National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for margin characterization rismc

  1. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

    2012-08-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

  2. Integrating Safety Assessment Methods using the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli

    2013-03-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of nuclear power plants (NPPs). As the current light water reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of systems, structures, and components (SSC) degradations or failures that initiate safety significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated primarily based on engineering judgment backed by a set of conservative engineering calculations. The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development (R&D) in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the RISMC Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as margins management strategies. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. As the lead Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory for this Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is tasked with developing and deploying methods and tools that support the quantification and management of safety margin and uncertainty.

  3. Robustness of RISMC Insights under Alternative Aleatory/Epistemic Uncertainty Classifications: Draft Report under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2012-09-20

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, would be founded on probabilistic characterizations of uncertainty in SSC performance. In the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technology, there has arisen a general consensus about the distinctive roles of two types of uncertainty: aleatory and epistemic, where the former represents irreducible, random variability inherent in a system, whereas the latter represents a state of knowledge uncertainty on the part of the analyst about the system which is, in principle, reducible through further research. While there is often some ambiguity about how any one contributing uncertainty in an analysis should be classified, there has nevertheless emerged a broad consensus on the meanings of these uncertainty types in the PRA setting. However, while RISMC methodology shares some features with conventional PRA, it will nevertheless be a distinctive methodology set. Therefore, the paradigms for classification of uncertainty in the PRA setting may not fully port to the RISMC environment. Yet the notion of risk-informed margin is based on the characterization of uncertainty, and it is therefore critical to establish a common understanding of uncertainty in the RISMC setting.

  4. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) PathwayTechnical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Richard Martineau

    2012-11-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

  5. Treatment of Passive Component Reliability in Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization FY 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W Youngblood

    2010-09-01

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, is founded on probabilistic characterizations of SSC performance.

  6. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program FY13 Status Update for EPRI - RISMC Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced "RISMC toolkit" that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is collaborating with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in order to focus on applications of interest to the U.S. nuclear power industry. This report documents the collaboration activities performed between INL and EPRI during FY2013.

  7. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  8. New Methods and Tools to Perform Safety Analysis within RISMC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diego Mandelli; Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi; Robert Kinoshita; Joshua Cogliati

    2013-11-01

    The Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway uses a systematic approach developed to characterize and quantify safety margins of nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. What differentiates the RISMC approach from traditional probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is the concept of safety margin. In PRA, a safety metric such as core damage frequency (CDF) is generally estimated using static fault-tree and event-tree models. However, it is not possible to estimate how close we are to physical safety limits (say peak clad temperature) for most accident sequences described in the PRA. In the RISMC approach, what we want to understand is not just the frequency of an event like core damage, but how close we are (or not) to this event and how we might increase our safety margin through margin management strategies in a Dynamic PRA (DPRA) fashion. This paper gives an overview of methods that are currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with the scope of advance the current state of the art of dynamic PRA.

  9. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Methods Development Work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis L; Ma, Zhegang; Tom Riley; Mandelli, Diego; Nielsen, Joseph W; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes the research activity developed during the Fiscal year 2014 within the Risk Informed Safety Margin and Characterization (RISMC) pathway within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) campaign. This research activity is complementary to the one presented in the INL/EXT-??? report which shows advances Probabilistic Risk Assessment Analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-7 in conjunction to novel flooding simulation tools. Here we present several analyses that prove the values of the RISMC approach in order to assess risk associated to nuclear power plants (NPPs). We focus on simulation based PRA which, in contrast to classical PRA, heavily employs system simulator codes. Firstly we compare, these two types of analyses, classical and RISMC, for a Boiling water reactor (BWR) station black out (SBO) initiating event. Secondly we present an extended BWR SBO analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-5 which address the comments and suggestions received about he original analysis presented in INL/EXT-???. This time we focus more on the stochastic analysis such probability of core damage and on the determination of the most risk-relevant factors. We also show some preliminary results regarding the comparison between RELAP5-3D and the new code RELAP-7 for a simplified Pressurized Water Reactors system. Lastly we present some conceptual ideas regarding the possibility to extended the RISMC capabilities from an off-line tool (i.e., as PRA analysis tool) to an online-tool. In this new configuration, RISMC capabilities can be used to assist and inform reactor operator during real accident scenarios.

  10. Modeling of a Flooding Induced Station Blackout for a Pressurized Water Reactor Using the RISMC Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven R; Smith, Curtis L; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua J; Kinoshita, Robert A

    2011-07-01

    In the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) approach we want to understand not just the frequency of an event like core damage, but how close we are (or are not) to key safety-related events and how might we increase our safety margins. The RISMC Pathway uses the probabilistic margin approach to quantify impacts to reliability and safety by coupling both probabilistic (via stochastic simulation) and mechanistic (via physics models) approaches. This coupling takes place through the interchange of physical parameters and operational or accident scenarios. In this paper we apply the RISMC approach to evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., system activation) and to perform statistical analyses (e.g., run multiple RELAP-7 simulations where sequencing/timing of events have been changed according to a set of stochastic distributions). By using the RISMC toolkit, we can evaluate how power uprate affects the system recovery measures needed to avoid core damage after the PWR lost all available AC power by a tsunami induced flooding. The simulation of the actual flooding is performed by using a smooth particle hydrodynamics code: NEUTRINO.

  11. Risk Informed Margins Management as part of Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith

    2014-06-01

    The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about Light Water Reactor (LWR) design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as risk informed margins management (RIMM) strategies.

  12. A risk-informed approach to safety margins analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli

    2013-07-01

    The Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway is a systematic approach developed to characterize and quantify safety margins of nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. The model has been tested on the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Lab.

  13. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment to Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. P. Blanchard; R. W. Youngblood

    2014-06-01

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway of the DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program focuses on advancing the state of the art in safety analysis and risk assessment to support decision-making on nuclear power plant operation well beyond the originally designed lifetime of the plants (i.e., beyond 60 years). Among the issues being addressed in RISMC is the significance of SSC aging and how confident we are about our understanding of its impact on the margin between the loads SSCs are expected to see during normal operation and accident conditions, and the SSC capacities (their ability to resist those loads) as the SSCs age. In this paper, a summary is provided of a case study that examines SSC aging from an environmental qualification (EQ) perspective. The case study illustrates how the state of knowledge regarding SSC margin can be characterized given the overall integrated plant design, and was developed to demonstrate a method for deciding on which cables to focus, which cables are not so important from an environmental qualification margin standpoint, and what plant design features or operating characteristics determine the role that environmental qualification plays in establishing a safety case on which decisions regarding margin can be made. The selection of cables for which demonstration of margin with respect to aging and environmental challenges uses a technique known as Prevention Analysis. Prevention Analysis is a Boolean method for optimal selection of SSCs (that is, those combinations of SSCs both necessary and sufficient to meet a predetermined selection criterion) in a manner that allows demonstration that plant-level safety can be demonstrated by the collection of selected SSCs alone. Choosing the set of SSCs that is necessary and sufficient to satisfy the safety objectives, and demonstrating that the safety objectives can be met effectively, determines where resources are best allocated to assure SSC performance margin. The paper describes the resulting component types that were selected by Prevention Analysis and identifies the accident sequence characteristics that cause these component types to be important from an EQ and aging perspective (and, hence, worthwhile evaluating the extent of safety margin). In addition, component types not selected as needing significant margin from an EQ and aging perspective are discussed and an engineering rationale is developed justifying the lack of need to apply resources to demonstrating margin for these component types. This rationale is in terms of design features of the plant and operating characteristics that make these component types less important from an EQ and aging perspective. While the case study focuses on EQ and aging of equipment and cables located inside the containment of this PWR, the prevention analysis method is demonstrated to be an effective technique for identification of minimal collections of components that would be effective in managing safety for a variety of issues associated with aging and long-term operation of the fleet of plants.

  14. A flooding induced station blackout analysis for a pressurized water reactor using the RISMC toolkit

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven; Smith, Curtis; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2015-05-17

    In this paper we evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: the RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., component/system activation) and to perform statistical analyses. In our case, the simulation of the flooding is performed by using an advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics code calledmore »NEUTRINO. The obtained results allow the user to investigate and quantify the impact of timing and sequencing of events on system safety. The impact of power uprate is determined in terms of both core damage probability and safety margins.« less

  15. Geotechnical characterization of sediments from Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Brian B. (Brian Bautista), 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Eight whole core sediment samples were obtained from ODP Site 1244, Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin with the goal of understanding the stress history, consolidation behavior and strength characteristics of the ...

  16. RISMC ADVANCED SAFETY ANALYSIS WORKING PLAN – FY 2015 – FY 2019

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H; Smith, Curtis L

    2014-09-01

    SUMMARY In this report, the Advanced Safety Analysis Program (ASAP) objectives and value proposition is described. ASAP focuses on modernization of nuclear power safety analysis (tools, methods and data); implementing state-of-the-art modeling techniques (which include, for example, enabling incorporation of more detailed physics as they become available); taking advantage of modern computing hardware; and combining probabilistic and mechanistic analyses to enable a risk informed safety analysis process. The modernized tools will maintain the current high level of safety in our nuclear power plant fleet, while providing an improved understanding of safety margins and the critical parameters that affect them. Thus, the set of tools will provide information to inform decisions on plant modifications, refurbishments, and surveillance programs, while improving economics. The set of tools will also benefit the design of new reactors, enhancing safety per unit cost of a nuclear plant. As part of the discussion, we have identified three sets of stakeholders, the nuclear industry, the Department of Energy (DOE), and associated oversight organizations. These three groups would benefit from ASAP in different ways. For example, within the DOE complex, the possible applications that are seen include the safety of experimental reactors, facility life extension, safety-by-design in future generation advanced reactors, and managing security for the storage of nuclear material. This report provides information in five areas: 1. A value proposition (“why is this important?”) that will make the case for stakeholder’s use of the ASAP research and development (R&D) products. 2. An identification of likely end users and pathway to adoption of enhanced tools by the end-users. 3. A proposed set of practical and achievable “use case” demonstrations. 4. A proposed plan to address ASAP verification and validation (V&V) needs. 5. A proposed schedule for the multi-year ASAP.

  17. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Blanchard; R. Youngblood

    2012-04-01

    In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional level, at the barrier level, at the component level), and where margin is thin or perhaps just degrading. If the plant is safe, it tells the decision-maker why the plant is safe and where margin needs to be maintained, and perhaps where the plant can afford to relax.

  18. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Youngblood; D. Blanchard

    2011-09-01

    In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional level, at the barrier level, at the component level), and where margin is thin or perhaps just degrading. If the plant is safe, it tells the decision-maker why the plant is safe and where margin needs to be maintained, and perhaps where the plant can afford to relax.

  19. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Station Blackout caused by external flooding using the RISMC toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelli, Diego; Smith, Curtis; Prescott, Steven; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2014-08-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates. In order to evaluate the impacts of these two factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization project aims to provide insights to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This paper focuses on the impacts of power uprate on the safety margin of a boiling water reactor for a flooding induced station black-out event. Analysis is performed by using a combination of thermal-hydraulic codes and a stochastic analysis tool currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory, i.e. RAVEN. We employed both classical statistical tools, i.e. Monte-Carlo, and more advanced machine learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to quantify changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. Results obtained give a detailed investigation of the issues associated with a plant power uprate including the effects of station black-out accident scenarios. We were able to quantify how the timing of specific events was impacted by a higher nominal reactor core power. Such safety insights can provide useful information to the decision makers to perform risk informed margins management.

  20. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Technical Basis Guide Describing How to Perform Safety Margin Configuration Risk Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; James Knudsen; Bentley Harwood

    2013-08-01

    The INL has carried out a demonstration of the RISMC approach for the purpose of configuration risk management. We have shown how improved accuracy and realism can be achieved by simulating changes in risk – as a function of different configurations – in order to determine safety margins as the plant is modified. We described the various technical issues that play a role in these configuration-based calculations with the intent that future applications can take advantage of the analysis benefits while avoiding some of the technical pitfalls that are found for these types of calculations. Specific recommendations have been provided on a variety of topics aimed at improving the safety margin analysis and strengthening the technical basis behind the analysis process.

  1. Pinning on a defect line: characterization of marginal disorder relevance and sharp asymptotics for the critical point shift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quentin Berger; Hubert Lacoin

    2015-04-08

    The effect of disorder for pinning models is a subject which has attracted much attention in theoretical physics and rigorous mathematical physics. A peculiar point of interest is the question of coincidence of the quenched and annealed critical point for a small amount of disorder. The question has been mathematically settled in most cases in the last few years, giving in particular a rigorous validation of the Harris Criterion on disorder relevance. However, the marginal case, where the return probability exponent is equal to $1/2$, i.e. where the inter-arrival law of the renewal process is given by $K(n)=n^{-3/2}\\phi(n)$ where $\\phi$ is a slowly varying function, has been left partially open. In this paper, we give a complete answer to the question by proving a simple necessary and sufficient criterion on the return probability for disorder relevance, which confirms earlier predictions from the literature. Moreover, we also provide sharp asymptotics on the critical point shift: in the case of the pinning (or wetting) of a one dimensional simple random walk, the shift of the critical point satisfies the following high temperature asymptotics $$ \\lim_{\\beta\\rightarrow 0}\\beta^2\\log h_c(\\beta)= - \\frac{\\pi}{2}. $$ This gives a rigorous proof to a claim of B. Derrida, V. Hakim and J. Vannimenus (Journal of Statistical Physics, 1992).

  2. Comparison of a Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment Approach with Advanced Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis L; Mandelli, Diego; Zhegang Ma

    2014-11-01

    As part of the Light Water Sustainability Program (LWRS) [1], the purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) [2] Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic and probabilistic approaches are combined in order to estimate a safety margin. We use the scenario of a “station blackout” (SBO) wherein offsite power and onsite power is lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and contrast this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario. We also describe our approach we are using to represent advanced flooding analysis.

  3. Accident Tolerant Fuel Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Heather Chichester; Jesse Johns; Melissa Teague; Michael Tonks; Robert Youngblood

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional “accident-tolerant” (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and evaluate margin recovery strategies.

  4. Accident tolerant fuel analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis; Chichester, Heather; Johns, Jesse; Teague, Melissa; Tonks, Michael Idaho National Laboratory; Youngblood, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced ''RISMC toolkit'' that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional ''accident-tolerant'' (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and evaluate margin recovery strategies.

  5. DYNAMIC AND CLASSICAL PRA: A BWR SBO CASE COMPARISON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandelli, Diego; Smith, Curtis L; Ma, Zhegang

    2011-07-01

    As part of the Light-Water Sustainability Program (LWRS), the purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain the safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic (i.e., dynamic system simulators) and probabilistic (stochastic sampling strategies) approaches are combined in a dynamic PRA fashion in order to estimate safety margins. We use the scenario of a “station blackout” (SBO) wherein offsite power and onsite power are lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and compare this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario. In the RISMC approach the dataset obtained consists of set of simulation runs (performed by using codes such as RELAP5/3D) where timing and ordering of events is changed accordingly to the stochastic sampling strategy adopted. On the other side, classical PRA methods, which are based on event-tree (FT) and fault-tree (FT) structures, generate minimal cut sets and probability values associated to each ET branch. The comparison of the classical and RISMC approaches is performed not only in terms of overall core damage probability but also considering statistical differences in the actual sequence of events. The outcome of this comparison analysis shows similarities and dissimilarities between the approaches but also highlights the greater amount of information that can be generated by using the RISMC approach.

  6. CASE STUDY FOR ENHANCED ACCIDENT TOLERANCE DESIGN CHANGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prescott, Steven; Smith, Curtis; Koonce, Tony

    2014-09-01

    The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about Light Water Reactor (LWR) design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as risk informed margins management (RIMM) strategies. The methods and tools provided by RISMC are essential to a comprehensive and integrated RIMM approach that supports effective preservation of margin for both active and passive SSCs. In this report, we discuss the methods and technologies behind RIMM for an application focused on enhanced accident tolerance design changes for a representative nuclear power plant. We look at a variety of potential plant modifications and evaluate, using the RISMC approach, the implications to safety margin for the various strategies.

  7. Coastal ocean margins program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The marine research program supported by the Office of Energy Research, Ecological Research Division, is focused to provide scientific information on major environmental issues facing development and expansion of most energy technologies and energy policy. These issues include waste disposal, siting/operations, and possible long term effects on global systems. The research is concentrated along the United States coastal margins where marine waters provide abundant food and resources while assimilating discharges from atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic sources. The program focuses on the formation and transport of particles within the waters of the continental shelf and the fate of these particles, whether on the shelf, on the slope, or in the open ocean. The program is conducted with multidisciplinary teams of researchers who investigate water mass movements, biological productivity, and naturally forming particles, as well as contaminant transport, to develop a clear understanding of the exchanges of contaminants and other materials that take place between continental shelf and open ocean waters. Seventy-five percent of the projects are funded to university grantees and twenty-five percent to National Laboratories.

  8. ROBUSTNESS OF DECISION INSIGHTS UNDER ALTERNATIVE ALEATORY/EPISTEMIC UNCERTAINTY CLASSIFICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2013-09-22

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A key technical challenge is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, would be founded on probabilistic characterizations of SSC performance. Evaluation of probabilistic safety margins will in general entail the uncertainty characterization both of the prospective challenge to the performance of an SSC ("load") and of its "capacity" to withstand that challenge. The RISMC framework contrasts sharply with the traditional probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) structure in that the underlying models are not inherently aleatory. Rather, they are largely deterministic physical/engineering models with ambiguities about the appropriate uncertainty classification of many model parameters. The current analysis demonstrates that if the distinction between epistemic and aleatory uncertainties is to be preserved in a RISMC-like modeling environment, then it is unlikely that analysis insights supporting decision-making will in general be robust under recategorization of input uncertainties. If it is believed there is a true conceptual distinction between epistemic and aleatory uncertainty (as opposed to the distinction being primarily a legacy of the PRA paradigm) then a consistent and defensible basis must be established by which to categorize input uncertainties.

  9. Marginal erg facies: A trial approach toward a descriptive classification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caputo, M.V. ); Langford, R.P. )

    1991-03-01

    During the late 1970s and early 1980s, sedimentologists began recognizing the margins of eolian sand seas as separate, components which differed from interior sand seas in geometry, extent, and facies. Stratigraphers have now observed these differences in eolian rocks. Erg margins may be grouped in five ways: (1) by associations with extradunal environments-coastal plain, lacustrine, periglacial, marine (tidal flat, coastal sabkha, beach, and lagoon), and arid alluvial (alluvial fan, fluvial, playa, inland sabkha); (2) by allocyclic controls-eustasy, plate tectonism, and climate; (3) by autocyclic controls-local tectonism, topography, vegetation, hydrology, structure, sediment source and supply, and wind regime; (4) by geographic position-upwind, downwind, and along-wind margins; and (5) by sedimentary facies-texture and architecture. In contrast with erg interiors, erg margins are characterized by smaller, less complex dune-forms related to thinner sand accumulation; elementary dune architecture; more vegetation and bioturbation; high occurrence of sand sheet, zibar, and serir facies; expansive, low-relief interdunes with widely distributed dunes; and a greater proportion of interbedded extradunal deposits. Some of the published studies on ancient eolian systems have identified erg margin facies that have been influences by marine and arid alluvial processes. Few reports have described lacustrine-eolian and periglacial-eolian interactions. This study is an attempt to organize known features of modern and ancient erg margins into a scheme based on erg margin controls.

  10. Station Blackout: A case study in the interaction of mechanistic and probabilistic safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli; Cristian Rabiti

    2013-11-01

    The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margins is important to improved decision making about nuclear power plant design, operation, and plant life extension. As research and development (R&D) in the light-water reactor (LWR) Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic and probabilistic approaches are combined in order to estimate a safety margin. We use the scenario of a “station blackout” wherein offsite power and onsite power is lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and contrast this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario.

  11. IMPROVING EFFICIENT MARGINAL ESTIMATORS IN BIVARIATE MODELS WITH PARAMETRIC MARGINALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schick, Anton

    AND ANTON SCHICK Abstract. Suppose we have data from a bivariate model with parametric marginals. Efficient nonparametric estimators in the presence of a constraint, see e.g. Schick and Wefelmeyer (2008) for a recent = The research of Hanxiang Peng was supported in parts by NSF Grant DMS 0940365. The research of Anton Schick

  12. Characterizing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMay 1,CenterJohnCeremonySynchrotronCharacterization

  13. Dynamics of the continental margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    On 18--20 June 1990, over 70 oceanographers conducting research in the ocean margins of North America attended a workshop in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The purpose of the workshop was to provide the Department of Energy with recommendations for future research on the exchange of energy-related materials between the coastal and interior ocean and the relationship between the ocean margins and global change. The workshop was designed to optimize the interaction of scientists from specific research disciplines (biology, chemistry, physics and geology) as they developed hypotheses, research questions and topics and implementation plans. The participants were given few restraints on the research they proposed other than realistic time and monetary limits. The interdisciplinary structure of the meeting promoted lively discussion and creative research plans. The meeting was divided into four working groups based on lateral, vertical, air/sea and sediment/water processes. Working papers were prepared and distributed before the meeting. During the meeting the groups revised the papers and added recommendations that appear in this report, which was reviewed by an Executive Committee.

  14. A Research Roadmap for Computation-Based Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boring, Ronald; Mandelli, Diego; Joe, Jeffrey; Smith, Curtis; Groth, Katrina

    2015-08-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research through the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to extend the life of the currently operating fleet of commercial nuclear power plants. The Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) research pathway within LWRS looks at ways to maintain and improve the safety margins of these plants. The RISMC pathway includes significant developments in the area of thermalhydraulics code modeling and the development of tools to facilitate dynamic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). PRA is primarily concerned with the risk of hardware systems at the plant; yet, hardware reliability is often secondary in overall risk significance to human errors that can trigger or compound undesirable events at the plant. This report highlights ongoing efforts to develop a computation-based approach to human reliability analysis (HRA). This computation-based approach differs from existing static and dynamic HRA approaches in that it: (i) interfaces with a dynamic computation engine that includes a full scope plant model, and (ii) interfaces with a PRA software toolset. The computation-based HRA approach presented in this report is called the Human Unimodels for Nuclear Technology to Enhance Reliability (HUNTER) and incorporates in a hybrid fashion elements of existing HRA methods to interface with new computational tools developed under the RISMC pathway. The goal of this research effort is to model human performance more accurately than existing approaches, thereby minimizing modeling uncertainty found in current plant risk models.

  15. Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1989-03-01

    Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Multivariate Distributions with Proportional Reversed Hazard Marginals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Multivariate Distributions with Proportional Reversed Hazard Marginals Debasis Kundu1 & Manuel Franco2 & Juana-Maria Vivo3 Abstract Several univariate proportional reversed hazard models have been a class of bivariate models with proportional reversed hazard marginals. It is observed that the proposed

  17. Dissecting the eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau : a study of landslides, erosion and river incision in a transient landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouimet, William Burke

    2007-01-01

    The eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau is characterized by large rivers dissecting regional topography that has been uplifted in association with the continued convergence of the Indian subcontinent and Eurasia. In this ...

  18. Electromagnetic exploration of the Exmouth and Vřring rifted margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myer, David Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Haq, B.U. , 1992. Seismic stratigraphy and passive marginHaq, B.U. , 1992. Seismic stratigraphy and passive marginHaq, B.U. , 1992. Seismic stratigraphy and passive margin

  19. Margins, Liquidity and the Cost of Hedging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mello, Antonio S.

    2012-05-21

    Recent financial reforms, such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Market Infrastructure Regulation, encourage greater use of clearing and therefore increased margining of derivative trades. They also impose ...

  20. On the quantification of safety margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pagani, Lorenzo P

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear industry has relied on the concept of Defense in Depth (DID) and traditional safety margins to deal with the uncertainties associated with the design and operation of nuclear facilities. These concepts were ...

  1. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A WholesaleRetrofitElectrical Equipment To Be Subjected to

  2. The law of demand versus diminishing marginal utility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettie, Bruce R.; Lafrance, Jeffrey T.

    2006-01-01

    Diminishing marginal utility will provide a negative sloperegularity for u. Thus, this utility function (or a simpleDiminishing Marginal Utility Endnotes References Burt,

  3. Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report - July 1999 Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999 Estimated Consumer Marginal Energy Prices for the Commercial and Residental Sectors for use in the Life-Cycle Cost...

  4. Electromagnetic exploration of the Exmouth and Vřring rifted margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myer, David Gerard

    2012-01-01

    continental margin; seismic interpretation, stratigraphy,CSEM, and seismic interpretation; (c) investigate the effect

  5. Extending RISMC Capabilities for Real-Time Diagnostics and Prognostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    curtis smith; Mandelli, Diego

    2014-11-01

    Quick and effective accident management is essential in any industry in order to limit and contain possible threats to both people and environment/assets. This is in particular relevant in the nuclear industry where accidents may have major impacts from an economic, health and societal point of view. As an example, the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident highlighted the importance of the ability of plant operators and plant staff to react quickly and effectively in accident conditions. This particular event showed the importance of being able to: • Determine/estimate the actual status of the plant (i.e., diagnosis) when the monitoring system is corrupted or partially unavailable, and, • Forecast its future evolution (i.e., prognosis). In this paper we want to describe a research direction geared toward the development of a new set of advanced diagnosis and prognosis tools. We employ innovative data mining and machine learning techniques that are able to infer plant status and mimic the plant’s full temporal behavior in order to assist the reactor operators during an accident scenario.

  6. Unitary-process discrimination with error margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Hashimoto; A. Hayashi; M. Hayashi; M. Horibe

    2010-06-10

    We investigate a discrimination scheme between unitary processes. By introducing a margin for the probability of erroneous guess, this scheme interpolates the two standard discrimination schemes: minimum-error and unambiguous discrimination. We present solutions for two cases. One is the case of two unitary processes with general prior probabilities. The other is the case with a group symmetry: the processes comprise a projective representation of a finite group. In the latter case, we found that unambiguous discrimination is a kind of "all or nothing": the maximum success probability is either 0 or 1. We also closely analyze how entanglement with an auxiliary system improves discrimination performance.

  7. Caldera Rim Margins | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: Energy ResourcesParish,Caldera Rim Margins Jump to:

  8. Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof Energy ThisSites |and theDepartment ofMarchMarginal

  9. MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

    2004-11-01

    A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

  10. Regnar -- Development of a marginal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thalund, K.M.; Brodersen, F.P.; Roigaard-Petersen, B.

    1994-12-31

    Regnar is a small marginal field located some 13 km from the main Dan F complex and is the first subsea completion in Danish waters, operated by Maersk Olie og Gas AS. A short lifetime has been predicted for the field which therefore has been developed as a low cost project, using a combination of subsea technology and minimum topside facilities. Regnar consists of a subsea x-mas tree producing through a 6 inch pipeline with a 2 1/2 inch chemical piggyback line to Dan F. The x-mas tree and the subsea choke valve are controlled from a buoy moored nearby the well. The buoy is radio linked to Dan F. The Regnar field was brought on stream on September 26, 1993.

  11. Sandia Energy - NASA Award for Marginal Ice Zone Observations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NASA Award for Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Process Experiment (MIZOPEX) Home Climate Office of Science News News & Events Research & Capabilities Monitoring Analysis...

  12. The Law of Demand versus Diminishing Marginal Utility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beattie, Bruce R.; LaFrance, Jeffrey T

    2006-01-01

    not guarantee DSD. This form of utility function generates aHausman). This type of utility model is commonplace amongversus Diminishing Marginal Utility References Burt, O.R.

  13. The Law of Demand Versus Diminishing Marginal Utility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beattie, Bruce R.; LaFrance, Jeffrey T.

    2006-01-01

    not guarantee DSD. This form of utility function generates aHausman). This type of utility model is commonplace amongversus Diminishing Marginal Utility References Burt, O.R.

  14. Recursive Pathways to Marginal Likelihood Estimation with Prior-Sensitivity Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Ewan

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the utility to contemporary Bayesian studies of recursive, Gauss-Seidel-type pathways to marginal likelihood estimation characterized by reverse logistic regression and the density of states. Through a pair of illustrative, numerical examples (including mixture modeling of the well-known 'galaxy dataset') we highlight both the remarkable diversity of bridging schemes amenable to recursive normalization and the notable efficiency of the resulting pseudo-mixture densities for gauging prior-sensitivity in the model selection context. Our key theoretical contributions show the connection between the nested sampling identity and the density of states. Further, we introduce a novel heuristic ('thermodynamic integration via importance sampling') for qualifying the role of the bridging sequence in marginal likelihood estimation. An efficient pseudo-mixture density scheme for harnessing the information content of otherwise discarded draws in ellipse-based nested sampling is also introduced.

  15. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

    2009-08-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

  16. INTRODUCTION Margin evolution and plate-reconstruction models require a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    ­243 Formation and evolution of Australian passive margins: implications for locating the boundary between. STAGG2 AND P. A. SYMONDS2 1 Division of Geology and Geophysics, Building F05, School of Geosciences. Australian passive margins display a large variety of styles, including narrow, wide, volcanic and non

  17. Radiotherapy margin design with particular consideration of high curvature CTVs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herschtal, Alan; Kron, Tomas; Fox, Chris [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, St. Andrews Place, E. Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia)

    2009-03-15

    In applying 3D conformal radiation therapy to a tumor clinical target volume (CTV), a margin is added around the CTV to account for any sources of error in the application of treatment which may result in misalignment between the CTV and the dose distribution actually delivered. The volume enclosed within the CTV plus the margin is known as the PTV, or planning target volume. The larger the errors are anticipated to be, the wider the margin will need to be to accommodate those errors. Based on the approach of van Herk et al. [''The probability of correct target dosage: Dose-population histograms for deriving treatment margins in radiotherapy,'' Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol., Phys. 47(4), 1121-1135 (2000)] this paper develops the mathematical theory behind the calculation of the margin width required to ensure that the entire CTV receives sufficiently high dose with sufficiently high probability. The margin recipe developed not only considers the magnitude of the errors but also includes a term to adjust for curved CTV surfaces. In doing so, the accuracy of the margin recipe is enhanced yet remains mathematically concise enough to be readily implemented in the clinical setting. The results are particularly relevant for clinical situations in which the uncertainties in treatment are large relative to the size of the CTV.

  18. Global-local Structural Optimization Using Response Surfaces of Local Optimization Margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    1 Global-local Structural Optimization Using Response Surfaces of Local Optimization Margins Boyang optimization problems. First, a large number of component optimizations for maximization of margins are performed. Response surface approximations (RSA) for maximum margins of component optimization

  19. Design of miniature floating platform for marginal fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Sha, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents the design of a novel type of miniature floating offshore platforms with a heave plate attached at the keel, suitable for developing deep-water marginal fields. This design features a small displacement, ...

  20. Making In-Class Competitions Desirable For Marginalized Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGovern, Amy

    with and hinder other opponents (e.g. a stock car race or boxing match). Students using Spacewar were com- peting may also appeal other groups of students who can be marginalized in engineering. Our results indicate

  1. The value of marginal analysis in electric power system operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzman, M.T.; Shelton, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    Electric utilities have traditionally based their calculation of costs and derived prices on the basis of averages. Marginal analysis provides an alternative method of costing and price setting. Not only does marginal analysis yield different computations, it can lead to different and more efficient decisions. This point is illustrated by the evaluation of biomass cogeneration to a utility and the costing of rural extensions. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    Presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated cost-of-service pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers?

  3. Electromagnetic exploration of the Exmouth and Vřring rifted margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myer, David Gerard

    2012-01-01

    on/off reservoir characterization, either regularizationgeneral characterization of on- versus off-reservoir, any of1D characterization tool. T peaks beneath the reservoir at

  4. Transverse extension of Guatemala active margin: implications for accretion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillen, K.J.

    1987-05-01

    The inner trench wall of the Middle America Trench off Guatemala does not show evidence of accretion, based on DSDP Legs 67 and 84. The presence of normal faults on the lower inner trench slope has resulted in various subsidence models for the margin. Fault traces would be expected to trend parallel to the margin (northwest-southeast) if margin subsidence had occurred. Instead, the faults trend north-south and occur in groups of faults downdropped to the east and to the west. The faults do not seem to be related to margin subsidence but rather to previously proposed Cenozoic Central American rifting. The rifting resulted from crustal bending as the Central American block rounded southern Mexico during differential North American/Caribbean plate motion. The rifts, which extend nearly to the trench axis, underlie the San Jose submarine canyon and align with the Guatemala City graben. Possible east-west accommodation zones, between fault zones that dip in opposite directions, exist near the shelf edge. These accommodation zones may have formed along lines of weakness where oceanic crust was previously emplaced into the margin during or prior to the Eocene. These rifts show that compressional and extension features can occur simultaneously with underthrusting on active margins.

  5. Bed radar reflectivity across the north margin of Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica, and implications for margin processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond, C. F.; Catania, Ginny A.; Nereson, Nadine; van der Veen, Cornelis J.

    2006-01-01

    the margin is mediated by processes other than deformation of thick dilated till that is the source of lubrication allowing fast motion in the interior of the ice stream....

  6. Marginal Abatement Costs and Marginal Welfare Costs for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions: Results from the EPPA Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Jennifer

    Marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves, relationships between tons of emissions abated and the CO2 (or GHG) price, have been widely used as pedagogic devices to illustrate simple economic concepts such as the benefits of ...

  7. Bioenergy crop productivity and potential climate change mitigation from marginal lands in the United States: An

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    ŔChampaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA Abstract Growing biomass feedstocks from marginal lands is becoming an increasingly

  8. State discrimination with error margin and its locality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Hayashi; T. Hashimoto; M. Horibe

    2008-07-10

    There are two common settings in a quantum-state discrimination problem. One is minimum-error discrimination where a wrong guess (error) is allowed and the discrimination success probability is maximized. The other is unambiguous discrimination where errors are not allowed but the inconclusive result "I don't know" is possible. We investigate discrimination problem with a finite margin imposed on the error probability. The two common settings correspond to the error margins 1 and 0. For arbitrary error margin, we determine the optimal discrimination probability for two pure states with equal occurrence probabilities. We also consider the case where the states to be discriminated are multipartite, and show that the optimal discrimination probability can be achieved by local operations and classical communication.

  9. Petroleum geology of Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America, from Guatemala to Ecuador

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scrutton, M.E.; Escalante, G.F.

    1986-07-01

    Exploration for hydrocarbons along the Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America has been limited and spasmodic. Less than 100 exploration wells have been drilled, with nearly 50 of these being in the Santa Elena, Progreso, and Guayas basins in Ecuador. Shows have been reported in some wells, and a few oil seeps are known. The only commercial production established to date has been from the Santa Elena Peninsula in Ecuador in the extreme south of the study area. Understanding of the geology in this part of the continental margin is incomplete at best. This paper reviews present-day knowledge in an attempt to define the sedimentary basins better, to characterize their structure and stratigraphy, and to assess their petroleum prospects. The area of continental margin reviewed is to the north, located northwest of the trench system where oceanic crust of the Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate, and to the south, where the northern part of the Nazca plate collides with the South American plate. This plate tectonic setting forms the framework on which local structural and sedimentary events have created a series of relatively small trench-slope and forearc basins in what is now the coastal plain and adjacent offshore area of Central and South America, south or west of a line of mountain ranges with active volcanism. Sedimentary fill is generally of Tertiary age. The basins and subbasins recognized and described include: in Ecuador - Guayas, Santa Elena, Progreso, Valdivia, Bajo Grande, Manta, Muisne-Esmeraldas, and Borbon; in Colombia - Choco-Pacific; in Panama - Gulf of Panama basin complex (Santiago, Tonosi, Sambu), and Burica-Chiriqui; in Costa Rica - Terraba and Coronado/Tempisque; in Nicaragua - San Juan del Sur; and in the Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala - the Pacific coastal basin.

  10. RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melrose, Don

    I t RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY, 4TOCHASTIC GROWTH emission, hich is an indirect emission process first discussed by Ginaburg and Zhe/eznyakoe, 9581, and electron cyclotron maser emission (ECME), which is a direct emission ess first discussed in the presently

  11. Large Margin Taxonomy Embedding with an Application to Document Categorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinberger, Kilian

    Large Margin Taxonomy Embedding with an Application to Document Categorization Kilian Weinberger that the topics are not just discrete classes, but are nodes in a complex taxonomy with rich inter-topic relationships. For example, web pages can be categorized into the Yahoo! web taxonomy or medical journals can

  12. Derivation of Locational Marginal Prices for Restructured Wholesale Power Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    the performance of these markets. In this paper, different AC and DC optimal power flow (OPF) models are presented Operator (MISO). Keywords: Locational marginal pricing, wholesale power market, AC optimal power flow, DC optimal power flow, U.S. Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO). #12;3 1 INTRODUCTION In an April 2003

  13. The Marginalized Particle Filter for Automotive Tracking Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Fredrik

    1 The Marginalized Particle Filter for Automotive Tracking Applications Andreas Eidehall Thomas Sch surroundings (lane geometry and the position of other vehicles), which is needed for intelligent automotive in a nonlinear estimation problem. For automotive tracking systems, these problems are traditionally handled

  14. The Marginalized Particle Filter for Automotive Tracking Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schön, Thomas

    The Marginalized Particle Filter for Automotive Tracking Applications Andreas Eidehall Thomas B surroundings (lane geometry and the position of other vehicles), which is needed for intelligent automotive in a nonlinear estimation problem. For automotive tracking systems, these problems are traditionally handled

  15. Sustainable bioenergy production from marginal lands in the US Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelfand, Ilya; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Gross, Katherine L.; Robertson, G. P.

    2013-01-24

    Long-term measurements of global warming impact coupled with spatially explicit modeling suggests that both climate benefits and the production potential of cellulosic crops grown on marginal lands of the US North Central region are substantial but will be insufficient to meet long-term biofuel needs.

  16. Building a "Margin of Safety" Into Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building a "Margin of Safety" Into Renewable Energy Procurements: A Review of Experience purchasers and electricity regulators must confront the reality that signed renewable energy contracts will not always yield operational projects on the timeline given in the contracts themselves. Renewable energy

  17. Tectonic evolution of the southwestern Black Sea margin, offshore Turkey 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can, Emrah

    1996-01-01

    to the Srednogorie intra-arc zone in Bulgaria. Following back-arc extension, the whole margin was affected by a compressional tectonic regime during Paleocene-early Eocene time. Under this regime, a series of thrust faults formed, which were connected to the Stara...

  18. Victorian Queer: Marginality and Money in Nineteenth-Century Literature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jung Sun

    2013-05-01

    , in that their voices are taken to be insignificant, and they are constantly queered even by the marginal group. In his book Enforcing Normalcy: Disability, Deafness and the Body, Lennard J. Davis focuses on the word ?normal? to understand the historical process... and problems that society and culture have faced. He defines a group of chosen words, called ?Keywords,? as ?significant indicative words in certain forms of thought? and ?certain uses [of these words] bound together certain ways of seeing culture and society...

  19. Sedimentary and faunal analysis of a marginal marine section, the Stone City Member (middle eocene), Crockett Formation, Burleson County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelms, Katherine Currier

    1979-01-01

    Diagram relating Miliolina-Rotaliina-Textulariina abundance to deltaic and other marginal marine environments 98 LIST OF FIGURES - Cont1nued F1 gure 15 Ratio of Textulari1na-Rotaliina-Nil1olina in samples from the Stone C1ty beds 16 Vertical... sediment packages and faunal assemblages may still be recognized. W. L. F1sher (1964) describes transgressive and regressive sediments from the Eocene of the Gulf Coast and characterizes dist1nctive groups of sediments which tend to occur in typical...

  20. R E V I E W Functionality and the evolution of marginal stability in proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, David

    R E V I E W Functionality and the evolution of marginal stability in proteins: Inferences from proteins are marginally stable. This has inspired several explanations. Having noted that the functionality that marginally stable proteins should have an evolutionary advantage over proteins of differing stability. Others

  1. Passive margins getting squeezed in the mantle convection vice Philippe Yamato,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Thorsten W.

    Passive margins getting squeezed in the mantle convection vice Philippe Yamato,1 Laurent Husson,1 2013. [1] Passive margins often exhibit uplift, exhumation, and tectonic inversion. We speculate passive margins. In order to address this issue, we design a 2-D viscous numerical model wherein

  2. Characterization of Section 404 Permit Mitigation Plans, Coastal Margin and Associated Watersheds, Upper Texas Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conkey, April A.

    2010-01-14

    A predicted loss of agricultural rice-wetlands and increasing urbanization and development threatens the remaining freshwater wetlands along the upper Texas coast. To avoid, minimize, and mitigate wetland loss, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers...

  3. Prioritization and Implementation Plan for Collaborative Case Study on RPV Steels During Extended Service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    Nuclear power currently provides a significant fraction of the United States non-carbon emitting power generation. In future years, nuclear power must continue to generate a significant portion of the nation's electricity to meet the growing electricity demand, clean energy goals, and ensure energy independence. New reactors will be an essential part of the expansion of nuclear power. However, given limits on new builds imposed by economics and industrial capacity, the extended service of the existing fleet will also be required. Ensuring public safety and environmental protection is a prerequisite to all nuclear power plant operating and licensing decisions at all stages of reactor life. This includes the original license period of 40 years, the first license extension to 60 years, and certainly for any consideration of life beyond 60 years. For extended operating periods, it must be shown that adequate aging management programs are present or planned and that appropriate safety margins exist throughout the subsequent license renewal periods. Materials degradation can impact reactor reliability, availability, and potentially, safe operation. Components within a reactor must tolerate the harsh environment of high temperature water, stress, vibration, and/or an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. Clearly, understanding materials degradation and accounting for the effects of a reactor environment in operating and regulatory limits is essential. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is designed to support the long-term operation (LTO) of existing domestic nuclear power generation with targeted collaborative research programs into areas beyond current short-term optimization opportunities. Within the LWRS program, two pathways have been initiated to perform research essential to informing relicensing decisions. The Materials Aging and Degradation Pathway is designed to help develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting long-term environmental degradation behavior of materials in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess performance of systems, structures, and components essential to safe and sustained operation. The Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization Pathway (RISMC) seeks to merge fundamental scientific understanding of critical phenomenological conditions and deterministic predictions of nuclear power plant performance with risk-informed characterization tools. This will provide an integrated characterization of public safety margins in an optimization of nuclear safety, plant performance, and long-term asset management. Clearly, these two pathways have many synergies in goals and outcomes. The data and mechanisms generated in the Materials Pathway may feed into and mold efforts within the RISMC Pathway. In addition, insights from the characterization tools developed in RISMC tasks may inform materials testing needs and experiments. To demonstrate this potentially powerful interaction, a joint case study has been proposed and initiated. This document describes the initial planning for a coordinated study between the Materials and the RISMC Pathways. A brief description of each Pathway is presented along with a more detailed description of the needs and requirements of this collaborative task. A list of criteria for any case-study candidate are then listed, along with the rationale for choosing pressurized thermal shock as the prime candidate an inter-pathway collaboration. A proposed timeline and organization of future interactions on this subject area is also presented.

  4. Dangerous Liouville Wave -- exactly marginal but non-conformal deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu Man Ho; Yu Nakayama

    2008-07-26

    We give a non-trivially interacting field theory example of scale invariant but non-conformal field theory. The model is based on the exactly solvable Liouville field theory coupled with free scalars deformed by an exactly marginal operator. We show non-vanishing of the trace of the energy-momentum tensor by using the quantum Schwinger-Dyson equation for the Liouville field theory, which is a sophistication of the quantum higher equations of motion for the Liouville field theory introduced by Alyosha Zamolodchikov. Possibly dangerous implications for the super-critical string theory will be discussed.

  5. SU-E-T-573: The Robustness of a Combined Margin Recipe for Uncertainties During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stroom, J; Vieira, S; Greco, C [Champalimaud Foundation, Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the variability of a safety margin recipe that combines CTV and PTV margins quadratically, with several tumor, treatment, and user related factors. Methods: Margin recipes were calculated by monte-carlo simulations in 5 steps. 1. A spherical tumor with or without isotropic microscopic was irradiated with a 5 field dose plan2. PTV: Geometric uncertainties were introduced using systematic (Sgeo) and random (sgeo) standard deviations. CTV: Microscopic disease distribution was modelled by semi-gaussian (Smicro) with varying number of islets (Ni)3. For a specific uncertainty set (Sgeo, sgeo, Smicro(Ni)), margins were varied until pre-defined decrease in TCP or dose coverage was fulfilled. 4. First, margin recipes were calculated for each of the three uncertainties separately. CTV and PTV recipes were then combined quadratically to yield a final recipe M(Sgeo, sgeo, Smicro(Ni)).5. The final M was verified by simultaneous simulations of the uncertainties.Now, M has been calculated for various changing parameters like margin criteria, penumbra steepness, islet radio-sensitivity, dose conformity, and number of fractions. We subsequently investigated A: whether the combined recipe still holds in all these situations, and B: what the margin variation was in all these cases. Results: We found that the accuracy of the combined margin recipes remains on average within 1mm for all situations, confirming the correctness of the quadratic addition. Depending on the specific parameter, margin factors could change such that margins change over 50%. Especially margin recipes based on TCP-criteria are more sensitive to more parameters than those based on purely geometric Dmin-criteria. Interestingly, measures taken to minimize treatment field sizes (by e.g. optimizing dose conformity) are counteracted by the requirement of larger margins to get the same tumor coverage. Conclusion: Margin recipes combining geometric and microscopic uncertainties quadratically are accurate under varying circumstances. However margins can change up to 50% for different situations.

  6. Pattern of Failure After Limited Margin Radiotherapy and Temozolomide for Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Mark W.; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.; Curran, Walter J.; Crocker, Ian R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the pattern of failure after limited margin radiotherapy for glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 62 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma treated between 2006 and 2008 with standard fractionation to a total dose of 60Gy with concurrent temozolomide (97%) or arsenic trioxide (3%). The initial clinical target volume included postoperative T2 abnormality with a median margin of 0.7cm. The boost clinical target volume included residual T1-enhancing tumor and resection cavity with a median margin of 0.5cm. Planning target volumes added a 0.3- or 0.5-cm margin to clinical target volumes. The total boost planning target volume (PTV{sub boost}) margin was 1cm or less in 92% of patients. The volume of recurrent tumor (new T1 enhancement) was categorized by the percent within the 60-Gy isodose line as central (>95%), infield (81-95%), marginal (20-80%), or distant (<20%). For comparison, an initial planning target volume with a 2-cm margin and PTV{sub boost} with a 2.5-cm margin were created for each patient. Results: With a median follow-up of 12 months, radiographic tumor progression developed in 43 of 62 patients. Imaging was available for analysis in 41: 38 (93%) had central or infield failure, 2 (5%) had marginal failure, and 1 (2%) had distant failure relative to the 60-Gy isodose line. The treated PTV{sub boost} (median, 140cm{sup 3}) was, on average, 70% less than the PTV{sub boost} with a 2.5-cm margin (median, 477cm{sup 3}) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: A PTV{sub boost} margin of 1cm or less did not appear to increase the risk of marginal and/or distant tumor failures compared with other published series. With careful radiation planning and delivery, it appears that treatment margins for glioblastoma can be reduced.

  7. Phytologia (December 2009) 91(3) 571 VARIATION AMONG THE SMOOTH-LEAF MARGINED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Robert P.

    -coumarate: CoA Ligase, Abscisic acid-insensitive 3, petN, psbM, SNPs, taxonomy. The smooth-leaf margined

  8. "Do It Again": Comic Repetition, Participatory Reception and Gendered Identity on Musical Comedy's Margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltimore, Samuel Dworkin

    2013-01-01

    Oz Before the Rainbow. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Universityby Samuel Dworkin Baltimore ABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATION “DoMargins by Samuel Dworkin Baltimore Doctor of Philosophy in

  9. A margin based approach to determining sample sizes via tolerance bounds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomer, Justin T.; Freeland, Katherine Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    This paper proposes a tolerance bound approach for determining sample sizes. With this new methodology we begin to think of sample size in the context of uncertainty exceeding margin. As the sample size decreases the uncertainty in the estimate of margin increases. This can be problematic when the margin is small and only a few units are available for testing. In this case there may be a true underlying positive margin to requirements but the uncertainty may be too large to conclude we have sufficient margin to those requirements with a high level of statistical confidence. Therefore, we provide a methodology for choosing a sample size large enough such that an estimated QMU uncertainty based on the tolerance bound approach will be smaller than the estimated margin (assuming there is positive margin). This ensures that the estimated tolerance bound will be within performance requirements and the tolerance ratio will be greater than one, supporting a conclusion that we have sufficient margin to the performance requirements. In addition, this paper explores the relationship between margin, uncertainty, and sample size and provides an approach and recommendations for quantifying risk when sample sizes are limited.

  10. Binary Join Trees for Computing Marginals in the Shenoy-Shafer Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Prakash P.

    1997-08-01

    -2003, USA pshenoy@ku.edu http://lark.cc.ku.edu/~pshenoy ? Appeared in International Journal of Approximate Reasoning, 17(2-3), 1997, 239?263. ii Binary Join Trees for Computing Marginals in the Shenoy... NETWORK FRAMEWORK .................................................2 3 AXIOMS FOR LOCAL COMPUTATION..........................................................5 4 COMPUTING A MARGINAL USING THE FUSION ALGORITHM ........................6 5 FUSION...

  11. Faunal responses to oxygen gradients on the Pakistan margin: A comparison of foraminiferans, macrofauna and megafauna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    Faunal responses to oxygen gradients on the Pakistan margin: A comparison of foraminiferans Oxygen minimum zone Benthos Arabian Sea Biodiversity Deep sea a b s t r a c t The Pakistan Margin where oxygen levels were lowest. The rarity of larger animals between 300 and 700 m on the Pakistan

  12. Wind speed influence on phytoplankton bloom dynamics in the Southern Ocean Marginal Ice Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Keith

    Wind speed influence on phytoplankton bloom dynamics in the Southern Ocean Marginal Ice Zone Dillon; published 7 August 2007. [1] Analysis of satellite ocean color and wind speed data within the seasonal ice. Moore (2007), Wind speed influence on phytoplankton bloom dynamics in the Southern Ocean Marginal Ice

  13. Ranking Structured Documents: A Large Margin Based Approach for Patent Prior Art Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomes, Carla P.

    Ranking Structured Documents: A Large Margin Based Approach for Patent Prior Art Search Yunsong Guo propose an approach for automatically rank- ing structured documents applied to patent prior art search. Our model, SVM Patent Ranking (SVMP R) incorporates margin constraints that di- rectly capture

  14. From Camp Dwellers to Urban Refugees?: Urbanization and Marginalization of Refugee Camps in Lebanon.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - 1 - From Camp Dwellers to Urban Refugees?: Urbanization and Marginalization of Refugee Camps villes invisibles 1. Introduction Palestinian refugees in Lebanon are marginalized in their host society with the relationship between the refugees' own socio-political dynamic, political actors, and space. The migrations

  15. The Case for Increasing Enrollment and Leveraging Marginal Costs: CSUN Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shubin, Carol

    The Case for Increasing Enrollment and Leveraging Marginal Costs: CSUN Case Study H. Hellenbrand1 will estimate the marginal cost for increasing enrollment from a theoretical point of view. This analysis will use data from the IPEDS data base and formulae for replacement costs suggested by the Legislative

  16. The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean Phoebe J. Lam1 concentrations in the upper 500m of the Western Subarctic Pacific, an iron-limited High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll a key source of bioavailable Fe to the HNLC North Pacific. Keywords: iron, continental margin, HNLC 1

  17. Produce through coiled tubing to keep marginal wells unloaded

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The use of coiled tubing as an alternate production tubing string has been attempted or considered by numerous operators in the past. However, its use has been tempered due to several problems known to be inherent with coiled tubing recompletions. Some of the problems encountered are: Killing the well to allow for tubing installation always carries the risk of formation damage; Candidate wells normally are marginal producers and may not produce sufficient revenue to justify the cost of a major workover; Procedures followed to install surface equipment may be hazardous; Previous installation designs required running the coiled tubing to the top of the tree, affecting the functional loss of all existing wellhead equipment; Often substandard modifications were required to reconnect into existing production facilities. However, a prototype spool and tubing hanger that incorporated modifications designed to solve these problems has been developed jointly by Reeled Tubing, Inc., and Well-head Control Systems. The solution is a new concept in the coiled tubing hanger. The design incorporates a floating element, which is a combination slip bowl, seal element and retaining sub. The entire assembly is installed and activated in the bore of a specially designed spool installed between the primary and secondary master valves of the existing wellhead.

  18. Performance Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Performance characterization efforts within the SunShot Systems Integration activities focus on collaborations with U.S. solar companies to:

  19. ORBITAL MIGRATION OF PROTOPLANETS IN A MARGINALLY GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2013-02-20

    Core accretion and disk instability require giant protoplanets to form in the presence of disk gas. Protoplanet migration models generally assume disk masses low enough that the disk's self-gravity can be neglected. However, disk instability requires a disk massive enough to be marginally gravitationally unstable (MGU). Even for core accretion, an FU Orionis outburst may require a brief MGU disk phase. We present a new set of three-dimensional, gravitational radiation hydrodynamics models of MGU disks with multiple protoplanets, which interact gravitationally with the disk and with each other, including disk gas mass accretion. Initial protoplanet masses are 0.01 to 10 M {sub Circled-Plus} for core accretion models, and 0.1 to 3 M {sub Jup} for Nice scenario models, starting on circular orbits with radii of 6, 8, 10, or 12 AU, inside a 0.091 M {sub Sun} disk extending from 4 to 20 AU around a 1 M {sub Sun} protostar. Evolutions are followed for up to {approx}4000 yr and involve phases of relative stability (e {approx} 0.1) interspersed with chaotic phases (e {approx} 0.4) of orbital interchanges. The 0.01 to 10 M {sub Circled-Plus} cores can orbit stably for {approx}1000 yr: monotonic inward or outward orbital migration of the type seen in low mass disks does not occur. A system with giant planet masses similar to our solar system (1.0, 0.33, 0.1, 0.1 M {sub Jup}) was stable for over 1000 yr, and a Jupiter-Saturn-like system was stable for over 3800 yr, implying that our giant planets might well survive an MGU disk phase.

  20. RELAP-7 Beta Release: Summary of Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martineau, Richard C.; Zhang, Hongbin; Zhao, Haihua

    2014-12-01

    RELAP-7 is a nuclear systems safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Building upon the decades of software development at the INL, we began the development of RELAP-7 in 2011 to support the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway. As part of this development, the first lines of RELAP-7 code were committed to the software revision control repository on November 7th, 2011. The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical methods, and physical models in order to provide capabilities needed for the RISMC methodology and to support nuclear power safety analysis. RELAP-7 is built using the INL’s modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). MOOSE provides improved numerical calculations (including higher-order integration in both space and time, yielding converged second-order accuracy). The RELAP-7 code structure is based on multiple physical component models such as pipes, junctions, pumps, etc. Each component can have options for different fluid models such as single- and two-phase flow. This component-based and physics-based software architecture allows RELAP-7 to adopt different physical models for different applications. A relatively new two-phase hydrodynamic model, termed the ''7-Equation model'' for two phasic pressures, velocities, energies, and volumetric fraction, is incorporated into RELAP-7 for liquid-gas (water-steam) flows. This new model allows second-order integration because it is well-posed, which will reduce the numerical error associated with traditional systems analysis codes. In this paper, we provide a RELAP-7 capability list describing analysis features, range of applicability, and reactor components that will be available for the December 15th, 2014 beta release of the software.

  1. RAVEN: a GUI and an Artificial Intelligence Engine in a Dynamic PRA Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; A. Alfonsi; J. Cogliati; R. Kinoshita; D. Gaston; R. Martineau; C. Curtis

    2013-06-01

    Increases in computational power and pressure for more accurate simulations and estimations of accident scenario consequences are driving the need for Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) [1] of very complex models. While more sophisticated algorithms and computational power address the back end of this challenge, the front end is still handled by engineers that need to extract meaningful information from the large amount of data and build these complex models. Compounding this problem is the difficulty in knowledge transfer and retention, and the increasing speed of software development. The above-described issues would have negatively impacted deployment of the new high fidelity plant simulator RELAP-7 (Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program) at Idaho National Laboratory. Therefore, RAVEN that was initially focused to be the plant controller for RELAP-7 will help mitigate future RELAP-7 software engineering risks. In order to accomplish this task, Reactor Analysis and Virtual Control Environment (RAVEN) has been designed to provide an easy to use Graphical User Interface (GUI) for building plant models and to leverage artificial intelligence algorithms in order to reduce computational time, improve results, and help the user to identify the behavioral pattern of the Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). In this paper we will present the GUI implementation and its current capability status. We will also introduce the support vector machine algorithms and show our evaluation of their potentiality in increasing the accuracy and reducing the computational costs of PRA analysis. In this evaluation we will refer to preliminary studies performed under the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) project of the Light Water Reactors Sustainability (LWRS) campaign [3]. RISMC simulation needs and algorithm testing are currently used as a guidance to prioritize RAVEN developments relevant to PRA.

  2. Anisotropic Margin Expansions in 6 Anatomic Directions for Oropharyngeal Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yock, Adam D. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Beadle, Beth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Lifei [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei, E-mail: dong.lei@scrippshealth.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to determine the expansions in 6 anatomic directions that produced optimal margins considering nonrigid setup errors and tissue deformation for patients receiving image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: For 20 patients who had received IGRT to the head and neck, we deformably registered each patient's daily images acquired with a computed tomography (CT)-on-rails system to his or her planning CT. By use of the resulting vector fields, the positions of volume elements within the clinical target volume (CTV) (target voxels) or within a 1-cm shell surrounding the CTV (normal tissue voxels) on the planning CT were identified on each daily CT. We generated a total of 15,625 margins by dilating the CTV by 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 mm in the posterior, anterior, lateral, medial, inferior, and superior directions. The optimal margins were those that minimized the relative volume of normal tissue voxels positioned within the margin while satisfying 1 of 4 geometric target coverage criteria and 1 of 3 population criteria. Results: Each pair of geometric target coverage and population criteria resulted in a unique, anisotropic, optimal margin. The optimal margin expansions ranged in magnitude from 1 to 5 mm depending on the anatomic direction of the expansion and on the geometric target coverage and population criteria. Typically, the expansions were largest in the medial direction, were smallest in the lateral direction, and increased with the demand of the criteria. The anisotropic margin resulting from the optimal set of expansions always included less normal tissue than did any isotropic margin that satisfied the same pair of criteria. Conclusions: We demonstrated the potential of anisotropic margins to reduce normal tissue exposure without compromising target coverage in IGRT to the head and neck.

  3. Benthic biological and biogeochemical patterns and processes across an oxygen minimum zone (Pakistan margin, NE Arabian Sea)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    (Pakistan margin, NE Arabian Sea) Gregory L. Cowie a,Ă, Lisa A. Levin b a The Sir John Murray Laboratories), and organic matter (OM) availability on benthic communities and processes across the Pakistan Margin

  4. Supplementary Materials Table 1: Simulated log-normal survival data marginal posterior probability of inclusion of relevant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vannucci, Marina

    .1835 Table 1: Simulated log-normal survival data: Marginal posterior probabilities of inclusion of rele- vant: Marginal posterior probabilities of inclusion of rele- vant variables under different maximum correlation

  5. Quantification of margins and uncertainty for risk-informed decision analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, Kenneth Fredrick

    2010-09-01

    QMU stands for 'Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties'. QMU is a basic framework for consistency in integrating simulation, data, and/or subject matter expertise to provide input into a risk-informed decision-making process. QMU is being applied to a wide range of NNSA stockpile issues, from performance to safety. The implementation of QMU varies with lab and application focus. The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program develops validated computational simulation tools to be applied in the context of QMU. QMU provides input into a risk-informed decision making process. The completeness aspect of QMU can benefit from the structured methodology and discipline of quantitative risk assessment (QRA)/probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). In characterizing uncertainties it is important to pay attention to the distinction between those arising from incomplete knowledge ('epistemic' or systematic), and those arising from device-to-device variation ('aleatory' or random). The national security labs should investigate the utility of a probability of frequency (PoF) approach in presenting uncertainties in the stockpile. A QMU methodology is connected if the interactions between failure modes are included. The design labs should continue to focus attention on quantifying uncertainties that arise from epistemic uncertainties such as poorly-modeled phenomena, numerical errors, coding errors, and systematic uncertainties in experiment. The NNSA and design labs should ensure that the certification plan for any RRW is supported by strong, timely peer review and by an ongoing, transparent QMU-based documentation and analysis in order to permit a confidence level necessary for eventual certification.

  6. Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone (7001100 m)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen) on the bathyal Pakistan margin, where sediments grade from fully laminated sediment at 700 m (0.12 mL LŔ1 O2 [5 m matter to generate abrupt faunal transitions on the Pakistan margin. & 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  7. Understanding the Zongo : processes of socio-spatial marginalization in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Emily Anne

    2014-01-01

    The spatial processes of marginalization and ghettoization have been described, labeled, and theorized extensively in the United States and Europe, yet there has been little research dedicated to these processes in the ...

  8. Analysis of post-Kyoto CO? emissions trading using marginal abatement curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny.; Decaux, Annelčne.

    Marginal abatement curves (MACs) are often used heuristically to demonstrate the advantages of emissions trading. In this paper, the authors derive MACs from EPPA, the MIT Joint Program's computable general equilibrium ...

  9. Storytelling on the margins : a theoretical framework for imagining a fashion innovation center in Tuscany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Alexa (Alexa Timeaus)

    2008-01-01

    The importance of the margin has long been deemed important in creative processes. At both the level of the individual and the level of the city, research shows that creativity tends to flourish on the philosophical and ...

  10. Some Improvements to the Shenoy-Shafer and Hugin Architectures for Computing Marginals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Tuija; Shenoy, Prakash P.

    1998-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to describe two modifications to the Shenoy–Shafer architecture with the goal of making it computationally more efficient in computing marginals of the joint valuation. We also describe a ...

  11. The evolution of lithospheric deformation and crustal structure from continental margins to oceanic spreading centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behn, Mark Dietrich, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    This thesis investigates the evolution of lithospheric deformation and crustal structure from continental margins to mid-ocean ridges. The first part (Ch. 2) examines the style of segmentation along the U.S. East Coast ...

  12. Experimental validation of the van Herk margin formula for lung radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecclestone, Gillian; Heath, Emily; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To validate the van Herk margin formula for lung radiation therapy using realistic dose calculation algorithms and respiratory motion modeling. The robustness of the margin formula against variations in lesion size, peak-to-peak motion amplitude, tissue density, treatment technique, and plan conformity was assessed, along with the margin formula assumption of a homogeneous dose distribution with perfect plan conformity.Methods: 3DCRT and IMRT lung treatment plans were generated within the ORBIT treatment planning platform (RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden) on 4DCT datasets of virtual phantoms. Random and systematic respiratory motion induced errors were simulated using deformable registration and dose accumulation tools available within ORBIT for simulated cases of varying lesion sizes, peak-to-peak motion amplitudes, tissue densities, and plan conformities. A detailed comparison between the margin formula dose profile model, the planned dose profiles, and penumbra widths was also conducted to test the assumptions of the margin formula. Finally, a correction to account for imperfect plan conformity was tested as well as a novel application of the margin formula that accounts for the patient-specific motion trajectory.Results: The van Herk margin formula ensured full clinical target volume coverage for all 3DCRT and IMRT plans of all conformities with the exception of small lesions in soft tissue. No dosimetric trends with respect to plan technique or lesion size were observed for the systematic and random error simulations. However, accumulated plans showed that plan conformity decreased with increasing tumor motion amplitude. When comparing dose profiles assumed in the margin formula model to the treatment plans, discrepancies in the low dose regions were observed for the random and systematic error simulations. However, the margin formula respected, in all experiments, the 95% dose coverage required for planning target volume (PTV) margin derivation, as defined by the ICRU; thus, suitable PTV margins were estimated. The penumbra widths calculated in lung tissue for each plan were found to be very similar to the 6.4 mm value assumed by the margin formula model. The plan conformity correction yielded inconsistent results which were largely affected by image and dose grid resolution while the trajectory modified PTV plans yielded a dosimetric benefit over the standard internal target volumes approach with up to a 5% decrease in the V20 value.Conclusions: The margin formula showed to be robust against variations in tumor size and motion, treatment technique, plan conformity, as well as low tissue density. This was validated by maintaining coverage of all of the derived PTVs by 95% dose level, as required by the formal definition of the PTV. However, the assumption of perfect plan conformity in the margin formula derivation yields conservative margin estimation. Future modifications to the margin formula will require a correction for plan conformity. Plan conformity can also be improved by using the proposed trajectory modified PTV planning approach. This proves especially beneficial for tumors with a large anterior–posterior component of respiratory motion.

  13. Subsidence history, crustal structure, and evolution of the Somaliland-Yemen conjugate margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Mohammed

    seismic refraction data and process-oriented gravity and flexure modeling. The margin is asymmetric et al., 2001; Dauteuil et al., 2001; Hebert et al., 2001; Manighetti et al., 1997]. Seismic and well

  14. A reference time scale for Site U1385 (Shackleton Site) on the SW Iberian Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodell, D.; Lourens, L.; Crowhurst, S.; Konijnendijk, T.; Tjallingii, R.; Jimenez-Espejo, F.; Skinner, L.; Tzedakis, P. C.

    2015-07-16

    ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 5 fidelity of the sediments on the SW Iberian Margin make this region a prime target for ocean drilling. In 2011, an Ancillary Program Letter (APL 763) was submitted to the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) requesting four...

  15. Estimating Marginal Returns to Medical Care: Evidence from At-Risk Newborns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almond, Douglas

    A key policy question is whether the benefits of additional medical expenditures exceed their costs. We propose a new approach for estimating marginal returns to medical spending based on variation in medical inputs generated ...

  16. Gas hydrates at two sites of an active continental margin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-03-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart or the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m. Both sites are characterized by rates of sedimentation exceeding about 30 m/m.y. and organic carbon contents exceeding about 0.5%. The magnitudes and trends of gas compositions, residual gas concentrations and chlorinity variations are generally similar at both sites. The carbon isotopic compositions are significantly heavier at Site 568 than at Site 565. The isotopic compositions and trends at Site 565 are typical of biogenic methane generation. At Site 568, the isotopic compositions are very heavy. In spite of its heavy carbon isotopic composition, this methane is believed to have a biogenic source.

  17. SUESS ET AL.: SEA FLOOR METHANE HYDRATES AT HYDRATE RIDGE, CASCADIA MARGIN Sea Floor Methane Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    SUESS ET AL.: SEA FLOOR METHANE HYDRATES AT HYDRATE RIDGE, CASCADIA MARGIN 1 Sea Floor Methane are exposed at the sea floor. A methane-oxidizing bacterial consortium populates the exposures of hydrate; colonies of vent macro-fauna are abundant as well. Discharge of methane from destabilized hydrate

  18. ENHANCED SEVERE TRANSIENT ANALYSIS FOR PREVENTION TECHNICAL PROGRAM PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gougar, Hans

    2014-09-01

    This document outlines the development of a high fidelity, best estimate nuclear power plant severe transient simulation capability that will complement or enhance the integral system codes historically used for licensing and analysis of severe accidents. As with other tools in the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Toolkit, the ultimate user of Enhanced Severe Transient Analysis and Prevention (ESTAP) capability is the plant decision-maker; the deliverable to that customer is a modern, simulation-based safety analysis capability, applicable to a much broader class of safety issues than is traditional Light Water Reactor (LWR) licensing analysis. Currently, the RISMC pathway’s major emphasis is placed on developing RELAP-7, a next-generation safety analysis code, and on showing how to use RELAP-7 to analyze margin from a modern point of view: that is, by characterizing margin in terms of the probabilistic spectra of the “loads” applied to systems, structures, and components (SSCs), and the “capacity” of those SSCs to resist those loads without failing. The first objective of the ESTAP task, and the focus of one task of this effort, is to augment RELAP-7 analyses with user-selected multi-dimensional, multi-phase models of specific plant components to simulate complex phenomena that may lead to, or exacerbate, severe transients and core damage. Such phenomena include: coolant crossflow between PWR assemblies during a severe reactivity transient, stratified single or two-phase coolant flow in primary coolant piping, inhomogeneous mixing of emergency coolant water or boric acid with hot primary coolant, and water hammer. These are well-documented phenomena associated with plant transients but that are generally not captured in system codes. They are, however, generally limited to specific components, structures, and operating conditions. The second ESTAP task is to similarly augment a severe (post-core damage) accident integral analyses code with high fidelity simulations that would allow investigation of multi-dimensional, multi-phase containment phenomena that are only treated approximately in established codes.

  19. Quantification of the Variability of Diaphragm Motion and Implications for Treatment Margin Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rit, Simon; Herk, Marcel van; Zijp, Lambert [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify the variability of diaphragm motion during free-breathing radiotherapy of lung patients and its effect on treatment margins to account for geometric uncertainties. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three lung cancer patients were analyzed. Each patient had 5-19 cone-beam scans acquired during different treatment fractions. The craniocaudal position of the diaphragm dome on the same side as the tumor was tracked over 2 min in the projection images, because it is both easily visible and a suitable surrogate to study the variability of the tumor motion and its impact on treatment margins. Intra-acquisition, inter-acquisition, and inter-patient variability of the respiratory cycles were quantified separately, as were the probability density functions (PDFs) of the diaphragm position over each cycle, each acquisition, and each patient. Asymmetric margins were simulated using each patient PDF and compared to symmetric margins computed from a margin recipe. Results: The peak-to-peak amplitude variability (1 SD) was 3.3 mm, 2.4 mm, and 6.1 mm for the intra-acquisition, inter-acquisition, and inter-patient variability, respectively. The average PDF of each cycle was similar to the sin{sup 4} function but the PDF of each acquisition was closer to a skew-normal distribution because of the motion variability. Despite large interfraction baseline variability, the PDF of each patient was generally asymmetric with a longer end-inhale tail because the end-exhale position was more stable than the end-inhale position. The asymmetry of the PDF required asymmetric margins around the time-averaged position to account for the position uncertainty but the average difference was 1.0 mm (range, 0.0-4.4 mm) for a sharp penumbra and an idealized online setup correction protocol. Conclusion: The respiratory motion is more irregular during the fractions than between the fractions. The PDF of the respiratory motion is asymmetrically distributed. Both the intra-acquisition variability and the PDF asymmetry have a limited impact on dose distributions and inferred margins. The use of a margin recipe to account for respiratory motion with an estimate of the average motion amplitude was adequate in almost all patients.

  20. Mapping the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: Differences in Definitions, Data and Models across Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Sarah M

    2014-01-01

    D. Land availability for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.of land available for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.so marginal land for biofuel crops is limited. Energy Policy

  1. Mapping the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: Differences in Definitions, Data and Models across Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Sarah M

    2014-01-01

    availability for biofuel production. Environ. Sci. Technol.of land available for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands:

  2. The politics of marginality in Wallowa County, Oregon: Contesting the production of landscapes of consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    The politics of marginality in Wallowa County, Oregon: Contesting the production of landscapes of consumption Jesse B. Abrams a,b,*, Hannah Gosnell c a Department of Sociology, Whitman College, 345 Boyer Ave not only technical issues of land productivity, but also broader community contestations over

  3. Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huerta, Audrey D.

    Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA ABSTRACT The tectonic evolution of the North Amer- ican Gulf of Mexico margin, including the Interior Salt Basin, outboard unextended Wiggins arch, and an unusually

  4. Anomalous Tectonic Subsidence of the Southern Australian Passive Margin: Response to Cretaceous Dynamic Topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    Anomalous Tectonic Subsidence of the Southern Australian Passive Margin: Response to Cretaceous that formed over and orthogonal to a Mesozoic subducted slab in the mantle. The tectonic subsidence pattern, enhancing initial subsidence. Subsequent lithospheric rebound coincides with post-rift thermal subsidence

  5. Coral reef evolution on rapidly subsiding margins Jody M. Webster a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riding, Robert

    Coral reef evolution on rapidly subsiding margins Jody M. Webster a,b, , Juan Carlos Braga d regions have experienced rapid subsidence (2­6 m/ka) over the last 500 ka. Rapid subsidence, combined sea-level changes, subsidence rates, accretion rates, basement substrates, and paleobathymetry

  6. Cenozoic stratigraphyand subsidence historyof the South China Sea margin in theTaiwan region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    Cenozoic stratigraphyand subsidence historyof the South China Sea margin in theTaiwan region A. T, together with the subsidence analysis of deep wells, show that during rifting (B58^37Ma post-breakup subsidence (B30^18Ma) possibly as the inferred induced convection abated following initial

  7. Re-Dispatching Generation to Increase Power System Security Margin and Support Low Voltage Bus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Re-Dispatching Generation to Increase Power System Security Margin and Support Low Voltage Bus by re-dispatching generator outputs, using a normal vector found at a voltage collapse boundary or a low voltage boundary (LVB). This method uses the normal vector as an indicator to change the generation

  8. The spiny lobster, Panulirus margin-atus, is endemic to the Hawaiian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    birds, monk seals, and reef fishes (Polo- vina et al., 1994). After the recruit- ment collapse132 The spiny lobster, Panulirus margin- atus, is endemic to the Hawaiian Archipelago and Johnston in the northwestern portion of the archipelago known as the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). From the early 1980s

  9. Leverage and Beliefs: Personal Experience and Risk Taking in Margin Lending*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    Leverage and Beliefs: Personal Experience and Risk Taking in Margin Lending* Peter Koudijs+ Hans of financial distress to address this question. An investor syndicate speculating in English stocks went times, and declining when asset prices fall (Adrian and Shin 2010). For example, when the stock market

  10. Abstract--Although Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP) plays an important role in many restructured wholesale power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    the performance of these markets. In this paper, different AC and DC optimal power flow (OPF) models are presented Terms-- Locational marginal pricing, wholesale power market, AC optimal power flow, DC optimal power to distinct local conditions (e.g., hydroelectric power in the northwest). Even in regions adopting the design

  11. Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 28, 2000/pp. 757763 EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF THE STABILITY MARGIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    757 Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 28, 2000/pp. 757­763 EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION the response of the combustion process heat release to driven flow oscillations and the response determine the stability margin of combustors. Such an approach would enable combustion engi- neers

  12. Optimized planning target volume margin in helical tomotherapy for prostate cancer: is there a preferred method?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Yuan Jie; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Jang, Min Sun; Yoon, Won Sup; Yang, Dae Sik; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong

    2015-01-01

    To compare the dosimetrical differences between plans generated by helical tomotherapy using 2D or 3D margining technique in in prostate cancer. Ten prostate cancer patients were included in this study. For 2D plans, planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding 5 mm (lateral/anterior-posterior) to clinical target volume (CTV). For 3D plans, 5 mm margin was added not only in lateral/anterior-posterior, but also in superior-inferior to CTV. Various dosimetrical indices, including the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF) were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Differences between 2D and 3D PTV indices were not significant except for CI (p = 0.023). 3D margin plans (11195 MUs) resulted in higher (13.0%) monitor units than 2D margin plans (9728 MUs). There were no significant d...

  13. Between-ness: Theory and Practice within the Margins of Cathy Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Colin

    Between-ness: Theory and Practice within the Margins of Excess Cathy Smith Queensland University framework developed in a doctoral program of research concerned with connecting philosophies of between-ness between- ness; that which is neither one state nor the other but a zone of blurring in-between. An example

  14. Geologic hazards on the Atlantic continental margin of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folger, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Although 46 exploratory holes have failed to reveal commercial hydrocarbon accumulations on the US Atlantic margin, about twice that number were drilled on the contiguous Canadian margin before large reserves were discovered. Thus, despite the initial results, exploration on the US margin will probably continue and additional information will be needed to augment the extensive environmental data base acquired over the past 10 years. The extent, timing, causes, and importance of sediment instability of the Continental Slopes of Georges Bank, Baltimore Canyon Trough and Carolina Trough--where future exploration will take place--remain controversial. Many question remain to be answered regarding such phenomena as creep on the upper slope, mass wasting in canyons and gullies, and slumping associated with faults and salt diapirs. Along the southeastern margin, the distribution of cavernous porosity below the shelf is only broadly known. Caverns pose a potential threat to drilling operations ranging from collapse of rigs to circulation loss and sheared drill strings. In deeper waters of the Continental Slope (700-2000 m), clathrates or frozen gas hydrates are common. The potential hazard of blow-outs from gas trapped beneath this layer are unknown. Additional information is needed to assess the bottom stresses imposed by tidal, storm, and geostrophically-driven currents on offshore rigs and structures, particularly in such areas as Georges Bank, the Carolina Trough, and the Blake Plateau.

  15. Marginal costs of freeway traffic congestion with on-road pollution exposure externality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Marginal costs of freeway traffic congestion with on-road pollution exposure externality Alexander August 2012 Received in revised form 6 March 2013 Accepted 23 September 2013 Keywords: External costs Traffic congestion On-road In-vehicle Pollution exposure Vehicle emissions a b s t r a c t The health cost

  16. Continuous Contour Monte Carlo for Marginal Density Estimation With an Application to a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Faming

    ; Gelman and Meng 1998), reverse logistic regression (Geyer 1994), marginal likelihood (Chib 1995; Chib; Reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo; Stochastic approximation; Wang-Landau algorithm. 1. INTRODUCTION;Continuous Contour Monte Carlo 609 variety of approaches including reversible jump MCMC (Green 1995; Green

  17. Water and energy footprints of bioenergy crop production on marginal lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA Abstract Water and energy demandsWater and energy footprints of bioenergy crop production on marginal lands A . K . B H A R D WA J and S . K . H A M I LT O N *w} *Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, East

  18. Systematic destruction of K-Feldspar in deeply buried rift and passive margin sandstones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Mark; Milliken, Kitty; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2001-01-01

    Systematic patterns of detrital K-feldspar decline with increasing burial depth are revealed during deep burial (2.5-4.5km) of sandstones in diverse sedimentary basins from three rift and two passive margin setings in the North Sea and USA gulf...

  19. Economic recovery of oil trapped at fan margins using high angle wells and multiple hydraulic fractures. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laue, M.L.

    1997-02-13

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically- fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The Unites States Department of Energy granted approval of the continuation application to implement Budget Period Two effective November 21, 1996. The only Budget Period One activities for the quarter involved project administration. Budget Period Two activities were initiated with the development of a drilling program for the high-angle slant well. The well was spud on December 4, 1996 and was drilling at 10,830 ft in the vertical section of the hole as of the end of the month.

  20. Timing and magnitude of Miocene eustasy derived from the mixed siliciclastic-carbonate stratigraphic record of the northeastern Australian margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leckie, Mark

    amplitude of sea-level change ice volume sequence stratigraphy Heterozoan carbonates Miocene ODP Leg 194 Eustasy is a key parameter to understand sedimentary sequences on continental margins and to reconstruct and timing of sequence formation on mixed carbonate-siliciclastic margins, and to estimate the amplitude

  1. Natural Hazards and Effects on Local Populations: Applications of NSF MARGINS research to hazards mitigation in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Jeffrey S.

    Natural Hazards and Effects on Local Populations: Applications of NSF MARGINS research to hazards (Co-chair: NSF MARGINS Central American Geologic Hazards Working Group, 2001) In: Silver, E. and Dixon Zone and Subduction Factory Initiatives, 15 p., 2001. Natural Hazards & Effects on Local Populations

  2. Self-Tuning PI TCP Flow Controller for AQM Routers With Interval Gain and Phase Margin Assignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Changcheng

    -tuning proportional-integral (PI) controller for Active Queue Management (AQM) in the Internet. Classical control to achieve good AQM performance while adapting the AQM control system to great traffic load changes very well Queue Management, PI Control, Gain Margin, Phase Margin, Self-Tune 1. INTRODUCTION Congestion control

  3. Shelf sedimentation on a tectonically active margin: A modern sediment budget for Poverty continental shelf, New Zealand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Mary C.

    Shelf sedimentation on a tectonically active margin: A modern sediment budget for Poverty Available online xxxx Keywords: Waipaoa River continental margin shelf sedimentation 210 Pb geochronology 239,240 Pu geochronology sediment budget The combination of high sediment yields and the prevalence

  4. seismic margin

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL Small-scale Friction Sensitivityv b, iNOTICE OF OPEN CHANGE

  5. Discrimination with error margin between two states - Case of general occurrence probabilities -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Sugimoto; T. Hashimoto; M. Horibe; A. Hayashi

    2009-11-18

    We investigate a state discrimination problem which interpolates minimum-error and unambiguous discrimination by introducing a margin for the probability of error. We closely analyze discrimination of two pure states with general occurrence probabilities. The optimal measurements are classified into three types. One of the three types of measurement is optimal depending on parameters (occurrence probabilities and error margin). We determine the three domains in the parameter space and the optimal discrimination success probability in each domain in a fully analytic form. It is also shown that when the states to be discriminated are multipartite, the optimal success probability can be attained by local operations and classical communication. For discrimination of two mixed states, an upper bound of the optimal success probability is obtained.

  6. Workshop on Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, M. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Safety Issue Resolution; Arsenault, F.; Patterson, M.; Gaal, M. [SCIENTECH, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1993-09-01

    These are the proceedings of the Public Workshop on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety. The workshop was held at the Holiday Inn, Bethesda, on April 27 and 28, 1993. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an opportunity for public and industry input to the program. The workshop addressed the institutionalization of the program to review regulations with the purpose of eliminating those that are marginal. The objective is to avoid the dilution of safety efforts. One session was devoted to discussion of the framework for a performance-based regulatory approach. In addition, panelists and attendees discussed scope, schedules and status of specific regulatory items: containment leakage testing requirements, fire protection requirements, requirements for environmental qualification of electrical equipment, requests for information under 10CFR50.54(f), requirements for combustible gas control systems, and quality assurance requirements.

  7. On the marginal instability threshold condition of the aperiodic ordinary mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2014-07-15

    The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability has recently received renewed attention owing to its potential applicability to the solar wind plasma. Here, an analytical marginal instability condition is derived for counter-streaming bi-Maxwellian plasma particle distribution functions. The derived marginal instability condition as a function of the temperature anisotropy and plasma beta agrees remarkably well with the numerically determined instability condition. The existence of a new instability domain of the O-mode at small plasma beta values is confirmed with the leading A??{sub ?}{sup ?1}-dependence, if the counter-stream parameter P{sub e} exceeds a critical value. At small plasma beta values at large enough counter-stream parameter, the O-mode also operates for temperature anisotropies A?=?T{sub ?}/T{sub ?}?>?1 even larger than unity, as the parallel counter-stream free energy exceeds the perpendicular bi-Maxwellian free energy.

  8. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike L. Laue

    1997-05-30

    The distal fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economical to develop using vertical wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three vertical wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

  9. Higher U.S. Crop Prices Trigger Little Area Expansion so Marginal Land for Biofuel Crops Is Limited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinton, S.; Babcock, Bruce; James, Laura; Bandaru, Varaprasad

    2011-06-12

    By expanding energy biomass production on marginal lands that are not currently used for crops, food price increases and indirect climate change effects can be mitigated. Studies of the availability of marginal lands for dedicated bioenergy crops have focused on biophysical land traits, ignoring the human role in decisions to convert marginal land to bioenergy crops. Recent history offers insights about farmer willingness to put non-crop land into crop production. The 2006-09 leap in field crop prices and the attendant 64% gain in typical profitability led to only a 2% increase in crop planted area, mostly in the prairie states

  10. The marginal leakage of some dental cements in humans: a PIXE-microbeam approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zadro, A.; Passi, P. [Dental School, Department of Dental Materials, University of Padua (Italy); Cavalleri, G. [Dental School, Department of Restorative Dentistry, University of Verona (Italy); Galassini, S.; Moschini, G.; Rossi, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)

    1999-06-10

    The marginal leakage and water absorption of dental cements and restorative materials has been investigated by many authors with several techniques, some of which led to valid results. However, no technique could give, by itself, information both on leakage and water absorption, as these measurements usually need different investigations. PIXE micro beam offers the possibility of investigating these two aspects at the same time, since it is possible to map a proper marker element. In the present study, cavities were made on 50 extracted human molars, then filled with five different temporary cements (IRM, Cavit W, Kalsogen, Fermit N, SuperEBA). The filled teeth were placed into a 5% silver nitrate solution, and after three days, one, two, three and four weeks were examined. The samples for microPIXE were prepared after embedding the teeth in epoxy resin, and sectioning and grinding them down to a thickness of about 1 mm. The sections were placed on metal holders, and examined with a scanning proton {mu}beam, in Legnaro (Italy) at the AN2000 LAB of INFN National Laboratories. The beam consisted of 2.4 MeV protons, it had a cross section of 1.5 micron in diameter and typical currents of the order of some {mu}A were used. The maps were obtained by an 'ad hoc' software with a McIntosh personal computer. Mapping of silver allowed to evaluate both the marginal leakage and the water absorption for each cement. The samples filled with Cavit W showed a great infiltration, as the tracing element was found in the cement bulk, along the margins and inside the cavity, while those filled with IRM and Kalsogen presented only a deposition of the tracing solution on the cement surface. SuperEBA showed a poor resistance against microleakage, because the marker element was only detected along the cavity margins. Fermit N showed the best marginal integrity, and on its surface no traces of siver were found. In this case the better resistance may be due to the resin present in the composition of the material.

  11. Abstract The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators burning gas also rose sharply.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    Abstract ­ The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators marginal cost, which is closely related to the natural gas price. Since gas units are usually the marginal the sensitivity of Var benefit with respect to generation cost. The U.S. natural gas industry has been

  12. Portable Optical Fiber Probe-Based Spectroscopic Scanner for Rapid Cancer Diagnosis: A New Tool for Intraoperative Margin Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chung-Chieh

    There continues to be a significant clinical need for rapid and reliable intraoperative margin assessment during cancer surgery. Here we describe a portable, quantitative, optical fiber probe-based, spectroscopic tissue ...

  13. Guaranteed margins and performance for an adaptive flight control system and application on the X-15 research airplane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dydek, Zachary Thompson

    2007-01-01

    The design tools developed for use with linear controllers such as gain and phase margins do not apply to nonlinear control architectures such as adaptive control. For decades, flight control engineers have used these tools ...

  14. Upgrading of substandard housing in Portugal : planning strategies for the technical improvement of marginal settlements, case study, the Casal Ventoso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Castello-Branco, Fernando N. B

    1983-01-01

    The primary scope of this thesis is to deal, from a technical standpoint, with the implementation of the upgrading concept in marginal settlements in Portugal. It consists mainly of two parts: The rationale of the concept, ...

  15. Evolution of oceanic margins : rifting in the Gulf of California and sediment diapirism and mantle hydration during subduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Nathaniel Clark

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates three processes that control the evolution of oceanic margins. Chapter 2 presents seismic images of a ~2-km-thick evaporite body in Guaymas Basin, central Gulf of California. In rifts, evaporites ...

  16. A comparison of the marginal adaptation of cathode-arc vapor-deposited titanium and cast base metal copings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jean C; Lai, Li-Chung; Sheets, Cherilyn G; Earthman, James; Newcomb, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Marginal fit of gold inlay castings. J Prosthet Dent 1966;filling and porosity in castings of titanium. Dent Matera b Wu et al alloy types, casting procedures, por- celain

  17. The Moho: Boundary above upper mantle peridotites or lower crustal eclogites? A global review and new interpretations for passive margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    and new interpretations for passive margins Rolf Mjelde a, , Alexey Goncharov b , R. Dietmar Müller c, Building F05, NSW 2006, Australia a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 21 July: Eclogites Moho Wide-angle seismic Passive margins We have performed a global study of 2D crustal scale wide

  18. Marginal Cost of Steam and Power from Cogeneration Systems Using a Rational Value-Allocation Procedure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumana, J. D.; Al-Gwaiz, M. M.

    2004-01-01

    operate in either modes 1a or 2a, as electric utility companies are loathe to purchase surplus power from a cogenerator unless it is priced substantially below the utility?s own cheapest marginal cost of production. Usually, the cogenerator cannot... will invariably be positive. Can we be assured that the foregoing conclusion is correct? Not really. For example, one could argue that the decision to hold electrical power prices fixed is arbitrary, and that it is equally valid to fix the steam price...

  19. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using Hig Angle Wells Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laue, M.L.

    1997-11-21

    The Yowlumne field is a giant field in the southern San Joaquin basin, Kern County, California. It is a deep (13,000 ft) waterflood operation that produces from the Miocene- aged Stevens Sand. The reservoir is interpreted as a layered, fan-shaped, prograding turbidite complex containing several lobe-shaped sand bodies that represent distinct flow units. A high ultimate recovery factor is expected, yet significant quantities of undrained oil remain at the fan margins. The fan margins are not economic to develop using vertical wells because of thinning pay, deteriorating rock quality, and depth. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the northeast distal fan margin through the use of a high- angle well completed with multiple hydraulic- fracture treatments. A high-angle well offers greater pay exposure than can be achieved with a vertical well. Hydraulic-fracture treatments will establish vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three vertical wells are anticipated at a cost of approximately two vertical wells. The near-horizontal well penetrated the Yowlumne sand; a Stevens sand equivalent, in the distal fan margin in the northeast area of the field. The well was drilled in a predominately westerly direction towards the interior of the field, in the direction of improving rock quality. Drilling and completion operations proved to be very challenging, leading to a number of adjustments to original plans. Hole conditions resulted in obtaining less core material than desired and setting intermediate casing 1200 ft too high. The 7 in. production liner stuck 1000 ft off bottom, requiring a 5 in. liner to be run the rest of the way. The cement job on the 5 in. liner resulted in a very poor bond, which precluded one of three hydraulic fracture treatments originally planned for the well. Openhole logs confirmed most expectations going into the project about basic rock properties: the formation was shaly with low porosities, and water saturations were in line with expectations, including the presence of some intervals swept out by the waterflood. High water saturations at the bottom of the well eliminated one of the originally planned hydraulic fracture treatments. Although porosities proved to be low, they were more uniform across the formation than expected. Permeabilities of the various intervals continue to be evaluated, but appear to be better than expected from the porosity log model derived in Budget Period One. The well was perforated in all pay sections behind the 5 in. liner. Production rates and phases agree nicely with log calculations, fractional flow calculations, and an analytical technique used to predict the rate performance of the well.

  20. Economic recovery of oil trapped at fan margins using high angle wells and multiple hydraulic fractures. Quarterly report, Apr 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laue, M.L.

    1997-08-31

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically-fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The long radius, near-horizontal well has been drilled and completion operations are in progress. Upon initial review of log data, two hydraulic fracture treatments were planned. However, the probability of the lower frac growing into thick sands previously swept by waterflood has called for additional information to be obtained prior to proceeding with hydraulic fracture treatments. Should permeabilities prove to be as favorable as some data indicate, produced water volumes could be excessively high. Prior to pumping the first frac, the well will be perforated and produced from lower pay intervals. These perfs will not impact future frac work. Rate data and pressure transient analysis will dictate the need for the lower frac.

  1. Marginal Misses After Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Chen, Leon M.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To describe the spatial distribution of local-regional recurrence (LRR) among patients treated postoperatively with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 90 consecutive patients treated by gross total resection and postoperative IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck from January 2003 to July 2009 were reviewed. Sites of disease were the oral cavity (43 patients), oropharynx (20 patients), larynx (15 patients), and hypopharynx (12 patients). Fifty patients (56%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Seventeen of 90 patients treated with postoperative IMRT experienced LRR, yielding a 2-year estimate of local regional control of 80%. Among the LRR patients, 11 patients were classified as in-field recurrences, occurring within the physician-designated clinical target volume, and 6 patients were categorized as marginal recurrences. There were no out-of-field geographical misses. Sites of marginal LRRs included the contralateral neck adjacent to the spared parotid gland (3 patients), the dermal/subcutaneous surface (2 patients), and the retropharyngeal/retrostyloid lymph node region (1 patient). Conclusions: Although the incidence of geographical misses was relatively low, the possibility of this phenomenon should be considered in the design of target volumes among patients treated by postoperative IMRT for head and neck cancer.

  2. Negative margins and OPEC prices: how buyers and sellers are coping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-28

    Apparent refining margins are so poor that many US refiners have accelerated their destocking, waiting for market uncertainty to be resolved. Margins based on official OPEC prices continue to be virtually all negative, including very light oils from the Middle East; by now, up to half the world's oil trade may reflect spot marketing, compared to less than 10% a few years ago. In today's buyer's market for crude oil, several sellers are resorting to multi-faceted discounts amounting to as much as US $4.50 or more under official OPEC prices. But meanwhile, US oil importers have learned how not to rely so much on a traditional run of crude oil: they are running reduced crude, resid, cat feed, condensate; and they are blending components for lighter products by importing and swapping whenever even pennies per barrel can be saved. This issue presents: (1) refining netback data, US Gulf and West Coasts, late November 1984 (official/contract vs spot crude prices; (2) asphalt export prices to the US from Canada, N. Antilles, and Venezuela; and (3) the fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices as of October 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  3. Energy-conserving perennial agriculture for marginal land in southern Appalachia. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, G.

    1982-01-30

    USDA economists predict the end of surplus farm production in the US within this decade. More and more marginal land will be cropped to provide feed for the growing world population and to produce energy. Much of this potential cropland in Southern Appalachia is poorly suited to annual crops, such as corn. Perennial crops are much better suited to steep, rocky, and wet sites. Research was undertaken on the theoretical potentials of perennial species with high predicted yields of protein, carbohydrates, or oils. Several candidate staple perennial crops for marginal land in Southern Appalachia were identified, and estimates were made of their yields, energy input requirements, and general suitabilities. Cropping systems incorporating honeylocust, persimmon, mulberry, jujube, and beech were compared with corn cropping systems. It appears that these candidate staple perennials show distinct advantages for energy conservation and environmental preservation. Detailed economic analyses must await actual demonstration trials, but preliminary indications for ethanol conversion systems with honeylocust are encouraging. It is suggested that short-term loans to farmers undertaking this new type of agriculture would be appropriate to solve cash-flow problems.

  4. Margin Size is an Independent Predictor of Local Tumor Progression After Ablation of Colon Cancer Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xiaodong; Sofocleous, Constantinos T., E-mail: sofoclec@mskcc.org; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Petre, Elena N. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Gonen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (United States); Do, Kinh G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Brown, Karen T.; Covey, Anne M.; Brody, Lynn A.; Alago, William; Thornton, Raymond H. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Kemeny, Nancy E. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine (United States); Solomon, Stephen B. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between the minimal margin size and local tumor progression (LTP) following CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CLM). An institutional review board-approved, HIPPA-compliant review identified 73 patients with 94 previously untreated CLM that underwent RFA between March 2003 and May 2010, resulting in an ablation zone completely covering the tumor 4-8 weeks after RFA dynamic CT. Comparing the pre- with the post-RFA CT, the minimal margin size was categorized to 0, 1-5, 6-10, and 11-15 mm. Follow-up included CT every 2-4 months. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the effect of the minimal margin size, tumor location, size, and proximity to a vessel on LTP. Forty-five of 94 (47.9 %) CLM progressed locally. Median LTP-free survival (LPFS) was 16 months. Two-year LPFS rates for ablated CLM with minimal margin of 0, 1-5 mm, 6-10 mm, 11-15 mm were 26, 46, 74, and 80 % (p < 0.011). Minimal margin (p = 0.002) and tumor size (p = 0.028) were independent risk factors for LTP. The risk for LTP decreased by 46 % for each 5-mm increase in minimal margin size, whereas each additional 5-mm increase in tumor size increased the risk of LTP by 22 %. An ablation zone with a minimal margin uniformly larger than 5 mm 4-8 weeks postablation CT is associated with the best local tumor control.

  5. On the global economic potentials and marginal costs of non-renewable resources and the price dynamics of energy commodities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    A model is presented in this work for simulating endogenously the evolution of the marginal costs of production of energy carriers from non-renewable resources, their consumption, depletion pathways and timescales. Such marginal costs can be used to simulate the long term average price formation of energy commodities. Drawing on previous work where a global database of energy resource economic potentials was constructed, this work uses cost distributions of non-renewable resources in order to evaluate global flows of energy commodities. A mathematical framework is given to calculate endogenous flows of energy resources given an exogenous commodity price path. This framework can be used in reverse in order to calculate an exogenous marginal cost of production of energy carriers given an exogenous carrier demand. Using rigid price inelastic assumptions independent of the economy, these two approaches generate limiting scenarios that depict extreme use of natural resources. This is useful to characterise the cur...

  6. Marginal cost of natural gas in developing countries: concepts and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashayekhi, A.

    1983-01-01

    Many developing nations are facing complex questions regarding the best strategy for developing their domestic gas reserves. The World Bank has addressed these questions in studies on the cost and prices of gas and its optimal allocation among different markets. Based on the average incremental method, an estimate of the marginal cost of natural gas in 10 developing countries proved to be $0.61-1.79/1000 CF or $3.59-10.54/bbl of oil equivalent, far below the border prices of competing fuels in these nations. Moreover, the cost of gas is not expected to rise in these countries within the next 20 years while the reserves/production ratios remain high. The sample involves a variety of gas compositions and production conditions among the countries of Bangladesh, Cameroon, Egypt, India, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Thailand, and Tunisia.

  7. Ideas underlying quantification of margins and uncertainties(QMU): a white paper.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, Jon Craig; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Pilch, Martin M.

    2006-09-01

    This report describes key ideas underlying the application of Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU) to nuclear weapons stockpile lifecycle decisions at Sandia National Laboratories. While QMU is a broad process and methodology for generating critical technical information to be used in stockpile management, this paper emphasizes one component, which is information produced by computational modeling and simulation. In particular, we discuss the key principles of developing QMU information in the form of Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty, the need to separate aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in QMU, and the risk-informed decision making that is best suited for decisive application of QMU. The paper is written at a high level, but provides a systematic bibliography of useful papers for the interested reader to deepen their understanding of these ideas.

  8. MNSR transient analyses and thermal-hydraulic safety margins for HEU and LEU cores using PARET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Arne P. [RERTR Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Jonah, S.A. [Centre for Energy Research and Training, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, P.M.B. 1014 (Nigeria)

    2008-07-15

    Thermal-hydraulic performance characteristics of Miniature Neutron Source Reactors under long-term steady-state and transient conditions are investigated. Safety margins and limiting conditions attained during these events are determined. Modeling extensions are presented that enable the PARET/ANL code to realistically track primary loop heatup, heat exchange to the pool, and heat loss from the pool to air over the pool. Comparisons are made of temperature predictions for HEU and LEU fueled cores under transient conditions. Results are obtained using three different natural convection heat transfer correlations: the original (PARET/ANL version 5), Churchill-Chu, and an experiment- based correlation from the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The MNSR, either fueled by HEU or by LEU, satisfies the design limits for long-term transient operation. (author)

  9. Marginal instability threshold condition of the aperiodic ordinary mode in equal-mass plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vafin, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2014-10-15

    The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability for counter-streaming bi-Maxwellian plasma particle distribution functions has recently received renewed attention due to its importance for the solar wind plasma. Here, the analytical marginal instability condition is derived for magnetized plasmas consisting of equal-mass charged particles, distributed in counter-streams with equal temperatures. The equal-mass composition assumption enormously facilitates the theoretical analysis due to the equality of the values of the electron and positron (positive and negative ion) plasma and gyrofrequencies. The existence of a new instability domain of the O-mode at small plasma beta values is confirmed, when the parallel counter-stream free energy exceeds the perpendicular bi-Maxwellian free energy.

  10. Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Executive Summary for 2014 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate Reservoirs for Improved Recovery of Remaining/Al 0.00 0.02 0.04 Eagle Ford Fm #12;#12; Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans

  11. CHARACTERIZATION Volume 1: Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;EFFLUENT CHARACTERIZATION STUDY Volume 1: Report for FRASER RIVER ESTUARY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Report No.: F07201RP.J11 #12;EFFLUENT CHARACTERIZATION STUDY i PREFACE The Fraser River Estuary Resource Inc. (TRI) was contracted to characterize the effluent from eleven industrial sites. Mc

  12. RECONSTRUCTING PALEO-SMT POSITIONS ON THE CASCADIA MARGIN USING MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Joel; Phillips, Stephen

    2014-09-30

    Magnetic susceptibility (?) is a mixed signal in marine sediments, representing primary depositional and secondary diagenetic processes. Production of hydrogen sulfide via anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) at the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) and organoclastic sulfate reduction above the SMT can result in the dissolution of iron oxides, altering ? in sediments in methane gas and gas hydrate bearing regions. We investigated records of ? on the Cascadia margin (ODP Sites 1249 and 1252; IODP Site 1325) using a Zr/Rb heavy mineral proxy from XRF core scanning to identify intervals of primary detrital magnetic susceptibility and intervals and predict intervals affected by magnetite dissolutions. We also measured total sulfur content, grain size distributions, total organic carbon (TOC) content, and magnetic mineral assemblage. The upper 100 m of Site 1252 contains a short interval of ? driven by primary magnetite, with multiple intervals (> 90 m total) of decreased ? correlated with elevated sulfur content, consistent with dissolution of magnetite and re-precipitation of pyrite. In the upper 90 m of Site 1249, ? is almost entirely altered by diagenetic processes, with much of the low ? explained by a high degree of pyritization, and some intervals affected by the precipitation of magnetic iron sulfides. At Site 1325, ? between 0-20 and 51-73 mbsf represents primary mineralogy, and in the interval 24-51 mbsf, ? may be reduced due to pyritization. This integrated approach allows for a prediction of primary ? and the amount of ? loss at each site when compared to actual ? measurements. In the case of magnetite dissolution and full pyritization, these drawdowns in ? are supported by sulfur measurements, and the exposure times of magnetite to hydrogen sulfide can be modeled. The presence of methane and methane hydrates at these sites, as well as large variations in TOC content, suggest that the past migration rates of the SMT and variation in sulfate reduction rates may influence ? alteration along the Cascadia margin.

  13. SU-E-T-36: An Investigation of the Margin From CTV to PTV Using Retraction Method for Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, D; Chen, J; Hao, Y; Liao, C; Huang, Y; Mo, Y; Wei, Y [The People's Hospital of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Nanning, Guangxi (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This work employs the retraction method to compute and evaluate the margin from CTV to PTV based on the influence of target dosimetry of setup errors during cervical carcinoma patients treatment. Methods: Sixteen patients with cervical cancer were treated by Elekta synergy and received a total of 305 KV-CBCT images. The iso-center of the initial plans were changed according to the setup errors to simulate radiotherapy and then recalculated the dose distribution using leaf sequences and MUs for individual plans. The margin from CTV to PTV will be concluded both by the method of retracting (Fixed the PTV of the original plan, and retract PTV a certain distance defined as simulative organization CTVnx. The minimum distance value from PTV to CTVnx which get specified doses, namely guarantee at least 99% CTV volume can receive the dose of 95%, is the margin CTV to PTV we found) and the former formula method. Results: (1)The setup errors of 16 patients in X, Y and Z directions were(1.13±2.94) mm,(?1.63±7.13) mm,(?0.65±2.25) mm. (2) The distance between CTVx and PTV was 5, 9 and 3mm in X, Y and Z directions According to 2.5+0.7?. (3) Transplantation plans displayed 99% of CTVx10- CTVx7 and received 95% of prescription dose, but CTVx6- CTVx3 departed from standard of clinic.In order to protect normal tissues, we selected 7mm as the minimum value of the margin from CTV to PTV. Conclusion: We have test an retraction method for the margin from CTV to PTV evaluation. The retraction method is more reliable than the formula method for calculating the margin from the CTV to the PTV, because it represented practice of treatment, and increasing a new method in this field.

  14. Stereotactic Radiosurgery of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastases: Prospective Evaluation of Target Margin on Tumor Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Adler, John R.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Given the neurocognitive toxicity associated with whole-brain irradiation (WBRT), approaches to defer or avoid WBRT after surgical resection of brain metastases are desirable. Our initial experience with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) targeting the resection cavity showed promising results. We examined the outcomes of postoperative resection cavity SRS to determine the effect of adding a 2-mm margin around the resection cavity on local failure (LF) and toxicity. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 120 cavities in 112 patients treated from 1998-2009. Factors associated with LF and distant brain failure (DF) were analyzed using competing risks analysis, with death as a competing risk. The overall survival (OS) rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method; variables associated with OS were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards and log rank tests. Results: The 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF and DF, with death as a competing risk, were 9.5% and 54%, respectively. On univariate analysis, expansion of the cavity with a 2-mm margin was associated with decreased LF; the 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF with and without margin were 3% and 16%, respectively (P=.042). The 12-month toxicity rates with and without margin were 3% and 8%, respectively (P=.27). On multivariate analysis, melanoma histology (P=.038) and number of brain metastases (P=.0097) were associated with higher DF. The median OS time was 17 months (range, 2-114 months), with a 12-month OS rate of 62%. Overall, WBRT was avoided in 72% of the patients. Conclusion: Adjuvant SRS targeting the resection cavity of brain metastases results in excellent local control and allows WBRT to be avoided in a majority of patients. A 2-mm margin around the resection cavity improved local control without increasing toxicity compared with our prior technique with no margin.

  15. The effects of a marginal intake of magnesium with soy protein concentrate on growth, gestation, and lactation in the rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Cynthia Anne

    1986-01-01

    THE EFFECTS OF A MARGINAL INTAKE OF MAGNESIUM WITH SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE ON GROWTH, GESTATION, AND LACTATION IN THE RAT A Thesis by CYNTHIA ANNE MCLAUGHLIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 19B6 Major Subject: Nutrrtion THE EFFECTS OF A MARGINAL INTAKE OF MAGNESIUM WITH SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE ON GROWTH, GESTATION, AND LACTATION IN THE RAT A Thesis by CYNTHIA ANNE MCLAUGHLIN Approved...

  16. Characterization Theorems by Generalized Indiscernibles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scow, Lynn Cho

    2010-01-01

    5.2 Characterization of NIP T . . . . . . . . .Property 3.3.1 Characterization: sufficiency . . . . .3.3.2 Characterization: necessity . . . . . . 4 Trees 4.1

  17. Empirical Characterization of Camera Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manduchi, Roberto; Baumgartner, Jeremy; Hinsche, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Empirical Characterization of Camera Noise JeremyAbstract. Noise characterization is important for severalprocedure produces a characterization of camera noise as a

  18. Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory at Austin Austin, Texas 78713Austin, Texas 78713--89248924 #12;Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Research Plans for 2012 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate

  19. Analysis of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves A. Denny Ellerman and Annelne Decaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves A. Denny Ellerman the advantages of emissions trading. In this paper, the authors derive MACs from EPPA, the MIT Joint Program the benefits of emissions trading in achieving the emission reduction targets implied by the Kyoto Protocol

  20. Surface uplift, fluvial incision, and geodynamics of plateau evolution, from the western margin of the Central Andean plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schildgen, Taylor F. (Taylor Frances)

    2008-01-01

    The Colca-Majes and Cotahuasi-Ocona rivers in southwest Peru that cut through the western margin of the Andean plateau en route to the Pacific Ocean incised canyons over 3 km deep in response to late Cenozoic surface uplift. ...

  1. Late-Pliocene timing of Corinth (Greece) rift-margin fault migration M.R. Leeder a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Late-Pliocene timing of Corinth (Greece) rift-margin fault migration M.R. Leeder a, , G.H. Mack b Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA c NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG, UK d Geochronology Research Laboratory, New Mexico Bureau

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 29, NO. 1, JANUARY 2014 203 Distribution Locational Marginal Pricing for Optimal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    Marginal Pricing for Optimal Electric Vehicle Charging Management Ruoyang Li, Student Member, IEEE, Qiuwei Wu, Member, IEEE, and Shmuel S. Oren, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--This paper presents an integrated vehicle (EV) loads in future power systems. In the proposed approach, the distribution system op- erator

  3. Project Overview and Motivation Given the burgeoning interest in the Cascadia margin from a variety of NSF-supported

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holbrook, W. Steven

    accessible to the Langseth seismic system on the margin, (3) well-constrained site selection for the future 3D MCS box, (4) a timely "test run" of the open-participation, open-access model for Langseth to the lack of such regional 2-D data. Finally, the sole research vessel capable of completing this work

  4. GLOVEBOX GLOVE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2012-05-14

    A task was undertaken to determine primarily the permeation behavior of various glove compounds from four manufacturers. As part of the basic characterization task, the opportunity to obtain additional mechanical and thermal properties presented itself. Consequently, a total of fifteen gloves were characterized for permeation, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Puncture Resistance, Tensile Properties and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. Detailed reports were written for each characterization technique used. This report contains the summary of the results.

  5. ORISE: Characterization surveys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    objective characterization surveys to define the extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental...

  6. Renewable energy technology characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    1997-12-01

    The Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describe the technical and economic status of the major emerging renewable energy options for electricity supply.

  7. Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 162, 2005, pp. 135146. Printed in Great Britain. Subsidence history of the north Indian continental margin, ZanskarLadakh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    . 135 Subsidence history of the north Indian continental margin, Zanskar­Ladakh Himalaya, NW India R. I of the tectonic subsidence and uplift through the pre- collisional history of the margin have been constructed.2. This model accounts for the general exponential decrease in the backstripped tectonic subsidence. The model

  8. New Views of the U.S. Atlantic Margin Mapped for UNCLOS Applications. James V. Gardner, Larry A. Mayer, Andy Armstrong, University of New Hampshire,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    areas of the lower slope. The large-area mapping required to support an UNCLOS submission, generates for the next generation of continental-margin studies. As part of the U.S. UNCLOS effort, the entire U to channels farther upslope. #12;Failures are common in the northern 80\\% of the margin. Some failures

  9. Stochastic modeling and survival analysis of marginally trapped neutrons for a magnetic trapping neutron lifetime experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. J. Coakley; M. S. Dewey; M. G. Huber; P. R. Huffman; C. R. Huffer; D. E. Marley; H. P. Mumm; C. M. O'Shaughnessy; K. W. Schelhammer; A. K. Thompson; A. T. Yue

    2015-08-10

    In a variety of neutron lifetime experiments, in addition to $\\beta-$decay, neutrons can be lost by other mechanisms including wall losses. Failure to account for these other loss mechanisms produces systematic measurement error and associated systematic uncertainties in neutron lifetime measurements. In this work, we develop a physical model for neutron wall losses and construct a competing risks survival analysis model to account for losses due to the joint effect of $\\beta-$decay losses, wall losses of marginally trapped neutrons, and an additional absorption mechanism. We determine the survival probability function associated with the wall loss mechanism by a Monte Carlo method. Based on a fit of the competing risks model to a subset of the NIST experimental data, we determine the mean lifetime of trapped neutrons to be approximately 700 s -- considerably less than the current best estimate of (880.1 $\\pm$ 1.1) s promulgated by the Particle Data Group [1]. Currently, experimental studies are underway to determine if this discrepancy can be explained by neutron capture by ${}^3$He impurities in the trapping volume. Analysis of the full NIST data will be presented in a later publication.

  10. Shutdown Margin for High Conversion BWRs Operating in Th-233U Fuel Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaniv Shaposhnik; Eugene Shwageraus; Ezra Elias

    2013-09-27

    Several reactivity control system design options are explored in order to satisfy shutdown margin (SDM) requirements in a high conversion BWRs operating in Th-233U fuel cycle (Th-RBWR). The studied has an axially heterogeneous fuel assembly structure with a single fissile zone sandwiched between two fertile blanket zones. The utilization of an originally suggested RBWR Y-shape control rod in Th-RBWR is shown to be insufficient for maintaining adequate SDM to balance the high negative reactivity feedbacks, while maintaining fuel breeding potential, core power rating, and minimum Critical Power Ratio (CPR). Instead, an alternative assembly design, also relying on heterogeneous fuel zoning, is proposed for achieving fissile inventory ratio (FIR) above unity, adequate SDM and meeting minimum CPR limit at thermal core output matching the ABWR power. The new concept was modeled as a single 3-dimensional fuel assembly having reflective radial boundaries, using the BGCore system, which consists of the MCNP code coupled with fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic feedback modules.

  11. Scattered light images of spiral arms in marginally gravitationally unstable discs with an embedded planet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, A; Benisty, M; Ataiee, S; Juhasz, A; Dullemond, C P; Van Boekel, R; Henning, T

    2015-01-01

    Scattered light images of transition discs in the near-infrared often show non-axisymmetric structures in the form of wide-open spiral arms in addition to their characteristic low-opacity inner gap region. We study self-gravitating discs and investigate the influence of gravitational instability on the shape and contrast of spiral arms induced by planet-disc interactions. Two-dimensional non-isothermal hydrodynamical simulations including viscous heating and a cooling prescription are combined with three-dimensional dust continuum radiative transfer models for direct comparison to observations. We find that the resulting contrast between the spirals and the surrounding disc in scattered light is by far higher for pressure scale height variations, i.e. thermal perturbations, than for pure surface density variations. Self-gravity effects suppress any vortex modes and tend to reduce the opening angle of planet-induced spirals, making them more tightly wound. If the disc is only marginally gravitationally stable ...

  12. Margin of Safety Definition and Examples Used in Safety Basis Documents and the USQ Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R. A.

    2013-10-03

    The Nuclear Safety Management final rule, 10 CFR 830, provides an undefined term, margin of safety (MOS). Safe harbors listed in 10 CFR 830, Table 2, such as DOE?STD?3009 use but do not define the term. This lack of definition has created the need for the definition. This paper provides a definition of MOS and documents examples of MOS as applied in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) approved safety basis for an existing nuclear facility. If we understand what MOS looks like regarding Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) parameters, then it helps us compare against other parameters that do not involve a MOS. This paper also documents parameters that are not MOS. These criteria could be used to determine if an MOS exists in safety basis documents. This paper helps DOE, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and its contractors responsible for the safety basis improve safety basis documents and the unreviewed safety question (USQ) process with respect to MOS.

  13. Subsets of Women With Close or Positive Margins After Breast-Conserving Surgery With High Local Recurrence Risk Despite Breast Plus Boost Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupe, Krystine; Truong, Pauline T.; Alexander, Cheryl; Lesperance, Mary; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: (1) To examine the effect of surgical margin status on local recurrence (LR) and survival following breast-conserving therapy; (2) To identify subsets with close or positive margins with high LR risk despite whole breast radiotherapy (RT) plus boost. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 2,264 women with pT1-3, any N, M0 invasive breast cancer, treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast {+-} boost RT. Five-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LR, breast cancer-specific and overall survival (BCSS and OS) were compared between cohorts with negative (n = 1,980), close (n = 222), and positive (n = 62) margins. LR rates were analyzed according to clinicopathologic characteristics. Multivariable Cox regression modeling and matched analysis of close/positive margin cases and negative margin controls were performed. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Boost RT was used in 92% of patients with close or positive margins. Five-year KM LR rates in the negative, close and positive margin cohorts were 1.3%, 4.0%, and 5.2%, respectively (p = 0.001). BCSS and OS were similar in the three margin subgroups. In the close/positive margin cohort, LR rates were 10.2% with age <45 years, 11.8% with Grade III, 11.3% with lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and 26.3% with {>=}4 positive nodes. Corresponding rates in the negative margin cohort were 2.3%, 2.4%, 1.0%, and 2.4%, respectively. On Cox regression analysis of the entire cohort, close or positive margin, Grade III histology, {>=}4 positive nodes, and lack of systemic therapy were significantly associated with higher LR risk. When close/positive margin cases were matched to negative margin controls, the difference in 5-year LR remained significant (4.25% vs. 0.7%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: On univariable analysis, subsets with close or positive margins, in combination with age <45 years, Grade III, LVI, and {>=}4 positive nodes, have 5-year LR >10% despite whole breast plus boost RT. These patients should be considered for more definitive surgery.

  14. An Enhanced In-Vessel Core Catcher for Improving In-Vessel Retention Margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy L. Rempe

    2005-11-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt that may relocate to the lower head of a reactor vessel is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for several advanced light water reactors. A U.S.-Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project has been initiated to explore design enhancements that could increase the margin for IVR for advanced reactors with higher power levels [up to 1500 MW(electric)]. As part of this effort, an enhanced in-vessel core catcher is being designed and evaluated. To reduce cost and simplify manufacture and installation, this new core catcher design consists of several interlocking sections that are machined to fit together when inserted into the lower head. If needed, the core catcher can be manufactured with holes to accommodate lower head penetrations. Each section of the core catcher consists of two material layers with an option to add a third layer (if deemed necessary). The first is a base material that has the capability to support and contain the mass of core materials that may relocate during a severe accident; the second is an oxide coating on top of the base material, which resists interactions with high-temperature core materials; and the third is an optional coating on the bottom side of the base material to protect it from oxidation during the lifetime of the reactor. This paper summarizes results from the invessel core catcher design and evaluation efforts, focusing on recently obtained results from materials interaction tests and prototypic testing activities.

  15. Development of an Enhanced Core Catcher for Improving In-Vessel Retention Margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, J.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Condie, K.G. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Knudson, D.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Suh, K.Y. [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Cheung, F.B. [The Pennsylvania State University (United States); Kim, S.B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-11-15

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt that may relocate to the lower head of a reactor vessel is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for several advanced light water reactors. A U.S.-Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project has been initiated to explore design enhancements that could increase the margin for IVR for advanced reactors with higher power levels [up to 1500 MW(electric)]. As part of this effort, an enhanced in-vessel core catcher is being designed and evaluated. To reduce cost and simplify manufacture and installation, this new core catcher design consists of several interlocking sections that are machined to fit together when inserted into the lower head. If needed, the core catcher can be manufactured with holes to accommodate lower head penetrations. Each section of the core catcher consists of two material layers with an option to add a third layer (if deemed necessary). The first is a base material that has the capability to support and contain the mass of core materials that may relocate during a severe accident; the second is an oxide coating on top of the base material, which resists interactions with high-temperature core materials; and the third is an optional coating on the bottom side of the base material to protect it from oxidation during the lifetime of the reactor. This paper summarizes results from the in-vessel core catcher design and evaluation efforts, focusing on recently obtained results from materials interaction tests and prototypic testing activities.

  16. The North American Atlantic outer continental margin landslides data base: Summary and observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, J.S.; O'Leary, D.W. (Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    A compilation of published data from 179 Quaternary mass movement features was analyzed to determine the common attributes of the slides, to reveal general trends, and to classify and compare slide types. The data set was derived primarily from high-resolution, seismic-reflection data and sidescan-sonar images. In general, evidence of slope failure is found throughout the length of the margin and in all water depths. Slides have occurred on slope angles ranging from 1{degree} to 30{degree} (avg.{approximately}5{degree}); they vary in width from 0.2 to 50 km (avg. {approximately}4 km) and in length from 0.3 to 380 km (avg. {approximately}10 km) and have been reported to be as thick as 650 m. They are slightly more prevalent on open slopes than in other physiographic settings (e.g., canyons, ridges, spurs) and more commonly translational than rotational (i.e., slumps). The slides show no striking affinity for a particular depth range, either in the data set as a whole or when analyzed in terms of physiographic setting, size, slope angle, or other basis for classification. Comparison of slides found on the open slope with those found within canyons shows that the average open slope slide tends to occur at lower slope angles and is much larger (by an order of magnitude) than the average canyon slide. Regardless of the physiographic setting or other characteristic, large-scale slides (area >100 km{sup 2}) rather than small-scale slides (area <10 km{sup 2}) tend to be associated with gentle slopes ({approximately}3-4{degree}) Similarly, slides generated on steep slopes ({>=}10{degree}), regardless of other attributes, tend to be small (avg. area <5 km{sup 2}). With few exceptions, comparisons between slide categories show only minor differences.

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Support and Modeling for the Boiling Water Reactor Station Black Out Case Study Using RELAP and RAVEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diego Mandelli; Curtis Smith; Thomas Riley; John Schroeder; Cristian Rabiti; Aldrea Alfonsi; Joe Nielsen; Dan Maljovec; Bie Wang; Valerio Pascucci

    2013-09-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated. In order to evaluate the impact of these two factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insight to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This report focuses, in particular, on the impact of power uprate on the safety of a boiled water reactor system. The case study considered is a loss of off-site power followed by the loss of diesel generators, i.e., a station black out (SBO) event. Analysis is performed by using a thermo-hydraulic code, i.e. RELAP-5, and a stochastic analysis tool currently under development at INL, i.e. RAVEN. Starting from the event tree models contained in SAPHIRE, we built the input file for RELAP-5 that models in great detail system dynamics under SBO conditions. We also interfaced RAVEN with RELAP-5 so that it would be possible to run multiple RELAP-5 simulation runs by changing specific keywords of the input file. We both employed classical statistical tools, i.e. Monte-Carlo, and more advanced machine learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to quantify changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. We also employed advanced data analysis and visualization tools that helped us to correlate simulation outcome such as maximum core temperature with a set of input uncertain parameters. Results obtained gave a detailed overview of the issues associated to power uprate for a SBO accident scenario. We were able to quantify how timing of safety related events were impacted by a higher reactor core power. Such insights can provide useful material to the decision makers to perform risk-infomed safety margins management.

  18. Soil Carbon Change and Net Energy Associated with Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: A Regional Modeling Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Link, Robert P.; Zhang, Xuesong; Post, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    The use of marginal lands (MLs) for biofuel production has been contemplated as a promising solution for meeting biofuel demands. However, there have been concerns with spatial location of MLs, their inherent biofuel potential, and possible environmental consequences with the cultivation of energy crops. Here, we developed a new quantitative approach that integrates high-resolution land cover and land productivity maps and uses conditional probability density functions for analyzing land use patterns as a function of land productivity to classify the agricultural lands. We subsequently applied this method to determine available productive croplands (P-CLs) and non-crop marginal lands (NC-MLs) in a nine-county Southern Michigan. Furthermore, Spatially Explicit Integrated Modeling Framework (SEIMF) using EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) was used to understand the net energy (NE) and soil organic carbon (SOC) implications of cultivating different annual and perennial production systems.

  19. Deseos de comunidad en el personaje intersticial y marginal: en la novela y el cine de los noventa en México

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno, Jose Antonio

    2010-05-31

    tomar soluciones ante contextos cruciales como son los efectos de los medios de comunicación, las enfermedades pandémicas como el SIDA, la migración y la violencia. Así, el personaje intersticial-marginal proporciona en cada escena cultural una visión... aceptarse, sin caer en contradicción, que el personaje intersticial propone con sus actos deseos utópicos en tiempos que son difíciles de advertirlos. De los efectos ocasionados por el neoliberalismo económico que causaron—en toda América Latina—el peor de...

  20. Three-Dimensional Characterization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    Three-Dimensional Characterization of Microstructure by Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction Anthony D scanning, statistical reconstruction, microscopy, texture, EBSD Abstract The characterization;MOTIVATION We review briefly the motivation for the characterization of materials in three dimen- sions. Most

  1. RECOMMENDED GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;RECOMMENDED GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION IN THE FRASER RIVER BASIN VOLUME II Ont. June 1993 Amended April 1994 #12;GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION PREFACE Ltd., Calgary, Alberta. #12;GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Fraser

  2. Electromagnetics in characterizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Bae-Ian, 1975-

    2003-01-01

    (cont.) Characterization of the differential guided mode of a coupled-strip transmission line allows us to understand its behaviors in high frequency circuit applications. S-parameters of the differential mode of a ...

  3. Tank waste characterization basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.M.

    1996-08-09

    This document describes the issues requiring characterization information, the process of determining high priority tanks to obtain information, and the outcome of the prioritization process. In addition, this document provides the reasoning for establishing and revising priorities and plans.

  4. A model of the methane cycle, permafrost, and hydrology of the Siberian continental margin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Archer, D.

    2014-06-03

    A two-dimensional model of a passive continental margin was adapted to the simulation of the methane cycle on Siberian continental shelf and slope, attempting to account for the impacts of glacial/interglacial cycles in sea level, alternately exposing the continental shelf to freezing conditions with deep permafrost formation during glacial times, and immersion in the ocean in interglacial times. The model is used to gauge the impact of the glacial cycles, and potential anthropogenic warming in the deep future, on the atmospheric methane emission flux, and the sensitivities of that flux to processes such as permafrost formation and terrestrial organic carbonmore »(Yedoma) deposition. Hydrological forcing drives a freshening and ventilation of pore waters in areas exposed to the atmosphere, which is not quickly reversed by invasion of seawater upon submergence, since there is no analogous saltwater pump. This hydrological pump changes the salinity enough to affect the stability of permafrost and methane hydrates on the shelf. Permafrost formation inhibits bubble transport through the sediment column, by construction in the model. The impact of permafrost on the methane budget is to replace the bubble flux by offshore groundwater flow containing dissolved methane, rather than accumulating methane for catastrophic release when the permafrost seal fails during warming. By far the largest impact of the glacial/interglacial cycles on the atmospheric methane flux is attenuation by dissolution of bubbles in the ocean when sea level is high. Methane emissions are highest during the regression (soil freezing) part of the cycle, rather than during transgression (thawing). The model-predicted methane flux to the atmosphere in response to a warming climate is small, relative to the global methane production rate, because of the ongoing flooding of the continental shelf. A slight increase due to warming could be completely counteracted by sea level rise on geologic time scales, decreasing the efficiency of bubble transit through the water column. The methane cycle on the shelf responds to climate change on a long time constant of thousands of years, because hydrate is excluded thermodynamically from the permafrost zone by water limitation, leaving the hydrate stability zone at least 300 m below the sediment surface.« less

  5. Optical Characterization of Plasmonic Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, David Jaeyun

    2012-01-01

    V. Shalaev, Optical Metamaterials (Springer, 2010). L. D.Characterization of Plasmonic Metamaterials by David JaeyunCharacterization of Plasmonic Metamaterials Copyright 2012

  6. The POLARBEAR Experiment: Design and Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kermish, Zigmund David

    2012-01-01

    Beam characterization infocal plane characterization . . . . . . . . . . .5.2.13 Pre-Cedar Flat Receiver Characterization 3.1 Fractional

  7. Surface expression of eastern Mediterranean slab dynamics: Neogene topographic and structural evolution of the southwest margin of the Central Anatolian Plateau, Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schildgen, T. F.

    he southwest margin of the Central Anatolian Plateau has experienced multiple phases of topographic growth, including the formation of localized highs prior to the Late Miocene that were later affected by wholesale uplift ...

  8. The Effect of Digital Die Spacer on the Marginal Fit of Cad Pressed Lithium Disilicate Complete Coverage Copings: An SEM Assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, James

    2015-04-24

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the marginal fit of pressed IPS e.max copings fabricated from a computer-aided designed and milled PMMA acrylic resin burnout coping of various cement spacer thicknesses. ...

  9. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

  10. Analysis and correlation of volcanic ash in marine sediments from the Peru Margin, Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201: explosive volcanic cycles of the north-central Andes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Shirley Dawn

    2007-04-25

    -1 ANALYSIS AND CORRELATION OF VOLCANIC ASH IN MARINE SEDIMENTS FROM THE PERU MARGIN, OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 201: EXPLOSIVE VOLCANIC CYCLES OF THE NORTH-CENTRAL ANDES A Thesis by SHIRLEY DAWN HART Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... MARGIN, OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 201: EXPLOSIVE VOLCANIC CYCLES OF THE NORTH-CENTRAL ANDES A Thesis by SHIRLEY DAWN HART Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  11. Tank characterization reference guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Lorenzo, D.S.; DiCenso, A.T.; Hiller, D.B.; Johnson, K.W.; Rutherford, J.H.; Smith, D.J. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Simpson, B.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Characterization of the Hanford Site high-level waste storage tanks supports safety issue resolution; operations and maintenance requirements; and retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and disposal technology development. Technical, historical, and programmatic information about the waste tanks is often scattered among many sources, if it is documented at all. This Tank Characterization Reference Guide, therefore, serves as a common location for much of the generic tank information that is otherwise contained in many documents. The report is intended to be an introduction to the issues and history surrounding the generation, storage, and management of the liquid process wastes, and a presentation of the sampling, analysis, and modeling activities that support the current waste characterization. This report should provide a basis upon which those unfamiliar with the Hanford Site tank farms can start their research.

  12. Philip Henry Wicksteed's marginal productivity theory of distribution and an investigation of those factors which influenced its formulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garner, Joseph Key

    1970-01-01

    their impoverished state. From these forces Hicksteed conceived the idea of a Labour Church that. would be dedicated to the working man and be the core of his religious activity. The Labour Church only enjoyed a short popularity. From Jevons, Hic'ksteed found... to the development oZ the marginal productivity theory of distribution and those factors that influenced its formulation, but berore turning to these topics, it is necessary to digress into two related discussions. First, a brief sketch will be made of Wicksteed...

  13. A study of beef cattle marketing in Venezuela and the marketing margins between the farm and retail levels of prices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acosta, Sady Ines Borjas-Paez

    1975-01-01

    partial fulf i 1 lment of the recu'. rement i or rhe degree of MASTEF, OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics A STUDY OF B EF' CATTLE M. 'RKEl'lNG :N VENEZUELA AND THE MARKETING MAPGINS BETWEEN THE FVARM AND RETAIL LEVELS Ot... for the period 1960-1972 were studied from the farm through 'retail levels, the variations in price spread were large. Lack of knowledge concerning share of marketing margins has brought inadequate govern- ment policies. The structural demand equation...

  14. Carbonate depositional environments and facies of the shelf margin and outer shelf, Lower Cretaceous Sligo Formation, south Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkland, Brenda Lee

    1986-01-01

    not been described in as much detail. Since the publication" of the facies study by Bebout et al. ( 1981), cores from two new wells along the reef trend have become available. A need exists for a detailed facies model along the shelf margin, for a... SLIGO 18. 48D R 15220 ft I SP I IIES 18, 800 fl TD AES j ( Q AES 16. 810 II TD ) ) I CORED INTERVAL ? TOP HOSSTON 18. 947 It TD 29 NUMBER OF SAMPLES OF EACH LiTHOLOG, ALL WELLS 60 NUMBER OF SAMPLES 20 pe @AC Gp, g( Z&qXO~ &~SXO~ C...

  15. Economic Impacts of Changes in United States Rice Price Variability on Market Efficiency, Marketing Margin and Producer Viability. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, W.R.; Richardson, J.W.; Brorsen, B.W.; Rister, M.E

    1984-01-01

    Station , Texas (Blank P~le fa 0rigiIlat BuDetiDJ "/ ' k ? Econolllic Illlpacts of Changes in United States Rice Price Variability on Market Efficiency, Marketing Margin, and Producer Viability W. R. GRANT, agricultural economist National... recorded. The sharp rise in prices triggered a suspension of domestic marketing quotas for P R I C E DOL/CWT 32.5 - 30.0 - 27.5 25.0 - 22.5 - 20.0 - 17.5 - 15.0 - 12.5 - 10.0 - 7.5 - Texas Mill Thailand Mill , , , , , , the 1974...

  16. Applying reservoir characterization technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lake, L.W.

    1994-12-31

    While reservoir characterization is an old discipline, only within the last 10 years have engineers and scientists been able to make quantitative descriptions, due mostly to improvements in high-resolution computational power, sophisticated graphics, and geostatistics. This paper summarizes what has been learned during the past decade by using these technologies.

  17. WebWorkload Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilles, Craig

    WebWorkload Characterization at a Micro­architectural Level Ramesh Radhakrishnan, Lizy John Laboratory, IBM Austin, TX. #12; Goals of this study n We study the behavior of modernWeb server applications programs to understand how they interact with the underlyingWeb server, hardware and OS under realistic

  18. Expedited Site Characterization Geophysics: Geophysical Methods and Tools for Site Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2009-01-01

    EXPEDITED ITE S CHARACTERIZATION EOPHYSICS G GEOPHYSICALM AND TOOLSFORSITE CHARACTERIZATION NORMAN E. GOLDSTEINExpedited Site Characterization Geophysics CONTENTS

  19. WFPC2 CTE Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew E. Dolphin

    2002-12-04

    The limiting factor of the accuracy of WFPC2 photometry is the CTE loss, which has increased to the level of 50% or more for faint stars at the top of the chips. I describe recent work on characterizing this effect, and provide improved equations for CTE correction. I also examine issues affecting background measurement, which if not done correctly can introduce artificial nonlinearities into photometry.

  20. SU-F-BRD-09: Is It Sufficient to Use Only Low Density Tissue-Margin to Compensate Inter-Fractionation Setup Uncertainties in Lung Treatment?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, K; Yue, N; Chen, T; Millevoi, R; Qin, S; Guo, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In lung radiation treatment, PTV is formed with a margin around GTV (or CTV/ITV). Although GTV is most likely of water equivalent density, the PTV margin may be formed with the surrounding low-density tissues, which may lead to unreal dosimetric plan. This study is to evaluate whether the concern of dose calculation inside the PTV with only low density margin could be justified in lung treatment. Methods: Three SBRT cases were analyzed. The PTV from the original plan (Plan-O) was created with a 5–10 mm margin outside the ITV to incorporate setup errors and all mobility from 10 respiratory phases. Test plans were generated with the GTV shifted to the PTV edge to simulate the extreme situations with maximum setup uncertainties. Two representative positions as the very posterior-superior (Plan-PS) and anterior-inferior (Plan-AI) edge were considered. The virtual GTV was assigned a density of 1.0 g.cm?3 and surrounding lung, including the PTV margin, was defined as 0.25 g.cm?3. Also, additional plan with a 1mm tissue-margin instead of full lung-margin was created to evaluate whether a composite-margin (Plan-Comp) has a better approximation for dose calculation. All plans were generated on the average CT using Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm with heterogeneity correction on and all planning parameters/monitor unites remained unchanged. DVH analyses were performed for comparisons. Results: Despite the non-static dose distribution, the high-dose region synchronized with tumor positions. This might due to scatter conditions as greater doses were absorbed in the solid-tumor than in the surrounding low-density lungtissue. However, it still showed missing target coverage in general. Certain level of composite-margin might give better approximation for the dosecalculation. Conclusion: Our exploratory results suggest that with the lungmargin only, the planning dose of PTV might overestimate the coverage of the target during treatment. The significance of this overestimation might warrant further investigation.

  1. Measurements and Characterization (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Measurements and Characterization that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for Analytical Microscopy, Electro-Optical Characterization, Surface Analysis, and Cell and Module Performance.

  2. Materials Characterization | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Microscopy X-ray Scattering Neutron Scattering Mechanical Properties Thermal Optical Spectroscopy Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Macromolecular Characterization Nuclear...

  3. CARD No. 24 Waste Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARD No. 24 Waste Characterization 24.A.1 BACKGROUND DOE must provide waste inventory information Report (TWBIR), Revisions 2 and 3, which provides waste characterization information specific to DOE solidified waste forms was included. Waste described in TWBIR Revision 3 was primarily characterized through

  4. Workload Characterization Issues and Methodologiesy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calzarossa, Maria Carla

    Workload Characterization Issues and Methodologiesy Maria Calzarossa, Luisa Massari, and Daniele, Italy fmcc,massari,tesserag@alice.unipv.it http://mafalda.unipv.it/ Abstract. Workload characterization for this characterization. The complexity of the new emerging systems and of their workloads makes these approaches quite

  5. RECOMMENDED GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;I RECOMMENDED GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION IN THE FRASER RIVER BASIN VOLUME I CONSULTANTS LTD. Richmond, B.C. June 1993 #12;DEVELOPMENT DOCUMENT FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION 1 PREFACE and the loadings of specific contaminants by characterizing wastewater releases to the Fraser River and its

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF DISCONTINUITIES IN THE SPRIPA GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    of time-scale drift* Characterization of Jointing In orderPaulsson, Rock mass characterization for storage of nuclearDoe, Hydrogeologic characterizations of fractured rocks for

  7. Thorough characterization of a EUV mask

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, G.

    2010-01-01

    SRAM (M! ) thorough characterization Figure 13 shows theresults of a thorough characterization of the SRAM area onFigure 13 Thorough characterization of 32nm technology node

  8. Characterization of Fuel-Cell Diffusion Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunterman, Haluna Penelope Frances

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of Fuel-Cell Diffusion Media by HalunaFall 2011 Abstract Characterization of Fuel-Cell Diffusionpredictive capabilities. Characterization of DM and their

  9. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Waste Characterizat...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Characterization Quality Assurance Project Plan Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Project Plan This document was used to...

  10. TRU waste characterization chamber gloveboxes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D. S.

    1998-07-02

    Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) is participating in the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Transuranic Waste Program in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Laboratory's support currently consists of intrusive characterization of a selected population of drums containing transuranic waste. This characterization is performed in a complex of alpha containment gloveboxes termed the Waste Characterization Gloveboxes. Made up of the Waste Characterization Chamber, Sample Preparation Glovebox, and the Equipment Repair Glovebox, they were designed as a small production characterization facility for support of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This paper presents salient features of these gloveboxes.

  11. Optical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Optical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Optical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) conducts optical characterization of large solar concentration devices. Concentration solar power (CSP) mirror panels and concentrating solar systems are tested with an emphasis is on measurement of parabolic trough mirror panels. The Optical Characterization Laboratory provides state-of-the-art characterization and testing capabilities for assessing the optical surface quality and optical performance for various CSP technologies including parabolic troughs, linear Fresnel, dishes, and heliostats.

  12. Overview of New Tools to Perform Safety Analysis: BWR Station Black Out Test Case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Mandelli; C. Smith; T. Riley; J. Nielsen; J. Schroeder; C. Rabiti; A. Alfonsi; Cogliati; R. Kinoshita; V. Pasucci; B. Wang; D. Maljovec

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA) methodologies couple system simulator codes (e.g., RELAP, MELCOR) with simulation controller codes (e.g., RAVEN, ADAPT). While system simulator codes accurately model system dynamics deterministically, simulation controller codes introduce both deterministic (e.g., system control logic, operating procedures) and stochastic (e.g., component failures, parameter uncertainties) elements into the simulation. Typically, a DPRA is performed by: 1) sampling values of a set of parameters from the uncertainty space of interest (using the simulation controller codes), and 2) simulating the system behavior for that specific set of parameter values (using the system simulator codes). For complex systems, one of the major challenges in using DPRA methodologies is to analyze the large amount of information (i.e., large number of scenarios ) generated, where clustering techniques are typically employed to allow users to better organize and interpret the data. In this paper, we focus on the analysis of a nuclear simulation dataset that is part of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) station blackout (SBO) case study. We apply a software tool that provides the domain experts with an interactive analysis and visualization environment for understanding the structures of such high-dimensional nuclear simulation datasets. Our tool encodes traditional and topology-based clustering techniques, where the latter partitions the data points into clusters based on their uniform gradient flow behavior. We demonstrate through our case study that both types of clustering techniques complement each other in bringing enhanced structural understanding of the data.

  13. Nondestructive material characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive material characterization, such as identification of material flaws or defects, material thickness or uniformity and material properties such as acoustic velocity. The apparatus comprises a pulsed laser used to excite a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer, which sends acoustic waves through an acoustic coupling medium to the test material. The acoustic wave is absorbed and thereafter reflected by the test material, whereupon it impinges on the PZ transducer. The PZ transducer converts the acoustic wave to electrical impulses, which are conveyed to a monitor.

  14. Ferrocyanide waste simulant characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeppson, D.W.; Wong, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    Ferrocyanide waste simulants were prepared and characterized to help assess safety concerns associated with the ferrocyanide sludges stored in underground single-shell waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Simulants were prepared to represent the variety of ferrocyanide sludges stored in the storage tanks. Physical properties, chemical compositions, and thermodynamic properties of the simulants were determined. The simulants, as produced, were shown to not sustain propagating reactions when subjected to a strong ignition source. Additional testing and evaluations are recommended to assess safety concerns associated with postulated ferrocyanide sludge dry-out and exposure to external ignition sources.

  15. Network Characterization Service (NCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Guojun; Yang, George; Crowley, Brian; Agarwal, Deborah

    2001-06-06

    Distributed applications require information to effectively utilize the network. Some of the information they require is the current and maximum bandwidth, current and minimum latency, bottlenecks, burst frequency, and congestion extent. This type of information allows applications to determine parameters like optimal TCP buffer size. In this paper, we present a cooperative information-gathering tool called the network characterization service (NCS). NCS runs in user space and is used to acquire network information. Its protocol is designed for scalable and distributed deployment, similar to DNS. Its algorithms provide efficient, speedy and accurate detection of bottlenecks, especially dynamic bottlenecks. On current and future networks, dynamic bottlenecks do and will affect network performance dramatically.

  16. Characterizing Heavy Ion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene Network ShapingDate:Characterization ofArctic

  17. Radiometer Characterization System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2 Radiometer Characterization System The

  18. ORISE: Characterization surveys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE The 2014Capabilities ORISE technicianCharacterization

  19. Mixed waste characterization reference document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

  20. Mechanical Characterization of Fuel Injector Piezoactuators and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Fuel Injector Piezoactuators and their Piezoceramics Mechanical Characterization of Fuel Injector Piezoactuators and their Piezoceramics 2007 Diesel...

  1. CLEERS Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx Control Fundamentals CLEERS Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx Control Fundamentals 2009 DOE Hydrogen...

  2. Microearthquake Technology for EGS Fracture Characterization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microearthquake Technology for EGS Fracture Characterization; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Microearthquake Technology for EGS Fracture Characterization;...

  3. Characterization of Mesoamerican jade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, R.L.; Sayre, E.V.; van Zelst, L.

    1983-11-23

    Jadeite occurring in the Motague River Valley of Guatemala has been characterized by neutron activation analysis and forms two district, phase-related groups. Comparison of the compositional profiles of Mayan jadeite artifacts reveals many specimens having profiles matching those of the Montagua source. Of particular interest are the large number of jadeite artifacts which show internal similarity yet have compositional patterns which are significantly different from the Montagua samples and Montagua-related artifacts. A few of the analyzed Costa Rican artifacts show patterns similar to those of the Motagua yet the vast majority fall within one of the two Costa Rican compositional groups. When considering the non-Motagua related Mayan artifacts, the analytical approach appears to be sufficiently sensitive so as to distinguish differences between the Chrome-green and Chichen-green material. Even two Honduran site specific groups of albite - cultural jade - form distinct groups.

  4. Photoelectronic characterization of heterointerfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brumbach, Michael Todd

    2012-02-01

    In many devices such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, transistors, etc., the performance relies on the electronic structure at interfaces between materials within the device. The objective of this work was to perform robust characterization of hybrid (organic/inorganic) interfaces by tailoring the interfacial region for photoelectron spectroscopy. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) were utilized to induce dipoles of various magnitudes at the interface. Additionally, SAMs of molecules with varying dipolar characteristics were mixed into spatially organized structures to systematically vary the apparent work function. Polymer thin films were characterized by depositing films of varying thicknesses on numerous substrates with and without interfacial modifications. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) was performed to evaluate a buried interface between indium tin oxide (ITO), treated under various conditions, and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). Conducting polymer films were found to be sufficiently conducting such that no significant charge redistribution in the polymer films was observed. Consequently, a further departure from uniform substrates was taken whereby electrically disconnected regions of the substrate presented ideally insulating interfacial contacts. In order to accomplish this novel strategy, interdigitated electrodes were used as the substrate. Conducting fingers of one half of the electrodes were electrically grounded while the other set of electrodes were electronically floating. This allowed for the evaluation of substrate charging on photoelectron spectra (SCOPES) in the presence of overlying semiconducting thin films. Such an experiment has never before been reported. This concept was developed out of the previous experiments on interfacial modification and thin film depositions and presents new opportunities for understanding chemical and electronic changes in a multitude of materials and interfaces.

  5. Economics and Policies for Carbon Capture and Sequestration in the Western United States: A Marginal Cost Analysis of Potential Power Plant Deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : A Marginal Cost Analysis of Potential Power Plant Deployment by Gary Shu B.S., Electrical Engineering Analysis of Potential Power Plant Deployment by Gary Shu Submitted to the Engineering Systems Division from coal-fired power plants. CCS technology is currently in development and requires higher

  6. Reprinted and updated from: Petroleum Systems of Divergent Continental Margin Basins, edited by Paul Post, 25th Bob S. Perkins Re-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Review of Tectonic Events on the Passive Margin of Eastern North America Martha Oliver Withjack & Roy W the tectonic processes associated with rifting, breakup, and the early stages of seafloor spreading with salt movement also de- veloped after rifting, especially on the Scotian shelf and Grand Banks

  7. Geological and biological heterogeneity of the Aleutian margin (19654822 m) A.E. Rathburn a,b,*, L.A. Levin b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    Geological and biological heterogeneity of the Aleutian margin (1965­4822 m) A.E. Rathburn a,b,*, L a Indiana State University, Geology Program, 179 Science Bldg., Terre Haute, IN 47809, USA b Scripps of Florida, Dept. Geological Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120, USA e The Natural History Museum

  8. Multi-phased uplift of the southern margin of the Central Anatolian plateau, Turkey: A record of tectonic and upper mantle processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bookhagen, Bodo

    Multi-phased uplift of the southern margin of the Central Anatolian plateau, Turkey: A record: Central Anatolian plateau uplift fluvial strath terraces cosmogenic nuclides biostratigraphy channel projection Uplifted Neogene marine sediments and Quaternary fluvial terraces in the Mut Basin, southern

  9. Tectonic features associated with the overriding of an accretionary wedge on top of a rifted continental margin: An example from Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    continental margin: An example from Taiwan Andrew T. Lin a, , Char-Shine Liu b , Che-Chuan Lin a , Philippe,d a Institute of Geophysics, National Central University, Taiwan b Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taiwan c Institute of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taiwan d CPC Corporation, Taiwan

  10. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SOLID EARTH, VOL. 118, 38993916, doi:10.1002/jgrb.50318, 2013 Multiphased tectonic evolution of the Central Algerian margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    penetration seismic profiles allow us to image the sedimentary sequence in the Algerian basin and the crustal structure at the continent-ocean boundary. Modeling of the wide-angle data shows thinning of the basement, from more than 15 km in the continental upper margin to only 5­6 km of oceanic-type basement

  11. Nuclear power plant cable materials : review of qualification and currently available aging data for margin assessments in cable performance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celina, Mathias Christopher; Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2013-05-01

    A selective literature review was conducted to assess whether currently available accelerated aging and original qualification data could be used to establish operational margins for the continued use of cable insulation and jacketing materials in nuclear power plant environments. The materials are subject to chemical and physical degradation under extended radiationthermal- oxidative conditions. Of particular interest were the circumstances under which existing aging data could be used to predict whether aged materials should pass loss of coolant accident (LOCA) performance requirements. Original LOCA qualification testing usually involved accelerated aging simulations of the 40-year expected ambient aging conditions followed by a LOCA simulation. The accelerated aging simulations were conducted under rapid accelerated aging conditions that did not account for many of the known limitations in accelerated polymer aging and therefore did not correctly simulate actual aging conditions. These highly accelerated aging conditions resulted in insulation materials with mostlyinert' aging processes as well as jacket materials where oxidative damage dropped quickly away from the air-exposed outside jacket surface. Therefore, for most LOCA performance predictions, testing appears to have relied upon heterogeneous aging behavior with oxidation often limited to the exterior of the cable cross-section - a situation which is not comparable with the nearly homogenous oxidative aging that will occur over decades under low dose rate and low temperature plant conditions. The historical aging conditions are therefore insufficient to determine with reasonable confidence the remaining operational margins for these materials. This does not necessarily imply that the existing 40-year-old materials would fail if LOCA conditions occurred, but rather that unambiguous statements about the current aging state and anticipated LOCA performance cannot be provided based on original qualification testing data alone. The non-availability of conclusive predictions for the aging conditions of 40-year-old cables implies that the same levels of uncertainty will remain for any re-qualification or extended operation of these cables. The highly variable aging behavior of the range of materials employed also implies that simple, standardized aging tests are not sufficient to provide the required aging data and performance predictions for all materials. It is recommended that focused studies be conducted that would yield the material aging parameters needed to predict aging behaviors under low dose, low temperature plant equivalent conditions and that appropriately aged specimens be prepared that would mimic oxidatively-aged 40- to 60- year-old materials for confirmatory LOCA performance testing. This study concludes that it is not sufficient to expose materials to rapid, high radiation and high temperature levels with subsequent LOCA qualification testing in order to predictively quantify safety margins of existing infrastructure with regard to LOCA performance. We need to better understand how cable jacketing and insulation materials have degraded over decades of power plant operation and how this aging history relates to service life prediction and the performance of existing equipment to withstand a LOCA situation.

  12. 2010 US Lighting Market Characterization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010 U.S. Lighting Market Characterization January 2012 Prepared for: Solid-State Lighting Program Building Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

  13. Please cite this article in press as: Graff Zivin, J.S., et al., Spatial and temporal heterogeneity of marginal emissions: Implications for electric cars and other electricity-shifting policies. J. Econ. Behav. Organ. (2014),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotchen, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    of marginal emissions: Implications for electric cars and other electricity-shifting policies. J. Econ. Behav.elsevier.com/locate/jebo Spatial and temporal heterogeneity of marginal emissions: Implications for electric cars and other emissions per mile than the average car currently on the road. Underlying many of our results

  14. Review of the margins for ASME code fatigue design curve - effects of surface roughness and material variability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2003-10-03

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. The Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of the existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data for carbon and low-alloy steels and wrought and cast austenitic SSs to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of the steels. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on the fatigue life of these steels in air and LWR environments. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are discussed. Data available in the literature have been reviewed to evaluate the conservatism in the existing ASME Code fatigue evaluations. A critical review of the margins for ASME Code fatigue design curves is presented.

  15. Quantifying reactor safety margins: Part 1: An overview of the code scaling, applicability, and uncertainty evaluation methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyack, B.E.; Duffey, R.B.; Griffith, P.; Katsma, K.R.; Lellouche, G.S.; Levy, S.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Wilson, G.E.; Wulff, W.; Zuber, N.

    1988-01-01

    In August 1988, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved the final version of a revised rule on the acceptance of emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) entitled ''Emergency Core Cooling System; Revisions to Acceptance Criteria.'' The revised rule states an alternate ECCS performance analysis, based on best-estimate methods, may be used to provide more realistic estimates of plant safety margins, provided the licensee quantifies the uncertainty of the estimates and included that uncertainty when comparing the calculated results with prescribed acceptance limits. To support the revised ECCS rule, the NRC and its contractors and consultants have developed and demonstrated a method called the Code Scaling, Applicability, and Uncertainty (CSAU) evaluation methodology. It is an auditable, traceable, and practical method for combining quantitative analyses and expert opinions to arrive at computed values of uncertainty. This paper provides an overview of the CSAU evaluation methodology and its application to a postulated cold-leg, large-break loss-of-coolant accident in a Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactor with 17 /times/ 17 fuel. The code selected for this demonstration of the CSAU methodology was TRAC-PF1/MOD1, Version 14.3. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Hydrate characterization research overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, R.D.

    1993-06-01

    Gas hydrate research has been focused primarily on the development of a basic understanding of hydrate formation and dissociation in the laboratory, as well as in the field. Laboratory research on gas hydrates characterized the physical system, which focused on creating methane hydrates samples, tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate samples, consolidated rock samples, frost base mixtures, water/ice-base mixtures, and water-base mixtures. Laboratory work produced measurements of sonic velocity and electrical resistivity of hydrates. As work progressed, areas, such as the Gulf of Mexico and the Guatemala Trench, where gas hydrates are likely to occur were identified, and specific high potential areas were targeted for detailed investigation. The testing of samples and recovered cores from such areas provided information for detection of hydrate formations in the natural environment. Natural gas hydrate samples have been tested for thermal properties, dissociation properties, fracture mechanics, and optical properties. Acoustical properties were investigated both in the laboratory and, as possible, in the field. Sonic velocity and electrical resistivity measurements will continue to be obtained. These activities have been undertaken in hydrate deposits on Alaska`s North Slope, the Gulf of Mexico and the US East coast offshore, as well as other gas hydrate target areas.

  17. Plant Phenotype Characterization System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

    2005-09-09

    This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

  18. Sequence stratigraphy of the late Pleistocene - Holocene deposits on the northwestern margin of the South Caspian Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmanov, Ogtay Rasim

    2004-11-15

    stratigraphy analysis of sedimentary strata from 117,000 years B.P. to present led to the identification of a highstand systems tract, two transgressive systems tracts and six lowstand systems tracts. Each systems tract is characterized by specific seismic...

  19. Multifunctional landscapes: Site characterization and field-scale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pagination 11 Keywords cellulosic biofuels, GHG emissions, marginal lands, nitrate leachate, nutrient recovery, sustainability Abstract Current and future demand for food, feed,...

  20. 167 Prospectus California Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system and associated changes in coastal upwelling. These data will be used to reconstruct north Pacific Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) where the digital data have been archived. #12;INTRODUCTION The California upwelling systems to climate change is poorly documented. Climate models and available paleoceanographic

  1. Secondary Malignancies From Prostate Cancer Radiation Treatment: A Risk Analysis of the Influence of Target Margins and Fractionation Patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dasu, Alexandru; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Franzen, Lars; Widmark, Anders; Nilsson, Per

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: This study explores the implications for cancer induction of treatment details such as fractionation, planning target volume (PTV) definition, and interpatient variations, which are relevant for the radiation treatment of prostate carcinomas. Methods and Materials: Treatment planning data from 100 patients have been analyzed with a risk model based on the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation competition model. The risk model can account for dose heterogeneity and fractionation effects characteristic for modern radiotherapy. Biologically relevant parameters from clinical and experimental data have been used with the model. Results: The results suggested that changes in prescribed dose could lead to a modification of the risks for individual organs surrounding the clinical target volume (CTV) but that the total risk appears to be less affected by changes in the target dose. Larger differences are observed for modifications of the margins between the CTV and the PTV because these have direct impact onto the dose level and dose heterogeneity in the healthy tissues surrounding the CTV. Interpatient anatomic variations also have to be taken into consideration for studies of the risk for cancer induction from radiotherapy. Conclusions: The results have shown the complex interplay between the risk for secondary malignancies, the details of the treatment delivery, and the patient heterogeneity that may influence comparisons between the long-term effects of various treatment techniques. Nevertheless, absolute risk levels seem very small and comparable to mortality risks from surgical interventions, thus supporting the robustness of radiation therapy as a successful treatment modality for prostate carcinomas.

  2. Electricity prices in a competitive environment: Marginal cost pricing of generation services and financial status of electric utilities. A preliminary analysis through 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The emergence of competitive markets for electricity generation services is changing the way that electricity is and will be priced in the United States. This report presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated {open_quotes}cost-of-service{close_quotes} pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers? This study is not intended to be a cost-benefit analysis of wholesale or retail competition, nor does this report include an analysis of the macroeconomic impacts of competitive electricity prices.

  3. Economic recovery of oil trapped at fan margins using high angle wells and multiple hydraulic fractures. Annual report, September 28, 1995--September 27, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemeyer, B.L.

    1997-09-01

    The digital fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economic to develop using verticle wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional verticle wells while maintaining verticle communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three verticle wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

  4. Complete Characterization of Quantum-Optical Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lvovsky, Alexander

    Complete Characterization of Quantum-Optical Processes Mirko Lobino, Dmitry Korystov, Connor characterization and assessment of processes that occur within quantum devices. We present a method for characterizing, with arbitrarily high accuracy, any quantum optical process. Our protocol recovers complete

  5. Stromatolites, ooid dunes, hardgrounds, and crusted mud beds, all products of marine cementation and microbial mats in subtidal oceanic mixing zone on eastern margin of Great Bahama Bank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dill, R.F.; Kendall, C.S.C.G.; Steinen, R.P.

    1989-03-01

    The interisland channels along the eastern margin of the Great Bahamas Bank contain lithified structures that owe their origin to recent marine cementation. This cementation appears to be commonly associated with a complex microbial community of plants and microorganisms living within a bank-margin oceanographic mixing zone. In this region, reversing tidal and wind-driven currents flow up to 3 knots (150 cm/sec) three hours out of each six-hour tidal period. Here, marine-cement crusted, carbonate mud beds are found interbedded within migrating ooid sand bars and dunes and are associated with growing, lithified stromatolites up to 2 m in height. These laminated mud beds are found with thicknesses of up to 1 m in subtidal depths of 4 to 8 m (12 to 25 ft). The muds appear to be homogeneous, but closer examination by SEM and under a microscope reveals they are composed of pelletoid aggregates of needle-shaped aragonite crystals with diameters of up to 50 ..mu... The size of these soft pellets is similar to the smaller grains of ooid sands that are abundant in the area. This size similarity could explain why both the mud beds are found in similar high-energy hydraulic regimes as the ooid sands, but does not suggest how or why the aggregates of pure aragonite needles form. A high production of ooid sand within this bank margin environment permits the formation of natural levees along the margins of tidal channels. The back sides of these levees are being lithified by marine cements to form hardgrounds. Skeletal and ooid sand dunes stabilized by Thallasia in channel bottoms also are becoming lithified. Grapestones form at the distributaries of flood tidal deltas of ooid sand. All of these features have a common attribute: they are continually in contact with the turbulent mixing-zone waters.

  6. A new P-velocity model for the Tethyan margin from a scaled S-velocity model and the inversion of P-and PKP-delay times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Lee, Suzan

    A new P-velocity model for the Tethyan margin from a scaled S-velocity model and the inversion of P- and PKP-delay times Sung-Joon Chang a, , Suzan Van der Lee a , Megan P. Flanagan b a Dept. of Earth Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-205, Livermore, CA 94551, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article

  7. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-02: Can Pre-Treatment 4DCT-Based Motion Margins Estimates Be Trusted for Proton Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seco, J; Koybasi, O; Mishra, P; James, S St.; Lewis, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy motion margins are generated using pre-treatment 4DCT data. The purpose of this study is to assess if pre-treatment 4DCT is sufficient in proton therapy to provide accurate estimate of motion margins. A dosimetric assessment is performed comparing pre-treatment margins with daily-customized margins. Methods: Gold fiducial markers implanted in lung tumors of patients were used to track the tumor. A spherical tumor of diameter 20 mm is inserted into a realistic digital respiratory phantom, where the tumor motion is based on real patient lung tumor trajectories recorded over multiple days. Using “Day 1” patient data, 100 ITVs were generated with 1 s interval between consecutive scan start times. Each ITV was made up by the union of 10 tumor positions obtained from 6 s scan time. Two ITV volumes were chosen for treatment planning: ITVmean-? and ITVmean+?. The delivered dose was computed on i) 10 phases forming the planning ITV (“10-phase” - simulating dose calculation based on 4DCT) and ii) 50 phantoms produced from 100 s of data from any other day with tumor positions sampled every 2 s (“dynamic” - simulating the dose that would actually be delivered). Results: For similar breathing patterns between “Day 1” and any other “Day N(>1)”, the 95% volume coverage (D95) for “dynamic” case was 8.13% lower than the “10-phase” case for ITVmean+?. For breathing patterns that were very different between “Day 1” and any other “Day N(>1)”, this difference was as high as 24.5% for ITVmean-?. Conclusion: Proton treatment planning based on pre-treatment 4DCT can lead to under-dosage of the tumor and over-dosage of the surrounding tissues, because of inadequate estimate of the range of motion of the tumor. This is due to the shift of the Bragg peak compared to photon therapy in which the tumor is surrounded by an electron bath.

  8. Expedited Site Characterization Geophysics: Geophysical Methods and Tools for Site Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2009-01-01

    Site Characterization Geophysics CONTENTS INTRODUCTIONSite Characterization Geophysics SELF-POTENTIAL Referencesand Environmental Geophysics, S. H. Ward, ed. (Soc. Expl.

  9. Reservoir characterization using wavelet transforms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera Vega, Nestor

    2004-09-30

    Automated detection of geological boundaries and determination of cyclic events controlling deposition can facilitate stratigraphic analysis and reservoir characterization. This study applies the wavelet transformation, a recent advance in signal...

  10. Cryogenic characterization of Josephson junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Keith Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenic characterization is a crucial part of understanding the behavior of low-temperature quantum electronics. Reliable device testing provides the feedback to fabrication process development, facilitating the rapid ...

  11. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  12. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Glenview, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL); Diaz, Rocio (Chicago, IL); Vukovic, Lela (Westchester, IL)

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  13. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  14. Low Temperature Performance Characterization | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization Low Temperature Performance Characterization Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in...

  15. Focal Fish Species Focal Fish Species Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Focal Fish Species Focal Fish Species Characterization APPENDIX I This chapter describes the fish selected the focal species based on their significance and ability to characterize the health

  16. Expedited Site Characterization | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expedited Site Characterization Working to save time and money in the characterization of DOE sites, Ames Lab scientists are advancing adoption of innovative technologies along...

  17. Plant Phenotype Characterization System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plant Phenotype Characterization System Plant Phenotype Characterization System New X-Ray Technology Accelerates Plant Research The ability to analyze plant root structure and...

  18. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations This document was used to determine facts and conditions...

  19. DISSERTATION DEVICE CHARACTERIZATION OF CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    DISSERTATION DEVICE CHARACTERIZATION OF CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAICS Submitted by Russell M Reserved #12;ABSTRACT DEVICE CHARACTERIZATION OF CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAICS Thin-film photovoltaics

  20. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 The documents...

  1. Assembly and electrical transport characterization of nanostructures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Assembly and electrical transport characterization of nanostructures. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Assembly and electrical transport characterization of...

  2. Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention/Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells Implantation, Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of...

  3. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the HTML: Surface...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Characterization Capabilities at the HTML: SurfaceSub-surface dislocation density analysis of forming samples using advanced characterization techniques 2011 DOE...

  4. Characterization of Light Scattering in Transparent Polycrystalline Laser Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Saurabh

    2013-01-01

    Loss ………………………………………..…… 7 Characterization of BulkImages, the utility of characterization techniques towardsapplicable towards the characterization of any transparent

  5. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

    2011-06-30

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those ~70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the KG basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m2. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basin is at the low end of glob

  6. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne Trehu; Peter Kannberg

    2011-06-30

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m{sup 2}). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that {approx}50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a 'toe-thrust' ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those {approx}70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the K-G basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m{sup 2}. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basi

  7. Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL.

  8. Characterization of Piezoelectric Materials for Transducers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart Sherrit; Binu K. Mukherjee

    2007-11-16

    Review of techniques for characterizing piezoelectric/electrostrictive material for transducer applications.

  9. Optic probe for semiconductor characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO); Hambarian, Artak (Yerevan, AM)

    2008-09-02

    Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

  10. Evaluation of the Planning Target Volume in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: What Is the Appropriate Expansion Margin in the Setting of Daily Image Guidance?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Donald, Paul J.; Perks, Julian; Purdy, James A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare patterns of disease failure among patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in conjunction with daily image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for head and neck cancer, according to the margins used to expand the clinical target volume (CTV) to create a planning target volume (PTV). Methods and Materials: Two-hundred and twenty-five patients were treated with IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Daily IGRT scans were acquired using either kilovoltage or megavoltage volumetric imaging prior to each delivered fraction. The first 95 patients were treated with IMRT with 5-mm CTV-to-PTV margins. The subsequent 130 patients were treated using 3-mm PTV expansion margins. Results: Two-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and distant metastasis-free survival were 76%, 78%, and 81%, respectively. There were no differences with respect to any of these endpoints among patients treated with 5-mm and 3-mm PTV expansion margins (p > 0.05, all). The 2-year local-regional control rate for patients treated with IMRT with 5-mm and 3-mm PTV margins was 78% and 78%, respectively (p = 0.96). Spatial evaluation revealed no differences in the incidences of marginal failures among those treated with 5-mm and 3-mm PTV margins. Conclusions: The use of 3-mm PTV expansion margins appears adequate and did not increase local-regional failures among patients treated with IMRT for head and neck cancer. These data demonstrate the safety of PTV reduction of less than 5 mm and support current protocols recommending this approach in the setting of daily IGRT.

  11. ROCK MASS CHARACTERIZATION FOR STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WASTE IN GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    m in diameter. 2) geological characterization - includingBasic Objectives Geological characterization Is the process

  12. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the External Auditory Canal and Middle Ear: Treatment Outcomes, Marginal Misses, and Perspective on Target Delineation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Wan-Yu [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Sung-Hsin [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Lu, Szu-Huai; Tsai, Chiao-Ling [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Oncology, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hong, Ruey-Long [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Ya-Fang [Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Lin, Kai-Nan; Ko, Jenq-Yuh; Lou, Pei-Jen; Wang, Cheng-Ping [Department of Otolaryngology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chong, Fok-Ching [Graduate Institute of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chun-Wei, E-mail: cwwang@ntuh.gov.tw [Graduate Institute of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To report outcomes of the rare disease of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the external auditory canal (EAC) and middle ear treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Failure patterns related to spatial dose distribution were also analyzed to provide insight into target delineation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of the records of 11 consecutive patients with SCC of the EAC and middle ear who were treated with curative surgery and postoperative IMRT at one institution between January 2007 and February 2010. The prescribed IMRT dose was 60 to 66 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Three patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and 1 patient received concurrent oral tegafur/uracil. The median follow-up time was 19 months (range, 6-33 months). Results: Four patients had locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year locoregional control rate of 70.7%. Among them, 1 patient had persistent disease after treatment, and 3 had marginal recurrence. Distant metastasis occurred in 1 patient after extensive locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year distant control rate of 85.7%. The estimated 2-year overall survival was 67.5%. The three cases of marginal recurrence were near the preauricular space and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, adjacent to the apex of the ear canal and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, and in the postauricular subcutaneous area and ipsilateral parotid nodes, respectively. Conclusions: Marginal misses should be recognized to improve target delineation. When treating SCC of the EAC and middle ear, care should be taken to cover the glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint and periauricular soft tissue. Elective ipsilateral parotid irradiation should be considered. The treatment planning procedure should also be refined to balance subcutaneous soft-tissue dosimetry and toxicity.

  13. Algorithmic + Geometric characterization of CAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gill, Richard D.

    Algorithmic + Geometric characterization of CAR (Coarsening at Random) Richard Gill - Utrecht but independent) CCAR 3 door problem X=door with car behind Y=two doors still closed = {your first choice, other door left closed} 3 door problem X=door with car behind Y=(your first choice, other door left closed

  14. Characterizing History Independent Data Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartline, Jason D.

    Characterizing History Independent Data Structures Jason D. Hartline 1 , Edwin S. Hong 1 history independent data structures as proposed for study by Teague and Naor [2]. In a history independent data struc­ ture, nothing can be learned from the representation of the data structure except for what

  15. Characterizing History Independent Data Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, Alexander E.

    Characterizing History Independent Data Structures Jason D. Hartline1 , Edwin S. Hong1 , Alexander history independent data structures as proposed for study by Teague and Naor [2]. In a history independent data struc- ture, nothing can be learned from the representation of the data structure except for what

  16. Characterizing Commercial Sites Selected for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as solar thermal absorption chillers, building energy management systems, and advanced lighting. The twoCharacterizing Commercial Sites Selected for Energy Efficiency Monitoring This report presents data of Commercial Sites Selected for Energy Efficiency Monitoring Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office

  17. Geological Characterization of California's Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the various data generated by the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership. The project's goals are to: · Perform a preliminary geologic characterization of the carbon dioxide sequestration of carbon sequestration potential. · For select formations previously studied in the Southern Sacramento

  18. Material stabilization characterization management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GIBSON, M.W.

    1999-08-31

    This document presents overall direction for characterization needs during stabilization of SNM at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Technical issues for needed data and equipment are identified. Information on material categories and links to vulnerabilities are given. Comparison data on the material categories is discussed to assist in assessing the relative risks and desired processing priority.

  19. A Characterization of Seymour Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostochka, Alexandr V.

    A Characterization of Seymour Graphs A. A. Ageev and A. V. Kostochka,* INSTITUTE OF MATHEMATICS undirected graph G is called a Seymour graph if the maximum number of edge disjoint T-cuts is equal to be subfamilies of Seymour graphs (Seymour J. Comb. Theory B 49 (1990), 189­222; Proc. London Math. Soc. Ser. (3

  20. Characterization of 3D Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization of 3D Photovoltaics SEMICONDUCTORS Our goal is to provide industry with test structures and models of next-generation photovoltaics, with an initial focus on cadmium telluride (Cd (nanostructured) photovoltaic devices. Objective Impact and Customers · The U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Roadmap

  1. NANOSCALE STRUCTURALAND MAGNETIC CHARACTERIZATION USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    of novel nanoscale storage devices and sensors. However, for successful utilization, it is essential]. Such unique properties of magnetic thin films and nanostructures hold great promise for the development to the characterization of nanostructured magnetic materials. 2. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY METHODS In the transmission electron

  2. Acoustic Characterization of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinn, D; Huber, R; Chambers, D; Cole, G; Balogun, O; Spicer, J; Murray, T

    2007-03-13

    This report describes the science and engineering performed to provide state-of-the-art acoustic capabilities for nondestructively characterizing mesoscale (millimeter-sized) objects--allowing micrometer resolution over the objects entire volume. Materials and structures used in mesoscale objects necessitate the use of (1) GHz acoustic frequencies and (2) non-contacting laser generation and detection of acoustic waves. This effort demonstrated that acoustic methods at gigahertz frequencies have the necessary penetration depth and spatial resolution to effectively detect density discontinuities, gaps, and delaminations. A prototype laser-based ultrasonic system was designed and built. The system uses a micro-chip laser for excitation of broadband ultrasonic waves with frequency components reaching 1.0 GHz, and a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer for detection. The proof-of-concept for mesoscale characterization is demonstrated by imaging a micro-fabricated etched pattern in a 70 {micro}m thick silicon wafer.

  3. AFIP-6 Characterization Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Dennis D. Keiser

    2011-12-01

    The AFIP-6 (ATR Full-size-plate In center flux trap Position) Characterization Summary Report outlines the fresh fuel characterization efforts performed during the AFIP-6 experiment. The AFIP-6 experiment was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuels at a scale prototypic of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel plates (45-inches long). The AFIP-6 test was the first test with plates that were swaged into the rails of the assembly. This test served to examine the effects of a plate in a swaged condition with longer fuel zones (22.5-inches long), that were centered in the plate. AFIP-6 test plates employed a zirconium interlayer that was co-rolled with the fuel foil. Previous mini-plate and AFIP irradiation experiments performed in ATR have demonstrated the stable behavior of the interface between the U-Mo fuel and the zirconium interlayer.

  4. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  5. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, Daniel R. (17 Eric Alan Lane, Tijeras, NM 87059); Alford, W. J. (3455 Tahoe, N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Gruetzner, James K. (9407 Shoehone, N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed.

  6. Instrumentation for CTA site characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fruck, Christian; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Mandát, Dušan; Schweizer, Thomas; Häfner, Dennis; Bulik, Tomasz; Cieslar, Marek; Costantini, Heide; Dominik, Michal; Ebr, Jan; Garczarczyk, Markus; Lorentz, Eckart; Pareschi, Giovanni; Pech, Miroslav; Puerto-Giménez, Irene; Teshima, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Many atmospheric and climatic criteria have to be taken into account for the selection of a suitable site for the next generation of imaging air-shower Cherenkov telescopes, the "Cherenkov Telescope Array" CTA. Such data are not available with sufficient precision or the comparability to allow for a comprehensive characterization of the proposed sites to be made. Identical cross-calibrated instruments have been developed which allow for precise comparison between sites, the cross-validation of existing data, and the ground-validation of satellite data. The site characterization work package of the CTA consortium opted to construct and deploy 9 copies of an autonomous multi-purpose weather sensor, incorporating an infrared cloud sensor a newly developed sensor for measuring the light of the night sky, and an All-Sky-Camera, the whole referred to as Autonomous Tool for Measuring Observatory Site COnditions PrEcisely (ATMOSCOPE). We present here the hardware that was combined into the ATMOSCOPE and characterize ...

  7. Greenhouse Gas Inventory Uncertainties Need Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Greenhouse Gas Inventory Uncertainties Need Characterization Contact: Gregg Marland, 865 of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted to and removed from the atmosphere are essential for understanding global.S. Department of Energy Greenhouse Gas Inventory Uncertainties Need Characterization Abstract: The assessment

  8. Characterization of Biofilm in 200W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-23679 Characterization of Biofilm in 200W Fluidized Bed Reactors September 2014 MH Lee E ER Eisenhauer SD Saurey EA Cordova BD Lee EC Golovich KE Parker #12;#12;PNNL-23679 Characterization of Biofilm

  9. Collector/Receiver Characterization (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities for collector/receiver characterization: determining optical efficiency, measuring heat loss, developing and testing concentrators, concentrating the sun's power, and optically characterizing CSP plants.

  10. RICE UNIVERSITY Electrical and Optical Characterization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    RICE UNIVERSITY Electrical and Optical Characterization of Molecular Nanojunctions by Daniel R Stanley C. Moore Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Peter Nordlander Professor of Physics and Astronomy Houston, Texas September, 2010 #12;ABSTRACT Electrical and Optical Characterization of Molecular

  11. Characterizations of the Proportional (Reversed) Hazard Class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Characterizations of the Proportional (Reversed) Hazard Class Debasis Kundu Department Abstract In this paper we provide two simple characterizations of the proportional (reversed) hazard class, generalized exponential, Rayleigh, Burr type X, exponentiated Weibull belong to the proportional (reversed

  12. Biomass Catalyst Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Biomass Catalyst Characterization Laboratory (BCCL) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

  13. Characterization of the pitch canker fungus, Fusarium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization of the pitch canker fungus, Fusarium circinatum, from Chile A. Jacobs a*, T and pine. These species are characterized by the typical Fusarium subglutinans (Wollenw. and Reinking and Marasas f. sp. pini Correll et al.] is characterized by the presence of sterile coils and the formation

  14. Skill characterization based on betweenness Ozgur Simsek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Skill characterization based on betweenness ¨Ozg¨ur S¸ims¸ek Andrew G. Barto Department of Computer a characterization of a useful class of skills based on a graphical repre- sentation of an agent's interaction with its environment. Our characterization uses betweenness, a measure of centrality on graphs. It captures

  15. Characterization of Revenue Equivalence Birgit Heydenreich1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandholm, Tuomas W.

    Characterization of Revenue Equivalence Birgit Heydenreich1 Rudolf M¨uller1 Marc Uetz1 Rakesh Vohra strategies by a unique payment scheme is called revenue equivalence. In this paper we give a characterization. The characterization holds for any (possibly infinite) outcome space and many of the known results about revenue

  16. Becoming Mark Antony: A Metabiographical Study of Characterization and Reception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lessie, Alexander James

    2015-01-01

    a Proof and Means of Characterization in Cicero’s Speeches,”A Metabiographical Study of Characterization and Reception AMetabiographical Study of Characterization and Reception by

  17. Characterization of the Biosynthetic Pathway of Fungal Aromatic Polyketides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yanran

    2012-01-01

    2011). Comparative Characterization of Fungal Anthracenone2011). Comparative Characterization of Fungal AnthracenoneCA (2002) Initial characterization of a type I fatty acid

  18. Characterization of Single Barrier Microrefrigerators at Cryogenic Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    at Springerlink.com Characterization of Single Barriercooling) at 100 K. Characterization of Single BarrierThe experimental characterization of single barrier

  19. 2014 WIND POWER PROGRAM PEER REVIEW-RESOURCE CHARACTERIZATION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resource Characterizations March 24-27, 2014 Wind Energy Technologies PR-5000-62152 2 Contents Resource Characterization Inflow Characterization Tasks-Patrick Moriarty, National...

  20. Advanced probabilistic risk analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabiti, Cristian; Alfonsi, Andrea; Mandelli, Diego; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2014-06-01

    RAVEN, under the support of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program [1], is advancing its capability to perform statistical analyses of stochastic dynamic systems. This is aligned with its mission to provide the tools needed by the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) path-lead [2] under the Department Of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability program [3]. In particular this task is focused on the synergetic development with the RELAP-7 [4] code to advance the state of the art on the safety analysis of nuclear power plants (NPP). The investigation of the probabilistic evolution of accident scenarios for a complex system such as a nuclear power plant is not a trivial challenge. The complexity of the system to be modeled leads to demanding computational requirements even to simulate one of the many possible evolutions of an accident scenario (tens of CPU/hour). At the same time, the probabilistic analysis requires thousands of runs to investigate outcomes characterized by low probability and severe consequence (tail problem). The milestone reported in June of 2013 [5] described the capability of RAVEN to implement complex control logic and provide an adequate support for the exploration of the probabilistic space using a Monte Carlo sampling strategy. Unfortunately the Monte Carlo approach is ineffective with a problem of this complexity. In the following year of development, the RAVEN code has been extended with more sophisticated sampling strategies (grids, Latin Hypercube, and adaptive sampling). This milestone report illustrates the effectiveness of those methodologies in performing the assessment of the probability of core damage following the onset of a Station Black Out (SBO) situation in a boiling water reactor (BWR). The first part of the report provides an overview of the available probabilistic analysis capabilities, ranging from the different types of distributions available, possible sampling strategies, and post processing analysis capabilities. The first part of the report provides an extensive description of two major developments introduced this year: adaptive sampling for limit surface sampling and multi variate distributions. The document concludes with a description of the demo case (BWR-SBO) and a discussion of the results obtained.

  1. Baseline Graphite Characterization: First Billet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark C. Carroll; Joe Lords; David Rohrbaugh

    2010-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Graphite Research and Development program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a very high temperature reactor design. To meet this goal, the program is generating the extensive amount of quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the available nuclear graphite grades. In order determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for the latest proposed designs, two main programs are underway. The first, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) program, is a set of experiments that are designed to evaluate the irradiated properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences, and compressive loads. Despite the aggressive experimental matrix that comprises the set of AGC test runs, a limited amount of data can be generated based upon the availability of space within the Advanced Test Reactor and the geometric constraints placed on the AGC specimens that will be inserted. In order to supplement the AGC data set, the Baseline Graphite Characterization program will endeavor to provide supplemental data that will characterize the inherent property variability in nuclear-grade graphite without the testing constraints of the AGC program. This variability in properties is a natural artifact of graphite due to the geologic raw materials that are utilized in its production. This variability will be quantified not only within a single billet of as-produced graphite, but also from billets within a single lot, billets from different lots of the same grade, and across different billets of the numerous grades of nuclear graphite that are presently available. The thorough understanding of this variability will provide added detail to the irradiated property data, and provide a more thorough understanding of the behavior of graphite that will be used in reactor design and licensing. This report covers the development of the Baseline Graphite Characterization program from a testing and data collection standpoint through the completion of characterization on the first billet of nuclear-grade graphite. This data set is the starting point for all future evaluations and comparisons of material properties.

  2. Petroleum characterization by perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senum, G.I.; Fajer, R.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Harris, B.R. Jr. (USDOE Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, Tupman, CA (United States)); DeRose, W.E. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); Ottaviani, W.L. (Chevron U.S.A., Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs), a class of six compounds, were used to help characterize the Shallow Oil Zone (SOZ) reservoir at the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC) at Elk Hills. The SOZ reservoir is undergoing a pilot gas injection program to assess the technical feasibility and economic viability of injecting gas into the SOZ for improved oil recovery. PFTs were utilized in the pilot gas injection to qualitatively assess the extent of the pilot gas injection so as to determine the degree of gas containment within the SOZ reservoir.

  3. Deep structure of the Texas Gulf passive margin and its Ouachita-Precambrian basement: Results of the COCORP San Marcos arch survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culotta, R.; Latham, T.; Oliver, J.; Brown, L.; Kaufman, S. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)); Sydow, M. (Pennzoil, Houston, TX (United States))

    1992-02-01

    This COCORP deep seismic survey provides a comprehensive image of the southeast-Texas part of the Gulf passive margin and its accreted Ouachita arc foundation. Beneath the updip limit of the Cenozoic sediment wedge, a prominent antiformal structure is imaged within the interior zone of the buried late Paleozoic Ouachita orogen. The structure appears to involve Precambrian Grenville basement. The crest of the antiform is coincident with the Cretaceous-Tertiary Luling-Mexia-Talco fault zone. Some of these faults dip to the northwest, counter to the general regional pattern of down-to-the-basin faulting, and appear to sole into the top of the antiform, suggesting that the Ouachita structure has been reactivated as a hingeline to the subsiding passive margin. The antiform may be tied via this fault system and the Ouachita gravity gradient to the similar Devils River, Waco, and Benton uplifts, interpreted as Precambrian basement-cored massifs. Above the Paleozoic sequence, a possible rift-related graben is imaged near the updip limit of Jurassic salt. Paleoshelf edges of the major Tertiary depositional sequences are marked by expanded sections disrupted by growth faults and shale diapirs. Within the Wilcox Formation, the transect crosses the mouth of the 900-m-deep Yoakum Canyon, a principal pathway of sediment delivery from the Laramide belt to the Gulf. Beneath the Wilcox, the Comanchean (Lower Cretaceous) shelf edge, capped by the Stuart City reef, is imaged as a pronounced topographic break onlapped by several moundy sediment packages. Because this segment of the line parallels strike, the topographic break may be interpreted as a 2,000-m-deep embayment in the Cretaceous shelf-edge, and possibly a major submarine canyon older and deeper than the Yoakum Canyon.

  4. Technology Characterizations. Environmental Information Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The Environmental Handbook Series is designed to overcome the deficiency of information utility and transfer. Each of the works in this series brings together information in an area and format that is useful to both public and private sector needs. It is meant to serve as a basic reference document that will stand for a period of time and help to enrich decisionmaking and research in the interface of energy and the environment. This particular handbook deals with environmental characterization data for the energy technologies and presents the data in a format for use by DOE policy analysts. This treatment includes not only the actual information base, but also a preface which explains the present concept, the historical growth of the program, and the new direction for improved utility. The information base, itself, is constantly being enhanced and is republished periodically as necessary. The specific energy systems for which environmental/technology characterization information is provided are grouped as follows: nuclear energy; coal; petroleum; gas; synthetic fuels; solar energy; geothermal energy; and hydroelectricity.

  5. Characterization of protein folding intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, P.S.

    1986-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a protein is encoded in its linear sequence of amino acids. Studies of protein folding are aimed at understanding the nature of this code which translates one-dimensional information to three-dimensions. It is now well-established that protein folding intermediates exist and can be populated significantly under some conditions. A method to characterize kinetic folding intermediates is described. The method takes advantage of the decrease in exchange rates between amide protons (i.e., peptide backbone NH) and solvent water protons, when the amide proton is involved in structure. The feasibility of using amide proton exchange to pulse-label proteins during folding has been demonstrated using (/sup 3/H)-H/sub 2/O. The results with ribonuclease A (RNase A) support a framework model for folding, in which the secondary structure of a protein is formed before tertiary structure changes are complete. Extension of these studies using NMR should permit characterization of early secondary structure folding frameworks.

  6. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

  7. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

  8. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Frank Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to â??real-worldâ?ť materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  9. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Laboratory (LANL) Interface Document More Documents & Publications Central Characterization Program (CCP) Acceptable Knowledge Documentation Central Characterization Program...

  10. Characterization of Instrumental Phase Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Y. Kubo; T. R. Hunter; R. D. Christensen; P. I. Yamaguchi

    2007-04-17

    Atmospheric water vapor causes significant undesired phase fluctuations for the Submillimeter Array (SMA) interferometer, particularly in its highest frequency observing band of 690 GHz. One proposed solution to this atmospheric effect is to observe simultaneously at two separate frequency bands of 230 and 690 GHz. Although the phase fluctuations have a smaller magnitude at the lower frequency, they can be measured more accurately and on shorter timescales due to the greater sensitivity of the array to celestial point source calibrators at this frequency. In theory, we can measure the atmospheric phase fluctuations in the 230 GHz band, scale them appropriately with frequency, and apply them to the data in 690 band during the post-observation calibration process. The ultimate limit to this atmospheric phase calibration scheme will be set by the instrumental phase stability of the IF and LO systems. We describe the methodology and initial results of the phase stability characterization of the IF and LO systems.

  11. Characterization of open cluster remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B Pavani; E. Bica

    2007-04-11

    Despite progress in the theoretical knowledge of open cluster remnants and the growing search for observational identifications in recent years, open questions still remain. The methods used to analyze open cluster remnants and criteria to define them as physical systems are not homogeneous. In this work we present a systematic method for studying these objects that provides a view of their properties and allows their characterization. Eighteen remnant candidates are analyzed by means of photometric and proper motion data. These data provide information on objects and their fields. We establish criteria for characterizing open cluster remnants, taking observational uncertainties into account. 2MASS J and H photometry is employed (i) to study structural properties of the objects by means of radial stellar density profiles, (ii) to test for any similarity between objects and fields with a statistical comparison method applied to the distributions of stars in the CMDs, and (iii) to obtain ages, reddening values, and distances from the CMD, taking an index of isochrone fit into account. The UCAC2 proper motions allowed an objective comparison between objects and large solid angle offset fields. The objective analysis based on the present methods indicates 13 open-cluster remnants in the sample. Evidence of the presence of binary stars is found, as expected for dynamically evolved systems. Finally, we infer possible evolutionary stages among remnants from the structure, proper motion, and CMD distributions. The low stellar statistics for individual objects is overcome by means of the construction of composite proper motion and CMD diagrams. The distributions of remnants in the composite diagrams resemble the single-star and unresolved binary star distributions of open clusters.

  12. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory and HTML User Program Success Stories Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML User Program Success Stories 2012 DOE...

  13. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Carbon Fiber and Composites Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  14. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm01laracurzio.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

  15. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010 -- Washington D.C. lm028laracurzio2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

  16. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review and Peer Evaluation lm028laracurzio2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

  17. Ultrasonic Characterization of Wastes | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrasonic Characterization of Wastes It's commonplace for seeing babies in utero, fish underwater and submarines in the ocean, but now sonar technology will be giving DOE an image...

  18. The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Phosphates...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Phosphates and Layered Manganese Oxides The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Phosphates and Layered Manganese Oxides 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and...

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Cathode Materials | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cathode Materials Synthesis and Characterization of Cathode Materials Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in...

  20. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Waste Certification...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Certification Plan Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Waste Certification Plan This document was used to determine facts and conditions during the Department of...

  1. U-Mo Corrosion Testing and Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    make dense CNT mats Pellet pressing to high green density and then hot pressing Characterization Density Optical Microscopy Thermal conductivity SEM XRD EMTA Models...

  2. Holographic characterization of imperfect colloidal spheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Hannel; Christine Middleton; David G. Grier

    2015-08-07

    We demonstrate precise measurements of the size and refractive index of individual dimpled colloidal spheres using holographic characterization techniques developed for ideal spheres.

  3. Central Characterization Program (CCP), Acceptable Knowledge...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for Los Alamos National Laboratory, TA-55 Mixed Transuranic Waste Streams Central Characterization Program (CCP), Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Los Alamos National...

  4. Central Characterization Program (CCP) TRU Nonconforming Item...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TRU Nonconforming Item Reporting and Control Central Characterization Program (CCP) TRU Nonconforming Item Reporting and Control This document was used to determine facts and...

  5. Measurement and Characterization of NOx Adsorber Regeneration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOx Adsorber Regeneration and Desulfation Measurement and Characterization of NOx Adsorber Regeneration and Desulfation 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Oak Ridge National...

  6. Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technologies - Teaming...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technologies - Teaming with DOE to Develop, Transfer, and Deploy Technologies Ames Laboratory scientists are contributing their expertise...

  7. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Authorized...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Authorized Methods for Payload Control Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Authorized Methods for Payload Control This document was used to determine facts and...

  8. Technical Meeting: Physical Characterization of Connected Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    input on a range of topics including the need for characterization protocols, architecture and boundaries, delivery of services, prioritization, maturity modeling, and...

  9. Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deck, Christian Peter

    2009-01-01

    materials .. 310 CVD OptimizationOptimization and Characterization of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes”, Journal of Electronic Materials,of the material as it appears in “Synthesis Optimization and

  10. Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance of In-Use Diesel Retrofit Technologies from the National Clean Diesel Campaign Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction...

  11. Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    technologies can be designed to utilize the available thermal energy from a combined heat and power (CHP) system. This technology characterization is intended to provide...

  12. Evaluation and Characterization of Lightweight Materials: Success...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML User Program Success Stories Characterization of Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction and Infrared Imaging Techniques...

  13. High Throughput Materials Characterization John M. Gregoire

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    White Paper for Establishing a User Facility for Synchrotron-based High Throughput Materials Characterization John M. Gregoire 1 , Matthew J. Kramer 2 , Apurva Mehta 3 1 Joint...

  14. Physical Description and Experimental Characterization of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Physical Description and Experimental Characterization of the Resistive Switching Filament. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Physical Description and Experimental...

  15. Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers In The Virginia Blue Ridge And Piedmont Provinces Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  16. Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with form History Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  17. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

  18. High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

  19. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and References report. The documents were examined and used to develop the final report. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF)Technical...

  20. Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials...

  1. Characterization of Catalysts for Aftertreatment and Biomass...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalysts for Aftertreatment and Biomass-derived Fuels: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Characterization of Catalysts for...

  2. The Terre Haute Door Company (THDC) designs three types of steel doors: Standard, High Security, and Maximum Security. Each door requires different amounts of machine and labor time and has different profit margins; this

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, David

    margins; this information is given in the following table. Machine 1 Machine 2 Hours Manpower Hours to it only 120 hours per week on machine 1 and 100 hours on machine 2 before required maintenance, and 280 hours of manpower available per week. Write a linear program that determines how many of each door

  3. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

  4. THERMOGRAVIMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2012-02-29

    An experimental project was initiated to characterize mass loss when heating different polymer glovebox glove material samples to three elevated temperatures, 90, 120, and 150 C. Samples from ten different polymeric gloves that are being considered for use in the tritium gloveboxes were tested. The intent of the study was to determine the amount of material lost. These data will be used in a subsequent study to characterize the composition of the material lost. One goal of the study was to determine which glove composition would least affect the glovebox atmosphere stripper system. Samples lost most of the mass in the initial 60 minutes of thermal exposure and as expected increasing the temperature increased the mass loss and shortened the time to achieve a steady state loss. The most mass loss was experienced by Jung butyl-Hypalon{reg_sign} at 146 C with 12.9% mass loss followed by Piercan Hypalon{reg_sign} at 144 C with 11.4 % mass loss and Jung butyl-Viton{reg_sign} at 140 C with 5.2% mass loss. The least mass loss was experienced by the Jung Viton{reg_sign} and the Piercan polyurethane. Unlike the permeation testing (1) the vendor and fabrication route influences the amount of gaseous species that is evolved. Additional testing to characterize these products is recommended. Savannah River Site (SRS) has many gloveboxes deployed in the Tritium Facility. These gloveboxes are used to protect the workers and to ensure a suitable environment in which to handle tritium gas products. The gas atmosphere in the gloveboxes is purified using a stripper system. The process gas strippers collect molecules that may have hydrogen or its isotopes attached, e.g., waters of hydration, acids, etc. Recently, sulfur containing compounds were detected in the stripper system and the presence of these compounds accelerates the stripper system's aging process. This accelerated aging requires the strippers to be replaced more often which can impact the facility's schedule and operational cost. It was posited that sulfur bearing and other volatile compounds were derived from glove off-gassing. Due to the large number of gloves in the facility, small mass loss from each glove could result in a significant total mass of undesirable material entering the glovebox atmosphere and subsequently the stripper system. A thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) study was conducted to determine the amount of low temperature volatiles that may be expected to offgas from the gloves. The data were taken on relatively small samples but are normalized with respect to the sample's surface area. Additional testing is needed to determine the composition of the off-gassing species. The TGA study was conducted to ascertain the magnitude of the issue and to determine if further experimentation is warranted or necessary.

  5. GEOMECHANICAL MODELING AS A RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOMECHANICAL MODELING AS A RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TOOL AT RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN _______________ ____________________ Dr. Terence K. Young Department Head Department of Geophysics ii #12;ABSTRACT Geomechanics is a powerful reservoir characterization tool. Geomechanical modeling is used here to understand how the in

  6. Characterization monitoring & sensor technology crosscutting program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the OFfice of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60).

  7. Adaptive characterization of coherent states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markku P. V. Stenberg; Kevin Pack; Frank K. Wilhelm

    2015-08-18

    We present methods for efficient characterization of an optical coherent state $|\\alpha\\rangle$. We choose measurement settings adaptively and stochastically, based on data while it is collected. Our algorithm divides the estimation in two distinct steps: (i) Before the first detection of vacuum state, the probability of choosing a measurement setting is proportional to detecting vacuum with the setting, which makes using too similar measurement settings twice unlikely and (ii) after the first detection of vacuum, we focus measurements in the region where vacuum is most likely to be detected. In step (i) [(ii)] the detection of vacuum (a photon) has a significantly larger effect on the shape of the posterior probability distribution of $\\alpha$. Compared to nonadaptive schemes, our method makes the number of measurement shots required to achieve certain level of accuracy smaller approximately by a factor proportional to the area describing the initial uncertainty of $\\alpha$ in phase space. While this algorithm is not directly robust against readout errors, we make it such by introducing repeated measurements in the step (i).

  8. Lorentz-Force Hydrophone Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Gilles, Bruno; Poizat, Adrien; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lafon, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    A Lorentz-force hydrophone consists of a thin wire placed inside a magnetic field. When under the influence of an ultrasound pulse, the wire vibrates and an electrical signal is induced by the Lorentz force that is proportional to the pulse amplitude. In this study a compact prototype of such a hydrophone is introduced and characterized, and the hydrodynamic model previously developed is refined. It is shown that the wire tension has a negligible effect on the measurement of pressure. The frequency response of the hydrophone reaches 1 MHz for wires with a diameter ranging between 70 and 400 \\micro m. The hydrophone exhibits a directional response such that the signal amplitude differs by less than 3dB as the angle of the incident ultrasound pulse varies from -20$^o$ and +20$^o$. The linearity of the measured signal is confirmed across the 50 kPa to 10 MPa pressure range, and an excellent resistance to cavitation is observed. This hydrophone is of interest for high pressure ultrasound measurements including Hi...

  9. Uranium mill ore dust characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knuth, R.H.; George, A.C.

    1980-11-01

    Cascade impactor and general air ore dust measurements were taken in a uranium processing mill in order to characterize the airborne activity, the degree of equilibrium, the particle size distribution and the respirable fraction for the /sup 238/U chain nuclides. The sampling locations were selected to limit the possibility of cross contamination by airborne dusts originating in different process areas of the mill. The reliability of the modified impactor and measurement techniques was ascertained by duplicate sampling. The results reveal no significant deviation from secular equilibrium in both airborne and bulk ore samples for the /sup 234/U and /sup 230/Th nuclides. In total airborne dust measurements, the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides were found to be depleted by 20 and 25%, respectively. Bulk ore samples showed depletions of 10% for the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides. Impactor samples show disequilibrium of /sup 226/Ra as high as +-50% for different size fractions. In these samples the /sup 226/Ra ratio was generally found to increase as particle size decreased. Activity median aerodynamic diameters of the airborne dusts ranged from 5 to 30 ..mu..m with a median diameter of 11 ..mu..m. The maximum respirable fraction for the ore dusts, based on the proposed International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) definition of pulmonary deposition, was < 15% of the total airborne concentration. Ore dust parameters calculated for impactor duplicate samples were found to be in excellent agreement.

  10. USING 3D COMPUTER MODELING, BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS, AND HIGH CAPACITY PUMPS TO RESTORE PRODUCTION TO MARGINAL WELLS IN THE EAST TEXAS FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.L. Bassett

    2003-06-09

    Methods for extending the productive life of marginal wells in the East Texas Field were investigated using advanced computer imaging technology, geophysical tools, and selective perforation of existing wells. Funding was provided by the Department of Energy, TENECO Energy and Schlumberger Wireline and Testing. Drillers' logs for more than 100 wells in proximity to the project lease were acquired, converted to digital format using a numerical scheme, and the data were used to create a 3 Dimensional geological image of the project site. Using the descriptive drillers' logs in numerical format yielded useful cross sections identifying the Woodbine Austin Chalk contact and continuity of sand zones between wells. The geological data provided information about reservoir continuity, but not the amount of remaining oil, this was obtained using selective modern logs. Schlumberger logged the wells through 2 3/8 inch tubing with a new slimhole Reservoir Saturation Tool (RST) which can measure the oil and water content of the existing porosity, using neutron scattering and a gamma ray spectrometer (GST). The tool provided direct measurements of elemental content yielding interpretations of porosity, lithology, and oil and water content, confirming that significant oil saturation still exists, up to 50% in the upper Woodbine sand. Well testing was then begun and at the end of the project new oil was being produced from zones abandoned or bypassed more than 25 years ago.

  11. Hydrogeologic characterization of Illinois wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miner, J.J.; Miller, M.V.; Rorick, N.L.; Fucciolo, C.S. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01

    The Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), under contract from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), is evaluating a series of selected wetlands and sites proposed for wetland construction and/or restoration. The program is associated with wetland mitigation for unavoidable effects of state highway construction. The goal of this ongoing program is: (1) to collect commonly lacking geologic, geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical data from various wetland sites; and (2) to create a database of this information for use by government agencies and the private sector. Some of the potential uses of this database include: (1) determination of history, role, and possible life cycle of various wetland types allowing more effective design criteria; (2) functional comparison of constructed or restored wetlands versus natural wetlands; (3) testing of wetland hypotheses and delineation techniques under a variety of known hydrogeologic conditions in Illinois; (4) hydrogeologic assessment of potential mitigation sites against a suite of known sites; and (5) determination of data and collection methods appropriate for hydrogeologic wetland studies. A series of tasks is required to complete each study. Historical information is collected from ISGS records, including data regarding topography, soils, sediments, bedrock, and local well records. A field-testing plan is prepared, which includes goals of the study, methods, research potential, and potential results. An initial report is prepared after geologic and geochemical characterization and the installation of needed ground water monitoring wells and surface water gauges. After one year of water-level monitoring, a final report is prepared regarding the present conditions of a site. Further monitoring may be required to determine the performance at constructed and/or restored sites.

  12. Double tracks test site characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the results of site characterization activities performed at the Double Tracks Test Site, located on Range 71 North, of the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) in southern Nevada. Site characterization activities included reviewing historical data from the Double Tracks experiment, previous site investigation efforts, and recent site characterization data. The most recent site characterization activities were conducted in support of an interim corrective action to remediate the Double Tracks Test Site to an acceptable risk to human health and the environment. Site characterization was performed using a phased approach. First, previously collected data and historical records sere compiled and reviewed. Generalized scopes of work were then prepared to fill known data gaps. Field activities were conducted and the collected data were then reviewed to determine whether data gaps were filled and whether other areas needed to be investigated. Additional field efforts were then conducted, as required, to adequately characterize the site. Characterization of the Double Tracks Test Site was conducted in accordance with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER).

  13. Tectonic signatures on active margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogarth, Leah Jolynn

    2010-01-01

    record: in?uence of glacial melting rates on the Youngerrecord: influence of glacial melting rates on the Youngerrecord: influence of glacial melting rates on the Younger

  14. Tectonic signatures on active margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogarth, Leah Jolynn

    2010-01-01

    fundamentals of sequence stratigraphy and key definitions.Eds. ), Sequence Stratigraphy and Facies AssociationsGeometry, facies and Sequence stratigraphy. International

  15. Tectonic signatures on active margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogarth, Leah Jolynn

    2010-01-01

    No. 33, pp. 25–40. Tulsa, Oklahoma. Gardner, J.B. ,to hydrocarbon exploration: Tulsa, Oklahoma, Americanto hydrocarbon exploration: Tulsa, Oklahoma, American

  16. Tectonic signatures on active margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogarth, Leah Jolynn

    2010-01-01

    Thompson, S. , 1977. Seismic stratigraphy and global changesThompson, 1977, Seismic stratigraphy and global changes ofThompson, 1977. Seismic stratigraphy and global changes of

  17. Tectonic signatures on active margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogarth, Leah Jolynn

    2010-01-01

    6). Most likely, wave and tidal energy ef?ciently reworksphysiography, tidal and wave energy, and dominant sediment

  18. Tectonic signatures on active margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogarth, Leah Jolynn

    2010-01-01

    Seismic stratigraphy - applications to hydrocarbon exploration:Seismic stratigraphy - applications to hydrocarbon exploration:Seismic stratigraphy - applications to hydrocarbon exploration:

  19. Core disruptive accident margin seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garin, John (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for sealing the annulus defined between a substantially cylindrical rotatable first riser assembly and plug combination disposed in a substantially cylindrical second riser assembly and plug combination of a nuclear reactor system. The apparatus comprises a flexible metal member having a first side attached to one of the riser components and a second side extending toward the other riser component and an actuating mechanism attached to the flexible metal member while extending to an accessible location. When the actuating mechanism is not activated, the flexible metal member does not contact the other riser component thus allowing the free rotation of the riser assembly and plug combination. When desired, the actuating mechanism causes the second side of the flexible metal member to contact the other riser component thereby sealing the annulus between the components.

  20. Tectonic signatures on active margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogarth, Leah Jolynn

    2010-01-01

    Eds. ), Sequence Stratigraphy and Facies Associationsfundamentals of sequence stratigraphy and key definitions.deformation and sequence stratigraphy of the continental

  1. Tectonic signatures on active margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogarth, Leah Jolynn

    2010-01-01

    1977. Seismic stratigraphic interpretation of depositionallocation and seismic lines shown. (For interpretation of the

  2. Calculating the Adequacy Reserve Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    April 17, 2015 RPM #12;GENESYS vs. RPM · GENESYS · Assesses power supply adequacy for 1 year RPM 80-Year Hydro Yes Yes Wind variation Yes, temp correlated No Solar variation No No Thermal Forced capacity and energy · Hydro · Energy: FELCC (1937 hydro year generation) · Capacity: 10-hour sustained peak

  3. Variational Algorithms for Marginal MAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Q; Ihler, A

    2013-01-01

    2004. A. L. Yuille. CCCP algorithms to minimize the BetheA tutorial on MM algorithms. The American Statistician, 1(time approximation algorithms for the ising model. SIAM

  4. On the Margin | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a commercial mammography unit, is already applying silicon photomultipliers to plant and animal imaging. This is a technology that will be deployed on a large scale in the GlueX...

  5. Tectonic signatures on active margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogarth, Leah Jolynn

    2010-01-01

    behavior of the barrier-island system between Fire Islandand evolution of barrier-island systems (Belknap and Kraft,

  6. Tectonic signatures on active margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogarth, Leah Jolynn

    2010-01-01

    submarine canyons. Sedimentology 50 (4), 625–637. McNinch,SEPM, Concepts in Sedimentology and Paleontology, vol. 7.aggradational phase. Sedimentology 54, 207-221. Swift, D. J.

  7. Loss characterization in microLoss characterization in micro--cavitiescavities using the thermalusing the thermal bistabilitybistability effecteffect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss characterization in microLoss characterization in micro--cavitiescavities using Scattering limited Q #12;Quick Test for Loss CharacterizationQuick Test for Loss Characterization #12 to characterize different loss mechanisms in these structuresdifferent loss mechanisms in these structures nn

  8. Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans for 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate Reservoirs for Improved Recovery of Remaining Hydrocarbons Charles#12; Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans for 2013 Outcrop for heavy oil deposits within the Canadian Grosmont Formation. #12;iii Reservoir Characterization Research

  9. Characterization of Shape Memory Alloys Using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    1 Characterization of Shape Memory Alloys Using Artificial Neural Networks Jim Henrickson, Kenton ­ Generate Training Data ­ Train Artificial Neural Network Results Conclusion Characterization of Shape Characterization of Shape Memory Alloys Using Artificial Neural Networks Jim Henrickson, Kenton Kirkpatrick, Dr

  10. Apparatus and method for characterizing ultrafast polarization varying optical pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smirl, Arthur (1020 Cherry La. Northwest, Iowa City, IA 52240); Trebino, Rick P. (425 Mulqueeny St., Livermore, CA 94550)

    1999-08-10

    Practical techniques are described for characterizing ultrafast potentially ultraweak, ultrashort optical pulses. The techniques are particularly suited to the measurement of signals from nonlinear optical materials characterization experiments, whose signals are generally too weak for full characterization using conventional techniques.

  11. Characterization of Semiconducting Materials Shuji Hasegawa and Masahiko Tomitori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    18 Characterization of Semiconducting Materials Shuji Hasegawa and Masahiko Tomitori Since scanning probe microscopy (SPM) enables characterizations of surface structures, dynamical processes as a characterization tool for semiconductors. First, SPM is quite surface-sensitive, which means, reversely

  12. Characterization of dipping fractures in transversely isotropic background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    Characterization of dipping fractures in transversely isotropic background Vladimir Grechka incidence becomes dependent on fracture infill (saturation). A complete medium-characterization procedure for the vertical and NMO velocities. Keywords.--fracture characterization, azimuthal anisotropy, multicomponent

  13. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Lipoprotein in Fusobacterium nucleatum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Aida

    2015-01-01

    W. , Lux, R. (2014). Characterization of aid1, a novel geneShi, W. , Lux, R. Characterization of a novel gene involvedLux, R. , Shi, W. Characterization of a novel gene involved

  14. Pedestrian flow characterization based on spatio-temporal Voronoi tessellations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    Pedestrian flow characterization based on spatio- temporal Voronoi tessellations Marija Nikoli Conference Monte Veritŕ / Ascona, April 15 ­ 17, 2015 #12;Pedestrian flow characterization based on spatio-temporal Voronoi tessellations Transport and Mobility Laboratory, EPFL Pedestrian flow characterization based

  15. Scanning Electron Microscopes in Materials Characterization ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scanning Electron Microscopes in Materials Characterization Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in...

  16. Alexandria Digital Library Project Content Access Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janée, Greg

    Alexandria Digital Library Project Content Access Characterization in Digital Libraries Greg Janée · James Frew · David Valentine University of California, Santa Barbara #12;Alexandria Digital Library environments e.g., GIS #12;Alexandria Digital Library Project Janée, Frew, Valentine · Content Access

  17. Characterization of Tri-lab Tantalum Plate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Deibler, Lisa Anne; Chen, Shu-Rong; Michael, Joseph R.

    2014-09-01

    This report provides a detailed characterization Tri-lab Tantalum (Ta) plate jointly purchased from HCStark Inc. by Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Data in this report was compiled from series of material and properties characterization experiments carried out at Sandia (SNL) and Los Alamos (LANL) Laboratories through a leveraged effort funded by the C2 campaign. Results include microstructure characterization detailing the crystallographic texture of the material and an increase in grain size near the end of the rolled plate. Mechanical properties evaluations include, compression cylinder, sub-scale tension specimen, micohardness and instrumented indentation testing. The plate was found to have vastly superior uniformity when compare with previously characterized wrought Ta material. Small but measurable variations in microstructure and properties were noted at the end, and at the top and bottom edges of the plate.

  18. Stability vs. Activity: Characterizing Strontium Ruthenate Crystals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    characterized a new electrolyser catalyst with the potential to improve the production of hydrogen for input into fuel cells. Their study is the first to focus on methods for...

  19. Experimental characterization of foam drainage and stability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheth, Vikas Rameshchandra

    1993-01-01

    A novel experimental procedure to characterize the stability of foams is established. The procedure involves the unsteady state drainage of liquid from a stationary foam due to an applied pressure difference (forced drainage)- Unlike other bulk...

  20. Electromagnetic Characterization of MIMO Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heath Jr., - Robert W.

    Electromagnetic Characterization of MIMO Communication Systems Kapil R. Dandekar, Sumant Kawale) wireless communication links [1, 2]. Systems with MIMO communication links use multiple antenna arrays, one generation mobile cellular systems [9]. The theoretical capabilities of MIMO communication links have been

  1. Advanced Tools For Characterizing HMA Fatigue Resistance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, James Jefferies

    2011-02-22

    Accurately and efficiently characterizing the material properties of hot mix asphalt (HMA) is critical to the design and development of pavements that can experience repeated loading for long periods of time and resist ...

  2. ANTI-CANCER NANOPARTICLE SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANTI-CANCER NANOPARTICLE SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION Fan Mei1 , Da-Ren Chen2 and Yin-Nan Lee1 1, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) from Green tea, Irresa and resveratrol have been shown to exhibit cancer

  3. Study of induced seismicity for reservoir characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Junlun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of the thesis is to characterize the attributes of conventional and unconventional reservoirs through passive seismicity. The dissertation is comprised of the development and applications of three new methods, ...

  4. Towards an integrated materials characterization toolbox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Ian M.

    The material characterization toolbox has recently experienced a number of parallel revolutionary advances, foreshadowing a time in the near future when material scientists can quantify material structure evolution across ...

  5. Characterization of light weight composite proppants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Mandar Chaitanya

    2009-05-15

    The research objectives are to develop experimental and computational techniques to characterize and to study the influence of polymer coating on the mechanical response of walnut shell particles to be used as proppants. E3-ESEM and Zeiss Axiophot...

  6. Prospective Study Evaluating Postoperative Radiotherapy Plus 2-Year Androgen Suppression for Post-Radical Prostatectomy Patients With Pathologic T3 Disease and/or Positive Surgical Margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)], E-mail: choo.c@mayo.edu; Danjoux, Cyril; Gardner, Sandra; Morton, Gerard; Szumacher, Ewa; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Cheung, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pearse, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a combined approach of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) plus 2-year androgen suppression (AS) for patients with pathologic T3 disease (pT3) and/or positive surgical margins (PSM) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients with pT3 and/or PSM after RP were treated with RT plus 2-year AS, as per a pilot, prospective study. Androgen suppression started within 1 month after the completion of RT and consisted of nilutamide for 4 weeks and buserelin acetate depot subcutaneously every 2 months for 2 years. Relapse-free rate, including freedom from prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse, was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression analysis was performed to evaluate prognostic factors for relapse. Prostate-specific antigen relapse was defined as a PSA rise above 0.2 ng/mL, with two consecutive increases over a minimum of 3 months. Results: The median age was 61 years at the time of RP. The median interval between RP and postoperative RT was 4.2 months. Forty-nine patients had undetectable PSA (<0.2 ng/mL), and 29 had persistently detectable postoperative PSA at the time of the protocol treatment. Median follow-up from RT was 6.4 years. Relapse-free rates at 5 and 7 years were 94.4% and 86.3%, respectively. Survival rates were 96% at 5 years and 93.1% at 7 years. On Cox regression analysis, persistently detectable postoperative PSA and pT3b-T4 were significant predictors for relapse. Conclusion: The combined treatment of postoperative RT plus 2-year AS yielded encouraging results for patients with pT3 and/or PSM and warrants a confirmatory study.

  7. MNSR transient analyses and thermal hydraulic safety margins for HEU and LEU cores using the RELAP5-3D code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, F.E.; Thomas, J.; Liaw, J.; Matos, J.E. [RERTR Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    For safety analyses to support conversion of MNSR reactors from HEU fuel to LEU fuel, a RELAP5-3D model was set up to simulate the entire MNSR system. This model includes the core, the beryllium reflectors, the water in the tank and the water in the surrounding pool. The MCNP code was used to obtain the power distributions in the core and to obtain reactivity feedback coefficients for the transient analyses. The RELAP5-3D model was validated by comparing measured and calculated data for the NIRR-1 reactor in Nigeria. Comparisons include normal operation at constant power and a 3.77 mk rod withdrawal transient. Excellent agreement was obtained for core coolant inlet and outlet temperatures for operation at constant power, and for power level, coolant inlet temperature, and coolant outlet temperature for the rod withdrawal transient. In addition to the negative reactivity feedbacks from increasing core moderator and fuel temperatures, it was necessary to calculate and include positive reactivity feedback from temperature changes in the radial beryllium reflector and changes in the temperature and density of the water in the tank above the core and at the side of the core. The validated RELAP5-3D model was then used to analyze 3.77 mk rod withdrawal transients for LEU cores with two UO{sub 2} fuel pin designs. The impact of cracking of oxide LEU fuel is discussed. In addition, steady-state power operation at elevated power levels was evaluated to determine steady-state safety margins for onset of nucleate boiling and for onset of significant voiding. (author)

  8. SA3654 Component characterization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meir, G.W.

    1996-06-01

    AlliedSignal Inc., Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T), was provided with production capability assurance program (PCAP) funding to develop, characterize, and qualify purchased product components for use on the PRESS-A program. The SA3654, N-Channel, Power MOSFET was identified as a component needing such activity to support PRESS-A. This report presents the characterization activities and results for the SA3654.

  9. Characterization of quantum states in predicative logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giulia Battilotti

    2011-07-15

    We develop a characterization of quantum states by means of first order variables and random variables, within a predicative logic with equality, in the framework of basic logic and its definitory equations. We introduce the notion of random first order domain and find a characterization of pure states in predicative logic and mixed states in propositional logic, due to a focusing condition. We discuss the role of first order variables and the related contextuality, in terms of sequents.

  10. Direct characterization of linear-optical networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleh Rahimi-Keshari; Matthew A. Broome; Robert Fickler; Alessandro Fedrizzi; Timothy C. Ralph; Andrew G. White

    2013-05-31

    We introduce an efficient method for fully characterizing multimode linear-optical networks. Our approach requires only a standard laser source and intensity measurements to directly and uniquely determine all moduli and non-trivial phases of the matrix describing a network. We experimentally demonstrate the characterization of a $6{\\times}6$ fiber-optic network and independently verify the results via nonclassical two-photon interference.

  11. Characterization of variant forms of organophosphorus hydrolase 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowe, Claire E.

    2013-02-22

    -1 CHARACTERIZATION OF VARIANT FORMS OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE A Senior Honors Thesis by CLAIRE E. ROWE Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the UNIVERSITY... UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS April2003 Group: Life Sciences 1 CHARACTERIZATION OF VARIANT FORMS OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS HYDROLASE A Senior Honors Thesis by CLAIRE E. ROWE Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships Texas A8 M...

  12. Summary status of K Basins sludge characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, R.B.

    1995-01-20

    A number of activities are underway as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project (SNFP) related to the processing and disposing of sludge in the 105-K Basins (K Basins). Efforts to rigorously define data requirements for these activities are being made using the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process. Summaries of current sludge characterization data are required to both help support this DQO process and to allow continued progress with on-going engineering activities (e.g., evaluations of disposal alternatives). This document provides the status of K Basins sludge characterization data currently available to the Nuclear Fuel Evaluations group. This group is tasked by the SNFP to help develop and maintain the characterization baseline for the K Basins. The specific objectives of this document are to: (1) provide a current summary (and set of references) of sludge characterization data for use by SNFP initiatives, to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort and to support on-going initiatives; (2) submit these data to an open forum for review and comment, and identify additional sources of significant data that may be available; (3) provide a summary of current data to use as part of the basis to develop requirements for additional sludge characterization data through the DQO process; (4) provide an overview of the intended activities that will be used to develop and maintain the sludge characterization baseline.

  13. DISCOVERY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AN EXTREMELY DEEP-ECLIPSING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DISCOVERY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AN EXTREMELY DEEP-ECLIPSING CATACLYSMIC VARIABLE: LSQ172554.8-643839 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: DISCOVERY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF...

  14. In-situ characterization and diagnostics of mechanical degradation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In-situ characterization and diagnostics of mechanical degradation in electrodes In-situ characterization and diagnostics of mechanical degradation in electrodes 2011 DOE Hydrogen...

  15. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project aims to develop improved geophysical imaging method for characterizing subsurface structure, identify fluid locations, and characterize fractures.

  16. Advanced Characterization of Particles and Particle-Cell Interactions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Particles and Particle-Cell Interactions Advanced Characterization of Particles and Particle-Cell Interactions 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

  17. Characterization of Field-Aged Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Field-Aged Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Deposits Characterization of Field-Aged Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Deposits Characterized field-aged exhaust gas recirculation...

  18. Thermolysis Characterization of Urea-SCR | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermolysis Characterization of Urea-SCR Thermolysis Characterization of Urea-SCR 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Cummins Inc. 2002deerfang.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  19. Auto/Steel Partnership: AHSS Stamping, Strain Rate Characterization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AHSS Stamping, Strain Rate Characterization, Sheet Steel Fatigue, AHSS Joining AutoSteel Partnership: AHSS Stamping, Strain Rate Characterization, Sheet Steel Fatigue, AHSS...

  20. Characterization and Surface Reactivity of Ferrihydrite Nanoparticles Assembled in Ferritin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Characterization and Surface Reactivity of Ferrihydrite Nanoparticles Assembled in Ferritin Gang of the nanoparticles were characterized by AFM and STM. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements suggested

  1. Electrochemical Characterization of Voltage Fade in LMR-NMC cells...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Voltage Fade in LMR-NMC cells Electrochemical Characterization of Voltage Fade in LMR-NMC cells 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  2. Auto/Steel Partnership: Fatigue of AHSS Strain Rate Characterization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fatigue of AHSS Strain Rate Characterization AutoSteel Partnership: Fatigue of AHSS Strain Rate Characterization 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

  3. Diesel Soot Filter Characterization and Modeling for Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soot Filter Characterization and Modeling for Advanced Substrates Diesel Soot Filter Characterization and Modeling for Advanced Substrates 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  4. DOE Awards Small Business Contract for Site Characterization...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Contract for Site Characterization and Erosion Control Work in Los Alamos, New Mexico DOE Awards Small Business Contract for Site Characterization and Erosion Control Work...

  5. DOE Awards Small Business Contract for Site Characterization...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Site Characterization and Erosion Control Work in Los Alamos, New Mexico DOE Awards Small Business Contract for Site Characterization and Erosion Control Work in Los Alamos, New...

  6. Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere Composition and Health Responses to Inhaled Emissions Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of...

  7. Characterizing wind power resource reliability in southern Africa...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE PAGES Search Results Published Article: Characterizing wind power resource reliability in southern Africa Title: Characterizing wind power resource reliability in southern...

  8. In-situ characterization of plasma modified surfaces by vibrational...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In-situ characterization of plasma modified surfaces by vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: In-situ characterization of...

  9. Development and Characterization of a Spray Deposited CNT/PVDF...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Development and Characterization of a Spray Deposited CNTPVDF Thin Film. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development and Characterization of a Spray...

  10. CRADA with Cummins on Characterization and Reduction of Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cummins on Characterization and Reduction of Combustion Variations CRADA with Cummins on Characterization and Reduction of Combustion Variations 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  11. Detection and characterization of multi-filament evolution during...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Detection and characterization of multi-filament evolution during resistive switching. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detection and characterization of...

  12. Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species in Diesel Exhaust and Aftertreatment Systems Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species in Diesel...

  13. 2010 U.S. Lighting Market Characterization - Excel workbook ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 U.S. Lighting Market Characterization - Excel workbook 2010 U.S. Lighting Market Characterization - Excel workbook Contains all data provided in the Lighting Market...

  14. Characterization of monolayer surface treatments for MEMS exposed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Characterization of monolayer surface treatments for MEMS exposed to possible back-end-of-line conditions. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characterization...

  15. Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of...

  16. Characterization of structural defects in nuclear graphite IG...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Characterization of structural defects in nuclear graphite IG-110 and NBG-18 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characterization of structural defects in nuclear graphite...

  17. Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Markets Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen Proton...

  18. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Tracer Methods for Characterizing...

  19. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Enhanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture...

  20. Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Fracture Characterization in Enhanced...

  1. Detection and Characterization of Natural and Induced Fractures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Natural and Induced Fractures for the Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems Detection and Characterization of Natural and Induced Fractures for the...

  2. Microstructural Characterization of Hard Ceramics Rohrer, G. S. (2014). Microstructural Characterization of Hard Ceramics. In V.K.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Microstructural Characterization of Hard Ceramics Rohrer, G. S. (2014). Microstructural Characterization of Hard Ceramics. In V.K. Sarin (Editor-in-Chief) & L #12;Microstructural Characterization of Hard Ceramics p. 2 4. Summary

  3. SU-E-J-39: Comparison of PTV Margins Determined by In-Room Stereoscopic Image Guidance and by On-Board Cone Beam Computed Tomography Technique for Brain Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh, T; Paul, S; Munshi, A; Sarkar, B; Krishnankutty, S; Sathya, J; George, S; Jassal, K; Roy, S; Mohanti, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereoscopic in room kV image guidance is a faster tool in daily monitoring of patient positioning. Our centre, for the first time in the world, has integrated such a solution from BrainLAB (ExacTrac) with Elekta's volumetric cone beam computed tomography (XVI). Using van Herk's formula, we compared the planning target volume (PTV) margins calculated by both these systems for patients treated with brain radiotherapy. Methods: For a total of 24 patients who received partial or whole brain radiotherapy, verification images were acquired for 524 treatment sessions by XVI and for 334 sessions by ExacTrac out of the total 547 sessions. Systematic and random errors were calculated in cranio-caudal, lateral and antero-posterior directions for both techniques. PTV margins were then determined using van Herk formula. Results: In the cranio-caudal direction, systematic error, random error and the calculated PTV margin were found to be 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.41 cm with XVI and 0.14 cm, 0.13 cm and 0.44 cm with ExacTrac. The corresponding values in lateral direction were 0.13 cm 0.1 cm and 0.4 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.42 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The same parameters for antero-posterior were for 0.1 cm, 0.11 cm and 0.34 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.16 cm and 0.43 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The margins estimated with the two imaging modalities were comparable within ± 1 mm limit. Conclusion: Verification of setup errors in the major axes by two independent imaging systems showed the results are comparable and within ± 1 mm. This implies that planar imaging based ExacTrac can yield equal accuracy in setup error determination as the time consuming volumetric imaging which is considered as the gold standard. Accordingly PTV margins estimated by this faster imaging technique can be confidently used in clinical setup.

  4. WRAP Module 1 waste characterization plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayancsik, B.A.

    1995-01-23

    The purpose of this document is to present the characterization methodology for waste generated, processed, or otherwise the responsibility of the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 facility. The scope of this document includes all solid low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), mixed waste (MW), and dangerous waste. This document is not meant to be all-inclusive of the waste processed or generated within WRAP Module 1, but to present a methodology for characterization. As other streams are identified, the method of characterization will be consistent with the other streams identified in this plan. The WRAP Module 1 facility is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The facility`s function is two-fold. The first is to verify/characterize, treat and repackage contact handled (CH) waste currently in retrievable storage in the LLW Burial Grounds, Hanford Central Waste Complex, and the Transuranic Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF). The second is to verify newly generated CH TRU waste and LLW, including MW. The WRAP Module 1 facility provides NDE and NDA of the waste for both drums and boxes. The NDE is used to identify the physical contents of the waste containers to support waste characterization and processing, verification, or certification. The NDA results determine the radioactive content and distribution of the waste.

  5. A Matrix Characterization for MELL Heiko Mantel1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreitz, Christoph

    A Matrix Characterization for MELL Heiko Mantel1 Christoph Kreitz2 1 German Research Center, LNAI 1489, pp. 169­183, c Springer Verlag, 1998. Abstract. We present a matrix characterization elaborate a methodology for proving matrix characterizations correct and complete. Our characterization

  6. Characterization of 1 and 2-matrices Rafael Bru1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bru, Rafael

    Characterization of 1 and 2-matrices Rafael Bru1 Ljiljana Cvetkovi2 Vladimir Kosti2 Francisco-matrices. In particular, new characterizations of 1 and of 2-matrices are given. Considering these characterizations some Introduction In this paper we give characterizations of subclasses of H-matrices which are being studied

  7. Characterization of DWPF recycle condensate materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.; Adamson, D. J.; King, W. D.

    2015-04-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle Condensate Tank (RCT) sample was delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization with particular interest in the concentration of I-129, U-233, U-235, total U, and total Pu. Since a portion of Salt Batch 8 will contain DWPF recycle materials, the concentration of I-129 is important to understand for salt batch planning purposes. The chemical and physical characterizations are also needed as input to the interpretation of future work aimed at determining the propensity of the RCT material to foam, and methods to remediate any foaming potential. According to DWPF the Tank Farm 2H evaporator has experienced foaming while processing DWPF recycle materials. The characterization work on the RCT samples has been completed and is reported here.

  8. Baseline Microstructural Characterization of Outer 3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zapp, Phillip E.; Dunn, Kerry A

    2005-07-31

    Three DOE Standard 3013 outer storage containers were examined to characterize the microstructure of the type 316L stainless steel material of construction. Two of the containers were closure-welded yielding production-quality outer 3013 containers; the third examined container was not closed. Optical metallography and Knoop microhardness measurements were performed to establish a baseline characterization that will support future destructive examinations of 3013 outer containers in the storage inventory. Metallography revealed the microstructural features typical of this austenitic stainless steel as it is formed and welded. The grains were equiaxed with evident annealing twins. Flow lines were prominent in the forming directions of the cylindrical body and flat lids and bottom caps. No adverse indications were seen. Microhardness values, although widely varying, were consistent with annealed austenitic stainless steel. The data gathered as part of this characterization will be used as a baseline for the destructive examination of 3013 containers removed from the storage inventory.

  9. 4. International reservoir characterization technical conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the Fourth International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference held March 2-4, 1997 in Houston, Texas. The theme for the conference was Advances in Reservoir Characterization for Effective Reservoir Management. On March 2, 1997, the DOE Class Workshop kicked off with tutorials by Dr. Steve Begg (BP Exploration) and Dr. Ganesh Thakur (Chevron). Tutorial presentations are not included in these Proceedings but may be available from the authors. The conference consisted of the following topics: data acquisition; reservoir modeling; scaling reservoir properties; and managing uncertainty. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  10. Complete Characterization of Quantum-Optical Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirko Lobino; Dmitry Korystov; Connor Kupchak; Eden Figueroa; Barry C. Sanders; A. I. Lvovsky

    2008-11-17

    The technologies of quantum information and quantum control are rapidly improving, but full exploitation of their capabilities requires complete characterization and assessment of processes that occur within quantum devices. We present a method for characterizing, with arbitrarily high accuracy, any quantum optical process. Our protocol recovers complete knowledge of the process by studying, via homodyne tomography, its effect on a set of coherent states, i.e. classical fields produced by common laser sources. We demonstrate the capability of our protocol by evaluating and experimentally verifying the effect of a test process on squeezed vacuum.

  11. Petrographic characterization of economizer fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Soares, S.; Guedes, A.; Garcia, C.; Flores, D.; Oliveira, A.

    2009-11-15

    Policies for reducing NOx emissions have led power plants to restrict O{sub 2}, resulting in high-carbon fly ash production. Therefore, some potentially useful fly ash, such as the economizer fly ash, is discarded without a thorough knowledge of its composition. In order to characterize this type of fly ash, samples were collected from the economizer Portuguese power plant burning two low-sulfur bituminous coals. Characterization was also performed on economizer fly ash subsamples after wet sieving, density and magnetic separation. Analysis included atomic absorption spectroscopy, loss-on-ignition, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  12. Characterization of Fernald Silo 3 Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.A.

    2001-04-04

    This report summarizes characterization results for uranium residues from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) Operable Unit (OU-4). These residues are currently stored in a one-million-gallon concrete silo, Silo 3, at the DOE Fernald Site, Ohio. Characterization of the Silo 3 waste is the first part of a three part study requested by Rocky Mountain Remedial Services (RMRS) through a Work for others Agreement, WFO-00-007, between the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) and RMRS. Parts 2 and 3 of this effort include bench- and pilot-scale testing.

  13. Updated U.S. Geothermal Supply Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petty, S.; Porro, G.

    2007-03-01

    This paper documents the approach taken to characterize and represent an updated assessment of U.S. geothermal supply for use in forecasting the penetration of geothermal electrical generation in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This work is motivated by several factors: The supply characterization used as the basis of several recent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) forecasts of geothermal capacity is outdated; additional geothermal resource assessments have been published; and a new costing tool that incorporates current technology, engineering practices, and associated costs has been released.

  14. An Operational Characterization of (lazy) Strong Normalization UnB 2006 -p. 1/16 An Operational Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala-RincĂłn, Mauricio

    An Operational Characterization of (lazy) Strong Normalization UnB 2006 - p. 1/16 An Operational Characterization of (lazy) Strong Normalization Luca Paolini and Simona Ronchi Della Rocca UniversitĂ  di Torino-by-value characterization of (lazy) -strong normalization q Problem 1: -Calculus q The Result 1 q Logical Characterization q

  15. Optimization, Characterization and Commissioning of a Novel Uniform Scanning Proton Beam Delivery System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascia, Anthony Edward

    2013-01-01

    Optimization and Characterization .51 Introduction ..51 MaterialsOptimization and Characterization ..97 Introduction ..97 Materials

  16. Transition metal complexes with multidentate phosphorous/nitrogen ligands. Synthesis, characterization and reactivity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rozenel, Sergio Santiago

    2011-01-01

    characterization and electrochemistry”. Dalton Trans. 2011.characterization, and electrochemistry Introduction Resultscharacterization and electrochemistry Introduction Mixed

  17. Color Printer Characterization Adjustment for Different

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Gaurav

    is often implemented as a 3D look-up table that maps from a device independent color space (e.g. CIELABColor Printer Characterization Adjustment for Different Substrates Mark Shaw,*1 Gaurav Sharma,2 October 2002; accepted 6 November 2002 Abstract: The use of multiple substrates in color printers requires

  18. LATERAL LANDFILL GAS MIGRATION: CHARACTERIZATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    LATERAL LANDFILL GAS MIGRATION: CHARACTERIZATION AND PRELIMINARY MODELING RESULTS O.BOUR*, E in the geological layer. Prior to drilling new boreholes on the site, a preliminary simplified model will be built with the numerical code TOUGH2-LGM. A description of the geological units, methane flux and the results

  19. On a characterization of PPT states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Majewski

    2007-08-29

    We present two different descriptions of positive partially transposed (PPT) states. One is based on the theory of positive maps while the second description provides a characterization of PPT states in terms of Hilbert space vectors. Our note is based on our previous results.

  20. Tank 241-U-204 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, K.E.

    1995-03-23

    This document is the tank characterization plan for Tank 241-U-204 located in the 200 Area Tank Farm on the Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. This plan describes Data Quality Objectives (DQO) and presents historical information and scheduled sampling events for tank 241-U-204.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF ELECTRONIC PACKAGING USING MOIR INTERFEROMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    CHARACTERIZATION OF ELECTRONIC PACKAGING USING MOIRÉ INTERFEROMETRY BY EUGENE A. STOUT V B of electronic packaging is limited by the ability of the chip carrier/PWB interconnections to withstand materials of the package as well as mechanically induced flexure. A micromechanical test apparatus

  2. Research Article Broadband Spectroscopic Thermoacoustic Characterization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witte, Russell S.

    Research Article Broadband Spectroscopic Thermoacoustic Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon electromagnetic radiation in the optical and microwave regions. This study applies thermoacoustic (TA) imaging SWNTs excel- lent candidates in contrast to agents for thermoacoustic imag- ing (TAI) [17­19]. In TAI

  3. Characterization of Commercial Sites Selected for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy management systems, and advanced lighting. The two larger buildings were important to add square pilot Enterprise Energy and Carbon Management (EECM) system to track energy consumption of municipalCharacterization of Commercial Sites Selected for Energy Efficiency Monitoring Prepared for the U

  4. RESEARCH ARTICLE Functional Characterization of Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Michael

    resistance mechanisms at least 5,000 years ago. Among bacteria sampled from the ancient layers bacteria conferred lower levels of resis- tance against clinically relevant antibiotics than resistance) Functional Characterization of Bacteria Isolated from Ancient Arctic Soil Exposes Diverse Resistance

  5. Hierarchical Characterization and Generation of Blogosphere Workloads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to a subject of general interest (e.g., politics, sports, and technology, etc.), many blogs have a more, which comprises a rich interconnected web of blog postings and comments by an increas­ ingly prominent#erent levels. The user view characterizes how individual users interact with blogosphere objects (blogs

  6. Hierarchical Characterization and Generation of Blogosphere Workloads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to a subject of general interest (e.g., politics, sports, and technology, etc.), many blogs have a more, which comprises a rich interconnected web of blog postings and comments by an increas- ingly prominent different levels. The user view characterizes how individual users interact with blogosphere objects (blogs

  7. Preparation and characterization of transparent PZNPLZT ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Preparation and characterization of transparent PZN­PLZT ceramics Q.R Yin,a) A.L. Ding, X.S. Zheng, and P.S. Qiu The State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfire Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ding Xi Road, 200050, Shanghai, China M

  8. The alternative Daugavet property. Characterizations for C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MartĂ­n, Miguel

    The alternative Daugavet property. Characterizations for C -algebras and von Neumann preduals of a Banach space The alternative Daugavet property Summary of results The talk is based on these papers M. MartĂ­n and T. Oikhberg, An alternative Daugavet property. Journal of Mathematical Analysis

  9. SEISMIC SINGULARITY CHARACTERIZATION WITH REDUNDANT DICTIONARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, John J.F.

    SEISMIC SINGULARITY CHARACTERIZATION WITH REDUNDANT DICTIONARIES by CATHERINE MAREVA DUPUIS Gradu of Mathematics The University of British Columbia Vancouver, Canada Date #12;Abstract We consider seismic signals of a seismic wave at a particular transition between two lithological layers in the subsurface. The location

  10. Exoplanet characterization with long slit spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Vigan; Maud Langlois; Claire Moutou; Kjetil Dohlen

    2008-08-28

    Extrasolar planets observation and characterization by high contrast imaging instruments is set to be a very important subject in observational astronomy. Dedicated instruments are being developed to achieve this goal with very high efficiency. In particular, full spectroscopic characterization of low temperature planetary companions is an extremely important milestone. We present a new data analysis method for long slit spectroscopy (LSS) with coronagraphy, which allows characterization of planetary companions of low effective temperature. In a speckle-limited regime, this method allows an accurate estimation and subtraction of the scattered starlight, to extract a clean spectrum of the planetary companion. We performed intensive LSS simulations with IDL/CAOS to obtain realistic spectra of low (R=35) and medium (R=400) resolution in the J, H, and K bands. The simulated spectra were used to test our method and estimate its performance in terms of contrast reduction and extracted spectra quality. Our simulations are based on a software package dedicated to the development of SPHERE, a second generation instrument for the ESO-VLT. Our method allows a contrast reduction of 0.5 to 2.0 magnitudes compared to the coronagraphic observations. For M0 and G0 stars located at 10 pc, we show that it would lead to the characterization of companions with Teff of 600 K and 900 K respectively, at angular separations of 1.0 as. We also show that errors in the wavelength calibration can produce significant errors in the characterization, and must therefore be minimized as much as possible.

  11. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States); Byrne, K.O.; Denzler, S. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This report revises and updates the geologic site characterization report that was published in 1980. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major east-west trending shear zone, not mapped in the 1980 report. Excessive gas influx in Caverns 18 and 20 may be associated with this shear zone. Subsidence values at Bayou Choctaw are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging only about 10 mm/yr but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values often approximate measurement accuracy. Periodic, temporary flooding is a continuing concern because of the low site elevation (less than 10 ft), and this may intensify as future subsidence lowers the surface even further. Cavern 4 was re-sonared in 1992 and the profiles suggest that significant change has not occurred since 1980, thereby reducing the uncertainty of possible overburden collapse -- as occurred at Cavern 7 in 1954. Other potential integrity issues persist, such as the proximity of Cavern 20 to the dome edge, and the narrow web separating Caverns 15 and 17. Injection wells have been used for the disposal of brine but have been only marginally effective thus far; recompletions into more permeable lower Pleistocene gravels may be a practical way of increasing injection capacity and brinefield efficiency. Cavern storage space is limited on this already crowded dome, but 15 MMBBL could be gained by enlarging Cavern 19 and by constructing a new cavern beneath and slightly north of abandoned Cavern 13. Environmental issues center on the low site elevation: the backswamp environment combined with the potential for periodic flooding create conditions that will require continuing surveillance.

  12. Statistical criteria for characterizing irradiance time series.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-10-01

    We propose and examine several statistical criteria for characterizing time series of solar irradiance. Time series of irradiance are used in analyses that seek to quantify the performance of photovoltaic (PV) power systems over time. Time series of irradiance are either measured or are simulated using models. Simulations of irradiance are often calibrated to or generated from statistics for observed irradiance and simulations are validated by comparing the simulation output to the observed irradiance. Criteria used in this comparison should derive from the context of the analyses in which the simulated irradiance is to be used. We examine three statistics that characterize time series and their use as criteria for comparing time series. We demonstrate these statistics using observed irradiance data recorded in August 2007 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and in June 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  13. Gypsy Field project in reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castagna, John P.; Jr., O'Meara, Daniel J.

    2000-01-12

    The overall objective of this project was to use extensive Gypsy Field Laboratory and data as a focus for developing and testing reservoir characterization methods that are targeted at improved recovery of conventional oil. This report describes progress since project report DOE/BC/14970-7 and covers the period June 1997-September 1998 and represents one year of funding originally allocated for the year 1996. During the course of the work previously performed, high resolution geophysical and outcrop data revealed the importance of fractures at the Gypsy site. In addition, personnel changes and alternative funding (OCAST and oil company support of various kinds) allowed the authors to leverage DOE contributions and focus more on geophysical characterization.

  14. Transuranic waste characterization sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is located approximately 25 miles northwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico, situated on the Pajarito Plateau. Technical Area 54 (TA-54), one of the Laboratory`s many technical areas, is a radioactive and hazardous waste management and disposal area located within the Laboratory`s boundaries. The purpose of this transuranic waste characterization, sampling, and analysis plan (CSAP) is to provide a methodology for identifying, characterizing, and sampling approximately 25,000 containers of transuranic waste stored at Pads 1, 2, and 4, Dome 48, and the Fiberglass Reinforced Plywood Box Dome at TA-54, Area G, of the Laboratory. Transuranic waste currently stored at Area G was generated primarily from research and development activities, processing and recovery operations, and decontamination and decommissioning projects. This document was created to facilitate compliance with several regulatory requirements and program drivers that are relevant to waste management at the Laboratory, including concerns of the New Mexico Environment Department.

  15. Topological Characterization of Extended Quantum Ising Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Zhang; Z. Song

    2015-10-27

    We show that a class of exactly solvable quantum Ising models, including the transverse-field Ising model and anisotropic XY model, can be characterized as the loops in a two-dimensional auxiliary space. The transverse-field Ising model corresponds to a circle and the XY model corresponds to an ellipse, while other models yield cardioid, limacon, hypocycloid, and Lissajous curves etc. It is shown that the variation of the ground state energy density, which is a function of the loop, experiences a nonanalytical point when the winding number of the corresponding loop changes. The winding number can serve as a topological quantum number of the quantum phases in the extended quantum Ising model, which sheds some light upon the relation between quantum phase transition and the geometrical order parameter characterizing the phase diagram.

  16. Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids. The present invention includes the use of two closely spaced transducers, or one transducer and a closely spaced reflector plate, to form an interferometer suitable for ultrasonic characterization of droplet-size and smaller samples without the need for a container. The droplet is held between the interferometer elements, whose distance apart may be adjusted, by surface tension. The surfaces of the interferometer elements may be readily cleansed by a stream of solvent followed by purified air when it is desired to change samples. A single drop of liquid is sufficient for high-quality measurement. Examples of samples which may be investigated using the apparatus and method of the present invention include biological specimens (tear drops; blood and other body fluid samples; samples from tumors, tissues, and organs; secretions from tissues and organs; snake and bee venom, etc.) for diagnostic evaluation, samples in forensic investigations, and detection of drugs in small quantities.

  17. Topological characterization of neutron star crusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. O. Dorso; P. A. Giménez Molinelli; J. A. López

    2012-08-23

    Neutron star crusts are studied using a classical molecular dynamics model developed for heavy ion reactions. After the model is shown to produce a plethora of the so-called "pasta" shapes, a series of techniques borrowed from nuclear physics, condensed matter physics and topology are used to craft a method that can be used to characterize the shape of the pasta structures in an unequivocal way.

  18. Characterization of multiqubit pure-state entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeqian Chen; Quanhua Xu

    2010-02-20

    A necessary and sufficient entanglement criterion based on variances of Mermin-Klyshko's Bell operators is proved for multiqubit pure states. Contrary to Bell's inequalities, entangled pure states strictly satisfy a quadratic inequality but product ones can attain the equality under some local unitary transformations, which can be obtained by solving a quadratic maximum problem. This presents a characterization of multiqubit pure-state entanglement.

  19. Statistics for characterizing data on the periphery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Hush, Donald R

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a class of statistics for characterizing the periphery of a distribution, and show that these statistics are particularly valuable for problems in target detection. Because so many detection algorithms are rooted in Gaussian statistics, we concentrate on ellipsoidal models of high-dimensional data distributions (that is to say: covariance matrices), but we recommend several alternatives to the sample covariance matrix that more efficiently model the periphery of a distribution, and can more effectively detect anomalous data samples.

  20. Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sedlacek, Arthur; S, Satheesh; Springston, Stephen

    This measurement characterizes the types of BC emissions that result in near­surface BC­ containing particles in a region that is dominated by biomass and open pit/stove cooking. Specifically, examine three primary BC emission sources: (i) urban setting (e.g., fossil fuel emissions); and (ii) biomass burning. Source (i) are captured at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) in Bangalore. Biomass emissions (ii) contains a series of 1­2 day measurement excursions to the rural area surrounding Bangalore.

  1. New characterization techniques for LSST sensors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nomerotski, A.

    2015-06-18

    Fully depleted, thick CCDs with extended infra-red response have become the sensor of choice for modern sky surveys. The charge transport effects in the silicon and associated astrometric distortions could make mapping between the sky coordinates and sensor coordinates non-trivial, and limit the ultimate precision achievable with these sensors. Two new characterization techniques for the CCDs, which both could probe these issues, are discussed: x-ray flat fielding and imaging of pinhole arrays.

  2. Experimental superplastic characterization of advanced aluminum alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopp, Christopher Carl

    1991-01-01

    categories. The first category is experimental SPF testing procedures at a constant crosshead velocity without an applied hydrostatic pressure, where SPF test data does not accurately measure the superplastic . properties of the alloy under study... recrystallization and cavitation in the alloy. This research involves the design and development of a test system to characterize the SPF properties of advanced aluminum alloys. The system in this study is constructed around an Instron testing machine, high...

  3. Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sedlacek, Arthur; S, Satheesh; Springston, Stephen

    2013-11-06

    This measurement characterizes the types of BC emissions that result in near­surface BC­ containing particles in a region that is dominated by biomass and open pit/stove cooking. Specifically, examine three primary BC emission sources: (i) urban setting (e.g., fossil fuel emissions); and (ii) biomass burning. Source (i) are captured at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) in Bangalore. Biomass emissions (ii) contains a series of 1­2 day measurement excursions to the rural area surrounding Bangalore.

  4. Full Reviews: Reservoir Characterization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescentDanKathy gdr.openei.orgReservoir Characterization

  5. Characterization of universal two-qubit Hamiltonians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew M. Childs; Debbie Leung; Laura Man?inska; Maris Ozols

    2014-12-10

    Suppose we can apply a given 2-qubit Hamiltonian H to any (ordered) pair of qubits. We say H is n-universal if it can be used to approximate any unitary operation on n qubits. While it is well known that almost any 2-qubit Hamiltonian is 2-universal (Deutsch, Barenco, Ekert 1995; Lloyd 1995), an explicit characterization of the set of non-universal 2-qubit Hamiltonians has been elusive. Our main result is a complete characterization of 2-non-universal 2-qubit Hamiltonians. In particular, there are three ways that a 2-qubit Hamiltonian H can fail to be universal: (1) H shares an eigenvector with the gate that swaps two qubits, (2) H acts on the two qubits independently (in any of a certain family of bases), or (3) H has zero trace. A 2-non-universal 2-qubit Hamiltonian can still be n-universal for some n >= 3. We give some partial results on 3-universality. Finally, we also show how our characterization of 2-universal Hamiltonians implies the well-known result that almost any 2-qubit unitary is universal.

  6. Site Characterization Progress Report No.20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    1999-10-01

    This is the 20th progress report issued by the U.S. Department of Energy. This report provides a summary-level discussion of Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project progress. Accomplishments this period are presented in a format that identifies important progress achieved and conveys how that progress supports the near-term objectives in the U.S. Department of Energy's schedule. Greater detail is documented in the cited references and in deliverables listed in Appendix A to this report. Readers may request specific U.S. Department of Energy-approved program documents that are listed in Section 7, References, and Appendix A by contacting the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Information Line at 1-800-225-6972. This document provides a discussion of recently completed and ongoing activities conducted by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project during the six-month reporting period from October 1, 1998, through March 31, 1999. Some information presented herein is by necessity preliminary, because some deliverables and reports that support the discussions have not been finalized. Projected future deliverables and reports are listed in Appendix B and are noted in the text as works in progress. Appendix C lists the status of milestone reports referenced in previous progress reports. A glossary of Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project-specific terms used in this report is given in Appendix D.

  7. Expedited site characterization. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) has been developed, demonstrated, and deployed as a new time-saving, cost-effective approach for hazardous waste site investigations. ESC is an alternative approach that effectively shortens the length of the assessment period and may significantly reduce costs at many sites. It is not a specific technology or system but is a methodology for most effectively conducting a site characterization. The principal elements of ESC are: a field investigation conducted by an integrated team of experienced professionals working in the field at the same time, analysis, integration and initial validation of the characterization data as they are obtained in the field, and a dynamic work plan that enables the team to take advantage of new insights from recent data to adjust the work plan in the field. This report covers demonstrations that took place between 1989 and 1996. This paper gives a description of the technology and discusses its performance, applications, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  8. PUREX low-level waste radionuclide characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, M.W.; LeBaron, G.J.

    1995-01-16

    The PUREX low-level waste (LLW) radionuclide characterization document describes the methodology for the characterization of solid LLW and solid low-level mixed waste (MW) with the respect to radiological characteristics. This document only serves as an overview of the PUREX radionuclide characterization methodology and provides specific examples for how the radionuclide distribution is derived. It would be impractical to provide all background information in this document. If further clarification and background information is required, consult the PUREX Regulatory Compliance group files. This document applies to only that waste generated in or is the responsibility of the PUREX facilities. The US Department of Energy (DOE) establishes the requirements for radioactive solid waste in DOE Order 5820.2A Radioactive Waste Management. Chapters 2 and 3 from DOE Order 5820.2A requires that generators of solid wastes in the LLW categories and the radioactive mixed waste subcategories: (1) identify the major radionuclides in each solid waste matrix and (2) determine the radionuclide concentrations and waste classes of their solid wastes. In addition, the Order also requires each generator to carry out a compliance program that ensures the proper certification of the solid waste generated.

  9. SPICES: spectro-polarimetric imaging and characterization of exoplanetary systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boccaletti, Anthony

    SPICES (Spectro-Polarimetric Imaging and Characterization of Exoplanetary Systems) is a five-year M-class mission proposed to ESA Cosmic Vision. Its purpose is to image and characterize long-period extrasolar planets and ...

  10. SWiFT Turbines Full Dynamic Characterization Opens Doors for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SWiFT Turbines Full Dynamic Characterization Opens Doors for Research in the Dynamics of Coupled Systems SWiFT Turbines Full Dynamic Characterization Opens Doors for Research in...

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF MAGNETRON SPUTTERED COATINGS BY PULSED EDDY CURRENT TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    CHARACTERIZATION OF MAGNETRON SPUTTERED COATINGS BY PULSED EDDY CURRENT TECHNIQUES Chris Mulligan1, Troy, NY 12180 ABSTRACT. A method that uses induced pulsed eddy currents for characterization of thick

  12. Power Consumption Characterization of a Graphics Processing Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    Power Consumption Characterization of a Graphics Processing Unit A Thesis in STS 402 Presented.....................................................................................................................VI CHAPTER ONE: THE NEED FOR A POWER CHARACTERIZATION............... 1 HISTORY OF GRAPHICS PROCESSORS .......................................................... 1 ENERGY AMBIGUITY OF MODERN GRAPHICS PROCESSORS ................. 2 POWER CONSUMPTION

  13. Characterization and production metrology of thin transistor gate oxide lms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    Review Characterization and production metrology of thin transistor gate oxide ®lms Alain C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 4. XRR and NR characterization of thin oxide ®lms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 5.2. Optical models of thin gate ®lms

  14. Fracture characterization from seismic measurements in a borehole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Fracture characterization is important for optimal recovery of hydrocarbons. In this thesis, we develop techniques to characterize natural and hydraulic fractures using seismic measurements in a borehole. We first develop ...

  15. Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization QA Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-09-09

    The Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan required each US Department of Energy (DOE) site that characterizes transuranic waste to be sent the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan that addresses applicable requirements specified in the QAPP.

  16. Gas characterization system operation, maintenance, and calibration plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tate, D.D.

    1996-03-04

    This document details the responsibilities and requirements for operation, maintenance, and calibration of the Gas Characterization Systems (GCS) analytical instrumentation. It further, defines the division of responsibility between the Characterization Monitoring Development organization and Tank Farms Operations.

  17. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Biomaterials: Meaningful Characterization and Engineering Inspiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1/21 Nonlinear Viscoelastic Biomaterials: Meaningful Characterization and Engineering Inspiration Annual Meeting Symposium: Biomaterials: Properties, Variation and Evolution Keywords: biomechanics, mucus techniques for characterization, pedal mucus samples (and biomaterials in general) are viscoelastic

  18. Materials Growth and Characterization of Thermoelectric and Resistive Switching Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Kate Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    2 Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition………………………5characterization. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition (Additionally, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (

  19. Identification and Characterization of Prokaryotic Regulatory Networks: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D Stormo

    2012-10-05

    We have completed our characterization of both the transcriptional regulatory network and post-transcriptional regulatory motifs in Shewanella.

  20. Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2004-09-13

    This report presents results obtained from detailed hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer system conducted at the Hanford Site.