processes Online section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Marine Ecological Processes Online section FAS 4270 (3 credits) Fall 2012 Course Description The course covers the ecology of marine organisms and habitats with focus on how general ecological principles and those unique to the marine environment drive patterns and processes. Prerequisite: Two

  6. Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marine Seep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifer, Ira; Boles, J R; Luyendyk, B P

    2007-01-01

    a marine seep, University of California Energy InstituteEnergy Development and Technology 009r “Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marinemarine hydrocarbon seeps at Coal Oil Point, CA: Implications for offshore oil production, Final report for University of California Energy

  7. Biogeography of Marine Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biogeography of Marine Algae David J Garbary, St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia and vicariance in establishing distributions and as factors associated with speciation. Since eukaryotic algae. There are many species that are virtually cosmopolitan (e.g. the green alga Enteromorpha intestinalis, the red

  8. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    hydrokinetic technologies to aquatic environments (i.e. rivers, estuaries, and oceans), fish and fish habitats, ecological relationships, and other marine and freshwater aquatic...

  9. DOE Announces Webinars on Better Buildings Challenge K-12 Education...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and share lessons learned from his experiences. Register for the webinar. January 22: Marine and Hydrokinetic Systems Performance Advancement Funding Opportunity Announcement...

  10. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    Marine diesel oil (MDO), Liquefied natural gas (LNG), Winddiesel oil) or to other renewable energy sources, such as winddiesel oil), or to other renewable energy sources, such as wind

  11. Marine Bio-Technologies Center of Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Bio-Technologies Center of Innovation Supporting the Blue Economy #12;A Nexus for Marine Biotechnology www.MBCOI.net Marine Category Market Share Market Category Biotechnology 8% Biotechnology compounds Marine Biotechnologies Global Market ~$172 Billion1 1Source: BioMarine Business Convention 2013

  12. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poulin, Robert

    .thieltges@otago.ac.nz Production of marine trematode cercariae: a potentially overlooked path of energy flow in benthic systems to the flow of matter and energy in some other way. For example, parasites of infected prey may 14, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark 5 Department of Biological Sciences, University of the Pacific, Stockton

  13. SEYMOUR CENTER at Long Marine Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    SEYMOUR CENTER at Long Marine Laboratory Facility Rental Policies and Procedures These policies apply to all events held at the Seymour Marine Discovery Center. Rental Fees The Seymour Marine Discovery Center

  14. Marine Mammal Internships & Research Opportunities in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    Marine Mammal Internships & Research Opportunities in the Aegean Sea We are excited to announce internship opportunities in marine mammal research. Students, recent graduates and scientists can join Archipelagos' research and conservation efforts in Eastern Aegean. Archipelagos Institute of Marine

  15. MARINE PROTECTED AREAS Fisheries Science and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    1 MARINE PROTECTED AREAS Fisheries Science and Management Rita OLIVEIRA MONTEIRO Cover photo of a mpa (coast and underwater) MARINE PROTECTED AREAS OBJECTIVES FOR TODAY: · definitions · historical · habitat degradation · invasive species · harmful algal blooms · marine epidemics · mass mortalities

  16. Marine reserve effects on fishery profit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Crow; Kendall, Bruce E.; Gaines, Steven; Siegel, David A.; Costello, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    the problem of sitting marine reserves. Bull. Mar. Sci. ,2005). Science and society: marine reserve design for theD.A. & Carr, M.H. (2005). Marine reserves exploit population

  17. Geo-Marine Letters An International Journal of Marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    of Geo-Marine Letters, pre- senting contributions from the 10th International Conference on Gas in Marine Sediments (September 2010, Lake Baikal, Russia), to the memory of Mikhail Konstantinovich Ivanov. The author professor and simply a great man. He built such a fantastic program (TTR) when Russia was facing so many

  18. Hypocholesterolemic Effects of Marine Oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hypocholesterolemic Effects of Marine Oils UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH FISHERIES, H. E. Crowther, Director Hypocholesterolemic Effects of Marine Oils By JAMES J. PEIFER Excerpt from Chapter 23 of the book, "Fish Oils,·· M. E. Stansby, editor Avi Publishing Company, Westport

  19. Application of Flow Battery in Marine Current Turbine System for Daily Power Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    Application of Flow Battery in Marine Current Turbine System for Daily Power Management Zhibin Zhou focuses on a grid-connected MCT system and proposes using vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) energy storage and to guarantee the expected power injection to the local grid. Keywords--Marine current turbine, flow battery

  20. HMSC Mission Statement The Hatfield Marine Science Center advances the mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Over the past seven years, HMSC has experienced many changes and new programs. The NSF with partnerships among Sea Grant, the Oregon Coast Aquarium, and Lincoln County School District. Our Visitor Center, the Marine Mammal Institute and the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center were established. HMSC