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1

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Study: Selection Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification Reference 1 discussed key elements of the process for developing a margins-based "safety case" to support safe and efficient operation for an extended period. The present report documents (in Appendix A) a case study, carrying out key steps of the Reference 1 process, using an actual plant Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) model. In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional

2

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification  

SciTech Connect

In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional level, at the barrier level, at the component level), and where margin is thin or perhaps just degrading. If the plant is safe, it tells the decision-maker why the plant is safe and where margin needs to be maintained, and perhaps where the plant can afford to relax.

D. Blanchard; R. Youngblood

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification  

SciTech Connect

In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional level, at the barrier level, at the component level), and where margin is thin or perhaps just degrading. If the plant is safe, it tells the decision-maker why the plant is safe and where margin needs to be maintained, and perhaps where the plant can afford to relax.

R. Youngblood; D. Blanchard

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study  

SciTech Connect

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reference 1 discussed key elements of the process for developing a margins-based “safety case” to support safe and efficient operation for an extended period. The present report documents (in...

6

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC)

7

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(RISMC) Advanced Test (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for

8

RISK-INFORMED SAFETY MARGIN CHARACTERIZATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of safety margins has served as a fundamental principle in the design and operation of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). Defined as the minimum distance between a system’s “loading” and its “capacity”, plant design and operation is predicated on ensuring an adequate safety margin for safety-significant parameters (e.g., fuel cladding temperature, containment pressure, etc.) is provided over the spectrum of anticipated plant operating, transient and accident conditions. To meet the anticipated challenges associated with extending the operational lifetimes of the current fleet of operating NPPs, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have developed a collaboration to conduct coordinated research to identify and address the technological challenges and opportunities that likely would affect the safe and economic operation of the existing NPP fleet over the postulated long-term time horizons. In this paper we describe a framework for developing and implementing a Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) approach to evaluate and manage changes in plant safety margins over long time horizons.

Nam Dinh; Ronaldo Szilard

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Characterizing entanglement with global and marginal entropic measures  

SciTech Connect

We qualify the entanglement of arbitrary mixed states of bipartite quantum systems by comparing global and marginal mixednesses quantified by different entropic measures. For systems of two qubits we discriminate the class of maximally entangled states with fixed marginal mixednesses, and determine an analytical upper bound relating the entanglement of formation to the marginal linear entropies. This result partially generalizes to mixed states the quantification of entanglement with marginal mixednesses holding for pure states. We identify a class of entangled states that, for fixed marginals, are globally more mixed than product states when measured by the linear entropy. Such states cannot be discriminated by the majorization criterion.

Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio; De Siena, Silvio [Dipartimento di Fisica 'E. R. Caianiello', Universita di Salerno, INFM UdR di Salerno, INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, 84081 Baronissi, SA (Italy)

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Treatment of Passive Component Reliability in Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization FY 2010 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, is founded on probabilistic characterizations of SSC performance.

Robert W Youngblood

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Evaluation of Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization for Applicability to Significance Determination Process Evaluations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an industry application of the risk-informed safety margin characterization (RISMC) framework to the analysis of a plant event previously subjected to a significance determination process (SDP) evaluation. Within the nuclear regulatory system in the United States, the SDP uses risk insights, where appropriate, to help inspectors and regulatory staff determine the safety or security significance of inspection findings identified within the seven cornerstones of safety at ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

12

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) PathwayTechnical Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Richard Martineau

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The effect of location and facility demand on the marginal cost of delivered wood chips from energy crops: A case study of the state of Tennessee  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost-supply curves for delivered wood chips from short rotation woody crops were calculated for 21 regularly-spaced locations spanning the state of Tennessee. These curves were used to systematically evaluate the combined effects of location and facility demand on wood chip feedstock costs in Tennessee. The cost-supply curves were developed using BRAVO, a GIS-based decision support system which calculates marginal cost of delivering wood chips to a specific location given road network maps and maps of farmgate prices and supplies of woody chips from short rotation energy crops. Marginal costs of delivered chips varied by both facility location in the state and facility demand. Marginal costs were lowest in central Tennessee unless the facility demand was greater than 2.7 million dry Mg per year (3 million dry tons per year) in which case west Tennessee was the lowest cost region. Marginal costs rose rapidly with increasing facility demand in the mountainous eastern portion of the state. Transportation costs accounted for 18 to 29% of the delivered cost and ranged between $8 and $18/dry Mg ($7 and $16/dry ton). Reducing the expected farmer participation rate from 100% to 50% or 25% dramatically raised the marginal costs of feedstock supply in the east and central regions of the state. The analysis demonstrates the need to use geographically-specific information when projecting the potential costs and supplies of biomass feedstock.

Graham, R.L.; Liu, W.; Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Biofuels Feedstock Development Program; Noon, C.; Daly, M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Management Science Program; Moore, A. [Dept. of Trade and Industry, Harwell (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Support Unit

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Robustness of RISMC Insights under Alternative Aleatory/Epistemic Uncertainty Classifications: Draft Report under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program  

SciTech Connect

The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, would be founded on probabilistic characterizations of uncertainty in SSC performance. In the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technology, there has arisen a general consensus about the distinctive roles of two types of uncertainty: aleatory and epistemic, where the former represents irreducible, random variability inherent in a system, whereas the latter represents a state of knowledge uncertainty on the part of the analyst about the system which is, in principle, reducible through further research. While there is often some ambiguity about how any one contributing uncertainty in an analysis should be classified, there has nevertheless emerged a broad consensus on the meanings of these uncertainty types in the PRA setting. However, while RISMC methodology shares some features with conventional PRA, it will nevertheless be a distinctive methodology set. Therefore, the paradigms for classification of uncertainty in the PRA setting may not fully port to the RISMC environment. Yet the notion of risk-informed margin is based on the characterization of uncertainty, and it is therefore critical to establish a common understanding of uncertainty in the RISMC setting.

Unwin, Stephen D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Marginally trapped surfaces in spaces of oriented geodesics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the geometric properties of marginally trapped surfaces (surfaces which have null mean curvature vector) in the spaces of oriented geodesics of Euclidean 3-space and hyperbolic 3-space, endowed with their canonical neutral Kaehler structures. We prove that every rank one surface in these four manifolds is marginally trapped. In the Euclidean case we show that Lagrangian rotationally symmetric sections are marginally trapped and construct an explicit family of marginally trapped Lagrangian tori. In the hyperbolic case we explore the relationship between marginally trapped and Weingarten surfaces, and construct examples of marginally trapped surfaces with various properties.

Brendan Guilfoyle; Nikos Georgiou

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

16

Regional Reserve Margins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report explores the status of reserve margins across the country. Reserve margins represent the margin of excess capacity compared to demand. It is commonly calculated as the fraction of unused capacity during the summer peak. Simple in concept, the numbers can be difficult to calculate because of changes in geographic boundaries between regions, different views of what capacity qualifies to be counted, and changes in estimates of demand. This report provides a comprehensive and consistently calcula...

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

17

A characterization of robust radiation therapy treatment planning methods-from expected value to worst case optimization  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To characterize a class of optimization formulations used to handle systematic and random errors in radiation therapy, and to study the differences between the methods within this class. Methods: The class of robust methods that can be formulated as minimax stochastic programs is studied. This class generalizes many previously used methods, ranging between optimization of the expected and the worst case objective value. The robust methods are used to plan intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatments for a case subject to systematic setup and range errors, random setup errors with and without uncertain probability distribution, and combinations thereof. As reference, plans resulting from a conventional method that uses a margin to account for errors are shown. Results: For all types of errors, target coverage robustness increased with the conservativeness of the method. For systematic errors, best case organ at risk (OAR) doses increased and worst case doses decreased with the conservativeness. Accounting for random errors of fixed probability distribution resulted in heterogeneous dose. The heterogeneities were reduced when uncertainty in the probability distribution was accounted for. Doing so, the OAR doses decreased with the conservativeness. All robust methods studied resulted in more robust target coverage and lower OAR doses than the conventional method. Conclusions: Accounting for uncertainties is essential to ensure plan quality in complex radiation therapy such as IMPT. The utilization of more information than conventional in the optimization can lead to robust target coverage and low OAR doses. Increased target coverage robustness can be achieved by more conservative methods.

Fredriksson, Albin [Optimization and Systems Theory, Department of Mathematics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden) and RaySearch Laboratories, Sveavaegen 25, SE-111 34 Stockholm (Sweden)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

A risk-informed approach to safety margins analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway is a systematic approach developed to characterize and quantify safety margins of nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. The model has been tested on the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Lab.

Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Maintaining plant safety margins  

SciTech Connect

The Final Safety Analysis Report Forms the basis of demonstrating that the plant can operate safely and meet all applicable acceptance criteria. In order to assure that this continues through each operating cycle, the safety analysis is reexamined for each reload core. Operating limits are set for each reload core to assure that safety limits and applicable acceptance criteria are not exceeded for postulated events within the design basis. These operating limits form the basis for plant operation, providing barriers on various measurable parameters. The barriers are refereed to as limiting conditions for operation (LCO). The operating limits, being influenced by many factors, can change significantly from cycle to cycle. In order to be successful in demonstrating safe operation for each reload core (with adequate operating margin), it is necessary to continue to focus on ways to maintain/improve existing safety margins. Existing safety margins are a function of the plant type (boiling water reactor/pressurized water reactor (BWR/PWR)), nuclear system supply (NSSS) vendor, operating license date, core design features, plant design features, licensing history, and analytical methods used in the safety analysis. This paper summarizes the experience at Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in its efforts to provide adequate operating margin for the plants that it supports.

Bergeron, P.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Margins up; consumption down  

SciTech Connect

The results of a survey of dealers in the domestic fuel oil industry are reported. Wholesale prices, reacting to oversupply, decreased as did retail prices; retail prices decreased at a slower rate so profit margins were larger. This trend produced competitive markets as price-cutting became the method for increasing a dealer's share of the profits. Losses to other fuels decreased, when the figures were compared to earlier y; and cash flow was very good for most dealers. In summary, profits per gallon of oil delivered increased, while the consumption of gasoline per customer decreased. 22 tables.

Mantho, M.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Characterization of the Germania Spraberry unit from analog studies and cased-hole neutron log data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need for characterization of the Germania unit has emerged as a first step in the review, understanding and enhancement of the production practices applicable within the unit and the trend area in general. Petrophysical characterization of the Germania Spraberry units requires a unique approach for a number of reasons ?? limited core data, lack of modern log data and absence of directed studies within the unit. In the absence of the afore mentioned resources, an approach that will rely heavily on previous petrophysical work carried out in the neighboring ET O??Daniel unit (6.2 miles away), and normalization of the old log data prior to conventional interpretation techniques will be used. A log-based rock model has been able to guide successfully the prediction of pay and non-pay intervals within the ET O??Daniel unit, and will be useful if found applicable within the Germania unit. A novel multiple regression technique utilizing non-parametric transformations to achieve better correlations in predicting a dependent variable (permeability) from multiple independent variables (rock type, shale volume and porosity) will also be investigated in this study. A log data base includes digitized formats of gamma ray, cased hole neutron, limited resistivity and neutron/density/sonic porosity logs over a considerable wide area.

Olumide, Babajide Adelekan

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update The original estimation of residential marginal energy prices at the individual household level (as reported in the Marginal Energy Prices Report, http://www.eren.doe.gov/buildings/codes_standards/applbrf/pdfs/marginal_ energy_price.pdf) was based on household energy billing data from EIA's 1993 RECS survey. When the 1997 RECS survey data became available, LBNL updated its estimation of residential marginal energy prices at the individual household level using that data. In addition, LBNL incorporated several refinements (as described below) to the marginal price estimation method it had originally developed. Presented below are the: * RECS97-based results. * Refinements to LBNL's marginal price estimation method.

23

Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update The original estimation of residential marginal energy prices at the individual household level (as reported in the Marginal Energy Prices Report, http://www.eren.doe.gov/buildings/codes_standards/applbrf/pdfs/marginal_ energy_price.pdf) was based on household energy billing data from EIA's 1993 RECS survey. When the 1997 RECS survey data became available, LBNL updated its estimation of residential marginal energy prices at the individual household level using that data. In addition, LBNL incorporated several refinements (as described below) to the marginal price estimation method it had originally developed. Presented below are the: * RECS97-based results. * Refinements to LBNL's marginal price estimation method.

24

Marginal Energy Prices- RECS97 Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

An updated estimation of residential marginal energy prices at the individual house level using the 1997 RECS survey data

25

Marginal Lands: Concept, Assessment and Management  

SciTech Connect

Marginal lands have received wide attention for their potential to improve food security and support bioenergy production. However, environmental, ecosystem service, and sustainability concerns have been widely raised over the use of marginal land. Knowledge of the extent, location, and quality of marginal lands as well as their assessment and management are limited and diverse. This paper provides a review of the historical development of marginal concept, its application and assessment. Limitations and priority research needs of marginal land assessment and management were discussed.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Izaurralde, Dr. R. Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Tectonic evolution of the southwestern Black Sea margin, offshore Turkey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The southwestern margin of the Black Sea was under the influence of a regional extensional tectonic regime behind an island arc during Late Cretaceous time. During this period, andesitic submarine volcanics covered the margin which was connected to the Srednogorie intra-arc zone in Bulgaria. Following back-arc extension, the whole margin was affected by a compressional tectonic regime during Paleocene-early Eocene time. Under this regime, a series of thrust faults formed, which were connected to the Stara Planina and the Fore-Balkan overthrust system, offshore Bulgaria. In the middle Eocene, the regional compressional regime gave way to an extensional phase which caused block faulting in the basement and triggered rapid subsidence on the outer shelf along these block faults. As a result, a transgressive period began across the region. In the south of the study area, a small basin formed and became isolated from the outer shelf behind a marginal rise which is bordered by several margin faults from the south and the north. The middle Eocene transgression reached its maximum during early Oligocene by covering the most of the land areas in the south. A regression in Late Oligocene deposited shallow marine sediments on the margin. During early to middle Mocene time, a delta system was formed by sediments that by-passed through a narrow corridor in the marginal rise and that were derived from the Srednogorie Zone. During early stages in the development of the North Anatolian Fault system and its probable northern strand in the Thrace Basin at the end of the middle Miocene, the southern and southeastern parts of the margin were left subaerially exposed. Late Miocene deposition was characterized by a long erosional period along the margin. Fluvial and shallow marine deposits of Pliocene age were deposited over the eroded Miocene unit during a sea-level rise. A sea-level fall in late Pliocene time formed a deep incised valley system on the shelf. A transgressive period during Quaternary time filled this valley system, and formed the present day Turkish Black Sea coast.

Can, Emrah

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd DRAFT Marginal Energy Prices Report July 1999 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Office of Codes and Standards Washington, DC 20585 ii J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd This document was prepared for the Department of Energy by staff members of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) iii J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd MARGINAL ENERGY PRICES Final Report Page Outline i Executive Summary 1 I. Background 2 II. Methods 4 III. Analysis and Results - Commercial 6 IV. Analysis and Results - Residential 12 V. Residential Heating Oil and Propane 19 VI. Taxes 22 Appendices Appendix 1. Tariffs Used in the Commercial Analysis 26

28

Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd DRAFT Marginal Energy Prices Report July 1999 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Office of Codes and Standards Washington, DC 20585 ii J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd This document was prepared for the Department of Energy by staff members of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) iii J:\marginal\FinalDraftReport7-29-99.wpd MARGINAL ENERGY PRICES Final Report Page Outline i Executive Summary 1 I. Background 2 II. Methods 4 III. Analysis and Results - Commercial 6 IV. Analysis and Results - Residential 12 V. Residential Heating Oil and Propane 19 VI. Taxes 22 Appendices Appendix 1. Tariffs Used in the Commercial Analysis 26

29

Streamlined environmental remediation characterization using remote sensing techniques: Case studies for the US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an overview of the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Remote Sensing Program and discusses how data from this program have assisted the environmental restoration program in streamlining site-characterization activities. Three case studies are described where remote sensing imagery has provided a more focused understanding of site problems with a resultant reduction in the need for costly and time-consuming, ground-based sampling approaches.

Carden, D.M. [Department of Energy (DOE), TN (United States). Oak Ridge Operations; Smyre, J.L.; Evers, T.K.; King, A.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Diverse Engagement: Drawing in the Margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that challenges the dominant theories and paradigms or research that involves marginalised communities. Or, the margin could simply mean a place to doodle to get the creative juices flowing. Whatever the meaning of the margin, each of the papers demonstrates... IN THE MARGINS, Proceedings of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference, Cambridge University, UK (28-29, June 2010) ISBN 978-0-9566139-1-2 © University of Cambridge, Graduate Development Programme. 10 Indeed all the essays contained in the volume...

French, Matthew; Jackson, Simon; Jokisuu, Elina

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

31

Pilot Application of Risk Informed Safety Margins to Support Nuclear Plant Long-Term Operation Decisions: Impacts on Safety Margins of Extended Power Uprates for BWR Station Blackout Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The risk-informed safety margin characterization (RISMC) framework is a technically robust approach that could be used to analyze nuclear power plant (NPP) safety margins for issues of significance to NPP safety. This report describes application of the RISMC framework to analysis of the impacts of an extended power uprate (EPU) to a boiling water reactor (BWR) station blackout (SBO) event, with emphasis on changes in safety margins due to elevated power levels. The analysis focused on probabilistic ...

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

32

Studies on marginal ulsers (summary)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anastomoses are mostly in the area of fundus glands or at the junction between ... glands and in those [cases, histological examination often revealed the ...

33

Technical Approach and Results from the Fuels Pathway on an Alternative Selection Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents a detailed plan for conducting case studies to characterize probabilistic safety margins associated with different fuel cladding types in a way that supports a valid comparison of different fuels' performance. Recent work performed in other programs is described briefly and used to illustrate the challenges posed by characterization of margin in a probabilistic way. It is additionally pointed out that consistency of evaluation of performance across different cladding types is not easy to assure; a process for achieving the needed consistency is described.

Bob Youngblood; Curtis Smith

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Circulation and Exchange in Choked Marginal Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory for the exchange between a rotating, buoyancy-forced marginal sea and an ocean is developed and tested numerically. Cooling over the marginal sea leads to sinking and sets up a two-layer exchange flow, with a warm surface layer entering ...

Larry J. Pratt; Michael A. Spall

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization Characterization of the Rust Fungus, Puccinia emaculata, and Evaluation of Genetic Variability for Rust Resistance in Switchgrass Populations Srinivasa Rao Uppalapati & Desalegn D. Serba & Yasuhiro Ishiga & Les J. Szabo & Shipra Mittal & Hem S. Bhandari & Joseph H. Bouton & Kirankumar S. Mysore & Malay C. Saha # The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract Several fungal pathogens have been identified on ornamental and native stands of switchgrass (Panicum virga- tum L.). Diseases of switchgrass, particularly rust, have been largely neglected and are likely to become the major limiting factor to biomass yield and quality, especially when monocul- tured over a large acreage. Based on teliospore morphology and internal transcribed spacer-based diagnostic primers, the rust pathogen collected

36

Characterizing the fabric of the urban environment: A case study of Greater Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of Greater Houston, Texas * Leanna Shea Rose, HashemA Case Study of Houston, Texas * Leanna Shea Rose, Hashemdata from University of Texas and land-use/land-cover (LULC)

Rose, Leanna Shea; Akbari, Hashem; Taha, Haider

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Definition: Capacity Benefit Margin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Benefit Margin Benefit Margin Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Capacity Benefit Margin The amount of firm transmission transfer capability preserved by the transmission provider for Load- Serving Entities (LSEs), whose loads are located on that Transmission Service Provider's system, to enable access by the LSEs to generation from interconnected systems to meet generation reliability requirements. Preservation of CBM for an LSE allows that entity to reduce its installed generating capacity below that which may otherwise have been necessary without interconnections to meet its generation reliability requirements. The transmission transfer capability preserved as CBM is intended to be used by the LSE only in times of emergency generation deficiencies.[1] Related Terms

38

A Physical Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The Case Of Neapolitan Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Physical Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The Case Of Neapolitan Area Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The onset of volcanism in the Neapolitan area and the tensile tectonics of the Tyrrhenian margin of the Apennine chain have been related to the opening of the Tyrrhenian Basin, which may have resulted in horizontal asthenosphere flows giving rise, in turn, to crustal distension, local mantle upwellings and ensuing volcanism. Geological and structural data were taken into consideration: the existence of a shallow crust-mantle discontinuity in the Neapolitan area, the onset of volcanism in a

39

On the quantification of safety margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear industry has relied on the concept of Defense in Depth (DID) and traditional safety margins to deal with the uncertainties associated with the design and operation of nuclear facilities. These concepts were ...

Pagani, Lorenzo P

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Marginal Energy Price Report- July 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Estimated Consumer Marginal Energy Prices for the Commercial and Residental Sectors for use in the Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for four of the High-Priority Appliance Rulemakings

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Soil Moisture Impacts on Convective Margins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An idealized prototype for the location of the margins of tropical land region convection zones is extended to incorporate the effects of soil moisture and associated evaporation. The effect of evaporation, integrated over the inflow trajectory ...

Benjamin R. Lintner; J. David Neelin

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The basins on the Argentine continental margin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After the stabilization of the central Gondwana Craton, orogenic belts were accreted, as a result of convergence events and an extensive passive margin developed in southwestern Gondwana. Thermal subsidence in Parana, Karoo-Ventania basins and the Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic rifts, were modified by the Gondwana breakup and the South Atlantic opening. Early Paleozoic marine transgressions deposited the Table Mountain Group in Ventania. In southwestern Patagonia foreland clastics were deposited. Magmatic arcs and marine units indicate a tectonic trough was formed, alternating with continental sequences, over Late Paleozoic metamorphics and intrusives, resulting from plastered terrains along the Gondwana margin. In Patagonia, Permo-Carboniferous continental and glacio marine clastics infill the basins, while in Ventania, paralic sequences, grade from neritic to continental to the northeast, extending beneath the continental margin. The Triassic-Jurassic rift basins progressed onto regional widespread acid lavas and were infilled by lagoonal organic-rich sequences. Early drift phase built basins transverse to the margin, with fluvio-lacustrine sequences: Salado, Colorado, Valdes-Rawson, San Julian and North Malvinas intracratonic basins, which underwent transtensional faulting. Post-Oxfordian to Neocomian brackish sequences, onlapped the conjugate basins during the margin`s drift, with petroleum systems, as in Austral and Malvinas. In the Valanginian, basic extrusions commenced to form on the continental border, heralding the oceanic phase. Due to thermal subsidence, offlaping sediments prograded onto the remaining half-grabens. Several petroleum systems, proven and hypothetical, are identified in this region.

Urien, C.M. [Buenos Aires Technological Institute Petroleum School, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Estimating Marginal Residential Energy Prices in the Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marginal Residential Energy Prices in the Analysis of Proposed Appliance Energy Efficiency Standards Title Estimating Marginal Residential Energy Prices in the Analysis of Proposed...

44

Energy consumption characterization as an input to building management and performance benchmarking - a case study PPT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present paper aims at describing the methodology and presents some final results of a work developed in the field of building energy benchmarking applied to the buildings of the Polytechnic Institute of Leiria, based on a thorough energy performance characterization of each of its buildings, looking specifically at the typology of canteen. Developing building energy performance benchmarking systems enables the comparison of actual consumption of individual buildings against others of the same typology and against targets previously defined. The energy performance indicator was computed based on two different relevant elements, the net floor area and number of served meals. Then, the results were ranked according to the percentile rules previously established, and compared. An environmental analysis based on equivalent CO2 emissions was also performed for each building.

Bernardo, H.; Neves, L.; Oliveira, F.; Quintal, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Framework for Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants in operation continue to undergo design and operational changes to support cost-effective long-term operation. Additionally, as plant operational lifetimes are extended, it is imperative that they effectively manage aging degradation, prevent the occurrence of any safety-significant operational events, and analytically demonstrate acceptable (and even improved) nuclear safety risk. This report describes initial research to develop and validate an integrated framework and a...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

46

Quantifying the margin sharpness of lesions on radiological images for content-based image retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop a method to quantify the margin sharpness of lesions on CT and to evaluate it in simulations and CT scans of liver and lung lesions. Methods: The authors computed two attributes of margin sharpness: the intensity difference between a lesion and its surroundings, and the sharpness of the intensity transition across the lesion boundary. These two attributes were extracted from sigmoid curves fitted along lines automatically drawn orthogonal to the lesion margin. The authors then represented the margin characteristics for each lesion by a feature vector containing histograms of these parameters. The authors created 100 simulated CT scans of lesions over a range of intensity difference and margin sharpness, and used the concordance correlation between the known parameter and the corresponding computed feature as a measure of performance. The authors also evaluated their method in 79 liver lesions (44 patients: 23 M, 21 F, mean age 61) and 58 lung nodules (57 patients: 24 M, 33 F, mean age 66). The methodology presented takes into consideration the boundary of the liver and lung during feature extraction in clinical images to ensure that the margin feature do not get contaminated by anatomy other than the normal organ surrounding the lesions. For evaluation in these clinical images, the authors created subjective independent reference standards for pairwise margin sharpness similarity in the liver and lung cohorts, and compared rank orderings of similarity used using our sharpness feature to that expected from the reference standards using mean normalized discounted cumulative gain (NDCG) over all query images. In addition, the authors compared their proposed feature with two existing techniques for lesion margin characterization using the simulated and clinical datasets. The authors also evaluated the robustness of their features against variations in delineation of the lesion margin by simulating five types of deformations of the lesion margin. Equivalence across deformations was assessed using Schuirmann's paired two one-sided tests. Results: In simulated images, the concordance correlation between measured gradient and actual gradient was 0.994. The mean (s.d.) and standard deviation NDCG score for the retrieval of K images, K = 5, 10, and 15, were 84% (8%), 85% (7%), and 85% (7%) for CT images containing liver lesions, and 82% (7%), 84% (6%), and 85% (4%) for CT images containing lung nodules, respectively. The authors' proposed method outperformed the two existing margin characterization methods in average NDCG scores over all K, by 1.5% and 3% in datasets containing liver lesion, and 4.5% and 5% in datasets containing lung nodules. Equivalence testing showed that the authors' feature is more robust across all margin deformations (p < 0.05) than the two existing methods for margin sharpness characterization in both simulated and clinical datasets. Conclusions: The authors have described a new image feature to quantify the margin sharpness of lesions. It has strong correlation with known margin sharpness in simulated images and in clinical CT images containing liver lesions and lung nodules. This image feature has excellent performance for retrieving images with similar margin characteristics, suggesting potential utility, in conjunction with other lesion features, for content-based image retrieval applications.

Xu Jiajing; Napel, Sandy; Greenspan, Hayit; Beaulieu, Christopher F.; Agrawal, Neeraj; Rubin, Daniel [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Large margin mixture of AR models for time series classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose the large margin autoregressive (LMAR) model for classification of time series patterns. The parameters of the generative AR models for different classes are estimated using the margin of the boundaries of AR models as the optimization ... Keywords: Generative and discriminative hybrid models, Large margin autoregressive model, Large margin mixture autoregressive model, Outlier detection, Rejection option, Time series classification

B. Venkataramana Kini; C. Chandra Sekhar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Marginally outer trapped surfaces in higher dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the basic setup of Kaluza-Klein theory, namely a 5-dimensional vacuum with a cyclic isometry, which corresponds to Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in 4-dimensional spacetime. We first recall the behaviour of Killing horizons and its generators under bundle lift and projection. We then show that the property of compact surfaces of being (stably) marginally trapped is preserved under lift and projection provided the appropriate ("Pauli-") conformal scaling is used for the spacetime metric. We also discuss and compare recently proven area inequalities for stable axially symmetric 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional marginally outer trapped surfaces.

Tim-Torben Paetz; Walter Simon

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

49

ECONOMIC RECOVERY OF OIL TRAPPED AT FAN MARGINS USING HIGH ANGLE WELLS AND MULTIPLE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The long radius, near horizontal well was drilled during the first quarter of 1996. Well conditions resulted in the 7 in. production liner sticking approximately 900 ft off bottom. Therefore, a 5 in. production liner was necessary to case this portion of the target formation. Swept-out sand intervals and a poor cement bond behind the 5 in. liner precluded two of the three originally planned hydraulic fracture treatments. As a result, all pay intervals behind the 5 in. liner were perforated and stimulated with a non-acid reactive fluid. Following a short production period, the remaining pay intervals in the well (behind the 7 in. liner) were perforated. The well was returned to production to observe production trends and pressure behavior and assess the need to stimulate the new perforations.

Mike L. Laue

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

50

Heat Exchanger Thermal Performance Margin Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides utility engineers with guidance on how to identify the thermal performance margin that is available in a given heat exchanger by comparing the thermal performance requirement at design limiting conditions to the thermal performance capability of the heat exchanger under those same conditions.

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

Pilot Application of Risk-Informed Safety Margins to Support Nuclear Plant Long-Term Operation Decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an industry application of the risk-informed safety margin characterization (RISMC) framework to the analysis of the impacts of a power uprate to a loss of main feedwater (LOMFW) event. The primary objective of this effort was to assess the changes in the safety margins for this event that result from the elevated power levels associated with a hypothetical plant power uprate. This analysis focused on the probabilistic risk assessment modeling of feed-and-bleed operation for ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

52

Ocean Margins Programs, Phase I research summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 1992, the DOE restructured its regional coastal-ocean programs into a new Ocean Margins Program (OMP), to: Quantify the ecological and biogeochemical processes and mechanisms that affect the cycling, flux, and storage of carbon and other biogenic elements at the land/ocean interface; Define ocean-margin sources and sinks in global biogeochemical cycles, and; Determine whether continental shelves are quantitatively significant in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and isolating it via burial in sediments or export to the interior ocean. Currently, the DOE Ocean Margins Program supports more than 70 principal and co-principal investigators, spanning more than 30 academic institutions. Research funded by the OMP amounted to about $6.9M in FY 1994. This document is a collection of abstracts summarizing the component projects of Phase I of the OMP. This phase included both research and technology development, and comprised projects of both two and three years duration. The attached abstracts describe the goals, methods, measurement scales, strengths and limitations, and status of each project, and level of support. Keywords are provided to index the various projects. The names, addresses, affiliations, and major areas of expertise of the investigators are provided in appendices.

Verity, P. [ed.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Rapid assessment of redevelopment potential in marginal oil fields, application to the cut bank field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantifying infill potential in marginal oil fields often involves several challenges. These include highly heterogeneous reservoir quality both horizontally and vertically, incomplete reservoir databases, considerably large amounts of data involving numerous wells, and different production and completion practices. The most accurate way to estimate infill potential is to conduct a detailed integrated reservoir study, which is often time-consuming and expensive for operators of marginal oil fields. Hence, there is a need for less-demanding methods that characterize and predict heterogeneity and production variability. As an alternative approach, various authors have used empirical or statistical analyses to model variable well performance. Many of the methods are based solely on the analysis of well location, production and time data. My objective is to develop an enhanced method for rapid assessment of infill-drilling potential that would combine increased accuracy of simulation-based methods with times and costs associated with statistical methods. My proposed solution is to use reservoir simulation combined with automatic history matching to regress production data to determine the permeability distribution. Instead of matching on individual cell values of reservoir properties, I match on constant values of permeability within regions around each well. I then use the permeability distribution and an array of automated simulation predictions to determine infill drilling potential throughout the reservoir. Infill predictions on a single-phase synthetic case showed greater accuracy than results from statistical techniques. The methodology successfully identified infill well locations on a synthetic case derived from Cut Bank field, a water-flooded oil reservoir. Analysis of the actual production and injection data from Cut Bank field was unsuccessful, mainly because of an incomplete production database and limitations in the commercial regression software I used. In addition to providing more accurate results than previous empirical and statistical methods, the proposed method can also incorporate other types of data, such as geological data and fluid properties. The method can be applied in multiphase fluid situations and, since it is simulation based, it provides a platform for easy transition to more detailed analysis. Thus, the method can serve as a valuable reservoir management tool for operators of stripper oil fields.

Chavez Ballesteros, Luis Eladio

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A Case Study on the Use of Innovative Methods for Comprehensive Site Characterization at Former Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a case study on using innovative technologies for investigating former manufactured gas plant sites.

2002-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

55

Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning  

SciTech Connect

Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS  

SciTech Connect

A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

ECN GHG Marginal Abatement Cost curves (NAMAC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECN GHG Marginal Abatement Cost curves (NAMAC) ECN GHG Marginal Abatement Cost curves (NAMAC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: ECN GHG Marginal Abatement Cost curves for the Non-Annex I region (NAMAC) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Resource assessment, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Website: www.ecn.nl/docs/library/report/2006/e06060.pdf References: GHG Marginal Abatement Cost curves for the Non-Annex I region[1] GHG Marginal Abatement Cost curves for the Non-Annex I region (NAMAC) (1999-present) ECN has developed a Marginal Abatement Cost curve containing detailed information on mitigation technologies and abatement costs in developing countries. * The MAC was first developed for the Dutch Ministry of Foreign

58

Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures Dictionary.png Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Fault Intersection Accommodation Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures Stratigraphic Boundaries Fissure Swarms Caldera Rim Margins Lithologically Controlled Fractures caused by igneous activity creates permeability, allowing water

59

Resource Adequacy Requirement: Reserve Margin, Contract Cover, and Price Caps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In setting RARs, some state agencies are proposing reserve margins greater than the pre-restructuring levels. But it would be a mistake to reach this conclusion unless other factors are explicitly considered. A simulation indicates that decisions on the reserve margin, the percentage of forward contract cover, and the level of price caps should not be made in isolation. The results support the conjecture that the higher the contract coverage, the less justifiable are high reserve margins or low price caps.

Rochlin, Cliff; Huang, Jeff

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota) Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota) Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations It is state policy to encourage the retirement of marginal, highly erodible

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Marginal Abatement Cost Tool (MACTool) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marginal Abatement Cost Tool (MACTool) Marginal Abatement Cost Tool (MACTool) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Marginal Abatement Cost Tool (MACTool) Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Climate Smart Planning Platform Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Analysis Tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: climatesmartplanning.org/node/33 Cost: Free Related Tools Global Relationship Assessment to Protect the Environment (GRAPE) Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A spreadsheet tool for building marginal abatement cost curves, and for calculating break-even carbon prices. Supports comparison of costs and

62

A "joint+marginal" approach to parametric polynomial optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 13, 2010 ... A "joint+marginal" approach to parametric polynomial optimization. Jean B. Lasserre(lasserre ***at*** laas.fr). Abstract: Given a compact ...

63

Drivers of gross margins in UK retail electricity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis aims at explaining why the UK residential electricity (retail) market enjoys high gross margins in comparison to Vattenfall’s markets in for example… (more)

Törnqvist, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Marginalized Monitoring: Adaptively Managing Urban Stormwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Case Study from Racine, Wisconsin, USA – 12 A QUATIC Eand harbor - Milwaukee, Wisconsin. E. coli , Enterococcus,water in Racine, Wisconsin. Human-specific Bacteroides , E.

Scanlan, Melissa K; Tai, Stephanie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

An integrated methodology for sub-surface fracture characterization using microseismic data: A case study at the NW Geysers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal and unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs are often characterized by low permeability and porosity. So, they are difficult to produce and require stimulation techniques, such as thermal shear deactivation and hydraulic fracturing. Fractures ... Keywords: Fuzzy clustering, Geothermal reservoirs, Microseismic, Shear wave splitting, Tomographic inversion, Unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs

Fred Aminzadeh, Tayeb A. Tafti, Debotyam Maity

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Bounds for the sum of dependent risks having overlapping marginals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe several analytical and numerical procedures to obtain bounds on the distribution function of a sum of n dependent risks having fixed overlapping marginals. As an application, we produce bounds on quantile-based risk measures for portfolios ... Keywords: 60E05, 60E15, Copula functions, Dependent risks, Fréchet bounds, Mass transportation theory, Overlapping marginals, Value-at-Risk

Paul Embrechts; Giovanni Puccetti

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A linear combination of classifiers via rank margin maximization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The method we present aims at building a weighted linear combination of already trained dichotomizers, where the weights are determined to maximize the minimum rank margin of the resulting ranking system. This is particularly suited for real applications ... Keywords: combination of classifiers, margin, ranking

Claudio Marrocco; Paolo Simeone; Francesco Tortorella

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Estimating Marginal Residential Energy Prices in the Analysis of Proposed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marginal Residential Energy Prices in the Analysis of Proposed Marginal Residential Energy Prices in the Analysis of Proposed Appliance Energy Efficiency Standards Title Estimating Marginal Residential Energy Prices in the Analysis of Proposed Appliance Energy Efficiency Standards Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-44230 Year of Publication 2000 Authors Chaitkin, Stuart, James E. McMahon, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Robert D. Van Buskirk, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-44230 Date Published March 1 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Use of marginal energy prices, instead of average energy prices, represents a theoretically valuable and challenging refinement to the usual life-cycle cost analysis conducted for proposed appliance energy efficiency standards. LBNL developed a method to estimate marginal residential energy prices using a regression analysis based on a nationally representative sample of actual consumer energy bills. Based on the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), national mean marginal electricity prices were estimated to be 2.5% less than average electricity prices in the summer and 10.0% less than average prices in the non-summer months. For natural gas, marginal prices were 4.4% less than average prices in the winter and 15.3% less than average prices in the non-winter months.

70

Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Name Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector Energy Focus Area Biomass Topics Resource assessment Resource Type Dataset, Maps, Publications Website http://www.biofuels.apec.org/p Country Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, China, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Chinese Taipei, Thailand, United States, Vietnam Australia and New Zealand, South-Eastern Asia, Northern America, South America, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Central America, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, South America, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Europe, , South-Eastern Asia, Northern America, South-Eastern Asia

71

Margin turnaround at hand: reprieve for US refiners  

SciTech Connect

After unseasonal US gasoline price deterioration during the summer driving months, a turnaround in rack (unbranded, undelivered wholesale) prices is helping to reverse the downward trend in refining margins on the Gulf Coast. In turn, the improved margins are buoying up light crude oil prices in the US Gulf Coast and strengthening spot-market prices. A graph tracks apparent margins on four important crudes utilized on the US Gulf Coast. August 1984 saw negative margins even for heavy Venezuelan Lagunillas (15/sup 0/ API) and Mexican Maya (22/sup 0/ API), but both were again positive in September. Energy Detente refining netback data for September 1984 are presented for the US Gulf Coast, the US West Coast, Rotterdam, and Singapore. The fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices are presented for September 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

1984-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

72

Marginal Sea Overflows and the Upper Ocean Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marginal sea overflows and the overlying upper ocean are coupled in the vertical by two distinct mechanisms—by an interfacial mass flux from the upper ocean to the overflow layer that accompanies entrainment and by a divergent eddy flux ...

Shinichiro Kida; Jiayan Yang; James F. Price

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Late Paleozoic-early Mesozoic history of the Pacific margin along Antarctica  

SciTech Connect

The late Paleozoic-early Mesozoic Pacific margin of Gondwanaland from eastern Australia to Patagonia was characterized by a series of back-arc and foreland basins associated with subduction and volcanism. The Transantarctic basin including the present Transantarctic Mountains and Tasmania evolved from a middle Paleozoic passive continental margin to an Early Permian back-arc basin and a Late Permian-Triassic foreland basin. The earliest evidence of a volcanic arc and subduction is the appearance of abundant volcanic detritus at the base of the Early Permian postglacial marine shale-and-sandstone sequence in the Ellsworth Mountains. Volcaniclastic forearc sediments of Permian( ) to Triassic age are known from the Antarctic Peninsula. The introduction of abundant volcanic detritus to the East Antarctic craton and a 180{degree} paleocurrent reversal in the Late Permian in the Beardmore Glacier area is the earliest evidence of folding along the Antarctic-Pacific margin. By the Early Triassic, folding involved Late Permian sequences in the Ellsworth and Transantarctic (Pensacola) mountains. Thick Upper Permian and Triassic braided-stream deposits of mixed volcanic and cratonic provenance accumulated in this foreland basin. Subsidence ended in the Early Jurassic with uplift and diabase intrusion associated with the breakup of Gondwanaland.

Collinson, J.W.; Isbell, J.L. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (USA)); Miller, M.F. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated cost-of-service pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers?

Information Center

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Long-run marginal costs lower than average costs  

SciTech Connect

The thesis of this article is that the long-run marginal costs of electricity are not always greater than the present average costs, as is often assumed. As long as short-run costs decrease with new plant additions, the long-run marginal cost is less than long-run average cost. When average costs increase with new additions, long-run marginal costs are greater than long-run average costs. The long-run marginal costs of a particular utility may be less than, equal to, or greater than its long-run average costs - even with inflation present. The way to determine which condition holds for a given utility is to estimate costs under various combinations of assumptions: probable load growth, zero load growth, and load growth greater than expected; and changes in load factor with attendant costs. Utilities that can demonstrate long-run marginal costs lower than long-run average costs should be encouraged to build plant and increase load, for the resulting productivity gains and slowing of inflation. Utilities that face long-run marginal costs greater than long-run average costs should discourage growth in sales through any available means.

Hunter, S.R.

1980-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

76

Marginal Abatement Costs and Marginal Welfare Costs for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions: Results from the EPPA Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves, relationships between tons of emissions abated and the CO2 (or GHG) price, have been widely used as pedagogic devices to illustrate simple economic concepts such as the benefits of ...

Morris, Jennifer

77

Do Americans Consume Too Little Natural Gas? An Empirical Test of Marginal Cost Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

implemented at relatively low cost. References [1] Averch,Departures from Marginal Cost Pricing,” American EconomicCoase, R.H. , “The Marginal Cost Controversy. ” Economica,

Davis, Lucas; Muehlegger, Erich

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

U. S. refinery margin update: A late and tenuous reprieve  

SciTech Connect

Just as many refiners viewed margin recovery possibilities in 1991 as lost, a late Summer series of market adjustments has provided some improvement. Wholesale gasoline prices account for most of the modest recovery. This issue features latest trends affecting margins in the two main US refining centers, and offers a new comparison of the two. The issue also presents the following: (1) the ED Refining Netback Data Series for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam and Singapore as of August 9, 1991; and (2) the ED Fuel Price/Tax Series for countries of the Western Hemisphere, August 1991 Edition. 7 figs., 5 tabs.

1991-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

79

Three faces of US refining: Margins by gasoline customer type  

SciTech Connect

While it is well known that the US gasoline market has become more volatile in recent years, it is less widely appreciated that the deeply structured, term-contract-oriented companies within the refining and marketing sectors are likely to obtain the best profit margins. This issue stratifies refining margins by class of wholesale-gasoline trade. This issue also presents the following: (a) ED refining netback data series for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore as of September 8, 1989; and (b) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Western Hemisphere, September 1989 edition. 5 figs., 5 tabs.

1989-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

80

Learning from marginalized users: reciprocity in HCI4D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Users in the developing world continue to appropriate information and communication technologies (ICTs) in pioneering ways resulting in innovations such as M-Pesa, the popular mobile money transfer system developed in Kenya. M-Pesa's success demonstrates ... Keywords: design and innovation, hci4d, marginalized users

Susan P. Wyche; Elisa Oreglia; Morgan G. Ames; Christopher Hoadley; Aditya Johri; Phoebe Sengers; Charles Steinfield

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Sustainable bioenergy production from marginal lands in the US Midwest  

SciTech Connect

Long-term measurements of global warming impact coupled with spatially explicit modeling suggests that both climate benefits and the production potential of cellulosic crops grown on marginal lands of the US North Central region are substantial but will be insufficient to meet long-term biofuel needs.

Gelfand, Ilya; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Gross, Katherine L.; Robertson, G. P.

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

82

Modelling Heterogeneous Dispersion in Marginal Models for Longitudinal Proportional Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the fitted curves for the pattern of dispersion profile over time across three different gas concentrationModelling Heterogeneous Dispersion in Marginal Models for Longitudinal Proportional Data Peter X proportional data assumes a constant dispersion para- meter. This assumption of dispersion homogeneity

Song, Peter X.

83

Building a "Margin of Safety" Into Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building a "Margin of Safety" Into Renewable Energy Procurements: A Review of Experience January 2006 CEC-300-2006-004 #12;ABSTRACT In implementing state renewables portfolio standards, utility purchasers and electricity regulators must confront the reality that signed renewable energy contracts

84

Feature Extraction Based on Maximum Nearest Subspace Margin Criterion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the classification rule of sparse representation-based classification (SRC) and linear regression classification (LRC), we propose the maximum nearest subspace margin criterion for feature extraction. The proposed method can be seen as a preprocessing ... Keywords: Dimensionality reduction, Face recognition, Feature extraction, Finger knuckle print recognition, Linear regression classification

Yi Chen; Zhenzhen Li; Zhong Jin

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Generation of Topographic Waves over the Continental Margin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical experiments were carried out to simulate the generation of topographic waves by a Gulf Stream ring over the continental margin in a stratified ocean on an f-plane. The study was aimed at understanding the combined effect of density ...

Ping-Tung Shaw; S. Divakar

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Introduction to the Marginal Value Approach for Fossil Asset Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As power markets become competitive, utilities will benefit from closely monitoring their fossil-fleet investment and deployment decisions. Adopting a marginal value approach for analyzing fossil asset management (FAM) decisions gives utilities a framework for systematically quantifying the corporate-level value of utility decisions.

1995-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

87

Wave-Induced Drift Force in the Marginal Ice Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind waves are commonly ignored when modeling the ice motion in the marginal ice zone. In order to estimate the importance of the wave forcing, an expression for the second-order wave-induced drift force on a floe exposed to a full directional ...

Diane Masson

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells Multiple Hydraulic Fractures  

SciTech Connect

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well.

Mike L. Laue

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

ECONOMIC RECOVERY OF OIL TRAPPED AT FAN MARGINS USING HIGH ANGLE WELLS AND MULTIPLE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well.

Mike L. Laue

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

90

Breast Conservation Therapy: The Influence of Molecular Subtype and Margins  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate treatment results and prognostic factors, especially margin status and molecular subtype, in early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: The records of 1,058 Stage I or II breast cancer patients treated with BCT (surgical excision plus radiotherapy) at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, from 1985-2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Conventional receptor analyses were used as surrogate markers for molecular subtype classification (luminal A, luminal B, Her2 positive, and basal like). Actuarial estimates of overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), failure-free survival, and locoregional control (LRC) were computed by use of Kaplan-Meier plots. We analyzed prognostic variables for significance using Cox proportional hazards univariate and multivariate analysis. The study was approved by the Duke University Medical Center Institutional Review Board. Results: The median age of the patients was 56 years (range, 18-89 years). Of the patients, 80% had T1 disease and 66% N0 disease pathologically. With a median follow-up of 9.8 years, an in-breast recurrence developed in 53 patients and 10 patients had nodal failure. For all patients, the 10-year CSS rate was 94%; LRC rate, 94%; and failure-free survival rate, 88%. Luminal A patients had a CSS rate of 95% and LRC rate of 99%. Basal-type patients appeared to do worse, with regard to both CSS rate (74%) and LRC rate (76%), but the numbers were small and the difference was not statistically significant. LRC rates of patients with negative margins (widely negative, close, and extent of margin not known) were virtually identical (93%, 96%, and 94%, respectively). Those with positive margins appeared to fare slightly worse based on LRC rate (88%), but again, the numbers were small and the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: BCT remains the treatment of choice for early-stage breast cancer patients irrespective of molecular subtype. Negative margins of excision are desirable, but the width of the negative margin does not influence outcome.

Demirci, Senem, E-mail: senem.demirci@ege.edu.tr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Ege University Faculty of Medicine, Izmir (Turkey); Broadwater, Gloria [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC (United States); Cancer and Leukemia Group B Statistical Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Clough, Robert; Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Estimating the marginal cost of reducing global fossil fuel CO[sub 2] emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper estimates the marginal, total, and average cost and effectiveness of carbon taxes applied either by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) members alone, or as part of a global cooperative strategy, to reduce potential future emissions and their direct implications for employment in the US coal industry. Two sets of cases are examined, one set in which OECD members acts alone, and another set in which the world acts in concert. In each case set taxes are examined which achieve four alternative levels of emissions reduction: halve the rate of emissions growth, no emissions growth, 20[percent] reduction from 1988 levels, and 50[percent] reduction from 1988 levels. For the global cooperation case, carbon tax rates of [dollar sign]32, [dollar sign]113, [dollar sign]161, and [dollar sign]517 per metric ton of carbon (mtC) were needed in the year 2025 to achieve the objectives. Total costs were respectively [dollar sign]40, [dollar sign]178, [dollar sign]253, and [dollar sign]848 billions of 1990 US dollars per year in the year 2025. Average costs were [dollar sign]32, [dollar sign]55, [dollar sign]59, and [dollar sign]135 per mtC. Costs were significantly higher in the cases in which the OECD members states acted alone. OECD member states, acting alone, could not reduce global emissions by 50[percent] or 20[percent] relative to 1988, given reference case assumptions regarding developing and recently planned nations economic growth.

Edmonds, J.; Barns, D.W.; McDonald, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Washington, DC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Victorian Queer: Marginality and Money in Nineteenth-Century Literature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines how Victorians used the word “queer” as associated with senses of “counterfeit” and “eccentricity” in selected Victorian novels. The word was popularly used, by Victorian writers of both genders and in various and diverse circumstances, to mean the unfamiliar, the unconventional, the incomprehensible, and the non-normal. Unlike the contemporary uses of the word, which are oriented toward a relatively particular meaning, the non-normal sexual, Victorian uses of the word had been fluid, unstable, and indeterminate, yet referring to or associating with the non-normal aspects in things and people. Knowing how the Victorians used the word helps us to understand that a concept of marginality can be extended to the extent of tolerating Otherness in marginalized positions and minority identities. Victorian novels including Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s Aurora Floyd (1863), Wilkie Collins’s Hide and Seek (1854), and Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1847) demonstrate how the word “queer” is indeterminately used and also represent how queer marginality is appreciated or rejected, and tolerated or discriminated against. As queerness is defined as the status of counterfeitabilty, a counterpart of authenticity, queer subjects are described to provoke a feeling of repulsion and tend to be criminalized or pathologized. On the other hand, as queerness is defined as the status of eccentricity, queer subjects are sympathized and defended in the narrative. Manifestations of eccentricities in queer subjects are occasionally reprimanded, but admired for queer subjects’ uncommon or distinguished individuality. Victorian novels demonstrate that queer marginality can be employed as a self-fashioning identity or social status for any non-normal individual to deal with social pressure of conformity.

Choi, Jung Sun

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Bayesian learning for a class of priors with prescribed marginals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss three learning rules for generalized Bayesian updating of an imprecise probability: (a modified version of) the generalized Bayes' rule, the maximum likelihood update rule (after Gilboa and Schmeidler) and a newly developed hybrid rule. We ... Keywords: Generalized Bayes rule, 62A01, 62F15, 62F35, 68T37, 86A04, Bayesian updating, Imprecise probability, Maximum likelihood update, Modeling expert opinions, Prescribed marginals, Probability of ruin, Robust Bayesian approach, Unknown correlation structure

Hermann Held; Thomas Augustin; Elmar Kriegler

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Weighted order statistic classifiers with large rank-order margin.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe how Stack Filters and Weighted Order Statistic function classes can be used for classification problems. This leads to a new design criteria for linear classifiers when inputs are binary-valued and weights are positive . We present a rank-based measure of margin that can be directly optimized as a standard linear program and investigate its effect on generalization error with experiment. Our approach can robustly combine large numbers of base hypothesis and easily implement known priors through regularization.

Porter, R. B. (Reid B.); Hush, D. R. (Donald R.); Theiler, J. P. (James P.); Gokhale, M. (Maya)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Optimization of Electric Energy Consumption in Marginal California Oilfields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a pilot study of electricity consumption in California oilfields that found significant potential for reducing costs through energy efficiency improvements. It offers suggestions for reducing electricity consumption that, if implemented, could result in a system-wide demand reduction and reduce the need for additional generation and power infrastructure capacity. Moreover, reducing oilfield energy costs would reduce the overall cost of oil production, helping marginal wells remain a...

2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

96

Quantification Of Margins And Uncertainties: A Bayesian Approach (full Paper)  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU) is 'a formalism for dealing with the reliability of complex technical systems, and the confidence which can be placed in estimates of that reliability.' (Eardleyet al, 2005). In this paper, we show how QMU may be interpreted in the framework of Bayesian statistical inference, using a probabilistic network. The Bayesian approach clarifies the probabilistic underpinnings of the formalism, and shows how the formalism can be used for deciSion-making.

Wallstrom, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using Hig Angle Wells Multiple Hydraulic Fractures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yowlumne field is a giant field in the southern San Joaquin basin, Kern County, California. It is a deep (13,000 ft) waterflood operation that produces from the Miocene- aged Stevens Sand. The reservoir is interpreted as a layered, fan-shaped, prograding turbidite complex containing several lobe-shaped sand bodies that represent distinct flow units. A high ultimate recovery factor is expected, yet significant quantities of undrained oil remain at the fan margins. The fan margins are not economic to develop using vertical wells because of thinning pay, deteriorating rock quality, and depth. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the northeast distal fan margin through the use of a high- angle well completed with multiple hydraulic- fracture treatments. A high-angle well offers greater pay exposure than can be achieved with a vertical well. Hydraulic-fracture treatments will establish vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three vertical wells are anticipated at a cost of approximately two vertical wells. The near-horizontal well penetrated the Yowlumne sand; a Stevens sand equivalent, in the distal fan margin in the northeast area of the field. The well was drilled in a predominately westerly direction towards the interior of the field, in the direction of improving rock quality. Drilling and completion operations proved to be very challenging, leading to a number of adjustments to original plans. Hole conditions resulted in obtaining less core material than desired and setting intermediate casing 1200 ft too high. The 7 in. production liner stuck 1000 ft off bottom, requiring a 5 in. liner to be run the rest of the way. The cement job on the 5 in. liner resulted in a very poor bond, which precluded one of three hydraulic fracture treatments originally planned for the well. Openhole logs confirmed most expectations going into the project about basic rock properties: the formation was shaly with low porosities, and water saturations were in line with expectations, including the presence of some intervals swept out by the waterflood. High water saturations at the bottom of the well eliminated one of the originally planned hydraulic fracture treatments. Although porosities proved to be low, they were more uniform across the formation than expected. Permeabilities of the various intervals continue to be evaluated, but appear to be better than expected from the porosity log model derived in Budget Period One. The well was perforated in all pay sections behind the 5 in. liner. Production rates and phases agree nicely with log calculations, fractional flow calculations, and an analytical technique used to predict the rate performance of the well.

Laue, M.L.

1997-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

98

Mechanisms for Precipitation Variability of the Eastern Brazil/SACZ Convective Margin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study examines the mechanisms for the connection between the precipitation variability in eastern Brazil and the South Atlantic convergence zone (SACZ) convective margin (eastern Brazil/SACZ convective margin) and the variability of ...

H.-Y. Ma; X. Ji; J. D. Neelin; C. R. Mechoso

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Nuclear Technology--Component Margins and Monitoring Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Nuclear Technology Margins and Monitoring Database, available to EPRI members, documents a consensus of experts on issues relating to equipment design margins and monitoring recommendations for large capital, balance-of-plant (BOP) components important to power production.

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

100

WHAT GOOD IS WEALTH WITHOUT HEALTH? THE EFFECT OF HEALTH ON THE MARGINAL UTILITY OF CONSUMPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate how the marginal utility of consumption varies with health. To do so, we develop a simple model in which the impact of health on the marginal utility of consumption can be estimated from data on permanent income, ...

Finkelstein, Amy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A study on transformation of self-similar processes with arbitrary marginal distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochastic discrete-event simulation studies of communication networks often require a mechanism to transform self-similar processes with normal marginal distributions into self-similar processes with arbitrary marginal distributions. The problem of ... Keywords: arbitrary marginal distribution, autocorrelation function, inverse cumulative distribution function, self-similar process, stochastic simulation

Hae-Duck J. Jeong; Jong-Suk R. Lee

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A New Fuzzy Support Vector Machine Based on the Weighted Margin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ideas from fuzzy neural networks and support vector machine (SVM) are incorporated to make SVM classifiers perform better. The influence of the samples with high uncertainty can be decreased by employing the fuzzy membership to weigh the margin of ... Keywords: fuzzy neural networks, fuzzy pattern recognition, margin, maximal margin algorithm, support vector machines

Qing Tao; Jue Wang

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Sequence stratigraphy of the late Pleistocene - Holocene deposits on the northwestern margin of the South Caspian Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interpretation of 900 km of a closely spaced grid of high-resolution seismic profiles over the northwestern margin of South Caspian Basin (SCB) allows recognition and study of six late Pleistocene - Holocene depositional sequences. Sequence stratigraphy analysis of sedimentary strata from 117,000 years B.P. to present led to the identification of a highstand systems tract, two transgressive systems tracts and six lowstand systems tracts. Each systems tract is characterized by specific seismic facies. Diverse depositional processes on the northwestern margin of the SCB are suggested by the thirteen seismic facies patterns recognized in the study area. Two distinct progradational complexes were interpreted within Sequence III and Sequences IV and V in the northeastern and northwestern parts of the study area, respectively. Stratigraphic interpretation of the sequences provided important information on parameters that control depositional architectures, such as lake level fluctuations, tectonic dynamics, and sediment supply. High sedimentation rates combined with a series of high-frequency and high-amplitude lake-level fluctuations, abrupt changes at the shelf edge, abnormally high formation pressure, and high tectonic activity during Quaternary time resulted in the development of a variety of complex geologic drilling hazards. I distinguished three types of hazards as a result of this study: mud volcanoes, sediment instability, and shallow gas. The 2D high-resolution seismic dataset from the northwestern margin of the SCB allowed more detailed seismic sequence stratigraphic analysis in the study area than has previously been attempted. In particular, it has a clear application in deciphering sediment supply and relative lake level changes as well as tectonic relationship of the northwestern shelf margin of the SCB. Results of this work led us towards better understanding of recent depositional history, improved our knowledge of the nature of the basin tectonics, climate history and styles of and controls on sedimentation processes within a sequence stratigraphic framework during the late Pleistocene-Holocene time.

Rahmanov, Ogtay Rasim

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Microsoft Word - RISMC ATR Case Study - Final.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-27015 2-27015 Revision 0 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study August 2012 DOE Office of Nuclear Energy DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trade mark,

105

Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors With Involved Surgical Margins: Prognostic Factors and the Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are rare neoplasms associated with poor outcomes without resection, and involved surgical margins are associated with a worse prognosis. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in these patients has not been characterized. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 46 consecutive patients with positive or close (<1 mm) margins after pNET resection, treated from 1983 to 2010, 16 of whom received adjuvant RT. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions; half the patients received concurrent chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. No patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Cox multivariate analysis (MVA) was used to analyze factors associated with overall survival (OS). Results: Median age at diagnosis was 56 years, and 52% of patients were female. Median tumor size was 38 mm, 57% of patients were node-positive, and 11% had a resected solitary liver metastasis. Patients who received RT were more likely to have larger tumors (median, 54 mm vs. 30 mm, respectively, p = 0.002) and node positivity (81% vs. 33%, respectively, p = 0.002) than those not receiving RT. Median follow-up was 39 months. Actuarial 5-year OS was 62% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41%-77%). In the group that did not receive RT, 3 patients (10%) experienced local recurrence (LR) and 5 patients (18%) developed new distant metastases, while in the RT group, 1 patient (6%) experienced LR and 5 patients (38%) developed distant metastases. Of all recurrences, 29% were LR. On MVA, male gender (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 3.81; 95% CI, 1.21-11.92; p = 0.02) and increasing tumor size (AHR = 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04; p = 0.007) were associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: Long-term survival is common among patients with involved-margin pNET. Despite significantly worse pathologic features among patients receiving adjuvant RT, rates of LR between groups were similar, suggesting that RT might aid local control, and merits further evaluation.

Arvold, Nils D. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ryan, David P. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ferrone, Cristina R. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Clark, Jeffrey W.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Deshpande, Vikram [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Allen, Jill N.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Zhu, Andrew X. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Warshaw, Andrew L. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: Tshong1@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Base case and perturbation scenarios  

SciTech Connect

This report describes fourteen energy factors that could affect electricity markets in the future (demand, process, source mix, etc.). These fourteen factors are believed to have the most influence on the State? s energy environment. A base case, or most probable, characterization is given for each of these fourteen factors over a twenty year time horizon. The base case characterization is derived from quantitative and qualitative information provided by State of California government agencies, where possible. Federal government databases are nsed where needed to supplement the California data. It is envisioned that a initial selection of issue areas will be based upon an evaluation of them under base case conditions. For most of the fourteen factors, the report identities possible perturbations from base case values or assumptions that may be used to construct additional scenarios. Only those perturbations that are plausible and would have a significant effect on energy markets are included in the table. The fourteen factors and potential perturbations of the factors are listed in Table 1.1. These perturbations can be combined to generate internally consist.ent. combinations of perturbations relative to the base case. For example, a low natural gas price perturbation should be combined with a high natural gas demand perturbation. The factor perturbations are based upon alternative quantitative forecasts provided by other institutions (the Department of Energy - Energy Information Administration in some cases), changes in assumptions that drive the quantitative forecasts, or changes in assumptions about the structure of the California energy markets. The perturbations are intended to be used for a qualitative reexamination of issue areas after an initial evaluation under the base case. The perturbation information would be used as a ?tiebreaker;? to make decisions regarding those issue areas that were marginally accepted or rejected under the base case. Hf a quantitative scoring system for issue areas were applied under the base case, a tractable quantitative decision model incorporating scenarios and their likelihoods could be developed and appli& in the decision process. LLNL has developed four perturbation scenarios that address the following issues: l} low economic growth, 2) high natural gas prices, 3) dysfunctional markets, and 4) a preference for green power. We have proposed a plausible scenario that addresses each issue for discussion and consideration by the CEC. In addition, we have provided an example application of the four perturbation scenarios in a qualitative framework for evaluation of issue areas developed for the PIEPC program. A description of each of the perturbation scenarios and a discussion of how they could effect decisions about today? s R&D funding is included. The scenarios attempt to cover a broad spectrum of plausible outcomes in a deregulated market environment. Nowever, Vhey are not a comprehensive and rigorously defined list of the most probable scenarios, but rather a qualitative inference based upon knowledge and expertise in the energy field.

Edmunds, T

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

SELF-ORGANIZATION OF RECONNECTING PLASMAS TO MARGINAL COLLISIONALITY IN THE SOLAR CORONA  

SciTech Connect

We explore the suggestions by Uzdensky and Cassak et al. that coronal loops heated by magnetic reconnection should self-organize to a state of marginal collisionality. We discuss their model of coronal loop dynamics with a one-dimensional hydrodynamic calculation. We assume that many current sheets are present, with a distribution of thicknesses, but that only current sheets thinner than the ion skin depth can rapidly reconnect. This assumption naturally causes a density-dependent heating rate which is actively regulated by the plasma. We report nine numerical simulation results of coronal loop hydrodynamics in which the absolute values of the heating rates are different but their density dependences are the same. We find two regimes of behavior, depending on the amplitude of the heating rate. In the case that the amplitude of heating is below a threshold value, the loop is in stable equilibrium. Typically, the upper and less dense part of a coronal loop is collisionlessly heated and conductively cooled. When the amplitude of heating is above the threshold, the conductive flux to the lower atmosphere required to balance collisionless heating drives an evaporative flow which quenches fast reconnection, ultimately cooling and draining the loop until the cycle begins again. The key elements of this cycle are gravity and the density dependence of the heating function. Some additional factors are present, including pressure-driven flows from the loop top, which carry a large enthalpy flux and play an important role in reducing the density. We find that on average the density of the system is close to the marginally collisionless value.

Imada, S. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Zweibel, E. G. [Departments of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

108

Marginal Stability Studies of Microturbulence Near ITB Onset on Alcator C-Mod  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Insight into microturbulence and transport in tokamak plasmas is being sought using linear simulations of drift waves near the onset time of an internal transport barrier (ITB) on Alcator C-Mod. Microturbulence is likely generated by instabilities of drift waves and causes transport of heat and particles. This transport is studied because the containment of heat and particles is important for the achievement of practical nuclear fusion. We investigate nearness to marginal stability of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes for conditions in the ITB region at the trigger time for ITB formation. Data from C-Mod, analyzed by TRANSP (a time dependent transport analysis code), is read by the code TRXPL and made into input files for the parallel gyrokinetic model code GS2. Temperature and density gradients in these input files are modified to produce new input files. Results from these simulations show a weak ITG instability in the barrier region at the time of onset, above marginal stability; the normalized critical temperature gradient is 80% of the experimental temperature gradient. The growth rate increases linearly above the critical value, with the spectrum of ITG modes remaining parabolic up to a multiplicative factor of 2. The effect of varying density gradients is found to be much weaker and causes the fastest growing drift mode to change from ITG to trapped electron mode character. Simulations were carried out on the NERSC IBM 6000 SP using 4 nodes, 16 processors per node. Predictive simulations were examined for converged instability after 10,000-50,000 timesteps in each case. Each simulation took approximately 30 minutes to complete on the IBM SP.

Baumgaertel, J.; Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; McCune, D.C.; Dorland, W.; Fiore, C.L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Resource allocation using quantification of margins and uncertainty.  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing need to assess the performance of high consequence systems using a modeling and simulation based approach. Central to this approach are the need to quantify the uncertainties present in the system and to compare the system response to an expected performance measure. At Sandia National Laboratories, this process is referred to as quantification of margins and uncertainties or QMU. Depending on the outcome of the assessment, there might be a need to increase the confidence in the predicted response of a system model; thus a need to understand where resources need to be allocated to increase this confidence. This paper examines the problem of resource allocation done within the context of QMU. An optimization based approach to solving the resource allocation is considered and sources of aleatoric and epistemic uncertainty are included in the calculations.

Mahadevan, Sankaran (Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN); Urbina, Angel; Paez, Thomas Lee (Thomas Paez Consulting, Durango, CO)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Microsoft Word - Report on Prevention Analysis Trial Method and Case Study Improvments - April 2012.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-23479 1-23479 Revision 1 Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification M3LW-12IN0702012 "Expansion of Trial Method and Case Study and Improvements" D. Blanchard (AREI) R. Youngblood (INL) April 2012 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial product,

111

Generic Planning Target Margin for Rectal Cancer Treatment Setup Variation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To calculate the generic planning target margin (GPTM) for patients receiving radiation therapy (RT) for rectal cancer placed in a prone position with a customized cradle for small-bowel exclusion. Methods and Materials: A total of 25 consecutive rectal cancer patients were treated for 25 or 28 fractions in a prone position using a cradle to maximize small bowel exclusion. Treatment planning computed tomography (CT) scans were used to create orthogonally digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) for portal image registration, which were compared with daily portal images from an electronic portal-imaging device (EPID). Translation values needed to align the DRRs and EPIDs were recorded for the superior to inferior (SI), right to left (RL), and anterior to posterior (AP) directions, and used to calculate the GPTM using the four-parameter model. Age, weight, and body mass index were tested compared with the setup variation using a Pearson correlation and a t test for significance. Gender versus setup variation was compared with a t test. Results: A total of 1,723 EPID images were reviewed. The GPTM was 10 mm superior, 8 mm inferior, 7 mm RL and 10 mm AP. Age and gender were unrelated to setup variation. Weight was significantly associated with systematic AP variation (p < 0.05). BMI was significantly associated with systematic SI (p < 0.05) and AP (p < 0.01) variation and random RL variation (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The GPTM for rectal cancer is asymmetric with a maximum of 10 mm in the superior, anterior and posterior dimensions. Body mass index may effect setup variation. Research using advanced treatment planning should include these margins in the planning target volume definition.

Robertson, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)], E-mail: jrobertson@beaumont.edu; Campbell, Jonathon P.; Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Seismic margin review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station: Summary report  

SciTech Connect

This Summary Report is the first of three volumes for the Seismic Margin Review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station. Volume 2 is the Systems Analysis of the first trial seismic margin review. Volume 3 documents the results of the fragility screening for the review. The three volumes demonstrate how the seismic margin review guidance (NUREG/CR-4482) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Seismic Design Margins Program can be applied. The overall objectives of the trial review are to assess the seismic margins of a particular pressurized water reactor, and to test the adequacy of this review approach, quantification techniques, and guidelines for performing the review. Results from the trial review will be used to revise the seismic margin methodology and guidelines so that the NRC and industry can readily apply them to assess the inherent quantitative seismic capacity of nuclear power plants.

Prassinos, P.G.; Murray, R.C.; Cummings, G.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Seismic margin review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station: Fragility analysis  

SciTech Connect

This Fragility Analysis is the third of three volumes for the Seismic Margin Review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station. Volume 1 is the Summary Report of the first trial seismic margin review. Volume 2, Systems Analysis, documents the results of the systems screening for the review. The three volumes are part of the Seismic Margins Program initiated in 1984 by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to quantify seismic margins at nuclear power plants. The overall objectives of the trial review are to assess the seismic margins of a particular pressurized water reactor, and to test the adequacy of this review approach, quantification techniques, and guidelines for performing the review. Results from the trial review will be used to revise the seismic margin methodology and guidelines so that the NRC and industry can readily apply them to assess the inherent quantitative seismic capacity of nuclear power plants.

Ravindra, M. K.; Hardy, G. S.; Hashimoto, P. S.; Griffin, M. J.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Characterizing the Impacts of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on Bulk Power System Operations Planning: Utility Wind Interest Group - Xcel Energy-North Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a case study evaluation of the impact of wind generation on electricity grid operations in the Xcel Energy-North service area around Minneapolis, Minnesota. The project's methodology and results will be useful when evaluating the operating impacts of wind generation at other locations.

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

Do Americans Consume Too Little Natural Gas? An Empirical Test of Marginal Cost Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to maximize the total number of customers and thus the totalon the total number of customers, and the “marginal customercharacterized by a large number of customers, each consuming

Davis, Lucas; Muehlegger, Erich

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Marginal Annotation in Medieval Romance Manuscripts: Understanding the Contemporary Reception of the Genre.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The extra-textual apparatus of a manuscript is an important aspect of the presentation and organization of the text itself. Marginal annotation is a vital… (more)

Eddy, Nicole

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Does Marginal Price Matter? A Regression Discontinuity Approach to Estimating Water Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does Marginal Price Matter? A Regression DiscontinuityCCF discontinuity, though, does not correspond to any waterin the RD analysis. A consumer does not know her exact water

Nataraj, Shanthi; Hanemann, W. Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses - Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results for the Base Case and Scenarios  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results for the Base Case and Scenarios Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62

119

Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase I, final report - overview  

SciTech Connect

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a multiyear, multiphase program whose overall objective is to develop improved methods for seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants, using a probabilistic computational procedure. The program is being carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Phase I of the SSMRP was successfully completed in January 1981: A probabilistic computational procedure for the seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants has been developed and demonstrated. The methodology is implemented by three computer programs: HAZARD, which assesses the seismic hazard at a given site, SMACS, which computes in-structure and subsystem seismic responses, and SEISIM, which calculates system failure probabilities and radioactive release probabilities, given (1) the response results of SMACS, (2) a set of event trees, (3) a family of fault trees, (4) a set of structural and component fragility descriptions, and (5) a curve describing the local seismic hazard. The practicality of this methodology was demonstrated by computing preliminary release probabilities for Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant north of Chicago, Illinois. Studies have begun aimed at quantifying the sources of uncertainty in these computations. Numerous side studies were undertaken to examine modeling alternatives, sources of error, and available analysis techniques. Extensive sets of data were amassed and evaluated as part of projects to establish seismic input parameters and to produce the fragility curves. 66 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

Smith, P.D.; Dong, R.G.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Bohn, M.P.; Chuang, T.Y.; Cummings, G.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Wells, J.E.

1981-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

120

Large scale continuous visual event recognition using max-margin Hough transformation framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we propose a novel method for continuous visual event recognition (CVER) on a large scale video dataset using max-margin Hough transformation framework. Due to high scalability, diverse real environmental state and wide scene variability ... Keywords: Continuous visual event, Event detection, Large scale, Max-margin Hough transform

Bhaskar Chakraborty, Jordi Gonzílez, F. Xavier Roca

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Faunal responses to oxygen gradients on the Pakistan margin: A comparison of foraminiferans, macrofauna and megafauna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faunal responses to oxygen gradients on the Pakistan margin: A comparison of foraminiferans Oxygen minimum zone Benthos Arabian Sea Biodiversity Deep sea a b s t r a c t The Pakistan Margin where oxygen levels were lowest. The rarity of larger animals between 300 and 700 m on the Pakistan

Levin, Lisa

122

Marginal Hilbert Spectrum Based on EMD Reconstruction and its Application in Fault Diagnosis of Cooling Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HHT (Hilbert-Huang Transform) is one kind of adaptive signal processing method and it is suitable for processing nonlinear and non-stationary signal. Amplitude-frequency characteristics of signal are accurately demonstrated through marginal Hilbert spectrum ... Keywords: Vibration signal, marginal Hilbert spectrum, Reconstruction filter, Fault diagnosis, Cooling tower

He Dhengyun, Yi Ding

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Development of a hybrid margin angle controller for HVDC continuous operation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to present a new hybrid margin angle control method for HVDC continuous operation under AC system fault conditions. For stable continuous operation of HVDC systems, the margin angle controller must be designed to maintain the necessary margin angle to avoid commutation failures. The proposed method uses the open loop margin angle controller (MAC) as the basic controller, and adds output from the closed loop MAC to correct the control angle. A fast voltage detection algorithm is used for open loop control, and margin angle reference correction using harmonics detection for closed loop control are also developed. The combination of open and closed loop control provides quick responses when faults occur with stable and speedy recovery after fault clearance. The effectiveness of the developed controller is confirmed through EMTP digital simulations and also with the experiments using an analogue simulator.

Sato, M. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Osaka (Japan); Yamaji, K. [Shikoku Electric Power Co., Takamatsu (Japan); Sekita, M. [Electric Power Development Co., Tokyo (Japan); Amano, M.; Nishimura, M.; Konishi, H.; Oomori, T. [Hitachi, Ltd. (Japan)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Effect of post-implant edema on prostate brachytherapy treatment margins  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine if postimplant prostate brachytherapy treatment margins calculated on Day 0 differ substantially from those calculated on Day 30. Methods: Thirty patients with 1997 American Joint Commission on Cancer clinical stage T1-T2 prostatic carcinoma underwent prostate brachytherapy with I-125 prescribed to 144 Gy. Treatment planning methods included using loose seeds in a modified peripheral loading pattern and treatment margins (TMs) of 5-8 mm. Postimplant plain radiographs, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance scans were obtained 1-4 hours after implantation (Day 0). A second set of imaging studies was obtained at 30 days after implantation (Day 30) and similarly analyzed. Treatment margins were measured as the radial distance in millimeters from the prostate edge to the 100% isodose line. The TMs were measured and tabulated at 90{sup o} intervals around the prostate periphery at 0.6-cm intervals. Each direction was averaged to obtain the mean anterior, posterior, left, and right margins. Results: The mean overall TM increased from 2.6 mm ({+-}2.3) on Day 0 to 3.5 mm ({+-}2.4) on Day 30. The mean anterior margin increased from 1.2 mm on Day 0 to 1.8 mm on Day 30. The posterior margin increased from 1.2 mm on Day 0 to 2.8 mm on Day 30. The lateral treatment margins increased most over time, with mean right treatment margin increasing from 3.9 mm on Day 0 to 4.7 mm on Day 30. Conclusion: Treatment margins appear to be durable in the postimplant period, with a clinically insignificant increase from Day 0 to Day 30.

Reed, Daniel R. [Radiation Oncology, Arizona Oncology Services, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Wallner, Kent [Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Mueller, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Maki, Jeffrey [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Sutlief, Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Butler, Wayne [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Benthic biological and biogeochemical patterns and processes across an oxygen minimum zone (Pakistan margin, NE Arabian Sea)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Pakistan margin, NE Arabian Sea) Gregory L. Cowie a,Ã?, Lisa A. Levin b a The Sir John Murray Laboratories), and organic matter (OM) availability on benthic communities and processes across the Pakistan Margin

Levin, Lisa

126

Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone (7001100 m)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen) on the bathyal Pakistan margin, where sediments grade from fully laminated sediment at 700 m (0.12 mL LÃ?1 O2 [5 m matter to generate abrupt faunal transitions on the Pakistan margin. & 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

Levin, Lisa

127

An Inverse Method for Tracking Ice Motion in the Marginal Ice Zone Using Sequential Satellite Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for tracking ice motion and estimating ocean surface currents from sequential satellite images is presented. It is particularly suited for the marginal ice zone. A simple ice advection model, driven by wind and surface currents, is ...

Mark Buehner; Keith R. Thompson; Ingrid Peterson

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Comparison of Radiation Budgets in the Fram Strait Summer Marginal Ice Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of surface radiation fluxes and meteorological conditions collected in the Fram Strait during the summer 1984 Marginal Ice Zone Experiment (MIZEX) are presented and analyzed. These data were combined with calculations from a ...

Jennifer A. Francis; Thomas P. Ackerman; Kristina B. Katsaros; Richard J. Lind; Kenneth L. Davidson

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Quasi-Geostrophic Topographically Generated Mean Flow over the Continental Margin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of oppositely directed, monthly mean alongshore currents and wind stress over the continental margin off the Pacific coast of North America motivate the theoretical examination of mean flow generation by topographic lee-wave drag. We ...

Roger M. Samelson; J. S. Allen

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Storytelling on the margins : a theoretical framework for imagining a fashion innovation center in Tuscany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of the margin has long been deemed important in creative processes. At both the level of the individual and the level of the city, research shows that creativity tends to flourish on the philosophical and ...

Mills, Alexa (Alexa Timeaus)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A Quadratic Loss Multi-Class SVM for which a Radius-Margin Bound Applies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To set the values of the hyperparameters of a support vector machine (SVM), the method of choice is cross-validation. Several upper bounds on the leave-one-out error of the pattern recognition SVM have been derived. One of the most popular is the radius-margin ... Keywords: leave-one-out cross-validation error, model selection, multi-class SVMs, radius-margin bounds

Yann Guermeur; Emmanuel Monfrini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Fundamentals of Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP): Examples of Pricing Outcomes on the PJM System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As power industry restructuring continues, more and more industry participants will be exposed to financial uncertainties created by locational marginal pricing. These uncertainties differ from those experienced under traditional regulation as well as from the resource adequacy-related price spikes experienced in the Midwest in 1998 and in the West during 2000-2001. Instead, locational marginal pricing systems create uncertainty in the cost of transporting power from resources to loads. This report will ...

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Organic geochemistry of continental margin and deep ocean sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research continues to be the understanding of the complex processes of fossil fuel formation and migration. DOE funded research to date has focused on case histories'' of down-hole well profiles of light hydrocarbons, pyrograms, pyrolysis-GC and -GCMS parameters, and biomarker data from wells in the Louisiana and Texas Gulf Coasts the Alaskan North Slope. In the case of the Alaskan North Slope, geological data and one-dimensional maturation modeling have been integrated in order to better constrain possible source rocks, timing, and migration routes for oil and gas generation and expulsion processes.This period, biomarker analyses and organic petrographic analyses were completed for the Ikpikpuk well. In the case of the Gulf Coast, we have obtained a one-dimensional maturation model of the Cost B-1 well in E. Cameron field of the Louisiana Gulf Coast. The completed E. Cameron data set adds to the enigma of the Gulf Coast oils found on the continental shelf of Louisiana. If significant quantities of the oil are coming from relatively organic lean Tertiary rocks, then non-conventional'' expulsion and migration mechanisms, such as gas dissolved in oil must be invoked to explain the Gulf Coast oils reservoired on the Louisiana continental shelf. We are designing and starting to assemble a hydrous pyrolysis apparatus to follow, the laboratory, rates of generation and expulsion of sediment gases. Initiation of some new research to examine {delta}{sup 13}C of individual compounds from pyrolysis is also described. We are beginning to examine both the laboratory and field data from the Gulf Coast in the context of a Global Basin Research Network (GBRN). The purpose is to better understand subsurface fluid flow processes over geologic time in sedimentary basins and their relation to resource accumulation (i.e., petroleum and metal ores). 58 refs.

Whelan, J.K.; Hunt, J.M.; Eglinton, T.; Dickinson, P.; Johnson, C.; Buxton, L.; Tarafa, M.E.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

Subhash Shah

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A model for characterizing annual flu cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influenza outbreaks occur seasonally and peak during winter season in temperate zones of the Northern and Southern hemisphere. The occurrence and recurrence of flu epidemics has been alluded to variability in mechanisms such temperature, climate, host ...

Miriam Nuño; Marcello Pagano

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Using Marginal Lands for Biofuels | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Marginal Lands for Biofuels Using Marginal Lands for Biofuels Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » January 2013 Using Marginal Lands for Biofuels Assessment shows Midwest could support biomass production while benefiting climate. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Macmillan Publishers Ltd: Gelfand, I., et al.

137

Quantification of the Variability of Diaphragm Motion and Implications for Treatment Margin Construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantify the variability of diaphragm motion during free-breathing radiotherapy of lung patients and its effect on treatment margins to account for geometric uncertainties. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three lung cancer patients were analyzed. Each patient had 5-19 cone-beam scans acquired during different treatment fractions. The craniocaudal position of the diaphragm dome on the same side as the tumor was tracked over 2 min in the projection images, because it is both easily visible and a suitable surrogate to study the variability of the tumor motion and its impact on treatment margins. Intra-acquisition, inter-acquisition, and inter-patient variability of the respiratory cycles were quantified separately, as were the probability density functions (PDFs) of the diaphragm position over each cycle, each acquisition, and each patient. Asymmetric margins were simulated using each patient PDF and compared to symmetric margins computed from a margin recipe. Results: The peak-to-peak amplitude variability (1 SD) was 3.3 mm, 2.4 mm, and 6.1 mm for the intra-acquisition, inter-acquisition, and inter-patient variability, respectively. The average PDF of each cycle was similar to the sin{sup 4} function but the PDF of each acquisition was closer to a skew-normal distribution because of the motion variability. Despite large interfraction baseline variability, the PDF of each patient was generally asymmetric with a longer end-inhale tail because the end-exhale position was more stable than the end-inhale position. The asymmetry of the PDF required asymmetric margins around the time-averaged position to account for the position uncertainty but the average difference was 1.0 mm (range, 0.0-4.4 mm) for a sharp penumbra and an idealized online setup correction protocol. Conclusion: The respiratory motion is more irregular during the fractions than between the fractions. The PDF of the respiratory motion is asymmetrically distributed. Both the intra-acquisition variability and the PDF asymmetry have a limited impact on dose distributions and inferred margins. The use of a margin recipe to account for respiratory motion with an estimate of the average motion amplitude was adequate in almost all patients.

Rit, Simon; Herk, Marcel van; Zijp, Lambert [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Late Quaternary Geochronology and Recent Faulting Along the Eastern Margin of the Shukash Basin, Central Cascade Range, Oregon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Part I: Seismic Stratigraphy Transecting the Eastern Margin of the Shukash Basin, Central Cascade Range, Oregon The Shukash Basin is a sediment filled-trough that lies… (more)

Lyon, Edward W., Jr.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Investigation on the Benefits of Safety Margin Improvement in CANDU Nuclear Power Plant Using an FPGA-based Shutdown System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The relationship between response time and safety margin of CANadian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) nuclear power plant (NPP) is investigated in this thesis. Implementation of safety… (more)

She, Jingke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

100,000 Years of African monsoon variability recorded in sediments of the Nile margin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100,000 Years of African monsoon variability recorded in sediments of the Nile margin Marie Revel a constitutes a first continuous high resolution record of the East African monsoon regime intensity over of the African monsoon over Ethiopia, the Nabtian period from 14 to 8 ka cal BP and the Saharan period from 98

Demouchy, Sylvie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 28, 2000/pp. 757763 EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF THE STABILITY MARGIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

757 Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 28, 2000/pp. 757­763 EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION the response of the combustion process heat release to driven flow oscillations and the response determine the stability margin of combustors. Such an approach would enable combustion engi- neers

Lieuwen, Timothy C.

142

Dynamical Criterion for a Marginally Unstable, Quasi-linear Behavior in a Two-Layer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-layer quasi-geostrophic flow forced by meridional variations in heating can be in regimes ranging from radiative equilibrium to forced geostrophic turbulence. Between these extremes is a regime where the time-mean (zonal) flow is marginally ...

W. Ebisuzaki

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Modified Halocline Water over the Laptev Sea Continental Margin: Historical Data Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical hydrographic data (1940s–2010) show a distinct cross-slope difference of the lower halocline water (LHW) over the Laptev Sea continental margins. Over the slope, the LHW is on average warmer and saltier by 0.2°C and 0.5 psu, ...

Igor A. Dmitrenko; Sergey A. Kirillov; Vladimir V. Ivanov; Bert Rudels; Nuno Serra; Nikolay V. Koldunov

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Seismic Margin Assessment of the Catawba Nuclear Station, Volume 1: Main Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A seismic margin assessment of the Duke Power Company Catawba unit 2 nuclear station showed the practicality of an EPRI-developed methodology for demonstrating the ability of nuclear plants to withstand earthquakes beyond design basis. The assessment established that the Catawba station would survive earthquake loads up to twice its design basis.

1989-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

145

Learning by extrapolation from marginal to full-multivariate probability distributions: decreasingly naive Bayesian classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Averaged n-Dependence Estimators (AnDE) is an approach to probabilistic classification learning that learns by extrapolation from marginal to full-multivariate probability distributions. It utilizes a single parameter that transforms ... Keywords: Averaged one-dependence estimators, Bayesian learning, Classification learning, Ensemble learning, Feating, Learning without model selection, Naive Bayes, Probabilistic learning, Semi-naive Bayesian learning

Geoffrey I. Webb; Janice R. Boughton; Fei Zheng; Kai Ming Ting; Houssam Salem

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Anomalous subsidence on the rifted volcanic margin of Pakistan: No influence from Deccan plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anomalous subsidence on the rifted volcanic margin of Pakistan: No influence from Deccan plume, Clifton, Karachi 75600, Pakistan A B S T R A C TA R T I C L E I N F O Article history: Received 28 October

Clift, Peter

147

Seismic Margin Assessment of the Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant, Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A seismic margin assessment of the Georgia Power Company Edwin I. Hatch, unit 1 nuclear power plant showed the practicality of an EPRI methodology for assessing the ability of nuclear plants to withstand large earthquakes. The assessment, performed by the utility, established that the plant can withstand an earthquake at least twice the magnitude for which it was designed.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental margin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental during opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Unlike the Atlantic margins, where Wilson cycles were first recognized, breakup in the Gulf of Mexico did not initially focus within the orogen, but was instead

Huerta, Audrey D.

149

Sidescan Sonar Imagery of the Winter Marginal Ice Zone Obtained from an AUV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first Arctic under-ice sidescan sonar imagery from an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) has been obtained in the winter marginal ice zone of the East Greenland Current at 73°00?N, 11°47?W, using a Maridan Martin 150 vehicle operated from R/...

P. Wadhams; J. P. Wilkinson; A. Kaletzky

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Margin-based over-sampling method for learning from imbalanced datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Learning from imbalanced datasets has drawn more and more attentions from both theoretical and practical aspects. Oversampling is a popular and simple method for imbalanced learning. In this paper, we show that there is an inherently potential risk associated ... Keywords: generalization, imbalance learning, large margin theory, over-fitting, over-sampling

Xiannian Fan; Ke Tang; Thomas Weise

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Economic recovery of oil trapped at fan margins using high angle wells and multiple hydraulic fractures. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The long radius, near horizontal well has been drilled. After pumping a remedial cement squeeze, all pay behind the 5 in. liner was perforated and stimulated. Once wellwork is complete for the existing perforations, a hydraulic fracture treatment will be pumped through a short interval of clustered perforations in the 7 in. liner. Following this frac, all pay behind the 7 in. liner will be perforated and completion operations will be final.

Laue, M.L.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

Prioritization and Implementation Plan for Collaborative Case Study on RPV Steels During Extended Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power currently provides a significant fraction of the United States non-carbon emitting power generation. In future years, nuclear power must continue to generate a significant portion of the nation's electricity to meet the growing electricity demand, clean energy goals, and ensure energy independence. New reactors will be an essential part of the expansion of nuclear power. However, given limits on new builds imposed by economics and industrial capacity, the extended service of the existing fleet will also be required. Ensuring public safety and environmental protection is a prerequisite to all nuclear power plant operating and licensing decisions at all stages of reactor life. This includes the original license period of 40 years, the first license extension to 60 years, and certainly for any consideration of life beyond 60 years. For extended operating periods, it must be shown that adequate aging management programs are present or planned and that appropriate safety margins exist throughout the subsequent license renewal periods. Materials degradation can impact reactor reliability, availability, and potentially, safe operation. Components within a reactor must tolerate the harsh environment of high temperature water, stress, vibration, and/or an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. Clearly, understanding materials degradation and accounting for the effects of a reactor environment in operating and regulatory limits is essential. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is designed to support the long-term operation (LTO) of existing domestic nuclear power generation with targeted collaborative research programs into areas beyond current short-term optimization opportunities. Within the LWRS program, two pathways have been initiated to perform research essential to informing relicensing decisions. The Materials Aging and Degradation Pathway is designed to help develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting long-term environmental degradation behavior of materials in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess performance of systems, structures, and components essential to safe and sustained operation. The Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization Pathway (RISMC) seeks to merge fundamental scientific understanding of critical phenomenological conditions and deterministic predictions of nuclear power plant performance with risk-informed characterization tools. This will provide an integrated characterization of public safety margins in an optimization of nuclear safety, plant performance, and long-term asset management. Clearly, these two pathways have many synergies in goals and outcomes. The data and mechanisms generated in the Materials Pathway may feed into and mold efforts within the RISMC Pathway. In addition, insights from the characterization tools developed in RISMC tasks may inform materials testing needs and experiments. To demonstrate this potentially powerful interaction, a joint case study has been proposed and initiated. This document describes the initial planning for a coordinated study between the Materials and the RISMC Pathways. A brief description of each Pathway is presented along with a more detailed description of the needs and requirements of this collaborative task. A list of criteria for any case-study candidate are then listed, along with the rationale for choosing pressurized thermal shock as the prime candidate an inter-pathway collaboration. A proposed timeline and organization of future interactions on this subject area is also presented.

Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Look-ahead voltage and load margin contingency selection functions for large-scale power systems  

SciTech Connect

Given the current operating condition (obtained from the real-time data), the near-term load demand at each bus (obtained from short-term load forecast), and the generation dispatch (say, based on economic dispatch), the authors present in this paper a load margin measure (MW and/or MVAR) to assess the system`s ability to withstand the forecasted load and generation variations. The authors also present a method to predict near-term system voltage profiles. The proposed look-ahead measure and the proposed voltage prediction are then applied to contingency selections for the near-term power system in terms of load margins to collapse and of the bus voltage magnitudes. They evaluate the proposed load-ahead measure and the voltage profile prediction on several power systems including a 1169-bus power system with 53 contingencies with promising results.

Chiang, H.D.; Wang, C.S.; Flueck, A.J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). School of Electrical Engineering

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Transient analyses and thermal-hydraulic safety margins for the Greek Research Reactor (GRRI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various core configurations for the Greek research reactor (GRR1) have been considered in assessing the safety issues of adding a beryllium reflector to the existing water reflected HEU core and the transition from HEU to an all LEU core. The assessment has included both steady-state and transient analyses of safety margins and limits. A small all fresh Be reflected HEU core with a rather large nuclear peaking factor can still be operated safely, and thus adding a Be reflector to the larger depleted HEU core should not pose a problem. The transition mixed core with 50% LEU elements has larger void and Doppler coefficients than the HEU reference core and gives a lower peak clad temperature under transient conditions. The transition cores should give ever increasing margins to plate melting and fission product release as LEU elements are added to the core.

Woodruff, W.L.; Deen, J.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Papastergiou, C. [National Centre for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Workshop on Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

These are the proceedings of the Public Workshop on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety. The workshop was held at the Holiday Inn, Bethesda, on April 27 and 28, 1993. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an opportunity for public and industry input to the program. The workshop addressed the institutionalization of the program to review regulations with the purpose of eliminating those that are marginal. The objective is to avoid the dilution of safety efforts. One session was devoted to discussion of the framework for a performance-based regulatory approach. In addition, panelists and attendees discussed scope, schedules and status of specific regulatory items: containment leakage testing requirements, fire protection requirements, requirements for environmental qualification of electrical equipment, requests for information under 10CFR50.54(f), requirements for combustible gas control systems, and quality assurance requirements.

Dey, M. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Safety Issue Resolution; Arsenault, F.; Patterson, M.; Gaal, M. [SCIENTECH, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Structural Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization Characterization and Comparison of Switchgrass Ball-milled Lignin Before and After Dilute Acid Pretreatment Reichel Samuel & Yunqiao Pu & Babu Raman & Arthur J. Ragauskas Received: 25 April 2009 / Accepted: 10 August 2009 # Humana Press 2009 Abstract To reduce the recalcitrance and enhance enzymatic activity, dilute H 2 SO 4 pretreatment was carried out on Alamo switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). Ball-milled lignin was isolated from switchgrass before and after pretreatment. Its structure was characterized by 13 C, HSQC, and 31 P NMR spectroscopy. It was confirmed that ball-milled switchgrass lignin is of HGS type with a considerable amount of p-coumarate and felurate esters of lignin. The major ball-milled lignin interunit was the β-O-4 linkage, and a minor amount of phenylcoumarin, resinol, and spirodienone units were also present. As a result of the acid pretreatment,

157

Levy process-driven mean-reverting electricity price model: the marginal distribution analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a class of stochastic mean-reverting models for electricity prices with Levy process-driven Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) processes being the building blocks. We first fit marginal distributions of power price series to two special classes of distributions ... Keywords: Correlation structure, Electricity market signals, Electricity option pricing, Heavy-tail, Levy process, Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type process, Risk management, Unbalanced-tail

Shi-Jie Deng; Wenjiang Jiang

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A Methodology for Assessment of Nuclear Power Plant Seismic Margin (Revision 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's seismic margin methodology enables utility engineers to quantify a nuclear power plant's ability to withstand an earthquake greater than design and still safely shut down for at least 72 hours. This cost-effective, practical methodology uses generic screening of systems and component seismic ruggedness and does not require probabilistic calculations. The revision adds depth, detail, and more complete procedures to the original report but does not change the basic method.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Margins for an in-plant piping system under dynamic loading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to verify that piping designed according to current practice does indeed have a large margin against failure and to quantify the excess capacity for piping and dynamic pipe supports on the basis of data obtained in a series of high-level seismic experiments (designated SHAM) on an in-plant piping system at the HDR (Heissdampfreaktor) Test Facility in Germany. 4 refs., 6 tabs.

Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Technical Framework for Management of Safety Margins—Loss of Main Feedwater Pilot Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a trial application to assess safety margins using a risk informed approach. The trial application focused on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) loss of feedwater (LOFW) event with failure of auxiliary feedwater (AFW), for which feed and bleed cooling would be required to prevent core damage. For this trial application the main parameters which impact core damage for the scenario were identified and distributions were constructed to represent the uncertainties associate...

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a propagating turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically-fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angled well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thininterbedded layers and the well bore.

Mike L. Laue

1997-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

162

Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectivensss of exploiting thin-layered, low energy deposits at the distal margin of a propagating turbinite complex through u se of hydraulically fractgured horizontal of high-angle wells. TGhe combinaton of a horizontal or high-angle weoo and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore.

Mike L. Laue

1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

163

Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore.

Laue, M.L.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Threat Characterization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Michalski Michalski SNL Department 5621 Threat Characterization Summary Slide: Threat Characterization Outcomes: Develop a network analysis toolset to allow an analyst to efficiently "crawl" large data sets to discover relevant threat information. Road Map Challenges:"The ability to discover & understand emerging threats and vulnerabilities is a prerequisite to developing effective countermeasures" Major Successes: * Implemented prototype front end crawler and semantic analysis engine (Sandia National Labs). * Transition Development work to the Institute for Complex Additive System Analysis (ICASA) Center (NMTech) * Quarterly threat reports being produced  Schedule: Improvements to both the analyst process and GUI Interface, 4Q 2009; Transition maintenance and development to

165

Higher U.S. Crop Prices Trigger Little Area Expansion so Marginal Land for Biofuel Crops Is Limited  

SciTech Connect

By expanding energy biomass production on marginal lands that are not currently used for crops, food price increases and indirect climate change effects can be mitigated. Studies of the availability of marginal lands for dedicated bioenergy crops have focused on biophysical land traits, ignoring the human role in decisions to convert marginal land to bioenergy crops. Recent history offers insights about farmer willingness to put non-crop land into crop production. The 2006-09 leap in field crop prices and the attendant 64% gain in typical profitability led to only a 2% increase in crop planted area, mostly in the prairie states

Swinton, S.; Babcock, Bruce; James, Laura; Bandaru, Varaprasad

2011-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

166

Abstract The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators burning gas also rose sharply.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract ­ The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators marginal cost, which is closely related to the natural gas price. Since gas units are usually the marginal the sensitivity of Var benefit with respect to generation cost. The U.S. natural gas industry has been

Tolbert, Leon M.

167

Evolution of oceanic margins : rifting in the Gulf of California and sediment diapirism and mantle hydration during subduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates three processes that control the evolution of oceanic margins. Chapter 2 presents seismic images of a ~2-km-thick evaporite body in Guaymas Basin, central Gulf of California. In rifts, evaporites ...

Miller, Nathaniel Clark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

On the Role of Eddies and Surface Forcing in the Heat Transport and Overturning Circulation in Marginal Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The factors that determine the heat transport and overturning circulation in marginal seas subject to wind forcing and heat loss to the atmosphere are explored using a combination of a high-resolution ocean circulation model and a simple ...

Michael A. Spall

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Conformal Postoperative Radiotherapy in Patients With Positive Resection Margins and/or pT3-4 Prostate Adenocarcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate outcome and toxicity of high-dose conformal radiotherapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Between August 1998 and December 2007, 182 consecutive patients with positive resection margins and/or pT3-4, node-negative prostate adenocarcinoma underwent postoperative conformal RT. The prescribed median dose to the prostate/seminal vesicle bed was 66.6 Gy (range 50-70). Hormone therapy (a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue and/or antiandrogen) was administered to 110/182 (60.5%) patients with high-risk features. Biochemical relapse was defined as an increase of more than 0.2 ng/mL over the lowest postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value measured on 3 occasions, each at least 2 weeks apart. Results: Median follow-up was 55.6 months (range 7.6-141.9 months). The 3- and 5-year probability of biochemical relapse-free survival were 87% and 81%, respectively. In univariate analysis, more advanced T stages, preoperative PSA values {>=}10 ng/mL, and RT doses <70 Gy were significant factors for biochemical relapse. Pre-RT PSA values >0.2 ng/mL were significant for distant metastases. In multivariate analysis, risk factors for biochemical relapse were higher preoperative and pre-RT PSA values, hormone therapy for under 402 days and RT doses of <70 Gy. Higher pre-RT PSA values were the only independent predictor of distant metastases. Acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities occurred in 72 (39.6%) and 91 (50%) patients, respectively. There were 2 cases of Grade III GI toxicity but no cases of Grade IV. Late GU and GI toxicities occurred in 28 (15.4%) and 14 (7.7%) patients, respectively: 11 cases of Grade III toxicity: 1 GI (anal stenosis) and 10 GU, all urethral strictures requiring endoscopic urethrotomy. Conclusions: Postoperative high-dose conformal RT in patients with high-risk features was associated with a low risk of biochemical relapse as well as minimal morbidity.

Bellavita, Rita, E-mail: ritabellavita@libero.it [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Massetti, Michela [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Abraha, Iosief [Regional Health Authority of Umbria, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Regional Health Authority of Umbria, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Lupattelli, Marco [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Mearini, Luigi [Urology Department, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Urology Department, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Falcinelli, Lorenzo; Farneti, Alessia; Palumbo, Isabella [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Porena, Massimo [Urology Department, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Urology Department, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Aristei, Cynthia [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Evaluation of Travis Peak gas reservoirs, west margin of the East Texas Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas production from low-permeability (tight) gas sandstones is increasingly important in the USA as conventional gas reservoirs are being depleted, and its importance will increase worldwide in future decades. Travis Peak tight sandstones have produced gas since the 1940s. In this study, well log, 2D seismic, core, and production data were used to evaluate the geologic setting and reservoir characteristics of the Travis Peak formation. The primary objective was to assess the potential for basinward extension of Travis Peak gas production along the west margin of the East Texas Basin. Along the west margin of the East Texas Basin, southeast-trending Travis Peak sandstones belts were deposited by the Ancestral Red River fluvial-deltaic system. The sandstones are fine-grained, moderately well sorted, subangular to subrounded, quartz arenites and subarkoses; reservoir quality decreases with depth, primarily due to diagenetic quartz overgrowths. Evaluation of drilling mud densities suggests that strata deeper than 12,500 ft may be overpressured. Assessment of the geothermal gradient (1.6 °F/100 ft) indicates that overpressure may be relict, resulting from hydrocarbon generation by Smackover and Bossier formation potential source rocks. In the study area, Travis Peak cumulative gas production was 1.43 trillion cubic feet from January 1, 1961, through December 31, 2005. Mean daily gas production from 923 wells was 925,000 cubic ft/well/day, during the best year of production. The number of Travis Peak gas wells in “high-cost” (tight sandstone) fields increased from 18 in the decade 1966-75 to 333 in the decade 1996-2005, when high-cost fields accounted for 33.2% of the Travis Peak gas production. However, 2005 gas production from high cost fields accounted for 63.2% of the Travis Peak total production, indicating that production from high-cost gas wells has increased markedly. Along the west margin of the East Texas Basin, hydrocarbon occurs in structural, stratigraphic, and combination traps associated with salt deformation. Downdip extension of Travis Peak production will depend on the (1) burial history and diagenesis, (2) reservoir sedimentary facies, and (3) structural setting. Potential Travis Peak hydrocarbon plays include: updip pinch-outs of sandstones; sandstone pinch-outs at margins of salt-withdrawal basins; domal traps above salt structures; and deepwater sands.

Li, Yamin

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I). Project IV. Structural building response; Structural Building Response Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Phase I effort of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) being performed by the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the basic objective of Subtask IV.1 (Structural Building Response Review) is to review and summarize current methods and data pertaining to seismic response calculations particularly as they relate to the objectives of the SSMRP. This material forms one component in the development of the overall computational methodology involving state of the art computations including explicit consideration of uncertainty and aimed at ultimately deriving estimates of the probability of radioactive releases due to seismic effects on nuclear power plant facilities.

Healey, J.J.; Wu, S.T.; Murga, M.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Measurement-based Voltage Stability Margin Calculator (MVSMC) v1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Voltage stability is a major concern in daily power system operations and a leading factor to limit power transfers in a prevailing open access environment. Voltage instability usually starts from a local bus or area, and then may evolve into a wide-area instability problem if it cannot be controlled locally. This program utilizes EPRImeasurement-based voltage stability monitoring technology and is able to calculate voltage stability margin indices at a load bus or for an entire load area using the measu...

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

173

On the effect of pulsating flow on surge margin of small centrifugal compressors for automotive engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surge is becoming a limiting factor in the design of boosting systems of downsized diesel engines. Although standard compressor flowcharts are used for the selection of those machines for a given application, on-engine conditions widely differ from steady flow conditions, thus affecting compressor behaviour and consequently surge phenomenon. In this paper the effect of pulsating flow is investigated by means of a steady gas-stand that has been modified to produce engine-like pulsating flow. The effect of pressure pulses' amplitude and frequency on the compressor surge line location has been checked. Results show that pulsating flow in the 40-67 Hz range (corresponding to characteristic pulsation when boosting an internal combustion engine) increases surge margin. This increased margin is similar for all the tested frequencies but depends on pulsation amplitude. In a further step, a non-steady compressor model is used for modelling the tests, thus allowing a deeper analysis of the involved phenomena. Model results widely agree with experimental results. (author)

Galindo, J.; Climent, H.; Guardiola, C.; Tiseira, A. [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain); Camino de Vera s/n, E 46022, Valencia (Spain)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Continental margin subsidence and heat flow: important parameters in formation of petroleum hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive continental margins have been shown to subside with a 50-My exponentially decaying rate which cannot be explained by isostatic compensation for sediment loading. This suggests that the subsidence is dominated by geodynamic processes similar to those in the deep ocean. Two simple geologic models for continental breakup are developed: (1) attenuation of continental lithosphere; and (2) intrusion of mantle diapirs. These models for rifting give a direct relation between subsidence of passive margins and their surface heat flow through time. On this basis we develop a method of reconstructing the thermal history of sedimentary strata from regional subsidence and sedimentation history. Because generation of petroleum hydrocarbons depends on the intergrated time/temperature history of buried organic material, this reconstruction technique can be used to determine the depth to the oil range of the hydrocarbon generation window in advance of drilling. By way of example, we reconstruct time/temperature/depth plots and estimate hydrocarbon maturity for one site in the Falkland Plateau and three sites in the North Atlantic near Cape Hatteras. In addition to providing a method for evaluating hydrocarbon potential in frontier regions where there is little or no well control, this approach suggests that there may be significant potential for oil and gas generation on the outer part of the continental rise and in deep-sea sedimentary basins. 13 figures, 1 table.

Royden, L. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge); Sclater, J.G.; Von Herzen, R.P.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Marginal Misses After Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe the spatial distribution of local-regional recurrence (LRR) among patients treated postoperatively with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 90 consecutive patients treated by gross total resection and postoperative IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck from January 2003 to July 2009 were reviewed. Sites of disease were the oral cavity (43 patients), oropharynx (20 patients), larynx (15 patients), and hypopharynx (12 patients). Fifty patients (56%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Seventeen of 90 patients treated with postoperative IMRT experienced LRR, yielding a 2-year estimate of local regional control of 80%. Among the LRR patients, 11 patients were classified as in-field recurrences, occurring within the physician-designated clinical target volume, and 6 patients were categorized as marginal recurrences. There were no out-of-field geographical misses. Sites of marginal LRRs included the contralateral neck adjacent to the spared parotid gland (3 patients), the dermal/subcutaneous surface (2 patients), and the retropharyngeal/retrostyloid lymph node region (1 patient). Conclusions: Although the incidence of geographical misses was relatively low, the possibility of this phenomenon should be considered in the design of target volumes among patients treated by postoperative IMRT for head and neck cancer.

Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Luu, Quang [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Chen, Leon M.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

NMR Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NMR NMR Characterization of C3H and HCT Down-Regulated Alfalfa Lignin Yunqiao Pu & Fang Chen & Angela Ziebell & Brian H. Davison & Arthur J. Ragauskas Published online: 20 October 2009 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC. 2009 Abstract Independent down-regulation of genes encoding p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H) and hydroxycinnamoyl CoA:shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) has been previously shown to reduce the recalcitrance of alfalfa and thereby improve the release of fermentable sugars during enzymatic hydrolysis. In this study, ball-milled lignins were isolated from wild-type control, C3H, and HCT gene down-regulated alfalfa plants. One- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques were utilized to determine structural changes in the ball-milled alfalfa lignins resulting from this genetic engineering.

177

Electromagnetic fields in cased borehole  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borehole electromagnetic (EM) measurements, using fiberglass-cased boreholes, have proven useful in oil field reservoir characterization and process monitoring (Wilt et al., 1995). It has been presumed that these measurements would be impossible in steel-cased wells due to the very large EM attenuation and phase shifts. Recent laboratory and field studies have indicated that detection of EM signals through steel casing should be possible at low frequencies, and that these data provide a reasonable conductivity image at a useful scale. Thus, we see an increased application of this technique to mature oilfields, and an immediate extension to geothermal industry as well. Along with the field experiments numerical model studies have been carried out for analyzing the effect of steel casing to the EM fields. The model used to be an infinitely long uniform casing embedded in a homogeneous whole space. Nevertheless, the results indicated that the formation signal could be accurately recovered if the casing characteristics were independently known (Becker et al., 1998; Lee el al., 1998). Real steel-cased wells are much more complex than the simple laboratory models used in work to date. The purpose of this study is to develop efficient numerical methods for analyzing EM fields in realistic settings, and to evaluate the potential application of EM technologies to cross-borehole and single-hole environment for reservoir characterization and monitoring.

Lee, Ki Ha; Kim, Hee Joon; Uchida, Toshihiro

2001-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

178

Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies, August 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL/TP-6A2-46209 NREL/TP-6A2-46209 Posted with permission. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies Energy Working Group August 2009 This report was prepared for the APEC Energy Working Group under EWG 11/2008A by: Anelia Milbrandt National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Golden, Colorado, USA Web site: www.nrel.gov Dr. Ralph P. Overend NREL Research Fellow (Retired) Ottawa, Ontario, Canada APEC#209-RE-01.4 Acknowledgments The authors would like to acknowledge and thank the project overseer, Mr. Jeffrey Skeer (Department of Energy, USA and chair of the APEC Biofuels Task Force), for his support, review, and guidance throughout this project. We also thank Mr. Mark Stumborg from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada for his review and recommendations.

179

Calculations to estimate the margin to failure in the TMI-2 vessel  

SciTech Connect

As part of the OECD-sponsored Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Vessel Investigation Project (VIP), margin-to-failure calculations for mechanisms having the potential to threaten the integrity of the vessel were performed to improve understanding of events that occurred during the TMI-2 accident. Analyses considered four failure mechanisms: tube rupture, tube ejection, global vessel failure, and localized vessel failure. Calculational input was based on data from the TMI-2 VIP examinations of the vessel steel samples, the instrument tube nozzles, and samples of the hard layer of debris found on the TMI-2 vessel lower head. Sensitivity studies were performed to investigate the uncertainties in key parameters for these analyses.

Stickler, L.A.; Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L.; Snow, S.D. [EG& G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Witt, R.J.; Corradini, M.L.; Kos, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Marginal Recurrence Requiring Salvage Radiotherapy After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Spinal Metastases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction: We sought to quantify and identify risk factors associated with margin recurrence (MR) requiring salvage radiotherapy after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed patients with spinal metastases who were treated with single-fraction SBRT between 2006 and 2009. Gross tumor was contoured, along with either the entire associated vertebral body(ies) or the posterior elements, and included in the planning target volume. No additional margins were used. MR was defined as recurrent tumor within one vertebral level above or below the treated lesion that required salvage radiotherapy. Only patients who presented for 3-month post-SBRT follow-up were included in the analysis. Fine and Gray competing risk regression models were generated to identify variables associated with higher risks of MR. MR was plotted using cumulative incidence analysis. Results: SBRT was delivered to 208 lesions in 149 patients. Median follow-up was 8.6 months, and median survival was 12.8 months. The median prescribed dose was 14 Gy (10-16 Gy). MR occurred in 26 (12.5%) treated lesions, at a median time of 7.7 months after SBRT. Patients with paraspinal disease at the time of SBRT (20.8% vs. 7.6% of patients; p = 0.02), and those treated with <16 Gy (16.3% vs. 6.3% of patients, p = 0.14) had higher rates of MR. Both variables were associated with significantly higher risk of MR on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: SBRT for spinal metastases results in a low overall rate of MR. The presence of paraspinal disease at the time of SBRT and a dose of <16 Gy were associated with higher risks of MR.

Koyfman, Shlomo A.; Djemil, Toufik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Burdick, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tulane Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Woody, Neil; Balagamwala, Ehsan H.; Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Angelov, Lilyana [Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Suh, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Chao, Samuel T., E-mail: chaos@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Assessment of Reactivity Margins and Loading Curves for PWR Burnup Credit Cask Designs  

SciTech Connect

This report presents studies to assess reactivity margins and loading curves for pressurized water reactor (PWR) burnup-credit criticality safety evaluations. The studies are based on a generic high-density 32-assembly cask and systematically vary individual calculational (depletion and criticality) assumptions to demonstrate the impact on the predicted effective neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, and burnup-credit loading curves. The purpose of this report is to provide a greater understanding of the importance of input parameter variations and quantify the impact of calculational assumptions on the outcome of a burnup-credit evaluation. This study should provide guidance to regulators and industry on the technical areas where improved information will most enhance the estimation of accurate subcritical margins. Based on these studies, areas where future work may provide the most benefit are identified. The report also includes an evaluation of the degree of burnup credit needed for high-density casks to transport the current spent nuclear fuel inventory. By comparing PWR discharge data to actinide-only based loading curves and determining the number of assemblies that meet the loading criteria, this evaluation finds that additional negative reactivity (through either increased credit for fuel burnup or cask design/utilization modifications) is necessary to accommodate the majority of current spent fuel assemblies in high-capacity casks. Assemblies that are not acceptable for loading in the prototypic high-capacity cask may be stored or transported by other means (e.g., lower capacity casks that utilize flux traps and/or increased fixed poison concentrations or high-capacity casks with design/utilization modifications).

Wagner, J.C.

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

182

DEVELOPMENT OF A COASTAL MARGIN OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT SYSTEM (CMOAS) TO CAPTURE THE EPISODIC EVENTS IN A SHALLOW BAY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corpus Christi Bay (TX, USA) is a shallow wind-driven bay which is designated as a National Estuary due to its impact on the economy. But this bay experiences periodic hypoxia (dissolved oxygen <2 mg/l) which threatens aerobic aquatic organisms. Development of the Coastal Margin Observation and Assessment System (CMOAS) through integration of real-time observations with numerical modeling helps to understand the processes causing hypoxia in this energetic bay. CMOAS also serves as a template for the implementation of observational systems in other dynamic ecosystems for characterizing and predicting other episodic events such as harmful algal blooms, accidental oil spills, sediment resuspension events, etc. State-of-the-art sensor technologies are involved in real-time monitoring of hydrodynamic, meteorological and water quality parameters in the bay. Three different platform types used for the installation of sensor systems are: 1) Fixed Robotic, 2) Mobile, and 3) Remote. An automated profiler system, installed on the fixed robotic platform, vertically moves a suite of in-situ sensors within the water column for continuous measurements. An Integrated Data Acquisition, Communication and Control system has been configured on our mobile platform (research vessel) for the synchronized measurements and real-time visualization of hydrodynamic and water quality parameters at greater spatial resolution. In addition, a high frequency (HF) radar system has been installed on remote platforms to generate surface current maps for Corpus Christi (CC) Bay and its offshore area. This data is made available to stakeholders in real-time through the development of cyberinfrastructure which includes establishment of communication network, software development, web services, database development, etc. Real-time availability of measured datasets assists in implementing an integrated sampling scheme for our monitoring systems installed at different platforms. With our integrated system, we were able to capture evidence of an hypoxic event in Summer 2007. Data collected from our monitoring systems are used to drive and validate numerical models developed in this study. The analysis of observational datasets and developed 2-D hydrodynamic model output suggests that a depth-integrated model is not able to capture the water current structure of CC Bay. Also, the development of a threedimensional mechanistic dissolved oxygen model and a particle aggregation transport model (PAT) helps to clarify the critical processes causing hypoxia in the bay. The various numerical models and monitoring systems developed in this study can serve as valuable tools for the understanding and prediction of various episodic events dominant in other dynamic ecosystems.

Islam, Mohammad S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

On the global economic potentials and marginal costs of non-renewable resources and the price dynamics of energy commodities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model is presented in this work for simulating endogenously the evolution of the marginal costs of production of energy carriers from non-renewable resources, their consumption, depletion pathways and timescales. Such marginal costs can be used to simulate the long term average price formation of energy commodities. Drawing on previous work where a global database of energy resource economic potentials was constructed, this work uses cost distributions of non-renewable resources in order to evaluate global flows of energy commodities. A mathematical framework is given to calculate endogenous flows of energy resources given an exogenous commodity price path. This framework can be used in reverse in order to calculate an exogenous marginal cost of production of energy carriers given an exogenous carrier demand. Using rigid price inelastic assumptions independent of the economy, these two approaches generate limiting scenarios that depict extreme use of natural resources. This is useful to characterise the cur...

Mercure, Jean-Francois

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Community-Based Incentives for Environmental Protection: The Case of Green Electricity*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Connecticut Clean Energy Communities (CCEC) program that provides mostly symbolic rewards in the formCommunity-Based Incentives for Environmental Protection: The Case of Green Electricity* Grant the period of initial qualification. We also find that a change in the marginal incentive created

Kotchen, Matthew J.

185

Enforcement Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cases Office of the General Counsel 1000 cases Office of the General Counsel 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-586-5281 en AeroSys: Order (2011-SCE-1624) http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/aerosys-order-2011-sce-1624 AeroSys: Order (2011-SCE-1624)

186

Case Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Study Case Study M2M Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 An irrigation pump connected to a web---to---wireless controller designed by M2M Communications. Agricultural Demand Response Program in California Helps Farmers Reduce Peak Electricity Usage, Operate More Efficiently Year---Round The development of a two---way, web---to---wireless controller for irrigation pumps is the foundation for an agricultural demand response program in California. Designed by M2M Communications of Boise, Idaho, the controller is part of an irrigation load control system that also includes sensors, smart meters, and other monitoring equipment. Partially funded with $2.2 million in Recovery Act stimulus funds awarded by the U.S. Department of

187

Case Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Name of Petitioner: Name of Petitioner: Date of Filing: Case Number: Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 JUL 2 2 2009 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Appeal Dean P. Dennis March 2, 2009 TBA-0072 Dean D. Dennis filed a complaint of retaliation under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Dennis alleged that he engaged in protected activity and that his employer, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec ), subsequently terminated him. An Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Hearing Officer denied relief in Dean P. Dennis, Case No. TBH-0072, 1 and Mr. Dennis filed the instant appeal. As discussed below, the appeal is denied. I. Background The DOE established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to "safeguard public

188

FOIA Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

foia-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 foia-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en FIA-13-0077 - In the Matter of John F. Garrity http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/fia-13-0077-matter-john-f-garrity FIA-13-0077 - In the Matter of John F. Garrity

189

Security Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

security-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 security-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en PSH-13-0103 - In the Matter of Personnel Security http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/psh-13-0103-matter-personnel-security PSH-13-0103 - In the Matter of Personnel Security

190

Whistleblower Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

whistleblower-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals whistleblower-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en WBX-12-0004 - In the Matter of Denise Hunter http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/wbx-12-0004-matter-denise-hunter WBX-12-0004 - In the Matter of Denise Hunter

191

EIA Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

eia-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 eia-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en TEE-0073 - In the Matter of Cole Distributing, Inc. http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/tee-0073-matter-cole-distributing-inc TEE-0073 - In the Matter of Cole Distributing, Inc.

192

Direct Nyquist array design of PID controllers for boiler-turbine units based on gain and phase margins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a direct Nyquist array (DNA) method for the design of PID controllers for multivariable boiler-turbine units with specifications of gain and phase margins is proposed. The essential objective is to propose a method for the design and auto-tuning ...

Hui Pan; Minrui Fei; Ling Wang; Kang Li; Lin Qian

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Surface uplift, fluvial incision, and geodynamics of plateau evolution, from the western margin of the Central Andean plateau  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Colca-Majes and Cotahuasi-Ocona rivers in southwest Peru that cut through the western margin of the Andean plateau en route to the Pacific Ocean incised canyons over 3 km deep in response to late Cenozoic surface uplift. ...

Schildgen, Taylor F. (Taylor Frances)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

FORMING PLANETESIMALS BY GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY. II. HOW DUST SETTLES TO ITS MARGINALLY STABLE STATE  

SciTech Connect

Dust at the midplane of a circumstellar disk can become gravitationally unstable and fragment into planetesimals if the local dust-to-gas ratio {mu}{sub 0} {identical_to} {rho}{sub d}/{rho}{sub g} is sufficiently high. We simulate how dust settles in passive disks and ask how high {mu}{sub 0} can become. We implement a hybrid scheme that alternates between a one-dimensional code to settle dust and a three-dimensional shearing box code to test for dynamical stability. This scheme allows us to explore the behavior of small particles having short but non-zero stopping times in gas: 0 < t{sub stop}<< the orbital period. The streaming instability is thereby filtered out. Dust settles until Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instabilities at the top and bottom faces of the dust layer threaten to overturn the entire layer. In this state of marginal stability, {mu}{sub 0} = 2.9 for a disk whose bulk (height-integrated) metallicity {Sigma}{sub d}/{Sigma}{sub g} is solar-thus {mu}{sub 0} increases by more than two orders of magnitude from its well-mixed initial value of {mu}{sub 0,init} = {Sigma}{sub d}/{Sigma}{sub g} = 0.015. For a disk whose bulk metallicity is 4x solar ({mu}{sub 0,init} = {Sigma}{sub d}/{Sigma}{sub g} = 0.06), the marginally stable state has {mu}{sub 0} = 26.4. These maximum values of {mu}{sub 0}, which depend on the background radial pressure gradient, are so large that gravitational instability of small particles is viable in disks whose bulk metallicities are just a few ({approx}<4) times solar. Our result supports earlier studies that assumed that dust settles until the Richardson number Ri is spatially constant. Our simulations are free of this assumption but provide evidence for it within the boundaries of the dust layer, with the proviso that Ri increases with {Sigma}{sub d}/{Sigma}{sub g} in the same way that we found in Paper I. Because increasing the dust content decreases the vertical shear and increases stability, the midplane {mu}{sub 0} increases with {Sigma}{sub d}/{Sigma}{sub g} in a faster than linear way, so fast that modest enhancements in {Sigma}{sub d}/{Sigma}{sub g} can spawn planetesimals directly from small particles.

Lee, Aaron T.; Chiang, Eugene [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Asay-Davis, Xylar [Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Barranco, Joseph, E-mail: a.t.lee@berkeley.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States)

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

195

ORISE: Characterization surveys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization surveys Characterization surveys An ORISE technicians performs a characterization survey The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs independent, objective characterization surveys to define the extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental aspect of all D&D projects, characterization surveys provide guidance to determine the best remediation procedures and are a cost-effective method of ensuring a site meets preliminary regulatory standards. ORISE designs characterization surveys using the data quality objectives process. This approach focuses on the particular objective of characterization, and ensures that only the data needed to address the characterization decisions are collected. Data collection efforts are

196

Conceptual and computational basis for the quantification of margins and uncertainty.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2001, the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy in conjunction with the national security laboratories (i.e, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories) initiated development of a process designated Quantification of Margins and Uncertainty (QMU) for the use of risk assessment methodologies in the certification of the reliability and safety of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. This presentation discusses and illustrates the conceptual and computational basis of QMU in analyses that use computational models to predict the behavior of complex systems. Topics considered include (1) the role of aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in QMU, (2) the representation of uncertainty with probability, (3) the probabilistic representation of uncertainty in QMU analyses involving only epistemic uncertainty, (4) the probabilistic representation of uncertainty in QMU analyses involving aleatory and epistemic uncertainty, (5) procedures for sampling-based uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, (6) the representation of uncertainty with alternatives to probability such as interval analysis, possibility theory and evidence theory, (7) the representation of uncertainty with alternatives to probability in QMU analyses involving only epistemic uncertainty, and (8) the representation of uncertainty with alternatives to probability in QMU analyses involving aleatory and epistemic uncertainty. Concepts and computational procedures are illustrated with both notional examples and examples from reactor safety and radioactive waste disposal.

Helton, Jon Craig (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Shutdown Margin for High Conversion BWRs Operating in Th-233U Fuel Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several reactivity control system design options are explored in order to satisfy shutdown margin (SDM) requirements in a high conversion BWRs operating in Th-233U fuel cycle (Th-RBWR). The studied has an axially heterogeneous fuel assembly structure with a single fissile zone sandwiched between two fertile blanket zones. The utilization of an originally suggested RBWR Y-shape control rod in Th-RBWR is shown to be insufficient for maintaining adequate SDM to balance the high negative reactivity feedbacks, while maintaining fuel breeding potential, core power rating, and minimum Critical Power Ratio (CPR). Instead, an alternative assembly design, also relying on heterogeneous fuel zoning, is proposed for achieving fissile inventory ratio (FIR) above unity, adequate SDM and meeting minimum CPR limit at thermal core output matching the ABWR power. The new concept was modeled as a single 3-dimensional fuel assembly having reflective radial boundaries, using the BGCore system, which consists of the MCNP code coupled with fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic feedback modules.

Yaniv Shaposhnik; Eugene Shwageraus; Ezra Elias

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

Responses of upland herpetofauna to the restoration of Carolina Bays and thinning of forested Bay Margins.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on the effects of wetland restoration on reptiles and amphibians is becoming more common, but almost all of these studies have observed the colonization of recently disturbed habitats that were completely dry at the time of restoration. In a similar manner, investigations herpetofaunal responses to forest management have focused on clearcuts, and less intensive stand manipulations are not as well studied. To evaluate community and population responses of reptiles and amphibians to hydrology restoration and canopy removal in the interior of previously degraded Carolina bays, I monitored herpetofauna in the uplands adjacent to six historically degraded Carolina bays at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina for four years after restoration. To evaluate the effects of forest thinning on upland herpetofauna, forests were thinned in the margins of three of these bays. I used repeated measures ANOVA to compare species richness and diversity and the abundance of selected species and guilds between these bays and with those at three reference bays that were not historically drained and three control bays that remained degraded. I also used Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) to look for community-level patterns based treatments.

Ledvina, Joseph A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

An Enhanced In-Vessel Core Catcher for Improving In-Vessel Retention Margins  

SciTech Connect

In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt that may relocate to the lower head of a reactor vessel is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for several advanced light water reactors. A U.S.-Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project has been initiated to explore design enhancements that could increase the margin for IVR for advanced reactors with higher power levels [up to 1500 MW(electric)]. As part of this effort, an enhanced in-vessel core catcher is being designed and evaluated. To reduce cost and simplify manufacture and installation, this new core catcher design consists of several interlocking sections that are machined to fit together when inserted into the lower head. If needed, the core catcher can be manufactured with holes to accommodate lower head penetrations. Each section of the core catcher consists of two material layers with an option to add a third layer (if deemed necessary). The first is a base material that has the capability to support and contain the mass of core materials that may relocate during a severe accident; the second is an oxide coating on top of the base material, which resists interactions with high-temperature core materials; and the third is an optional coating on the bottom side of the base material to protect it from oxidation during the lifetime of the reactor. This paper summarizes results from the invessel core catcher design and evaluation efforts, focusing on recently obtained results from materials interaction tests and prototypic testing activities.

Joy L. Rempe

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Development of an Enhanced Core Catcher for Improving In-Vessel Retention Margins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt that may relocate to the lower head of a reactor vessel is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for several advanced light water reactors. A U.S.-Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project has been initiated to explore design enhancements that could increase the margin for IVR for advanced reactors with higher power levels [up to 1500 MW(electric)]. As part of this effort, an enhanced in-vessel core catcher is being designed and evaluated. To reduce cost and simplify manufacture and installation, this new core catcher design consists of several interlocking sections that are machined to fit together when inserted into the lower head. If needed, the core catcher can be manufactured with holes to accommodate lower head penetrations. Each section of the core catcher consists of two material layers with an option to add a third layer (if deemed necessary). The first is a base material that has the capability to support and contain the mass of core materials that may relocate during a severe accident; the second is an oxide coating on top of the base material, which resists interactions with high-temperature core materials; and the third is an optional coating on the bottom side of the base material to protect it from oxidation during the lifetime of the reactor. This paper summarizes results from the in-vessel core catcher design and evaluation efforts, focusing on recently obtained results from materials interaction tests and prototypic testing activities.

Rempe, J.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Condie, K.G. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Knudson, D.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Suh, K.Y. [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Cheung, F.B. [The Pennsylvania State University (United States); Kim, S.B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A passive margin-type submarine fan complex, Permian Ecca Group, South Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A submarine fan complex, comprising five arenaceous fan systems separated by basinal shale units, occurs in the southwestern part of the intracratonic Karoo basin in South Africa. Although basin development is related to a subduction zone bordering the palaeo-Pacific ocean to the south of Gondwanaland and the evolution of the Cape Fold Belt, the entire Lower Permian Ecca Group basin-fill succession reflects depositional characteristics of a passive-margin setting. The submarine fan complex, 250 m thick, originated from sediments supplied by Mississippi-type deltas dominating the Ecca coastline. The fine grain-size and low sand/shale ratio of the submarine fan and deltaic deposits reflect the maturity of the ancient river systems. Outcrops of the fan complex are well exposed and cover an area of 650 km{sup 2}. The strata are not affected by folding, and deep erosion allows three-dimensional viewing of mid-fan to outer-fan deposits. Features of interest include stacked lobe deposits displayed along 2.5 km of a 60 m high cliff section, and a transverse cliff section through channel-fill deposits 500 m wide. Paleocurrent directions reveal that each sequence had its own main source area located to the northwest and south of its present geographic location. The cyclic nature of the fan complex is attributed to relative sea-level changes; deposition took place on the basin floor in water depths that do not exceed 500 m. Shoaling of the basin to wave base depths is reflected in the pro-delta and delta front deposits overlying the uppermost fan sequence. Major factors in controlling direction of fan progradation were delta switching and basin floor topography.

Wickens, H.D. (SOEKOR-Pty. Ltd., Parow (South Africa)); Bouma, A.H. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Technical Basis Guide Describing How to Perform Safety Margin Configuration Risk Management  

SciTech Connect

The INL has carried out a demonstration of the RISMC approach for the purpose of configuration risk management. We have shown how improved accuracy and realism can be achieved by simulating changes in risk – as a function of different configurations – in order to determine safety margins as the plant is modified. We described the various technical issues that play a role in these configuration-based calculations with the intent that future applications can take advantage of the analysis benefits while avoiding some of the technical pitfalls that are found for these types of calculations. Specific recommendations have been provided on a variety of topics aimed at improving the safety margin analysis and strengthening the technical basis behind the analysis process.

Curtis Smith; James Knudsen; Bentley Harwood

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The need for rotational margins in intensity-modulated radiotherapy and a new method for planning target volume design  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The effect of rotational errors on the coverage of clinical target volumes (CTVs) is examined. A new planning target volume (PTV) construction that considers the individual paths traced by movements of the target boundary points is developed. Methods and Materials: A standard uniform margin expansion was compared with a PTV constructed from the space swept out by a concave moving target. A new method formed the PTV by aggregating the separate convex hulls taken of the positions of the individual target boundary points in a sampling of CTV displacements. Results: A 0.5-cm uniform margin adequate for translations was inadequate given CTV rotation about a fixed off-center axis. A PTV formed of the target's swept-out area was 22% smaller than needed for coverage by a uniform margin, but computationally is not readily extended to translations combined with rotations about a shifting axis. Forming instead the union of convex hulls of the boundary points in a sampling of CTV displacements represented these movements in the PTV design and retained the target's concave shape. Conclusions: Planning target volumes should accommodate target rotation. The union of convex hulls of the boundary point positions in a sampling of displacements can effectively represent multiple sources of deviations while preserving target concavities.

Langer, Mark Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)]. E-mail: mlanger@iupui.edu; Papiez, Lech [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Spirydovich, Siarhei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Thai, Van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Refining and Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012 ... Solar Cell Silicon: Refining and Characterization .... Silicon PV Wafers: Correlation of Mechanical Properties and Crack Propagation with ...

206

Mixed Waste Characterization Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of the process of characterizing potential mixed waste streams from nuclear power plants. Utility experts developed these guidelines to help guide utility personnel through the characterization process and provide a mechanism for properly documenting the characterization of individual waste streams.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

NETL: Emissions Characterization - CMU Emissions Characterization Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Emissions Characterization Study Source Emissions Characterization Study The emissions characterization study is being performed in conjunction with the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study [PDF-744KB], a larger effort that includes ambient measurements and atmospheric modeling of the Pittsburgh region. The main objectives of this portion of the study are: To achieve advanced characterization of the PM in the Pittsburgh region. Measurements include the PM size, surface, volume, and mass distribution; chemical composition as a function of size and on a single particle basis; temporal and spatial variability. To obtain accurate current fingerprints of the major primary PM sources in the Pittsburgh region using traditional filter-based sampling and state-of-the-art techniques such as dilution sampling and single particle analysis using mass spectroscopy and LIBS.

208

Dynamic Long-Term Modelling of Generation Capacity Investment and Capacity Margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Total interest accumulated during construction is given by TIACx = ICx ? cxpx. Finally, DCx is the present worth of the decommissioning cost. Only nuclear projects have considerable decommissioning costs (estimated at 12% of px4); in the case of other... plant types the decommissioning liabilities are assumed to be offset by the salvage value of the assets [22]. Nuclear decommissioning is assumed to take 150 years and the equivalent incidence of capital outlay matrix contains 0.05 for the first 10...

Eager, Dan; Hobbs, Benjamin; Bialek, Janusz

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

209

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products: The Case of India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A: Calculating Marginal Electricity Rates An understandingof marginal electricity rates is crucial in assessingElectricity Rates .

McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert, Virginie; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Structural Characterization of Modern Highway Overcrossings - Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING © ASCE / JUNE 2004 / 859 Roesset,groups. ’’ Pile founda- tions, ASCE, New York. Seed, H. B. ,860 / JOURNAL OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING © ASCE / JUNE 2004

Zhang, Jian; Makris, Nicos; Delis, Tim

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Individualized Margins in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy Planning for Lung Cancer: Analysis of Physiological Movements and Their Dosimetric Impacts  

SciTech Connect

In conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer, respiratory movements are not taken into account when a single computed tomography (CT) scan is performed. This study examines tumor movements to design individualized margins to account for these movements and evaluates their dosimetric impacts on planning volume. Fifteen patients undergoing CT-based planning for radical radiotherapy for localized lung cancer formed the study cohort. A reference plan was constructed based on reference gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (rGTV, rCTV, and rPTV, respectively). The reference plans were compared with individualized plans using individualized margins obtained by using 5 serial CT scans to generate individualized target volumes (iGTV, iCTV, and iPTV). Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was used for plan generation using 6- and 23-MV photon beams. Ten plans for each patient were generated and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated. Comparisons of volumetric and dosimetric parameters were performed using paired Student t-tests. Relative to the rGTV, the total volume occupied by the superimposed GTVs increased progressively with each additional CT scans. With the use of all 5 scans, the average increase in GTV was 52.1%. For the plans with closest dosimetric coverage, target volume was smaller (iPTV/rPTV ratio 0.808) but lung irradiation was only slightly decreased. Reduction in the proportion of lung tissue that received 20 Gy or more outside the PTV (V20) was observed both for 6-MV plans (-0.73%) and 23-MV plans (-0.65%), with p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively. In conformal RT planning for the treatment of lung cancer, the use of serial CT scans to evaluate respiratory motion and to generate individualized margins to account for these motions produced only a limited lung sparing advantage.

Germain, Francois [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Laval University, Quebec (Canada)], E-mail: fgermain@bccancer.bc.ca; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, Andre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Laval University, Quebec (Canada)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Radiobiological Impact of Reduced Margins and Treatment Technique for Prostate Cancer in Terms of Tumor Control Probability (TCP) and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dose escalation in prostate radiotherapy is limited by normal tissue toxicities. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of margin size on tumor control and side effects for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) treatment plans with increased dose. Eighteen patients with localized prostate cancer were enrolled. 3DCRT and IMRT plans were compared for a variety of margin sizes. A marker detectable on daily portal images was presupposed for narrow margins. Prescribed dose was 82 Gy within 41 fractions to the prostate clinical target volume (CTV). Tumor control probability (TCP) calculations based on the Poisson model including the linear quadratic approach were performed. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was calculated for bladder, rectum and femoral heads according to the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman method. All plan types presented essentially identical TCP values and very low NTCP for bladder and femoral heads. Mean doses for these critical structures reached a minimum for IMRT with reduced margins. Two endpoints for rectal complications were analyzed. A marked decrease in NTCP for IMRT plans with narrow margins was seen for mild RTOG grade 2/3 as well as for proctitis/necrosis/stenosis/fistula, for which NTCP <7% was obtained. For equivalent TCP values, sparing of normal tissue was demonstrated with the narrow margin approach. The effect was more pronounced for IMRT than 3DCRT, with respect to NTCP for mild, as well as severe, rectal complications.

Jensen, Ingelise, E-mail: inje@rn.d [Department of Medical Physics, Aalborg Hospital, University of Aarhus, Aalborg (Denmark); Carl, Jesper [Department of Medical Physics, Aalborg Hospital, University of Aarhus, Aalborg (Denmark); Lund, Bente [Department of Oncology, Aalborg Hospital, University of Aarhus, Aalborg (Denmark); Larsen, Erik H. [Department of Urology, Aalborg Hospital, University of Aarhus, Aalborg (Denmark); Nielsen, Jane [Department of Medical Physics, Aalborg Hospital, University of Aarhus, Aalborg (Denmark)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

GLOVEBOX GLOVE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY  

SciTech Connect

A task was undertaken to determine primarily the permeation behavior of various glove compounds from four manufacturers. As part of the basic characterization task, the opportunity to obtain additional mechanical and thermal properties presented itself. Consequently, a total of fifteen gloves were characterized for permeation, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Puncture Resistance, Tensile Properties and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. Detailed reports were written for each characterization technique used. This report contains the summary of the results.

Korinko, P.

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

214

NP Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(BES) Biological and Environmental Science (BER) Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) High Energy Physics (HEP) Nuclear Physics (NP) Agenda Hotel Case Studies Case Study Worksheets...

215

Characterization of Light Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... Characterization of Grit Blasted Metallic Biomaterials by ... The grit blasting, a surface improvement treatment is used to enhance mechanical ...

216

Characterization of Advanced Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... In this study, the binary and ternary thermal energy storage materials have been performed the phase equilibrium and characterization studies ...

217

ORISE: Characterization surveys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental aspect of all D&D projects, characterization surveys provide...

218

Characterization - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 17, 2010 ... Our continuing studies involve characterization of neutron-irradiated specimens, including 12YWT and MA957 irradiated in HFIR to 9 dpa at ...

219

Broadening the Appeal of Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: Capturing Both Carbon Mitigation and Development Benefits of Clean Energy Technologies: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Broadening the Appeal of Broadening the Appeal of Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: Capturing Both Carbon Mitigation and Development Benefits of Clean Energy Technologies Preprint Shannon Cowlin, Jaquelin Cochran, Sadie Cox, and Carolyn Davidson National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wytze van der Gaast JI Network Presented at the 2012 World Renewable Energy Forum Denver, Colorado May 13-17, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-6A20-54487 August 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

220

A method for calculation of margins to voltage instability applied on the Norwegian system for maintaining required security level  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes a method for calculating margins to voltage instability. The method is based on sensitivity techniques. The measure to voltage instability can be given in terms of MW, MVAr or MVA depending on the components in the increase in load. The extensions to earlier publications of the method are the ability to increase the load and generation simultaneously on several buses without increasing the computation time. A single forward and backward substitution is sufficient to find the required sensitivities when the load is increased. The productions of the plant can be increased either by a specified profile or by using the turbine droop characteristics. A method for identification of contingencies needing an explicit reserve evaluation is briefly described.

Flataboe, N.; Fosso, O.B.; Ognedal, R.; Carlsen, T.; Heggland, K.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Bayesian inference through encompassing priors and importance sampling for a class of marginal models for categorical data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a Bayesian approach for selecting the model which is the most supported by the data within a class of marginal models for categorical variables formulated through equality and/or inequality constraints on generalised logits (local, global, continuation or reverse continuation), generalised log-odds ratios and similar higher-order interactions. For each constrained model, the prior distribution of the model parameters is formulated following the encompassing prior approach. Then, model selection is performed by using Bayes factors which are estimated by an importance sampling method. The approach is illustrated through three applications involving some datasets, which also include explanatory variables. In connection with one of these examples, a sensitivity analysis to the prior specification is also considered.

Bartolucci, Francesco; Farcomeni, Alessio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

The electrical resistivity method in cased boreholes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of downhole current sources in resistivity mapping can greatly enhance the detection and delineation of subsurface features. The purpose of this work is to examine the resistivity method for current sources in wells cased with steel. The resistivity method in cased boreholes with downhole current sources is investigated using the integral equation (IE) technique. The casing and other bodies are characterized as conductivity inhomogeneities in a half-space. For sources located along the casing axis, an axially symmetric Green's function is used to formulate the surface potential and electric field (E-field) volume integral equations. The situations involving off-axis current sources and three-dimensional (3-D) bodies is formulated using the surface potential IE method. The solution of the 3-D Green's function is presented in cylindrical and Cartesian coordinate systems. The methods of moments is used to solve the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind for the response due to the casing and other bodies. The numerical analysis revealed that the current in the casing can be approximated by its vertical component except near the source and the axial symmetric approximation of the casing is valid even for the 3-D problem. The E-field volume IE method is an effective and efficient technique to simulate the response of the casing in a half-space, whereas the surface potential approach is computationally better when multiple bodies are involved. Analyzing several configurations of the current source indicated that the casing response is influenced by four characteristic factors: conduction length, current source depth,casing depth, and casing length. 85 refs., 133 figs., 11 tabs.

Schenkel, C.J.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Site characterization handbook  

SciTech Connect

This Handbook discusses both management and technical elements that should be considered in developing a comprehensive site characterization program. Management elements typical of any project of a comparable magnitude and complexity are combined with a discussion of strategies specific to site characterization. Information specific to the technical elements involved in site characterization is based on guidance published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with respect to licensing requirements for LLW disposal facilities. The objective of this Handbook is to provide a reference for both NRC Agreement States and non-Agreement States for use in developing a comprehensive site characterization program that meets the specific objectives of the State and/or site developer/licensee. Each site characterization program will vary depending on the objectives, licensing requirements, schedules/budgets, physical characteristics of the site, proposed facility design, and the specific concerns raised by government agencies and the public. Therefore, the Handbook is not a prescriptive guide to site characterization. 18 refs., 6 figs.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

In Case of Emergency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Case of Emergency In Case of Emergency Print FirePolice Emergency: ext. 7911 Cell phone or off-site: 510-486-7911 When dialing from off-site, the following numbers need to be...

225

Characterizing electrocatalytic surfaces: Electrochemical and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing electrocatalytic surfaces: Electrochemical and NMR studies of methanol and carbon monoxide on PtC Title Characterizing electrocatalytic surfaces: Electrochemical...

226

Nuclear power plant cable materials : review of qualification and currently available aging data for margin assessments in cable performance.  

SciTech Connect

A selective literature review was conducted to assess whether currently available accelerated aging and original qualification data could be used to establish operational margins for the continued use of cable insulation and jacketing materials in nuclear power plant environments. The materials are subject to chemical and physical degradation under extended radiationthermal- oxidative conditions. Of particular interest were the circumstances under which existing aging data could be used to predict whether aged materials should pass loss of coolant accident (LOCA) performance requirements. Original LOCA qualification testing usually involved accelerated aging simulations of the 40-year expected ambient aging conditions followed by a LOCA simulation. The accelerated aging simulations were conducted under rapid accelerated aging conditions that did not account for many of the known limitations in accelerated polymer aging and therefore did not correctly simulate actual aging conditions. These highly accelerated aging conditions resulted in insulation materials with mostlyinert' aging processes as well as jacket materials where oxidative damage dropped quickly away from the air-exposed outside jacket surface. Therefore, for most LOCA performance predictions, testing appears to have relied upon heterogeneous aging behavior with oxidation often limited to the exterior of the cable cross-section - a situation which is not comparable with the nearly homogenous oxidative aging that will occur over decades under low dose rate and low temperature plant conditions. The historical aging conditions are therefore insufficient to determine with reasonable confidence the remaining operational margins for these materials. This does not necessarily imply that the existing 40-year-old materials would fail if LOCA conditions occurred, but rather that unambiguous statements about the current aging state and anticipated LOCA performance cannot be provided based on original qualification testing data alone. The non-availability of conclusive predictions for the aging conditions of 40-year-old cables implies that the same levels of uncertainty will remain for any re-qualification or extended operation of these cables. The highly variable aging behavior of the range of materials employed also implies that simple, standardized aging tests are not sufficient to provide the required aging data and performance predictions for all materials. It is recommended that focused studies be conducted that would yield the material aging parameters needed to predict aging behaviors under low dose, low temperature plant equivalent conditions and that appropriately aged specimens be prepared that would mimic oxidatively-aged 40- to 60- year-old materials for confirmatory LOCA performance testing. This study concludes that it is not sufficient to expose materials to rapid, high radiation and high temperature levels with subsequent LOCA qualification testing in order to predictively quantify safety margins of existing infrastructure with regard to LOCA performance. We need to better understand how cable jacketing and insulation materials have degraded over decades of power plant operation and how this aging history relates to service life prediction and the performance of existing equipment to withstand a LOCA situation.

Celina, Mathias Christopher; Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Lindgren, Eric Richard

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Nuclear power plant cable materials : review of qualification and currently available aging data for margin assessments in cable performance.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A selective literature review was conducted to assess whether currently available accelerated aging and original qualification data could be used to establish operational margins for the continued use of cable insulation and jacketing materials in nuclear power plant environments. The materials are subject to chemical and physical degradation under extended radiationthermal- oxidative conditions. Of particular interest were the circumstances under which existing aging data could be used to predict whether aged materials should pass loss of coolant accident (LOCA) performance requirements. Original LOCA qualification testing usually involved accelerated aging simulations of the 40-year expected ambient aging conditions followed by a LOCA simulation. The accelerated aging simulations were conducted under rapid accelerated aging conditions that did not account for many of the known limitations in accelerated polymer aging and therefore did not correctly simulate actual aging conditions. These highly accelerated aging conditions resulted in insulation materials with mostlyinert' aging processes as well as jacket materials where oxidative damage dropped quickly away from the air-exposed outside jacket surface. Therefore, for most LOCA performance predictions, testing appears to have relied upon heterogeneous aging behavior with oxidation often limited to the exterior of the cable cross-section - a situation which is not comparable with the nearly homogenous oxidative aging that will occur over decades under low dose rate and low temperature plant conditions. The historical aging conditions are therefore insufficient to determine with reasonable confidence the remaining operational margins for these materials. This does not necessarily imply that the existing 40-year-old materials would fail if LOCA conditions occurred, but rather that unambiguous statements about the current aging state and anticipated LOCA performance cannot be provided based on original qualification testing data alone. The non-availability of conclusive predictions for the aging conditions of 40-year-old cables implies that the same levels of uncertainty will remain for any re-qualification or extended operation of these cables. The highly variable aging behavior of the range of materials employed also implies that simple, standardized aging tests are not sufficient to provide the required aging data and performance predictions for all materials. It is recommended that focused studies be conducted that would yield the material aging parameters needed to predict aging behaviors under low dose, low temperature plant equivalent conditions and that appropriately aged specimens be prepared that would mimic oxidatively-aged 40- to 60- year-old materials for confirmatory LOCA performance testing. This study concludes that it is not sufficient to expose materials to rapid, high radiation and high temperature levels with subsequent LOCA qualification testing in order to predictively quantify safety margins of existing infrastructure with regard to LOCA performance. We need to better understand how cable jacketing and insulation materials have degraded over decades of power plant operation and how this aging history relates to service life prediction and the performance of existing equipment to withstand a LOCA situation.

Celina, Mathias Christopher; Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Lindgren, Eric Richard

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Coastal Boundary Layer at the Eastern Margin of the Southeast Pacific (23.4°S, 70.4°W): Cloudiness-Conditioned Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A basic climatological description of 29 years of surface and upper-air observations at a coastal site (23.4°S, 70.4°W) in northern Chile is presented. The site is considered to be generally representative of the eastern coastal margin of the ...

Ricardo C. Muñoz; Rosa A. Zamora; José A. Rutllant

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Tank characterization reference guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of the Hanford Site high-level waste storage tanks supports safety issue resolution; operations and maintenance requirements; and retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and disposal technology development. Technical, historical, and programmatic information about the waste tanks is often scattered among many sources, if it is documented at all. This Tank Characterization Reference Guide, therefore, serves as a common location for much of the generic tank information that is otherwise contained in many documents. The report is intended to be an introduction to the issues and history surrounding the generation, storage, and management of the liquid process wastes, and a presentation of the sampling, analysis, and modeling activities that support the current waste characterization. This report should provide a basis upon which those unfamiliar with the Hanford Site tank farms can start their research.

De Lorenzo, D.S.; DiCenso, A.T.; Hiller, D.B.; Johnson, K.W.; Rutherford, J.H.; Smith, D.J. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Simpson, B.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Characterization of Planar Transmission Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... References on: On-Wafer Measurement and Calibration, Planar Transmission Line Characterization and Multiconductor Transmission Lines. ...

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Jankovic Aerosol Characterization.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization, Characterization, Aerosol Characterization, Interpretation, and Interpretation, and Application of Data Application of Data NSRC Symposium NSRC Symposium July 8, 2008 John Jankovic, CIH CIH Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Aerosol Characterization, Interpretation, and Aerosol Characterization, Interpretation, and Application of Data Application of Data Department of Energy (DOE) Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRC) developing Approach to Nanomaterial ES&H - The CNMS Approach * Establish Exposure Control Guideline (ECG) - Characterize Aerosol * Collect and interpret data * Assign Process to a Control Band Aerosol Particle Characterization * Size distribution (geometric mean and geometric standard deviation related to either mass, surface, or number)

232

Session C: Nanoscale Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 23, 2010... a 523 nm laser with a pulse energy of 0.6 nJ, a pulse frequency of 100 kHz, ... In the case of multijunction tandem solar cells, the semimetallic ...

233

Review of the margins for ASME code fatigue design curve - effects of surface roughness and material variability.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. The Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of the existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data for carbon and low-alloy steels and wrought and cast austenitic SSs to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of the steels. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on the fatigue life of these steels in air and LWR environments. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are discussed. Data available in the literature have been reviewed to evaluate the conservatism in the existing ASME Code fatigue evaluations. A critical review of the margins for ASME Code fatigue design curves is presented.

Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

2003-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards a Low Carbon Economy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: A Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards a...

235

Furnace Black Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Furnace Black Characterization Sid Richardson Carbon Co Fort Worth, TX Dr. Michel Gerspacher #12 of Crystallographic Studies #12;005F7 Methodologies #12;005F8 Summary · For all furnace carbon black 12� Surface Unorganized Carbon Identified #12;005F11 SRCC's Model #12;005F12 Carbon Black Surface Activity

236

Standard Bullets and Casings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Figure 2. On the left, a NIST SRM 2461 ... Case mounted on a brass cylinder holder; right, optical micrograph ... the data are in ASCII tab delimited format ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

OSCARS Case Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feedback: info@es.net OSCARS Case Study OSCARS Virtual Circuits Extend JGI Network Capacity The Challenge In February 2010, the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) at Lawrence Berkeley...

238

Characterization of light weight composite proppants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research objectives are to develop experimental and computational techniques to characterize and to study the influence of polymer coating on the mechanical response of walnut shell particles to be used as proppants. E3-ESEM and Zeiss Axiophot LM are used to study the cellular microstructure and feasibility of polymer infiltration and uniform coating. Three main testing procedures; single particle compression, heating tests on coated and uncoated walnut shell particles and 3-point flexure tests are undertaken. In in-situ ESEM observations on both the coated and uncoated particles showed signs of charring at about 175 – 200 ºC. Single particle compression test are conducted with random geometry particles and subsequently with four distinct shape categories to minimize the statistical scatter; flat top, round top, cone top, and high aspect ratio. Single particle tests on uniformly cut cuboid particles from walnut shell flakes are used to capture the nonlinear material response. Furthermore cyclic compression loads are imposed on flat top particles which reveal that significant permanent deformation set in even at low load levels. Computational models include Hertzian representation, 2D and 3D finite element models to simulate single coated and uncoated particles under compression. The elastic material with geometric nonlinear representation is not able to simulate the compression response observed during testing. The inelastic material representation is able to significantly improve the compression response and address the influence of geometric shape on particle response. A single uniform layer of polymer coat is introduced on the 3D models with nonlinear material definition. Coating provides a marginal improvement in load vs displacement response of the particles while increasing the ability of the particle to withstand higher loads.

Kulkarni, Mandar Chaitanya

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products: The Case of India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on projections of electricity prices or avoided costs forthe projected marginal electricity price for households orfirst cost. Marginal Electricity Prices The consumer impacts

McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert, Virginie; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Electro-Optical Characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Electro-Optical Characterization group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we use various electrical and optical experimental techniques to relate photovoltaic device performance to the methods and materials used to produce them. The types of information obtained by these techniques range from small-scale atomic-bonding information to large-scale macroscopic quantities such as optical constants and electron-transport properties. Accurate and timely measurement of the electro-optical properties as a function of device processing provides researchers and manufacturers with the knowledge needed to troubleshoot problems and develop the knowledge base necessary for reducing cost, maximizing efficiency, improving reliability, and enhancing manufacturability. We work collaboratively with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes our primary techniques and capabilities.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Electricity prices in a competitive environment: Marginal cost pricing of generation services and financial status of electric utilities. A preliminary analysis through 2015  

SciTech Connect

The emergence of competitive markets for electricity generation services is changing the way that electricity is and will be priced in the United States. This report presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated {open_quotes}cost-of-service{close_quotes} pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers? This study is not intended to be a cost-benefit analysis of wholesale or retail competition, nor does this report include an analysis of the macroeconomic impacts of competitive electricity prices.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Measurements and Characterization (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Measurements and Characterization that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for Analytical Microscopy, Electro-Optical Characterization, Surface Analysis, and Cell and Module Performance.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Influence of Defect Kind and Size on Margins With Respect to Fast Fracture of Irradiated PWR Vessels: Joint EPRI-CRIEPI RPV Embrittl ement Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the effects of improved analysis techniques on the calculated margins against crack initiation and fast fracture in PWR vessels. A comparison of this work with previous studies showed that use of more in-depth analytic techniques may lead to more-realistic treatment of surface flaws. Such findings are particularly valuable to utilities developing nondestructive inspection techniques and evaluation methods for demonstrating the acceptability of an irradiated PWR vessel.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

244

Assessment of Planning Target Volume Margins for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of the Prostate Gland: Role of Daily Inter- and Intrafraction Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine planning target volume margins for prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy based on inter- and intrafraction motion using four daily localization techniques: three-point skin mark alignment, volumetric imaging with bony landmark registration, volumetric imaging with implanted fiducial marker registration, and implanted electromagnetic transponders (beacons) detection. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer formed the basis of this study. Each patient was implanted with three electromagnetic transponders and underwent a course of 39 treatment fractions. Daily localization was based on three-point skin mark alignment followed by transponder detection and patient repositioning. Transponder positioning was verified by volumetric imaging with cone-beam computed tomography of the pelvis. Relative motion between the prostate gland and bony anatomy was quantified by offline analyses of daily cone-beam computed tomography. Intratreatment organ motion was monitored continuously by the Calypso (registered) System for quantification of intrafraction setup error. Results: As expected, setup error (that is, inter- plus intrafraction motion, unless otherwise stated) was largest with skin mark alignment, requiring margins of 7.5 mm, 11.4 mm, and 16.3 mm, in the lateral (LR), longitudinal (SI), and vertical (AP) directions, respectively. Margin requirements accounting for intrafraction motion were smallest for transponder detection localization techniques, requiring margins of 1.4 mm (LR), 2.6 mm (SI), and 2.3 mm (AP). Bony anatomy alignment required 2.1 mm (LR), 9.4 mm (SI), and 10.5 mm (AP), whereas image-guided marker alignment required 2.8 mm (LR), 3.7 mm (SI), and 3.2 mm (AP). No marker migration was observed in the cohort. Conclusion: Clinically feasible, rapid, and reliable tools such as the electromagnetic transponder detection system for pretreatment target localization and, subsequently, intratreatment target location monitoring allow clinicians to reduce irradiated volumes and facilitate safe dose escalation, where appropriate.

Tanyi, James A., E-mail: tanyij@ohsu.ed [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); He, Tongming [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Summers, Paige A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States); Mburu, Ruth G. [Department of Chemistry, Portland State University, Portland, OR (United States); Kato, Catherine M.; Rhodes, Stephen M.; Hung, Arthur Y.; Fuss, Martin [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

NERSC Benchmarking and Workload Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Petascale Initiative Science Gateway Development Storage and IO Technologies Testbeds Home R & D Benchmarking & Workload Characterization Benchmarking & Workload...

246

Materials Characterization | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization Nuclear Forensics Scanning Probes Related Research Materials Theory and Simulation Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials Home | Science &...

247

Advanced Characterization, Modeling, and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron ... Hume-Rothery Award Symposium: Electronic structure theory of stability and ...

248

Case No. VBU-0016  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16 16 September 15, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner:Gary Roybal Date of Filing:June 23, 1999 Case Number:VBU-0016 On October 6, 1998, Gary Roybal (Roybal) filed a complaint under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The regulations governing the program were revised in a new interim final rule that took effect on April 14, 1999. Along with other procedural changes, the interim final rule reassigned the investigative function to the Office of Hearings and Appeals. All of the pending whistleblower cases in the investigative stage, including Roybal's case, were then transferred to OHA. The OHA investigator assigned to the case dismissed Roybal's complaint on June 11, 1999. On June 23,

249

Case No. VWZ-0009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. Date of Filing: March 8, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0009 This decision...

250

Science DMZ Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies Studies About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ CU Science DMZ Penn State & VTTI Science DMZ NOAA Science DMZ NERSC Science DMZ ALS Multi-facility Workflow LCLS ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Science DMZ Case Studies Developed by ESnet engineers, the Science DMZ model addresses common network performance problems encountered at any institution by creating an environment that is tailored to the needs of high performance science

251

Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in the marginal seas of Siberia: implications for the fate and removal of pollutants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides have been widely used to trace the sources and fate of radioactive pollutants in the marine environment. In this study, particle-reactive radionuclides such as ... Ph and 214 Th have been employed for scavenging studies. The inventories of Pu and radiocesium and activity ratios of Pu (such as 238PU/239,24OPu) have been utilized to determine the sources and transport of anthropogenic pollutants. Water soluble tracers such as Ra isotopes and radiocesium have been used to determine the water mass movements as well as residence time of water masses. This will help to define the processes related to estuarine mixing over the continental shelf which control radioactive and other pollutants entering surface waters of the Arctic Ocean. 21OPb and 214 Th concentrations were measured in a suite of water samples (dissolved and particulate phases) from the marginal seas of the Russian Arctic (Pechora, Kara, Laptev, and East Siberian Seas) in order to better understand scavenging within the water column. To elucidate the sources of Pu and 131CS to the study area, Pu and "'Cs concentrations and 238PU/239,240puactivity ratios were measured in water samples. Concentrations of Ra isotopes were also determined for the estimation of the residence time of river water entering the Kara Sea. The model-derived scavenging parameters for 114 Th and "OPb clearly indicate particle concentrations, influenced by resuspension, ice melt, and continental runoff, primarily control the removal of these nuclides. Concentrations and inventories of Pu and "'Cs as well the activity ratio of "IpU/219,l4OpU suggest two main sources of Pu and "'Cs to the waters over the Siberian shelf. an oceanic source, likely from Sellafield and La Hague nuclear reprocessing plants, and a riverine source emanating from estuarine sediments . 21lpU/219,24OPu activity ratios suggest all of the Pu entering into shelf waters by way of Siberian rivers is from Global Fallout. The Pu concentrations are also primarily controlled by the particle concentrations in the water column. River water residence times for the surface and subsurface waters of the Kara Sea were estimated, using2l'Ra/22'Ra activity ratios, to be on the order of one year and 30 years, respectively.

Schwantes, Jon Michael

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Dynamics and energetics of the cloudy boundary layer in simulations of off-ice flow in the marginal ice zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kinetic energy even in the present case where very strong surface heat fluxes occur. Ice-phase. Inclusion of the ice phase significantly affected the radiative budget as compared to purely liquid clouds, illustrating the importance of ice-phase­radiative couplings for accurate simulations of arctic clouds

Harrington, Jerry Y.

253

A Modeling Case Study of Mixed-Phase Clouds over the Southern Ocean and Tasmania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud structure associated with two frontal passages over the Southern Ocean and Tasmania is investigated. The first event, during August 2006, is characterized by large quantities of supercooled liquid water and little ice. The second case, ...

Anthony E. Morrison; Steven T. Siems; Michael J. Manton; Alex Nazarov

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Ferrocyanide waste simulant characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide waste simulants were prepared and characterized to help assess safety concerns associated with the ferrocyanide sludges stored in underground single-shell waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Simulants were prepared to represent the variety of ferrocyanide sludges stored in the storage tanks. Physical properties, chemical compositions, and thermodynamic properties of the simulants were determined. The simulants, as produced, were shown to not sustain propagating reactions when subjected to a strong ignition source. Additional testing and evaluations are recommended to assess safety concerns associated with postulated ferrocyanide sludge dry-out and exposure to external ignition sources.

Jeppson, D.W.; Wong, J.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Characterization of Photovoltaic Concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper will describe the resources at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for performing characterization of photovoltaic (PV) materials designed for operation under concentrated light. NREL has the capability to measure devices ranging from very small, unencapsulated research cells to reasonably sized, environmentally protected modules. Data gathering and interpretation are also ongoing areas of revision and improvement. The main goal of the current research is to reduce the measurement uncertainty to the lowest practical value. At present, the state of the art is limited at a ?5% level in measuring efficiency accurately.

Kiehl, J.; Emery, E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Network Characterization Service (NCS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed applications require information to effectively utilize the network. Some of the information they require is the current and maximum bandwidth, current and minimum latency, bottlenecks, burst frequency, and congestion extent. This type of information allows applications to determine parameters like optimal TCP buffer size. In this paper, we present a cooperative information-gathering tool called the network characterization service (NCS). NCS runs in user space and is used to acquire network information. Its protocol is designed for scalable and distributed deployment, similar to DNS. Its algorithms provide efficient, speedy and accurate detection of bottlenecks, especially dynamic bottlenecks. On current and future networks, dynamic bottlenecks do and will affect network performance dramatically.

Jin, Guojun; Yang, George; Crowley, Brian; Agarwal, Deborah

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

257

Optical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Optical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Optical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) conducts optical characterization of large solar concentration devices. Concentration solar power (CSP) mirror panels and concentrating solar systems are tested with an emphasis is on measurement of parabolic trough mirror panels. The Optical Characterization Laboratory provides state-of-the-art characterization and testing capabilities for assessing the optical surface quality and optical performance for various CSP technologies including parabolic troughs, linear Fresnel, dishes, and heliostats.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A Case Study of an Unusually Intense Atmospheric Gravity Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A remarkable long-lived, large-amplitude gravity wave in the Carolinas and Virginia on 27 February 1984 is investigated by means of a subsynoptic-scale case study. The wave was characterized by a minor-wave of elevation followed by a sharp wave ...

Lance F. Bosart; Anton Seimon

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01  

SciTech Connect

The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those ~70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the KG basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m2. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basin is at the low end of glob

Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m{sup 2}). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that {approx}50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a 'toe-thrust' ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those {approx}70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the K-G basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m{sup 2}. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basi

Anne Trehu; Peter Kannberg

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Mound facility physical characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Case tool evaluation system  

SciTech Connect

An automated system that uses an analytical approach to evaluate Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools is currently being developed. this system is referred to as the CASE Tool Evaluation System. The following general criteria will be used: overall tool functionality; tool stability; cost; interfaces with other software; customization; ease of use; output produced; hardware and operating system needs; documentation; training and vendor support; repository interface; methodologies; and vendor stability. in Phase 1 CASE tools will be eliminated that do not meet certain must-have'' characteristics specified by the user. Phase 2 will further reduce the size of the tool list by retaining those tools that possess desirable, but not absolutely necessary'' characteristics, also specified by the user. Phase 3 will employ the Analytic Hierarchy Process, developed by Dr. Thomas L. Saaty, to rank the tools. Users will be able to supply tools of their own choosing, in addition to tools that are generated via normal use of the system. All three phases will interact with a database that stores objective information about CASE tools. The use of the Analytic Hierarchy process (AHP) distinguishes this method of CASE tool evaluation from others. As used in this system, the AHP is a method of breaking down the complex, unstructured problem of selecting a CASE tool into its component evaluation criteria and candidate tools. These criteria and tools are arranged into a hierarchical order. Each criterion and tool is assigned a subjective numerical value (by experts or users or both). These values are then synthesized to determine which have the highest priority. The result will be a ranked list of CASE tools tailored to the needs and desires of the user.

Green, P.L.; Andreae, P.V.; Pennewell, W.J.; Clinard, L.A.; Thomas, B. Jr.; Tarrant, P.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Mixed waste characterization reference document  

SciTech Connect

Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Case No. VWX-0014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VWX-0014 VWX-0014 November 29, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Supplemental Order Name of Case:Frank E. Isbill Date of Filing:November 4, 1999 Case Number: VWX-0014 This Decision supplements an Initial Agency Decision, dated September 27, 1999, issued by the undersigned Hearing Officer of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy in a case involving a "whistleblower" complaint filed by Frank E. Isbill (the complainant) under 10 C.F.R. Part 708. See Frank E. Isbill, 27 DOE ¶ 87,529 (1999). In the Decision, I found that NCI Information Systems, Inc. (the contractor), a DOE contractor, had violated the provisions of 10 C.F.R. § 708.5 by removing the complainant's supervisory duties in reprisal for his making protected disclosures related to a

265

Case No. VBZ-0057  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

57 57 November 1, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motions to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: Janet K. Benson Date of Filings: April 6, 2000 August 7, 2000 Case Numbers: VBZ-0057 VBZ-0058 This determination considers Motions to Dismiss(1) filed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Laboratory)(2) under the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In these Motions, the Laboratory contends that the claims asserted by Janet Benson in OHA Case No. VWA-0044 are defective as a matter of law and should not be determined on the merits.(3) The Laboratory makes the following arguments in support of these Motions: (1) The Laboratory cannot be held liable for any acts of reprisal that occurred prior to September 23, 1994, the date it agreed to comply with Part 708 (OHA Case No. VBZ-0057);

266

Case No. VBZ-0028  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28 28 October 12, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: Sandia Corporation Date of Filing: August 24, 1999 Case Number: VBZ-0028 This decision considers a "Motion to Dismiss" filed by the Sandia Corporation (Sandia) on August 24, 1999. In its Motion, Sandia seeks judgment on the record of Complaint filed by Dr. Jiunn Yu (Yu) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Yu's Complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708 has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VBH-0028. The present Motion has been assigned Case No. VBZ-0028. The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public

267

Case No. VWZ-0011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 May 19, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc. Date of Filing: May 18, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0011 This decision considers a "Motion to Dismiss" filed by West Valley Nuclear Services, Inc. (West Valley) on May 18, 1999. In its Motion, West Valley seeks the partial dismissal of a Complaint filed by John L. Gretencord (Gretencord) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Gretencord requested a hearing on his Complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708 on March 19, 1999, and it has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VWA-0033. The present Motion has been assigned Case No. VWZ-0011.

268

Case No. VBR-0002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VBR-0002 VBR-0002 January 24, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Supplemental Order Name of Petitioner: Westinghouse Savannah River Company Date of Filing: November 12, 1999 Case Number: VBR-0002 This supplemental order concerns a Motion for Reconsideration (Case No. VBR-0002) filed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) on November 12, 1999. The reconsideration motion relates to an Initial Agency Decision issued by the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE) on November 2, 1999 (Case No. VBH-0002). In the Initial Agency Decision, I granted relief to the Complainant on the whistleblower complaint he had filed against WSRC under 10 C.F.R. Part 708.(1) I found that WSRC had failed to prove by "clear and convincing" evidence

269

Case No. VWD-0004  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 July 1, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Supplemental Order Names of Petitioners:Princeton University General Physics Corporation Date of Filing: June 10, 1999 Case Number: VWD-0004 This decision will consider a Motion for Discovery filed jointly by Princeton University (Princeton) and General Physics Corporation (GPC) on June 10, 1999 with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). The discovery motion relates to a hearing requested by David Turner under the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). The OHA has assigned Mr. Turner's hearing request Case No. VWA-0038, and the discovery request under consideration Case No. VWD-0004. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program

270

Case No. VBH-0025  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 June 22, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Alizabeth Aramowicz Smith Date of Filing:July 6, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0025 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Alizabeth Aramowicz Smith, a former contractor employee at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As explained below, Smith's complaint should be denied. This case arises under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the "whistleblower" regulations. The whistleblower regulations prohibit a contractor from retaliating against a contractor employee who engages in protected conduct. Protected conduct includes disclosing information that the employee believes reveals 1) a substantial violation of a law, rule, or

271

Case No. VWD-0002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 May 21, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Supplemental Order Name of Petitioner:Frank E. Isbill Date of Filing: May 4, 1999 Case Number: VWD-0002 This determination will consider two requests for discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) on May 4, 1999, by Frank E. Isbill (the complainant). These requests (which have been grouped together as one Motion for Discovery, Case No. VWD-0002) concern the hearing requested by the complainant under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). He requested this hearing on March 29, 1999 (Case No. VWA-0034) in connection with the Part 708 complaint he filed against NCI Communications, Inc. (the contractor). The DOE recently

272

Case No. VWZ-0017  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 November 10, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: University of California Date of Filing: October 6, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0017 This decision considers a Motion to Dismiss filed by the University of California (the University) on October 6, 1999. In its Motion, the University seeks dismissal of the complaint filed against it by Charles Montaño under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Montaño's complaint under Part 708 has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VWA-0042. The present Motion has been assigned Case No. VWZ-0017. The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public

273

Case No. VWZ-0010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 May 12, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc. Date of Filing: April 27, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0010 This decision considers a "Motion to Dismiss" filed by West Valley Nuclear Services, Inc. (West Valley) on April 27, 1999. In its Motion, West Valley seeks the dismissal of a Complaint filed by John L. Gretencord (Gretencord) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Gretencord requested a hearing on his Complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708 on March 19, 1999, and it has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VWA-0033. The present Motion has been assigned Case No. VWZ-0010.

274

Case No. VBH-0023  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 March 31, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Stephanie A. Ashburn Date of Filing:July 6, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0023 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Stephanie A. Ashburn, a former fellow of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). As explained below, Ashburn's complaint is denied. This case arises under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the "whistleblower" regulations. The whistleblower regulations prohibit a contractor from retaliating against a contractor employee who engages in protected conduct. Protected conduct includes disclosing information that the employee believes reveals 1) a substantial violation of a law, rule, or

275

Case No. VBZ-0047  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

47 47 August 30, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Summary Judgment Name of Case: Edward J. Seawalt Date of Filing: August 23, 2000 Case Number: VBZ-0047 This decision will consider a Motion for Summary Judgment that Contract Associates, Inc., ("the contractor") filed on August 23, 2000. The contractor moves to deny a complaint filed by Edward J. Seawalt ("Mr. Seawalt" or "the complainant") under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Seawalt's complaint has been set for a hearing under Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VBH-0047. I. Background The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public

276

Case No. VBX-0014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VBX-0014 VBX-0014 April 25, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Supplemental Order Name of Case: Roy Leonard Moxley Date of Filing:January 10, 2000 Case Number: VBX-0014 This Decision supplements an Initial Agency Decision, dated December 29, 1999, that I issued as the Hearing Officer in a case involving a "whistleblower" complaint. The complaint was filed by Roy Leonard Moxley under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. See Roy Leonard Moxley, 27 DOE ¶ 87,546 (1999) (the Initial Agency Decision). In that Decision, I found that Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), a DOE contractor, had violated the provisions of 10 C.F.R. § 708.5 by reducing Mr. Moxley's salary grade level (SGL) from SGL 31 to SGL

277

Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documentation Page Documentation Page 1. Report No. DE - FC 21 - 92MC29077 2. 3. Recipient's Accession No. 5. Report Date August 31, 2000 4. Title and Subtitle Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility 6. 7. Author(s) The University of Oklahoma 8. Performing Organization Rept. No. 10. Project/Task/Work Unit No. 9. Performing Organization Name and Address The University of Oklahoma Sarkeys Energy Center T301 100 E Boyd St Norman, OK 73019 11. Contract (C) or Grant (G) No. DOE:DE FC21 92 MC29077 13. Type of Report & Period Covered Final Report 09 30 92 - 03 31 00 12. Sponsoring Organization Name and Address US Dept of Energy - FETL 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26505 14. 15. Supplementary Notes Several technical papers were prepared and presented at various Society of Petroleum Engineers Conferences and US

278

Furnace Black Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Furnace Black Furnace Black Characterization Sid Richardson Carbon Co Fort Worth, TX Dr. Michel Gerspacher 005F 2 Definitions Particle Aggregate = 20nm to 100nm "Diameter" = 200nm to 1,000nm "Length" = Set of Percolated Aggregates Particle (?) Aggregate Agglomerate Constituents Size = Tech/Scientific Challenge 005F 3 Furnace Process High Temperature Refractory Feedstock Oil Air Natural Gas Reaction Zone Quench 005F 4 Specific Surface Area 005F 5 Structure 3-D Morphology Key Characteristic Summary of Crystallographic Studies 005F 7 Methodologies 005F 8 Summary * For all furnace carbon black 12Å < L C < 17Å * Crystallite L a ≈ 25Å * Amorphous Carbon * No micropores * Very few surface groups (hetero atoms) { 005F 9 Effect of Heat Treatment on Amorphous Carbon

279

Project Finance Case Studies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finance Case Finance Case Studies FUPWG Meeting October 21, 2010 RENEWABLE ENERGY * Solar, wind, biomass and geothermal power resources show great promise to positively impact both the environment and energy security. * While these technologies are coming down in cost, there is often no price associated with carbon content, causing renewable energy to remain more expensive than fossil fuels in most markets. * Utilizing Treasury Cash Grant, Investment and Production Tax Credits, Renewable Energy Credits and state rebates is essential to a project's viability. WATER and WASTEWATER * With operating budgets stretched, many public-sector utilities are struggling to upgrade critical water treatment facilities to comply with changing environmental regulations or to maintain system efficiencies.

280

The Case for Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land Press, 1995 TESTING ELECTRIC VEHICLE DEMAND IN " HYBRIDThe Case for Electric Vehicles DanieI Sperlmg Reprint UCTCor The Case for Electric Vehicles Darnel Sperling Institute

Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Photoelectronic characterization of heterointerfaces.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In many devices such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, transistors, etc., the performance relies on the electronic structure at interfaces between materials within the device. The objective of this work was to perform robust characterization of hybrid (organic/inorganic) interfaces by tailoring the interfacial region for photoelectron spectroscopy. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) were utilized to induce dipoles of various magnitudes at the interface. Additionally, SAMs of molecules with varying dipolar characteristics were mixed into spatially organized structures to systematically vary the apparent work function. Polymer thin films were characterized by depositing films of varying thicknesses on numerous substrates with and without interfacial modifications. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) was performed to evaluate a buried interface between indium tin oxide (ITO), treated under various conditions, and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). Conducting polymer films were found to be sufficiently conducting such that no significant charge redistribution in the polymer films was observed. Consequently, a further departure from uniform substrates was taken whereby electrically disconnected regions of the substrate presented ideally insulating interfacial contacts. In order to accomplish this novel strategy, interdigitated electrodes were used as the substrate. Conducting fingers of one half of the electrodes were electrically grounded while the other set of electrodes were electronically floating. This allowed for the evaluation of substrate charging on photoelectron spectra (SCOPES) in the presence of overlying semiconducting thin films. Such an experiment has never before been reported. This concept was developed out of the previous experiments on interfacial modification and thin film depositions and presents new opportunities for understanding chemical and electronic changes in a multitude of materials and interfaces.

Brumbach, Michael Todd

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Materials Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization Laboratory The Materials Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) research focus is the physical and photoelectrochemical...

283

Characterization of Grain Size, Morphology, Transmittance, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2010 ... Characterization of Minerals, Metals and Materials: Characterization of Grain Size, Morphology, Transmittance, and Tomography Sponsored ...

284

Chemical Characterization of Nanomaterial Formulations for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL) is a ... National Institutes of Health (NIH). ... infrastructure and characterization services with the ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

285

Mechanical Characterization of Cellular Ceramic Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work two different types of commercial ceramic filter materials are investigated. Characterization ... Characterization of Graphite from PAN Aerogels.

286

Materials Characterization Committee - Committee Home Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Characterization Committee is part of the Extraction & Processing Division;. Our Mission: Focuses on the materials characterization aspect of ...

287

Characterizing flows with an instrumented particle measuring Lagrangian accelerations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present in this article a novel Lagrangian measurement technique: an instrumented particle which continuously transmits the force/acceleration acting on it as it is advected in a flow. We develop signal processing methods to extract information on the flow from the acceleration signal transmitted by the particle. Notably, we are able to characterize the force acting on the particle and to identify the presence of a permanent large-scale vortex structure. Our technique provides a fast, robust and efficient tool to characterize flows, and it is particularly suited to obtain Lagrangian statistics along long trajectories or in cases where optical measurement techniques are not or hardly applicable.

Zimmermann, Robert; Gasteuil, Yoann; Volk, Romain; Pinton, Jean-François

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Statistical techniques for the characterization of partially observed epidemics.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Techniques appear promising to construct and integrate automated detect-and-characterize technique for epidemics - Working off biosurveillance data, and provides information on the particular/ongoing outbreak. Potential use - in crisis management and planning, resource allocation - Parameter estimation capability ideal for providing the input parameters into an agent-based model, Index Cases, Time of Infection, infection rate. Non-communicable diseases are easier than communicable ones - Small anthrax can be characterized well with 7-10 days of data, post-detection; plague takes longer, Large attacks are very easy.

Safta, Cosmin; Ray, Jaideep; Crary, David (Applied Research Associates, Inc, Arlington, VA); Cheng, Karen (Applied Research Associates, Inc, Arlington, VA)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Retrospective Case Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project, Retrospective Case Studies (RCS) operates directly under DGE's Resource Exploration and Assessment program. The overall objectives of this project are: (1) to improve the general and specific level of understanding of geothermal systems, and (2) to improve tools and technology for geothermal exploration and assessment.

Wright, Phillip M.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Xylooligosaccharides Production, Quantification, and Characterization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Xylooligosaccharides Production, Quantification, and Characterization in Context of Lignocellulosic Biomass Pretreatment Qing Qing 1 , Hongjia Li 2,3,4, , Rajeev Kumar 2,4 and...

291

Elementary Yet Precise Worst-Case Analysis of Floyd's Heap-Construction Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worst-case behavior of the heap-construction phase of Heapsort escaped mathematically precise characterization by a closed-form formula for almost five decades. This paper offers a proof that the exact number of comparisons of keys performed in the ... Keywords: Heapsort, sum of digits, worst-case analysis

Marek A. Suchenek

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Plant Phenotype Characterization System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

293

Modeling Dwarfs for Workload Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Workload characterization is an important concept in performance tuning and efficiency improvement of high performance computing systems. Not only does it allow a system to dynamically adjust resources, it also helps improve energy efficiency resulting ... Keywords: Berkeley's Dwarfs, MICA, Discrete-time Markov Chain, Workload Characterization

Kittituch Manakul, Peerapon Siripongwutikorn, Simon See, Tiranee Achalakul

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nuclear power plants. However, an evi- dent lack of knowledge in the field had demanded for a detaileds & Dt^boooo^j Risø-R-525 Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation (Small-Scale Experiments EXPLOSION CHARACTERIZATION, WAVE PROPAGATION (Small-Scale Experiments) G.C. Larsen Abstract. A number

295

Characterization of national Web domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last few years, several studies on the characterization of the public Web space of various national domains have been published. The pages of a country are an interesting set for studying the characteristics of the Web because at the same ... Keywords: Web characterization, Web measurement

Ricardo Baeza-Yates; Carlos Castillo; Efthimis N. Efthimiadis

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Case No. VWZ-0020  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20 20 February 3, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Case: Lucy B. Smith Date of Filing: October 14, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0020 This determination will consider a Motion to Dismiss filed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) on October 14, 1999. WSRC seeks dismissal of three allegations of retaliation by reason of failure to rehire submitted by Lucy B. Smith under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In a submission dated December 6, 1999, WSRC further requests dismissal of a discovery request made by Ms. Smith regarding hiring by subcontractors of WSRC. I. Background Ms. Smith's Part 708 complaint arises from her employment as a chemist with WSRC at DOE's Savannah

297

Case No. VWD-0006  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 August 10, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Name of Petitioner:Lucy B. Smith Date of Filing: August 2, 1999 Case Number: VWD-0006 This determination will consider a Motion for Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) by Lucy B. Smith. This Motion, dated July 20, 1999, concerns the hearing requested by Ms. Smith under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). She requested this hearing on May 5, 1999 (Case No. VWA-0041) in connection with the Part 708 complaint she filed against Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). I. Factual Background Ms. Smith's Part 708 complaint arises from her employment as a chemist with WSRC at DOE's Savannah

298

Case No. VBD-0059  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

59 59 June 8, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Name of Case: Janet L. Westbrook Date of Filing: June 5, 2001 Case Number: VBD-0059 This determination will consider a Motion for Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) by UT-Battelle, LLC, the company that manages the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Motion relates to a hearing soon to be held on a complaint that Janet L. Westbrook filed under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). For the reasons stated below, the motion is denied. Ms. Westbrook worked at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a radiological engineer. She claims that she has persistently disclosed various safety-related concerns and as a result experienced hostility and

299

Case No. VBD-0063  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63 63 August 14, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Name of Petitioner:Bruce R. Field Date of Filing: August 2, 2001 Case Number: VBD-0063 This determination will consider a Motion for Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) by Bruce R. Field (Field). This Motion, dated August 2, 2001, concerns the hearing requested by Field under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). Field requested this hearing on April 24, 2001 (Case No. VBH-0063) in connection with the Part 708 complaint he filed against the management and operating contractor, Midwest Research Institute (MRI) for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).(1) I. Background Field's complaint arises from his employment at NREL as a Project Manager. During the period 1994 to

300

Case No. VWZ-0016  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 November 8, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: Charles Montaño Date of Filing: October 4, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0016 This decision considers a Motion to Dismiss filed by Charles Montaño (Montaño) on October 4, 1999. In his Motion, Montaño seeks dismissal of the hearing scheduled to begin on November 16, 1999 and judgment on the existing record for the Whistleblower Complaint that he filed against the University of California (the University) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. His Complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708 has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VWA-0042. The present Motion has been

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Case No. VBU-0050  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50 50 June 15, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Decision of the Director Name of Case: Darryl H. Shadel Date of Filing: May 30, 2000 Case Number: VBU-0050 Darryl H. Shadel (the complainant) appeals the dismissal of his whistleblower complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program. As explained below, I have determined that the complaint was improperly dismissed, and that further processing should be accorded. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program Part 708 prohibits contractors from retaliating against contractor employees who engage in protected conduct. Protected conduct includes disclosing information that the employee believes reveals a substantial and specific danger to employees (a protected disclosure). If a contractor retaliates against an employee

302

Case No. VBH-0034  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 September 29, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Jennifer S. Gentry Date of Filing: August 24, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0034 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Jennifer S. Gentry, a former employee (hereinafter the employee) of Golder Federal Services Incorporated, formerly Golder Associates, Inc. (Golder). Golder was a subcontractor for EG&G, then the managing and operating contractor at DOE's Rocky Flats site (hereinafter the term "contractors" refers to both Golder and EG&G). The employee alleges that she made protected disclosures concerning health and safety matters, and as a result, the contractors took retaliatory actions against her. For the reasons explained below, I have

303

Case No. VBI-0045  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VBI-0045 VBI-0045 June 22, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Decision and Order Name of Case: Joseph P. Carson Date of Filing: March 14, 2000 Case Number: VBI-0045 On March 14, 2000, Joseph P. Carson (Carson) filed a "Whistleblower Reprisal Complaint per section 3164 of the NNSA Authorization Act for FY 2000." Carson is employed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as a Safety Engineer, nominally assigned to the Office of Oversight, Planning and Analysis, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight, Office of Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (EH), but he is currently stationed in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the March 14, 2000 complaint, Carson alleges that in 1999 he made a number of protected disclosures about Glenn Podonsky, a senior

304

Case No. VBU-0039  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

39 39 November 30, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Decision of the Director Name of Case: Edward J. Seawalt Date of Filing: November 2, 1999 Case Number: VBU-0039 Edward J. Seawalt (the complainant) appeals the dismissal of his complaint against Contract Associates, Inc. (the Contractor) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The program prohibits a DOE contractor from retaliating against an employee for disclosing certain information (a protected disclosure). As explained below, I have determined that Mr. Seawalt's appeal should be granted in part and his complaint remanded for further processing. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program is set forth at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The DOE recently

305

Case No. VWZ-0012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 August 6, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Case: Lucy B. Smith Date of Filing: June 30, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0012 This determination will consider a Motion to Dismiss filed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) on June 30, 1999. WSRC seeks dismissal of the underlying complaint filed by Lucy B. Smith under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. I. Background Ms. Smith's Part 708 complaint arises from her employment as a chemist with WSRC at DOE's Savannah River Site. Ms. Smith alleges that she made three protected disclosures involving health and safety concerns to WSRC officials during the last half of 1996. Subsequently, on January 20, 1997, Ms. Smith received a Reduction in Force notice from WSRC. Ms. Smith then filed a complaint with the United

306

EDO: Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EDO Case Studies EDO Case Studies Technology Transfer / Technology Assistance Technology identifies anomalies in complex financial data Identifying atypical information in financial data early could help determine problematic financial trends such as the systemic risk that recently put the U.S. and global financial systems in a downward fall. Recognizing such anomalous information can also help regulators understand markets, and identify the potential need of new rules and regulations. Additionally, it can help investors and advisors better manage their investment and savings portfolios. The AnomalatorTM software, developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, uses advanced mathematical algorithms to identify unusual trends in complex financial data and graphically show how it compares with

307

Case No. VWA-0040  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 December 13, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Rosie L. Beckham Date of Filing: April 27, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0040 Rosie L. Beckham (hereinafter the complainant) filed a complaint against her former employer, KENROB and Associates, Inc. (hereinafter the contractor) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The program prohibits a DOE contractor from retaliating against an employee for disclosing certain information (a protected disclosure). A DOE office investigated the complaint and issued a report, which concluded that the complainant was not entitled to relief. The complainant requested a hearing, and I was appointed to conduct the hearing and issue an

308

Case No. VBH-0021  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 21 February 7, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Eugene J. Dreger Date of Filing: July 14, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0021 This Initial Agency Decision addresses a whistleblower complaint filed by Eugene J. Dreger (the complainant) against his former employer, Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. At the time of the incidents described below, Dreger worked at the DOE's Nevada Test Site as a safety inspector. REECO was a primary contractor at the Test Site until December 31, 1995. Beginning January 1, 1996, Bechtel Nevada assumed this responsibility, and it has also assumed responsibility for litigation relating to

309

Case No. VBZ-0005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05 05 October 4, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: Fluor Daniel Fernald Date of Filing: September 7, 1999 Case Number: VBZ-0005 This decision will consider a Motion to Dismiss Fluor Daniel Fernald (FDF) filed on September 7, 1999. FDF moves to dismiss a Complaint filed by Thomas W. Dwyer under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Dwyer's Complaint has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VBH-0005. I. Background The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public and employee health and safety; ensur[e] compliance with applicable laws, rules, and regulations; and prevent[] fraud, mismanagement, waste, and abuse" at DOE's Government-owned or -leased facilities.

310

Case No. VWA-0039  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 February 25, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Luis P. Silva Date of Filing: April 27, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0039 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Luis P. Silva, a former employee of the Scientific Ecology Group (SEG) and its successor firm, GTS Duratek (GTS).(1) SEG, and then GTS, were subcontractors to Sandia Corporation at the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility (RMWMF) where Silva worked before he was laid off by GTS in August 1997. Sandia is a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, the management and operating contractor at DOE's Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In March 1998, Roy F. Weston, Inc. replaced GTS as Sandia's subcontractor at the RMWMF. Silva alleges that he made protected disclosures

311

WSH Case Studies 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Health Case Summaries and Health Case Summaries Enforcement Workshop, March 2012 1. Unescorted Entry into Active Laser Area A Facilities electrician received a work order from his work lead to install a switch box and a power cord on a vacuum pump in a Class 4 laser room. He arrived escorted by a laser lab scientist to review the scope of work. After reviewing the work to be performed and inspecting the equipment, the electrician alerted the laser lab scientist that he needed additional tools and materials to complete the task. The scientist informed the electrician that he should not work in a laser lab without an escort. The electrician then informed his work lead that he needed to re- schedule the job. The work lead did not discuss or address the work area hazards and controls

312

Case No. VBA-0055  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

<BR> Case No. VBA-0055 October 2, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Lucy Smith Date of Filing: July 20, 2000 Case Number: VBA-0055 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD) issued on July 11, 2000, involving a Complaint filed by Lucy Smith (Smith or the Complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In her Complaint, Smith claims that her former employer, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), a DOE contractor, terminated her employment during a reduction in force (RIF), and then failed to rehire her, in retaliation for making disclosures that are protected under Part 708. In the IAD, however, the Hearing Officer determined that

313

Case No. VBH-0007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 September 27, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Salvatore Gionfriddo Date of Filing: June 23, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0007 On December 28, 1998, Salvatore Gionfriddo (Complainant) filed a Complaint of Reprisal with the Director of the Federal Energy Technology Center of the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program. The Complainant alleged that he made a protected disclosure under Part 708 and his employer, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) retaliated against him by terminating his employment. (1) On July 19, 1999, ERC filed a Motion to Dismiss the complaint. The firm claims that its agreement with the DOE is not covered by Part 708 and that it is not obligated to participate in proceedings

314

Case No. VBH-0035  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 September 22, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Theresa G. Joyner Date of Filing: August 24, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0035 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Theresa G. Joyner, a former employee (hereinafter the employee) of NCI Information Systems, Inc. (NCI) (hereinafter the contractor). As explained below, the employee's request for relief is denied. I. Background The Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program governs this matter. The DOE recently revised the regulations governing this program. See 64 Fed. Reg. 12862 (March 15, 1999) (amending 10 C.F.R. pt. 708) (the whistleblower regulations). Under the regulations, the DOE's Office of

315

Case No. VWJ-0001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VWJ-0001 VWJ-0001 June 29, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Protective Order Name of Petitioner:Nicholas Dominguez Date of Filing: June 25, 1999 Case Number:VWJ-0001 On April 20, 1999, Nicholas Dominguez filed a request for hearing under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Case No. LWA- 0006). Dominguez alleges that his former employer, Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (Lockheed Martin), retaliated against him for disclosing information concerning possible safety issues. Dominguez seeks discovery of Lockheed Martin documents that the firm claims are confidential business documents. Lockheed Martin has agreed to provide these documents pursuant to the attached Protective Order that has been agreed to by counsel for Dominguez. The parties ask that the attached Agreed

316

Product Efficiency Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

product-efficiency-cases Office of Hearings and product-efficiency-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en EXC-13-0004 - In the Matter of Liebherr Canada Ltd. http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/exc-13-0004-matter-liebherr-canada-ltd EXC-13-0004 - In the Matter of Liebherr Canada Ltd.

317

Case No. VBU-0047  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

47 47 April 17, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Decision of the Director Name of Case: Edward J. Seawalt Date of Filing: March 20, 2000 Case Number: VBU-0047 Edward J. Seawalt (the Complainant) appeals the second dismissal of his whistleblower complaint. In a prior decision, I remanded the first dismissal for consideration of whether good reason existed for the Complainant's late filing of his complaint. Edward J. Seawalt, 27 DOE ¶ ____ (1999) (Seawalt). As explained below, I have determined that the Complainant has shown good reason for the late filing of his complaint and, therefore, that the complaint should be remanded for further processing. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program is set forth at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The DOE's new Part

318

Case No. VWD-0007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 August 24, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Name of Petitioner:Linda D. Gass Date of Filing: August 11, 1999 Case Number: VWD-0007 This determination will consider a Motion for Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) by Linda D. Gass. This Motion, dated August 10, 1999, concerns the hearing requested by Ms. Gass under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). She requested this hearing on January 12, 1999 (Case No. VWA- 0041) in connection with the Part 708 complaint she filed against Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES). I. Background Ms. Gass began working for LMES in March 1982. In her Complaint, Ms. Gass alleged that in 1991 she

319

Characterization of electrochemical systems and batteries: Materials and systems  

SciTech Connect

Materials are a pacing problem in battery development. The battery environment, particularly in rechargeable batteries, places great demands on materials. Characterization of battery materials is difficult because of their complex nature. In many cases meaningful characterization requires iii situ methods. Fortunately, several new electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques for in situ characterization studies have recently become available, and reports of new techniques have become more frequent. The opportunity now exists to utilize advanced instrumentation to define detailed features, participating chemical species and interfacial structure of battery materials with a precision heretofore not possible. This overview gives key references to these techniques and discusses the application of x-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of battery materials.

McBreen, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Characterization of electrochemical systems and batteries: Materials and systems  

SciTech Connect

Materials are a pacing problem in battery development. The battery environment, particularly in rechargeable batteries, places great demands on materials. Characterization of battery materials is difficult because of their complex nature. In many cases meaningful characterization requires iii situ methods. Fortunately, several new electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques for in situ characterization studies have recently become available, and reports of new techniques have become more frequent. The opportunity now exists to utilize advanced instrumentation to define detailed features, participating chemical species and interfacial structure of battery materials with a precision heretofore not possible. This overview gives key references to these techniques and discusses the application of x-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of battery materials.

McBreen, J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Integrated reservoir characterization for the Mazari oil field, Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a field study performed on the Mazari oil field located in Sind province, Pakistan. We used an integrated reservoir characterization technique to incorporate the geological, petrophysical, and reservoir performance data to interpret historical reservoir performance, to assess and refine reservoir management activities, and to make plans for future reservoir developments. We used a modified approach to characterize within the mappable geological facies. Our approach is based on the Kozeny-Carmen equation and uses the concept of mean hydraulic radius. As part of our objective to characterize the reservoir, we tabulated reservoir characteristics for each hydraulic flow unit, and we presented estimates of in-place reserves. We evaluated reservoir performance potential using the production history, well tests and cased-hole well log surveys. Suggestions for reservoir management activities in conjunction with the evaluation of the reservoir performance are discussed in detail. Finally, we give recommendations for activities in reservoir development particularly infill drilling considerations and secondary recovery efforts.

Ashraf, Ejaz

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage  

SciTech Connect

Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

323

Characterization & Transport in Nanoporous Networks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These research studies focused on the characterization and transport for porous solids which comprise both microporosity and mesoporosity. Such materials represent membranes made from zeolites as well as for many new nanoporous solids. Several analytical sorption techniques were developed and evaluated by which these multi-dimensional porous solids could be quantitatively characterized. Notably an approach by which intact membranes could be studied was developed and applied to plate-like and tubular supported zeolitic membranes. Transport processes were studied experimentally and theoretically based on the characterization studies.

William C. Conner

2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

324

Case No. VBH-0036  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 September 23, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Complainant: XXXXXXX Date of Filing: August 24, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0036 XXXXXXX (the complainant) filed a complaint against his employer, Fluor Daniel, Inc. (FDI), and two other DOE contractors, Duke Engineering & Services (DE&S) and TRW Environmental Safety Systems (TRW), pursuant to the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In that complaint, the complainant alleges that he suffered reprisals because he had made a disclosure that is protected by Part 708. I. Background The Contractor Employee Protection Program was established to encourage contractor employees to

325

324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

326

NMR characterization of thin films  

SciTech Connect

A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Glenview, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL); Diaz, Rocio (Chicago, IL); Vukovic, Lela (Westchester, IL)

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

327

NCCoE - Use Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Health IT: Mobile Devices Use Case. Energy. ... system for mobile devices server* • Mobile device management server* • Auditing mobile device ...

328

Seismic Safety Margins Research Programs. Assessment of potential increases in risk due to degradation of steam generator and reactor coolant pump supports. [PWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the NRC licensing review for the North Anna Units 1 and 2 pressurized-water reactors (PWRs), questions were raised regarding the potential for low-fracture toughness of steam-generator and reactor-coolant-pump supports. Because other PWRs may face similar problems, this issue was incorporated into the NRC Program for Resolution of Generic Issues. The work described in this report was performed to provide the NRC with a quantitative evaluation of the value/impact implications of the various options of resolving the fracture-toughness question. This report presents an assessment of the probabilistic risk associated with nil-ductility failures of steam-generator and reactor-coolant-pump structural-support systems during seismic events, performed using the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program codes and data bases.

Bohn, M. P.; Wells, J. E.; Shieh, L. C.; Cover, L. E.; Streit, R. L.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Site Characterization Awards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Site Characterization Awards Site Characterization Awards A description of...

330

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

331

Case No. VBA-0044  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 April 10, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Rosie L. Beckham Date of Filing: December 28, 1999 Case Number: VBA-0044 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision issued on December 13, 1999, involving a complaint filed by Rosie L. Beckham filed against her former employer, KENROB and Associates, Inc. (KENROB) under the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Rosie L. Beckham, 27 DOE ¶ 87,543 (1999). In her complaint, Ms. Beckham alleges that KENROB, among other things, terminated her employment after she questioned the legality of the company's procurement practices. A Hearing Officer denied relief to Ms. Beckham, finding in the Initial Agency Decision that she had failed to make any disclosures protected under the Part 708 regulations. As set forth in this Decision, I

332

Case No. VBA-0032  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 November 26, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Roger H. Hardwick Date of Filing: July 26, 1999 Case Number: VBA-0032 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision issued on July 6, 1999, on a complaint filed by Roger H. Hardwick (Hardwick or the complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In his complaint, Hardwick seeks compensation for alleged retaliatory actions taken against him by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), a DOE contractor, and by KenRob and Associates, Inc. (KenRob), his former employer under a subcontract with SAIC, as a result of making an alleged protected disclosure to DOE. In the Initial Agency Decision, however, the Hearing Officer determined that the complainant had failed to

333

Case No. VWA-0032  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 July 6, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Roger W. Hardwick Date of Filing: March 8, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0032 This Decision involves a complaint of reprisal filed by Roger W. Hardwick (also referred to as the Complainant) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Hardwick was employed by KenRob and Associates, Inc. and worked as a subcontractor on a contract that the DOE awarded to Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). Mr. Hardwick contends that in January 1994, he made a protected disclosure to the DOE concerning the manner in which SAIC was performing its DOE contract. Hardwick states that he was terminated from the subcontract two weeks after the disclosure and that KenRob terminated his

334

Case No. VBH-0059  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 December 21, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hearing Officer Decision Name of Petitioner: Janet L. Westbrook Date of Filing: March 20, 2001 Case Number: VBH-0059 This Decision involves a complaint that Janet L. Westbrook (Westbrook) filed under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program against UT-Batelle, LLC, the contractor that manages the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (the Laboratory). That program is codified at Part 708 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In her complaint, Westbrook maintains that she was retaliated against and ultimately discharged for making a series of disclosures about radiation safety at the Laboratory. I. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program

335

Case No. VBA-0011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 July 28, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Names of Petitioner:Diane E. Meier Date of Filing:January 11, 2000 Case Number: VBA-0011 On January 11, 2000, Diane E. Meier (Meier) filed a Notice of Appeal from an Initial Agency Decision by a Hearing Officer from the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). The Decision denied the relief which Meier seeks in her complaint against Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Diane E. Meier, 27 DOE ¶ 87,545 (1999) (Meier). In her Appeal, Meier challenges several aspects of the Initial Agency Decision and requests that her complaint be granted. As set forth in this decision, I have

336

Case No. VBA-0038  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 March 28, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Ann Johndro-Collins Date of Filing: October 29, 1999 Case Number: VBA-0038 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision issued on September 27, 1999, on a complaint filed by Ann Johndro-Collins (Johndro-Collins or the complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In her complaint, Johndro- Collins seeks compensation for alleged retaliatory actions taken against her by Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH), a DOE contractor, as a result of making an alleged protected disclosure to DOE. As set forth in this decision, I have determined that Johndro-Collins's Appeal must be denied. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program

337

Case No. VBH-0014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 December 29, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner:Roy Leonard Moxley Date of Filing:November 7, 1996 Case Number: VBH-0014 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Roy Leonard Moxley against his employer, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. At all times relevant to this proceeding, WSRC was the management and operating contractor at the DOE's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. Mr. Moxley alleges that during a period of at least two years, he made several disclosures to WSRC that its personnel practices were in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). According

338

Case No. VWA-0031  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 August 6, 1999 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Barbara Nabb Date of Filing: February 25, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0031 I. Introduction This Decision involves a complaint filed by Mrs. Barbara Nabb under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In her complaint, Mrs. Nabb contends that reprisals were taken against her after she made certain disclosures concerning possible health and safety violations and mismanagement at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). These reprisals allegedly were taken by EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. (EG&G) and by Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC (Kaiser Hill). EG&G was the managing and operating contractor of Rocky Flats beginning in December

339

Case No. VWR-0003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VWR-0003 VWR-0003 September 20, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Reconsideration Name of Petitioner: Linda D. Gass Date of Filing: September 3, 1999 Case Number: VWR-0003 This decision will consider a "Motion to Revive Disclosures Dismissed Prior to the Enactment of Revisions to Part 708" Linda D. Gass filed on March 8, 1999. In her Motion, Ms. Gass requests that I reconsider an order issued on March 12, 1999, in which I dismissed in part her Complaint filed under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, 27 DOE ¶ 87,510 (1999). I. Background The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public

340

Case No. VBH-0042  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42 42 March 1, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hearing Officer Decision Name of Petitioner: Richard R. Sena Date of Filing: February 24, 2000 Case Number: VBH-0042 This Decision involves a complaint filed by Richard R. Sena (Sena) against Sandia Corporation under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program. That program is codified at Part 708 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In his complaint, Sena maintains that he was retaliated against and ultimately constructively discharged for disclosing that laboratory personnel were using the Internet improperly at Sandia National Laboratories. I. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program The Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program was established to safeguard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Case No. VBA-0041  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 March 13, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: John L. Gretencord Date of Filing: November 26, 1999 Case Number: VBA-0041 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD) issued on November 4, 1999, involving a complaint filed by John L. Gretencord (Gretencord or the complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In his complaint, Gretencord claims that West Valley Nuclear Services, Inc.(West Valley), a DOE contractor, terminated his employment in retaliation for his making disclosures that are protected under Part 708. In the IAD, however, the Hearing Officer determined that West Valley had shown that it would have terminated the

342

Case No. VBH-0015  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 December 1, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Morris J. Osborne Date of Filing: June 28, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0015 This Decision involves a complaint filed by Mr. Morris J. Osborne (hereinafter the complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The complainant contends that reprisals were taken against him after he made disclosures concerning the lack of electrical inspections at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab (INEEL). These alleged reprisals were taken by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (Lockheed). Lockheed was the managing and operating contractor of INEEL through September 30, 1999. Bechtel assumed Lockheed's

343

Case No. VWA-0014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 February 5, 1997 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner:Charles Barry DeLoach Date of Filing:November 1, 1996 Case Number: VWA-0014 This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Charles Barry DeLoach (DeLoach) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. For a four year period, DeLoach was employed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), a DOE management and operating contractor, at DOE's Savannah River site (Savannah River). DeLoach alleges that during his tenure at WSRC, he made disclosures regarding health and safety issues to various supervisors or managers at Savannah River. On March 19, 1993, DeLoach was fired after an investigation

344

Case No. VWA-0037  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 September 27, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Ann Johndro-Collins Date of Filing: April 27, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0037 This Decision considers a complaint of retaliation and request for relief filed by Ann Johndro-Collins (the Complainant) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The Complainant alleged that her employer, Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH), retaliated against her for making a protected disclosure as defined in the Part 708 regulations. As explained below, I have concluded that the Complainant's request for relief should be denied. BACKGROUND Procedural Background The Complainant filed a complaint with the DOE's Office of Inspections, Office of the Inspector General,

345

Item Subject FAR Case  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Acquisition Circular (FAC) 2005-53 Item Subject FAR Case I. Equal Opportunity for Veterans 2009-007 II. Unique Procurement Instrument Identifier 2009-023 III. Uniform Suspension and Debarment Requirement 2009-036 IV. Extension of Sunset Date for Protests of Task and 2011-015 Delivery Orders V. Encouraging Contractor Policies to Ban Text Messaging 2009-028 While Driving. VI. TINA Interest Calculations 2009-034 Item I--Equal Opportunity for Veterans (FAR 2009-007) The interim rule, published September 29, 2010, is adopted as final with minor changes. A definition from the clause at FAR 52.222-35 for ``executive and senior management'' is added to FAR subpart 22.13. The interim rule implemented Department of

346

Case No. VBH-0028  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 April 7, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Dr. Jiunn S. Yu Date of Filing: July 2, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0028 This decision considers a Complaint filed by Dr. Jiunn S. Yu (Dr. Yu) against the Sandia Corporation (Sandia) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. I. Background The Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program was established to safeguard "public and employee health and safety; ensur[e] compliance with applicable laws, rules, and regulations; and prevent[] fraud, mismanagement, waste and abuse" at DOE's Government-owned or -leased facilities. 57 Fed. Reg. 7533 (March 3, 1992). Its primary purpose is to encourage contractor employees to disclose

347

Case No. VBA-0007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 December 15, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Salvatore Gionfriddo Date of Filing: October 13, 1999 Case Number: VBA-0007 On October 13, 1999, Salvatore Gionfriddo ("Appellant" or "Complainant") filed a Notice of Appeal from an Initial Agency Decision by a Hearing Officer from the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). In the Initial Agency Decision, the Hearing Officer dismissed a complaint filed by Mr. Gionfriddo under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Salvatore Gionfriddo, 27 DOE ¶ 87,528 (1999). I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program The DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program was established to safeguard "public and employee

348

Case No. VBH-0056  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 March 6, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner:Jean G. Rouse Date of Filing:November 7, 2000 Case Number: VBH-0056 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Jean G. Rouse (the Complainant) against her current employer, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. WSRC is the management and operating contractor at the DOE's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The Complainant alleges that in June 2000, WSRC changed her job classification in retaliation for her having filed a whistleblower complaint against the company in 1998. As discussed below, I have determined that

349

Case No. VWA-0017  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 April 13, 1998 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Timothy E. Barton Date of Filing: June 27, 1994 Case Number: VWA-0017 This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Timothy E. Barton under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. From June to September 1994, Barton was employed as a Quality Assurance/Safety Manager by R.E. Schweitzer Construction Company (RESCC), which was awarded a contract by the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) to perform construction work on the Vitrification Pilot Plant at the DOE's Fernald site. Barton alleges that RESCC retaliated against him by terminating his employment for taking certain actions and

350

Case No. VBU-0077  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

77 77 October 25, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Decision of the Director Name of Petitioner: Ronald E. Timm Date of Filing: September 25, 2001 Case Number: VBU-0077 Ronald E. Timm (the Complainant), the President of RETA Security, a Department of Energy (DOE) subcontractor, appeals the dismissal of his whistleblower complaint filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program. On September 10, 2001, the Employee Concerns Program Manager at the DOE's Albuquerque Operations Office dismissed the Complainant's complaint for lack of jurisdiction. As explained below, I uphold the dismissal of the subject complaint. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program The regulations governing the DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program are set forth at 10 C.F.R.

351

Case No. VBH-0005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 May 2, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Thomas Dwyer Date of Filing: June 23, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0005 This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Thomas Dwyer under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. From January 1996 to October 1997, Mr. Dwyer was employed as a pipefitter by Fluor Daniel Fernald (FDF), a DOE contractor responsible for the cleanup of the Fernald Environmental Management Project, a former DOE uranium production facility located about 18 miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. Dwyer alleges that FDF first suspended him and then terminated him in retaliation for taking certain actions and making health and safety disclosures.

352

Case No. VBZ-0003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 June 21, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner:Carl J. Blier Date of Filing:May 11, 1999 Case Number: VBZ-0003 This determination will consider a request to dismiss filed by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) on May 11, 1999. ORAU seeks dismissal of the underlying complaint filed by Carl J. Blier under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. This matter is before me as the investigator assigned to investigate Mr. Blier's complaint. I. Background Mr. Blier's Part 708 complaint arises from his employment with ORAU. In his complaint, Mr. Blier alleges that in April 1996 he became aware of possible irregularities regarding the approval of higher cost air-

353

Case No. VBH-0002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 November 2, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner:Don W. Beckwith Date of Filing:February 2, 1998 Case Number: VBH-0002 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Don W. Beckwith (the Complainant) against his former employer, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. At all times relevant to this proceeding, WSRC was the management and operating contractor at the DOE's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The Complainant alleges that in December 1997, he disclosed to WSRC that a WSRC management official had engaged in improper conduct. According to the Complainant, WSRC terminated him in January 1998 as a consequence of his disclosure. As discussed

354

Case No. VWA-0005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05 05 * The original of this document contains information which is subject to withholding from disclosure under 5 U.S.C. 552. Such material has been deleted from this copy and replaced with XXXXX's. DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Names of Petitioners:Daniel L. Holsinger K-Ray Security, Inc. Date of Filing:December 6, 1995 Case Numbers: VWA-0005 VWA-0009 I. Introduction This Decision involves a complaint filed by Daniel L. Holsinger (Holsinger) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In his complaint, Holsinger contends that certain reprisals were taken against him after he raised concerns relating to the possible theft of government property from the DOE's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). These reprisals

355

Case No. VWA-0041  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 July 11, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Lucy B. Smith Date of Filing: May 5, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0041 This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Lucy B. Smith (Smith) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. From September 1973 to March 1997, Smith was employed as a chemist at the DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS) by various contractors, the most recent of which was Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). At the time of her termination, Smith worked at WSRC's Waste Management Laboratory. Smith alleges that in retaliation for making a number of health and safety disclosures WSRC terminated her pursuant to a January 1997 Reduction-in-

356

Case No. VWA-0021  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 21 June 1, 1998 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Carlos M. Castillo Date of Filing: February 2, 1998 Case Number: VWA-0021 This Decision involves a complaint filed by Carlos M. Castillo (Castillo or "the complainant") under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Castillo is the former employee of a DOE contractor, Kiewit Construction Company (Kiewit), and alleges in his complaint that during that employment certain reprisals were taken against him by Kiewit as a result of his raising a concern related to safety. These alleged reprisals include the complainant's wrongful termination from employment and, after he had been rehired, being improperly selected for a company layoff. After a

357

Case No. VBA-0005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 July 24, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Thomas Dwyer Date of Filing: May 23, 2000 Case Number: VBA-0005 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD) issued on May 2, 2000, involving a complaint filed by Thomas Dwyer (Dwyer or the complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In his complaint, Dwyer claims that Fluor Daniel Fernald (FDF), a DOE contractor, suspended and then terminated his employment in retaliation for his making disclosures that are protected under Part 708. In the IAD, however, the Hearing Officer determined that FDF had shown that it would have terminated the complainant for his misconduct, even in the absence of the protected disclosures. As set forth in this decision, I have determined that Dwyer's

358

Case No. VBH-0060  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60 60 November 1, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner:Robert Burd Date of Filing:March 27, 2001 Case Number: VBH-0060 This Decision addresses the complaint filed by Robert Burd (Complainant) against his former employer, Mason and Hangar Corporation (the employer), pursuant to the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Complainant alleges that the employer wrongfully terminated him for raising safety concerns. For the reasons set forth below, the complaint will be granted. I. Procedural History Complainant filed his Part 708 complaint on October 13, 2000 with the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE/AOO). At all times relevant to the complaint, the employer was the primary management and

359

Case No. VWA-0026  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 February 17, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hearing Officer Decision Name of Petitioner: Joseph Carson Date of Filing: October 26, 1998 Case Number: VWA-0026 This Decision involves the referral of a whistleblower matter involving Joseph Carson (Carson), a Department of Energy (DOE) employee. Pursuant to an order of an administrative judge of the United States Merit Systems Protection Board (http://www.mspb.gov) (MSPB) that implemented a settlement agreement between the DOE and Carson, Carson was permitted to submit documents to the Office of Hearings and Appeals regarding six instances of retaliation that he claims occurred because of certain protected disclosures that he made. The DOE was also permitted to submit documents at the same time.

360

Case No. VWA-0036  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 November 8, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Robert Gardner Date of Filing: April 20, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0036 This Decision involves a complaint filed by Robert Gardner (Gardner or "Complainant") under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Gardner is a former employee of a DOE contractor, Rust GeoTech (Rust). He alleges that certain reprisals were taken against him by Rust, including denial of a merit pay increase in 1996 and interference with his prospects for future employment in retaliation for his protected disclosures to DOE management and public officials. On the basis of the hearing that was conducted and the record before me, I have concluded

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Case No. VWA-0033  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 November 4, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioners:Gretencord v. West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc. Date of Filing: March 19, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0033 This decision considers a Complaint filed by John L. Gretencord (Gretencord) against West Valley Nuclear Services, Inc. (West Valley) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Gretencord requested a hearing on his Complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708 on March 19, 1999. I. Background The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public and employee health and safety; ensur[e] compliance with applicable laws, rules, and regulations; and

362

Case No. VBH-0010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 September 1, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Jagdish C. Laul Date of Filing: December 3, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0010 This Decision involves a complaint filed by Dr. Jagdish C. Laul (hereinafter the complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The complainant contends that his dismissal by his employer, Excalibur Associates, Inc. (Excalibur) was a reprisal for his participation in a prior Part 708 proceeding. Excalibur is a subcontractor of Kaiser Hill Company (Kaiser) who is the managing and operating contractor of DOE's Rocky Flats Field Office (Rocky Flats). I. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program A. Regulatory Background

363

Case No. VWA-0018  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 May 21, 1998 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner:Thomas T. Tiller Date of Filing:November 17, 1997 Case Number: VWA-0018 This Decision concerns two whistleblower complaints filed by Thomas T. Tiller (Tiller) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. At all times relevant to this proceeding, Tiller was employed by Wackenhut Services, Incorporated (Wackenhut), a DOE contractor that provides paramilitary security support services at the DOE's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. Tiller contends in his first complaint that Wackenhut demoted him after he alleged that a senior level manager at Wackenhut had engaged in unethical and possible criminal conduct. In his

364

Case No. VBH-0024  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 March 1, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Matthew J. Rooks Date of Filing: July 6, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0024 This Initial Agency Decision considers a complaint filed by Matthew J. Rooks under the whistleblower protection program of the Department of Energy, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. As explained below, Rooks' complaint is denied. Background Rooks filed this complaint under the Part 708 regulations on November 17, 1998, and the Department's Office of the Inspector General began an investigation. While the investigation was pending, responsibility for conducting investigations of Part 708 complaints was transferred to the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA). 64 Fed. Reg. 12826 (March 15, 1999). The OHA issued a Report of Investigation on July 6, 1999. The Report, which I will discuss further below,

365

Case No. VBH-0017  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 July 18, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Jimmie L. Russell Date of Filing: October 12, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0017 This Initial Agency Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Mr. Jimmie L. Russell under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In his complaint, Mr. Russell contends that reprisals were taken against him after he made certain disclosures concerning mismanagement, breaches in security procedures and safety violations at the DOE's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL is managed and operated by the University of California (the UC). At the time that he made the alleged disclosures, Mr. Russell worked at LANL for managers who

366

Residual Seminal Vesicle Displacement in Marker-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer and the Impact on Margin Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The objectives of this study were to quantify residual interfraction displacement of seminal vesicles (SV) and investigate the efficacy of rotation correction on SV displacement in marker-based prostate image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). We also determined the effect of marker registration on the measured SV displacement and its impact on margin design. Methods and Materials: SV displacement was determined relative to marker registration by using 296 cone beam computed tomography scans of 13 prostate cancer patients with implanted markers. SV were individually registered in the transverse plane, based on gray-value information. The target registration error (TRE) for the SV due to marker registration inaccuracies was estimated. Correlations between prostate gland rotations and SV displacement and between individual SV displacements were determined. Results: The SV registration success rate was 99%. Displacement amounts of both SVs were comparable. Systematic and random residual SV displacements were 1.6 mm and 2.0 mm in the left-right direction, respectively, and 2.8 mm and 3.1 mm in the anteroposterior (AP) direction, respectively. Rotation correction did not reduce residual SV displacement. Prostate gland rotation around the left-right axis correlated with SV AP displacement (R{sup 2} = 42%); a correlation existed between both SVs for AP displacement (R{sup 2} = 62%); considerable correlation existed between random errors of SV displacement and TRE (R{sup 2} = 34%). Conclusions: Considerable residual SV displacement exists in marker-based IGRT. Rotation correction barely reduced SV displacement, rather, a larger SV displacement was shown relative to the prostate gland that was not captured by the marker position. Marker registration error partly explains SV displacement when correcting for rotations. Correcting for rotations, therefore, is not advisable when SV are part of the target volume. Margin design for SVs should take these uncertainties into account.

Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Catton, Charles N. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Ontario Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Ontario Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Physics, Toronto (Canada); Lebesque, Joos V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Herk, Marcel van, E-mail: portal@nki.n [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Toward Engineered, Useful Use Cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore common problems that exist in the practice of use case modeling: lack of consistency in defining use cases, misalignment between the UML metamodel and the textual representations of use cases expounded in the literature, and the lack of a semantics that allows use cases to be executable and analyzable. We propose an engineering approach to the issues that can provide a precise foundation for use case development. We next discuss four potential uses of such a foundation and identify the research problems that must be addressed to support these applications.

Clay Williams; Matthew Kaplan; Tim Klinger; Amit Paradkar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Electrochemical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Electrochemical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The research focus at the Electrochemical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is evaluating the electrochemical properties of novel materials synthesized by various techniques and understanding and delineating the reaction mechanisms to provide practical solutions to PEMFCs commercialization issues of cost, performance and durability. It is also involved in the development of new tools and techniques for electrochemical characterization. The laboratory concentrates on the development and characterization of new materials for PEMFCs such as electrocatalysts, catalyst supports in terms of electrochemical activity, electrochemical surface area and corrosion/durability. The impact of impurities and/or contaminants on the catalyst activity is also under study. Experiments that can be performed include: (1) Determination and benchmarking of novel electrocatalyst activity; (2) Determination of electrochemical surface area; (3) Determination of electrocatalyst and support corrosion resistance and durability; (4) Synthesis and characterization of novel electrocatalyst; (5) Determination of fundamental electrochemical parameters; and (6) Estimation of electrocatalyst utilization.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Case No. VBA-0033  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 April 5, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Names of Petitioners:Kaiser-Hill Company, L.L.C. EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. Dates of Filing:August 26, 1999 August 27, 1999 Case Number: VBA-0033 On August 26 and 27, 1999, Kaiser-Hill Company, L.L.C. (K-H) and EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. (EG&G) respectively filed Notices of Appeal from an Initial Agency Decision by a Hearing Officer from the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). In the Initial Agency Decision, the Hearing Officer granted relief to Barbara Nabb on the basis of her complaint under the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Barbara Nabb, 27 DOE ¶ 87,519 (1999). In their Appeals, K-H and EG&G challenge several aspects of the Initial Agency Decision and request that Ms.

370

Lead Defendant Cases Filed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 0 Judgment for defendant 77 Navy 1 3 Adverse dispositions: 73 NRC 3 0 TRO 0 DOI - BLM 14 3 Preliminary Injunction 6 - FWS 6 0 Permanent Injunction 10 - BuRec 1 0 Remand 19 - NPS 6 1 Dismissal w/ settlement 26 - BIA/NIGC 3 0 Dismissal w/o settlement 12 - MMS 0 2 Case pending, NEPA 233 - OSM 1 0 USDA - FS 46 13 - APHIS 3 5 DOC - NOAA 8 0 Army - COE 15 5 Gov't Agency Army 2 0 Jurisdictional - P prevailed 1 DOT - FHWA 9 1 Jurisdictional - D prevailed 27 - FTA 1 0 NEPA - Not required 3 - FAA 0 0 NEPA - Is required 0 DOE 6 0 CE - Adequate 5 EPA 1 0 CE - Not Adequate 3 HUD 1 0 EA - Adequate* 14 Air Force 0 0 EA - Not Adequate* 9 TVA 1 1 EIS - Adequate* 21 FCC 0 1 EIS - Not Adequate* 15 GSA 1 0 SEIS - Needed* 1 Ex-Im Bank (OPEC) 0 0 SEIS -Not Needed* 8 USPS 0 0 HHS-FDA 0 0 -NIH 0 0 VA Pending

371

Explosively separable casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An explosively separable casing including a cylindrical afterbody and a circular cover for one end of the afterbody is disclosed. The afterbody has a cylindrical tongue extending longitudinally from one end which is matingly received in a corresponding groove in the cover. The groove is sized to provide a pocket between the end of the tongue and the remainder of the groove so that an explosive can be located therein. A seal is also provided between the tongue and the groove for sealing the pocket from the atmosphere. A frangible holding device is utilized to hold the cover to the afterbody. When the explosive is ignited, the increase in pressure in the pocket causes the cover to be accelerated away from the afterbody. Preferably, the inner wall of the afterbody is in the same plane as the inner wall of the tongue to provide a maximum space for storage in the afterbody and the side wall of the cover is thicker than the side wall of the afterbody so as to provide a sufficiently strong surrounding portion for the pocket in which the explosion takes place. The detonator for the explosive is also located on the cover and is carried away with the cover during separation. The seal is preferably located at the longitudinal end of the tongue and has a chevron cross section.

Jacobson, Albin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Rychnovsky, Raymond E. (Livermore, CA); Visbeck, Cornelius N. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Microstructural Characterization of Damage Mechanisms of Graphite ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Nanostructured Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries and for Supercapacitors. Presentation Title, Microstructural Characterization of Damage  ...

373

Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides information about Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Mechanical Property and Microstructural Characterization of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MECHANICAL PROPERTY AND MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION. OF VACUUM DIE CAST SUPERALLOY MATERIALS. John J. Schirra ...

375

Comparison of three methods for optical characterization of point-focus concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three different methods for characterizing point-focus solar concentrator optical performance have been developed for specific applications. These methods include a laser ray trace technique called the Scanning Hartmann Optical Test, a video imaging process called the 2f Test, and on-sun testing in conjunction with optical computer modeling. Three concentrator test articles, each of a different design, were characterized using at least two of the methods and, in one case, all three. The results of these test are compared. Excellent agreement was observed in the results, suggesting that the techniques provide consistent and accurate characterizations of solar concentrator optics.

Wendelin, T.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Grossman, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Co-validation of three methods for optical characterization of point-focus concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three different methods for characterizing point-focus solar concentrator optical performance have been developed for specific applications. These methods include a laser ray trace technique called the Scanning Hartmann Optical Test, a video imaging process called the 2f Technique and actual on-sun testing in conjunction with optical computer modeling. Three concentrator test articles, each of a different design, were characterized using at least two of the methods and, in one case, all three. The results of these tests are compared in order to validate the methods. Excellent agreement is observed in the results, suggesting that the techniques provide consistent and accurate characterizations of solar concentrator optics.

Wendelin, T.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Grossman, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Materials Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Materials Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Materials Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) research focus is the physical and photoelectrochemical characterization of novel materials. In this laboratory unknown samples are characterized by identifying and quantifying molecular species present through the implementation of a suite of analytical instrumentation and techniques. This leads to the ability to deconvolute decomposition routes and elucidate reaction mechanisms of materials through thermal and evolved gas analysis. This aids in the synthesis of next generation materials that are tailored to optimize stability and performance. These techniques and next generation materials will have many applications. One particular focus is the stable and conductive tetherable cations for use as membrane materials in anion exchange membrane fuel cells. Another is to understand the leachant contaminants derived from balance of plant materials used in proton exchange membrane fuel cell vehicles. Once identified and quantified, these organic and ionic species are dosed as contaminants into ex/in-situ fuel cell tests, to determine the effect on durability and performance. This laboratory also acts in support of fuel cell catalysis, manufacturing, and other related projects. The Materials Characterization Laboratory will cover multiple analytical operations, with the overall goal of troubleshooting synthetic materials or process streams to improve performance. Having novel evolved gas analysis and other analytical capabilities; this laboratory provides a viable location to analyze small batch samples, whereas setting up these types of capabilities and expertise would be cost and time prohibitive for most institutions. Experiments that can be performed include: (1) Evolved gas analysis; (2) Heterogeneous catalysis; (3) Trace level contaminants analysis; (4) Catalyst characterization; (5) Kinetics and stability; (6) Hyphenated techniques; and (7) Isotopic analysis for elucidating reaction mechanisms and decoupling chemical reactions.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Better Building Case Competition: 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of California, Irvine, presents his team's HEI Hotel case. Image of student presenting Noah Walker, a first year MBA-Master of Environmental Management joint degree student at...

379

FAQ for Case Study Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements...

380

National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Electrical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Electrical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. Electrical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on the detailed electrical characterization of components and systems. This laboratory allows researchers to test the ability of equipment to withstand high voltage surges and high current faults, including equipment using standard and advanced fuels such as hydrogen. Equipment that interconnected to the electric power grid is required to meet specific surge withstand capabilities. This type of application tests the ability of electrical equipment to survive a lightning strike on the main grid. These are often specified in IEEE standards such as IEEE Std. 1547. In addition, this lab provides a space for testing new, unproven, or potentially hazardous equipment for robust safety assessment prior to use in other labs at ESIF. The Electric Characterization Laboratory is in a location where new, possibly sensitive or secret equipment can be evaluated behind closed doors.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Material stabilization characterization management plan  

SciTech Connect

This document presents overall direction for characterization needs during stabilization of SNM at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Technical issues for needed data and equipment are identified. Information on material categories and links to vulnerabilities are given. Comparison data on the material categories is discussed to assist in assessing the relative risks and desired processing priority.

GIBSON, M.W.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Characterization equipment essential drawing plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to list the Characterization equipment drawings that are classified as Essential Drawings and Support Drawings. Essential Drawings: Are those drawings identified by the facility staff as necessary to directly support the safe operation of the facility or equipment (HNF 1997a). Support Drawings: Are those drawings identified by facility staff that further describe the design details of structures, systems, or components shown on essential drawings. (HNF 1997a) The Characterization equipment drawings identified in this report are deemed essential drawings as defined in HNF-PRO-242, Engineering Drawing Requirements (HNF 1997a). These drawings will be prepared, revised, and maintained per HNF-PRO-440, Engineering Document Change Control (HNF 1997b). All other Characterization equipment drawings not identified in this document will be considered General drawings until the Characterization Equipment Drawing Evaluation Report (Wilson 1998) is updated during fiscal year 1999. Trucks 1 and 2 drawings are not included in this revision of the essential drawing list due to uncertainty about future use.

WILSON, G.W.

1999-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

385

Characterization Summary Report for the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(LLNL) are submitting this Characterization Summary Report for the Building 865 study area at LLNL Site 300. This letter report summarizes the results of environmental investigations performed in the Building 865 study area to determine if contamination has been released to the environment as a result of past activities. The results of this remedial investigation are organized

Ms. Kathy Setian; Mr. Jacinto Soto; Ms. Susan Timm

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

ALGEBRAIC CHARACTERIZATION OF UNIQUELY ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be interested in the following ideals of R: ... of the first author is supported under a National Science Foundation Graduate ... collects the results in the series of papers [3, 4, 12, 13, 14]. ... Our main result provides such a characterization.

387

Characterization of Minerals and Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012... FeCl2 and FeCl3 chlorides with ammonia in a microfluidic reactor; ... Synthesis and Characterization of Al, Ag, Ti, Cu, and B Substituted ... and the melting temperature and melting mechanisms has been studied. ... features such as stoichiometry, morphology of the products, reaction times and structures.

388

Characterization of Field Exposed Thin Film Modules: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Test arrays of thin film modules have been deployed at the Solar Energy Centre near New Delhi, India since 2002-2003. Performances of these arrays were reported by O.S. Sastry [1]. This paper reports on NREL efforts to support SEC by performing detailed characterization of selected modules from the array. Modules were selected to demonstrate both average and worst case power loss over the 8 years of outdoor exposure. The modules characterized included CdTe, CIS and three different types of a-Si. All but one of the a-Si types were glass-glass construction. None of the modules had edge seals. Detailed results of these tests are presented along with our conclusions about the causes of the power loss for each technology.

Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Sastry, O. S.; Stokes, A.; Singh, Y. K.; Kumar, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Tank characterization report for single-shell Tank B-201  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to characterize the waste in single shell Tank B-201. Characterization includes the determination of the physical, chemical (e.g., concentrations of elements and organic species), and radiological properties of the waste. These determinations are made using analytical results from B-201 core samples as well as historical information about the tank. The main objective is to determine average waste properties: but in some cases, concentrations of analytes as a function of depth were also determined. This report also consolidates the available historical information regarding Tank B-201, arranges the analytical information from the recent core sampling in a useful format, and provides an interpretation of the data within the context of what is known about the tank.

Heasler, P.G.; Remund, K.M.; Tingey, J.M.; Baird, D.B.; Ryan, F.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Dataplot Commands for Alaska Pipeline Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dataplot Commands for Alaska Pipeline Case Study. Set Software Options and Get Started, . . Starting Alaska Pipeline Calibration Case Study . . ...

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Sandy Hill Case Study Packet 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandy Hill Case Study Packet 2004. The Baldrige Case Study Packet is composed of documents used to train Baldrige ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

392

Reanalyses Suitable for Characterizing Long-Term Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reanalyses are, by a substantial margin, the most utilized climate data products, and they are applied in a myriad of different contexts. Despite their popularity, there are substantial concerns about their suitability for the monitoring of long-...

P. W. Thorne; R. S. Vose

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

reference case | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reference case reference case Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

394

case studies | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

case studies case studies Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Three case studies in (1) Solar market electrification, (2) Wind-solar hybrid system in Kuakata Sea Beach and (3) Micro hydro power plant of Aung Thuwi Khoi. (Purpose): SWERA Documentation Source Renewable Energy Research Centre Date Released December 02nd, 2003 (10 years ago) Date Updated October 20th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords Bangladesh case studies documentation GEF renewable energy small hydro solar SWERA UNEP wind Data application/pdf icon Download Document (pdf, 566.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2002 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Please cite publication as follows: RERC,2003. Utilization of Renewables in Bangladesh: Case Studies. Renewable Energy Research Centre, Dhaka University, Bangladesh. GEF UNEP SWERA. Available from http://swera.unep.net on 2 December 2003.

395

A Case Study Of The Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Case Study Of The Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Geochemical and geophysical investigations in the Bohai Gulf and adjacent areas, China, indicate that uplift of the high-conductivity layer in the lithosphere coincides with the area of high heat flow. In this area are distributed abundant oil and gas fields in a Tertiary fault basin and also large quantities of basaltic rocks. Gas fields, mostly CO2 bearing, occur at the basin margins, where a widespread alkaline olivine basalt has high contents of gold. Geochemical prospecting of the surface (soil and soil gas) in the area indicates that there is an anomaly zone of

396

Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... Preparation of ?-Diketone Modified Silica Gel and its Application to the Removal ofHeavy Metal Ions from Industrial Wastewater: Nan Zhang1; ...

397

Characterizing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

we were able to achieve a throughput of about 36 Gbps, a number close enough to the line rate for us to be convinced that the 4 Gbps not witnessed in the trans- fer was due...

398

Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Mapping Mechanical Properties on the Nanoscale Using Atomic Force Acoustic .... "Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Battery Cathodes: In-Situ XAS" Research ...

399

Analysis of Restricted Natural Gas Supply Cases  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The four cases examined in this study have progressively greater impacts on overall natural gas consumption, prices, and supply. Compared to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 reference case, the no Alaska pipeline case has the least impact; the low liquefied natural gas case has more impact; the low unconventional gas recovery case has even more impact; and the combined case has the most impact.

James Kendell

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Current and future industrial energy service characterizations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications and resultant services in the industrial sector of the United States and 15 selected states are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research on: (1) market suitability analysis, (2) market development, (3) end-use matching, (3) industrial applications case studies, and (4) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. In reviewing existing industrial energy data bases, the level of detail, disaggregation, and primary sources of information were examined. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC, primary fuel, and end use. Projections of state level energy prices to 1990 are developed using the energy intensity approach. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed. Future end-use energy requirements were developed for each 4-digit SIC industry and were grouped as follows: (1) hot water, (2) steam (212 to 300/sup 0/F, each 100/sup 0/F interval from 300 to 1000/sup 0/F, and greater than 1000/sup 0/F), and (3) hot air (100/sup 0/F intervals). Volume I details the activities performed in this effort.

Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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401

AFIP-6 Characterization Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AFIP-6 (ATR Full-size-plate In center flux trap Position) Characterization Summary Report outlines the fresh fuel characterization efforts performed during the AFIP-6 experiment. The AFIP-6 experiment was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuels at a scale prototypic of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel plates (45-inches long). The AFIP-6 test was the first test with plates that were swaged into the rails of the assembly. This test served to examine the effects of a plate in a swaged condition with longer fuel zones (22.5-inches long), that were centered in the plate. AFIP-6 test plates employed a zirconium interlayer that was co-rolled with the fuel foil. Previous mini-plate and AFIP irradiation experiments performed in ATR have demonstrated the stable behavior of the interface between the U-Mo fuel and the zirconium interlayer.

Dr. Dennis D. Keiser

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Acoustic Characterization of Mesoscale Objects  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the science and engineering performed to provide state-of-the-art acoustic capabilities for nondestructively characterizing mesoscale (millimeter-sized) objects--allowing micrometer resolution over the objects entire volume. Materials and structures used in mesoscale objects necessitate the use of (1) GHz acoustic frequencies and (2) non-contacting laser generation and detection of acoustic waves. This effort demonstrated that acoustic methods at gigahertz frequencies have the necessary penetration depth and spatial resolution to effectively detect density discontinuities, gaps, and delaminations. A prototype laser-based ultrasonic system was designed and built. The system uses a micro-chip laser for excitation of broadband ultrasonic waves with frequency components reaching 1.0 GHz, and a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer for detection. The proof-of-concept for mesoscale characterization is demonstrated by imaging a micro-fabricated etched pattern in a 70 {micro}m thick silicon wafer.

Chinn, D; Huber, R; Chambers, D; Cole, G; Balogun, O; Spicer, J; Murray, T

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

403

Light scattering for aerogel characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for aerogel characterization for aerogel characterization Title Light scattering for aerogel characterization Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1998 Authors Hunt, Arlon J. Journal Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids Volume 225 Pagination 303-306 Keywords aerogel, light scattering, microstructure Abstract Light scattering is a useful tool to evaluate aerogel clarity, study its structure, pore size, mechanical strain, and examine the modes of sol-gel evolution that determine its microstructure. Ultraviolet-visible transmission spectroscopy can be used to study the wavelength dependent scattering to readily compare aerogels of differing origins, thickness, and to evaluate effects of residual contaminants. Infrared reflectance measurements can be used to determine the effective real and imaginary indices of refraction of porous aerogel materials for material property and radiant heat transfer studies. Measurements of scattering at a fixed angle can be used for quality control, to evaluate sources of scattering, and study inhomogeneities. Measurement of the Mueller matrix (describing the 16-element angle-dependent transformation of intensity and polarization of incident to scattered light) provides information about the anisotropy, large pore fraction, induced stresses, microstructure and inhomogeneities in the aerogel. The time evolution of scattering before and after gel formation gives information.

404

Identifying and controlling casing corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A survey of 73 wells in California's vintage South Belridge field indicated numerous casing leaks concentrated at 200-ft and 400- to 500-ft depths. Cathodic protection methods could not be used, and it was necessary to establish the precise causes of corrosion in order to develop techniques to control it. Casing was retrieved from two wells and, after thorough lab analysis, it was concluded that shallow-zone corrosion was triggered by oxygen in surrounding soil and that deep-zone corrosion was the result of CO/sub 2/ in formation water. Prevention depends upon more reliable isolation of casing from the formation with better cementing methods and longer conductor pipe.

Gordon, B.A.; Grimes, W.D.; Treseder, R.S.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Tectonic signatures on active margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Holocene shelf sedimentation offshore La Jolla, California.selected perspective views offshore San Diego, California.and selected perspective views offshore greater Los Angeles,

Hogarth, Leah Jolynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Margin Distribution Bounds on Generalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the points. Freund and Schapire 6] (a similar technique was employed by Klasner and Simon 8] for rendering otherwise: The fat shattering dimension fatH of the set H is a function from the positive real numbers the fat shattering dimension of th

Bristol, University of

407

Margin Distribution Bounds on Generalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Klasner and Simon [8] for rendering a real valued function learning algorithm noise tolerant) developed f b 2 H satisfying f b (x) ( â?? r x + fl if b x = 1 Ÿ r x \\Gamma fl otherwise: The fat shattering dimension fat H of the set H is a function from the positive real numbers to the integers which maps a value

Cristianini, Nello

408

Tectonic signatures on active margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

369-382. Paine, J.G. , 1993. Subsidence of the Texas coast:56 Figure 4.2 Uplift and Subsidence Rates Along thedepth and by tectonic subsidence. Contrary to many of the

Hogarth, Leah Jolynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A HYBRID BIO ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and characterization of A Hybrid bio/synthetic biomimetic aggrecan Macromolecule for the treatment of Low Back Pain. ...

410

Biomass Catalyst Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Biomass Catalyst Characterization Laboratory (BCCL) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Advanced Material Development, Processing and Characterization  

The patented suite of Advanced Material Development, Processing and Characterization offers armor structures to prevent unauthorized entry or ...

412

Focused Ion Beam Nanofabrication and Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... materials characterization, nanoprototyping, in-situ electrical measurement, TEM ... the-art research in Nanotechnology, Materials and Life Sciences. ...

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

413

CNEA Fresh Fuel Plate Characterization Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Characterization summary report outlining the findings of the fresh fuel examinations of the plates received from CNEA.

D. Keiser; F. Rice

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Fabrication and Characterization of Reticulated, Porous Mesh ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2010 ... Fabrication and Characterization of Reticulated, Porous Mesh Arrays and Foams for Aerospace Applications by Additive Manufacturing Using ...

415

Thermal Photoacoustic Characterization of Polymeric Composites ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential Characterization of Ikperejere Iron shale and Iron Sandstone Deposit · Direct Precipitation of ... High Temperature Exposure of Oil Well Cements.

416

High Resolution Transmission Microscopy Characterization of an ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Resolution Transmission Microscopy Characterization of an Oxide ... Line Dislocation Dynamics Simulation of fundamental dislocation properties in ...

417

Numerical Simulation and Experimental Characterization of Friction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Strength Aluminum Brazing Sheets for Condenser Fins of Automotive Heat Exchangers · High Temperature Creep Characterization of A380 Cast ...

418

Processing and Microstructural Characterization of Lanthanum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis and ...

419

Modeling & Characterization of Harvestable Kinetic Energy for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gov 301.975-5479. Modeling & Characterization of Harvestable Kinetic Energy for Wearable Medical Sensors. RF-enabled ...

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

420

Localized Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Polymer Nanocomposites. Presentation Title, Localized Characterization of ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Spectroscopic Characterization of Optical Properties and Durability ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The substrates and coatings were characterized using UV/visible absorption, total ... Opacified, Reinforced Aerogel for Thermal Insulation of Thermoelectric ...

422

Session M: Graphene - Materials and Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 24, 2010 ... TMS 2010 Electronic Materials Conference: Session M: Graphene - Materials and Characterization Program Organizers: Mark Goorsky, ...

423

Mechanical Characterization and Modeling - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 3, 2011 ... Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with .... Reduction Initiative of the National Nuclear Security Administration in ...

424

The Compelling Case for NGVs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Compelling Case for NGVs Compelling Case for NGVs Utilities and Federal Agencies Working Together to Make the Most of The Opportunity Stephe Yborra Director of Market Analysis, Education & Communications Clean Vehicle Education Foundation Director of Market Development NGVAmerica A Compelling Case for Natural Gas Vehicles * Natural gas is America's fuel: America's resource, America's jobs. Reduced reliance on volatile foreign oil supplies = Energy Security. * A wide variety of NGVs are available from OEMs and SVMs. Natural gas engines emit far less emissions than diesel or gasoline and their performance now match/exceed diesel, gasoline * Significantly lower fuel / O&M costs generate substantial life-cycle savings and, in many cases, provide fast payback of initial purchase

425

OHA EIA CASES ARCHIVE FILE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a archive file of our EIA decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark section of the...

426

OHA Whistleblower Cases Archive File  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a archive file of our Whistleblower decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark...

427

OHA Security Cases Archive File  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a archive file of our Security decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark section of...

428

OHA FOIA Cases Archive File  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a archive file of our FOIA decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark section of the...

429

OHA Misc Cases Archive File  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a archive file of our Misc decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark section of the...

430

Nuclear Utility Mixed Waste Stream Characterization Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents industry experience at nuclear utilities in characterizing the hazardous component of potential mixed waste streams. It identifies key considerations for characterizing mixed waste; provides background information, including actual sample results, on the majority of plant processes with a potential to generate mixed waste; and presents a methodology for characterizing mixed waste.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

Characterizing large-scale routing anomalies: a case study of the china telecom incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China Telecom's hijack of approximately 50,000 IP prefixes in April 2010 highlights the potential for traffic interception on the Internet. Indeed, the sensitive nature of the hijacked prefixes, including US government agencies, garnered a great deal ... Keywords: border gateway protocol, measurement, routing, security

Rahul Hiran, Niklas Carlsson, Phillipa Gill

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Workload Characterization on a Production Hadoop Cluster: A Case Study on Taobao  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Dynamic Job Grouping-Based Scheduling for Deploying Applications with Fine-Grained Tasks the detailed analysis by running simulations. In addition, job processing granularity size is introduced for such jobs and similar problem was conducted in James, Hawick and Coddington (1999). Among others, two

Shi, Weisong

433

Characterization of Induced Seismicity in a Petroleum Reservoir: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid production and injection in hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs generally results in induced seismic activity. In this paper we study the microseismic activity in a petroleum field in Oman. The microearthquake data ...

Sze, Edmond

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Quantitative characterization of transboundary flows of used electronics : a case study of the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite growing interest and concern surrounding transboundary movements of used electronics around the world, there is a dearth of data on their movements. Although a multitude of different data sources exist, coherent ...

Miller, Travis Reed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Spectral decomposition aids AVO analysis in reservoir characterization: A case study of Blackfoot field, Alberta, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blackfoot field, Alberta, Canada, has produced oil and gas from a Glauconitic compound incised valley-system. In this area channels can be filled with sands and/or shales. Differentiation of prospective channel sands and non-productive shales was always ... Keywords: Amplitude anomaly, Fluid, Lithology, Sand, Spectral decomposition

Wang Jung Yoon; Mohammed Farfour

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Characterization of bedded salt for storage caverns -- A case study from the Midland Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The geometry of Permian bedding salt in the Midland Basin is a product of interaction between depositional facies and postdepositional modification by salt dissolution. Mapping high-frequency cycle patterns in cross section and map view using wireline logs documents the salt geometry. Geologically based interpretation of depositional and dissolution processes provides a powerful tool for mapping and geometry of salt to assess the suitability of sites for development of solution-mined storage caverns. In addition, this process-based description of salt geometry complements existing data about the evolution of one of the best-known sedimentary basins in the world, and can serve as a genetic model to assist in interpreting other salts.

Hovorka, Susan D.; Nava, Robin

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

437

Optimization Case Study of CSP Temperature Cycle and Board Bending Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RE1-3 1 Optimization Case Study of CSP Temperature Cycle and Board Bending Reliability Ian R attach, CSP, chip scale package, solder joint reliability, fatigue cracking, board flex sensitivity of our CSP products because of a tensile sensitivity that was not characterized by a controlled test

Harvey, Ian R.

438

Petroleum characterization by perfluorocarbon tracers  

SciTech Connect

Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs), a class of six compounds, were used to help characterize the Shallow Oil Zone (SOZ) reservoir at the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC) at Elk Hills. The SOZ reservoir is undergoing a pilot gas injection program to assess the technical feasibility and economic viability of injecting gas into the SOZ for improved oil recovery. PFTs were utilized in the pilot gas injection to qualitatively assess the extent of the pilot gas injection so as to determine the degree of gas containment within the SOZ reservoir.

Senum, G.I.; Fajer, R.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Harris, B.R. Jr. (USDOE Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, Tupman, CA (United States)); DeRose, W.E. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); Ottaviani, W.L. (Chevron U.S.A., Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Baseline Graphite Characterization: First Billet  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Graphite Research and Development program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a very high temperature reactor design. To meet this goal, the program is generating the extensive amount of quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the available nuclear graphite grades. In order determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for the latest proposed designs, two main programs are underway. The first, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) program, is a set of experiments that are designed to evaluate the irradiated properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences, and compressive loads. Despite the aggressive experimental matrix that comprises the set of AGC test runs, a limited amount of data can be generated based upon the availability of space within the Advanced Test Reactor and the geometric constraints placed on the AGC specimens that will be inserted. In order to supplement the AGC data set, the Baseline Graphite Characterization program will endeavor to provide supplemental data that will characterize the inherent property variability in nuclear-grade graphite without the testing constraints of the AGC program. This variability in properties is a natural artifact of graphite due to the geologic raw materials that are utilized in its production. This variability will be quantified not only within a single billet of as-produced graphite, but also from billets within a single lot, billets from different lots of the same grade, and across different billets of the numerous grades of nuclear graphite that are presently available. The thorough understanding of this variability will provide added detail to the irradiated property data, and provide a more thorough understanding of the behavior of graphite that will be used in reactor design and licensing. This report covers the development of the Baseline Graphite Characterization program from a testing and data collection standpoint through the completion of characterization on the first billet of nuclear-grade graphite. This data set is the starting point for all future evaluations and comparisons of material properties.

Mark C. Carroll; Joe Lords; David Rohrbaugh

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) More Documents & Publications Supplement No. 1 to the FUSRAP Summary Protocol - Designation/Elimination Protocol Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Radiological Data Demonstrate Protectiveness at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "margin characterization case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Monitoring and repairing geothermal casing cement: a case history  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A manmade geothermal reservoir has been created by drilling a deep hole into relatively impermeable hot rocks, creating a large surface area for heat transfer by hydraulic fracturing, then drilling a second hole to intersect the fracture to complete the closed circulation loop. A second generation system, presently being drilled, will entail creating multiple, parallel, vertical fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. The original completion of injection Hole EE-1, consisting of a conventional high-temperature formulation of Class B portland cement, stabilized with 40% silica sand, did not withstand the cyclic stresses, and rapid deterioration of casing-to-cement and cement-to-formation bonds occurred, which allowed significant flow in the resulting microannulus. The performance history of the casing cement for the existing HDR EE-1 injection well, the subsequent remedial cementing program, the cement bond logs, and the radioactive isotope tracer injections tests, used to monitor the condition of the casing cement is described. (MHR)

Pettitt, R.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Analysis Of The Tank 6F Final Characterization Samples-2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm-243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite Sample 2, and highest concentrations for Composite Sample 3. The Hg and Mo results suggest possible measurement outliers. However, the magnitudes of the differences between the Hg 95% upper confidence limit (UCL95) results with and without the outlier and the magnitudes of the differences between the Mo UCL95 results with and without the outlier do not appear to have practical significance. It is recommended to remove the potential measurement outliers. Doing so is conservative in the sense of producing a higher UCL95 for Hg and Mo than if the potential outliers were included in the calculations. In contrast to the inorganic results, most of the radionuclides did not demonstrate heterogeneity among the three Tank 6F composite sample characterization results.

Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.; Shine, E. P.

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

443

ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 6F FINAL CHARACTERIZATION SAMPLES-2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm-243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite Sample 2, and highest concentrations for Composite Sample 3. The Hg and Mo results suggest possible measurement outliers. However, the magnitudes of the differences between the Hg 95% upper confidence limit (UCL95) results with and without the outlier and the magnitudes of the differences between the Mo UCL95 results with and without the outlier do not appear to have practical significance. It is recommended to remove the potential measurement outliers. Doing so is conservative in the sense of producing a higher UCL95 for Hg and Mo than if the potential outliers were included in the calculations. In contrast to the inorganic results, most of the radionuclides did not demonstrate heterogeneity among the three Tank 6F composite sample characterization results.

Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M.; Shine, G.

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

444

Analysis of the Tank 6F Final Characterization Samples-2012  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm- 243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite Sample 2, and highest concentrations for Composite Sample 3. The Hg and Mo results suggest possible measurement outliers. However, the magnitudes of the differences between the Hg 95% upper confidence limit (UCL95) results with and without the outlier and the magnitudes of the differences between the Mo UCL95 results with and without the outlier do not appear to have practical significance. It is recommended to remove the potential measurement outliers. Doing so is conservative in the sense of producing a higher UCL95 for Hg and Mo than if the potential outliers were included in the calculations. In contrast to the inorganic results, most of the radionuclides did not demonstrate heterogeneity among the three Tank 6F composite sample characterization results.

Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.; Shine, E. P.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Accumulated waste characterization work plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) as part of the uranium enrichment complex produces enriched uranium for power generation and defense purposes. Since the beginning of diffusion plant operations in 1953, a variety of waste materials and excess equipment has been generated through both normal operations and as part of major system upgrade programs. However, as a result of the closure of former onsite radioactive management facilities and limited onsite and offsite disposal facilities for mixed (hazardous and radioactive) wastes, PORTS has accumulated large quantities of waste awaiting final disposition. These accumulated wastes were estimated in the Accumulated Waste Plan (AWP) to consist of some 21,700 containers of the radioactive, RCRA hazardous, PCB, mixed and asbestos wastes in various storage areas and process buildings with PORTS. In order to proper manage these wastes onsite and prepare for them for ultimate treatment or disposal, a detailed understanding of the waste contents and characteristics must be developed. The strategy for managing and disposing of these wastes was outlined in the AWP. The purpose of this Accumulated Waste Characterization Work Plan (AWCWP) is to provide a detailed plan for characterizing waste containers from the existing PORTS inventory. The AWCWP documents the process and analytical information currently available and describes statistically-based sampling and analyses required to support proper regulatory classification.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Technology Characterizations. Environmental Information Handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Environmental Handbook Series is designed to overcome the deficiency of information utility and transfer. Each of the works in this series brings together information in an area and format that is useful to both public and private sector needs. It is meant to serve as a basic reference document that will stand for a period of time and help to enrich decisionmaking and research in the interface of energy and the environment. This particular handbook deals with environmental characterization data for the energy technologies and presents the data in a format for use by DOE policy analysts. This treatment includes not only the actual information base, but also a preface which explains the present concept, the historical growth of the program, and the new direction for improved utility. The information base, itself, is constantly being enhanced and is republished periodically as necessary. The specific energy systems for which environmental/technology characterization information is provided are grouped as follows: nuclear energy; coal; petroleum; gas; synthetic fuels; solar energy; geothermal energy; and hydroelectricity.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

Schumacher, R.F.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

448

BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

Schumacher, R.F.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

449

Stack Characterization System Development and Testing  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, as well as the rest of the U.S. Department of Energy community, has numerous off-gas stacks that need to be decommissioned, demolished, and packaged for disposal. Disposal requires a waste disposition determination phase. Process knowledge typically makes a worst-case scenario decision that may place lower-level waste into a more expensive higher-level waste disposal category. Truly useful radiological and chemical sampling can be problematic on old stacks due to their inherent height and access hazards, and many of these stacks have begun to deteriorate structurally. A remote stack characterization system (SCS) that can manage sample and data collection removes people from the hazards and provides an opportunity for access to difficult to reach internal stack areas. The SCS is a remotely operated articulated radiological data recovery system designed to deploy down into off-gas stacks from the top via crane. The battery-powered SCS is designed to stabilize itself against the stack walls and move various data recovery systems into areas of interest on the inner stack walls. Stabilization is provided by a tripod structure; sensors are mounted in a rotatable bipod underneath the tripod. Sensors include a beta/gamma/alpha detector, a removable contaminant multi-sample automated sampler, and a multi-core remote core drill. Multiple cameras provide remote task viewing, support for sampling, and video documentation of the process. A delay in funding has delayed project delivery somewhat. Therefore, this paper describes the technology and shows fabrication and testing progress to the extent that data is available.

Noakes, Mark W [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Lloyd, Peter D [ORNL; Pin, Francois G [ORNL; Rowe, John C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Tools & Resources: Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Case Studies Case Studies Find out more about how energy efficiency upgrade programs across the United States are using innovative financing mechanisms, high-demand promotions, tailored contractor training, and more to drive the number of building upgrades through a holistic, whole-home approach. Use the lessons they learned to accelerate your own program's journey to success. The case studies below provide extensive, beneficial insight from Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners and others on the topics of: Driving Demand Financing Service Delivery Workforce Development. Topic Title Description Program Featured Sector Source Year Service Delivery Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record Time Provides examples of lessons learned through the implementation and monitoring of Austin Energy's Best Offer Ever promotion. The promotional offer generated a record number of home upgrades in just six months.

451

Enforcement Cases | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enforcement Cases Enforcement Cases Enforcement Cases RSS December 20, 2013 AeroSys: Order (2011-SCE-1624) DOE ordered AeroSys, Inc. (AeroSys) to pay a $100,000 civil penalty after finding AeroSys had (1) failed to certify that certain models of space-constrained central air conditioners and air conditioning heat pumps comply with the applicable energy conservation standards; and (2) manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. units of noncompliant models of space-constrained central air conditioners and air conditioning heat pumps. November 15, 2013 Sylvane: Order (2013-CE-36005) DOE ordered Sylvane, Inc. to pay a $4,000 civil penalty after finding Sylvane had failed to certify that certain models of dehumidifiers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

452

EIA Cases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIA Cases EIA Cases EIA Cases RSS February 14, 2011 TEE-0073 - In the Matter of Cole Distributing, Inc. On December 13, 2010, Cole Distributing, Inc. (Cole) filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). The firm requests that it be permanently relieved of the requirement to prepare and file the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-782B, entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report." As explained below, we have determined that Cole's request should be denied. February 14, 2011 TEE-0076 - In the Matter of Brodeur's Oil Service, Inc. On February 18, 2011, Brodeur's Oil Service, Inc. (Brodeur's) filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of

453

Security Cases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security Cases Security Cases Security Cases RSS December 23, 2013 PSH-13-0103 - In the Matter of Personnel Security On January 29, 2013, the Individual completed and submitted a Questionnaire for National Security Positions (QNSP) to a Local Security Office (LSO). In this QNSP, the Individual admitted that he had used a neighbor's internet connection without permission on several occasions in 2010 and 2011, and had downloaded copyrighted software and media to his computer without permission from the copyright holders from 2000 through 2006. Exhibit 7 at 18-19. December 20, 2013 PSH-13-0102 - In the Matter of Personnel Security On December 20, 2013, a Hearing Officer determined that an individual's security clearance should be restored. In reaching this determination, the

454

Health IT Mobile Device Use Case Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health IT Mobile Device Use Case Meeting. Purpose: ... This meeting will address the Health IT project's first use case, Mobile Devices. ...

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

455

Renewable Energy Case Studies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Case Studies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Renewable Energy Case Studies AgencyCompany Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

456

Solar Thermal Reactor Materials Characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current research into hydrogen production through high temperature metal oxide water splitting cycles has created a need for robust high temperature materials. Such cycles are further enhanced by the use of concentrated solar energy as a power source. However, samples subjected to concentrated solar radiation exhibited lifetimes much shorter than expected. Characterization of the power and flux distributions representative of the High Flux Solar Furnace(HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) were compared to ray trace modeling of the facility. In addition, samples of candidate reactor materials were thermally cycled at the HFSF and tensile failure testing was performed to quantify material degradation. Thermal cycling tests have been completed on super alloy Haynes 214 samples and results indicate that maximum temperature plays a significant role in reduction of strength. The number of cycles was too small to establish long term failure trends for this material due to the high ductility of the material.

Lichty, P. R.; Scott, A. M.; Perkins, C. M.; Bingham, C.; Weimer, A. W.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Large Scale Verification of External RPV Cooling in Case of Severe Accident  

SciTech Connect

The design of the SWR 1000 - developed by Framatome ANP, consists of components, to flood the exterior of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in the case of a hypothetical core melt accident. FANP performed tests to demonstrate that there are significant safety margins against occurring of a critical heat flux (CHF). For this purpose different pretests have been performed in a water / air operated test facility. Within the first pretests the global flow conditions around the RPV have been investigated by measuring the local void fractions with impedance and fiber optical probes. In addition the local water velocities have been measured with a Laser Doppler Anemometer. In further pretests a section model has been implemented in the test facility and the geometry has been modified until the flow conditions in the section model and the global model have been similar. Scaling procedures proved, that the water/ air tests of the section model could be transferred to a water /steam operated heated 1:1 scaled model. Such a model has been manufactured and integrated in the BENSON test-rig - a highly flexible water/steam separate effect test-facility operated by Framatome ANP. The model has been equipped with heating wires pressed in slots in the surface of the model, which represented the RPV- wall. The distance between the slots has been chosen in such a way that the decay heat flux profile, which would have to be removed in a core melt accident, could be simulated. In addition more than 300 thermocouples have been installed on the heated surface to measure the wall temperature and observe whether a CHF has occurred. During the tests no CHF occurred - the tests have been limited only by the test set-up. The tests have been performed at ambient conditions, whereas the pressure under accident conditions would be significantly above these conditions. The critical heat flux increases, with increasing pressure. Considering this effect the proven margin against occurring of a CHF is about four. As the measurements have been limited by the test set-up and as the literature shows that CHF-values of inclined and curved comparable structures are much higher, than the tested heat fluxes it can be expected that the real safety margins against occurring of a CHF are much higher than four. (author)

Schmidt, H. [Framatome ANP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, D91050 Erlangen (Germany)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Electron and X-Ray Microscopy: Structural Characterization of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2009 ... Recent Advances in Structural Characterization of Materials: Electron and X-Ray Microscopy: Structural Characterization of Nanoscale ...

459

Electrochemical Characterization of Lead-Calcium Alloy in Agitated ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Pb Free Piezoelectric Ceramics - Barium ... Thermographic Characterization of Tensile Behavior in Railway Bogie Materials.

460

AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study, AFM was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to a Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage and increased conductivity in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam.

Teague, L.; Duff, M.

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

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