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1

MAPSS Vegetation Modeling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: MAKMAMAMAPSS

2

Monte Carlo simulation model for electromagnetic scattering from vegetation and inversion of vegetation parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis research, a coherent scattering model for microwave remote sensing of vegetation canopy is developed on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations. An accurate model of vegetation structure is essential for the ...

Wang, Li-Fang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Vegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

urbanization effects on the water cycle. Although there are many stormwater best management practices (BMPs (ET) and soil media water storage between storm events. Lazzarin et al. (2005) estimated that ET ratesVegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results James A. Sherrard Jr.1

4

A phenomenological model for the flow resistance over submerged vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A phenomenological model for the flow resistance over submerged vegetation Alexandra G. Konings,1: Konings, A. G., G. G. Katul, and S. E. Thompson (2012), A phenomenological model for the flow resistance [2002]. In this paper, a phenomenological approach is used to describe the momentum transfer

Katul, Gabriel

5

Uncertainty analysis of vegetation distribution in the northern high latitudes during the 21st century with a dynamic vegetation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study aims to assess how high-latitude vegetation may respond under various climate scenarios during the 21st century with a focus on analyzing model parameters induced uncertainty and how this uncertainty compares ...

Jiang, Yueyang

6

Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V{sub c,max} (maximum carboxylation rate) and J{sub max} (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the vegetation feedbacks to climate in Earth system models.

Xu, Chonggang [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fisher, Rosie [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cai, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); McDowell, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 2 Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model with a combination of satellite observations (Fig. 2.1) and field mea- surements, as projected by simulation modeling

Bhatt, Uma

8

Use of vegetation for abatement of road traffic noise in a 1:10 scale street model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of vegetation for abatement of road traffic noise in a 1:10 scale street model J.Y. Jeona , H was constructed to evaluate the noise abatement by use of vegetation as sustainable means. The model materials

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

9

A flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control in urban storm water runoff [Kirby et al., 2005], and linking tidal hydrodynamic forcing to flow and field studies. The proposed model asymptotically recovers the flow resistance formulation when the waterA flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics Gabriel G

Katul, Gabriel

10

Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using two climate-vegetation model simulations from the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, version 2), we investigate vegetation-precipitation feedbacks across North Africa during the mid-Holocene. From mid-Holocene snapshot runs of FOAM and CCSM2, we detect a negative feedback at the annual timescale with our statistical analysis. Using the Monte- Carlo bootstrap method, the annual negative feedback is further confirmed to be significant in both simulations. Additional analysis shows that this negative interaction is partially caused by the competition between evaporation and transpiration in North African grasslands. Furthermore, we find the feedbacks decrease with increasing timescales, and change signs from positive to negative at increasing timescales in FOAM. The proposed mechanism for this sign switch is associated with the different persistent timescales of upper and lower soil water contents, and their interactions with vegetation and atmospheric precipitation.

Wang, Yi; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Gallimore, Robert; Levis, Samuel; Kutzbach, John E.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Modeling of the interactions between forest vegetation, disturbances, and sediment yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of the interactions between forest vegetation, disturbances, and sediment yields Erkan on the frequency and magnitude of sediment delivery from a small watershed ($3.9 km2 ) in the Idaho batholith weathering and the divergence of diffusive sediment transport on hillslopes. Soil removal is due to episodic

Tarboton, David

12

Modeling of sorption isotherms of dried vegetable wastes from wholesale market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The moisture sorption isotherms of dried vegetable wastes (based on green leaves and fruits) from wholesale market were determined at 25, 40, 60 and 90 C by the static gravimetric method. Experimental data were fit by using several mathematical models. The G.A.B. and the Halsey model gave the minimum mean square error. G.A.B. parameters were related with temperature by Arrhenius expressions.

Lopez, A.; Iguaz, A.; Esnoz, A.; Virseda, P.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of wave attenuation through artificial vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is commonly known that coastal vegetation dissipates energy and aids in shoreline protection by damping incoming waves and depositing sediment in vegetated regions. However, this critical role of vegetation to dampen wave forces is not fully...

Augustin, Lauren Nicole

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Global vegetation model diversity and the risks of climate-driven ecosystem shifts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change is modifying global biogeochemical cycles, and is expected to exert increasingly large effects in the future. How these changes will in turn affect and interact with the structure and function of particular ecosystems is unclear, however, both because of scientific uncertainties and the very diversity of global vegetation models in use. Writing in Environmental Research Letters, Warszawski et al. (1) aggregate results from a group of models, across a range of emissions scenarios and climate data, to investigate these risks. Although the models frequently disagree about which specific regions are at risk, they consistently predict a greater chance of ecosystem restructuring with more warming; this risk roughly doubles between 2 and 3 įC increases in global mean temperature. The innovative work of Warszawski et al. represents an important first step towards fully consistent multi-model, multi-scenario assessments of the future risks to global ecosystems.

Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

15

Model and laboratory study of dispersion in flows with submerged vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation is ubiquitous in rivers, estuaries, and wetlands, strongly influencing water conveyance and mass transport. The plant canopy affects mean and turbulent flow structure, and thus both advection and dispersion. ...

Murphy, E.

16

Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica under Climate Change Scenarios*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precipitation, the impacts of climate change on vegetation and water cycle are predicted with relatively low under Climate Change Scenarios* PABLO IMBACH,1 LUIS MOLINA,1 BRUNO LOCATELLI,# OLIVIER ROUPSARD,1,@ GIL MAHE¬ī ,& RONALD NEILSON,**,&& LENIN CORRALES,11 MARKO SCHOLZE,## AND PHILIPPE CIAIS @@ 1 Climate Change

Boyer, Edmond

17

Climate-Soil-Vegetation Control on Groundwater Table Dynamics and its Feedbacks in a Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the three dynamically linked branches of the water cycle, including atmospheric, surface, and subsurface water, groundwater is the largest reservoir and an active component of the hydrologic system. Because of the inherent slow response time, groundwater may be particularly relevant for long time-scale processes such as multi-years or decadal droughts. This study uses regional climate simulations with and without surface water Ė groundwater interactions for the conterminous U.S. to assess the influence of climate, soil, and vegetation on groundwater table dynamics, and its potential feedbacks to regional climate. Analysis shows that precipitation has a dominant influence on the spatial and temporal variations of groundwater table depth (GWT). The simulated GWT is found to decrease sharply with increasing precipitation. Our simulation also shows some distinct spatial variations that are related to soil porosity and hydraulic conductivity. Vegetation properties such as minimum stomatal resistance, and root depth and fraction are also found to play an important role in controlling the groundwater table. Comparing two simulations with and without groundwater table dynamics, we find that groundwater table dynamics mainly influences the partitioning of soil water between the surface (0 Ė 0.5 m) and subsurface (0.5 Ė 5 m) rather than total soil moisture. In most areas, groundwater table dynamics increases surface soil moisture at the expense of the subsurface, except in regions with very shallow groundwater table. The change in soil water partitioning between the surface and subsurface is found to strongly correlate with the partitioning of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. The evaporative fraction (EF) is generally higher during summer when groundwater table dynamics is included. This is accompanied by increased cloudiness, reduced diurnal temperature range, cooler surface temperature, and increased cloud top height. Although both convective and non-convective precipitation are enhanced, the higher EF changes the partitioning to favor more non-convective precipitation, but this result could be sensitive to the convective parameterization used. Compared to simulations without groundwater table dynamics, the dry bias in the summer precipitation is slightly reduced over the central and eastern U.S. Groundwater table dynamics can provide important feedbacks to atmospheric processes, and these feedbacks are stronger in regions with deeper groundwater table, because the interactions between surface and subsurface are weak when the groundwater table is deep. This increases the sensitivity of surface soil moisture to precipitation anomalies, and therefore enhances land surface feedbacks to the atmosphere through changes in soil moisture and evaporative fraction. By altering the groundwater table depth, land use change and groundwater withdrawal can alter land surface response and feedback to the climate system.

Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Qian, Yun; Liang, Xu

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

18

Investigation of North American vegetation variability under recent climate: A study using the SSiB4/TRIFFID biophysical/dynamic vegetation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of CMIP5 Earth System Models in Reproducing LeafHemisphere. Part II: Earth System Models. Remote Sensing, 5,

Zhang, Z; Xue, Y; Macdonald, G; Cox, PM; Collatz, GJ

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Investigation of North American vegetation variability under recent climate Ė A study using the SSiB4/TRIFFID biophysical/dynamic vegetation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of CMIP5 Earth System Models in Reproducing LeafHemisphere. Part II: Earth System Models. Remote Sensing, 5,

zhang, Z; xue, Y; Macdonald, G; Cox, P; Collatz, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Improving parameterization of scalar transport through vegetation in a coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several regional-scale ecosystem models currently parameterize subcanopy scalar transport using a rough-wall boundary eddy diffusivity formulation. This formulation predicts unreasonably high soil evaporation beneath tall, ...

Link, Percy Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Equilibrium Response and Transient Dynamics Datasets from VEMAP: Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Users of the VEMAP Portal can access input files of numerical data that include monthly and daily files of geographic data, soil and site files, scenario files, etc. Model results from Phase I, the Equilibrium Response datasets, are available through the NCAR anonymous FTP site at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/vresults.html. Phase II, Transient Dynamics, include climate datasets, models results, and analysis tools. Many supplemental files are also available from the main data page at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html.

23

Ecological Modelling 127 (2000) 6579 Can a vegetation index derived from remote sensing be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be indicative of areal transpiration? Jozsef Szilagyi * Conser6ation and Sur6ey Di6ision, Uni6ersity of Nebraska-mail address: jszilagyi1@unl.edu (J. Szilagyi) 0304-3800/00/$ - see front matter © 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. PII: S0304-3800(99)00200-8 #12;J. Szilagyi / Ecological Modelling 127 (2000) 65

Szilagyi, Jozsef

24

Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

Chen, Tsuhan

25

Comparing three vegetation monoterpene emission models to measured gas concentrations with a model of meteorology, air chemistry and chemical transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are essential in atmospheric chemistry because of their chemical reactions that produce and destroy tropospheric ozone, their effects on aerosol formation and growth, and their potential influence on global warming. As one of the important BVOC groups, monoterpenes have been a focus of scientific attention in atmospheric research. Detailed regional measurements and model estimates are needed to study emission potential and the monoterpene budget on a global scale. Since the use of empirical measurements for upscaling is limited by many physical and biological factors such as genetic variation, temperature and light, water availability, seasonal changes, and environmental stresses, comprehensive inventories over larger areas are difficult to obtain.

Smolander, S.; He, Q.; Mogensen, Ditte; Zhou, L.; Back, J.; Ruuskanen, T.; Noe, S.; Guenther, Alex B.; Aaltonen, H.; Kulmala, M.; Boy, Michael

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

26

Hydrodynamics of vegetated channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper highlights some recent trends in vegetation hydrodynamics, focusing on conditions within channels and spanning spatial scales from individual blades, to canopies or vegetation patches, to the channel reach. At ...

Nepf, Heidi

27

Surface energy partitioning over four dominant vegetation types across the United States in a coupled regional climate model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slopes Model (PRISM) data) and to standard WRF model output. We found that WRF3-CLM3.5 can capture and Forecasting Model 3≠Community Land Model 3.5 (WRF3-CLM3.5), by comparing model output to observations (Ameri simulation of downward solar radiation could reduce the energy flux and temperature biases. After adding

Kueppers, Lara M.

28

Impact of Hillslope-Scale Organization of Topography, Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, and Vegetation on Modeling Surface Microwave Radiation Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microwave radiometry will emerge as an important tool for global remote sensing of near-surface soil moisture in the coming decade. In this modeling study, we find that hillslope-scale topography (tens of meters) influences ...

Flores, Alejandro N.

29

Effects of vegetation and soil moisture on the simulated land surface processes from the coupled WRF/Noah model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulations. Meso- scale models, which have been used not only for numerical weather prediction but also surface and atmosphere into numerical weather or climate prediction. This study describes coupled WRF [Chen et al., 1997; Pielke et al., 1997]. Numerical weather prediction with high spatial and tempo- ral

Small, Eric

30

Ecological Impacts of the Cerro Grande Fire: Predicting Elk Movement and Distribution Patterns in Response to Vegetative Recovery through Simulation Modeling October 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned approximately 17,200 ha in north-central New Mexico as the result of an escaped prescribed burn initiated by Bandelier National Monument. The interaction of large-scale fires, vegetation, and elk is an important management issue, but few studies have addressed the ecological implications of vegetative succession and landscape heterogeneity on ungulate populations following large-scale disturbance events. Primary objectives of this research were to identify elk movement pathways on local and landscape scales, to determine environmental factors that influence elk movement, and to evaluate movement and distribution patterns in relation to spatial and temporal aspects of the Cerro Grande Fire. Data collection and assimilation reflect the collaborative efforts of National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and Department of Energy (Los Alamos National Laboratory) personnel. Geographic positioning system (GPS) collars were used to track 54 elk over a period of 3+ years and locational data were incorporated into a multi-layered geographic information system (GIS) for analysis. Preliminary tests of GPS collar accuracy indicated a strong effect of 2D fixes on position acquisition rates (PARs) depending on time of day and season of year. Slope, aspect, elevation, and land cover type affected dilution of precision (DOP) values for both 2D and 3D fixes, although significant relationships varied from positive to negative making it difficult to delineate the mechanism behind significant responses. Two-dimensional fixes accounted for 34% of all successfully acquired locations and may affect results in which those data were used. Overall position acquisition rate was 93.3% and mean DOP values were consistently in the range of 4.0 to 6.0 leading to the conclusion collar accuracy was acceptable for modeling purposes. SAVANNA, a spatially explicit, process-oriented ecosystem model, was used to simulate successional dynamics. Inputs to the SAVANNA included a land cover map, long-term weather data, soil maps, and a digital elevation model. Parameterization and calibration were conducted using field plots. Model predictions of herbaceous biomass production and weather were consistent with available data and spatial interpolations of snow were considered reasonable for this study. Dynamic outputs generated by SAVANNA were integrated with static variables, movement rules, and parameters developed for the individual-based model through the application of a habitat suitability index. Model validation indicated reasonable model fit when compared to an independent test set. The finished model was applied to 2 realistic management scenarios for the Jemez Mountains and management implications were discussed. Ongoing validation of the individual-based model presented in this dissertation provides an adaptive management tool that integrates interdisciplinary experience and scientific information, which allows users to make predictions about the impact of alternative management policies.

S.P. Rupp

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Vegetables: Selection, Care, Cooking.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and blemishes and decay. For the least waste in paring, select potatoes that are regular in shape and have shallow eyes. Avoid potatoes that show green 1 color on some part of the surface; the green portions taste bitter. One pound of fresh po- , tatoes... aging. daily food guide for Texans, three kinds of Other vegetables include all those that are vegetables-green or yellow, other vegetables not green or yellow, and supply other needed and Irish or sweet potatoes are good nutrition vitamins...

Reasonover, Frances; Mason, Louise; Tribble, Marie; Cox, Maeona

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Vegetable Gardening in Containers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This 7 page publications explains how to grow vegetables in containers when insufficient space or unsutable soil conditions make a traditional garden difficult to achieve. Topics include: container materials, crop selection, growing media, seeding...

Masabni, Joseph; Cotner, Sam

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

33

Specialty Vegetables in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chayote squash - Creole cooks call it mirliton, South Americans call it mango squash and Floridians call it a vegetable pear. These are all the same vegetable but with many names! Amaranths (Chinese Spinach) Description. Amaranths are green, leafy... wash flowers thoroughly and make certain all chemical or organic pesticide has been removed. Give them a gentle bath in salt water and then dip the petals in ice water to perk them up. Drain on paper towels. For later marketing, petals and whole...

Longbrake, Thomas D.; Baker, Marvin L.; Cotner, Sam; Parsons, Jerry; Roberts, Roland; Stein, Larry

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Special study on vegetative covers. [UMTRA Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions. 28 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Vegetative covers: Special study. [Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, (2) define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and (3) develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites (Shiprock, New Mexico; Burrell, Pennsylvania; and Clive, Utah) where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Oak Woodland Vegetation Dynamics: A State and Transition Approach1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a format that is sensible and accessible to natural resource managers. State and transition models have93 Oak Woodland Vegetation Dynamics: A State and Transition Approach1 Melvin R. George2 and Maximo and transition format. Keywords: Oak-woodlands, state and transition models, succession, vegetation dynamics

Standiford, Richard B.

37

Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines Based on Sustainability Goals for the Macquarie Campus #12.................................................................................................................................10 4.2.5 Shale-Sandstone soil transition...................................................................................................................................11 #12;3 1. Purpose This document provides a guideline for specific grounds management procedures

Wang, Yan

38

Vegetable Gardening in Containers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are indicated in Table 1. * Growing Media Synthetic "soils" are best suited for vegetable container gardening. These mixes may be composed of sawdust, wood chips, peat moss, perlite, ver miculite or almost any other type of media. Regardless of what... "soils" are available from gar den centers, or one can be pre pared by mixing horticultu ral grade vermiculite, peat moss, limestone, superphosphate, and garden fertilizer. To 1 bushel each of vermiculite and peat moss, add 10 tablespoons...

Cotner, Sam

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Stream Temperature Response to Three Riparian Vegetation Scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Stream temperature response to three distinct riparian conditions were then modeled: open, in vegetation loss can increase other processes that play a role in heat exchange between the atmosphere local near-stream air mass transfer (18). Recent research on the effects of riparian vegetation

Selker, John

40

-Mapping Mountain vegetation -1 Applied Vegetation Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modeling, image-based texture analysis, and object-based classification Dobrowski, Solomon Z.1*; Safford Pacific Southwest Region, 1323 Club Drive, Vallejo, CA 94592, USA; *Corresponding author; E-mail solomon, is devising a methodology that leverages the strengths of both predictive modeling and image-based approaches

Dobrowski, Solomon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Chapter 17 Vegetation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStanding FriedelIron-Sulfur3-1 November 2012 Words in17-1

42

N A Vegetation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModificationEnzyme-FunctionalizedCirculatoryo r t h F o-N A

43

Vegetation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Zip:ScaleVegetation Jump to: navigation,

44

Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have helped to fuel their resurgence in industrial and urban settings. There are many environmental and economical benefits that can be realized by incorporating a vegetative roof into the design of a building. These include storm-water retention, energy conservation, reduction in the urban heat island effect, increased longevity of the roofing membrane, the ability of plants to create biodiversity and filter air contaminants, and beautification of the surroundings by incorporating green space. The vegetative roof research project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was initiated to quantify the thermal performance of various vegetative roofing systems relative to black and white roofs. Single Ply Roofing Institute (SPRI) continued its long-term commitment to cooperative research with ORNL in this project. Low-slope roof systems for this study were constructed and instrumented for continuous monitoring in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. This report summarizes the results of the annual cooling and heating loads per unit area of three vegetative roofing systems with side-by-side comparison to black and white roofing systems as well as a test section with just the growing media without plants. Results showed vegetative roofs reduced heat gain (reduced cooling loads) compared to the white control system due to the thermal mass, extra insulation, and evapo-transpiration associated with the vegetative roofing systems. The 4-inch and tray systems reduced the heat gain by approximately 61%, while the reduction with the 8-inch vegetative roof was found to be approximately 67%. The vegetative roofing systems were more effective in reducing heat gain than in reducing heat losses (heating loads). The reduction in heat losses for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 40% in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. It should be noted that these values are climate dependent. Vegetative roofs also reduced the temperature (heat exposure) and temperature fluctuations (thermal stress) experienced by the membrane. In the cooling season of East Tennessee, the average peak temperature of the 4-inch and tray systems was found to be approximately 94 F cooler than the control black roofing system. The average temperature fluctuations at the membrane for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 10 F compared to 125 F for black and 64 F for white systems. As expected, the 8-inch vegetative roof had the lowest fluctuations at approximately 2 F. Future work will include modeling of the energy performance of vegetative roof panels in the test climate of East Tennessee. The validated model then will be used to predict energy use in roofs with different insulation levels and in climates different from the test climate.

Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Ennis, Mike J [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Investigation of Soil Moisture - Vegetation Interactions in Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but not well understood climate factor. This study examines soil moisture-vegetation health interactions using both in situ observations and land surface model simulations. For the observational study, soil moisture is taken from 20 in situ Oklahoma Mesonet...

Ford, Trenton W.

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

46

ERDC/CERLTR-05-39 Simulation of Vegetation Recovery from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/CERLTR-05-39 Simulation of Vegetation Recovery from Military Disturbances on Fort Bliss Tamara of Vegetation Recovery from Military Disturbances on Fort Bliss Tamara Hochstrasser and Debra Peters USDA the vegetation simulation modeling capabilities of Fort Bliss, Texas, for evaluating the effects of military

Fehmi, Jeffrey S.

47

The vegetation of Yucca Mountain: Description and ecology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was monitored over a six-year period, from 1989 through 1994. Yucca Mountain is located at the northern limit of the Mojave Desert and is the only location being studied as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Site characterization consists of a series of multidisciplinary, scientific investigations designed to provide detailed information necessary to assess the suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site as a repository. This vegetation description establishes a baseline for determining the ecological impact of site characterization activities; it porvides input for site characterization research and modeling; and it clarifies vegetation community dynamics and relationships to the physical environment. A companion study will describe the impact of site characterization of vegetation. Cover, density, production, and species composition of vascular plants were monitored at 48 Ecological Study Plots (ESPs) stratified in four vegetation associations. Precipitation, soil moisture, and maximum and minimum temperatures also were measured at each study plot.

NONE

1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

48

A new cost-distance model for human accessibility and an evaluation of accessibility bias in permanent vegetation plots in Great Smoky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new cost-distance model for human accessibility and an evaluation of accessibility bias-mail toddjobe@unc.edu Abstract Question: Can a new cost-distance model help us to evaluate the potential crossings, and vegeta- tion density were incorporated into a least-cost model of energetic expenditure

Peet, Robert K.

49

International bibliography of vegetation maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:100,000,000], in Voss, John, "Preliminary report of the paleo-ecology of a Wisconsin and an Illinois bog." Trans. Illinois State Acad. Sci., vol. 24, p. 136.) 1887 "VEGETATION REGIONS ACCORDING TO OSCAR DRUDE" black and white [1:56,300,0001 LEGEND 1. Tundra 2... survey of North America." In Engler, A., and Oscar Drude (eds.), Die Vegetation der Erde. Leipzig, Wilhelm Engelmann, vol. 13, inserted at back. [ 1911 ] "NORTH AMERICA VEGETATION" black and white [ 1 -.34,400,000] LEGEND 1. Tropical forest 5...

Ku?chler, A. W. (August William)

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Selecting Fresh Fruits and Vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time. Selecting Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Amanda Scott* E-197 9/08 This publication was sponsored by a grant from the Initiative for Future Agriculture Food Systems, a program of the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, which...

Scott, Amanda

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

51

Longitudinal dispersion in vegetated flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation is ubiquitous in rivers, estuaries and wetlands, strongly influencing both water conveyance and mass transport. The plant canopy affects both mean and turbulent flow structure, and thus both advection and ...

Murphy, Enda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Texas Home Vegetable Gardening Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With this manual, home gardeners are sure to be successful growing vegetables. It includes information on garden planning, crop selection, soil preparation, fertilization, planting techniques, watering, pest control and harvesting. Tables show...

Masabni, Joseph

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

53

Investigation of the effect of a circular patch of vegetation on turbulence generation and sediment deposition using four case studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study describes the spatial distribution of sediment deposition in the wake of a circular patch of model vegetation and the effect of the patch on turbulence and mean flow. Two difference types pf vegetation were used ...

Ortiz, Alejandra C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Satellite-based estimates of net radiation and modeling the role of topography and vegetation on inter-annual hydro-climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change acknowledged that the lack of relevant observations in various regions of the world is a crucial gap in understanding and modeling impacts of ...

Bisht, Gautam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Coupling dry deposition to vegetation phenology in the Community Earth System Model: Implications for the simulation of surface O[subscript 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dry deposition is an important removal process controlling surface ozone. We examine the representation of this ozone loss mechanism in the Community Earth System Model. We first correct the dry deposition parameterization ...

Val?Martin, M.

56

Vegetation Change Analysis User's Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Diagnostic techniques are needed to identify thresholds of sustainable military use. A cooperative effort among U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on developing new techniques for monitoring and mitigating military impacts in arid lands. This manual focuses on the development of new monitoring techniques that have been implemented at Fort Irwin, California. New mitigation techniques are described in a separate companion manual. This User's Manual is designed to address diagnostic capabilities needed to distinguish between various degrees of sustainable and nonsustainable impacts due to military training and testing and habitat-disturbing activities in desert ecosystems. Techniques described here focus on the use of high-resolution imagery and the application of image-processing techniques developed primarily for medical research. A discussion is provided about the measurement of plant biomass and shrub canopy cover in arid. lands using conventional methods. Both semiquantitative methods and quantitative methods are discussed and reference to current literature is provided. A background about the use of digital imagery to measure vegetation is presented.

D. J. Hansen; W. K. Ostler

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Environmental Effects of Woody Vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In rural loca- tions, woody vegetation provides for man's protection and preservation. Farm windbreaks in improv- ing human comfort by shielding people from direct solar radiation. What happens to the solar but significant amount is used for heating tree parts. The portion of solar radiation used in photosynthesis (food

Koford, Rolf R.

58

Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Vegetable Crops Hotline index 2005 MANAGEMENT TIPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Labeled for Row Middle Use in Vegetable Crops 446 Kudzu Turning Over New Leaves in Indiana Counties 447

Ginzel, Matthew

60

Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-page fact sheet discussing the pitfalls of using straight vegetable oil (SVO) as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fruit and Vegetable Consumption by Low-Income Americans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ML, Schillo BA. 5 A Day fruit and vegetable interventionof perceived barriers to fruit and vegetable consumptionKA, Potter JD. Vegetables, fruit, and cancer prevention: a

Sisson, Aimee

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Vegetation of Upper Coastal Plain depression wetlands: Environmental templates and wetland dynamics within a landscape framework.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reference wetlands play an important role in efforts to protect wetlands and assess wetland condition. Because wetland vegetation integrates the influence of many ecological factors, a useful reference system would identify natural vegetation types and include models relating vegetation to important regional geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical properties. Across the U.S. Atlantic Coastal Plain, depression wetlands are a major hydrogeomorphic class with diverse characteristics. For 57 functional depression wetlands in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, we characterized the principal vegetation types and used a landscape framework to assess how local (wetland-level) factors and regional landscape settings potentially influence vegetation composition and dynamics. Wetland sites were stratified across three Upper Coastal Plain landscape settings that differ in soils, surface geology, topography, and land use. We sampled plant composition, measured relevant local variables, and analyzed historical transitions in vegetative cover types. Cluster analysis identified six vegetation types, ranging from open-water ponds and emergent marshes to closed forests. Significant vegetation-environment relationships suggested environmental ''templates'' for plant community development. Of all local factors examined, wetland hydrologic regime was most strongly correlated with vegetation type, but depression size, soil textural type, and disturbance history were also significant. Because hydrogeologic settings influence wetland features, local factors important to vegetation were partly predictable from landscape setting, and thus wetland types were distributed non-randomly across landscape settings. Analysis of long-term vegetation change indicated relative stability in some wetlands and succession in others. We developed a landscape-contingent model for vegetation dynamics, with hydroperiod and fire as major driving variables. The wetland classification, environmental templates, and dynamics model provide a reference framework to guide conservation priorities and suggest possible outcomes of restoration or management.

De Steven, Diane; Toner, Maureen, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Vegetation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudha Patri Mechanical Engineer Telephoneo 250 o 250 G-2.6

64

Vegetation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudha Patri Mechanical Engineer Telephoneo 250 o 250

65

Vegetation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudha Patri Mechanical Engineer Telephoneo 250 o 250/::vI

66

Impacts of vegetation and cold season processes on soil moisture and climate relationships over Eurasia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of vegetation and cold season processes on soil moisture and climate relationships over investigate the impacts of vegetation and cold season processes on soil moisture persistence and climate, without the use of a model, in the former Soviet Union provides a unique look at soil moisture­climate

Ni-Meister, Wenge

67

Sky Vegetables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation,PvtSouth Dakota) Jump to:Oklahoma:Vegetables Jump to:

68

Ecophysiology of forest and savanna vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lowland vegetation of tropical South AmericaóAn overview, instate for tropical South America, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 30(dry seasonal forests of South America, Ann. Mo. Bot. Gard. ,

Lloyd, J.; Goulden, M. L.; Ometto, J. P.; Patino, S.; Fyllas, N. M.; Quesada, C. A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Harmonic propagation of variability in surface energy balance within a coupled soil-vegetation-atmosphere system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[1] The response of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum model to incoming radiation forcing is investigated in order to gain insights into the coupling of soil and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) states and fluxes. The ...

Gentine, P.

70

E-Print Network 3.0 - african vegetation fires Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2005 by the Ecological Society of America Summary: A MODEL-FRAMED EVALUATION OF ELEPHANT EFFECTS ON TREE AND FIRE DYNAMICS IN AFRICAN SAVANNAS PETER W. J... . The vegetation...

71

Contribution of vegetation and peat fires to particulate air pollution in Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smoke haze, caused by vegetation and peat fires in Southeast Asia, is of major concern because of its adverse impact on regional air quality. We apply two different methods (a chemical transport model and a Lagrangian ...

Reddington, C L

72

Sandhills Vegetation Will heat from the pipeline affect the growth of vegetation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sandhills Vegetation Will heat from the pipeline affect the growth of vegetation? What we know. Will the Sandhills vegetation grow back after the pipeline is constructed? What we know ­ response by Professor Jerry issues, revegetation problems on the pipeline will be at discreet locations. If surrounding pastures

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

73

Fruit and Vegetable Safety Challenge Game Directions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Fruit and Vegetable Safety Challenge Game Directions Equipment needed: 1. Computer, projector (fruits, vegetables, and meat) 6. Cleaning solutions (bleach, soap, water) 7. Stop watch 8. Team prizes How to Start: This game can be used with the "A Healthy Harvest: Safe Handling of Fresh Fruits

74

Guide for Developing Integrated Aquatic Vegetation Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guide for Developing Integrated Aquatic Vegetation Management Plans in Oregon Maribeth V. Gibbons is an integrated aquatic vegetation management plan? When is an IAVMP required? Part II: Developing a Plan Chapter and Reservoirs · Portland State University · Portland OR 97207 #12;Acknowledgements This manual benefited

75

HYDROPONIC VEGETABLE GARDENING Marcy Stanton, Master Gardener  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a water source. Lighting: A simple 2-bulb 4-foot fluorescent fixture with standard COOL WHITE bulbs is adequate for most leafy vegetables. Do not buy any of the fancy fluorescent grow bulbs; you are wasting your money on these expensive bulbs. When we set up a fluorescent light system to grow vegetables, what

New Hampshire, University of

76

Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients: 1 1/2 pounds fresh or frozen fish fillets or steaks 4 sodium) Directions 1. Rinse fish under cold water and pat dry. Place 4 individual portions of fish on 4 pieces of foil large enough to completely wrap around the fish and vegetables. 2. Diagonally slice

Liskiewicz, Maciej

77

International Workshop Responses of Vegetation and Human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of southern Russia and climatic changes" 15.00 ­ Dr. A. Skorobogatov (Voronezh University, Russia). "TheInternational Workshop Responses of Vegetation and Human Society to Climatic Changes in Ukraine- Ukrainian team started to investigate Holocene climate changes and the resulting vegetation and human

Bern, Universität

78

Interaction between flow, transport and vegetation spatial structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper summarizes recent advances in vegetation hydrodynamics and uses the new concepts to explore not only how vegetation impacts flow and transport, but also how flow feedbacks can influence vegetation spatial ...

Luhar, Mitul

79

Reliability Based Vegetation Management Through Intelligent System Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reliability Based Vegetation Management Through Intelligent System Monitoring Final Project Report Research Center since 1996 PSERC #12;Power Systems Engineering Research Center Reliability Based Vegetation project titled "Reliability Based Vegetation Maintenance Through Intelligent System Monitoring (T-27)." We

80

CONNECTICUT VEGETABLE & SMALL FRUIT GROWERS' Thursday, January 15, 2015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONNECTICUT VEGETABLE & SMALL FRUIT GROWERS' CONFERENCE Thursday, January 15, 2015 Maneeley. Connecticut Vegetable & Small Fruit Growers' Conference (We need folks to pre-register so Maneeley's has:______________________________________ ---- Town:______________ State:_____ Zip:____________ ---- Check off: Vegetable grower ___ Fruit grower

Alpay, S. Pamir

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Record of Decision (ROD). Planning Steps 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. The work involved will be to clear tall growing vegetation that is...

82

The limited growth of vegetated shear layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In contrast to free shear layers, which grow continuously downstream, shear layers generated by submerged vegetation grow only to a finite thickness. Because these shear layers are characterized by coherent vortex structures ...

Ghisalberti, M.

83

Membrane degumming of crude vegetable oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crude vegetable oils contain various minor substances like phospholipids, coloring pigments, and free fatty acids (FFA) that may affect quality of the oil. Reduction of energy costs and waste disposal are major concerns for many oil refiners who...

Lin, Lan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

N /A

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM CHANGE A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center of the uncertainties with climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems is understanding where transitions

86

Safe Storage of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proper storage of fresh fruits and vegetables can help consumers avoid foodborne illness. This publication explains how to safely store apples, bananas, berries, beets, broccoli, carrots, corn, grapes, herbs, lettuce and greens, melons, nectarines...

Scott, Amanda

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

87

Nonlinear Characteristics of Wave Propagation over Vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The attenuation of wave energy by submerged or near-emergent coastal vegetation is one of the prominent methods of energy dissipation in areas with significant presence of wetlands. In this thesis, the nature of this dissipation in nearshore random...

Venkattaramanan, Aravinda

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

88

Vegetative covers: Special study. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, (2) define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and (3) develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites (Shiprock, New Mexico; Burrell, Pennsylvania; and Clive, Utah) where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

A satellite-based biosphere parameterization for net ecosystem CO2 exchange: Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM) Pathmathevan Mahadevan,1 Steven C. Wofsy,1 Daniel M. Matross,1 12 April 2008. [1] We present the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM), a satellite of ecosystem photosynthesis, and annual sum of NEE at all eddy flux sites for which it is optimized

Lin, John Chun-Han

90

The wake structure behind a porous obstruction and its implications for deposition near a finite patch of emergent vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This experimental study describes the mean and turbulent flow structure in the wake of a circular array of cylinders, which is a model for a patch of emergent vegetation. The patch diameter, D, and patch density, a (frontal ...

Chen, Zhengbing

91

Vegetation Indices to Aid Areal Evapotranspiration Estimations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation Indices to Aid Areal Evapotranspiration Estimations Jozsef Szilagyi1 Abstract: Multiyear Seevers and Ottmann 1994; Nicholson et al. 1996; Sz- ilagyi et al. 1998; Szilagyi and Parlange 1999; Szilagyi 2000 . Different authors drew differing conclusions about the appli- cability of NDVI to estimate

Szilagyi, Jozsef

92

Easy Gardening.....Harvesting and Handling Vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Easy Gardening Joseph Masabni, Assistant Professor and Extension Horticulturist, The Texas A&M University System HARVESTING ? HANDLING ? STORING VEGETABLES -1- T ohelpensurethatthevegetables yougrowandprepareareofhigh quality.... Acknowledgments Thispublicationwasrevisedfromearlierversionswrittenby SamCotner,ProfessorEmeritusandformerExtension Horticulturist,andAlWagner,formerProfessorand ExtensionHorticulturist. -6- Produced by AgriLife Communications, The Texas A&M System Extension...

Cotner, Sam; Masabni, Joseph; Wagner, Al

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

93

Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Received 7 December 2009; accepted 4Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked to Sea Ice Decline Uma S. Bhatt*,1 Donald A Institute, and Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska

Bhatt, Uma

94

An application of predictive vegetation mapping to mountain vegetation in Sweden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

community data as the dependent variable and various environmental data as the independent variables thought to control or correlate with vegetation distributions. The environmental data were either obtained from existing digital datasets or derived from...

Green, Janet Alexis

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

95

Momentum and scalar transport in vegetated shear flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental aquatic flows are seldom free of vegetative influence. However, the impact of submerged vegetation on the hydrodynamics and mixing processes in aquatic flows remains poorly understood. In this thesis, I present ...

Ghisalberti, Marco (Marco Andrea), 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Interactions between currents and the spatial structure of aquatic vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation is present in nearly all aquatic environments, ranging from meandering streams to constructed channels and rivers, as well as in lakes and coastal zones. This vegetation grows in a wide range of flow environments ...

Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Improving vegetable preference and consumption among preschool children: evaluating results from an educational intervention using vegetable gardening  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's exposure to a variety of vegetables through the incorporation of weekly gardening supplemented with classroom activities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of vegetable gardening to improve preschool children's affective responses...

Lorenz, Saundra Gail

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

How to deal with radiologically contaminated vegetation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the findings from a literature review conducted as part of a Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development Biomass Remediation Task. The principal objective of this project is to develop a process or group of processes to treat radiologically contaminated vegetation in a manner that minimizes handling, processing, and treatment costs. Contaminated, woody vegetation growing on waste sites at SRS poses a problem to waste site closure technologies that are being considered for these sites. It is feared that large sections of woody vegetation (logs) can not be buried in waste sites where isolation of waste is accomplished by capping the site. Logs or large piles of woody debris have the potential of decaying and leaving voids under the cap. This could lead to cap failure and entrance of water into the waste. Large solid objects could also interfere with treatments like in situ mixing of soil with grout or other materials to encapsulate the contaminated sediments and soils in the waste sites. Optimal disposal of the wood includes considerations of volume reduction, treatment of the radioactive residue resulting from volume reduction, or confinement without volume reduction. Volume reduction consists primarily of removing the carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen in the wood, leaving an ash that would contain most of the contamination. The only contaminant that would be released by volume reduction would by small amounts of the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, tritium. The following sections will describe the waste sites at SRS which contain contaminated vegetation and are potential candidates for the technology developed under this proposal. The description will provide a context for the magnitude of the problem and the logistics of the alternative solutions that are evaluated later in the review. 76 refs.

Wilde, E.W.; Murphy, C.E.; Lamar, R.T.; Larson, M.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

?Aceite Vegetal Puro Como Combustible Diesel? (Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? Spanish Version) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Sediment storage by vegetation in steep bedrock landscapes: Theory, experiments, and implications for postfire sediment yield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment storage by vegetation in steep bedrock landscapes: Theory, experiments, and implications for postfire sediment yield Michael P. Lamb,1 Mariya Levina,1 Roman A. DiBiase,1 and Brian M. Fuller1 Received 26 September 2012; revised 6 March 2013; accepted 8 March 2013. [1] Mechanistic models for sediment

103

Global latitudinal-asymmetric vegetation growth trends and their driving mechanisms: 1982-2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a recent Leaf Area Index (LAI) dataset and the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), we investigate percent changes and controlling factors of global vegetation growth for the period 1982 to 2009. Over that 28-year period, both the remote-sensing estimate and model simulation show a significant increasing trend in annual vegetation growth. Latitudinal asymmetry appeared in both products, with small increases in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and larger increases at high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). The south-to-north asymmetric land surface warming was assessed to be the principal driver of this latitudinal asymmetry of LAI trend. Heterogeneous precipitation functioned to decrease this latitudinal LAI gradient, and considerably regulated the local LAI change. CO2 fertilization during the last three decades, was simulated to be the dominant cause for the enhanced vegetation growth. Our study, though limited by observational and modeling uncertainties, adds further insight into vegetation growth trends and environmental correlations. These validation exercises also provide new quantitative and objective metrics for evaluation of land ecosystem process models at multiple spatio-temporal scales.

Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Zhu, Zaichun [Boston University; Myneni, Ranga B. [Boston University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Using Long Term Vegetation Data and Ecological Sites: A Strategy for Wildlife Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Long Term Vegetation Data and Ecological Sites: A Strategy for Wildlife Management Kevin of data grouped by Ecological Site with management and environmental variables to determine mechanisms project goals. Benefits are overlapping and include: · State and Transition Models (STMs): Inference

105

Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

arctic vegetation damage: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gradient. Here we examine the complex interrelationships between patterned ground, climate, vegetation and soil along a north-south transect through all five bioclimate...

107

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

14, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOEEIS-0285SA-35) James Jellison - TFOOlympia...

108

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPZ992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOEEIS-0285SA-25) Elizabeth Johnson - TFRThe...

109

The effects of elephant and mesoherbivores on woody vegetation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Herbivores are important drivers and have a longstanding history in shaping our terrestrial environments. However, during the past decades, changes in woody vegetation in savannaÖ (more)

Lagendijk, Daisy Diana Georgette.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: alocally...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Local...

111

affects arabidopsis vegetative: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The vegetation reacts with changes in species composition and a decrease in biodiversity. Artificial snowing modifies some of these impacts: The soil frost is mitigated due to an...

112

african vegetation phenology: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

rainy season. Further research is needed to address interaction between groundwater under climate change. 1. Introduction "Vegetation phenology" refers to the periodic biological...

113

Fresh Vegetables: Getting the Most Nutrition for Your Money  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and quality. Visit local farmer?s markets and roadside stands. Grocery stores aren?t the only place to buy fresh vegetables. Be Safe! P oor storage and preparation of vegeta- bles can cost you money if the vegeta- bles go to waste or cause a foodborne... carefully. Bruises and other blemishes speed up deterioration and allow bacteria to enter the produce. Use clean, cool, running water to wash the vegetables. Hard vegetables like potatoes and carrots should be cleaned with a vegetable brush to remove any...

Anding, Jenna

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

114

Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV July 21, 2005 David Francis and Allen Van Deynze At the recent ASHS meetings in Las Vegas, a workshop "Translational Genomics of Vegetable Crops interventions" (Minna and Gazdar, 1996). In applied plant science, "translational genomics" implies

Douches, David S.

115

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Sustainable Vegetable Production and Nutrition Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management that builds collaboratively on MSU's strengths in vegetable production and sustainable croppingASSISTANT PROFESSOR Sustainable Vegetable Production and Nutrition Systems The Department of Horticulture (http://www.hrt.msu.edu) in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at Michigan State

Isaacs, Rufus

116

FRUIT & VEGETABLE GROWERS MANUAL FOR THE BEGINNING GROWER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MINNESOTA FRUIT & VEGETABLE GROWERS MANUAL FOR THE BEGINNING GROWER Developed by the University & Outreach Assistance Partnership Program through a partnership agreement with the Minnesota Fruit before I harvest my produce? 135 3. When should I harvest my fruits and vegetables? 136 4. How should I

Amin, S. Massoud

117

Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data. Abstract Creation photo-interpretation, or ground-based inventories. National inventories are a potential source

118

Interactions among flow, sediment deposition and aquatic vegetation in a channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic vegetation is commonly present in rivers in many forms. This thesis consists of two studies, which examine the flow structure around a patch of emergent, rigid vegetation in a laboratory channel. The vegetation ...

Zong, Lijun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

120

Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

fruits and vegetables. Beyond tasting and learning about the many varieties of tomatoes, visitors are also  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fruits and vegetables. Beyond tasting and learning about the many varieties of tomatoes, visitors and other fruit, vegetable, and herb variety research conducted by Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazonian vegetation coupled Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Amazonia L. R. Hutyra,1,2 Summary: and resilience of Amazonian vegetation to climate change by analyzing observed climate-vegetation relationships... coupled changes...

123

SO/sub 2/ dose-response sensitivity classification data for crops and natural vegetation species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years studies have been made on the interaction of sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and vegetation by performing field research and by developing analytical procedures for applying field observation data to energy impact assessments. As a result of this work, numerous reports have been prepared on crop-pollutant interactions, such as dose-response data; on the applications of such data to screening approaches for identifying crops at risk; and on models that predict crop yield reductions from point source emissions of SO/sub 2/. Data that were used for these studies, such as the crop-at-risk screening procedure, are presented in this report. Maps are also presented that show the national distribution of SO/sub 2/-sensitive crops and natural vegetation.

Irving, P.M.; Ballou, S.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Flow and Transport in Regions with Aquatic Vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This review describes mean and turbulent flow and mass transport in the presence of aquatic vegetation. Within emergent canopies, the turbulent length scales are set by the stem diameter and spacing, and the mean flow is ...

Nepf, Heidi

125

Status of Baseline Sampling for Elements in Soil and Vegetation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling for Elements in Soil and Vegetation at Four Kgra's in the Imperial Valley, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

126

Flow-induced reconfiguration of buoyant and flexible aquatic vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant posture can play a key role in the health of aquatic vegetation, by setting drag, controlling light availability, and mediating the exchange of nutrients and oxygen. We study the flow-induced reconfiguration of ...

Nepf, Heidi

127

Biogeochemistry and vegetation in a cranberry bog chronosequence Genevieve Noyce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogeochemistry and vegetation in a cranberry bog chronosequence Genevieve Noyce Mount Holyoke Ecosystems Center, MBL, Woods Hole, MA 17 December 2007 #12;Noyce 2 Abstract Abandoned cranberry bogs: abandoned cranberry bogs, succession, biogeochemical controls, exotic species, forests Introduction

Vallino, Joseph J.

128

EIS-0097: Bonneville Power Administration Transmission Facilities Vegetation Management Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energyís Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic implications of various alternatives associated with implementing a vegetation management program.

129

Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usa Abstract A survey of diffuse CO2 efflux, soil temperature and soil-gas chemistry over areas of localized vegetation-kill on and around the resurgent dome of Long...

130

Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USA Abstract A survey of diffuse CO2 efflux, soil temperature and soil-gas chemistry over areas of localized vegetation-kill on and around the resurgent dome of Long...

131

Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

Nepf, Heidi

132

Further Tests of Vegetable Varieties for the Winter Garden Region.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watermelon 3 8 Summary of Promising Varieties 42 AcknowIedgments Literature Cited BULLETIN NO. 546 JULY , 1937 FURTHER TESTS OF VEGETABLE VARIETIES FOR THE WINTER GARDEN REGION By Leslie R. Hawthorn, Horticulturist, Substation No. 19, Winter Haven...

Hawthorn, L. R. (Leslie Rushton)

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Map of mixed prairie grassland vegetation, Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A color vegetation map at the scale of 1:12,000 of the area surrounding the Rocky Flats, Rockwell International Plant near Boulder, Colorado, provides a permanent record of baseline data which can be used to monitor changes in both vegetation and environment and thus to contribute to future land management and land-use policies. Sixteen mapping units based on species composition were identified, and characterized by two 10-m/sup 2/ vegetation stands each. These were grouped into prairie, pasture, and valley side on the basis of their species composition. Both the mapping units and these major groups were later confirmed by agglomerative clustering analysis of the 32 vegetation stands on the basis of species composition. A modified Bray and Curtis ordination was used to determine the environmental factor complexes controlling the distribution of vegetation at Rocky flats. Recommendations are made for future policies of environmental management and predictions of the response to environmental change of the present vegetation at the Rocky Flats site.

Clark, S J.V.; Webber, P J; Komarkova, V; Weber, W A

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Vegetation's Red Edge: A Possible Spectroscopic Biosignature of Extraterrestrial Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth's deciduous plants have a sharp order-of-magnitude increase in leaf reflectance between approximately 700 and 750 nm wavelength. This strong reflectance of Earth's vegetation suggests that surface biosignatures with sharp spectral features might be detectable in the spectrum of scattered light from a spatially unresolved extrasolar terrestrial planet. We assess the potential of Earth's step-function-like spectroscopic feature, referred to as the "red edge", as a tool for astrobiology. We review the basic characteristics and physical origin of the red edge and summarize its use in astronomy: early spectroscopic efforts to search for vegetation on Mars and recent reports of detection of the red edge in the spectrum of Earthshine (i.e., the spatially integrated scattered light spectrum of Earth). We present Earthshine observations from Apache Point Observatory to emphasize that time variability is key to detecting weak surface biosignatures such as the vegetation red edge. We briefly discuss the evolutionary advantages of vegetation's red edge reflectance, and speculate that while extraterrestrial "light harvesting organisms" have no compelling reason to display the exact same red edge feature as terrestrial vegetation, they might have similar spectroscopic features at different wavelengths than terrestrial vegetation. This implies that future terrestrial-planet-characterizing space missions should obtain data that allow time-varying, sharp spectral features at unknown wavelengths to be identified. We caution that some mineral reflectance edges are similar in slope and strength to vegetation's red edge (albeit at different wavelengths); if an extrasolar planet reflectance edge is detected care must be taken with its interpretation.

Sara Seager; Edwin L. Turner; Justin Schafer; Eric B. Ford

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

Influence of metal process micronic and submicronic particles on vegetables quality and ecosystems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sativa) and parsley (Petroselinum crispum), vegetables currently cultivated in kitchen gardens with high

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

136

Advection, dispersion, and filtration of fine particles within emergent vegetation of the Florida Everglades  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., phosphorous) [Sansalone and Buchberger, 1997; Noe et al., 2007]. [3] Wetland vegetation influences flow

137

Vegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by insulating vegetation from winter wind and temperature extremes, modifying winter soil temperatures

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

138

EFFECTS OF VEGETATION ON TURBULENCE, SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND STREAM MORPHOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetation, from an individual stem to multiple stems in various configurations, profoundly alters turbulent flows. These alterations influence sediment transport and stream morphology, but depend on complex interactions and relationships between flow, plants and sediment properties. This is illustrated for three case studies that represent a variety of macrophyte patterns and scales in the environment: flows through simulated uniformly distributed plant stems, emergent and submerged; flows with alternating simulated stem patches; and flow around an isolated stem in a flood plain. The emergent case demonstrates that when density is sparse the mean velocity and turbulence intensities vary horizontally around the stems, which would promote a heterogeneous bedform morphology. However, it is still unclear how density, submergence ratio, and flow Reynolds number, in combination, influence interference effects, vortex shedding and dissipation, and velocity, pressure and lift fluctuations that affect sediment entrainment. The submerged case demonstrates significant reduction of the mean velocity, turbulence intensities, and turbulent shear near the bed compared to an unobstructed flow and supports numerous observations that vegetation promotes deposition or stabilizes bed sediments. The case of alternating emergent vegetation patches illustrates how vegetation adjusts the bed promoting scour in open water and deposition within the patches. The isolated stem case illustrates the variety of coherent structures generated, their complex interaction, and their role in specific sediment transport phenomena observed. Additional research is required, however, to quantify thresholds and relationships for flow-vegetation-sediment interactions so that aquatic macrophyte plantings can be used more effectively in water resource management.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Novel Bioplastics and biocomposites from Vegetable Oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polymeric materials have been prevalent in our everyday lives for quite a long time. Most of today's polymeric materials are derived from nonrenewable petroleum-based feedstocks. Instabilities in the regions where petroleum is drilled, along with an increased demand in petroleum, have driven the price of crude oil to record high prices. This, in effect, increases the price of petroleum-based polymeric materials, which has caused a heightened awareness of renewable alternatives for polymeric feedstocks. Cellulose, starch, proteins and natural oils have all been examined as possible polymeric feedstocks. Natural oils are commercially available on a large scale and are relatively cheap. It is projected that the U.S. alone will produce 21 billion pounds of soybean oil in the period 2008/2009. Natural oils also have the advantages of inherent biodegradability, low toxicity, high purity and ready availability. Most natural oils possess a triglyceride structure as shown in Figure 1. Most natural oils have a unique distribution of fatty acid side chains, along with varying degrees of unsaturation per triglyceride. Common fatty acid side chains in naturally occurring oils are palmitic acid (C16:0), a 16 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; stearic acid (C18:0), an 18 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; oleic acid (C18:1), an 18 carbon fatty acid with one double bond; linoleic acid (C18:2), an 18 carbon fatty acid with two double bonds; and linolenic acid (C18:3), an 18 carbon fatty acid with three double bonds. Of course, there are other fatty acids with varying degrees of unsaturation, but their abundance is usually minimal. All of the unsaturated fatty acids mentioned have naturally occurring cis double bonds, which is common for most unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the afore mentioned fatty acids have the first double bond at the position of carbon 9 (C9), followed by carbon 12 (C12), if there are two degrees of unsaturation, then at carbon 15 (C15), if there are three degrees of unsaturation. In addition, the double bonds are not in conjugation. Table 1 gives the fatty acid make-up of linseed oil. It can be seen that linseed oil has an average of 6.0 double bonds per triglyceride. Its fatty acid content consists of 5.4% palmitic acid (C16:0), 3.5% stearic acid (C18:0), 19% oleic acid (C18:1), 24 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 47% linolenic (C18:3). Table 1 also gives the fatty acid composition and varying degrees of unsaturation for various other naturally-occurring natural vegetable oils. The regions of unsaturation in natural oils allow for interesting polymer chemistry to take place. Some of this interesting polymer science, however, involves chemical modification of the regions of unsaturation. Acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is prepared by epoxidation of the double bonds, followed by ring opening with acrylic acid. The resulting oil has both acrylate groups and hydroxyl groups. Wool and colleagues have further reacted the hydroxyl groups within the oil with maleic anhydride to produce maleated acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (MAESO). The MAESO has been copolymerized with styrene free radically to produce promising thermosetting sheet molding resins. Petrovi? and co-workers have directly ring opened the epoxidized oil to produce polyols that produce promising polyurethanes through condensation polymerization with diisocyanates. Our group's work initially focused on direct cationic copolymerization of the double bonds or conjugated double bonds of natural oils with monomers, such as styrene and divinylbenzene, to produce promising thermosetting resins. The only modification of the oils that was carried out in these studies was conjugation of the double bonds to enhance the reactivity of the oil. This work has been expanded recently with the incorporation of glass fiber to produce promising composites. We have also explored thermal polymerization techniques to make novel thermosets. This dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter discusses the synthesis and characterization of biobased

Phillip H. Henna

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

140

RAPID SEPARATION OF ACTINIDES AND RADIOSTRONTIUM IN VEGETATION SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and radiostrontium in vegetation samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis. The actinides in vegetation method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Alpha emitters are prepared using rare earth microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in vegetation sample analysis can be performed in less than 8 h with excellent quality for emergency samples. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory actinide particles or vegetation residue after furnace heating is effectively digested.

Maxwell, S.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Global longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with those observed in the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Normalized Difference Vegetation the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) extending back to 1981. The NDVI is derived by subtracting in the hydrological, energy and carbon cycles, through influences of land cover change on hydrologic responses

Evans, Jason

142

Soil and Vegetation Management: Keys to Water Conservation on Rangeland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The amount of water that soaks into the soil largely determines plant productivity. We can manage and conserve water where and when it falls, and by controlling the kind of vegetation we can make the fullest use of rain water. This publication...

Schuster, Joseph L.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

Sweet potatoes are a warm-weather vegetable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sweet potatoes are a warm- weather vegetable related to the morning glory family.Although Louisiana sweet potatoes are often referred to as yams, they truly are sweet potatoes. The Louisiana producers began calling the orange-fleshed sweet potatoes grown in Louisiana"yams" to distinguish them from

144

Chicken Noodle Soup 3 T. canola or vegetable oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chicken Noodle Soup 3 T. canola or vegetable oil 3# chicken bone-in (thigh meat or legs the skins and ends for the stock. Cut the end off the celery head and reserve for stock. Cut both onions in half and remove skin of onion and reserve for stock. Take 1 carrot, 1 stalk of celery and 1 onion

Liu, Taosheng

145

9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management remains widely cited as the most logical and elegant frame- work for continuous improvement9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes David H Duncan1 of the `adaptive management' paradigm to natural resource man- agement, using regional management of native

Burgman, Mark

146

Beyond Biodiesel Running on Straight Vegetable Oil (SVO)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20 Beyond Biodiesel ­ Running on Straight Vegetable Oil (SVO) The green tree has many branches in the development and promotion of biodiesel for nearly two decades. Technologies based on the use of hydrogen in a low-percentage mixture with petroleum fuel. Hence the development of biodiesel. Paul Trella, New

Kaye, Jason P.

147

Thin-layer drying behavior of vegetable wastes from wholesale market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thin-layer drying behavior of vegetable wastes (as a mix of lettuce and cauliflower leaves) from wholesale market for a temperature range of 50--150 C was determined. Drying of this material was found to take part only in the falling-rate period. The experimental data were fitted to the simple exponential model and the Page model. Both models have good prediction capability. Effective diffusion coefficient varied from 6.03 x 10{sup {minus}9} to 3.15 x 10{sup {minus}8} m{sup 2}/s with an activation energy of diffusion of 19.82 kJ/mol. The temperature dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient was expressed by an Arrhenius-type relationship.

Lopez, A.; Iguaz, A.; Esnoz, A.; Virseda, P.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0StatementsMixing Up aSTANDARDS

149

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0StatementsMixing Up aSTANDARDSwarm dense

150

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0StatementsMixing Up aSTANDARDSwarm densein

151

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0StatementsMixing Up aSTANDARDSwarm

152

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0StatementsMixing Up

153

Rooting Characteristics of Vegetation Near Areas 3 and 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site--Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy emplaced high-specific-activity low-level radioactive wastes and limited quantities of classified transuranic wastes in Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes from 1984 to 1989. The boreholes are located at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in southern Nevada. The boreholes were backfilled with native alluvium soil. The surface of these boreholes and trenches is expected to be colonized by native vegetation in the future. Considering the long-term performance of the disposal facilities, bioturbation (the disruption of buried wastes by biota) is considered a primary release mechanism for radionuclides disposed in GCD boreholes as well as trenches at both Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs. This report provides information about rooting characteristics of vegetation near Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs. Data from this report are being used to resolve uncertainties involving parameterization of performance assessment models used to characterize the biotic mixing of soils and radionuclide transport processes by biota. The objectives of this study were to: (1) survey the prior ecological literature on the NTS and identify pertinent information about the vegetation, (2) conduct limited field studies to describe the current vegetation in the vicinity of Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs so as to correlate findings with more extensive vegetation data collected at Yucca Mountain and the NTS, ( 3 ) review prior performance assessment documents and evaluate model assumptions based on current ecological information, and (4) identify data deficiencies and make recommendations for correcting such deficiencies.

D. J. Hansen

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

The role of vegetation in the CO[subscript 2] flux from a tropical urban neighbourhood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urban surfaces are usually net sources of CO[subscript 2]. Vegetation can potentially have an important role in reducing the CO[subscript 2] emitted by anthropogenic activities in cities, particularly when vegetation is ...

Velasco, E.

155

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting vegetable stand Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: non-vegetative ground cover. For example, if running water covers 1% of your station, standing water 2... . If a habitat is flooded but Live vegetation ground cover...

156

Vegetation and sediment characteristics of created and natural Spartina alterniflora marshes in Lower Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Five natural and ten created Spartina altemiflora marshes in the Lower Galveston Bay System, Texas, were compared to determine if there were significantly different vegetative and sediment characteristics associated with each marsh type. Vegetative...

Albertson, Andrea Kai

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Optimization of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System waveform metrics to support vegetation measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System waveform metrics to support vegetation GLAS Optimization Remote sensing Vegetation structure The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) has optimized a noise coefficient which could be constant or vary according to observation period or noise

Lefsky, Michael

158

Measurements and Linear Wave Theory Based Simulations of Vegetated Wave Hydrodynamics for Practical Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave attenuation by vegetation is a highly dynamic process and its quantification is important for accurately understanding and predicting coastal hydrodynamics. However, the influence of vegetation on wave dissipation is not yet fully established...

Anderson, Mary Elizabeth

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

159

Best Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Develop educational materials related to aquatic plant identification and their specific managementBest Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E vegetation management with the ultimate goal of producing the best management practices protocol in Iowa

Koford, Rolf R.

160

Self-consistent photothermal techniques: Application for measuring thermal diffusivity in vegetable oils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent photothermal techniques: Application for measuring thermal diffusivity in vegetable of vegetable oils. The thermal diffusivity of six commercial vegetable oils olive, corn, soybean, canola in terms of thermal diffusivity was shown. The high measurement precision of the TWRC highlights

Mandelis, Andreas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Updated March 2013 Eat Smart, Live Strong is designed to improve fruit and vegetable consumption and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated March 2013 Eat Smart, Live Strong is designed to improve fruit and vegetable consumption: ¬∑ eat at least 3 ¬Ĺ cups of fruit and vegetable per day (1 ¬Ĺ cups of fruits and 2 cups of vegetables;Session 1, Reach Your Goals, Step by Step allows participants to review the amount of fruits

162

ForPeerReview From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to polyols and main industrial products Myriam and main industrial products Most of biobased polyols for polyurethanes are synthesized from vegetable oils literature; focus on the industrial synthetic routes. Keywords: vegetable oils; biobased polyols

Boyer, Edmond

163

Fire recurrence in the subarctic and its implications for vegetation composition E. A. JOHNSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire recurrence in the subarctic and its implications for vegetation composition E. A. JOHNSON JOHNSON,,E. A. 1979. Fire recurrence in the subarctic and its implications for vegetation composition. Can of the distribution's hazard of burning function to vegetation composition and r-K selection is discussed. JOHNSON,E

Johnson, Edward A.

164

Similar effects of residential and non-residential vegetation on bird diversity in suburban neighbourhoods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Similar effects of residential and non-residential vegetation on bird diversity in suburban the Queen in Right of Canada 2013 Abstract Estimating the relative importance of vegetation on residential land (gardens, yards, and street-trees) and vegetation on non-residential land (parks and other large

Dawson, Jeff W.

165

Vegetation survey of knapweed on the Yakima Training Center - 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes and discusses the results of a vegetation survey conducted in 1992 on a portion of the Yakima Training Center (YTC). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this survey and a similar survey in 1991 for the U.S. Department of the Army. The objectives of the survey were to evaluate the impact of the herbicide picloram on forbs where aerial applications of picloram were made in 1988, 1989, and 1991 to control knapweed infestations. Forbs are of special interest because they are an important part of the spring and summer diet of the western sage grouse, which is a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service candidate species for the threatened and endangered list. We also conducted a limited evaluation of the effectiveness of the spray program in controlling the spread of knapweed. Percent plant canopy cover and number of forbs were measured on 120 transacts on the herbicide-treated and untreated control areas. Herbicide treatment in 1991 resulted in a significant reduction in knapweed based on percent cover and density. The treatment areas also all had lower percent canopy cover of perennial forbs and fewer perennial forbs compared to control areas. Canopy cover of shrubs and annual, biennial, and perennial forbs measured on the YTC increased between the 1991 and 1992 survey, which may indicate a recovery of these vegetation types after disturbance. These increases also could reflect the mild 1992 winter and superior growing conditions in the spring of 1992. We recommend that these vegetation transacts continue to be monitored for an additional growing season to evaluate (1) whether knapweed increases to its previous abundance in the 1991 herbicide-treated area, (2) the efficacy of herbicide application on transacts along roadways, and (3) the increase in invasive annuals in herbicide-treated areas and the possible effects on community vegetation structure and sage grouse habitat.

Downs, J.L.; Cadoret, N.A.; Rickard, W.H.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Vegetation, edaphic, and topographic interrelationships in an East Texas forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEGETATION, EDAPHIC, AND TOPOGRAPHIC INTERRELATIONSHIPS IN AN EAST TEXAS FOREST A Thesis by JOHNNY ZANE HINTON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) (Head of Department) December 1981 ABSTRACT... Vegetat1on, Edaphic, and Topographic Interrelationsh1ps In an East Texas Forest. (Oecember 1981) Johnny Zane Hinton, B. S. , Texas A&M Un1versity Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Fred E, Sme1ns Thirty stands were sampled on the Angelina National...

Hinton, Johnny Zane

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Iodine in Drinking Waters, Vegetables, Cottonseed Meal, and Roughages.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBRARY, A & M COLLEGE, G. S. FRAPS and J. F. FUDGE Division of Chemistry TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 595 NOVEMBER 1940 -- IODINE IN DRINKING WATERS, VEGETABLES..., COTTONSEED MEAL, AND ROUGEIAGES ! .I rq?,\\?Y - AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President A96-1140-7M-LJ.80 5 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Iodine was determined in nearly 500 samples of city and rural drinking waters...

Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin); Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1940-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Range Vegetation Response to Burning Thicketized Live Oak Savannah.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TABLE 9. TOTAL STANDING CROP OF LIVE OAK AND NEW GROWTH (KGIHA) AND STANDING CROP INCREASE ( REPRESENTED BY NEW GROWTH IN APRIL AND JULY, 1* ON AREAS BURNED AT VARIOUS DATES ON THE ARANS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE NEAR AUSTWELL, TEXAS' New growth2... Response of live oak-dominated vegetation on thicketized uplands to burning in the fall 1974, spring 1975, and fall 1975 was evaluated through 1977 on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. Standing crop, species diversity, and botanical composition...

Scifres, C.J.; Kelly, D.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Activity of polymerized trichloroacetic acid for highway vegetation control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mem r ember Play 1/74 ABSTRACT Activity of Polymer- zed Trichloroacetic Acid for Highway Vegetation Control. (May 1/74) Hobert Phillip Wieaenfeld, B. S. , California State University, Humboldt Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Wayne G. Mc... applied to highway roadsides near Fort Worth, Lufkin and Yoakum, Texas in the spring of 1g'7$. Two polymerizing activates which differed in their solubility were used. TCA polymerized with the more soluble activate and applied at a rate of '3 lbs...

Wiedenfeld, R. P

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Calculation set for design and optimization of vegetative soil covers Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study demonstrates that containment of municipal and hazardous waste in arid and semiarid environments can be accomplished effectively without traditional, synthetic materials and complex, multi-layer systems. This research demonstrates that closure covers combining layers of natural soil, native plant species, and climatic conditions to form a sustainable, functioning ecosystem will meet the technical equivalency criteria prescribed by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency. In this study, percolation through a natural analogue and an engineered cover is simulated using the one-dimensional, numerical code UNSAT-H. UNSAT-H is a Richards. equation-based model that simulates soil water infiltration, unsaturated flow, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, and deep percolation. This study incorporates conservative, site-specific soil hydraulic and vegetation parameters. Historical meteorological data are used to simulate percolation through the natural analogue and an engineered cover, with and without vegetation. This study indicates that a 3-foot (ft) cover in arid and semiarid environments is the minimum design thickness necessary to meet the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency-prescribed technical equivalency criteria of 31.5 millimeters/year and 1 x 10{sup -7} centimeters/second for net annual percolation and average flux, respectively. Increasing cover thickness to 4 or 5 ft results in limited additional improvement in cover performance.

Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Uptake of 137Cs by Leafy Vegetables and Grains from Calcareous Soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cesium-137 was deposited on Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll in 1954 as a result of nuclear testing and has been transported and cycled in the ecosystem ever since. Atoll soils are of marine origin and are almost pure CaCO{sub 3} with high concentrations of organic matter in the top 40 cm. Data from previous experiments with mature fruit trees show very high transfer factors (TF's), [Bq g{sup -1} plant/ Bq g{sup -1} soil, both in dry weight] into fruits from atoll calcareous soil. These TF's are much higher than reported for continental, silica-based soils. In this report TF's for 5 types of leafy vegetable crops and 2 types of grain crops are provided for use in predictive dose assessments and for comparison with other data from other investigators working with other types of soil in the IAEA CRP ''The Classification of Soil Systems on the Basis of Transfer Factors of Radionuclides from Soil to Reference Plants''. Transfer factors for plants grown on calcareous soil are again very high relative to clay-containing soils and range from 23 to 39 for grain crops and 21 to 113 for leafy vegetables. Results from these experiments, in this unique, high pH, high organic content, low potassium (K) soil, provide a boundary condition for models relating soil properties to TF.

Robison, W; Hamilton, T; Conrado, C; Kehl, S

2004-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

174

Microsoft PowerPoint - Town Bluff Vegetation impact.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping Richland OperationsU.S.OnlineTank09TWP-ICEPortland, Oregon

175

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical...

176

488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Potential of vegetable oils as a domestic heating fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dependence on imported oil for domestic heating has led to the examination of other potential fuel substitutes. One potential fuel is some form of vegetable oil, which could be a yearly-renewable fuel. In Western Canada, canola has become a major oilseed crop; in Eastern Canada, sunflowers increasingly are becoming a source for a similar oil; for this reason, the Canadian Combustion Research Laboratory (CCRL) has chosen these oils for experimentation. Trials have been conducted in a conventional warm air oil furnace, fitted with a flame retention head burner. Performance has been measured with pure vegetable oils as well as a series of blends with conventional No. 2 oil. The effects of increased fuel pressure and fuel preheating are established. Emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates are given for both steady state and cyclic operation. Canola oil cannot be fired in cyclic operation above 50:50 blends with No. 2 oil. At any level above a 10% blend, canola is difficult to burn, even with significant increased pressure and temperature. Sunflower oil is much easier to burn and can be fired as a pure fuel, but with high emissions of incomplete combustion products. An optimum blend of 50:50 sunflower in No. 2 oil yields emissions and performance similar to No. 2 oil. This blend offers potential as a means of reducing demand of imported crude oil for domestic heating systems.

Hayden, A.C.S.; Begin, E.; Palmer, C.E.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Effect of Brush Vegetation on Deep Drainage Using Chloride Mass Balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is comparable to that by herbaceous vegetation (Wilcox, 2005). The canopy of an average-size, mature redberry and ashe juniper can intercept 26% and 37% of the annual precipitation, respectively. Redberry and ashe juniper litter can intercept 40% and 43..., superactive, thermic Pachic Paleustolls. Dominant woody-shrub vegetation cover includes juniper (Juniperus ashei) with other existing vegetation such as little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) and threeawn (Aristida). Site G4 The soil at site G4...

Navarrete Ganchozo, Ronald J.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

179

Vegetation Dynamics and Livestock Production on Rangelands in the Southern Great Plains.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We examined vegetation dynamics and livestock production in response to land management practices on rangelands in two different studies, one in north central and oneÖ (more)

Cummings, Daniel Chad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic vegetation fires Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dust aerosols VOCsDMS ET vegetation Anthropogenic waste byproduct air quality water management... combustionfires Anthropogenic crop production oil byproduct drilling...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

SITE DESIGN GUIDELINES PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR BICYCLE VEGETATION FURNISHINGS LIGHTING SIGNAGE PAVING SITEWORK PARKING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SITE DESIGN GUIDELINES PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR BICYCLE VEGETATION FURNISHINGS LIGHTING SIGNAGE PAVING.7 Pedestrians .................................................................................... 3.8 Bicycles ..................................................... Section Four Bicycle Systems 4.1 Shared Roadways

Duchowski, Andrew T.

182

Climate change and uncertainty in ecological niche modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in California." Journal of Climate 8(3): 606- Elith, J. , C.vegetation model for use with climate models: concepts andthe suitability of spatial climate data sets." International

Alvarez, Otto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

-Climate and pH as determinants of vegetation succession in man-made habitats -701 Journal of Vegetation Science 18: 701-710, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sites in areas deforested by air pollution. Methods: We investigated vegetation patterns on 15 succes, spoil heaps after coal mining, sites at water reservoirs, extracted sand pit and peatland and reclaimed

Kratochvíl, Lukas

184

Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal wetlands.

Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a single-fluid diffuse interface model in the ALE-AMR hydrodynamics code to simulate surface tension effects. We show simula- tions and compare them to other surface tension...

186

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sion effects. We show the result of a test case, and compare it to the result without surface tension. The model describes droplet formation nicely. Application The ARRA-funded...

187

Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme and implementation of a new numerical scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ii Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme and implementation of a new.S. Fairbanks, Alaska August 2005 #12;iii Abstract The Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil-Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS........................................................................................................................... 24 Evaluation of snow depth and soil temperatures predicted by the Hydro- Thermodynamic Soil

Moelders, Nicole

188

Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS) Pamela Spier, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK Abstract This paper presents an evaluation of the Hydro. Introduction and Motivation The Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS, Kramm et al. 1996, Mölders

Moelders, Nicole

189

Comparing Optical and Microwave Remote Sensing-based Vegetation Density over Mongolia for 1988-2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation Index (NDVI), derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) series.vandijk@csiro.au Abstract ­ Vegetation density plays an important role in water and energy balance. Satellite-based optical product (Tucker et al., 2005). It can provide a relatively high spatial resolution product (up to 1km

Evans, Jason

190

Shrub thicket vegetation on tropical granitic inselbergs (French Guiana) Sarthou, Corinne1*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Shrub thicket vegetation on tropical granitic inselbergs (French Guiana) Sarthou, Corinne1@mnhn.fr Abstract. In French Guiana, inselbergs are granite outcrops rising abruptly from the surrounding rain substrate. Shrub granitic vegetation, organised in thickets on open exposed rocks of inselbergs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

191

Effects of Woody Vegetation Removal on Soil Water Dynamics in a South Texas Shrubland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

removal on various soil textures we studied changes in soil water, rooting depth, and the role of water redistribution by woody vegetation. Woody vegetation was removed using common methods of cut-stump and roller chop across three soil types. Soil water...

Mattox, April Marie

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Effects of forestry practices on vegetation structure and bird community of Kibale National Park, Uganda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Uganda Cagan H. Sekercioglu* Center for Conservation Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford on the vegetation structure and bird community of Kibale National Park, Uganda. I compared four forest treatments Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Uganda; Tropical forestry; Selective logging; Vegetation structure

Sekercioglu, Cagan Hakki

193

P.M. Vermeersch (ed.) 3 -WOODY VEGETATION AND ITS USE DURING THE NEOLITHIC AT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

because they have been submitted for 14 C dating. The site is located in a tributary wadi of the wadi). The modern arboreal vegetation of the Tree Shelter wadi is limited to a lonely Acacia tree at the en- trance of the wadi. The modern vegetation in the broad area of the Red Sea coastal land between wadi Qena

Marinova, Elena

194

Climate, Livestock, and Vegetation: What Drives Fire Increase in the Arid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: burning; arid ecosystems; livestock; climate; broad-scale climate; Southern Russia; socio-economic change by decreasing livestock numbers, vegetation changes, climate change, or interactions of these factors. OurClimate, Livestock, and Vegetation: What Drives Fire Increase in the Arid Ecosystems of Southern

Radeloff, Volker C.

195

A TEST FOR LIFE ON EXOPLANETS: THE TERRESTRIAL VEGETATION DETECTION IN THE EARTHSHINE SPECTRUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bacteria [7]. A second type of biosignature is provided by signs of stellar light transformation the possible presence of life on this planet. Spectral biosignatures can be of two types. A first type consists of photosynthetic (green) vegetation, non­photosynthetic (dry) and a soil (from [9]). The so­called vegetation red

Lardière, Olivier

196

Organic Vegetable Organic Vegetable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrates on natural processes and how to manage them. Other materials and products are additions to .......................................6 Safety ................................................................6 Insect Management ...........................................7 Disease Management ......................................10 Weed Management

197

VEGETATION COVER ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES IN UTAH AND ARIZONA USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Remote sensing technology can provide a cost-effective tool for monitoring hazardous waste sites. This study investigated the usability of HyMap airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (126 bands at 2.3 x 2.3 m spatial resolution) to characterize the vegetation at U.S. Department of Energy uranium processing sites near Monticello, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Grass and shrub species were mixed on an engineered disposal cell cover at the Monticello site while shrub species were dominant in the phytoremediation plantings at the Monument Valley site. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate leaf-area-index (LAI) of the vegetation using three different methods (i.e., vegetation indices, red-edge positioning (REP), and machine learning regression trees), and (2) map the vegetation cover using machine learning decision trees based on either the scaled reflectance data or mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF)-derived metrics and vegetation indices. Regression trees resulted in the best calibration performance of LAI estimation (R{sup 2} > 0.80). The use of REPs failed to accurately predict LAI (R{sup 2} < 0.2). The use of the MTMF-derived metrics (matched filter scores and infeasibility) and a range of vegetation indices in decision trees improved the vegetation mapping when compared to the decision tree classification using just the scaled reflectance. Results suggest that hyperspectral imagery are useful for characterizing biophysical characteristics (LAI) and vegetation cover on capped hazardous waste sites. However, it is believed that the vegetation mapping would benefit from the use of 1 higher spatial resolution hyperspectral data due to the small size of many of the vegetation patches (< 1m) found on the sites.

Serrato, M.; Jungho, I.; Jensen, J.; Jensen, R.; Gladden, J.; Waugh, J.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

Modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of technical machines became a standard technique since computer became powerful enough to handle the amount of data relevant to the specific system. Simulation of an existing physical device requires the knowledge of all relevant quantities. Electric fields given by the surrounding boundary as well as magnetic fields caused by coils or permanent magnets have to be known. Internal sources for both fields are sometimes taken into account, such as space charge forces or the internal magnetic field of a moving bunch of charged particles. Used solver routines are briefly described and some bench-marking is shown to estimate necessary computing times for different problems. Different types of charged particle sources will be shown together with a suitable model to describe the physical model. Electron guns are covered as well as different ion sources (volume ion sources, laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron resonance ion sources, and H$^-$-sources) together with some remarks on beam transport.

Spšdtke, P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. Work also includes clearing of a small (<1/4 mile) section of access road. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for detailed information on each section of the referenced transmission lines. BPA will conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and where possible to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The vegetation needing control is mainly Douglas Fir, Alder, and blackberries as indicated in Section 1.2 of the attached checklist. The work involved in the ROW includes: clearing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon pose a hazard to the lines; treating the associated stumps and re-sprouts with herbicide to ensure that the roots are killed preventing new sprouts; and selectively eliminating tall growing vegetation before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing vegetation. All work will take place in existing rights-of-ways and around transmission structures. All work will be accomplished by selective vegetation control methods to assure that there is little potential harm to non-target vegetation and to low-growing plants. The work will provide system reliability and fire protection. Also, all off right-of-way trees that are potentially unstable and will fall within a minimum distance or into the zone where the conductors swing will be removed. Access roads will be treated using mowing and herbicide applications. The work will provide system reliability. The subject transmission lines range from 115kV to 230kV and are made up of accompanying access roads, steel and wooden transmission line structures and associated switching platforms. The minimum clearance ranges from 21 feet for 115kV lines to 23 feet for 230kV lines. ROW easement widths vary along the length of the project. Vegetation control for this project is designed to provide a 3 year maintenance free interval. In summary, the overall vegetation management scheme will be to selectively remove tall growing vegetation then apply selective herbicide treatment using cut stump applications.

N /A

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

200

The impact of cattle grazing on salt marsh and elevated hummock vegetation communities of a Texas barrier island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To assess the effects of cattle herbivory on vegetation community structure and composition in a Texas coastal salt marsh, data measuring several vegetation parameters were collected in four distinct habitats within a heavily grazed marsh over...

Carothers, James Michael

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fruit and Vegetable Servings in Local Farm-Sourced and Standard Lunches Offered to Children in a Head Start Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Independent-samples t-tests were performed using SPSS. There were no significant differences in either fruit or vegetable consumption between conventional lunches and locally-sourced lunches. Even though there was more variety of fruit and vegetable offerings...

Johnson, Amy M.

2010-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Water-Wise Vegetable Garden: An Analysis of the Potential for Irrigation through Rainwater Harvesting in Sunny Northern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vegetables spinach and cabbage have a lower water demandmelons, spinach and yellow corn are among the most water-

Smith, Adrienne; Esterer-Vogel, Elisabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Water-Wise Vegetable Garden: An Analysis of the Potential for Irrigation through Rainwater Harvesting in Sunny Northern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

above the vegetable beds. Heavy water tanks require strongspaces. Since water is very heavy (8 pounds per gallon) it

Smith, Adrienne; Esterer-Vogel, Elisabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

N /A

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

205

Supply Response and Impact of Government-Supported Crops on the Texas Vegetable Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply functions, elasticity estimates, and nonjointness test results consistently indicated that few commodities compete economically in the production of six major Texas vegetables (cabbage, cantaloupes, carrots, onions, potatoes, and watermelons). Significant bias effects caused by government-supported commodities, fixed inputs, and technological change were observed and measured. Nonnested test results for the hypothesis of sequential decision making by vegetable producers were inconclusive, but they gave greater likelihood support to sequential than to contemporaneous decision making. Many crops are produced under provision of gov-ernment programs intended both to prevent severe drops in prices received by farmers and to limit supplies. Diversion payments, price supports, and acreage restrictions are examples of governmental policies designed to stabilize and control field crop production in the U.S, Vegetable production and marketing, on the other hand, are often subject only to minimum standards implemented by grow-ers í associations and shippers to ensure quality of the fresh produce. Their prices are allowed to vary according to market conditions prevailing at the time of harvest. Meanwhile, health-conscious con-sumers are enhancing their diets by expanding con-sumption of vegetables. For example, per capita consumption of fresh vegetables in the U.S. has increased more than a third in less than 15 years, rising from 75 to 102 pounds between 1975 and 1989 (USDA). Texas is a major vegetable producing state. In 1989 it ranked sixth among the 50 states in value of vegetables produced and fourth in value of fresh vegetables produced (USDA). Considerable re-sources are devoted to them, and income generated from vegetable production and associated agribus-iness activities contribute substantially to the eco-

Fermin Ornelas; C. Richard Shumway

206

Models Datasets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0StatementsMixingAssessing8 MayModels-Datasets

207

ISDAC Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSLthe U.S.;2cSupercomputing: TheModeling

208

Global Emissions of Terpenoid VOCs from Terrestrial Vegetation in the Last Millennium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8 GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signicant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 15 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% 19 20 less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends ofglobal isoprene emissions to be mostly a*ected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signifcant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 16 17 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 18 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Smolander, S.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Kaplan, J. O.; Guenther, Alex B.; Arneth, A.; Riipinen, I.

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

209

Vegetation uptake from burial ground alpha waste trenches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was conducted as part of an evaluation of the potential radiological consequences of reinhabiting the SRS burial ground. The objective was to determine the uptake of buried, low-level, transuranic waste from unlined earthen trenches by forest vegetation. Two tree plots were established in 1979. One plot was put over a trench containing alpha waste and the other in an area without trenches. When the tree seedlings were sampled during 1979 and 1980, and analysized for {sup 239}Pu and {sup 238}Pu, there was only a small difference in radionuclude concentration between trees planted over the trench and those planted on the control plot because of the limited root intrusion into the trench by the seedlings. However, when trees were sample in 1986, 1987, and 1988 and analyzed for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 237}Np activity, the average activity of all of these isotopes was significantly higher over the trenches than in the control plot. These measurements indicate that tree roots will extract transuranic isotopes from buried, low-level waste. The amount of radioisotopes moved from the trenches to the surface is small and the level in the trees is low enough that dose from exposure will be small. The long term effects of transport of radioisotopes from the trenches to the surface soil was evaluated by estimating the accumulation in the surface soil. Transuranic activity in selected food crops was calculated using the soil activity and the literature derived concentration factors. In all cases, the activity of the transuranic isotopes in the edible portion of the plants was quite low. The activity in the leaf tissue was much higher than in the seed. However, it should be noted that in only one case was the activity higher than the naturally occurring activity of {sup 40}K in the pine foliage.

Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Tuckfield, R.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Assessing general relationships between aboveground biomass and vegetation structure parameters for improved carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Click Here for Full Article Assessing general relationships between aboveground biomass 2010; published 23 June 2010. [1] Lidarbased aboveground biomass is derived based on the empirical relationship between lidarmeasured vegetation height and aboveground biomass, often leading to large

Ni-Meister, Wenge

211

The effects of nutrition education on attitudes and behaviors of children regarding fruits and vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

curriculum has improved nutritional knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding fruits and vegetables. One hundred and thirty - five students, representing ages five through twelve, approximately grades three through five, from four counties across...

Koch, Sharon Elaine, 1976-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Feedbacks between flow, vegetation, deposition, and the implications for landscape development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flow and sedimentation around patches of vegetation are important to landscape evolution, and a better understanding of these processes would facilitate more effective river restoration and wetlands engineering. In wetlands ...

Kondziolka, John M. (John Michael)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Vegetation, soils, and surface hydrology of playa landforms in the Rio Grande Plains, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Playas in the Rio Grande Plains of southern Texas were compared with respect to their: 1) size, shape, soil properties, and microtopography, 2) vegetation composition and structure, 3) surface water accumulation potential, and 4) disturbance history...

Farley, Andrea Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

214

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic vegetation amplify Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Y N C H E T A L . 2001 American Meteorological Society Summary: vegetation, permafrost, soil, and the atmo- sphere to amplify ecosystem change. MacDonald et al. (1993... the...

215

Coastal Marsh Vegetation Dynamics of the East Bay of Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The structure and function of coastal marshes results from a complex interaction of biotic and abiotic processes that continually influence the characteristics of marsh vegetation. A great deal of research has focused on how tidal processes...

Johnson, Jeremy Scott

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

216

The coupled development of terrain and vegetation : the case of semiarid grasslands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The distribution of vegetation in semiarid landscapes organizes as a function of moisture availability, which is often mediated by the form of the land surface. Simultaneously the processes that shape the land surface are ...

Flores Cervantes, Javier Homero, 1977-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Momentum and mass transport by coherent structures in a shallow vegetated shear flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In many aquatic systems, from tidal creeks with fringing mangroves to rivers and associated floodplains, there exists an interface between dense vegetation and a high conveyance channel. A shear flow develops across this ...

White, Brian L., 1975-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Investigation of the utility of the vegetation condition index (VCI) as an indicator of drought  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relationship between the satellite-based Vegetation Condition Index (VCI) and frequently used agricultural drought indices like Palmer Drought Severity Index, Palmerís Z-index, Standard Precipitation Index, percent normal and deciles...

Ganesh, Srinivasan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Relationships of exotic plant communities with native vegetation, environmental factors, disturbance, and landscape ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecosystems in numerous ways. Theories on relation- ships of exotic species invasions with native vegetation strongly related to the eco- system classification. For example, mean exotic cover ranged from

Abella, Scott R.

220

Effects of dynamic vegetation and topography on hydrological processes in semi-arid areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystems of dry climates represent a particularly interesting object for ecohydrological studies, as water is generally considered to be the key limiting resource. This work focuses on vegetation-water-energy dynamics ...

Ivanov, Valeri Yuryevich, 1974-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences the metabolism of prairie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences, the restoration allowed recovery of some features of open-canopy prairie streams. Woody expansion apparently. Keywords: macroalgae, microalgae, primary production, restoration, streams Introduction North American

Dodds, Walter

222

A Comparison of Vegetation in Artificially Isolated Wetlands on West Galveston Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to compare vegetation systems among three artificially isolated wetlands on the west end of Galveston Island. Sample sites were identified as isolated wetlands and anthropogenic impact was observed. Wetland plant...

Wilson, Ashley

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

Using mobile technology to impact fruit and vegetable consumption in low-income youth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The benefits of fruits and vegetables (FV) include supplying nutrients and fiber to the diet, reducing risk of disease, and assisting in weight maintenance by increasing satiety and decreasing energy density of the diet. FV intake has been...

Hutcheson, Tresza Denae

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROTOPOGRAPHY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VEGETATION PATTERNS IN CREATED WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROTOPOGRAPHY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VEGETATION PATTERNS IN CREATED WETLANDS, Virginia, USA 20192 Abstract: Created wetlands are increasingly used to mitigate wetland loss. Thus, identifying wetland creation methods that enhance ecosystem development might increase the likelihood

225

Evaluation of vegetable oils for deep frying of batter-breaded meat nuggets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATION OF VEGETABLE OILS FOR DEEP FRYING OF BATIER-BREADED MEAT NUGGETS A Thesis by SHIRLEY ELIZABETH HOUSSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology EVALUATION OF VEGETABLE OILS FOR DEEP FRYING OF BATTER-BREADED MEAT NUGGETS A Thesis by SHIRLEY ELIZABETH HOUSSON Approved as to style and content by: Ki Soon Rhee (Chair...

Housson, Shirley Elizabeth

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Canopy, litter and allelopathic effects of Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei, Buchholz) on understory vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CANOPY, ~ AND ALLELOPATHIC EFFECTS OF ASHE JUNIPER (JUNIPERUS ASHEI, BUCHHOLZ) ON UNDERSTORY VEGETATION A Thesis by LISA YVONNE YAGER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fufillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1993 Major Subject: Range Science CANOPY, LIITER AND ALLELOPATHIC EFFECTS OF ASHE JUNIPER (JUNIPERUS ASHEI, BUCHHOLZ) ON UNDERSTORY VEGETATION A Thesis by LISA YVONNE YAGER Submitted to Texas A...

Yager, Lisa Yvonne

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Vegetative covers for sediment control and phosphorus sequestration from dairy waste application fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEGETATIVE COVERS FOR SEDIMENT CONTROL AND PHOSPHORUS SEQUESTRATION FROM DAIRY WASTE APPLICATION FIELDS A Thesis by SUBHASIS GIRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2008 Major Subject: Biological and Agricultural Engineering VEGETATIVE COVERS FOR SEDIMENT CONTROL AND PHOSPHORUS SEQUESTRATION FROM DAIRY WASTE APPLICATION FIELDS A Thesis...

Giri, Subhasis

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson Joseph A for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson,a Joseph A. Shaw,a Rick Lawrence,b Paul W. Nugent,a Laura M of these calibrated imagers is imaging of vegetation for CO2 gas leak detection. During a four-week period

Shaw, Joseph A.

229

Growth response of selected vegetable species to plant residue of guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taub.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROWTH RESPONSE OF SELECTED VEGETABLE SPECIES TO PLANT RESIDUE OF GUAR (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L. ) Taub. ) A Thesis by DEBBIE JOHN REID Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Horticulture GROWTH RESPONSE OF SELECTED VEGETABLE SPECIES TO PLANT RESIDUE OF GUAR (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L. ) Taub. ) A Thesis by DEBBIE JOHN REID Approved as to style...

Reid, Debbie John

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

An evaluation of low-density introductions of triploid grass carp in vegetated small sportfishing impoundments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN EVALUATION OF LOW-DENSITY INTRODUCTIONS OF TRIPLOID GRASS CARP IN VEGETATED SMALL SPORTFISHING IMPOUNDMENTS A Thesis by BRIAN GENE BLACKWELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1993 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences AN EVALUATION OF LOW-DENSITY INTRODUCTIONS OF TRIPLOID GRASS CARP IN VEGETATED SMALL SPORTFISHING IMPOUNDMENTS A Thesis by BRIAN GENE...

Blackwell, Brian Gene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

231

Use of vegetation to ameliorate building microclimates: an assessment of energy-conservation potentials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The space-conditioning energy conservation potentials of landscapes designed to ameliorate building microclimates are evaluated. The physical bases for vegetative modifications of climate are discussed, and results of past study of the effects of vegetation on space-conditioning energy consumption in buildings are reviewed. The state-of-the-art of energy-conserving landscape designs is assessed and recommendations are presented for further research.

Hutchison, B.A.; Taylor, F.G.; Wendt, R.L.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Satellite image analysis for surveillance, vegetation and climate change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, many studies have provided abundant evidence to show the trend of tree mortality is increasing in many regions, and the cause of tree mortality is associated with drought, insect outbreak, or fire. Unfortunately, there is no current capability available to monitor vegetation changes, and correlate and predict tree mortality with CO{sub 2} change, and climate change on the global scale. Different survey platforms (methods) have been used for forest management. Typical ground-based forest surveys measure tree stem diameter, species, and alive or dead. The measurements are low-tech and time consuming, but the sample sizes are large, running into millions of trees, covering large areas, and spanning many years. These field surveys provide powerful ground validation for other survey methods such as photo survey, helicopter GPS survey, and aerial overview survey. The satellite imagery has much larger coverage. It is easier to tile the different images together, and more important, the spatial resolution has been improved such that close to or even higher than aerial survey platforms. Today, the remote sensing satellite data have reached sub-meter spatial resolution for panchromatic channels (IKONOS 2: 1 m; Quickbird-2: 0.61 m; Worldview-2: 0.5 m) and meter spatial resolution for multi-spectral channels (IKONOS 2: 4 meter; Quickbird-2: 2.44 m; Worldview-2: 2 m). Therefore, high resolution satellite imagery can allow foresters to discern individual trees. This vital information should allow us to quantify physiological states of trees, e.g. healthy or dead, shape and size of tree crowns, as well as species and functional compositions of trees. This is a powerful data resource, however, due to the vast amount of the data collected daily, it is impossible for human analysts to review the imagery in detail to identify the vital biodiversity information. Thus, in this talk, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges to use high resolution satellite imagery and machine learning theory to monitor tree mortality at the level of individual trees.

Cai, D Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

233

Geosci. Model Dev., 4, 9931010, 2011 www.geosci-model-dev.net/4/993/2011/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for earth system models B. Poulter1,2, P. Ciais2, E. Hodson1, H. Lischke1, F. Maignan2, S. Plummer3, and N, earth system models require a represen- tation of vegetation distributions that are either prescribed products and adapted for earth system models is an important component for reducing the uncertainty

Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

234

PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN REMOTE SENSING OF VEGETATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

make food from light energy, carbon dioxide and water in a series of chemical reactions. Some. The sugar formed is glucose, the food a plant uses for maintenance and growth. The process is illustrated by Model EE LL Solar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance Solar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance

Frank, Thomas D.

235

Characterization of Households and its Implications for the Vegetation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

motivations for and participation in local land management. Key words: urban ecology; population; house- hold be enhanced by examining the multidimensional social characteristics of house- holds. To this end, we of a quadratic term for housing age significantly im- proved the models. Based on these research re- sults, we

Vermont, University of

236

Theoretical Population Biology 71 (2007) 111 Nonlinear dynamics and pattern bifurcations in a model for vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical Population Biology 71 (2007) 1­11 Nonlinear dynamics and pattern bifurcations observed in aerial photographs of sub- Saharan Africa in the 1950s (MacFadyen, 1950; Hemming, 1965; Wickens in the plant density U because the presence of plant roots in the soil increases water ARTICLE IN PRESS www

Sherratt, Jonathan A.

237

Using Unmanned Helicopters to Assess Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluating vegetation cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. Methods that have sufficient accuracy and improved cost efficiency could dramatically alter how biotic resources are monitored on both public and private lands. This will be of interest to land managers because there are rarely enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, unmanned helicopters were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover during May, June, and July in 2005. The images were used to estimate percent cover for six vegetative cover classes (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forbs, litter, and bare ground). The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Ocular assessments of digital imagery were performed using a software program called SamplePoint, and the results were compared against field measurements collected using a point-frame method to assess accuracy. The helicopter imagery evaluation showed a high degree of agreement with field cover class values for litter, bare ground, and grass, and reasonable agreement for dead shrubs. Shrub cover was often overestimated and forbs were generally underestimated. The helicopter method took 45% less time than the field method to set plots and collect and analyze data. This study demonstrates that UAV technology provides a viable method for monitoring vegetative cover on rangelands in less time and with lower costs. Tradeoffs between cost and accuracy are critical management decisions that are important when managing vegetative conditions across vast sagebrush ecosystems throughout the Intermountain West.

Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Randy Lee

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation at radioactive-waste disposal Area G during the 1994 growing season  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overstory (pinon pine) and understory (grass and forb) vegetation samples were collected within and around selected points at Area G-a low-level radioactive solid-waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory-for the analysis of tritium ({sup 3}H), strontium ({sup 90}Sr), plutonium ({sup 238} Pu and {sup 239}Pu), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), americium ({sup 241}Am), and total uranium. In general, most vegetation samples collected within and around Area G contained radionuclide levels in higher concentrations than vegetation collected from background areas. Tritium, in particular, was detected as high as 5,800 pCi/mL in overstory vegetation collected outside the fence just west of the tritium shafts; this suggests that tritium is migrating from this waste repository through subsurface pathways. Also, understory vegetation collected north of the transuranic (TRU) pads (outside the fence of Area G) contained the highest values of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am, and may be a result of surface holding, storage, or disposal activities.

Fresquez, P.R.; Biggs, J.B.; Bennett, K.D.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Trajectories of change in sagebrush steppe vegetation communities in relation to multiple wildfires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeated perturbations, both biotic and abiotic, can lead to fundamental changes in the nature of ecosystems including changes in state. Sagebrush-steppe communities provide important habitat for wildlife and grazing for livestock. Fire is an integral part of these systems, but there is concern that increased ignition frequencies and invasive species are fundamentally altering these systems. Despite these issues, the majority of studies of fire effects in Artemisia tridentata wyomingensis-dominated systems have focused on the effects of single burns. The Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), in south-central Washington (U.S.A.), was one of the largest areas of continuous shrub-steppe habitat in the state until large wildfires burnt the majority of it in 2000 and 2007. We analysed data from permanent vegetation transects established in 1996 and resampled in 2002 and 2009. Our objective was to describe how the fires, and subsequent post-fire restoration efforts, affected communities successional pathways. Plant communities differed in response to repeated fire and restoration; these differences could largely be ascribed to the functional traits of the dominant species. Low elevation communities, previously dominated by obligate seeders, moved farthest from their initial composition and were dominated by weedy, early successional species in 2009. Higher elevation sites with resprouting shrubs, native bunchgrasses and few invasive species were generally more resilient to the effects of repeated disturbances. Shrub cover has been almost entirely removed from ALE, though there is evidence of recovery where communities were dominated by re-sprouters. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) dominance was reduced by herbicide application in areas where it was previously abundant but increased significantly in untreated areas. Several re-sprouting species, notably Phlox longifolia and Poa secunda, expanded remarkably following competitive release from shrub canopies and/or abundant cheatgrass. Our results suggest that community dynamics can be understood through a state-and-transition model with two axes (shrub/grass and native/invasive abundance), though such models also need to account for differences in plant functional traits and disturbance regimes. We use our results to develop an illustrative model that will be expanded with further research.

Davies, G. M.; Bakker, J. D.; Dettweiler-Robinson, E.; Dunwiddie, Peter W.; Hall, S. A.; Downs, Janelle L.; Evans, J.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Canned and Frozen Vegetables: Getting the Most Nutrition for Your Money  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Suggested Uses of Selected Canned and Frozen Vegetables Vegetable Availability Key Nutrients Comments/Uses Asparagus canned,frozen Vitamin C and Folate Expensive. Use as a side dish. Beans,Baked canned Protein, Fiber,Thiamin, Low cost. Use as a main or side... dish. Magnesium, Potassium, Zinc and Phosphorus Beans,Green canned,frozen Fiber (F) and Vitamin C Use cut beans in salads and mixed dishes. or Wax Beans,Lima canned,frozen Protein, Fiber,Vitamins Available in white, green and yellow...

Anding, Jenna

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Evaluation of vegetative cover on reclaimed land by color infrared videography relative to soil properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were collected in three reclaimed portions of the Martin Lake mine near Tatum, Texas. Analysis of the video imagery indicated that 11% of the A2 area, 8% of the B area and 15% of the C2 area were poorly vegetated by bermudagrass. Areas totally devoid... as bare soil in these two mine areas are known to be actively used haul roads. Sparsely vegetated areas account for 7. 8'4 of the A2, 4. 8% of the B and 13% of the C2 areas. These values were significantly different at the 5% confidence level...

Pfordresher, Anne Augusta

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The effects of cattle on shoreline vegetation of ponds and tanks in south Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE December I97S Hajor Subject: Wildlife and. Fisheries Sciences THE EFFECTS OF CATTLE ON SHORELINE VEGETATION OF PONDS AND TANKS IN SOUTH TEXAS A Thesis by RICHARD JOHN WHITE Approved as to content and style by: Chairmen of Committee Head... of Department M ber ber December 1978 ABSTRACT Ti e Effe ts of Cattle on Shoreline Vegetation of Ponds a", !d Tanks in "outh Texas. (December i978) Richard John Nhytc, B, Nat ~ Res. , University of New England Chairman of Mvisory Committee: Dr. N ~ J...

Whyte, Richard John

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

State and Transition Modeling History & Current Concepts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management input · Friedel(1991) concentrated on thresholds ­ "...compatible with state and transition theoryState and Transition Modeling History & Current Concepts Tamzen K. Stringham Oregon State vegetation change #12;· Non-equilibrium Models (States, Transitions and Thresholds) ­ Encompass Range

244

Investigation of North American vegetation variability under recent climate Ė A study using the SSiB4/TRIFFID biophysical/dynamic vegetation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zhou et al. , 2003; Alessandri and Navarra, 2008; Rehfeldttar.gz. References Alessandri, A. , and A. Navarra, 2008: On

zhang, Z; xue, Y; Macdonald, G; Cox, P; Collatz, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Impacts of Climate Change and Vegetation Dynamics on Runoff in the Mountainous Region of the Haihe River Basin in the Past Five Decades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate and atmospheric CO2 concentration have changed significantly in the mountainous region of the Haihe River basin over the past five decades. In the study, a process-based terrestrial model, version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4), was used to quantify the spatiotemporal changes in runoff over the region, driven by the varying climate factors and CO2 concentration. Overall, our simulations suggest that climate-induced change in runoff in this region show a decreasing trend since 1960. Changes in precipitation, solar radiation, air temperature, and wind speed accounts for 56%, -14%, 13%, -5% of the overall decrease in annual runoff, respectively, but their relative contributions vary across the study area. Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration was found to have limited impacts on runoff. Significant decrease in runoff over the southern and northeastern portion of the region is primarily attributed to decreasing precipitation, while decreasing solar radiation and increasing air temperature are the main causes of slight runoff increase in the northern portion. Our results also suggest that the magnitude of decreasing trend could be greatly underestimated if the dynamical interactions of vegetation phenology with the environmental factors are not considered in the modeling, highlighting the importance of including dynamic vegetation phenology in the prediction of runoff in this region.

Lei, Huimin; Yang, Dawen; Huang, Maoyi

2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

Disease Management for Vegetable Crops Program Leader: Margaret Tuttle McGrath, Associate Professor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affecting vegetables grown on Long Island within organic as well as conventional production systems by and genetic control. Examine impact on diseases of practices to improve soil health: annual compost amendments conducted in 2010 included 1) evaluating registered conventional fungicides and experimentals; 2) examining

Lazzaro, Brian

247

The Earth as an extrasolar planet: The vegetation spectral signature today and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Earth as an extrasolar planet: The vegetation spectral signature today and during the last in an unresolved extrasolar Earth-like planet integrated reflectance spectrum. Here we investigate the potential during these extrema when 1 hal-00351408,version1-9Jan2009 #12;Earth's climate and biomes maps were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

248

The Earth as an extrasolar planet: the vegetation spectral signature today  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Earth as an extrasolar planet: the vegetation spectral signature today and during the last extrasolar Earth-like planet integrated reflectance spectrum. Here, we investigate the potential during these extrema, when Earth's climate and biomes maps were different from today, we are able to test

Arnold, Luc

249

Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three Major Floods, Gila RiverKelvey, Director Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Burkham, D. E. 1927 Hydraulic effects 19.16:655-J 1. Gila River-Floods. 2. Hydraulics. 3. Botany-Ecology-Gila River. 1. Title: Hydraulic

250

Normalized Microwave Reflection Index: A Vegetation Measurement Derived From GPS Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is known as Normalized Differ- ence Water Index (NDWI) [12]. It is calculated using reflectance in two near infrared (NIR) channels. Similar indices have been proposed that use reflectance at other NIR wavelengthsNormalized Microwave Reflection Index: A Vegetation Measurement Derived From GPS Networks Kristine

Small, Eric

251

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT VEGETATION COVER TYPES ON SEDIMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT VEGETATION COVER TYPES ON SEDIMENT by trapping sediment during tidal exchange. They are considered good sediment retention environments, but little is known about the spatial variability of sedimentation within these wetlands, and the role

Lovett, Gary M.

252

Mark E. Uchanksi, PhD Assistant Professor of Vegetable Physiology, Plant and Environmental Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

producers in New Mexico and the desert southwest. Several recent projects have shown the great potential imports from other states. New Mexico vegetable farmers face many unique challenges, which are often. Effect of Rotational Crop Residues on Chile (Capsicum annuum) Germination and Vigor. Hortscience 46(9): S

Johnson, Eric E.

253

Vegetation communities associated with the 100-Area and 200-Area facilities on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington, lies within the broad semi-arid shrub-steppe vegetation zone of the Columbia Basin. Thirteen different habitat types on the Hanford Site have been mapped in Habitat Types on the Hanford Site: Wildlife and Plant Species of Concern (Downs et al. 1993). In a broad sense, this classification is correct. On a smaller scale, however, finer delineations are possible. This study was conducted to determine the plant communities and estimate vegetation cover in and directly adjacent to the 100 and 200 Areas, primarily in relation to waste sites, as part of a comprehensive ecological study for the Compensation Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) characterization of the 100 and 200 Areas. During the summer of 1993, field surveys were conducted and a map of vegetation communities in each area, including dominant species associations, was produced. The field surveys consisted of qualitative community delineations. The community delineations described were made by field reconnaissance and are qualitative in nature. The delineations were made by visually determining the dominant plant species or vegetation types and were based on the species most apparent at the time of inspection. Additionally, 38 transects were run in these plant communities to try to obtain a more accurate representation of the community. Because habitat disturbances from construction/operations activities continue to occur in these areas, users of this information should be cautious in applying these maps without a current ground survey. This work will complement large-scale habitat maps of the Hanford Site.

Stegen, J.A.

1994-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

254

Specialty Crop Profile: Anthony Bratsch, Extension Specialist, Vegetables and Small Fruit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specialty Crop Profile: Pawpaw Anthony Bratsch, Extension Specialist, Vegetables and Small Fruit Introduction Pawpaw (Asimina spp.) is a native fruit crop that is in the beginning phases of domestication.S. The pawpaw is the largest edible tree fruit native to the United States. It is the only temperate member

Liskiewicz, Maciej

255

Flow, Sedimentation, and Biomass Production on a Vegetated Salt Marsh in South Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Flow, Sedimentation, and Biomass Production on a Vegetated Salt Marsh in South Carolina: Toward studies at North Inlet estuary, South Carolina, the biomass of the S. alterniflora on the marsh platform at North Inlet are used to relate biomass to plant area per unit volume, stem diameter, and an empirical

256

I. Abstract Vegetation plays an important role in the surface energy and water balance of wetlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

55 I. Abstract Vegetation plays an important role in the surface energy and water balance or reverse the downward trend in streamflow. In this study, we investigated the energy and water balance had been sprayed with herbicide (and remained only as dead, standing biomass). Energy balance

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

257

Postdoctoral research associate position on vegetation remote sensing at the Free University of Berlin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 100% of the German TV-L13 salary scale. Title of the post Analysis of global maps of terrestrial vegetation: part of the energy absorbed by chlorophyll is not used for carbon fixation but emitted at longer of GOSAT-FTS spaceborne measurements in the 750-770 nm window. Solar Fraunhofer lines superposed to the Fs

258

Eighty years of change: vegetation in the montane ecoregion of Jasper National Park, Alberta,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eighty years of change: vegetation in the montane ecoregion of Jasper National Park, Alberta and dis- tribution in the montane ecoregion of Jasper National Park, in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta parc natio- nal de Jasper, situé dans les Montagnes Rocheuses en Alberta, au Canada. Une approche

Macdonald, Ellen

259

-Establishment of Norway spruce seedlings -681 Journal of Vegetation Science 7: 681-684, 1996  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Establishment of Norway spruce seedlings - 681 Journal of Vegetation Science 7: 681-684, 1996 abandoned for half a century and are sur- rounded by Picea abies (Norway spruce) forests. The causes of inhibition of establishment of Norway spruce seedlings in the meadows were tested experimentally

Leps, Jan "Suspa"

260

Vegetation changes on an abandoned rice field following herbicide and fertilizer treatments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ass (pa icum ~v(r turn L. ), a d rownseed nasn I (~nas alum plicat I ~ Michx. ). In co treat, vegetation of abend ed rice land is composed principally of annual forbs intermixed with three-awns (Aristida spp. ). Forbs, as used in this paper, wili...

Cwik, Michael Joseph

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Elephant in the Room Presentation to the Saskatchewan Greenhouse and Vegetable Growers Association of Saskatchewan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Elephant in the Room Presentation to the Saskatchewan Greenhouse and Vegetable Growers Association of Saskatchewan November 14, 2009, by MIKE FURI, Branch Manager Manitoba/Saskatchewan Wholesale Division TGP, Saskatchewan Director Canadian Produce Marketing Association #12;Goals & Benefits · To reduce

Peak, Derek

262

Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas Justin A. Hogan,1 sequestration sites for possible leaks of the CO2 gas from underground reservoirs, a low-cost multispectral are then flagged for closer inspection with in-situ CO2 sensors. The system is entirely self

Shaw, Joseph A.

263

The impact of vegetation on fractionation of rare earth elements (REE) during waterrock interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impact of vegetation on fractionation of rare earth elements (REE) during water The fractionation of the rare earth elements (REE) in river water, as well as the immobilization of REE in the river earth elements (REE) principally originate from apatite dissolution during weathering. However, stream

Mailhes, Corinne

264

Gas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= ) in the silty ice, reaching values as high as 22 mM [Tison et al., 1998]. Ammonium oxalate is produced duringGas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion R. Souchez,1 J prevailing during build-up of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) are not yet established. Here we use results from

Chappellaz, J√©r√īme

265

Vegetative and reproductive innovations of early land plants: implications for a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetative and reproductive innovations of early land plants: implications for a uni ed phylogeny Karen Sue Renzaglia1 , R. Joel Du¬°1 {, Daniel L. Nickrent1 and David J. Garbary2 1Department of Plant (renzaglia@plant.siu.edu) 2 Department of Biology, St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia

Nickrent, Daniel L.

266

Applying Scaled Vegetation Greenness Metrics to Constrain Simulated Transpiration Anomalies: A Study over Australia*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Climate Change Research Centre, Level 4 Mathews Building, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052: A Study over Australia* MARK DECKER, ANDY J. PITMAN, AND JASON EVANS Climate Change Research CentreApplying Scaled Vegetation Greenness Metrics to Constrain Simulated Transpiration Anomalies

Evans, Jason

267

Russell W. Wallace, Ph.D. & John C. Hodges Extension Vegetable Specialist & Research Technician  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas Agricultural Research. & Extension Center Route 3, Box 213AA Lubbock, TX 79403 Effects of Plastic than those grown on red plastic film. Tomato yields were significantly higher when grown in cages. Hodges Extension Vegetable Specialist & Research Technician Texas Agricultural Research. & Extension

Mukhtar, Saqib

268

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation using spectral imaging. This has been accom- plished with both visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) sunlight-path laser absorption measurements [14]­[16], in-situ visible and near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectral

Lawrence, Rick L.

269

Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked September 2008 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2008 Abstract Brownfield sites contribute of a chronosequence of urban brownfield sites in Bremen and Berlin, Germany. These parameters were linked

Kleyer, Michael

270

MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review paper Riparian vegetation research in Mediterranean-climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review paper Riparian vegetation research in Mediterranean-climate are from land-use conversion to agriculture, streamflow regulation, nutrient enrichment, and climate change editors: N. Bonada & V. H. Resh / Streams in Mediterranean climate regions: lessons learned from the last

Stella, John C.

271

RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation dynamics in a Mediterranean coast and in regions that are expected to experience a mediterranean-type climate in the future. Samartin √Ā O. Heiri √Ā W. Tinner Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research

Bern, Universität

272

Holocene vegetation and fire dynamics in the supra-mediterranean belt of the Nebrodi Mountains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Mediterranean region. Copyright # 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS: climate change; human impact; Ilex TINNER1 1 Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of BernHolocene vegetation and fire dynamics in the supra-mediterranean belt of the Nebrodi Mountains

Bern, Universität

273

Ris Energy Report 2 Biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils that have been  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6.2 Ris√ł Energy Report 2 Biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils that have been chemically (canola) oil with methanol. Biodiesel can be burned directly in diesel engines. Robert Diesel himself, but it was not until the oil crisis of the 1970s that biofuels attracted serious interest. Biodiesel is reported

274

8 March 2010 Role of dietary iodine and cruciferous vegetables in thyroid cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8 March 2010 1 Role of dietary iodine and cruciferous vegetables in thyroid cancer: A countrywide Rougier, MD4 Pascal Guénel, MD, PhD1,2 Author affiliations 1 Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, CESP: Pascal Guénel, MD, PhD Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer UMRS 1018, Inserm CESP 16 avenue Paul

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

275

Quaternary Science Reviews 21 (2002) 10391059 Lateglacial and early Holocene vegetation development in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development in the Gutaiului Mountains, northwestern Romania Leif Bj.orkmana, *, Angelica Feurdeanb , Kajsa-Bolyai University, Kogalniceanu 1, 3400 Cluj, Romania c (Angstr.om Laboratory, Division of Ion Physics, Box 534, S in the Gutaiului Mountains in northwestern Romania, in order to reconstruct the vegetation development during

Wohlfarth, Barbara

276

Vegetation and Fire at the Last Glacial Maximum in Tropical South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Vegetation and Fire at the Last Glacial Maximum in Tropical South America Francis E temperatures. Keywords Charcoal · Last Glacial Maximum · pollen · Quaternary · tropical South America F-mail: Francis.Mayle@ed.ac.uk 89F. Vimeux et al. (eds.), Past Climate Variability in South America

Binford, Michael W.

277

Geomorphic controls on hydrology and vegetation in an arid basin: Turkana district, northern Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a broad ecological study of Kenyan pastoralist adaptation to periodic drought, a study was done to determine how arid region geomorphology affects hydrology and subsequently vegetative patterns. In this study area, 100 kilometers south of Lake Turkana, it appears that irregular precipitation is stored in bajada sediments and is available to deeply rooted vegetation over long periods of time. This vegetation provides a relatively constant food source for people's herds of browsers, the camels and goats, whereas cattle, which graze mainly on grasses, are significant producers only during wet seasons. Field observations suggest that the mountain and abutting pediment soils are too shallow to store appreciable water. However, greater quantities of water are stored in the deeper bajada sediments adjacent to the pediment where pastoralists dig temporary wells in ephemeral channels during wet seasons. Density of tree growth is greater along channels, and highest canopy cover values are found about the pediment-bajada interface. Geohydrologic processes in this area provide the basis for continuous occupation by the desert people, in contrast to recurring famines in adjacent areas, by enhancing the growth of woody vegetation.

Coppinger, K.D.; Doehring, D.O.; Schimel, D.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes Yonghoon Choi and Yang Wang Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State. Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents

Wang, Yang

279

The temporal mapping of riparian vegetation at Leon Creek in Bexar County, Texas from 1987 to 1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and urban zones. Results for both Image Difference Calculation and Percent Area Calculation suggest that for the total watershed, there are higher rates of decreases in vegetation occurring in rural and urban zones. Less vegetation overall in the 0.5 mi...

Cummins, Karen Leigh

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

SUN Regulates Vegetative and Reproductive Organ Shape by Changing Cell Division Patterns1[C][W][OA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUN Regulates Vegetative and Reproductive Organ Shape by Changing Cell Division Patterns1[C controlling the elongated fruit shape of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is SUN. In this study, we explored the roles of SUN in vegetative and reproductive development using near isogenic lines (NILs) that differ

van der Knaap, Esther

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to Assess Vegetative Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosytstems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with the University of Idaho, is evaluating novel approaches for using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quicker and safer method for monitoring biotic resources. Evaluating vegetative cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. In assessing vegetative cover, methods that improve accuracy and cost efficiency could revolutionize how biotic resources are monitored on western federal lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species, some of which are important indicator species (e.g., sage grouse). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluation of these ecosystems. In this project, two types of UAV platforms (fixed wing and helicopter) were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate total percent cover, (2) estimate percent cover for six different types of vegetation, and (3) locate sage grouse based on representative decoys. The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetative cover. A software program called SamplePoint developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) was used to evaluate the imagery for percent cover for the six vegetation types (bare ground, litter, shrubs, dead shrubs, grasses, and forbs). Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy.

Robert P. Breckenridge

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Overview of Opportunities for Co-Location of Solar Energy Technologies and Vegetation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale solar facilities have the potential to contribute significantly to national electricity production. Many solar installations are large-scale or utility-scale, with a capacity over 1 MW and connected directly to the electric grid. Large-scale solar facilities offer an opportunity to achieve economies of scale in solar deployment, yet there have been concerns about the amount of land required for solar projects and the impact of solar projects on local habitat. During the site preparation phase for utility-scale solar facilities, developers often grade land and remove all vegetation to minimize installation and operational costs, prevent plants from shading panels, and minimize potential fire or wildlife risks. However, the common site preparation practice of removing vegetation can be avoided in certain circumstances, and there have been successful examples where solar facilities have been co-located with agricultural operations or have native vegetation growing beneath the panels. In this study we outline some of the impacts that large-scale solar facilities can have on the local environment, provide examples of installations where impacts have been minimized through co-location with vegetation, characterize the types of co-location, and give an overview of the potential benefits from co-location of solar energy projects and vegetation. The varieties of co-location can be replicated or modified for site-specific use at other solar energy installations around the world. We conclude with opportunities to improve upon our understanding of ways to reduce the environmental impacts of large-scale solar installations.

Macknick, J.; Beatty, B.; Hill, G.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Vegetation History And Logging Disturbance: Effects On Rain Forest In The Lope Reserve, Gabon (With Special Emphasis On Elephants and Apes)†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation of the effects of commercial mechanised selective logging on rain forest vegetation and mammals, was undertaken in the Lope Reserve, central Gabon, between January 1989 to July 1991. Vegetation in Lope ...

White, Lee JT

284

Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

Tabares Velasco, P. C.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Final environmental assessment for vegetation control at VHF stations, microwave stations, electrical substations, and pole yards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Southwestern Power Adm. operates very high frequency (VHF) and microwave radio stations, electrical substations, and pole yards for electric power transmission throughout AR, MO, and OK. Vegetation growth at the stations must be suppressed for safety of operation and personnel. Southwestern has been using a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control for this purpose; Federally- mandated reductions in staff and budgetary resources require Southwestern to evaluate all potentially efficient methods for vegetation control. Three alternatives were examined: no action, mechanical/manual control, and (proposed) a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control. Environmental impacts on air and water quality, wetlands, wildlife, endangered species, archaeological and other resources, farmland, human health, transportation, etc. were evaluated.

NONE

1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

287

UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE (UAV) HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING FOR DRYLAND VEGETATION MONITORING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

UAV-based hyperspectral remote sensing capabilities developed by the Idaho National Lab and Idaho State University, Boise Center Aerospace Lab, were recently tested via demonstration flights that explored the influence of altitude on geometric error, image mosaicking, and dryland vegetation classification. The test flights successfully acquired usable flightline data capable of supporting classifiable composite images. Unsupervised classification results support vegetation management objectives that rely on mapping shrub cover and distribution patterns. Overall, supervised classifications performed poorly despite spectral separability in the image-derived endmember pixels. Future mapping efforts that leverage ground reference data, ultra-high spatial resolution photos and time series analysis should be able to effectively distinguish native grasses such as Sandberg bluegrass (Poa secunda), from invasives such as burr buttercup (Ranunculus testiculatus) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum).

Nancy F. Glenn; Jessica J. Mitchell; Matthew O. Anderson; Ryan C. Hruska

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The direct economic effects of a policy to provide government subsidized price discounts for the purchase of fruit and vegetable by food stamp recipients.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the purchase of fruit and vegetable by food stamp recipients. by Karen M. Jetter Assistant Research Economist price discounts on fresh fruit and vegetable to food stamp recipients. The suggestion for a price discount on fruit and vegetable for food stamps recipients is contained in the 2004 Farm Bill, section 4116

California at Davis, University of

289

Comparison of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Platforms for Assessing Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quick and safe method for monitoring biotic resources was evaluated. Vegetation cover and the amount of bare ground are important factors in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems and assessment of rangeland health. Methods that improve speed and cost efficiency could greatly improve how biotic resources are monitored on western lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species (including sage grouse and pygmy rabbit). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, two UAV platforms, fixed wing and helicopter, were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate percent cover for six different vegetation types (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forb, litter, and bare ground) and (2) locate sage grouse using representative decoys. The field plots were located on the Idaho National Engineering (INL) site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetation cover. A software program called SamplePoint was used along with visual inspection to evaluate percent cover for the six cover types. Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy. The comparison of fixed-wing and helicopter UAV technology against field estimates shows good agreement for the measurement of bare ground. This study shows that if a high degree of detail and data accuracy is desired, then a helicopter UAV may be a good platform to use. If the data collection objective is to assess broad-scale landscape level changes, then the collection of imagery with a fixed-wing system is probably more appropriate.

Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Sera White

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Relation of Soils, Rainfall and Grazing Management to Vegetation, Western Edwards Plateau of Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the station have been subjected to different rates of stocking with various ' cornhinations of sheep and cattle since grazing experiments were started in 1938. Vegetation on the experimental pastures is fairly representative of that supported by several... areas. I (2) Tobosagrass has been affected very little by the grazing practices for the 16-year period. ' It decreased slightly on the ridgetop soils but increased on other soils in pastures grazed with sheep. ' Cattle utilized tobosa more...

Young, Vernon A. (Vernon Alphus); Thomas, Gerald W.

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Synthetic cytokinin effects on vegetative propagation of Lilium longiflorum Thunb. 'Ace'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A ', ~/~ '- . g. ~ember August 1974 ABSTRACT Synthetic Cytokinin Effects on Vegetative Propagation oi' Lili 1 ~if1 , h O. 'Ace'. (hog : 1974I Cathy Marie Wilhite, B. S. , Texas Tech University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. A. E. Nightingale Foliar... of her commi ttee, Drs. A. E. Nightingale, H. T. Blackhurst, and M. H. Milford, for their patience, guidance, and understanding. She also appreciates the encouragement of the faculty, secretaries, and fellow graduate students in the Horticulture...

Wilhite, Cathy Marie

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Impact of trail use on the soils and vegetation of Petit Jean State Park, Arkansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Magill & Nord, 1963). STUDY AREA Petit Jean State Park is located on Petit Jean Mountain. This is one flat-topped ridge among many such ridges along the Arkansas River Valley. It is located in the southwest corner of Conway County, Arkansas... closed canopy E. A sparse ground vegetative cover II. Upland Woodland exhibited the following biotic and physical characteristics (Fig. 5): A. A ridge top or exposed slope location B. A drier environment than that along streams C. An oak...

Walter, Elizabeth Anne

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Vegetation trends in reclaimed areas at Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine, Grimes County, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetation productivity and cover studies have been conducted annually at the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine since 1989, and multiple annual clippings have been collected since 1991. The primary purpose of these studies was to examine revegetation success, in terms of herbaceous productivity, for various post-mine soil types. However, the studies also contain detailed information on species composition. For the years in which multiple annual clippings have been collected (1991 through 1996), total vegetation cover increased, with the mean proportion of bare ground dropping from 12% in 1991 to 1% in 1996. Relative proportions of most introduced and native grasses were virtually static from 1991 through 1994; in 1995, however, herbicide applications to reduce clover cover resulted in a dramatic increase in total grass cover, especially in bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) and Indiangrass (Sorgastrum nutans). In contrast to the trends of other introduced and native grasses, bahiagrass increased in cover throughout the study period, increasing from 7% in 1991 to 21 % in 1996. Annual and weedy grass species decreased in cover throughout the study period, falling from 12% cover in 1991 to 2% in 1996. This trend of displacement of annuals by perennials is typically observed during ecological succession in natural vegetation communities, and appears to have been accelerated by the herbicide application.

Westerman, C.A. [Morrison Knudsen Corp., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes and evaluates the concentrations of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr, and total U in understory and overstory vegetation collected from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), its perimeter, and regional background areas in 1998. Comparisons to conservative toxicity reference value safe limits were also made. The arithmetic mean LANL radionuclide concentrations in understory were 501 pCi L{sup {minus}1} for {sup 3}H, 0.581 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 137}Cs, 0.001 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 238}Pu, 0.008 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 239,240}Pu, 0.007 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 241}Am, 1.46 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 90}Sr, and 0.233 {micro}g ash g{sup {minus}1} for total uranium. The mean LANL radionuclide concentrations in overstory were 463 pCi L{sup {minus}1} for {sup 3}H, 1.51 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 137}Cs, 0.0004 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} {sup 238}Pu, 0.008 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 239,240}Pu, 0.014 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 241}Am, 1.97 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 90}Sr, and 0.388 {micro}g ash g{sup {minus}1} for total uranium. Concentrations of radionuclides and total U in both understory and overstory vegetation at LANL generally were not statistically higher than in perimeter and regional background vegetation ({alpha} = 0.05). The exceptions were LANL {sup 3}H > perimeter {sup 3}H (understory) and LANL {sup 3}H background {sup 3}H (overstory). All maximum radionuclide concentrations were lower than toxicity reference values. With the exception of total U, the relationship between contaminant concentration in soil vs. vegetation was insignificant ({alpha} = 0.05). Generally, as the concentration of total U in soil decreased, the concentration in vegetation increased. This held true for both understory and overstory and regardless of whether data were separated by general location (LANL, perimeter, and background) or not. There was no apparent relationship between contaminant concentrations in understory vs. overstory.

G. J. Gonzales; P. R. Fresquez; M. A. Mullen; L. Naranjo, Jr.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Vegetation classification and the efficacy of plant dominance-based classifications in predicting the occurrence of plant and animal species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Vegetation associations are often distinguished on the basis of the dominant plant species. Associations with markedly different dominants (e.g., evergreen and deciduous trees) are expected to indicate high complementarity. In this study I evaluated...

Yantis, James Hugh

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Potential influence of climate-induced vegetation shifts on future land use and associated land carbon fluxes in Northern Eurasia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change will alter ecosystem metabolism and may lead to a redistribution of vegetation and changes in fire regimes in Northern Eurasia over the 21st century. Land management decisions will interact with these ...

Kicklighter, D W

298

OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY AT 5 YEARS OF AGE IN RELATION TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INTAKE OVER TIME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Childhood overweight and obesity has increased as American diets have evolved to include fewer fruits and vegetables. It is important to evaluate the effect of dietary components on childhood overweight and obesity. Objective...

Cody, Claire McCaslin

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Responses of soil microbial and nematode communities to aluminum toxicity in vegetated oil-shale-waste lands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Responses of soil microbial and nematode communities to aluminum toxicity in vegetated oil-shale and total Al concentrations showed a significant decrease after planting S. cumini plantation onto the shale

Neher, Deborah A.

300

Modeling Residential Urban Areas from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Residential Urban Areas from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds Qian-Yi Zhou and Ulrich models for residential areas from aerial LiDAR scans. The key differ- ence between downtown area modeling and residential area modeling is that the latter usually contains rich vegetation. Thus, we propose a robust

Shahabi, Cyrus

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report ďSRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping ReportĒ, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

Edwards, Lloyd A. [Leading Solutions, LLC.; Paresol, Bernard [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Studies on the effect of heading back and chemical treatments of vegetative and fruiting response of pecans Carya illinoensis (Wag.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDIES ON THE EFFECT OF HEADING BACK AND CHEMICAL TREATMENTS ON VEGETATIVE AND FRUITING RESPONSE OF PECANS CARYA ILLINOENSIS (WAG. ) A Thesis RONALD FRED HOOKS Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER QF SCIENCE January l966 Major Subject: Horticulture STUDIES ON THE EFFECT OF HEADING BACK AND CHEMICAL TREATMENTS ON VEGETATIVE AND FRUITING RESPONSE OF PECANS CARYA ILLINOENSIS (WAG. ) A The...

Hooks, Ronald Fred

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Past and Future Effects of Ozone on Net Primary Production and Carbon Sequestration Using a Global Biogeochemical Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exposure of plants to ozone inhibits photosynthesis and therefore reduces vegetation production and carbon sequestration. Simulations with the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) for the historical period (1860-1995) show ...

Felzer, Benjamin Seth.

304

Modeling & Simulation publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0StatementsMixing UpModeling & Simulation

305

Enterprise Risk Management Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia NanoparticlesSmartAffects the FutureEnrico Rossi College2005Model The

306

The characteristics of the woody vegetation on three soils in Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dominant woody vegetat1on on the Axtell soil series. 29 Percent compos it1on, abundance, density, frequency and mean area of woody vegetation exceeding twenty feet in height on the Lakeland soil ser1es. 32 6. Species composition based on cover, number... savannah by Gould et al. (1960). Darrow and NcCully (19/9) reported that "during the past several decades, the 1ncrease and continued spread of such brushy plants as post and black- I pack oaks, haw, smilax and yaupon have converted the or1g1nal open...

Capps, Robert Curtis

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Services, Facilities, and Costs of Marketing Vegetables in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000. The railroads have established regular fast-freight schedules for fruit and vegetables as follows : first morning out, Houston; second morning out, Fort Worth; third morning out, Little Rock, Memphis, and New Orleans ; fourth morning out, St. Louis ; fifth... on the right gives the average per cent for the ithree years of carlots shipped by Texas to these markets. Of all carlots #of cabbage shipped into St. Louis, 78 per cent mere from Texas. Dur- ing the same period, Texas furnished 58 per cent for Chicago...

Crawford, G. L. (George Lemuel)

1928-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Spring 1995 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the 1994 and 1995 wildlife and vegetation surveys were to gather data to be used for various applications including: (1) basewide Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) Work Plan (Scoping Document), (2) the completion of the basewide ERA, (3) determining remedial activities, and (4) determining the distribution of state and federal list plant and animal species on Norton AFB. Data gathering included an inventory of plant and animal species present, the identification of potential ecological receptors, mapping of habitats, and constructing the ecological food web present on or near the IRP sites of concern.

NONE

1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

309

Mead-Liberty 345-kV Transmission Line Access Road Maintenance and Localized Vegetation Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG4, 2012 1:00 -2 Mead-Liberty

310

Vegetation success, seepage, and erosion on tailing sites reclaimed with cattle and biosolids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reclamation field studies were designed at the Phelps Dodge Morenci Mine in Arizona to evaluate the benefits of biosolids, cattle impact, and other treatment variables on soil-capped tailings. First-year monitoring has provided preliminary data about soil chemical and physical parameters, soil matrix potential profiles, erosion, and vegetation measurements of ground cover, biomass production and frequency. Plots were first seeded in January 1998 with a cover crop of oats or barley. Plots were seeded again in August 1998 with native and native plus non-native plant species. Early productivity from the second seeding was inversely related to seedling density. Plots capped with unamended Gila conglomerate (Gila) materials contained meager plant nutrient levels and produced numerous small seedlings that were poorly rooted and had little standing biomass. Vegetation on the cattle and biosolids treatments was vigorous and productive but at a much lower density than unamended Gila plots. Cattle treatment added little plant-nutrient value to the Gila cap compared to biosolids amendment. However, high rates of biosolids brought excessive salinity. Straw from the cattle treatment provided an effective mulch to improve soil moisture storage but increased the potential for deep seepage. Unamended Gila and biosolids plots had intermediate moisture storage and a modest potential for seepage compared to bare tailings. Mulch cover plus a lower rate of biosolids on Gila is seen as a promising, cost-effective amendment combination for future evaluation.

Vinson, J.; Jones, B.; Milczarek, M.; Hammermeister, D.; Word, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

Not Available

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Hydrogenated soy ethyl ester (HySEE) from ethanol and waste vegetable oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biodiesel is gaining recognition in the United States as a renewable fuel which may be used as an alternative to diesel fuel without any modifications to the engine. Currently the cost of this fuel is the factor that limits its use. One way to reduce the cost of biodiesel is to use a less expensive form of vegetable oil such as waste oil from a processing plant. These operations use mainly hydrogenated soybean oil, some tallow and some Canola as their frying oils. It is estimated that there are several million pounds of waste vegetable oil from these operations. Additional waste frying oil is available from smaller processors, off-grade oil seeds and restaurants. This paper reports on developing a process to produce the first 945 liters (250 gallons) of HySEE using recipes developed at the University of Idaho; fuel characterization tests on the HySEE according to the ASAE proposed Engineering Practice for Testing of Fuels from Biological Materials, X552; short term injector coking tests and performance tests in a turbocharged, DI, CI engine; and a 300 hour screening test in a single cylinder, IDI, CI engine.

Peterson, C.; Reece, D.; Thompson, J. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)] [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll: Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation, soil, animals, cistern water, and ground water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended as a resource document for the eventual cleanup of Bikini Atoll and contains a summary of the data for the concentrations of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in vegetation through 1987 and in soil through 1985 for 14 islands at Bikini Atoll. The data for the main residence island, Bikini, and the most important island, Eneu, are extensive; these islands have been the subject of a continuing research and monitoring program since 1974. Data for radionuclide concentrations in ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, and pigs from Bikini and Eneu Islands are presented. Also included are general summaries of our resuspension and rainfall data from Bikini and Eneu Islands. The data for the other 12 islands are much more limited because samples were collected as part of a screening survey and the islands have not been part of a continuing research and monitoring program. Cesium-137 is the radionuclide that produces most of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake by terrestrial foods and secondly by direct external gamma exposure. Remedial measures for reducing the /sup 137/Cs uptake in vegetation are discussed. 40 refs., 32 figs., 131 tabs.

Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Stuart, M.L.

1988-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Meteorological and air quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative cover in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study described in this report is part of a project sponsored by the Toronto Atmospheric Fund, performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, to assess the potential role of surface property modifications on energy, meteorology, and air quality in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Canada. Numerical models were used to establish the possible meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative fraction, i.e., ''cool-city'' strategies that can mitigate the urban heat island (UHI), significantly reduce urban energy consumption, and improve thermal comfort, particularly during periods of hot weather in summer. Mitigation is even more important during critical heat wave periods with possible increased heat-related hospitalization and mortality. The evidence suggests that on an annual basis cool-city strategies are beneficial, and the implementation of such measures is currently being investigated in the U.S. and Canada. We simulated possible scenari os for urban heat-island mitigation in the GTA and investigated consequent meteorological changes, and also performed limited air-quality analysis to assess related impacts. The study was based on a combination of mesoscale meteorological modeling, Lagrangian (trajectory), and photochemical trajectory modeling to assess the potential meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of cool-city strategies. As available air-quality and emissions data are incompatible with models currently in use at LBNL, our air-quality analysis was based on photochemical trajectory modeling. Because of questions as to the accuracy and appropriateness of this approach, in our opinion this aspect of the study can be improved in the future, and the air-quality results discussed in this report should be viewed as relatively qualitative. The MM5 meteorological model predicts a UHI in the order of 2 to 3 degrees C in locations of maxima, and about 1 degree C as a typical value over most of the urban area. Our si mulations suggest that cool-city strategies can typically reduce local urban air temperature by 0.5-1 degrees C; as more sporadic events, larger decreases (1.5 degrees C, 2.5-2.7 degrees C and 4-6 degrees C) were also simulated. With regard to ozone mixing ratios along the simulated trajectories, the effects of cool-city strategies appear to be on the order of 2 ppb, a typical decrease. The photochemical trajectory model (CIT) also simulates larger decreases (e.g., 4 to 8 ppb), but these are not taken as representative of the potential impacts in this report. A comparison with other simulations suggest very crudely that a decrease of this magnitude corresponds to significant ''equivalent'' decreases in both NOx and VOCs emissions in the region. Our preliminary results suggest that significant UHI control can be achieved with cool-cities strategies in the GTA and is therefore worth further study. We recommend that better input data and more accurate modeling schemes be used to carry out f uture studies in the same direction.

Taha, Haider; Hammer, Hillel; Akbari, Hashem

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

315

Coastal Dynamics 2013 A 3-D PHASE-AVERAGED MODEL FOR SHALLOW WATER FLOW WITH WAVES IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coastal Dynamics 2013 1915 A 3-D PHASE-AVERAGED MODEL FOR SHALLOW WATER FLOW WITH WAVES in coastal vegetated waters with short waves. The model adopts the 3-D phase-averaged shallow water flow mesh in the vertical direction. The flow model is coupled with a spectral wave deformation model called

US Army Corps of Engineers

316

A validation of heat and carbon fluxes from highresolution land surface and regional models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) or regional climate models (RCMs) [Alessandri et al., 2007; Steiner et al., 2009]. [3., 2006; Alessandri et al., 2007; Jarlan et al., 2008; Steiner et al., 2009]. However, the SVAT models models do not account for the role of terrestrial vegetation in the carbon cycle variability [Alessandri

D'Andrea, Fabio

317

Combining MSS and AVHRR imagery to assess vegetation biomass and dynamics in an arid pastoral ecosystem, Turkana District, Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landsat multi-spectral scanner (MSS) imagery was used to develop a vegetation type-biomass map of the 84,000 Km/sup 2/ Turkana District, Kenya. NOAA satellite advanced very high resolution radiometry (AVHRR) imagery was overlaid on the MSS map to trace the seasonal and annual dynamics of vegetation communities used by Turkana pastoral nomads, 1981-1984. Four regions (sub-sectional territories) were compared with respect to peak herbaceous biomass, woody canopy cover, and seasonal fluxes in total green biomass. Results demonstrated major variations among regions and between wet and dry season ranges within regions. Pastoral land use patterns appear to minimize effects of seasonal vegetation fluxes on livestock herds.

Ellis, J.E.; Swift, D.M.; Hart, T.C.; Dick, O.B.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetable Processing/Cold Storage Facilities. Proceedings ofControl System in a Food Cold Storage Facility. Case Studyare discussed below. Cold storage involves the storage of

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, Vincent P. (Los Alamos, NM); Barron, Michael H. (Los Alamos, NM); Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, V.P.; Barron, M.H.; Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Synthesis, droplet combustion, and sooting characteristics of biodiesel produced from waste vegetable oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In light of the potential of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME, i.e. biodiesel) as a renewable energy source, an innovative acid catalyzed process was developed for the synthesis of biodiesel from waste vegetable oils. The synthesized biodiesels were analytically characterized for their major components, molar fraction and molecular weight of each component, the average molecular weight, and the heat of combustion. Their droplet combustion characteristics in terms of the burning rate, flame size, and sooting tendency were subsequently determined in a high-temperature, freely-falling droplet apparatus. Results show that the biodiesel droplet has higher burning rate, and that biodiesel in general has a lower propensity to soot because its molecular oxygen content promotes the oxidation of the soot precursors.

Li, T. X.; Zhu, D. L.; Akafuah, N.; Saito, K.; Law, C. K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Representing the effects of alpine grassland vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal dynamics by ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hourly time steps, soil surface temperature is calculated by iteratively solving the energy balanceRepresenting the effects of alpine grassland vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal] Soil surface temperature is a critical boundary condition for the simulation of soil temperature

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

323

int. j. remote sensing, 2002, vol. 23, no. 21, 47614776 A multivariate approach to vegetation mapping of Manitoba's Hudson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12­14 June 2000. International Journal of Remote Sensing ISSN 0143-1161 print/ISSN 1366-5901 onlineint. j. remote sensing, 2002, vol. 23, no. 21, 4761­4776 A multivariate approach to vegetation the likelihood of errors in classi cation caused by overlap between classes. 1. Introduction Remotely sensed data

Kenkel, Norm

324

Comparison of Georgia and US Per Capita Fruit, Vegetable, Livestock, and Poultry Consumption, 2011 Estimated 2011 Georgia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Georgia and US Per Capita Fruit, Vegetable, Livestock, and Poultry Consumption, 2011 Capita) Data System 4 Value= Per capita consumption (column 3) multiplied by Georgia Population (9 Estimated 2011 Georgia Population (9,687,653)1 2011 Farm Gate Production (lbs)2 2010 Per Capita US

Scott, Robert A.

325

Elephant seasonal vegetation preferences across dry and wet savannas Scott R. Loarie a,*, Rudi J. van Aarde b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elephant seasonal vegetation preferences across dry and wet savannas Scott R. Loarie a,*, Rudi J Accepted 8 August 2009 Available online 6 October 2009 Keywords: African elephants Conservation ecology Land use change Habitat selection a b s t r a c t As African savanna elephants (Loxodonta africana

Pretoria, University of

326

VEGETATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF PRONGHORN BED SITES IN WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, SOUTH DAKOTA --Much of the previous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

49 NOTES VEGETATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF PRONGHORN BED SITES IN WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, SOUTH DAKOTA mortality (Beale 1978, Barrett 1984, Gregg et al. 2001) and social behavior (Kitchen 1974, Autenrieth. The pronghorn was reintroduced into Wind Cave National Park, South Dakota, in 1914 and thus, has been maintained

327

Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5&  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are required forest areas for Vietnam Erosion Risk Map Cover types C1 Natural Forests >1.7 Plantation forest.2 (ESRI, 2008), to generate a map of required protective forest area for Vietnam. (3) (4) (5Results Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5& ∑ Map

328

-Improved estimates of incident radiation and heat load -751 Journal of Vegetation Science 18: 751-754, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as predictors. Heat load was calculated as a 45 degree rotation of the PDIR response surface. Results- Improved estimates of incident radiation and heat load - 751 Journal of Vegetation Science 18 regression (NPMR) improve estimates of potential direct incident radia- tion (PDIR) and heat load based

McCune, Bruce

329

Vegetation and climate dynamics during the early Middle Miocene from Lake Sinj (Dinaride Lake System, SE Croatia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System, SE Croatia) Gonzalo Jiménez-Moreno a, , Oleg Mandic b , Mathias Harzhauser b , Davor Paveli c of Zagreb, Pierottijeva 6, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia A B S T R A C TA R T I C L E I N F O Article history 2008 Keywords: pollen vegetation climate change Miocene Croatia Pollen data from sediments from

Jiménez-Moreno, Gonzalo

330

Exploring the relationships between vegetation measurements and temperature in residential areas by integrating LIDAR and remotely sensed imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at higher resolutions is much more difficult to obtain. This has allowed researchers to study urban heat island dynamics at a micro-scale. However, this study suggests that a vegetation index alone might not be the best surrogate variable for providing...

Clemonds, Matthew A

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

-RECORDING RELATIVE WATER TABLE DEPTH USING PVC TAPE DISCOLOURATION -21 Applied Vegetation Science 8: 21-26, 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- RECORDING RELATIVE WATER TABLE DEPTH USING PVC TAPE DISCOLOURATION - 21 Applied Vegetation during restoration. The PVC tape discolouration method enables spatially and temporally extensive studies and the same variables indicated by discolouration of PVC tape attached to green bamboo stakes installed

Navr√°tilov√°, Jana

332

The influence of increasing population size and vegetation productivity on elephant distribution in the Kruger National Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-cell occupancy increased with population size, while grid-cell-specific density became less variable. In additionThe influence of increasing population size and vegetation productivity on elephant distribution Research Unit, Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa

Pretoria, University of

333

Integrating multi-temporal spectral and structural information to map wetland vegetation in a lower Connecticut River tidal marsh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Coastal wetlands Image classification LiDAR Phragmites australis QuickBird Spectroradiometer Vegetation variability of the dominant marsh plant species, Spartina patens, Phragmites australis and Typha spp-native genotype of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud (common reed) in Connecticut marshes (Barrett

Royer, Dana

334

Long-term evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil-Vegetation Scheme's frozen ground/permafrost component using observations at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-term evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil-Vegetation Scheme's frozen ground/permafrost component of the hydro-thermodynamic soil-vegetation scheme (HTSVS) was evaluated by means of permafrost computational time. Citation: Mo¨lders, N., and V. E. Romanovsky (2006), Long-term evaluation of the Hydro

Moelders, Nicole

335

Fruits & Veggies On the Go! You know that eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is good for you, but  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fruits & Veggies On the Go! You know that eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is good for you, but you're constantly on the go. See how you can fit fruits and veggies into your everyday world. Fruits and vegetables can be a part of a balanced diet any- time, anywhere. Fruits and veggies

Burke, Peter

336

H. Nguyen-Ngoc, C. Tran-Minh / Materials Science and Engineering C 27 (2007) 607-611 Sol-gel process for vegetal-cells encapsulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation of by-products that is detrimental to Chlorella vulgaris cells. The influence of several factors entrapment, vegetal cells, Chlorella vulgaris, fluorescence detection by aqueous precursors [7-8]. In this work, micro-algae cells of Chlorella vulgaris as an example of vegetal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

337

34 Jong-Seok Lee : Utilizing Concept of Vegetation Freeboard Equivalence in River Restoration International Journal of Contents, Vol.8, No.3, Sep 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Vegetation Freeboard Equivalence (VFE); River Restoration; Stream Rehabilitation; Levee Design; Flood Control34 Jong-Seok Lee : Utilizing Concept of Vegetation Freeboard Equivalence in River Restoration in River Restoration Jong-Seok Lee* Department of Civil Engineering Hanbat National University, Daejeon 301

Julien, Pierre Y.

338

Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMVAR GPPCAL-CMCD CNT-CMCD ORC-STD FM-BF-NOSNAG AverageEC obs. period CMCD HHCD for only EC obs. period CMCD ORC-STD ORC-FM-NOSNAG Standard ORCHIDEE with fire and without

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to Assess Vegetative Cover and Identify Biotic Resources in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems: Preliminary Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with the University of Idaho, is evaluating novel approaches for using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quicker and safer method for monitoring biotic resources. Evaluating vegetative cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. In assessing vegetative cover, methods that improve accuracy and cost efficiency could revolutionize how biotic resources are monitored on western federal lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species, some of which are important indicator species (e.g., sage grouse). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluation of these ecosystems. In this project, two types of UAV platforms (fixed wing and helicopter) were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate total percent cover, (2) estimate percent cover for six different types of vegetation, and (3) locate sage grouse based on representative decoys. The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetative cover. A software program called SamplePoint developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service was used to evaluate the imagery for percent cover for the six vegetation types (bare ground, litter, shrubs, dead shrubs, grasses, and forbs). Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy.

Robert P. Breckenridge

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Cellular Automata Modelling of Seagrass in the Orbetello Lagoon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the submerged vegetation, with a critical coexistence between macroalgae and macrophytes, is the key management, is located along Italy's west coast. It consists of two shallow coastal reservoirs with a combined surface model for the water Paper presented at the iEMSs 2004 International Congress: "Complexity and Integrated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

Waugh, W.J.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Current vegetation characteristics within tree-kill zones of F- and H-Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetation of two wetland areas previously adversely affected by outcropping groundwater was characterized to evaluate the type and extent of revegetation. When the damage first became evident in the late 1970s and early 1980s the areas were examined and described to try to establish the cause of the extensive tree mortality. The F- and H-Area seepage basins above the wetland areas received waste products from the separation areas beginning in 1955. The operation, estimated loading, and current status of the basins were summarized by Killian et al. Analysis of soil and water at the affected seeplines where the tree-kill was occurring confirmed that the surface water was strongly influenced by constituents of the F- and H-Area seepage basins. While no single cause of the forest mortality was defined, alterations in the hydrology and siltation patterns, pH changes, increased conductivity, and increased levels of sodium, nitrogen compounds, and aluminum were believed to be interacting to cause the mortality.

Nelson, E.A.; Irwin, J.E.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Final report on LDRD project : biodiesel production from vegetable oils using slit-channel reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents work done for a late-start LDRD project, which was carried out during the last quarter of FY07. The objective of this project was to experimentally explore the feasibility of converting vegetable (e.g., soybean) oils to biodiesel by employing slit-channel reactors and solid catalysts. We first designed and fabricated several slit-channel reactors with varying channel depths, and employed them to investigate the improved performance of slit-channel reactors over traditional batch reactors using a NaOH liquid catalyst. We then evaluated the effectiveness of several solid catalysts, including CaO, ZnO, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, calcium gluconate, and heteropolyacid or HPA (Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}), for catalyzing the soybean oil-to-biodiesel transesterification reaction. We found that the slit-channel reactor performance improves as channel depth decreases, as expected; and the conversion efficiency of a slit-channel reactor is significantly higher when its channel is very shallow. We further confirmed CaO as having the highest catalytic activity among the solid catalysts tested, and we demonstrated for the first time calcium gluconate as a promising solid catalyst for converting soybean oil to biodiesel, based on our preliminary batch-mode conversion experiments.

Kalu, E. Eric (FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL); Chen, Ken Shuang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Mapping of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Using Autonomous Underwater Vehicles in Nearshore Regions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) equipped with sidescan sonar was investigated for determining the boundaries of nearshore submerged aquatic vegetation beds, specifically eelgrass (Zostera marina). Shifts in eelgrass bed morphology, size, and distribution are used as indicators in monitoring programs to measure the impacts of coastal development and environmental stressors on eelgrass and to establish the efficacy of restoration programs. However, many monitoring programs necessarily extend over multiple-year time periods. Therefore, techniques that are easily reproducible, accurate, and cost-effective can demonstrate distinct advantages over some of the more traditional and labor-intensive methods, such as diver assessments and transects of shoot counts. Remote monitoring of eelgrass beds using satellite and aerial imagery has been demonstrated with moderate success, but requires groundtruthing, which can be costly and which frequently cannot delineate the deeper boundaries of eelgrass beds. One possible means for low-cost mapping is the use of AUVs equipped with acoustic imaging hardware. AUVs provide an ideal platform, because they can be deployed by small teams (two people), they are highly maneuverable, they can cover large areas over a relatively short time period (3knot operational speed), and they are equipped with multiple oceanographic instruments for correlated data collection. This paper describes the use of sidescan-equipped AUV technology deployed over multiple time periods at the same location where imagery of eelgrass beds was obtained and analyzed for comparative purposes.

Jones, Mark E.; Miller, Lee M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Ewert, Daniel W.

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

345

Modeling the Micro Scale | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0StatementsMixingAssessing8 May 2005Modeling

346

Flue gas desulfurization sludge: establishment of vegetation on ponded and soil-applied waste. Final report January 1977-September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives results of research to identify and evaluate forms of vegetation and methods of their establishment for reclaiming retired flue gas desulfurization sludge ponds. Also studied were the soil liming value of limestone scrubber sludge (LSS) and plant uptake and percolation losses of some chemical nutrients in the sludge. Several vegetation schemes were evaluated between 1977 and 1982 for covering and stabilizing LSS at Colbert Steam Plant, Cherokee, AL, and Shawnee Steam Plant, Paducah, KY. Eleven tree and 10 grass or legume species were tested for adaptability and survival when planted directly in LSS or in LSS amended with soil, municipal sewage sludge, or standard potting mix. Other studies indicated that LSS apparently has sufficient unreacted limestone to be a satisfactory soil liming agent.

Giordano, P.M.; Mays, D.A.; Soileau, J.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Baseline concentrations of radionuclides and heavy metals in soils and vegetation around the DARHT facility: Construction phase (1996)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy`s Mitigation Action Plan for the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), baseline concentrations of radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, total U), and heavy metals (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se and Tl) in soil, sediment, and vegetation (overstory and understory) around the DARHT facility during the construction phase in 1996 were determined. Also, U and Be concentrations in soil samples collected in 1993 from within the proposed DARHT facility area are reported. Most radionuclides in soils, sediments, and vegetation were within current background and/or long-term regional statistical reference levels.

Fresquez, P.R.; Haagenstad, H.T.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Production of Biodiesel from Vegetable Oil Using CaO Catalyst & Analysis of Its Performance in Four Stroke Diesel Engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract- The production of biodiesel from vegetable oils stands as a new versatile method of energy generation in the present scenario. Biodiesel is obtained by the transesterification of long chain fatty acids in presence of catalysts. Transesterification is an attractive and widely accepted technique. The purpose of the transesterification process is to lower the viscosity of the oil. The most important variables affecting methyl ester yield during the transesterification reaction are the molar ratio of alcohol to vegetable oil, reaction temperature, catalyst amount and time. Biodiesel is renewable, biodegradable, non-toxic, and essentially free of sulfur and aromatics. It can be used in diesel engines by blending with conventional diesel in various proportions. Biodiesel seems to be a realistic fuel for future. It has become more attractive recently because of its environmental benefits. This paper discuses the production of biodiesel from

Sruthi Gopal; Sajitha C. M; Uma Krishnakumar

349

EA-1982: Parker-Davis Transmission System Routine Operation and Maintenance Project and Proposed Integrated Vegetation Management Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed continuation of operations and maintenance activities and implementation of a vegetation management program on Westernís Parker-Davis Transmission System. These actions would occur on existing transmission line and access road rights-of-way, and at substations and maintenance facilities associated with the transmission system.

350

Applicability of the ďGallet equationĒ to the vegetation clearances of NERC Reliability Standard FAC-003-2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NERC has proposed a standard to use to specify clearances between vegetation and power lines. The purpose of the rule is to reduce the probability of flashover to a calculably low level. This report was commissioned by FERCís Office of Electrical Reliability. The scope of the study was analysis of the mathematics and documentation of the technical justification behind the application of the Gallet equation and the assumptions used in the technical reference paper

Kirkham, Harold

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of Iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation, 1945--1947: Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project whose goal is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The report describes in detail the reconstructed conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation which was collected from the beginning of October 1945 through the end of December 1947.

Mart, E.I.; Denham, D.H.; Thiede, M.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Radionuclide and heavy metal concentrations in soil, vegetation, and fish collected around and within Tsicoma Lake in Santa Clara Canyon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radionuclide ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, total U) and heavy metal (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Tl) contents were determined in soil, vegetation (overstory and understory), and fish (rainbow trout) collected around and within Tsicoma Lake in Santa Clara Canyon in 1995. All heavy metal and most radionuclide contents around or within the lake, except for U in soil, vegetation, and fish, were within or just above upper limit background. Detectable levels (where the analytical result was greater than two times counting uncertainty) of U in soils, vegetation, and fish were found in slightly higher concentrations than in background samples. Overall, however, maximum total committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE)(95% confidence level)--based on consumption of 46 lb of fish--from Tsicoma Lake (0.066 mrem/y) was within the maximum total CEDE from the ingestion of fish from the Mescalero National Fish Hatchery (background)(0.113 mrem/y).

Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

VEGETATION MEDIATED THE IMPACTS OF POSTGLACIAL CLIMATIC CHANGE ON FIRE REGIMES IN THE SOUTHCENTRAL BROOKS RANGE, ALASKA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine direct and indirect impacts of millennial-scale climatic change on fire regimes in the southcentral Brooks Range, Alaska, using four lake-sediment records and existing paleoclimate interpretations. New techniques are introduced to identify charcoal peaks semi-objectively and detect statistical differences in fire regimes. Peaks in charcoal accumulation rates (CHARs) provide estimates of fire return intervals (FRIs) which are compared between vegetation zones described by fossil pollen and stomata. Climatic warming from ca 15-9 ka BP (calendar years before CE 1950) coincides with shifts in vegetation from herb tundra to shrub tundra to deciduous woodlands, all novel species assemblages relative to modern vegetation. Two sites cover this period and show increased CHARs and decreased FRIs with the transition from herb to shrub tundra ca 13.3-14.3 ka BP. Short FRIs in the Betula-dominated shrub tundra (mean [m] FRI 144 yr; 95% CI 119-170) primarily reflect the effects of flammable, continuous fuels on the fire regime. FRIs increased significantly with the transition to Populus-dominated deciduous woodlands ca 10.5 ka BP (mFRI 251 yr [158-352]), despite evidence of warmer- and drier-than-present summers. We attribute reduced fire activity under these conditions to low flammability of deciduous fuels. Three sites record the mid to late Holocene, when cooler and moister conditions allowed Picea glauca forest-tundra and P. mariana boreal forests to establish ca 8 and 5.5 ka BP. Forest-tundra FRIs did not differ significantly from the previous period (mFRIs range from 131-238 yr), but FRIs decreased with the transition to boreal forest (mFRI 145 yr [129-163]). Overall, fire-regime shifts in the study area showed greater correspondence with vegetation characteristics than with inferred climate, and we conclude that vegetation mediated the impacts of millennial-scale climatic change on fire regimes by modifying landscape flammability. Our findings emphasize the importance of biological-physical feedbacks in determining the response of arctic and subarctic ecosystems to past, and by inference, future climatic change.

Higuera, P E; Brubaker, L B; Anderson, P M; Hu, F S; Brown, T A

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

355

The effects of nutrition education and gardening on attitudes, preferences and knowledge of 2nd-5th graders regarding fruits and vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in minority populations. Past studies have reported that a horticulture-based curriculum, including gardening, can improve children's attitudes toward eating fruits and vegetables. To investigate whether children of a minority population can benefit from...

Nolan, Geralyn A.

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

356

Metal and arsenic impacts to soils, vegetation communities and wildlife habitat in southwest Montana uplands contaminated by smelter emissions. 1: Field evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrations of arsenic and metals in soils surrounding a smelter in southwest Montana were correlated with vegetative community structure and composition and wildlife habitat quality. Soils in the uplands surrounding the smelter were highly enriched with arsenic and metals. Concentrations of these analytes decreased with distance from the smelter and with soil depth, suggesting that the smelter is the source of the enrichment. In enriched areas, marked modifications to the native vegetation community structure and composition were observed. These included replacement of evergreen forest with bare unvegetated ground; species impoverishment and increased dominance by weed species in grasslands; and reductions in the vertical complexity of the habitat. Significant negative correlations existed between soil arsenic and metals concentrations and the extent of vegetative cover and the vertical diversity of plant communities. Loss of vegetative cover in the affected areas has been accompanied by reductions in their capacity to support indigenous wildlife populations.

Galbraith, H.; LeJeune, K.; Lipton, J. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Spatial variations in soil and plant delta 13 C and delta 15 N values in a subtropical savanna: implications for vegetation change and nutrient dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lower-lying portions of the landscape are dominated by closed-canopy woodlands. I used soil ?13C in conjunction with aerial photography and geostatistics to quantify landscape-scale vegetation dynamics in uplands of this savanna parkland. Spatial...

Bai, E

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Please cite as: Kemp, W.M., W.R. Boynton and A.J. Hermann, 1995. Ecosystem modeling and energy analysis of submerged  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Please cite as: Kemp, W.M., W.R. Boynton and A.J. Hermann, 1995. Ecosystem modeling and energy MODELING A N D ENERGY ANALYSIS OF SUBMERGED AQUATIC VEGETATION IN CHESAPEAI, and benthic microalgae). This model, which has been calibrated and venfied against independent data sets

Boynton, Walter R.

359

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Regional climate effects of irrigation and urbanization in thewestern united states: a model intercomparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the western United States, more than 30,500 square miles has been converted to irrigated agriculture and urban areas. This study compares the climate responses of four regional climate models (RCMs) to these past land-use changes. The RCMs used two contrasting land cover distributions: potential natural vegetation, and modern land cover that includes agriculture and urban areas. Three of the RCMs represented irrigation by supplementing soil moisture, producing large decreases in August mean (-2.5 F to -5.6 F) and maximum (-5.2 F to -10.1 F) 2-meter temperatures where natural vegetation was converted to irrigated agriculture. Conversion to irrigated agriculture also resulted in large increases in relative humidity (9 percent 36 percent absolute change). Only one of the RCMs produced increases in summer minimum temperature. Converting natural vegetation to urban land cover produced modest but discernable climate effects in all models, with the magnitude of the effects dependent upon the preexisting vegetation type. Overall, the RCM results indicate that land use change impacts are most pronounced during the summer months, when surface heating is strongest and differences in surface moisture between irrigated land and natural vegetation are largest. The irrigation effect on summer maximum temperatures is comparable in magnitude (but opposite in sign) to predicted future temperature change due to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations.

Snyder, M.A.; Kueppers, L.M.; Sloan, L.C.; Cavan, D.C.; Jin, J.; Kanamaru, H.; Miller, N.L.; Tyree, M.; Du, H.; Weare, B.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Vegetation and wildfire controls on sediment yield in bedrock Roman A. DiBiase1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sensitive to climate, tectonics, and wildfire. Predicting landscape response to these pertur- bations demands a quantitative understanding of erosion processes. However, existing models for hillslope sediment scale, our measurements match records of postfire sediment yield from nearby retention basins. Contrary

DiBiase, Roman A.

362

Remote sensing data assimilation for a prognostic phenology model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predicting the global carbon and water cycle requires a realistic representation of vegetation phenology in climate models. However most prognostic phenology models are not yet suited for global applications, and diagnostic satellite data can be uncertain and lack predictive power. We present a framework for data assimilation of Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) and Leaf Area Index (LAI) from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to constrain empirical temperature, light, moisture and structural vegetation parameters of a prognostic phenology model. We find that data assimilation better constrains structural vegetation parameters than climate control parameters. Improvements are largest for drought-deciduous ecosystems where correlation of predicted versus satellite-observed FPAR and LAI increases from negative to 0.7-0.8. Data assimilation effectively overcomes the cloud- and aerosol-related deficiencies of satellite data sets in tropical areas. Validation with a 49-year-long phenology data set reveals that the temperature-driven start of season (SOS) is light limited in warm years. The model has substantial skill (R = 0.73) to reproduce SOS inter-annual and decadal variability. Predicted SOS shows a higher inter-annual variability with a negative bias of 5-20 days compared to species-level SOS. It is however accurate to within 1-2 days compared to SOS derived from net ecosystem exchange (NEE) measurements at a FLUXNET tower. The model only has weak skill to predict end of season (EOS). Use of remote sensing data assimilation for phenology model development is encouraged but validation should be extended with phenology data sets covering mediterranean, tropical and arctic ecosystems.

Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Stockli, Reto [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Radionuclide Concentrations in soils an Vegetation at Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Area G During 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil samples were collected at 15 locations and unwashed overstory and understory vegetation samples were collected at nine locations within and around the perimeter of Area G, the primary disposal facility for low-level radioactive solid waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These samples were analyzed for {sup 3}H, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 238}U. Soil samples collected at Area G contained detectable concentrations of 3H (27%), {sup 239,240}Pu (60%), {sup 238}Pu (40%), and {sup 241}Am (47%) above regional statistical reference levels (RSRLs). In contrast, the levels of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and U in all of the soil samples at Area G were either nondetectable or within RSRLs. The highest levels of {sup 3}H in soils were detected in the southwestern portion of Area G near the {sup 3}H shafts, whereas the highest concentrations of the Pu isotopes were detected in the northern and northeastern portions. All concentrations of {sup 3}H and Pu in soils, however, were far below LANL screening action levels. As for vegetation, most radionuclides in/on plants were either nondetectable or within RSRLs. The exceptions were {sup 3}H in overstory and some understory vegetation, particularly in the southwestern portion of Area G, which correlated very well with the soils data in that area. Also, there was some foliar contamination from {sup 241}Am and Pu isotopes in/on a few plant samples--the highest concentrations occurring in the northern section of Area G.

P.R. Fresquez; E.A. Lopez

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Effects of various uranium leaching procedures on soil: Short-term vegetation growth and physiology. Progress report, April 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant volumes of soil containing elevated levels of uranium exist in the eastern United States. The contamination resulted from the development of the nuclear industry in the United States requiring a large variety of uranium products. The contaminated soil poses a collection and disposal problem of a magnitude that justifies the development of decontamination methods. Consequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program to address the problem. The fundamental goal of the USID task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than what can be done using current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics and without generating waste that is difficult to manage and/or dispose of. However, procedures developed for removing uranium from contaminated soil have involved harsh chemical treatments that affect the physicochemical properties of the soil. The questions are (1) are the changes in soil properties severe enough to destroy the soil`s capacity to support and sustain vegetation growth and survival? and (2) what amendments might be made to the leached soil to return it to a reasonable vegetation production capacity? This study examines the vegetation-support capacity of soil that had been chemically leached to remove uranium. The approach is to conduct short-term germination and phytotoxicity tests for evaluating soils after they are subjected to various leaching procedures followed by longer term pot studies on successfully leached soils that show the greatest capacity to support plant growth. This report details the results from germination and short-term phytotoxicity testing of soils that underwent a variety of leaching procedures at the bench scale at ORNL and at the pilot plant at Fernald.

Edwards, N.T.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Effects of roller-chopping and shredding, a herbicide, and prescribed burning on vegetation of the Rio Grande Plain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and soils. Vegetation Ri story of' land use. NETj. . ODS . R I Si ji, I S I? r e-S Li, dy Treatment s . 1'joody Soecies Composition P:jant density. Stem density, lier. "baceous Vege Lation. Basal cover Page 13 75 '? 5 ?'7 77 Species... that, the general area has an average yearly ra'r&fa11 of' about 50 inches (l'ig. 1). This verage is not truly indicative of the rainfall because of the extreme annua7 fluctuations. Records indic te that the variation hes 'been from a low of 9. r...

Holtz, Stephen Theodore

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Vegetational analyses and the determination of range condition classes on selected areas of the Welder Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prai- xies was x'sported, as early as half a century ago by 0offey (1909). He desoribed the vegetation of the Victoria clay series as native grassland that had been invaded by run. "4ng mesquite, He attributed the invasion of the mesquite... grasses. Boils In a reconnaissance soil survey, Coffey (1909) classified the soils of the genex'al area containing the Welder Wildlife Hefuge as part of. the Victoria series. Tue black soils that comprise the Victoxia series were formed from a deposit...

Box, Thadis W

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A vegetational analysis of an East Texas bottomland hardwood area with special emphasis on wood duck habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and was an example of good wood duck habitat. It consisted of a series of four sloughs in the southeastern portion of the Area, 40 m east of the Angelina River (Fig. 4). This area of sloughs and the intervening land was 3. 41 ha. Slough B was found within...A VEGETATIONAL ANALYSIS OF AN EAST TEXAS BOTTOMLAND HARDWOOD AREA WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON WOOD DUCK HABITAT A Thesis by WILLIAM IRL MORRILL Sumitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

Morrill, William Irl

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

The Impact of Observed Vegetation Changes on LandAtmosphere Feedbacks During Drought  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Desalination and Reuse Centre, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi conditions of the advanced research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model to assess the influence. 2010). Some changes in the climate and extreme weather events in Australia have been attributed

Evans, Jason

369

Evaluation of HadGEM2 model Hadley Centre technical note 74  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of HadGEM2 model Hadley Centre technical note 74 W.J. Collins, N. Bellouin, M. Doutriaux for attention in HadGEM2. HadGEM2 has substantially improved mean SSTs and wind stress and improved tropical SST. The TRIFFID vegetation scheme had been used in a configuration from a previous generation of Hadley Centre

Reichler, Thomas

370

UNCORRECTED 2 Models of natural and human dynamics in forest landscapes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

protected areas, though they differ in the specifics of vegetation and land 23 use. In the Texas sitesUNCORRECTED PROOF 1 2 Models of natural and human dynamics in forest landscapes: 3 Cross natural and human systems across sites and cultures through a process of simplification and 17 abstraction

Monticino, Michael

371

A model study of the effects of climatic precipitation changes on ground temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The cumulative effect of these processes governs the heat flux at the ground surface and couples surface air of a prairie region in the southern Great Plains of North America and force the model with meteorological data heat within the soil, vegetation, and air; chemical weathering; and biological processes

Smerdon, Jason E.

372

Basic model Basic model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early days Basic model Literature Classical literature Bayes pre-MCMC Bayes post-MCMC Basic model systems via latent factors Hedibert Freitas Lopes Booth School of Business University of Chicago Col / 66 #12;Early days Basic model Literature Classical literature Bayes pre-MCMC Bayes post-MCMC Basic

Liu, I-Shih

373

Considering river structure and stability in the light of evolution: feedbacks between riparian vegetation and hydrogeomorphology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

work on 263 continental surfaces. This energy then was also transferred through trophic networks 264 permitting geomorphic work to be accomplished by different taxa and in different ways 265 (Naylor et al., 2002). 266 The processes leading to soil... -level functioning on the basis of matter and energy fluxes. Specific 63 conceptual models related to this framework include the river continuum (Vannote et al., 64 1980), nutrient spiraling (Newbold et al., 1982), flood pulse (Junk et al., 1989), patch 65...

Corenblit, Dov; Davies, Neil S.; Steiger, Johannes; Gibling, Martin R.; Bornette, Gudrun

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

374

Radionuclide Concentrations in Terrestrial Vegetation and Soil Samples On and Around the Hanford Site, 1971 Through 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring is conducted on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to comply with DOE Orders and federal and state regulations. Major objectives of the monitoring are to characterize contaminant levels in the environment and to determine site contributions to the contaminant inventory. This report focuses on surface soil and perennial vegetation samples collected between 1971 and 2008 as part of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Surface Environmental Surveillance Project performed under contract to DOE. Areas sampled under this program are located on the Hanford Site but outside facility boundaries and on public lands surrounding the Hanford Site. Additional samples were collected during the past 8 years under DOE projects that evaluated parcels of land for radiological release. These data were included because the same sampling methodology and analytical laboratory were used for the projects. The spatial and temporal trends of six radionuclides collected over a 38-year period were evaluated. The radionuclides----cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239/240, and uranium (reported either as uranium-238 or total uranium)----were selected because they persist in the environment and are still being monitored routinely and reported in Hanford Site environmental reports. All these radionuclides were associated with plutonium production and waste management of activities occurring on the site. Other sources include fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, which ended in 1980, and the Chernobyl explosion in 1986. Uranium is also a natural component of the soil. This assessment of soil and vegetation data provides important information on the distribution of radionuclides in areas adjacent to industrial areas, established perimeter locations and buffer areas, and more offsite nearby and distant locations. The concentrations reflect a tendency for detection of some radionuclides close to where they were utilized onsite, but as one moves to unindustrialized areas on the site, surrounding buffer areas and perimeter location into the more distant sites, concentrations of these radionuclides approach background and cannot be distinguished from fallout activity. More importantly, concentrations in soil and vegetation samples did not exceed environmental benchmark concentrations, and associated exposure to human and ecological receptors were well below levels that are demonstratively hazardous to human health and the environment.

Simmons, Mary Ann; Poston, Ted M.; Fritz, Brad G.; Bisping, Lynn E.

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

A Fully Biobased Epoxy Resin from Vegetable Oils: From the Synthesis of the Precursors by Thiol-ene Reaction to the Study of the Final Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Fully Biobased Epoxy Resin from Vegetable Oils: From the Synthesis of the Precursors by Thiol agent for bio-based epoxy resin. The thermal crosslinking reaction between AGSO and epoxi- dized linseed and thermal behav- iors. But, the substitution of bis-phenol A based epoxy resins by materials coming from

Boyer, Edmond

376

EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOEís Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Westernís Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona.

377

An Analysis of Self-similarity, Momentum Conservation and Energy Transport for an Axisymmetric Turbulent Jet through a Staggered Array of Rigid Emergent Vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficient c is 85 +/- 5, and the halfwidth spreading rate eta_(1/2) is 0:093 +/- 0:003. Upon the introduction of vegetation, from partially obstructed to fully obstructed, B falls from 5:1+/- 0:2 to 4:2 +/- 0:2 and finally 3:7 +/-0:1 for the fully obstructed...

Allen, Jon Scott

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

378

EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOEís Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Westernís proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska.

379

Hydrologic and Vegetation Effects on Water Column Phosphorus in Wetland Mesocosms J. R. White,* K. R. Reddy, and J. Majer-Newman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrologic and Vegetation Effects on Water Column Phosphorus in Wetland Mesocosms J. R. White,* K. The restoration plan for the Everglades includes construction of large stormwater treatment areas (STAs) decreased by 49% for the SAV treatments compared with 41% for the EAV treatments, irrespective of hydrology

Florida, University of

380

Queuing models System dynamics models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

models Value chain models Business Model / Organizational Perspective Process Perspective Information#12;#12;#12;#12;Queuing models System dynamics models #12;#12;#12;#12;Blueprint or touchpoint

Glushko, Robert J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

CHANGES IN 137 CS CONCENTRATIONS IN SOIL AND VEGETATION ON THE FLOODPLAIN OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER OVER A 30 YEAR PERIOD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

{sup 137}Cs released during 1954-1974 from nuclear production reactors on the Savannah River Site, a US Department of Energy nuclear materials production site in South Carolina, contaminated a portion of the Savannah River floodplain known as Creek Plantation. {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations have been measured in Creek Plantation since 1974 making it possible to calculate effective half-lives for {sup 137}Cs in soil and vegetation and assess the spatial distribution of contaminants on the floodplain. Activity concentrations in soil and vegetation were higher near the center of the floodplain than near the edges as a result of frequent inundation coupled with the presence of low areas that trapped contaminated sediments. {sup 137}Cs activity was highest near the soil surface, but depth related differences diminished with time as a likely result of downward diffusion or leaching. Activity concentrations in vegetation were significantly related to concentrations in soil. The plant to soil concentration ratio (dry weight) averaged 0.49 and exhibited a slight but significant tendency to decrease with time. The effective half-lives for {sup 137}Cs in shallow (0-7.6 cm) soil and in vegetation were 14.9 (95% CI = 12.5-17.3) years and 11.6 (95% CI = 9.1-14.1) years, respectively, and rates of {sup 137}Cs removal from shallow soil and vegetation did not differ significantly among sampling locations. Potential health risks on the Creek Plantation floodplain have declined more rapidly than expected on the basis of radioactive decay alone because of the relatively short effective half-life of {sup 137}Cs.

Paller, M.; Jannik, T.; Fledderman, P.

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

382

Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A framework for benchmarking land models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine dataĖmodel mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models to improve their prediction performance skills.

Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, J.; Abramowitz, G.; Bacour, C.; Blyth, E.; Carvalhais, N.; Ciais, Philippe; Dalmonech, D.; Fisher, J.B.; Fisher, R.; Friedlingstein, P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jones, C.; Koven, C.; Lawrence, David M.; Li, D.J.; Mahecha, M.; Niu, S.L.; Norby, Richard J.; Piao, S.L.; Qi, X.; Peylin, P.; Prentice, I.C.; Riley, William; Reichstein, M.; Schwalm, C.; Wang, Y.; Xia, J. Y.; Zaehle, S.; Zhou, X. H.

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

384

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

385

Adaptation to metal-contaminated soils in populations of the moss, Ceratodon purpureus: Vegetative growth and reproductive expression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many observations suggest that morphological evolution occurs slowly in bryophytes, and this has been suggested to reflect low genetic diversity within species. Isozyme studies, however, stand in apparent contrast and have shown that bryophytes can contain high levels of genetic variability within and among populations. In light of this conflict, we tested the potential of the moss, Ceratodon purpureus, to undergo adaptive change (i.e., ecotypic differentiation) in response to soils that have been contaminated with high levels of metals for 90 years by measuring gametophytic growth and reproductive expression under experimental conditions. Variation in protonemal growth in sterile culture indicates that plants from one population growing on contaminated soil near a smelter are significantly more tolerant of zinc, cadmium, and lead than plants from uncontaminated sites. Results from a common garden experiment, in which plants were grown on soil from the smelter site, indicate that plants from near the smelter are significantly more tolerant of contaminated soils than plants from uncontaminated sites for vegetative growth. The same experiment suggests that plants from the smelter site are also more tolerant in terms of gametangial production (although we could not test this statistically). Our results demonstrate that C. purpureus has been able to undergo relatively rapid evolution in response to strong selective pressures. 29 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Jules, E.S.; Shaw, A.J. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of Iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation, 1945--1947: Draft. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project whose goal is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The report describes in detail the reconstructed conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation which was collected from the beginning of October 1945 through the end of December 1947.

Mart, E.I.; Denham, D.H.; Thiede, M.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Influence of application methods and varying rates of uniconazol on the vegetative and reproductive response of pecan trees, Carya illinoensis (Wang) K. Koch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFLUENCE OF APPLICATION METHODS AND VARYING RATES OF UNICONAZOL ON THE VEGETATIVE AND REPRODUCTIVE RESPONSE OF PECAN ~, Carye illinoertsis (Wang) K Koch A Thesis CHARLES JORDAN GRAHAM Submitted to the OIIice of Graduate Studies of Texas A..., Carya illinoensis (Wang) K. Koch A Thesis CHARLES JORDAN GRAHAM Approved as to style and content by: J. enton Storey (Chairman of Committee) eorge y McEachern (Member) anklin ong (Member) David Wm. Reed (Head of Department) May 1990 ABSTRACT...

Graham, Charles Jordan

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 Ė Air and Water Volume 2 Ė Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Soils, Resilience and State-and-Transition Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into coppice dunes mesquite encroachment reduction in grassland vegetation sand deposition over fine

390

sexual reproduction vegetative reproduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006 3 1 2 3 physiological integration 1 coppice, sprout propagule subterranean stem bulb corm tuber

Tomimatsu,, Hiroshi

391

Vegetation N A County  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudha Patri Mechanical Engineer Telephoneo 250 oN A County

392

Modeling Tidal Marsh Distribution with Sea-Level Rise: Evaluating the Role of Vegetation, Sediment, and Upland Habitat in Marsh Resiliency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and 180 cm/century sea-level rise at mid suspended sedimentCouncil (2012) Sea-level rise for the coasts of California,to projecting future sea-level rise. Science 315: 368Ė370.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Environmental, genetic, and ecophysiological variation of western and Utah juniper and their hybrids: A model system for vegetation response to climate change. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report focuses on the following two research projects relating to the biological effects of climate change: Hybridization and genetic diversity populations of Utah (Juniperus osteosperma) and western (Juniperus occidentalis) juniper: Evidence from nuclear ribosomal and chloroplast DNA; and Ecophysiological patterns of pinyon and juniper.

Nowak, R.S. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Dept. of Environmental and Resource Sciences; Tausch, R.J. [Forest Service, Reno, NV (United States). Rocky Mountain Research Station

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Holocene climate evolution in the high-latitude Southern Hemisphere simulated by a coupled atmosphere-sea ice-ocean-vegetation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 a) b) Sea-ice area -2.0 -1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.5 -9000 -8000 -7000 -6000 -5000 -4000 -3000 -2000 concentrations 500 550 600 650 700 750 -9000 -8000 -7000 -6000 -5000 -4000 -3000 -2000 -1000 0 Time [yr] CH4conc -8000 -7000 -6000 -5000 -4000 -3000 -2000 -1000 0 Time [yr] W/m 2 JAN FEBDEC MAR AUG NOV OCTSEP JUL CH4

Renssen, Hans

395

Interactions of CO{sub 2} with temperature and other climate variables: response of vegetation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this project were: (1) to examine experimentally, for major crop species, the interacting effects of CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and water availability on plant growth and development, (2) to model these interactions, and (3) to continue developing physiologically-based mechanistic models for predicting crop response to increased CO{sub 2} concentration and future global climate change. To meet these objectives, controlled-environment studies were conducted on cotton, lemon, rice, and soybean and a long-term open-top chamber study was continued on orange. Much progress was made on development of plant growth models for cotton, wheat, rice, and soybean. In addition, there were two special modeling efforts which have the potential for contributing to all of the crop models. These efforts are concerned with modeling root growth and physical and chemical processes in soil and with modeling the effect of stomatal aperture on photosynthesis and transpiration rates as a function of CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and vapor pressure deficit. The root growth and soil process modeling is important because it enables us to estimate the water available to the plant. The modeling of effects of stomatal aperture on photosynthesis and transpiration rates enables them to estimate dry weight gain and water use by the plant. These are both important components of the interaction of CO{sub 2} concentration with temperature and water availability. The work on stomatal aperture, photosynthesis, and transpiration has the added benefit of allowing us to improve predictions of energy partitioning by the terrestrial biosphere. The lack of realistic energy partitioning is a serious deficiency of the present general circulation models which are used to predict how climate will change. An additional important aspect of the rice experiments is a study of methane emissions of paddy-grown (i.e., flooded) rice grown under two levels of CO{sub 2} and three temperature regimes.

Knipling, E.B.

1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

396

Lifecycle Model  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter describes the lifecycle model used for the Departmental software engineering methodology.

1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

Modeling Intragranular Diffusion in Low-Connectivity Granular Media. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0StatementsMixing UpModelingIntragranular

398

Modeling the Effect of Ice Nuclei on ARM Clouds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0StatementsMixingAssessing theModeling

399

ISDD: A Computational Model of Particle Sedimentation, Diffusion and Target  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSLthe U.S.;2cSupercomputing: TheModeling

400

Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds"OfficeTourFrom3,:ACoupled Well Models

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Chernobyl doses. Volume 3. Habitat and vegetation near the Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor Station. Technical report, 29 September 1987-28 February 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume presents a detailed exposition on the soils, climate, and vegetation of the Poles'ye region of Ukraine and Belorussia with emphasis on the area around the Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor Station. This data provides background for interpretation of multispectral satellite imagery of the area. Volume 1 uses these images and the information of this report to analyze the radiation response of the canopy of the coniferous forests in the immediate vicinity of the reactor station after the accident of 26 April 1986.... Chernobyl, Forest damage, Landsat, Change detection, Conifer stress, Fallout, Ionizing radiation, Multispectral imagery.

Painter, E.L.; Whicker, F.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Modeling Transformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Transformation What does each step do? #12;Transformation Procedure #12;Transformation Procedure #12;Building Your Model Yarn = chromosomal DNA Beads - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Ribosomes #12;Add transformation solution Tube CaCl2 #12;Transformation solution: CaCl2

Rose, Michael R.

403

Determination of locational error associated with global positioning system (GPS) radio collars in relation to vegetation and topography in north-central New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996, a study was initiated to assess seasonal habitat use and movement patterns of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) using global positioning system (GPS) radio collars. As part of this study, the authors attempted to assess the accuracies of GPS (non-differentially corrected) positions under various vegetation canopies and terrain conditions with the use of a GPS ``test`` collar. The test collar was activated every twenty minutes to obtain a position location and continuously uplinked to Argos satellites to transfer position data files. They used a Telonics, Inc. uplink receiver to intercept the transmission and view the results of the collar in real time. They placed the collar on a stand equivalent to the neck height of an adult elk and then placed the stand within three different treatment categories: (1) topographical influence (canyon and mesa tops), (2) canopy influence (open and closed canopy), and (3) vegetation type influence (ponderosa pine and pinion pine-juniper). The collar was kept at each location for one hour (usually obtaining three fixes). In addition, the authors used a hand-held GPS to obtain a position of the test collar at the same time and location.

Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Evaluation of Snow Depth and Soil Temperatures Predicted by the HydroThermodynamic SoilVegetation Scheme Coupled with the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Discrepancies between predicted and observed snow- depth changes relate to the coupling. Enhanced water supply to the atmosphere, which results from water that was assumed to be open in MM5 but was actually ice covered also lead to snowfall where none occurred. For heavy snowfall the performance of the coupled model

Moelders, Nicole

405

PREDICTIVE MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREDICTIVE MODELS is a collection of five models - CFPM, CO2PM, ICPM, PFPM, and SFPM - used in the 1982-1984 National Petroleum Council study of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential. Each pertains to a specific EOR process designed to squeeze additional oil from aging or spent oil fields. The processes are: 1) chemical flooding; 2) carbon dioxide miscible flooding; 3) in-situ combustion; 4) polymer flooding; and 5) steamflood. CFPM, the Chemical Flood Predictive Model, models micellar (surfactant)-polymer floods in reservoirs, which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic or caustic-polymer processes. CO2PM, the Carbon Dioxide miscible flooding Predictive Model, is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO2 injection or water-alternating gas processes. ICPM, the In-situ Combustion Predictive Model, computes the recovery and profitability of an in-situ combustion project from generalized performance predictive algorithms. PFPM, the Polymer Flood Predictive Model, is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. SFPM, the Steamflood Predictive Model, is applicable to the steam drive process, but not to cyclic steam injection (steam soak) processes. The IBM PC/AT version includes a plotting capability to produces a graphic picture of the predictive model results.

Ray, R.M. (DOE Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, Bartlesville, OK (United States))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Earth System Modeling -- Director`s initiative. LDRD Program final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Earth System Modeling Director`s Initiative is to develop and test a framework for interactively coupling subsystem models that represent the physical, chemical, and biological processes which determine the state of the atmosphere, ocean, land surface and vegetation. Most studies of the potential for human perturbations of the climate system made previously have treated only limited components of the Earth system. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the capability of coupling all relevant components in a flexible framework that will permit a wide variety of tests to be conducted to assure realistic interactions. A representation of the Earth system is shown and its important interactions.

MacCracken, M.; Penner, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Atmospheric Science Div.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

OSPREY Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of off-gas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data is obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data and parameters were input into the adsorption model to develop models specific for krypton adsorption. The same can be done for iodine, xenon, and tritium. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Customers will be given access to OSPREY to used and evaluate the model.

Veronica J. Rutledge

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

An ecological and range vegetation analysis of the upland sites of the southern extension of the oak-hickory forest region in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s ............................. . 56 9. An undisturbed open site four m ile s west of Luling, Texas. The dead t r e e s are the resu lt o f a f ire which o c cu r red in 1 9 4 9 . .................................. 58 10. A good condition site loca ted in the Baptist C em... the nature o f the vegetational changes which are o c cu rr in g is n e c e s sa ry fo r p roper management o f these a reas as range lands. 4 OBJECTIVES The ob je c t iv es set forth in this study are th ree - fo ld : 1. To make an e co lo g...

McCaleb, John Earl

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Programming models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A programming model is a set of software technologies that support the expression of algorithms and provide applications with an abstract representation of the capabilities of the underlying hardware architecture. The primary goals are productivity, portability and performance.

Daniel, David J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Pherson, Allen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thorp, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barrett, Richard [SNL; Clay, Robert [SNL; De Supinski, Bronis [LLNL; Dube, Evi [LLNL; Heroux, Mike [SNL; Janssen, Curtis [SNL; Langer, Steve [LLNL; Laros, Jim [SNL

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

410

River meander modeling and confronting uncertainty.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines the meandering phenomenon as it occurs in media throughout terrestrial, glacial, atmospheric, and aquatic environments. Analysis of the minimum energy principle, along with theories of Coriolis forces (and random walks to explain the meandering phenomenon) found that these theories apply at different temporal and spatial scales. Coriolis forces might induce topological changes resulting in meandering planforms. The minimum energy principle might explain how these forces combine to limit the sinuosity to depth and width ratios that are common throughout various media. The study then compares the first order analytical solutions for flow field by Ikeda, et al. (1981) and Johannesson and Parker (1989b). Ikeda's et al. linear bank erosion model was implemented to predict the rate of bank erosion in which the bank erosion coefficient is treated as a stochastic variable that varies with physical properties of the bank (e.g., cohesiveness, stratigraphy, or vegetation density). The developed model was used to predict the evolution of meandering planforms. Then, the modeling results were analyzed and compared to the observed data. Since the migration of a meandering channel consists of downstream translation, lateral expansion, and downstream or upstream rotations several measures are formulated in order to determine which of the resulting planforms is closest to the experimental measured one. Results from the deterministic model highly depend on the calibrated erosion coefficient. Since field measurements are always limited, the stochastic model yielded more realistic predictions of meandering planform evolutions. Due to the random nature of bank erosion coefficient, the meandering planform evolution is a stochastic process that can only be accurately predicted by a stochastic model.

Posner, Ari J. (University of Arizona Tucson, AZ)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Modeling Quality Information within Business Process Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Quality Information within Business Process Models Robert Heinrich, Alexander Kappe. Business process models are a useful means to document information about structure and behavior literature and tool survey on modeling quality information within business process models. Keywords: Business

Paech, Barbara

412

PREDICTIVE MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREDICTIVE MODELS is a collection of five models - CFPM, CO2PM, ICPM, PFPM, and SFPM - used in the 1982-1984 National Petroleum Council study of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential. Each pertains to a specific EOR process designed to squeeze additional oil from aging or spent oil fields. The processes are: 1) chemical flooding, where soap-like surfactants are injected into the reservoir to wash out the oil; 2) carbon dioxide miscible flooding, where carbon dioxide mixes with the lighter hydrocarbons making the oil easier to displace; 3) in-situ combustion, which uses the heat from burning some of the underground oil to thin the product; 4) polymer flooding, where thick, cohesive material is pumped into a reservoir to push the oil through the underground rock; and 5) steamflood, where pressurized steam is injected underground to thin the oil. CFPM, the Chemical Flood Predictive Model, models micellar (surfactant)-polymer floods in reservoirs, which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic or caustic-polymer processes. CO2PM, the Carbon Dioxide miscible flooding Predictive Model, is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO2 injection or water-alternating gas processes. ICPM, the In-situ Combustion Predictive Model, computes the recovery and profitability of an in-situ combustion project from generalized performance predictive algorithms. PFPM, the Polymer Flood Predictive Model, is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. SFPM, the Steamflood Predictive Model, is applicable to the steam drive process, but not to cyclic steam injection (steam soak) processes.

Ray, R.M. (DOE Bartlesville Energy Technology Technology Center, Bartlesville, OK (United States))

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

How Groundwater Models Work (or Modeling 101)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas inPortalAllBPA addresses EMF B O NHowPart One:

414

Collier, K.J., B.D. Clarkson, B.M.T.A. Aldridge, and B.J. Hicks. 2008. Can urban streams be restored? Linking vegetation restoration with urban  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

urban streams be restored? Linking vegetation restoration with urban stormwater mitigation K.J. Collier1 include biomonitoring of stream health, restoration of urban streams, and the ecology of large riversCitation: Collier, K.J., B.D. Clarkson, B.M.T.A. Aldridge, and B.J. Hicks. 2008. Can urban streams

Waikato, University of

415

Welcome to our monthly gardening series, hope you are enjoying the tips we are providing you each month. Whether it be vegetable gardening, planting flowers or ornamentals, please join us  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or download the following link http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mg319. Vegetables Spring gardens are starting to wind is good time to build up your garden soil with organic material such as leaves, grass clippings, pine://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vh021. Lawns Avoid mowing during the heat of the day, mow high and use a sharp blade. There is less

Florida, University of

416

Rainier Mesa CAU Infiltration Model using INFILv3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The outline of this presentation are: (1) Model Inputs - DEM, Precipitation, Air temp, Soil props, Surface geology, Vegetation; (2) Model Pre-processing - Runoff Routing and sinks, Slope and Azimuth, Soil Ksat reduction with slope (to mitigate bathtub ring), Soil-Bedrock Interface permeabilities; (3) Model Calibration - ET using PEST, Chloride mass balance data, Streamflow using PEST; (4) Model Validation - Streamflow data not used for calibration; (5) Uncertainty Analysis; and (6) Results. Conclusions are: (1) Average annual infiltration rates =11 to 18 mm/year for RM domain; (2) Average annual infiltration rates = 7 to 11 mm/year for SM domain; (3) ET = 70% of precipitation for both domains; (4) Runoff = 8-9% for RM; and 22-24% for SM - Apparently high average runoff is caused by the truncation of the lowerelevation portions of watersheds where much of the infiltration of runoff waters would otherwise occur; (5) Model results are calibrated to measured ET, CMB data, and streamflow observations; (6) Model results are validated using streamflow observations discovered after model calibration was complete; (7) Use of soil Ksat reduction with slope to mitigate bathtub ring was successful (based on calibration results); and (8) Soil-bedrock K{_}interface is innovative approach.

Levitt, Daniel G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwicklis, Edward M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

417

In: Dengler, J., Oldeland, J., Jansen, F., Chytr, M., Ewald, J., Finckh, M., Glckler, F., Lopez-Gonzalez, G., Peet, R.K., Schamine, J.H.J. (2012) [Eds.]: Vegetation databases for the 21st century. Biodiversity & Ecology 4: 337337. DOI: 10.7809/b-e.00128.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of vegetation in a context of environmental changes (mainly climate and land use). Permanent plots are currently are available on request. Keywords: climate change; land use; permanent plot; Switzerland; vegetation monitoring: http://www.unil.ch/ppch Availability: according to a specific agreement Online upload: no Online search

Lehmann, Laurent

418

Vennetier M. ; Ripert C. (2010) Climate change impact on vegetation: lessons from an exceptionally hot and dry decade in South-eastern France. In: Climate Change and variability, (eds Simlard S.W. ; Austin M.E.), Sciyo, Rijeka, Croatia, p. 225-241.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vennetier M. ; Ripert C. (2010) Climate change impact on vegetation: lessons from an exceptionally hot and dry decade in South-eastern France. In: Climate Change and variability, (eds Simlard S¬į13 Climate change impact on vegetation: lessons from an exceptionally hot and dry decade in south

Boyer, Edmond

419

Model systems This year's model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@biochem.wisc.edu RTR received ScB degrees in chemistry and biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that initially inspired the chemical simplification. In such cases, the later stages of model studies can seem

Raines, Ronald T.

420

Estimation of net primary productivity using a process-based model in Gansu Province, Northwest China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ecological structure in the arid and semi-arid region of Northwest China with forest, grassland, agriculture, Gobi, and desert, is complex, vulnerable, and unstable. It is a challenging and sustaining job to keep the ecological structure and improve its ecological function. Net primary productivity (NPP) modeling can help to improve the understanding of the ecosystem, and therefore, improve ecological efficiency. The boreal ecosystem productivity simulator (BEPS) model provides the possibility of NPP modeling in terrestrial ecosystem, but it has some limitations for application in arid and semi-arid regions. In this paper we improve the BEPS model, in terms of its water cycle by adding the processes of infiltration and surface runoff, to be applicable in arid and semi-arid regions. We model the NPP of forest, grass, and crop in Gansu Province as an experimental area in Northwest China in 2003 using the improved BEPS model, parameterized with moderate resolution remote sensing imageries and meteorological data. The modeled NPP using improved BEPS agrees better with the ground measurements in Qilian Mountain than that with original BEPS, with a higher R2 of 0.746 and lower root mean square error (RMSE) of 46.53 gC/m2 compared to R2 of 0.662 and RMSE of 60.19 gC/m2 from original BEPS. The modeled NPP of three vegetation types using improved BEPS show evident differences compared to that using original BEPS, with the highest difference ratio of 9.21% in forest and the lowest value of 4.29% in crop. The difference ratios between different vegetation types lie on the dependence on natural water sources. The modeled NPP in five geographic zones using improved BEPS are higher than those with original BEPS, with higher difference ratio in dry zones and lower value in wet zones.

Wang, Peijuan; Xie, Donghui; Zhou, Yuyu; E, Youhao; Zhu, Qijiang

2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Modelling osteomyelitis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13 of 14 12. Paoletti N, Lio P, Merelli E, Viceconti M: Multi-level Computational Modeling and Quantitative Analysis of Bone Remodeling. IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics 2012, 99(PrePrints). 13. Geris L, Vander Sloten...

LiÚ, Pietro; Paoletti, Nicola; Moni, Mohammad A; Atwell, Kathryn; Merelli, Emanuela; Viceconti, Marco

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

422

Criticality Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality computational method will be used for evaluating the criticality potential of configurations of fissionable materials (in-package and external to the waste package) within the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for all waste packages/waste forms. The criticality computational method is also applicable to preclosure configurations. The criticality computational method is a component of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). How the criticality computational method fits in the overall disposal criticality analysis methodology is illustrated in Figure 1 (YMP 2003, Figure 3). This calculation will not provide direct input to the total system performance assessment for license application. It is to be used as necessary to determine the criticality potential of configuration classes as determined by the configuration probability analysis of the configuration generator model (BSC 2003a).

A. Alsaed

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

423

Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in predicted weekly average regional latent heat fluxes were smaller than for NEE, but larger than for either ecosystem respiration or assimilation alone. However, spatial and diurnal variations of hundreds of W m{sup -2} in latent heat fluxes were common. We conclude that, in this heterogeneous system, characterizing vegetation cover type and LAI at the scale of spatial variation are necessary for accurate estimates of bottom-up, regional NEE and surface energy fluxes.

Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Integration of the predictions of two models with dose measurements in a case study of children exposed to the emissions of a lead smelter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The predictions of two source-to-dose models are systematically evaluated with observed data collected in a village polluted by a currently operating secondary lead smelter. Both models were built up from several sub-models linked together and run using Monte-Carlo simulation, to calculate the distribution children's blood lead levels attributable to the emissions from the facility. The first model system is composed of the CalTOX model linked to a recoded version of the IEUBK model. This system provides the distribution of the media-specific lead concentrations (air, soil, fruit, vegetables and blood) in the whole area investigated. The second model consists of a statistical model to estimate the lead deposition on the ground, a modified version of the model HHRAP and the same recoded version of the IEUBK model. This system provides an estimate of the concentration of exposure of specific individuals living in the study area. The predictions of the first model system were improved in terms of accuracy and precision by performing a sensitivity analysis and using field data to correct the default value provided for the leaf wet density. However, in this case study, the first model system tends to overestimate the exposure due to exposed vegetables. The second model was tested for nine children with contrasting exposure conditions. It managed to capture the blood levels for eight of them. In the last case, the exposure of the child by pathways not considered in the model may explain the failure of the model. The interest of this integrated model is to provide outputs with lower variance than the first model system, but at the moment further tests are necessary to conclude about its accuracy.

Bonnard, R.; McKone, T.E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Sandia National Laboratories: Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mark Boslough Featured in NOVA Special about the Chelyabinsk Meteor On April 3, 2013, in Capabilities, Computational Modeling & Simulation, Modeling, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis,...

426

Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) Developer's Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the guidelines adopted for software development of the Community Land Model (CLM) and serves as a reference to the entire code base of the released version of the model. The version of the code described here is Version 3.0 which was released in the summer of 2004. This document, the Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) User's Guide (Vertenstein et al., 2004), the Technical Description of the Community Land Model (CLM) (Oleson et al., 2004), and the Community Land Model's Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM): Technical Description and User's Guide (Levis et al., 2004) provide the developer, user, or researcher with details of implementation, instructions for using the model, a scientific description of the model, and a scientific description of the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model integrated with CLM respectively. The CLM is a single column (snow-soil-vegetation) biogeophysical model of the land surface which can be run serially (on a laptop or personal computer) or in parallel (using distributed or shared memory processors or both) on both vector and scalar computer architectures. Written in Fortran 90, CLM can be run offline (i.e., run in isolation using stored atmospheric forcing data), coupled to an atmospheric model (e.g., the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM)), or coupled to a climate system model (e.g., the Community Climate System Model Version 3 (CCSM3)) through a flux coupler (e.g., Coupler 6 (CPL6)). When coupled, CLM exchanges fluxes of energy, water, and momentum with the atmosphere. The horizontal land surface heterogeneity is represented by a nested subgrid hierarchy composed of gridcells, landunits, columns, and plant functional types (PFTs). This hierarchical representation is reflected in the data structures used by the model code. Biophysical processes are simulated for each subgrid unit (landunit, column, and PFT) independently, and prognostic variables are maintained for each subgrid unit. Vertical heterogeneity is represented by a single vegetation layer, 10 layers for soil, and up to five layers for snow, depending on the snow depth. For computational efficiency, gridcells are grouped into ''clumps'' which are divided in cyclic fashion among distributed memory processors. Additional parallel performance is obtained by distributing clumps of gridcells across shared memory processors on computer platforms that support hybrid Message Passing Interface (MPI)/OpenMP operation. Significant modifications to the source code have been made over the last year to support efficient operation on newer vector architectures, specifically the Earth Simulator in Japan and the Cray X1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Homan et al., 2004). These code modifications resulted in performance improvements even on the scalar architectures widely used for running CLM presently. To better support vectorized processing in the code, subgrid units (columns and PFTs) are grouped into ''filters'' based on their process-specific categorization. For example, filters (vectors of integers) referring to all snow, non-snow, lake, non-lake, and soil covered columns and PFTs within each clump are built and maintained when the model is run. Many loops within the scientific subroutines use these filters to indirectly address the process-appropriate subgrid units.

Hoffman, FM

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

427

A thick homogeneous vegetated cover design proves cost - and schedule-effective for the reclamation of uranium mills sites near Spokane, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has licensed two medium sized uranium mills with tailings impoundments covering 28 and 40 hectares (70 and 100 acres), respectively, The uranium mill licensees have submitted closure and reclamation plans to the state, and site-specific conditions have determined the closure design features, Conventional uranium mill cover designs usually incorporate an overall cap of one to three meters, which includes a low-permeability clay barrier layer. A technical evaluation of several uranium mill facilities that used this design was published in the fall of 1994 and reported that unexpected vegetation root damage had occurred in the low-permeability clay (or bentonite amended) barrier layers. The technical report suggested that the low-permeability design feature at some sites could be compromised within a very short time and the regulatory goal of 1,000 years performance might not be achieved. In October 1994, WDOH sponsored a technical forum meeting to consider design alternatives to address these reliability concerns. Representatives from the federal government, nuclear industry, licensees, engineering firms, and state regulatory agencies attended the workshop. Risk factors considered in the evaluation of the uranium mill reclamation plans include: (1) radon gas emanation through the cover (the air pathway), and (2) migration of hazardous and/or radioactive constituents (the groundwater pathway). Additional design considerations include site structural stability, longevity of 1,000 years, and no active (ongoing) maintenance. 9 refs.

Blacklaw, J.; Robertson, G.; Stoffel, D.; Ahmad, J.; Fordham, E. [Washington State Dept. of Health, Olympia, WA (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Metal and arsenic impacts to soils, vegetation communities and wildlife habitat in southwest Montana uplands contaminated by smelter emissions. 2: Laboratory phytotoxicity studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetation communities on metal- and arsenic-contaminated uplands surrounding a smelter in southwest Montana have been eliminated or highly modified. Laboratory toxicity tests were performed using site soils from the impacted areas to determine whether the soils limit the ability of plants to establish and grow. The germination and growth of alfalfa, lettuce, and wheat in impacted area soils was compared to germination and growth of the three species in reference soils. The degree of phytotoxicity was quantified using a species-endpoint toxicity score calculated on the magnitude of difference between germination and growth of plants in impacted and reference soils. The impacted soils exhibited substantial toxicity to plants: 5% of the sites were severely phytotoxic, 55% were highly phytotoxic, 10% were moderately phytotoxic, 20% were mildly phytotoxic, and 10% were nontoxic. Root growth was consistently the most affected endpoint (18 of 20 impacted soils) and reduction in root length and mass was observed. Correlation and partial correlation analysis was used to evaluate the causes of phytotoxicity. Concentrations of As, Cu, and Zn and, to a lesser extent, Pb and Cd were found to be positively correlated with phytotoxicity.

Kapustka, L.A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Lipton, J.; Galbraith, H.; Cacela, D.; LeJeune, K. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Modeling ChargeTransfer in Soft Actuators with Limb-like Motion | The Ames  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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430

Modeling the Bonds of Iron and Water - NERSC SCience News February 28, 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0StatementsMixingAssessing theModeling the

431

Modeling the Market Potential of Hydrogen from Wind and Competing Sources: Preprint  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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432

Noncommutative Standard Model: Model Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A noncommutative version of the usual electro-weak theory is constructed. We discuss how to overcome the two major problems: 1) although we can have noncommutative U(n) (which we denote by $U_{\\star}(n)$) gauge theory we cannot have noncommutative SU(n) and 2) the charges in noncommutative QED are quantized to just $0, \\pm 1$. We show how the problem with charge quantization, as well as with the gauge group, can be resolved by taking $U_{\\star}(3)\\times U_{\\star}(2)\\times U_{\\star}(1)$ gauge group and reducing the extra U(1) factors in an appropriate way. Then we proceed with building the noncommutative version of the standard model by specifying the proper representations for the entire particle content of the theory, the gauge bosons, the fermions and Higgs. We also present the full action for the noncommutative Standard Model (NCSM). In addition, among several peculiar features of our model, we address the {\\it inherent} CP violation and new neutrino interactions.

M. Chaichian; P. Presnajder; M. M. Sheikh-Jabbari; A. Tureanu

2003-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

433

Autonomie Model  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EERE BlogAttachmentFlash2011-21 AuditInsulated CladdingofofAutonomie Model

434

Inverse Modeling of Hydrologic Parameters Using Surface Flux and Runoff Observations in the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study demonstrates the possibility of inverting hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4). Previous studies showed that surface flux and runoff calculations are sensitive to major hydrologic parameters in CLM4 over different watersheds, and illustrated the necessity and possibility of parameter calibration. Two inversion strategies, the deterministic least-square fitting and stochastic Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) - Bayesian inversion approaches, are evaluated by applying them to CLM4 at selected sites. The unknowns to be estimated include surface and subsurface runoff generation parameters and vadose zone soil water parameters. We find that using model parameters calibrated by the least-square fitting provides little improvements in the model simulations but the sampling-based stochastic inversion approaches are consistent - as more information comes in, the predictive intervals of the calibrated parameters become narrower and the misfits between the calculated and observed responses decrease. In general, parameters that are identified to be significant through sensitivity analyses and statistical tests are better calibrated than those with weak or nonlinear impacts on flux or runoff observations. Temporal resolution of observations has larger impacts on the results of inverse modeling using heat flux data than runoff data. Soil and vegetation cover have important impacts on parameter sensitivities, leading to the different patterns of posterior distributions of parameters at different sites. Overall, the MCMC-Bayesian inversion approach effectively and reliably improves the simulation of CLM under different climates and environmental conditions. Bayesian model averaging of the posterior estimates with different reference acceptance probabilities can smooth the posterior distribution and provide more reliable parameter estimates, but at the expense of wider uncertainty bounds.

Sun, Yu; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Tian, Fuqiang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

435

Microsoft Word - Modeling Summary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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436

Model Verification and Validation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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437

Models and Datasets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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438

High-fidelity Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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439

Graphical models, causal inference, and econometric models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphical models, causal inference, and econometric models Peter Spirtes Abstract A graphical model modeling has historical ties to causal modeling in econometrics and other social sciences, there have been isolated from the econometric tradition. In this paper I will describe a number of recent developments

Spirtes, Peter

440

Baseline radionuclide concentrations in soils and vegetation around the proposed Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility and the Weapons Subsystems Laboratory at TA-16  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preoperational environmental survey is required by the Department of Energy (DOE) for all federally funded research facilities that have the potential to cause adverse impacts on the environment. Therefore, in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, an environmental survey was conducted over the proposed sites of the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) and the Weapons Subsystems Laboratory (WSL) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) at TA-16. Baseline concentrations of tritium ({sup 3}H), plutonium ({sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu) and total uranium were measured in soils, vegetation (pine needles and oak leaves) and ground litter. Tritium was also measured from air samples, while cesium ({sup 137}Cs) was measured in soils. The mean concentration of airborne tritiated water during 1987 was 3.9 pCi/m{sup 3}. Although the mean annual concentration of {sup 3}H in soil moisture at the 0--5 cm (2 in) soil depth was measured at 0.6 pCi/mL, a better background level, based on long-term regional data, was considered to be 2.6 pCi/mL. Mean values for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 218}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total uranium in soils collected from the 0--5 cm depth were 1.08 pCi/g, 0.0014 pCi/g, 0.0325 pCi/g, and 4.01 {micro}g/g, respectively. Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) needles contained higher values of {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total uranium than did leaves collected from gambel`s oak (Quercus gambelii). In contrast, leaves collected from gambel`s oak contained higher levels of {sup 137}Cs than what pine needles did.

Fresquez, P.R.; Ennis, M.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Carbon dynamics in arctic vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the Arctic land surface and the global climate system. A large amount of organic carbon (C) is currently stored in Arctic soils; if ...

Street, Lorna Elizabeth

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

442

Washing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics, Acts of Congress of May 8, 1914, as amended, and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the United...

Scott, Amanda

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

443

PATHWAY: a simulation model of radionuclide-transport through agricultural food chains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PATHWAY simulates the transport of radionuclides from fallout through an agricultural ecosystem. The agro-ecosystem is subdivided into several land management units, each of which is used either for grazing animals, for growing hay, or for growing food crops. The model simulates the transport of radionuclides by both discrete events and continuous, time-dependent processes. The discrete events include tillage of soil, harvest and storage of crops,and deposition of fallout. The continuous processes include the transport of radionuclides due to resuspension, weathering, rain splash, percolation, leaching, adsorption and desorption of radionuclides in the soil, root uptake, foliar absorption, growth and senescence of vegetation, and the ingestion assimilation, and excretion of radionuclides by animals. Preliminary validation studies indicate that the model dynamics and simulated values of radionuclide concentrations in several agricultural products agree well with measured values when the model is driven with site specific data on deposition from world-wide fallout.

Kirchner, T.B.; Whicker, F.W.; Otis, M.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Hydrologic Modeling Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management Programs has both experience and technical knowledge to use and develop Earth systems models. Hydrological Modeling Models are simplified representations of...

445

Sandia National Laboratories: Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a model that can be used ... Sandian Mark Boslough Featured on NOVA Episode about Chelyabinsk Meteor On November 20, 2013, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Modeling,...

446

Development of High Resolution Land Surface Parameters for the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a growing need for high-resolution land surface parameters as land surface models are being applied at increasingly higher spatial resolution offline as well as in regional and global models. The default land surface parameters for the most recent version of the Community Land Model (i.e. CLM 4.0) are at 0.5į or coarser resolutions, released with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Plant Functional Types (PFTs), vegetation properties such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Stem Area Index (SAI), and non-vegetated land covers were developed using remotely sensed datasets retrieved in late 1990ís and the beginning of this century. In this study, we developed new land surface parameters for CLM 4.0, specifically PFTs, LAI, SAI and non-vegetated land cover composition, at 0.05į resolution globally based on the most recent MODIS land cover and improved MODIS LAI products. Compared to the current CLM 4.0 parameters, the new parameters produced a decreased coverage by bare soil and trees, but an increased coverage by shrub, grass, and cropland. The new parameters result in a decrease in global seasonal LAI, with the biggest decrease in boreal forests; however, the new parameters also show a large increase in LAI in tropical forest. Differences between the new and the current parameters are mainly caused by changes in the sources of remotely sensed data and the representation of land cover in the source data. Advantages and disadvantages of each dataset were discussed in order to provide guidance on the use of the data. The new high-resolution land surface parameters have been used in a coupled land-atmosphere model (WRF-CLM) applied to the western U.S. to demonstrate their use in high-resolution modeling. A remapping method from the latitude/longitude grid of the CLM data to the WRF grids with map projection was also demonstrated. Future work will include global offline CLM simulations to examine the impacts of source data resolution and subsequent land parameter changes on simulated land surface processes.

Ke, Yinghai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Coleman, Andre M.; Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

447

Analysis of the NAEG model of transuranic radionuclide transport and dose  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the model for estimating the dose from /sup 239/Pu developed for the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) by using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis. Sensitivity analysis results suggest that the air pathway is the critical pathway for the organs receiving the highest dose. Soil concentration and the factors controlling air concentration are the most important parameters. The only organ whose dose is sensitive to parameters in the ingestion pathway is the GI tract. The air pathway accounts for 100% of the dose to lung, upper respiratory tract, and thoracic lymph nodes; and 95% of its dose via ingestion. Leafy vegetable ingestion accounts for 70% of the dose from the ingestion pathway regardless of organ, peeled vegetables 20%; accidental soil ingestion 5%; ingestion of beef liver 4%; beef muscle 1%. Only a handful of model parameters control the dose for any one organ. The number of important parameters is usually less than 10. Uncertainty analysis indicates that choosing a uniform distribution for the input parameters produces a lognormal distribution of the dose. The ratio of the square root of the variance to the mean is three times greater for the doses than it is for the individual parameters. As found by the sensitivity analysis, the uncertainty analysis suggests that only a few parameters control the dose for each organ. All organs have similar distributions and variance to mean ratios except for the lymph modes. 16 references, 9 figures, 13 tables.

Kercher, J.R.; Anspaugh, L.R.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Modeling LIDAR Detection of Biological Aerosols to Determine Optimum Implementation Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed for a larger multi-laboratory project named the Background Interferent Measurement and Standards project. While originally tasked to develop algorithms to optimize biological warfare agent detection using UV fluorescence LIDAR, the current uncertainties in the reported fluorescence profiles and cross sections the development of any meaningful models. It was decided that a better approach would be to model the wavelength-dependent elastic backscattering from a number of ambient background aerosol types, and compare this with that generated from representative sporulated and vegetative bacterial systems. Calculations in this report show that a 266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm elastic backscatter LIDAR experiment will allow an operator to immediately recognize when sulfate, VOC-based or road dust (silicate) aerosols are approaching, independent of humidity changes. It will be more difficult to distinguish soot aerosols from biological aerosols, or vegetative bacteria from sporulated bacteria. In these latter cases, the elastic scattering data will most likely have to be combined with UV fluorescence data to enable a more robust categorization.

Sheen, David M.; Aker, Pam M.

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

449

I&C Modeling in SPAR Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models for the U.S. commercial nuclear power plants currently have very limited instrumentation and control (I&C) modeling [1]. Most of the I&C components in the operating plant SPAR models are related to the reactor protection system. This was identified as a finding during the industry peer review of SPAR models. While the Emergency Safeguard Features (ESF) actuation and control system was incorporated into the Peach Bottom Unit 2 SPAR model in a recent effort [2], various approaches to expend resources for detailed I&C modeling in other SPAR models are investigated.

John A. Schroeder

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Standard Solar Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar models are important in our understanding of stars and stellar evolution. Solar models have been constructed using different methods. In this work, a solar model will be built using the fitting method. The model will incorporate the most recent input data. The model will be evolved to the current epoch starting from the zero-age main sequence model.

Loong, Lim Yaw; Yusof, Norhasliza; Kassim, Hasan Abu [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110).Development of Aerosol Models

452

A Conceptual Model of Sedimentation in the SacramentoĖSan Joaquin Delta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 21st-century sea-level rise. Science 321:1340Ė1343.more vegetation. Sea-level rise in open water is partiallyshed, vegetation, sea-level rise, Central Valley, Delta

Schoellhamer, David H.; Wright, Scott A.; Drexler, Judy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Modeling Aeolian Transport of Contaminated Sediments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G: Sensitivities to Succession, Disturbance, and Future Climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G disposal facility is used for the disposal of radioactive waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. In compliance with that requirement, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for facilities that receive waste after September 26, 1988. Sites are also required to conduct composite analyses for facilities that receive waste after this date; these analyses account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (and will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with these facilities. LANL issued Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis in 2008. In support of those analyses, vertical and horizontal sediment flux data were collected at two analog sites, each with different dominant vegetation characteristics, and used to estimate rates of vertical resuspension and wind erosion for Area G. The results of that investigation indicated that there was no net loss of soil at the disposal site due to wind erosion, and suggested minimal impacts of wind on the long-term performance of the facility. However, that study did not evaluate the potential for contaminant transport caused by the horizontal movement of soil particles over long time frames. Since that time, additional field data have been collected to estimate wind threshold velocities for initiating sediment transport due to saltation and rates of sediment transport once those thresholds are reached. Data such as these have been used in the development of the Vegetation Modified Transport (VMTran) model. This model is designed to estimate patterns and long-term rates of contaminant redistribution caused by winds at the site, taking into account the impacts of plant succession and environmental disturbance. Aeolian, or wind-driven, sediment transport drives soil erosion, affects biogeochemical cycles, and can lead to the transport of contaminants. Rates of aeolian sediment transport depend in large part on the type, amount, and spatial pattern of vegetation. In particular, the amount of cover from trees and shrubs, which act as roughness elements, alters rates of aeolian sediment transport. The degree to which the understory is disturbed and the associated spacing of bare soil gaps further influence sediment transport rates. Changes in vegetation structure and patterns over periods of years to centuries may have profound impacts on rates of wind-driven transport. For recently disturbed areas, succession is likely to occur through a series of vegetation communities. Area G currently exhibits a mosaic of vegetation cover, with patches of grass and forbs over closed disposal units, and bare ground in heavily used portions of the site. These areas are surrounded by less disturbed regions of shrubland and pinon-juniper woodland; some ponderosa pine forest is also visible in the canyon along the road. The successional trajectory for the disturbed portions of Area G is expected to proceed from grasses and forbs (which would be established during site closure), to shrubs such as chamisa, to a climax community of pinon-juniper woodland. Although unlikely under current conditions, a ponderosa pine forest could develop over the site if the future climate is wetter. In many ecosystems, substantial and often periodic disturbances such as fire or severe drought can rapidly alter vegetation patterns. Such disturbances are likely to increase in the southwestern US where projections call for a warmer and drier climate. With respect to Area G, the 3 most likely disturbance types are surface fire, crown fire, and drought-induced tree mortality. Each type of disturbance has a different frequency or likelihood of occurrence, but all 3 tend to reset the vegetation succession cycle to earlier stages. The Area G performance assessment and composite an

Whicker, Jeffrey J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kirchner, Thomas B. [New Mexico State University; Breshears, David D. [University of Arizona; Field, Jason P. [University of Arizona

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

454

Cognitive Modeling Cognitive Modelling -The nature of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cognitive Modeling Cognitive Modelling - The nature of Connectionism and notes on computability Mathias Hinz Universität Bremen November 17, 2014 November 17, 2014 1 #12;Cognitive Modeling topic · Comparing PDP and nature · properties of PDP · computability · discussion November 17, 2014 2 #12;Cognitive

Bremen, Universität

455

The Standard Model Beyond the Standard Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

physics with top quark Search for Extra-dimensions Conclusions 1 The Standard Model Building block quark Search for Extra-dimensions Conclusions Building block The particles and forces The Standard Model the Standard Model New physics with top quark Search for Extra-dimensions Conclusions Building block

456

Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 10Ė25% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Wavelet-based cascade model for intermittent structure in terrestrial environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A wavelet-like model for distributions of objects in natural and man-made terrestrial environments is developed. The model is constructed in a self-similar fashion, with the sizes, amplitudes, and numbers of objects occurring at a constant ratios between parent and offspring objects. The objects are randomly distributed in space according to a Poisson process. Fractal supports and a cascade model are used to organize objects intermittently in space. In its basic form, the model is for continuously varying random fields, although a level-cut is introduced to model two-phase random media. The report begins with a description of relevant concepts from fractal theory, and then progresses through static (time-invariant), steady-state, and non-steady models. The results can be applied to such diverse phenomena as turbulence, geologic distributions, urban buildings, vegetation, and arctic ice floes. The model can be used as a basis for synthesizing realistic terrestrial scenes, and for predicting the performance of ...

Wilson, D Keith; Vecherin, Sergey N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Sandia Modeling Tool Webinar  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Webinar attendees will learn what collaborative, stakeholder-driven modeling is, how the models developed have been and could be used, and how specifically this process and resulting models might...

459

Position Description: Ph.D. Student in Vegetation Modeling and Climate Vulnerability Montana State University is seeking a Ph.D. student for a NASA Applied Sciences project on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information. An overview of the project can be found at (http://www.montana.edu/lccvp/) Application Procedures Montana State University is seeking a Ph.D. student for a NASA Applied Sciences project on vulnerability of biological resources under climate and land use change. The project will use NASA resources to inform climate

Hansen, Andrew J.

460

SoilVegetationAtmosphere Transfer Schemes and Large-Scale Hydrological Models (Proceedings of a symposium held during the Sixth IAHS Scientific Assembly at Maastricht, The Netherlands, July 2001).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOSEPH P. McFADDEN & GLEN E. LISTON Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Research and Engineering Laboratory, Fort Wainwright, Alaska 99703, USA ROGER A. PIELKE, SR Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA F. STUART CHAPIN, III

Pielke, Roger A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 103, NO. D24, PAGES 32,257-32,276, JANUARY 27, 1998 Synergistic algorithm for estimating vegetation canopy leaf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 103, NO. D24, PAGES 32,257-32,276, JANUARY 27, 1998 32257 communities across the globe in response to climate changes. Leaf area index (LAI) is a state parameter in all models describing the exchange of fluxes of energy, mass (e.g., water and CO2), and momentum between

Myneni, Ranga B.

462

Geologic Framework Model Analysis Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), Version 3.1 (GFM3.1) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.1 and previous versions. The GFM represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the stratigraphy and structural features of the location of the potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. The GFM encompasses an area of 65 square miles (170 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the GFM were chosen to encompass the most widely distributed set of exploratory boreholes (the Water Table or WT series) and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The GFM was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphy sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. This interim change notice (ICN) was prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model Process Model Report Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The GFM is one component of the Integrated Site Model (ISM) (Figure l), which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed project stratigraphy into model stratigraphic units that are most useful for the primary downstream models and the repository design. These downstream models include the hydrologic flow models and the radionuclide transport models. All the models and the repository design, in turn, will be incorporated into the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of the potential radioactive waste repository block and vicinity to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a host for the repository. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 2.

R. Clayton

2000-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

463

Sandia National Laboratories: Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sandia Study Shows Large LNG Fires Hotter but Smaller Than Expected On December 6, 2011, in Analysis, Energy Assurance, Infrastructure Security, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis,...

464

Modeling and Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE modeling and analysis activities focus on reducing uncertainties and improving transparency in photovoltaics (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) performance modeling. The overall goal of...

465

ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4) Generation of derivative property models via linear coregionalization with porosity; (5) Post-processing of the simulated models to impart desired secondary geologic attributes and to create summary and uncertainty models; and (6) Conversion of the models into real-world coordinates. The conversion to real world coordinates is performed as part of the integration of the RPM into the Integrated Site Model (ISM) 3.1; this activity is not part of the current analysis. The ISM provides a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site and consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) RPM, which is the subject of this AMR; and (3) Mineralogic Model. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows the geographic boundaries of the RPM and other component models of the ISM.

Clinton Lum

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

466

An efficient strategy for the inversion of bidirectional reflectance models with satellite remote sensing data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The angular distribution of radiation scattered by the earth surface contains information on the structural and optical properties of the surface. Potentially, this information may be retrieved through the inversion of surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) models. This report details the limitations and efficient application of BRDF model inversions using data from ground- and satellite-based sensors. A turbid medium BRDF model, based on the discrete ordinates solution to the transport equation, was used to quantify the sensitivity of top-of-canopy reflectance to vegetation and soil parameters. Results were used to define parameter sets for inversions. Using synthetic reflectance values, the invertibility of the model was investigated for different optimization algorithms, surface and sampling conditions. Inversions were also conducted with field data from a ground-based radiometer. First, a soil BRDF model was inverted for different soil and sampling conditions. A condition-invariant solution was determined and used as the lower boundary condition in canopy model inversions. Finally, a scheme was developed to improve the speed and accuracy of inversions.

Privette, J.L.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

Sandia National Laboratories: Modeling & Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

On September 19, 2013, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Facilities, Grid Integration, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, News, News &...

468

OSHWPP model programs guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Descriptions of model occupational health and safety programs implemented at DOE facilities are presented.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

PREDICTIVE MODELS. Enhanced Oil Recovery Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREDICTIVE MODELS is a collection of five models - CFPM, CO2PM, ICPM, PFPM, and SFPM - used in the 1982-1984 National Petroleum Council study of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential. Each pertains to a specific EOR process designed to squeeze additional oil from aging or spent oil fields. The processes are: 1 chemical flooding; 2 carbon dioxide miscible flooding; 3 in-situ combustion; 4 polymer flooding; and 5 steamflood. CFPM, the Chemical Flood Predictive Model, models micellar (surfactant)-polymer floods in reservoirs, which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic or caustic-polymer processes. CO2PM, the Carbon Dioxide miscible flooding Predictive Model, is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO2 injection or water-alternating gas processes. ICPM, the In-situ Combustion Predictive Model, computes the recovery and profitability of an in-situ combustion project from generalized performance predictive algorithms. PFPM, the Polymer Flood Predictive Model, is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. SFPM, the Steamflood Predictive Model, is applicable to the steam drive process, but not to cyclic steam injection (steam soak) processes. The IBM PC/AT version includes a plotting capability to produces a graphic picture of the predictive model results.

Ray, R.M. [DOE Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1992-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

470

Thermal acclimation of leaf respiration of tropical trees and lianas: response to experimental canopy warming,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vegetation models (DGVMs) and Earth system models (Friedlingstein et al., 2006; Ahlstrom et al., 2012

Lichstein, Jeremy W.

471

Time Series Models: Hidden Markov Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time Series Models: Hidden Markov Models & Linear Dynamical Systems Sam Roweis Gatsby Computational before. Discrete state: { Moore and Mealy machines (engineering) { stochastic #12;nite state automata (CS chain with stochastic measurements. Gauss-Markov process in a pancake. PSfrag replacements x 1 y 1 x 2 y

Roweis, Sam

472

Time Series Models: Hidden Markov Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time Series Models: Hidden Markov Models & Linear Dynamical Systems Sam Roweis Gatsby Computational. Discrete state: { Moore and Mealy machines (engineering) { stochastic #12;nite state automata (CS with stochastic measurements. Gauss-Markov process in a pancake. PSfrag replacements x 1 y 1 x 2 y 2 x 3 y 3 x T y

Roweis, Sam

473

Model Validation Status Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective for the Model Validation Status Review was to perform a one-time evaluation of model validation associated with the analysis/model reports (AMRs) containing model input to total-system performance assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain site recommendation (SR). This review was performed in response to Corrective Action Request BSC-01-C-01 (Clark 2001, Krisha 2001) pursuant to Quality Assurance review findings of an adverse trend in model validation deficiency. The review findings in this report provide the following information which defines the extent of model validation deficiency and the corrective action needed: (1) AMRs that contain or support models are identified, and conversely, for each model the supporting documentation is identified. (2) The use for each model is determined based on whether the output is used directly for TSPA-SR, or for screening (exclusion) of features, events, and processes (FEPs), and the nature of the model output. (3) Two approaches are used to evaluate the extent to which the validation for each model is compliant with AP-3.10Q (Analyses and Models). The approaches differ in regard to whether model validation is achieved within individual AMRs as originally intended, or whether model validation could be readily achieved by incorporating information from other sources. (4) Recommendations are presented for changes to the AMRs, and additional model development activities or data collection, that will remedy model validation review findings, in support of licensing activities. The Model Validation Status Review emphasized those AMRs that support TSPA-SR (CRWMS M&O 2000bl and 2000bm). A series of workshops and teleconferences was held to discuss and integrate the review findings. The review encompassed 125 AMRs (Table 1) plus certain other supporting documents and data needed to assess model validity. The AMRs were grouped in 21 model areas representing the modeling of processes affecting the natural and engineered barriers, plus the TSPA model itself Description of the model areas is provided in Section 3, and the documents reviewed are described in Section 4. The responsible manager for the Model Validation Status Review was the Chief Science Officer (CSO) for Bechtel-SAIC Co. (BSC). The team lead was assigned by the CSO. A total of 32 technical specialists were engaged to evaluate model validation status in the 21 model areas. The technical specialists were generally independent of the work reviewed, meeting technical qualifications as discussed in Section 5.

E.L. Hardin

2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

474

The North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project Part 1: Overview and experimental design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison and evaluation effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. MsTMIP builds upon current and past synthesis activities, and has a unique framework designed to isolate, interpret, and inform understanding of how model structural differences impact estimates of carbon uptake and release. Here we provide an overview of the MsTMIP effort and describe how the MsTMIP experimental design enables the assessment and quantification of TBM structural uncertainty. Model structure refers to the types of processes considered (e.g. nutrient cycling, disturbance, lateral transport of carbon), and how these processes are represented (e.g. photosynthetic formulation, temperature sensitivity, respiration) in the models. By prescribing a common experimental protocol with standard spin-up procedures and driver data sets, we isolate any biases and variability in TBM estimates of regional and global carbon budgets resulting from differences in the models themselves (i.e. model structure) and model-specific parameter values. An initial intercomparison of model structural differences is represented using hierarchical cluster diagrams (a.k.a. dendrograms), which highlight similarities and differences in how models account for carbon cycle, vegetation, energy, and nitrogen cycle dynamics. We show that, despite the standardized protocol used to derive initial conditions, models show a high degree of variation for GPP, total living biomass, and total soil carbon, underscoring the influence of differences in model structure and parameterization on model estimates.

Huntzinger, D.N. [Northern Arizona University] [Northern Arizona University; Schwalm, C. [Northern Arizona University] [Northern Arizona University; Michalak, A.M [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford] [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford; Schaefer, K. [National Snow and Ice Data Center] [National Snow and Ice Data Center; King, A.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wei, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jacobson, A. [National Snow and Ice Data Center] [National Snow and Ice Data Center; Liu, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Cook, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Post, W.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Berthier, G. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Hayes, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Huang, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ito, A. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan] [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan; Lei, H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Lu, C. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.] [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Mao, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Peng, C.H. [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences] [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences; Peng, S. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Poulter, B. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Riccuito, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shi, X. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tian, H. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.] [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Wang, W. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field] [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field; Zeng, N. [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Zhao, F. [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Zhu, Q. [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University] [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Interactions of CO{sub 2} with temperature and other climate variables: Response of vegetation. Final report, September 1, 1988--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current project was initiated in 1991, and full details of the scope of the project are contained in the original proposal. that original proposal was reviewed and approved for three years funding. Progress made in 1991-92 and 1992-93 was described in annual Progress Reports and Statements of Work. This document summarizes progress made over the duration of the project, but with an emphasis on the final year`s (1993-94) results. Several of the important experiments are ongoing, to the extent that alternative funding could be arranged, and analyses of data from several of the earlier completed experiments is continuing. Therefore, this Final Report is also intermediary in nature, and additional results from this project will be reported in the open literature in the future. The overall objectives of the project were: (1) to examine experimentally, for major crop species, the interacting effects of CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and water availability on plant growth and development, (2) to model these interactions, and (3) to continue developing physiologically-based mechanistic models for predicting crop response to increased CO{sub 2} concentration and future global climate change.

Acock, B.; Kimball, B.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Energy-consumption modelling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A highly sophisticated and accurate approach is described to compute on an hourly or daily basis the energy consumption for space heating by individual buildings, urban sectors, and whole cities. The need for models and specifically weather-sensitive models, composite models, and space-heating models are discussed. Development of the Colorado State University Model, based on heat-transfer equations and on a heuristic, adaptive, self-organizing computation learning approach, is described. Results of modeling energy consumption by the city of Minneapolis and Cheyenne are given. Some data on energy consumption in individual buildings are included.

Reiter, E.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Biosphere Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the biosphere model, the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), which describes radionuclide transport processes in the biosphere and associated human exposure that may arise as the result of radionuclide release from the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of the process models that support the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), TSPA-LA. The ERMYN provides the capability of performing human radiation dose assessments. This report documents the biosphere model, which includes: (1) Describing the reference biosphere, human receptor, exposure scenarios, and primary radionuclides for each exposure scenario (Section 6.1); (2) Developing a biosphere conceptual model using site-specific features, events, and processes (FEPs) (Section 6.2), the reference biosphere (Section 6.1.1), the human receptor (Section 6.1.2), and approximations (Sections 6.3.1.4 and 6.3.2.4); (3) Building a mathematical model using the biosphere conceptual model (Section 6.3) and published biosphere models (Sections 6.4 and 6.5); (4) Summarizing input parameters for the mathematical model, including the uncertainty associated with input values (Section 6.6); (5) Identifying improvements in the ERMYN compared with the model used in previous biosphere modeling (Section 6.7); (6) Constructing an ERMYN implementation tool (model) based on the biosphere mathematical model using GoldSim stochastic simulation software (Sections 6.8 and 6.9); (7) Verifying the ERMYN by comparing output from the software with hand calculations to ensure that the GoldSim implementation is correct (Section 6.10); (8) Validating the ERMYN by corroborating it with published biosphere models; comparing conceptual models, mathematical models, and numerical results (Section 7).

D.W. Wu; A.J. Smith

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

478

UNSAT-H Version 2. 0: Unsaturated soil water and heat flow model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents UNSAT-H Version 2.0, a model for calculating water and heat flow in unsaturated media. The documentation includes the bases for the conceptual model and its numerical implementation, benchmark test cases, example simulations involving layered soils and plant transpiration, and the code listing. Waste management practices at the Hanford Site have included disposal of low-level wastes by near-surface burial. Predicting the future long-term performance of any such burial site in terms of migration of contaminants requires a model capable of simulating water flow in the unsaturated soils above the buried waste. The model currently used to meet this need is UNSAT-H. This model was developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to assess water dynamics of near-surface, waste-disposal sites at the Hanford Site. The code is primarily used to predict deep drainage as a function of such environmental conditions as climate, soil type, and vegetation. UNSAT-H is also used to simulate the effects of various practices to enhance isolation of wastes. 66 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

Fayer, M.J.; Jones, T.L.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Ratchet Model of Baryogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a toy model of baryogenesis which applies the `ratchet mechanism,' used frequently in the theory of biological molecular motors, to a model proposed by Dimopoulos and Susskind.

Takeuchi, Tatsu; Sugamoto, Akio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Ratchet Model of Baryogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a toy model of baryogenesis which applies the `ratchet mechanism,' used frequently in the theory of biological molecular motors, to a model proposed by Dimopoulos and Susskind.

Tatsu Takeuchi; Azusa Minamizaki; Akio Sugamoto

2013-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Sandia Modeling Tool Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hosted by the Energy Department and Western Area Power Administration, this webinar will show attendees about what collaborative, stakeholder-driven modeling is and how the modeling tools and process developed by Sandia can be used in Indian Country.

482

Aircraft collision models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction: The threat of midair collisions is one of the most serious problems facing the air traffic control system and has been studied by many researchers. The gas model is one of the models which describe the expected ...

Endoh, Shinsuke

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Optimizing Preventive Maintenance Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimizing Preventive Maintenance Models. Michael Bartholomew-Biggs. School of Physics Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire.

484

PREDICTIVE MODELS. Enhanced Oil Recovery Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREDICTIVE MODELS is a collection of five models - CFPM, CO2PM, ICPM, PFPM, and SFPM - used in the 1982-1984 National Petroleum Council study of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential. Each pertains to a specific EOR process designed to squeeze additional oil from aging or spent oil fields. The processes are: 1 chemical flooding, where soap-like surfactants are injected into the reservoir to wash out the oil; 2 carbon dioxide miscible flooding, where carbon dioxide mixes with the lighter hydrocarbons making the oil easier to displace; 3 in-situ combustion, which uses the heat from burning some of the underground oil to thin the product; 4 polymer flooding, where thick, cohesive material is pumped into a reservoir to push the oil through the underground rock; and 5 steamflood, where pressurized steam is injected underground to thin the oil. CFPM, the Chemical Flood Predictive Model, models micellar (surfactant)-polymer floods in reservoirs, which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic or caustic-polymer processes. CO2PM, the Carbon Dioxide miscible flooding Predictive Model, is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO2 injection or water-alternating gas processes. ICPM, the In-situ Combustion Predictive Model, computes the recovery and profitability of an in-situ combustion project from generalized performance predictive algorithms. PFPM, the Polymer Flood Predictive Model, is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. SFPM, the Steamflood Predictive Model, is applicable to the steam drive process, but not to cyclic steam injection (steam soak) processes.

Ray, R.M. [DOE Bartlesville Energy Technology Technology Center, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1992-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

485

Analysis of forest environmental measurements to estimate parameters of microclimate and air-pollution deposition-velocity models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for estimating flux densities and deposition of gaseous pollutants for a period of a year or more, using data collected for a period of a few days. The estimates are based on models which characterize the transfer of gases from the atmosphere to the vegetation as a series of resistances and then use linear statistical submodels based on experimental data to relate the resistances to the surrounding environment. The models are shown to fit the experimental data reasonably well. Annual values calculated for a young loblolly pine plantation were: evaporation 63.2 cm, carbon dioxide exchange 31.5 t/ha, and sulfur dioxide exchange 120 gm/ha. 17 references.

Murphy, Jr, C E; Lorenz, R

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

IR DIAL performance modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing a DIAL performance model for CALIOPE at LLNL. The intent of the model is to provide quick and interactive parameter sensitivity calculations with immediate graphical output. A brief overview of the features of the performance model is given, along with an example of performance calculations for a non-CALIOPE application.

Sharlemann, E.T.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Model Fire Protection Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To facilitate conformance with its fire safety directives and the implementation of a comprehensive fire protection program, DOE has developed a number of "model" program documents. These include a comprehensive model fire protection program, model fire hazards analyses and assessments, fire protection system inspection and testing procedures, and related material.

488

A Holographic Energy Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We suggest a holographic energy model in which the energy coming from spatial curvature, matter and radiation can be obtained by using the particle horizon for the infrared cut-off. We show the consistency between the holographic dark-energy model and the holographic energy model proposed in this paper. Then, we give a holographic description of the universe.

P. Huang; Yong-Chang Huang

2012-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

489

Rock Properties Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

C. Lum

2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

490

Models on Distributed Memory Architectures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0StatementsMixingAssessing85/2004 Y.He 1 MPH:

491

Chaos Models in Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper discusses the main ideas of the chaos theory and presents mainly the importance of the nonlinearities in the mathematical models. Chaos and order are apparently two opposite terms. The fact that in chaos can be found a certain precise symmetry (Feigenbaum numbers) is even more surprising. As an illustration of the ubiquity of chaos, three models among many other existing models that have chaotic features are presented here: the nonlinear feedback profit model, one model for the simulation of the exchange rate and one application of the chaos theory in the capital markets.

Sorin Vlad; Paul Pascu; Nicolae Morariu

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

492

UZ Colloid Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

M. McGraw

2000-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

493

Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Up-scaling from physically based numerical simulations at hillslope scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall-runoff response, especially in steep forested regions. However; its contribution is poorly represented in current generation of land surface hydrological models (LSMs) and catchment-scale rainfall-runoff models. The lack of physical basis of common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global models. This paper is aimed at deriving physically based parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship relating to subsurface flow. These parameterizations are derived through a two-step up-scaling procedure: firstly, through simulations with a physically based (Darcian) subsurface flow model for idealized three dimensional rectangular hillslopes, accounting for within-hillslope random heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties, and secondly, through subsequent up-scaling to the catchment scale by accounting for between-hillslope and within-catchment heterogeneity of topographic features (e.g., slope). These theoretical simulation results produced parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship in terms of soil hydraulic properties, topographic slope and their heterogeneities, which were consistent with results of previous studies. Yet, regionalization of the resulting storage-discharge relations across 50 actual catchments in eastern United States, and a comparison of the regionalized results with equivalent empirical results obtained on the basis of analysis of observed streamflow recession curves, revealed a systematic inconsistency. It was found that the difference between the theoretical and empirically derived results could be explained, to first order, by climate in the form of climatic aridity index. This suggests a possible codependence of climate, soils, vegetation and topographic properties, and suggests that subsurface flow parameterization needed for ungauged locations must account for both the physics of flow in heterogeneous landscapes, and the co-dependence of soil and topographic properties with climate, including possibly the mediating role of vegetation.

Ali, Melkamu; Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Fiori, Aldo; Sivapalan, Murugesu

2014-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

494

Calibrated Properties Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model report is to document the calibrated properties model that provides calibrated property sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models (UZ models). The calibration of the property sets is performed through inverse modeling. This work followed, and was planned in, ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 1.2.6 and 2.1.1.6). Direct inputs to this model report were derived from the following upstream analysis and model reports: ''Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170038]); ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169855]); ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]); ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]). Additionally, this model report incorporates errata of the previous version and closure of the Key Technical Issue agreement TSPAI 3.26 (Section 6.2.2 and Appendix B), and it is revised for improved transparency.

T. Ghezzehej

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

495

Foam process models.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we summarize our work on developing a production level foam processing computational model suitable for predicting the self-expansion of foam in complex geometries. The model is based on a finite element representation of the equations of motion, with the movement of the free surface represented using the level set method, and has been implemented in SIERRA/ARIA. An empirically based time- and temperature-dependent density model is used to encapsulate the complex physics of foam nucleation and growth in a numerically tractable model. The change in density with time is at the heart of the foam self-expansion as it creates the motion of the foam. This continuum-level model uses an homogenized description of foam, which does not include the gas explicitly. Results from the model are compared to temperature-instrumented flow visualization experiments giving the location of the foam front as a function of time for our EFAR model system.

Moffat, Harry K.; Noble, David R.; Baer, Thomas A. (Procter & Gamble Co., West Chester, OH); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Mondy, Lisa Ann

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

RHP: HOW CLIMATE MODELS GAIN AND EXERCISE How Climate Models Gain and Exercise Authority  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional models, intermediate complexity models, general circulation models, and Earth system models. 2 www

Hulme, Mike

497

Constitutive models in LAME.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Library of Advanced Materials for Engineering (LAME) provides a common repository for constitutive models that can be used in computational solid mechanics codes. A number of models including both hypoelastic (rate) and hyperelastic (total strain) constitutive forms have been implemented in LAME. The structure and testing of LAME is described in Scherzinger and Hammerand ([3] and [4]). The purpose of the present report is to describe the material models which have already been implemented into LAME. The descriptions are designed to give useful information to both analysts and code developers. Thus far, 33 non-ITAR/non-CRADA protected material models have been incorporated. These include everything from the simple isotropic linear elastic models to a number of elastic-plastic models for metals to models for honeycomb, foams, potting epoxies and rubber. A complete description of each model is outside the scope of the current report. Rather, the aim here is to delineate the properties, state variables, functions, and methods for each model. However, a brief description of some of the constitutive details is provided for a number of the material models. Where appropriate, the SAND reports available for each model have been cited. Many models have state variable aliases for some or all of their state variables. These alias names can be used for outputting desired quantities. The state variable aliases available for results output have been listed in this report. However, not all models use these aliases. For those models, no state variable names are listed. Nevertheless, the number of state variables employed by each model is always given. Currently, there are four possible functions for a material model. This report lists which of these four methods are employed in each material model. As far as analysts are concerned, this information is included only for the awareness purposes. The analyst can take confidence in the fact that model has been properly implemented and the methods necessary for achieving accurate and efficient solutions have been incorporated. The most important method is the getStress function where the actual material model evaluation takes place. Obviously, all material models incorporate this function. The initialize function is included in most material models. The initialize function is called once at the beginning of an analysis and its primary purpose is to initialize the material state variables associated with the model. Many times, there is some information which can be set once per load step. For instance, we may have temperature dependent material properties in an analysis where temperature is prescribed. Instead of setting those parameters at each iteration in a time step, it is much more efficient to set them once per time step at the beginning of the step. These types of load step initializations are performed in the loadStepInit method. The final function used by many models is the pcElasticModuli method which changes the moduli that are to be used by the elastic preconditioner in Adagio. The moduli for the elastic preconditioner are set during the initialization of Adagio. Sometimes, better convergence can be achieved by changing these moduli for the elastic preconditioner. For instance, it typically helps to modify the preconditioner when the material model has temperature dependent moduli. For many material models, it is not necessary to change the values of the moduli that are set initially in the code. Hence, those models do not have pcElasticModuli functions. All four of these methods receive information from the matParams structure as described by Scherzinger and Hammerand.

Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Scherzinger, William Mark

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : installation manual.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.

Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J.; Vogt, M. C.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

499

Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : programmer's manual.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.

Klaus, C. M.; Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J.; Vogt, M. C.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

500

Sandia National Laboratories: Modeling & Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Grid Integration, Wind Energy Sandia finalized and submitted the updated "WECC Wind Power Plant Dynamic Model-ing Guide" and the "WECC PV Power Plant Dynamic Modeling...