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1

MAPSS Vegetation Modeling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MAPSS Vegetation Modeling MAPSS Vegetation Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MAPSS Vegetation Modeling Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Biomass, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.fs.fed.us/pnw/mdr/mapss/ MAPSS Vegetation Modeling Screenshot References: MAPSS[1] Applications "A landscape- to global-scale vegetation distribution model that was developed to simulate the potential biosphere impacts and biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks from climatic change. Model output from MAPSS has been used extensively in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate

2

MAPSS Version 1.0 Available  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MAPSS (Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System Model) Version 1.0 Available MAPSS (Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System Model) Version 1.0 Available The ORNL NASA DAAC is please to announce the release of a new vegetation distribution model product, MAPSS: Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System Model, Version 1.0. The MAPSS model was developed by the Pacific Northwest Research Station USDA Forest Service and has been used extensively by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) in regional and global assessments of climate change impacts on vegetation. The MAPSS model simulates the potential natural vegetation that could exist on any upland site in the world under present, past, or future climate change. It operates on the fundamental principal that ecosystems will tend to maximize the leaf area that can be supported at a site by available soil

3

Monte Carlo simulation model for electromagnetic scattering from vegetation and inversion of vegetation parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis research, a coherent scattering model for microwave remote sensing of vegetation canopy is developed on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations. An accurate model of vegetation structure is essential for the ...

Wang, Li-Fang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Linking Models and Data on Vegetation Structure Submitted to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Linking Models and Data on Vegetation Structure Submitted to: Journal of Geophysical Research the original development of "Nachhaltigkeit" or in English "sustainability" with the Germans in the mid-18th

Moorcroft, Paul R.

5

A phenomenological model for the flow resistance over submerged vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A phenomenological model for the flow resistance over submerged vegetation Alexandra G. Konings,1: Konings, A. G., G. G. Katul, and S. E. Thompson (2012), A phenomenological model for the flow resistance [2002]. In this paper, a phenomenological approach is used to describe the momentum transfer

Katul, Gabriel

6

Uncertainty analysis of vegetation distribution in the northern high latitudes during the 21st century with a dynamic vegetation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study aims to assess how high-latitude vegetation may respond under various climate scenarios during the 21st century with a focus on analyzing model parameters induced uncertainty and how this uncertainty compares ...

Jiang, Yueyang

7

Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V{sub c,max} (maximum carboxylation rate) and J{sub max} (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the vegetation feedbacks to climate in Earth system models.

Xu, Chonggang [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fisher, Rosie [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cai, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); McDowell, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of wave attenuation through artificial vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? 5.1. Introduction to COULWAVE Boussinesq Model ................................................. 51? 5.2. Numerical Modeling of Vegetation Friction Factor .............................................. 53? CHAPTER VI - CONCLUSIONS... Additionally, vegetation directly increases the durability of shorelines through the root systems and enhances the storage of sand in dunes (Dean, 1978). Until recently the importance and function of wetlands was not well understood, and the amount...

Augustin, Lauren Nicole

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 2 Recent Changes in Arctic Vegetation: Satellite Observations and Simulation Model with a combination of satellite observations (Fig. 2.1) and field mea- surements, as projected by simulation modeling

Bhatt, Uma

10

Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using two climate-vegetation model simulations from the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, version 2), we investigate vegetation-precipitation feedbacks across North Africa during the mid-Holocene. From mid-Holocene snapshot runs of FOAM and CCSM2, we detect a negative feedback at the annual timescale with our statistical analysis. Using the Monte- Carlo bootstrap method, the annual negative feedback is further confirmed to be significant in both simulations. Additional analysis shows that this negative interaction is partially caused by the competition between evaporation and transpiration in North African grasslands. Furthermore, we find the feedbacks decrease with increasing timescales, and change signs from positive to negative at increasing timescales in FOAM. The proposed mechanism for this sign switch is associated with the different persistent timescales of upper and lower soil water contents, and their interactions with vegetation and atmospheric precipitation.

Wang, Yi; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Gallimore, Robert; Levis, Samuel; Kutzbach, John E.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Modeling of the interactions between forest vegetation, disturbances, and sediment yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of the interactions between forest vegetation, disturbances, and sediment yields Erkan on the frequency and magnitude of sediment delivery from a small watershed ($3.9 km2 ) in the Idaho batholith weathering and the divergence of diffusive sediment transport on hillslopes. Soil removal is due to episodic

Tarboton, David

12

Simulating Surface Energy Fluxes and Radiometric Surface Temperatures for Two Arid Vegetation Communities Using the SHAW Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While land–atmosphere transfer models have been pursued for over 30 years, Soil–Vegetation–Atmosphere–Transfer (SVAT) models are gaining attention only recently as the need to better represent the interaction between the soil and atmosphere in ...

G. N. Flerchinger; W. P. Kustas; M. A. Weltz

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Climate change and Ecotone boundaries: Insights from a cellular automata ecohydrology model in a Mediterranean catchment with topography controlled vegetation patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Regions of vegetation transitions (ecotones) are known to be highly sensitive to climate fluctuations. In this study, the Cellular-Automata Tree Grass Shrub Simulator (CATGraSS) has been modified, calibrated and used with downscaled future climate scenarios to examine the role of climate change on vegetation patterns in a steep mountainous catchment (1.3 km2) located in Sicily, Italy. In the catchment, north-facing slopes are mostly covered by trees and grass, and south-facing slopes by Indian Fig opuntia and grass, with grasses dominating as elevation grows. \\{CATGraSS\\} simulates solar radiation, evapotranspiration, and soil moisture in space and time. Each model cell can hold a single plant type or can be bare soil. Plant competition is modeled explicitly through mortality and the establishment of individual plants in open spaces. In this study, \\{CATGraSS\\} is modified to account for heterogeneity in soil thickness and tested in the study catchment using the historical climate of the region. Predicted vegetation patterns are compared with those obtained from satellite images. Results of model under current climate underscore the importance of solar irradiance and soil thickness, especially in the uplands where soil is shallow, in determining vegetation composition over complex terrain. A stochastic weather generator is used to generate future climate change scenarios for the catchment by downscaling GCM realizations in space and time. Future increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration was considered through modifying the vegetation water use efficiency and stomatal resistance for our study site. Model results suggest that vegetation pattern is highly sensitive to temperature and rainfall variations provided by climate scenarios (30% reduction of the annual precipitation and a 2.8 °C increase of the mean annual temperature). Future climate change is predicted to bring a considerable reorganization of the plant composition following topographic patterns, leading to a decrease of trees cover at the expenses of a grass expansion, which will cause loss of landscape vegetation diversity.

Domenico Caracciolo; Leonardo Valerio Noto; Erkan Istanbulluoglu; Simone Fatichi; Xiaochi Zhou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

A model of phosphorus cycling to explore the role of biomass turnover in submerged aquatic vegetation wetlands for Everglades restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Engineered wetlands using submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) are a cornerstone to the Stormwater Treatment Area (STA) project for stripping phosphorus from agricultural stormwater and lake water before entering protected Everglades marshes in south Florida, USA. However, recent efforts have suggested that the apparent lowest achievable outflow P (C*) in SAV systems (?16 ?g/l) may not be low enough for proposed regulatory criteria. Thus, deepened predictive understanding on the functionality of these systems is of critical importance. Here, we develop a steady-state mass balance model of intermediate complexity to investigate C* in SAV systems. The model focuses on the role of SAV biomass turnover and P release to the water column, drawing upon established principles from shallow lake studies. This study introduces several large and unique datasets collected from a single study site (STA-2 Cell 3) over a 10-year period and demonstrates coherence in these data through the modeling approach. The datasets included inflow–outflow values, P storage in accrued sediment at two intervals, annual surveys of SAV species composition, gradients of SAV tissue-P, and gradients of internal water column P concentration (previously published). The model was implemented and calibrated in an uncertainty framework with Monte Carlo methods, threshold screening, and multi-criteria limits of acceptability. Model calibration and validation appeared successful, resulting distributions of model parameters and accepted model simulations were relatively narrow, and results deepened perspectives on the previously identified C*. Rooted SAV species may be mining substantial P from underlying soils via root uptake and thus contributing internal loads. Steady turnover and decomposition of SAV biomass may be accounting for up to about a third of the background C*. These perspectives are relevant to STA optimization; our unique data, usage, and calibration strategy should be of interest to the aquatic ecosystem modeling community in general.

John M. Juston; Thomas A. DeBusk; Kevin A. Grace; Scott D. Jackson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Influence of beaver impoundments on vegetative composition, and modeling habitat suitability as a tool for wildlife management and conservation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Beavers (Castor canadensis) can have dramatic effects on vegetative communities through impounding streams and wetlands. These alterations may influence rare plant species where beaver create… (more)

Bonner, Jerri LeAnne.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Vegetation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vegetation Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleVegetation&oldid612270" Category: NEPA Resources...

18

Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

Chen, Tsuhan

19

Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment Models for Consumption of Raw Vegetables Irrigated with Reclaimed Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The practice of adding water to cut surfaces to keep...waxed boxes, wherein water pools. Feeding damage by insects...Agriculture methods Conservation of Natural Resources...Food Contamination Fresh Water virology Models, Biological...

Andrew J. Hamilton; Frank Stagnitti; Robert Premier; Anne-Maree Boland; Glenn Hale

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

A fully traits-based approach to modeling global vegetation distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biosphere–climate interactions. Despite their importance, DGVMs are among the most uncertain components of earth system models when predicting climate change (2). DGVMs have been built around the concept of Plant Functional Types (PFTs...

Peter M. van Bodegom; Jacob C. Douma; Lieneke M. Verheijen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Improving parameterization of scalar transport through vegetation in a coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several regional-scale ecosystem models currently parameterize subcanopy scalar transport using a rough-wall boundary eddy diffusivity formulation. This formulation predicts unreasonably high soil evaporation beneath tall, ...

Link, Percy Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Spatial and temporal signatures of fragility and threshold proximity in modelled semi-arid vegetation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...other similar simulations when neighbourhood...model grids from simulations, where alpha...consequence of the processes described in...using the rlowess Matlab function...the aryule Matlab function...M. 1952 The chemical basis of morphogenesis...justification Adobe PDF - rspb20101750supp2...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Pattern selection and hysteresis in the Rietkerk model for banded vegetation in semi-arid environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...they appear to be restricted to the Rocky Mountains. Snow drifting along the lines...plant-surface water model system in an arid flat environment. Bull. Math. Biol. 74...dominant controls of ribbon forests in the Rocky Mountains, USA. Appl. Veg. Sci. 12...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Vegetation Collections Project Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vegetation Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation Collections Overview Vegetation regulates the flow of numerous biogeochemical cycles, most critically those of water, carbon, and nitrogen; it is also of great importance in local and global energy balances. Vegetation collections data include: Biomass Biome Characteristics Litter Chemistry and Decomposition Geoecology Nutrient Concentration, Profiles, and Turnover Global Fire Emissions, Vegetation, and Leaf Area Index (LAI) Ecosystem Structure and Function Phenoregions Carbon Flux Vegetation Resources The following resources related to Vegetation Collections are maintained by the ORNL DAAC: Global Leaf Area Index Data Net Primary Production Project Get Vegetation Data Find and order data sets: See list of data sets and download data

25

Vegetation-climate feedbacks in a greenhouse world  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atmospheric CO2 concen- trations on climate.Therefore, complete models of climate, atmosphere and vegetation (earth system models) must incorporate all of these processes. This section will consider the future interactions between vegetation...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Position Description: Ph.D. Student in Vegetation Modeling and Climate Vulnerability Montana State University is seeking a Ph.D. student for a NASA Applied Sciences project on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biological resources under climate and land use change. The project will use NASA resources to inform climate to present and under projected future climate and land use scenarios using NASA and other data and modelsPosition Description: Ph.D. Student in Vegetation Modeling and Climate Vulnerability Assessment

Hansen, Andrew J.

27

Survey Results In ORNL DAAC News ORNL DAAC News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Results In Results In ORNL DAAC News ORNL DAAC News WINTER 2008 T he ORNL Distrib- uted Active Archive Center (DAAC) is a NASA-sponsored source for biogeochemical and ecological data and services useful in environmental research. The ORNL DAAC cur- rently archives and distr ibutes greater than 780 products cat- egorized as Field Cam- paign, Land Validation, Regional and Global or Model Archive. Please visit us online at http://daac.ornl.gov for a comprehensive description of data, ser- vices, and tools avail- able from the ORNL DAAC. Archived news can be found at http:// daac.ornl.gov/news. shtml. http://www.nasa.gov MAPSS Vegetation Distribution Model Available MAPSS Model * Web Site Outage * Gap-Filled and * Smoothed LAI/fPAR New Search Tools *

28

Impact of Hillslope-Scale Organization of Topography, Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, and Vegetation on Modeling Surface Microwave Radiation Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microwave radiometry will emerge as an important tool for global remote sensing of near-surface soil moisture in the coming decade. In this modeling study, we find that hillslope-scale topography (tens of meters) influences ...

Flores, Alejandro N.

29

Effects of vegetation and soil moisture on the simulated land surface processes from the coupled WRF/Noah model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulations. Meso- scale models, which have been used not only for numerical weather prediction but also surface and atmosphere into numerical weather or climate prediction. This study describes coupled WRF [Chen et al., 1997; Pielke et al., 1997]. Numerical weather prediction with high spatial and tempo- ral

Small, Eric

30

Analytical expressions of variability in ecosystem structure and function obtained from three-dimensional stochastic vegetation modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...temperature, T a, horizontal wind speed, U x , relative humidity...area for a biologically diverse system through a superposition of separate...Strahler, and CE Woodcock. 1995 A hybrid geometric optical-radiative...formulations for the partitioning of solar radiation in land surface models...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Vegetable Gardening in Containers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This 7 page publications explains how to grow vegetables in containers when insufficient space or unsutable soil conditions make a traditional garden difficult to achieve. Topics include: container materials, crop selection, growing media, seeding...

Masabni, Joseph; Cotner, Sam

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

32

Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate Area and Carbon Content of Sphagnum Since Last Glacial Maximum (2002) TDE Model Intercomparison Project Data Archive Presentations and abstracts from the recent DOE Terrestrial Science Team Meeting (Argonne National Laboratory, October 29-31, 2001) FACE (Free-Air CO2 Enrichment) Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth (2001), NDP-078A | PDF Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation and Ecosystems: 1990-1999 Literature (2000), CDIAC-129 Direct effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on plants and ecosystems: An updated bibliographic data base (1994), CDIAC-70 A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated

33

Oak Woodland Vegetation Dynamics: A State and Transition Approach1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a format that is sensible and accessible to natural resource managers. State and transition models have93 Oak Woodland Vegetation Dynamics: A State and Transition Approach1 Melvin R. George2 and Maximo and transition format. Keywords: Oak-woodlands, state and transition models, succession, vegetation dynamics

Standiford, Richard B.

34

Vegetables: Selection, Care, Cooking.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if cooking whole. Place in boiling, salted water (1 teaspoon sa!t 1 to each quart of water). Bring water and vege- tables to a boil quickly; reduce temperature to simmer and cook until tender but firm. Bacon or ham drippings and salt pork or ham chunks..., cauliflower, spin- ach and other greens may be cooked this way. Slice, dice or shred the vegetable. Melt a small amount of cooking fat (1 to 2 table- spoons) in a heavy frypan or saucepan; add the vegetables, salt lightly and toss until the vege- table...

Reasonover, Frances; Mason, Louise; Tribble, Marie; Cox, Maeona

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Vegetable Gardening in Containers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are indicated in Table 1. * Growing Media Synthetic "soils" are best suited for vegetable container gardening. These mixes may be composed of sawdust, wood chips, peat moss, perlite, ver miculite or almost any other type of media. Regardless of what... "soils" are available from gar den centers, or one can be pre pared by mixing horticultu ral grade vermiculite, peat moss, limestone, superphosphate, and garden fertilizer. To 1 bushel each of vermiculite and peat moss, add 10 tablespoons...

Cotner, Sam

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

ERDC/CERLTR-05-39 Simulation of Vegetation Recovery from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/CERLTR-05-39 Simulation of Vegetation Recovery from Military Disturbances on Fort Bliss Tamara of Vegetation Recovery from Military Disturbances on Fort Bliss Tamara Hochstrasser and Debra Peters USDA the vegetation simulation modeling capabilities of Fort Bliss, Texas, for evaluating the effects of military

Fehmi, Jeffrey S.

37

-Mapping Mountain vegetation -1 Applied Vegetation Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modeling, image-based texture analysis, and object-based classification Dobrowski, Solomon Z.1*; Safford Pacific Southwest Region, 1323 Club Drive, Vallejo, CA 94592, USA; *Corresponding author; E-mail solomon, is devising a methodology that leverages the strengths of both predictive modeling and image-based approaches

Dobrowski, Solomon

38

Investigation of Soil Moisture - Vegetation Interactions in Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but not well understood climate factor. This study examines soil moisture-vegetation health interactions using both in situ observations and land surface model simulations. For the observational study, soil moisture is taken from 20 in situ Oklahoma Mesonet...

Ford, Trenton W.

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

39

Investigation of the effect of a circular patch of vegetation on turbulence generation and sediment deposition using four case studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study describes the spatial distribution of sediment deposition in the wake of a circular patch of model vegetation and the effect of the patch on turbulence and mean flow. Two difference types pf vegetation were used ...

Ortiz, Alejandra C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic vegetation types Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Dynamic vegetation Figure 3: Evolution of regional arctic models. Geophysical ocean-sea ice... that can be adapted to focus resolution on the Arctic. Stand alone ASM...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Texas Home Vegetable Gardening Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With this manual, home gardeners are sure to be successful growing vegetables. It includes information on garden planning, crop selection, soil preparation, fertilization, planting techniques, watering, pest control and harvesting. Tables show...

Masabni, Joseph

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

42

Selecting Fresh Fruits and Vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time. Selecting Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Amanda Scott* E-197 9/08 This publication was sponsored by a grant from the Initiative for Future Agriculture Food Systems, a program of the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, which...

Scott, Amanda

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

43

Energy saving performance of green vegetation on LEED certified buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sustainable building practices can considerably reduce building's environmental impact in energy consumption. Covering a building envelope with green vegetation, such as green roof and green wall, is considered a sustainable construction practice, as green vegetation has a positive performance in energy savings. It reduces heat flux and solar reflectivity, generates evaporative cooling, increases thermal performance of the building envelope, and blocks the wind effect on the building. This paper analyses the energy performance of green vegetation in a high occupancy LEED Gold standard building in Canada. DesignBuilder software was used to model the energy consumption for heating and cooling, and EnergyPlus software was used to perform the detailed energy simulations. The developed simulation model was validated with the actual energy consumptions of the selected building. Three different scenarios of green vegetation were simulated and the results show that green vegetation could considerably reduce the negative heat transfer through the building façade in summer and winter months. However, the analysis demonstrated that the green vegetation is not cost-effective in winter months or cold climatic regions due to the low energy savings performance. The paper concludes with recommendations to improve the overall energy performance in green buildings.

H. Feng; K. Hewage

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Sky Vegetables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vegetables Vegetables Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Vegetables Address 45 Rosemary Street, Suite F Place Needham, MA Zip 02494 Sector Solar Website http://www.skyvegetables.com/i Coordinates 42.2882945°, -71.2335259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.2882945,"lon":-71.2335259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

Vegetation of Upper Coastal Plain depression wetlands: Environmental templates and wetland dynamics within a landscape framework.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reference wetlands play an important role in efforts to protect wetlands and assess wetland condition. Because wetland vegetation integrates the influence of many ecological factors, a useful reference system would identify natural vegetation types and include models relating vegetation to important regional geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical properties. Across the U.S. Atlantic Coastal Plain, depression wetlands are a major hydrogeomorphic class with diverse characteristics. For 57 functional depression wetlands in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, we characterized the principal vegetation types and used a landscape framework to assess how local (wetland-level) factors and regional landscape settings potentially influence vegetation composition and dynamics. Wetland sites were stratified across three Upper Coastal Plain landscape settings that differ in soils, surface geology, topography, and land use. We sampled plant composition, measured relevant local variables, and analyzed historical transitions in vegetative cover types. Cluster analysis identified six vegetation types, ranging from open-water ponds and emergent marshes to closed forests. Significant vegetation-environment relationships suggested environmental ''templates'' for plant community development. Of all local factors examined, wetland hydrologic regime was most strongly correlated with vegetation type, but depression size, soil textural type, and disturbance history were also significant. Because hydrogeologic settings influence wetland features, local factors important to vegetation were partly predictable from landscape setting, and thus wetland types were distributed non-randomly across landscape settings. Analysis of long-term vegetation change indicated relative stability in some wetlands and succession in others. We developed a landscape-contingent model for vegetation dynamics, with hydroperiod and fire as major driving variables. The wetland classification, environmental templates, and dynamics model provide a reference framework to guide conservation priorities and suggest possible outcomes of restoration or management.

De Steven, Diane; Toner, Maureen, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Intercomparison of Simulated Global Vegetation Distributions in Response to 6 kyr BP Orbital Forcing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The response of ten atmospheric general circulation models to orbital forcing at 6 kyr BP has been investigated using the BIOME model, which predicts equilibrium vegetation distribution, as a diagnostic. Several common features emerge: (a) ...

S. P. Harrison; D. Jolly; F. Laarif; A. Abe-Ouchi; B. Dong; K. Herterich; C. Hewitt; S. Joussaume; J. E. Kutzbach; J. Mitchell; N. de Noblet; P. Valdes

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fruit and Vegetable Consumption by Low-Income Americans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ML, Schillo BA. 5 A Day fruit and vegetable interventionof perceived barriers to fruit and vegetable consumptionKA, Potter JD. Vegetables, fruit, and cancer prevention: a

Sisson, Aimee

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Environmental Effects of Woody Vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State University of Science and Technology, Ames, Iowa. In Iowa, trees and shrubs are a vital asset1 Environmental Effects of Woody Vegetation F-319/August 2005 FORESTRY EXTENSION NOTES IOWA STATE in improv- ing human comfort by shielding people from direct solar radiation. What happens to the solar

Koford, Rolf R.

49

Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-page fact sheet discussing the pitfalls of using straight vegetable oil (SVO) as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Contribution of Dynamic Vegetation Phenology to Decadal Climate Predictability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, the impact of coupling and initializing the leaf area index from the dynamic vegetation model Lund–Potsdam–Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ-GUESS) is analyzed on skill of decadal predictions in the fully coupled atmosphere–land–...

Martina Weiss; Paul A. Miller; Bart J. J. M. van den Hurk; Twan van Noije; Simona ?tef?nescu; Reindert Haarsma; Lambertus H. van Ulft; Wilco Hazeleger; Philippe Le Sager; Benjamin Smith; Guy Schurgers

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Vegetation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rails 'R Utility ROW Roads oTES Plants (2) 2 Other Set-Asides D Three Rivers Landfill D Hydric Soils 380 Soils Soil Series and Phase DBaB DBaC .Pk TrB TuE TuF VaC o...

52

Regime shifts in models of dryland vegetation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Department of Solar Energy and Environmental...pattern-forming systems showing self-organized...incipient shift to a hybrid state consisting...conditions of high wind power-[33...multitude of stable hybrid states. The...extended root systems in inducing hybrid states. This...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ecophysiology of forest and savanna vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lowland vegetation of tropical South America—An overview, instate for tropical South America, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 30(dry seasonal forests of South America, Ann. Mo. Bot. Gard. ,

Lloyd, J.; Goulden, M. L.; Ometto, J. P.; Patino, S.; Fyllas, N. M.; Quesada, C. A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Sandhills Vegetation Will heat from the pipeline affect the growth of vegetation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sandhills Vegetation Will heat from the pipeline affect the growth of vegetation? What we know. Will the Sandhills vegetation grow back after the pipeline is constructed? What we know ­ response by Professor Jerry issues, revegetation problems on the pipeline will be at discreet locations. If surrounding pastures

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

55

Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients: 1 1/2 pounds fresh or frozen fish fillets or steaks 4 sodium) Directions 1. Rinse fish under cold water and pat dry. Place 4 individual portions of fish on 4 pieces of foil large enough to completely wrap around the fish and vegetables. 2. Diagonally slice

Liskiewicz, Maciej

56

Fruit and Vegetable Safety Challenge Game Directions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Fruit and Vegetable Safety Challenge Game Directions Equipment needed: 1. Computer, projector (fruits, vegetables, and meat) 6. Cleaning solutions (bleach, soap, water) 7. Stop watch 8. Team prizes How to Start: This game can be used with the "A Healthy Harvest: Safe Handling of Fresh Fruits

57

Bringing fruit, vegetaBle and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bringing fruit, vegetaBle and plant products into the uK Don't break the law check the rules before you travel securing our Border CONTROLLING MIGRATION #12;there are very strict controls on what fruit the list below), you can bring in any fruit, vegetables or plant products ­ as long as they are grown

Molinari, Marc

58

HYDROPONIC VEGETABLE GARDENING Marcy Stanton, Master Gardener  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a water source. Lighting: A simple 2-bulb 4-foot fluorescent fixture with standard COOL WHITE bulbs is adequate for most leafy vegetables. Do not buy any of the fancy fluorescent grow bulbs; you are wasting your money on these expensive bulbs. When we set up a fluorescent light system to grow vegetables, what

New Hampshire, University of

59

CONNECTICUT VEGETABLE & SMALL FRUIT GROWERS' Thursday, January 15, 2015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONNECTICUT VEGETABLE & SMALL FRUIT GROWERS' CONFERENCE Thursday, January 15, 2015 Maneeley. Connecticut Vegetable & Small Fruit Growers' Conference (We need folks to pre-register so Maneeley's has:______________________________________ ---- Town:______________ State:_____ Zip:____________ ---- Check off: Vegetable grower ___ Fruit grower

Alpay, S. Pamir

60

Towards a theory of ecotone resilience: Coastal vegetation on a salinity gradient  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ecotones represent locations where vegetation change is likely to occur as a result of climate and other environmental changes. Using a model of an ecotone vulnerable to such future changes, we estimated the resilience of the ecotone to disturbances. The specific ecotone is that between two different vegetation types, salinity-tolerant and salinity-intolerant, along a gradient in groundwater salinity. In the case studied, each vegetation type, through soil feedback loops, promoted local soil salinity levels that favor itself in competition with the other type. Bifurcation analysis was used to study the system of equations for the two vegetation types and soil salinity. Alternative stable equilibria, one for salinity-tolerant and one for salinity intolerant vegetation, were shown to exist over a region of the groundwater salinity gradient, bounded by two bifurcation points. This region was shown to depend sensitively on parameters such as the rate of upward infiltration of salinity from groundwater into the soil due to evaporation. We showed also that increasing diffusion rates of vegetation can lead to shrinkage of the range between the two bifurcation points. Sharp ecotones are typical of salt-tolerant vegetation (mangroves) near the coastline and salt-intolerant vegetation inland, even though the underlying elevation and groundwater salinity change very gradually. A disturbance such as an input of salinity to the soil from a storm surge could upset this stable boundary, leading to a regime shift of salinity-tolerant vegetation inland. We showed, however, that, for our model as least, a simple pulse disturbance would not be sufficient; the salinity would have to be held at a high level, as a ‘press’, for some time. The approach used here should be generalizable to study the resilience of a variety of ecotones to disturbances.

Jiang Jiang; Daozhou Gao; Donald L. DeAngelis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Use of Two-Stream Approximations for the Parameterization of Solar Radiative Energy Fluxes through Vegetation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two-stream approximations have been used widely and for a long time in the field of radiative transfer through vegetation in various contexts and in the last 10 years also to model the hemispheric reflectance of vegetated surfaces in numerical ...

Joachim H. Josepoh; Jean Laquinta; Bernard Pinty

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

3, 10211043, 2006 Effects of vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

patterns on yields of the surface and subsurface waters in the Heishui Alpine Valley in west China Y. Liu 1 between different vegetation types and water yields were investi- gated in the Heishui Valley of the upper

Boyer, Edmond

63

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM CHANGE A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center of the uncertainties with climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems is understanding where transitions

64

The limited growth of vegetated shear layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In contrast to free shear layers, which grow continuously downstream, shear layers generated by submerged vegetation grow only to a finite thickness. Because these shear layers are characterized by coherent vortex structures ...

Ghisalberti, M.

65

Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

N /A

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Safe Storage of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proper storage of fresh fruits and vegetables can help consumers avoid foodborne illness. This publication explains how to safely store apples, bananas, berries, beets, broccoli, carrots, corn, grapes, herbs, lettuce and greens, melons, nectarines...

Scott, Amanda

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

67

Nonlinear Characteristics of Wave Propagation over Vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The attenuation of wave energy by submerged or near-emergent coastal vegetation is one of the prominent methods of energy dissipation in areas with significant presence of wetlands. In this thesis, the nature of this dissipation in nearshore random...

Venkattaramanan, Aravinda

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

Membrane degumming of crude vegetable oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crude vegetable oils contain various minor substances like phospholipids, coloring pigments, and free fatty acids (FFA) that may affect quality of the oil. Reduction of energy costs and waste disposal are major concerns for many oil refiners who...

Lin, Lan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

February 20, 2003 February 20, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-123: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 19, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-126: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 18, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-125: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 18, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-124: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 12, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-121: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 10, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-120: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Benton County, Washington January 16, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program December 24, 2002

70

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 19, 2002 July 19, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-96: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Snohomish District Substations July 19, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-70: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 9, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-81: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 1, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-84: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 1, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-80: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 1, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-78: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program June 21, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-75: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program May 31, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-58: Supplement Analysis

71

The wake structure behind a porous obstruction and its implications for deposition near a finite patch of emergent vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This experimental study describes the mean and turbulent flow structure in the wake of a circular array of cylinders, which is a model for a patch of emergent vegetation. The patch diameter, D, and patch density, a (frontal ...

Chen, Zhengbing

72

Direct green extraction of volatile aroma compounds using vegetable oils as solvents: Theoretical and experimental solubility study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The current study aimed at evaluation of the dissolving power of various vegetable oils in both theoretical and experimental way for the extraction of volatile aroma compounds (VACs) from basil. The solubility of six main \\{VACs\\} from basil in ten vegetable oils was firstly investigated through a theoretical modeling of their Hansen solubility parameters (HSP), followed by real experimental extractions using vegetable oils as solvents instead of petroleum-based solvents such as dichloromethane. Furthermore, multivariate statistical analyses were performed to partition vegetable oils into clusters referring to their dissolving power of VACs, which could be quantified by gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy (GC–MS) coupling to the headspace solid phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME). The results indicated that the solubility of \\{VACs\\} in enriched vegetable oils was significantly different (p solvents for further application in green extraction of natural products, in which sunflower oil gave the best performance.

Ying Li; Anne Sylvie Fabiano-Tixier; Christian Ginies; Farid Chemat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Preserving Vegetation in Parks and Wilderness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...recom-mendations for preserving redwood groves along the Eel River...dominated by 1 000-year-old redwood trees, or in an untrammeled...vegetation of the California coastal redwood region in relation to gradients...careful data collection and humble advocacy. Inevitably the chemists...

Edward C. Stone

1965-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

74

Soils and Vegetation of the Congo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... responsible for the fifth International Congress of Soil Science being held in 1954 in the Congo. There have been numerous publications from this field, and this is one of a ... of a series on natural resources from L'Institut National pour 1'fitude Agronomique du Congo (Carte des Sols et de la Vegetation du ...

1963-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

75

An application of predictive vegetation mapping to mountain vegetation in Sweden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

community data as the dependent variable and various environmental data as the independent variables thought to control or correlate with vegetation distributions. The environmental data were either obtained from existing digital datasets or derived from...

Green, Janet Alexis

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

76

Carbon sequestration in forest vegetation of Beijing at sublot level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on forest inventory data (FID) at sublot level, we estimated the carbon sequestration in forest vegetation of Beijing, China in 2009. In this study, the carbon sequestration in forest vegetation at sublot l...

Yu Xiao; Kai An; Gaodi Xie; Chunxia Lu; Biao Zhang

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Chicken Noodle Soup 3 T. canola or vegetable oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Carefully strain the stock into another pot to remove the vegetable solids and reserve for soup. Cook off

Liu, Taosheng

79

Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data. Abstract Creation of accurate vegetation maps from optical satellite data requires use of reference data to aid

80

Using Long Term Vegetation Data and Ecological Sites: A Strategy for Wildlife Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Long Term Vegetation Data and Ecological Sites: A Strategy for Wildlife Management Kevin of data grouped by Ecological Site with management and environmental variables to determine mechanisms project goals. Benefits are overlapping and include: · State and Transition Models (STMs): Inference

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Sediment storage by vegetation in steep bedrock landscapes: Theory, experiments, and implications for postfire sediment yield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment storage by vegetation in steep bedrock landscapes: Theory, experiments, and implications for postfire sediment yield Michael P. Lamb,1 Mariya Levina,1 Roman A. DiBiase,1 and Brian M. Fuller1 Received 26 September 2012; revised 6 March 2013; accepted 8 March 2013. [1] Mechanistic models for sediment

82

?Aceite Vegetal Puro Como Combustible Diesel? (Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? Spanish Version) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program 285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations. This electric transmission system operates in seven states of the Pacific Northwest. (See Figure I-1). The seven states offer a great diversity of vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and neighboring members of the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to keep vegetation a safe distance away from our electric power facilities and control noxious weeds at our

86

INTEGRATED PLANT RECORD (IPR) VEGETATION ANALYSIS APPLIED TO MODERN VEGETATION IN SOUTH CHINA AND JAPAN  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...microclimates are developed due to foehn wind and other factors causing strong vegetational...near Longqi Mountain and from a local station at 1000-m (He et al...and 6); however, we assume that local variability in humidity or variable...

VASILIS TEODORIDIS; JOHANNA KOVAR-EDER; PETR MAZOUCH

87

Applied Vegetation Science 15 (2012) 161165 Species introduction a major topic in vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ecosystems. Despite an enormous increase in ecological knowledge during the past 20 yr, restoration projects) and Knowledge and Management of Aquatic Ecosystems (five papers). Limiting factor and starting conditions in vegetation restoration Norbert Ho¨ lzel, Elise Buisson & Thierry Dutoit Ho¨ lzel, N. (corresponding author

Naud Frédéric

88

Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: alocally...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Local...

89

The effects of elephant and mesoherbivores on woody vegetation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Herbivores are important drivers and have a longstanding history in shaping our terrestrial environments. However, during the past decades, changes in woody vegetation in savanna… (more)

Lagendijk, Daisy Diana Georgette.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Impact of vegetation fraction from Indian geostationary satellite on short-range weather forecast  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indian economy is largely depending upon the agricultural productivity and thus influences the trade among the SAARC countries. High-resolution and good-quality regional weather forecasts are necessary for planners, resource managers, insurers and national agro-advisory services. In this study, high resolution updated land-surface state in terms of vegetation fraction (VF) from operational vegetation index products of Indian geostationary satellite (INSAT 3A) sensor (CCD) was utilized in numerical weather prediction (NWP) model (e.g. WRF) to investigate its impact on short-range weather forecast over the control run. Results showed that the updated vegetation fraction from INSAT 3A CCD improved the low-level 24 h temperature (?18%) and moisture (?10%) forecast in comparison to control run. The 24 h rainfall forecast was also improved (more than 5%) over central and southern India with the use of updated vegetation fraction compared to control experiment. INSAT 3A VF based experiment also showed a net improvement of 27% in surface sensible heat fluxes from WRF in comparison to control experiment when both were compared with area-averaged measurements from Large Aperture Scintillometer (LAS). This triggers the need of more and more use of realistic and updated land surface states through satellite remote sensing data as well as in situ micrometeorological measurements to improve the forecast quality, skill and consistency.

Prashant Kumar; Bimal K. Bhattacharya; P.K. Pal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

FRUIT & VEGETABLE GROWERS MANUAL FOR THE BEGINNING GROWER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MINNESOTA FRUIT & VEGETABLE GROWERS MANUAL FOR THE BEGINNING GROWER Developed by the University & Outreach Assistance Partnership Program through a partnership agreement with the Minnesota Fruit before I harvest my produce? 135 3. When should I harvest my fruits and vegetables? 136 4. How should I

Amin, S. Massoud

92

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Sustainable Vegetable Production and Nutrition Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management that builds collaboratively on MSU's strengths in vegetable production and sustainable croppingASSISTANT PROFESSOR Sustainable Vegetable Production and Nutrition Systems The Department of Horticulture (http://www.hrt.msu.edu) in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at Michigan State

Isaacs, Rufus

93

Soil and Vegetation Maps of the Belgian Congo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... fascicles containing land-usage maps published by the Institut National pour l'Etude Agronomique du Congo Beige "Carte des Sols et de la Vegetation du ... Beige "Carte des Sols et de la Vegetation du Congo Beige et du Ruanda-TJrundi" (Brussels, 1954). Each fascicle contains a soil ...

1955-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

94

Stand establishment: Researching operational vegetation management scenarios designed to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vegetation management. Promote reforestation success such that survival, wood-crop biomass and growth of young plantations from seedling establishment through crown closure with an emphasis on operational five years of plantation establishment Summit Sweet Home Vegetation Management Principle #3 All plants

95

Vegetation-climate feedbacks in a greenhouse world  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...increases in vegetation leaf area index (LAI) and vegetation height...through changes in leaf area index (LAI), the net conductance...structure will have continued to completion. The map of this response...and a response of leaf area index (LAI) (from Betts et al...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV July 21, 2005 David Francis and Allen Van Deynze At the recent ASHS meetings in Las Vegas, a workshop "Translational Genomics of Vegetable Crops interventions" (Minna and Gazdar, 1996). In applied plant science, "translational genomics" implies

Douches, David S.

97

Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables Dataset Summary Description Production, acreage, value, prices, imports, exports, per capita use, and beginning stocks for major fresh market and processed vegetables, 1970 onward. Also includes data for potatoes, sweet potatoes, dry beans and peas, and fresh and processed mushrooms. Tags {"United States","Economic Research Service",prices,value,imports,exports,"per capita use","beginning stocks",vegetables,"fresh market",processed,potatoes,"sweet potatoes","dry beans",peas,"fresh muschrooms","processed mushrooms",mushrooms}

98

EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, 728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts from vegetation management in the "project area" of the Hanford Site. The project area excludes most of the Hanford Reach National Monument that is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under permit from DOE. Vegetation managment under the EA would be consistent with and complement similar efforts currently being performed by the USFWS on the Monument. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA, and that preparation of

99

EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

28: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, 28: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts from vegetation management in the "project area" of the Hanford Site. The project area excludes most of the Hanford Reach National Monument that is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under permit from DOE. Vegetation managment under the EA would be consistent with and complement similar efforts currently being performed by the USFWS on the Monument. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA, and that preparation of

100

CHANGES IN RIPARIAN VEGETATION IN THE SOUTHWESTERN UNITED STATES: Floods and Riparian Vegetation on the San Juan River, Southeastern Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHANGES IN RIPARIAN VEGETATION IN THE SOUTHWESTERN UNITED STATES: Floods and Riparian Vegetation (Surveyed Water Surface Elevation) 113 m3/s (Calculated Water Surface Elevation) 4,200 m3 /s (1911 Flood) 1,980 m3 /s (Peak Flood of Gaging Record) 900 m3/s 1911 Slackwater Deposits Driftwood Other Historic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Interactions among flow, sediment deposition and aquatic vegetation in a channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic vegetation is commonly present in rivers in many forms. This thesis consists of two studies, which examine the flow structure around a patch of emergent, rigid vegetation in a laboratory channel. The vegetation ...

Zong, Lijun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

fruits and vegetables. Beyond tasting and learning about the many varieties of tomatoes, visitors are also  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fruits and vegetables. Beyond tasting and learning about the many varieties of tomatoes, visitors and other fruit, vegetable, and herb variety research conducted by Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazonian vegetation coupled Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Amazonia L. R. Hutyra,1,2 Summary: and resilience of Amazonian vegetation to climate change by analyzing observed climate-vegetation relationships... coupled changes...

104

Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

105

Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

106

Soil Carbon in Montane Meadows Modulated by Climate and Vegetation along an  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soil Carbon in Montane Meadows Modulated by Climate and Vegetation along an Soil Carbon in Montane Meadows Modulated by Climate and Vegetation along an Elevation Gradient Speaker(s): Marc Fischer Date: September 25, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Release or uptake of soil carbon has the potential to affect atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and hence feedback to greenhouse gas forced climate change. We conducted extensive observations of soil carbon cycling in three montane meadows spaced at elevation intervals (~300 m) that effect average temperature variations in the range expected under a doubled CO2 climate (~2 C). We find that carbon in the top 10 cm of soil can be explained (R2~0.7) by a simple function of plant productivity, litter quality, and soil microclimate that is derived from a steady-state model of carbon pools and flows. Because the variables used in this

107

Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

42: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation 42: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah Summary This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Western's proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska. The EIS website is http://ww2.wapa.gov/sites/western/transmission/infrastruct/Pages/Western%20FS%20EIS.aspx.

109

Microsoft PowerPoint - Town Bluff Vegetation impact.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

's. In 1989 the used for the Lake constructed in the 1950's. In 1989 the 's. In 1989 the used for the Lake constructed in the 1950's. In 1989 the dam was modified for the installation of Robert D. Willis dam was modified for the installation of Robert D. Willis Power Plant. The plant has two S Power Plant. The plant has two S - - Tube type turbines Tube type turbines which operate generators nominally rated at 4Mwh each. which operate generators nominally rated at 4Mwh each. Actual power production has rarely exceeded 3.6Mwh Actual power production has rarely exceeded 3.6Mwh Invasive species of Vegetation has increased to the Invasive species of Vegetation has increased to the point that an aquatic vegetation control program is being point that an aquatic vegetation control program is being managed by Town Bluff in coordination with TPWD and managed by Town Bluff in coordination with TPWD and

110

Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

Nepf, Heidi

111

Further Tests of Vegetable Varieties for the Winter Garden Region.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watermelon 3 8 Summary of Promising Varieties 42 AcknowIedgments Literature Cited BULLETIN NO. 546 JULY , 1937 FURTHER TESTS OF VEGETABLE VARIETIES FOR THE WINTER GARDEN REGION By Leslie R. Hawthorn, Horticulturist, Substation No. 19, Winter Haven...

Hawthorn, L. R. (Leslie Rushton)

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

British Society for the Promotion of Vegetable Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the Society 150 acres of land which it owns at Paglesham, Essex, for a substation primarily to be used for the multiplication of stocks of seed of vegetables bred at ...

1949-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

113

BPA's Vegetation Management Program - Fact Sheet - May 2006  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and encroachments that could hinder BPA's ability to access and maintain its lines. BPA manages the vegetation on and near its rights-of-way to keep people safe and the system...

114

EIS-0097: Bonneville Power Administration Transmission Facilities Vegetation Management Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic implications of various alternatives associated with implementing a vegetation management program.

115

Spatial distribution of deposition within a patch of vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This laboratory study describes the spatial pattern of deposition observed in a patch of vegetation located at the wall of a channel. There are two sources of sediment flux to the patch: the advection of particles across ...

Zong, Lijun

116

Managing Insect and Mite Pests in Vegetable Gardens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

insects and other pests. Understanding insects About 30,000 species of insects are found in Texas; fewer than 100 routinely cause problems in vegetable gardens. Most garden insects are either incidental or beneficial when they help with pol- lination...

Jackman, John A.

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

117

Vegetation mosaic and deer distribution in south Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEGETATION MOSAIC AND DEER DISTRIBUTION IN SOUTH TEXAS A Thesis MARTIN N. TCHAMBA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major... Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences VEGETATION MOSAIC AND DEER DISTRIBUTION IN SOUTH TEXAS A Thesis by Martin N. Tchamba Approved as to style and content by: L le H. Blankenship (Co-Chairman) Jane M. Packard (Co-Chairman) ar W. Varner...

Tchamba, Martin N.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

118

Representing Grass– and Shrub–Snow–Atmosphere Interactions in Climate System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A vegetation-protruding-above-snow parameterization for earth system models was developed to improve energy budget calculations of interactions among vegetation, snow, and the atmosphere in nonforested areas. These areas include shrublands, ...

Glen E. Liston; Christopher A. Hiemstra

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Map of mixed prairie grassland vegetation, Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A color vegetation map at the scale of 1:12,000 of the area surrounding the Rocky Flats, Rockwell International Plant near Boulder, Colorado, provides a permanent record of baseline data which can be used to monitor changes in both vegetation and environment and thus to contribute to future land management and land-use policies. Sixteen mapping units based on species composition were identified, and characterized by two 10-m/sup 2/ vegetation stands each. These were grouped into prairie, pasture, and valley side on the basis of their species composition. Both the mapping units and these major groups were later confirmed by agglomerative clustering analysis of the 32 vegetation stands on the basis of species composition. A modified Bray and Curtis ordination was used to determine the environmental factor complexes controlling the distribution of vegetation at Rocky flats. Recommendations are made for future policies of environmental management and predictions of the response to environmental change of the present vegetation at the Rocky Flats site.

Clark, S J.V.; Webber, P J; Komarkova, V; Weber, W A

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Advection, dispersion, and filtration of fine particles within emergent vegetation of the Florida Everglades  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., phosphorous) [Sansalone and Buchberger, 1997; Noe et al., 2007]. [3] Wetland vegetation influences flow

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Vegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by insulating vegetation from winter wind and temperature extremes, modifying winter soil temperatures

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

122

Assessing the Vegetation Condition Impacts of the 2011 Drought Across the U.S. Southern Great Plains Using the Vegetation Drought Response Index (VegDRI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Vegetation Drought Response Index (VegDRI), which combines traditional climate- and satellite-based approaches for assessing vegetation conditions, offers new insights into assessing the impacts of drought from local to regional scales. In ...

Tsegaye Tadesse; Brian D. Wardlow; Jesslyn Brown; Michael Hayes; Mark Svoboda; Brian Fuchs; Denise Gutzmer

123

Vegetation's Red Edge: A Possible Spectroscopic Biosignature of Extraterrestrial Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth's deciduous plants have a sharp order-of-magnitude increase in leaf reflectance between approximately 700 and 750 nm wavelength. This strong reflectance of Earth's vegetation suggests that surface biosignatures with sharp spectral features might be detectable in the spectrum of scattered light from a spatially unresolved extrasolar terrestrial planet. We assess the potential of Earth's step-function-like spectroscopic feature, referred to as the "red edge", as a tool for astrobiology. We review the basic characteristics and physical origin of the red edge and summarize its use in astronomy: early spectroscopic efforts to search for vegetation on Mars and recent reports of detection of the red edge in the spectrum of Earthshine (i.e., the spatially integrated scattered light spectrum of Earth). We present Earthshine observations from Apache Point Observatory to emphasize that time variability is key to detecting weak surface biosignatures such as the vegetation red edge. We briefly discuss the evolutionary advantages of vegetation's red edge reflectance, and speculate that while extraterrestrial "light harvesting organisms" have no compelling reason to display the exact same red edge feature as terrestrial vegetation, they might have similar spectroscopic features at different wavelengths than terrestrial vegetation. This implies that future terrestrial-planet-characterizing space missions should obtain data that allow time-varying, sharp spectral features at unknown wavelengths to be identified. We caution that some mineral reflectance edges are similar in slope and strength to vegetation's red edge (albeit at different wavelengths); if an extrasolar planet reflectance edge is detected care must be taken with its interpretation.

Sara Seager; Edwin L. Turner; Justin Schafer; Eric B. Ford

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

124

Novel Bioplastics and biocomposites from Vegetable Oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polymeric materials have been prevalent in our everyday lives for quite a long time. Most of today's polymeric materials are derived from nonrenewable petroleum-based feedstocks. Instabilities in the regions where petroleum is drilled, along with an increased demand in petroleum, have driven the price of crude oil to record high prices. This, in effect, increases the price of petroleum-based polymeric materials, which has caused a heightened awareness of renewable alternatives for polymeric feedstocks. Cellulose, starch, proteins and natural oils have all been examined as possible polymeric feedstocks. Natural oils are commercially available on a large scale and are relatively cheap. It is projected that the U.S. alone will produce 21 billion pounds of soybean oil in the period 2008/2009. Natural oils also have the advantages of inherent biodegradability, low toxicity, high purity and ready availability. Most natural oils possess a triglyceride structure as shown in Figure 1. Most natural oils have a unique distribution of fatty acid side chains, along with varying degrees of unsaturation per triglyceride. Common fatty acid side chains in naturally occurring oils are palmitic acid (C16:0), a 16 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; stearic acid (C18:0), an 18 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; oleic acid (C18:1), an 18 carbon fatty acid with one double bond; linoleic acid (C18:2), an 18 carbon fatty acid with two double bonds; and linolenic acid (C18:3), an 18 carbon fatty acid with three double bonds. Of course, there are other fatty acids with varying degrees of unsaturation, but their abundance is usually minimal. All of the unsaturated fatty acids mentioned have naturally occurring cis double bonds, which is common for most unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the afore mentioned fatty acids have the first double bond at the position of carbon 9 (C9), followed by carbon 12 (C12), if there are two degrees of unsaturation, then at carbon 15 (C15), if there are three degrees of unsaturation. In addition, the double bonds are not in conjugation. Table 1 gives the fatty acid make-up of linseed oil. It can be seen that linseed oil has an average of 6.0 double bonds per triglyceride. Its fatty acid content consists of 5.4% palmitic acid (C16:0), 3.5% stearic acid (C18:0), 19% oleic acid (C18:1), 24 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 47% linolenic (C18:3). Table 1 also gives the fatty acid composition and varying degrees of unsaturation for various other naturally-occurring natural vegetable oils. The regions of unsaturation in natural oils allow for interesting polymer chemistry to take place. Some of this interesting polymer science, however, involves chemical modification of the regions of unsaturation. Acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is prepared by epoxidation of the double bonds, followed by ring opening with acrylic acid. The resulting oil has both acrylate groups and hydroxyl groups. Wool and colleagues have further reacted the hydroxyl groups within the oil with maleic anhydride to produce maleated acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (MAESO). The MAESO has been copolymerized with styrene free radically to produce promising thermosetting sheet molding resins. Petrovi? and co-workers have directly ring opened the epoxidized oil to produce polyols that produce promising polyurethanes through condensation polymerization with diisocyanates. Our group's work initially focused on direct cationic copolymerization of the double bonds or conjugated double bonds of natural oils with monomers, such as styrene and divinylbenzene, to produce promising thermosetting resins. The only modification of the oils that was carried out in these studies was conjugation of the double bonds to enhance the reactivity of the oil. This work has been expanded recently with the incorporation of glass fiber to produce promising composites. We have also explored thermal polymerization techniques to make novel thermosets. This dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter discusses the synthesis and characterization of biobased

Phillip H. Henna

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

125

Soil and Vegetation Management: Keys to Water Conservation on Rangeland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The amount of water that soaks into the soil largely determines plant productivity. We can manage and conserve water where and when it falls, and by controlling the kind of vegetation we can make the fullest use of rain water. This publication...

Schuster, Joseph L.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

126

Texas High Plains Vegetable & Weed Control Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas High Plains Vegetable & Weed Control Research Program Research Summary Reports 2008 Texas RESULTS OF HIGH PLAINS TRIALS 8 Herbicides and Weed Control Herbicide screen for mustard and collard for heat tolerance and yield on the Texas High Plains (I) .................. 40 Evaluation of snap bean

Mukhtar, Saqib

127

Biology and Management of Fungal Pathogens of Vegetables Program Leader  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and determining efficacy of disease control products #12;Re cauliflower rubber bands.msg Alternaria leaf spot on cabbage Program Justification: Fungal diseases are often a major limiting factor in vegetable production seeks to find cost effective disease control measures that result in production of high quality produce

Lazzaro, Brian

128

Sweet potatoes are a warm-weather vegetable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sweet potatoes are a warm- weather vegetable related to the morning glory family.Although Louisiana sweet potatoes are often referred to as yams, they truly are sweet potatoes. The Louisiana producers began calling the orange-fleshed sweet potatoes grown in Louisiana"yams" to distinguish them from

129

Reliability Based Vegetation Management Through Intelligent System Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management programs for transmission lines operated at 200 kV and above are now subject to a reliability vegetation-caused outages. Programs for lower voltage lines are subject to state regulatory policies data that was utilized and referenced in this report. #12;ii Executive Summary Trees and other

130

Predictive Models of Forest Dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...currently highly uncertain (Fig. 1), making vegetation dynamics one of the largest sources of uncertainty in Earth system models. Reducing this uncertainty requires work on several fronts. For example, physiological parameters need to be...

Drew Purves; Stephen Pacala

2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

131

Vegetation Change in Salt Marshes of Cape Cod National Seashore (Massachusetts, USA) Between 1984 and 2013  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vegetation patterns in salt marshes are largely based on elevation in relation to tidal flooding. In New England salt marshes, vegetation is distinctly zoned into species that occur in the high marsh (elevatio...

Stephen M. Smith

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

MODIS Consistent Vegetation Parameter Specifications and Their Impacts on Regional Climate Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A consistent set of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation parameters, including leaf and stem area index (LAI and SAI, respectively), land-cover category (LCC), fractional vegetation cover (FVC), and albedo ...

Min Xu; Xin-Zhong Liang; Arthur Samel; Wei Gao

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The role of vegetation in the CO[subscript 2] flux from a tropical urban neighbourhood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urban surfaces are usually net sources of CO[subscript 2]. Vegetation can potentially have an important role in reducing the CO[subscript 2] emitted by anthropogenic activities in cities, particularly when vegetation is ...

Velasco, E.

134

Optimization of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System waveform metrics to support vegetation measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System waveform metrics to support vegetation GLAS Optimization Remote sensing Vegetation structure The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) has optimized a noise coefficient which could be constant or vary according to observation period or noise

Lefsky, Michael

135

Influence of woody plant on spring and riparian vegetation in central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spring flow and vegetation cover in a first-order watershed and investigate the herbaceous community structure of upland riparian zones. This study consists of two major components: (1) the effects of environmental factors and vegetation cover on spring...

Shen, Li

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Updated March 2013 Eat Smart, Live Strong is designed to improve fruit and vegetable consumption and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated March 2013 Eat Smart, Live Strong is designed to improve fruit and vegetable consumption: · eat at least 3 ½ cups of fruit and vegetable per day (1 ½ cups of fruits and 2 cups of vegetables;Session 1, Reach Your Goals, Step by Step allows participants to review the amount of fruits

137

Response of Vegetation to Livestock Grazing at the Texas Experimental Ranch.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................. 1 Climate Physiography and Soils Vegetation Grazing Treatments METHODS ................................ 2 1960-78 1978-82 Relationship Between Sampling Methods RESULTS ............................ . ..... 3 VEGETATION TRENDS (1960... with an extensive rangeland laboratory to evaluate the long-term effects of grazing management on cow/calf and vegetation performance. Since 1960, three grazing treatments have been continued in the same pastures without interruption: continuous grazing...

Heitschmidt, R.K.; Dowhower, S.L.; Gordon, R.A.; Price, D.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Fire recurrence in the subarctic and its implications for vegetation composition E. A. JOHNSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire recurrence in the subarctic and its implications for vegetation composition E. A. JOHNSON JOHNSON,,E. A. 1979. Fire recurrence in the subarctic and its implications for vegetation composition. Can of the distribution's hazard of burning function to vegetation composition and r-K selection is discussed. JOHNSON,E

Johnson, Edward A.

139

Genetic Polymorphisms in Nitric Oxide Synthase Genes Modify the Relationship between Vegetable and Fruit Intake and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...history of NHL, total energy intake (kcal), smoking...significant after false discovery rate adjustment for...primarily found in dark-green leafy vegetables...Controlling the false discovery rate: a practical and...regression model. The false discovery rate method was applied...

Xuesong Han; Tongzhang Zheng; Qing Lan; Yaqun Zhang; Briseis A. Kilfoy; Qin Qin; Nathaniel Rothman; Shelia H. Zahm; Theodore R. Holford; Brian Leaderer; and Yawei Zhang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Vegetation, edaphic, and topographic interrelationships in an East Texas forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEGETATION, EDAPHIC, AND TOPOGRAPHIC INTERRELATIONSHIPS IN AN EAST TEXAS FOREST A Thesis by JOHNNY ZANE HINTON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) (Head of Department) December 1981 ABSTRACT... Vegetat1on, Edaphic, and Topographic Interrelationsh1ps In an East Texas Forest. (Oecember 1981) Johnny Zane Hinton, B. S. , Texas A&M Un1versity Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Fred E, Sme1ns Thirty stands were sampled on the Angelina National...

Hinton, Johnny Zane

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Iodine in Drinking Waters, Vegetables, Cottonseed Meal, and Roughages.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBRARY, A & M COLLEGE, G. S. FRAPS and J. F. FUDGE Division of Chemistry TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 595 NOVEMBER 1940 -- IODINE IN DRINKING WATERS, VEGETABLES..., COTTONSEED MEAL, AND ROUGEIAGES ! .I rq?,\\?Y - AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President A96-1140-7M-LJ.80 5 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Iodine was determined in nearly 500 samples of city and rural drinking waters...

Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin); Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1940-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Vegetation survey of knapweed on the Yakima Training Center - 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes and discusses the results of a vegetation survey conducted in 1992 on a portion of the Yakima Training Center (YTC). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this survey and a similar survey in 1991 for the U.S. Department of the Army. The objectives of the survey were to evaluate the impact of the herbicide picloram on forbs where aerial applications of picloram were made in 1988, 1989, and 1991 to control knapweed infestations. Forbs are of special interest because they are an important part of the spring and summer diet of the western sage grouse, which is a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service candidate species for the threatened and endangered list. We also conducted a limited evaluation of the effectiveness of the spray program in controlling the spread of knapweed. Percent plant canopy cover and number of forbs were measured on 120 transacts on the herbicide-treated and untreated control areas. Herbicide treatment in 1991 resulted in a significant reduction in knapweed based on percent cover and density. The treatment areas also all had lower percent canopy cover of perennial forbs and fewer perennial forbs compared to control areas. Canopy cover of shrubs and annual, biennial, and perennial forbs measured on the YTC increased between the 1991 and 1992 survey, which may indicate a recovery of these vegetation types after disturbance. These increases also could reflect the mild 1992 winter and superior growing conditions in the spring of 1992. We recommend that these vegetation transacts continue to be monitored for an additional growing season to evaluate (1) whether knapweed increases to its previous abundance in the 1991 herbicide-treated area, (2) the efficacy of herbicide application on transacts along roadways, and (3) the increase in invasive annuals in herbicide-treated areas and the possible effects on community vegetation structure and sage grouse habitat.

Downs, J.L.; Cadoret, N.A.; Rickard, W.H.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Vegetative Propagation and Topophytic Responses of Selected Baldcypress Clones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, were kept overnight in a cooler at 8.7° C to ensure hydration. Cuttings were placed in plastic bags partially filled with water and stuck (planting the unrooted basal end in the substrate) the following day. Before 13 sticking, cuttings were..., foliar salt exposure and high pH soil tolerance. Experiments were conducted beginning in May, 2008 to determine commercial viability of vegetative propagation by shoot tip cuttings of these selections, to identify treatment combinations that led...

King, Andrew Richard

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

144

Growing Fall Vegetables and Annuals in South Central Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.... ~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 9 Emergency Procedure ....................... 20 Strawberries ............................... 10 Problems in a Fall Garden ................... 21 Grow Spring-Flowering Bulbs ................ 12 This publication wa~ compiled by Dr. Jerry Parsons... it is the middle of the summer, now is the time to start getting things in shape for a fall flower and vegetable garden. In this area of Texas, gardening can continue the year-round. It is always a tough decision to decide whether to terminate spring...

Parsons, Jerry; Cotner, Sam; Johnson, Jerral; Janne, Everett; Stewart, J. W.; Roberts, Roland; Johnson, Shirley

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Uptake of 137Cs by Leafy Vegetables and Grains from Calcareous Soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cesium-137 was deposited on Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll in 1954 as a result of nuclear testing and has been transported and cycled in the ecosystem ever since. Atoll soils are of marine origin and are almost pure CaCO{sub 3} with high concentrations of organic matter in the top 40 cm. Data from previous experiments with mature fruit trees show very high transfer factors (TF's), [Bq g{sup -1} plant/ Bq g{sup -1} soil, both in dry weight] into fruits from atoll calcareous soil. These TF's are much higher than reported for continental, silica-based soils. In this report TF's for 5 types of leafy vegetable crops and 2 types of grain crops are provided for use in predictive dose assessments and for comparison with other data from other investigators working with other types of soil in the IAEA CRP ''The Classification of Soil Systems on the Basis of Transfer Factors of Radionuclides from Soil to Reference Plants''. Transfer factors for plants grown on calcareous soil are again very high relative to clay-containing soils and range from 23 to 39 for grain crops and 21 to 113 for leafy vegetables. Results from these experiments, in this unique, high pH, high organic content, low potassium (K) soil, provide a boundary condition for models relating soil properties to TF.

Robison, W; Hamilton, T; Conrado, C; Kehl, S

2004-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

146

Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Agency/Company /Organization: World Agroforestry Centre Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Adaptation, Background analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.worldagroforestrycentre.org/sea/Publications/files/policybrief/PB0 Country: Philippines South-Eastern Asia Coordinates: 12.879721°, 121.774017° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":12.879721,"lon":121.774017,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

147

Maternal feeding self-efficacy and fruit and vegetable intakes in infants. Results from the SAIDI study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Adequate consumption of fruits and vegetables (FV) is a characteristic of a healthy diet but remains a challenge in nutrition interventions. This cross-sectional study explored the multi-directional relationships between maternal feeding self-efficacy, parenting confidence, child feeding behaviour, exposure to new food and FV intake in a cohort of 277 infants. Mothers with healthy infants weighing ?2500?g and ?37?weeks gestation were recruited post-natally from 11 South Australian hospitals. Socio-demographic data were collected at recruitment. At 6?months postnatal, infants were weighed and measured, and mothers completed a questionnaire exploring their perceptions of child feeding behaviour and child exposure to new foods. The questionnaire also included the Short Temperament Scale for Infants, Kessler 10 to measure maternal psychological distress and 5 items measuring maternal feeding self-efficacy. The number of occasions and variety of FV (number of subgroups within food groups) consumed by infants were estimated from a 24-hour dietary recall and 2?days food record. Structural equation modelling was performed using Mplus version 6.11. Median (IQR) variety scores were 2 (1–3) for fruit and 3 (2–5) for vegetable intake. The most popular FV consumed were apple (n?=?108, 45.0%) and pumpkin (n?=?143, 56.3%). None of the variables studied predicted the variety of child fruit intake. Parenting confidence, exposure to new foods and child feeding behaviour were indirectly related to child vegetable intake through maternal feeding self-efficacy while total number of children negatively predicted child vegetable variety (p?

Gloria A. Koh; Jane A. Scott; Richard J. Woodman; Susan W. Kim; Lynne A. Daniels; Anthea M. Magarey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Effect of Brush Vegetation on Deep Drainage Using Chloride Mass Balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is comparable to that by herbaceous vegetation (Wilcox, 2005). The canopy of an average-size, mature redberry and ashe juniper can intercept 26% and 37% of the annual precipitation, respectively. Redberry and ashe juniper litter can intercept 40% and 43..., superactive, thermic Pachic Paleustolls. Dominant woody-shrub vegetation cover includes juniper (Juniperus ashei) with other existing vegetation such as little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) and threeawn (Aristida). Site G4 The soil at site G4...

Navarrete Ganchozo, Ronald J.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

149

Potential of vegetable oils as a domestic heating fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dependence on imported oil for domestic heating has led to the examination of other potential fuel substitutes. One potential fuel is some form of vegetable oil, which could be a yearly-renewable fuel. In Western Canada, canola has become a major oilseed crop; in Eastern Canada, sunflowers increasingly are becoming a source for a similar oil; for this reason, the Canadian Combustion Research Laboratory (CCRL) has chosen these oils for experimentation. Trials have been conducted in a conventional warm air oil furnace, fitted with a flame retention head burner. Performance has been measured with pure vegetable oils as well as a series of blends with conventional No. 2 oil. The effects of increased fuel pressure and fuel preheating are established. Emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates are given for both steady state and cyclic operation. Canola oil cannot be fired in cyclic operation above 50:50 blends with No. 2 oil. At any level above a 10% blend, canola is difficult to burn, even with significant increased pressure and temperature. Sunflower oil is much easier to burn and can be fired as a pure fuel, but with high emissions of incomplete combustion products. An optimum blend of 50:50 sunflower in No. 2 oil yields emissions and performance similar to No. 2 oil. This blend offers potential as a means of reducing demand of imported crude oil for domestic heating systems.

Hayden, A.C.S.; Begin, E.; Palmer, C.E.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Jordan Tatter Scholarship in Horticulture Sponsored by the Michigan Vegetable Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jordan Tatter Scholarship in Horticulture Sponsored by the Michigan Vegetable Council) Submit application to behe@msu.edu Summary: The Jordan Tatter Scholarship in Horticulture was initiated

151

Vegetation Dynamics and Livestock Production on Rangelands in the Southern Great Plains.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We examined vegetation dynamics and livestock production in response to land management practices on rangelands in two different studies, one in north central and one… (more)

Cummings, Daniel Chad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Characteristics of vegetation and its relationship with landfill gas in closed landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An investigation was carried out to elucidate landfill gas (LFG) and the vegetation characteristics in closed landfill. The results indicate that the stabilization process of the landfill is an important factor influencing the components of landfill gases. The coverage, height and species of vegetation increase with the closed time of landfill. Fourteen species were observed in the investigated cells, dominated by Phragmites australis, an invasive perennial plant. The concentrations of methane and carbon dioxide from vegetated cover soil were lower than those from non-vegetated cover soil.

Chai Xiaoli; Zhao Xin; Lou Ziyang; Takayuki Shimaoka; Hirofumi Nakayama; Cao Xianyan; Zhao Youcai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Coastal Marsh Vegetation Dynamics of the East Bay of Galveston Bay, Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The structure and function of coastal marshes results from a complex interaction of biotic and abiotic processes that continually influence the characteristics of marsh vegetation.… (more)

Johnson, Jeremy Scott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Vegetation and sediment characteristics of created and natural Spartina alterniflora marshes in Lower Galveston Bay, Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Five natural and ten created Spartina altemiflora marshes in the Lower Galveston Bay System, Texas, were compared to determine if there were significantly different vegetative… (more)

Albertson, Andrea Kai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic vegetation fires Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dust aerosols VOCsDMS ET vegetation Anthropogenic waste byproduct air quality water management... combustionfires Anthropogenic crop production oil byproduct drilling...

156

SITE DESIGN GUIDELINES PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR BICYCLE VEGETATION FURNISHINGS LIGHTING SIGNAGE PAVING SITEWORK PARKING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SITE DESIGN GUIDELINES PEDESTRIAN VEHICULAR BICYCLE VEGETATION FURNISHINGS LIGHTING SIGNAGE PAVING.7 Pedestrians .................................................................................... 3.8 Bicycles ..................................................... Section Four Bicycle Systems 4.1 Shared Roadways

Duchowski, Andrew T.

157

-Climate and pH as determinants of vegetation succession in man-made habitats -701 Journal of Vegetation Science 18: 701-710, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sites in areas deforested by air pollution. Methods: We investigated vegetation patterns on 15 succes, spoil heaps after coal mining, sites at water reservoirs, extracted sand pit and peatland and reclaimed

Kratochvíl, Lukas

158

Contingent Valuation of renewable energy innovations: vegetal biomass in Italy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Warming-up of the planet and scarcity of conventional energy resources has led to aim of reducing the consumption of fossil fuels and the development of innovative renewable technologies for energy production. However, innovations and investments in renewable energy can encounter resistance of local communities. This makes planning for the development of Renewable Energy Source-based power plants often very difficult. Against this background, we investigate the level of social consensus on and support of the development of an energy plant based on the use of vegetal biomass in Central Sardinia, Italy. The method adopted is Contingent Valuation. Estimates of ex-ante household Willingness To Pay are implemented, as they are important indicators of the social endorsement for the project development. Implications concerning consensus/disagreement on innovative technologies for sustainable energy production are discussed as perspectives of future research.

Andrea De Montis; Corrado Zoppi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

The consequences of pleistocene climate change on lowland neotropical vegetation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Palynological reconstructions indicate that lowland tropical America was subject to intense cooling during the last ice-age. The descent of presently montane taxa into the lowlands of Amazonia and Minas Gerais indicate temperature depressions ranging from 5[degrees]C to 9[degrees]C cooler-than-present. The strengthened incursion of southerly airmasses caused a reassortment of vegetation throughout Amazonia. Presently allopatric species are found to have been sympatric as novel forest assemblages and formed and dissolved. Modest drying, perhaps a 20% reduction in precipitation, accounts for all the records that show a Pleistocene expansion of savanna. No evidence is found to support the fragmentation of Amazonian forests during glacial times, and the hypothesis of forest refuges as an explanation of tropical speciation is rejected on empirical grounds.

De Oliveira, P.E.; Colinvaux, P.A. (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama City (Panama))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Incidence of Gastric Cancer: A Prospective Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and intakes of total energy, alcohol, and processed...supplement use, and consumption of red meat, poultry...suggest that frequent consumption of vegetables may reduce...to increase vegetable consumption. 1 Parkin DM, Bray...55:74-108. 2 World Cancer Research Fund...

Susanna C. Larsson; Leif Bergkvist; and Alicja Wolk

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A TEST FOR LIFE ON EXOPLANETS: THE TERRESTRIAL VEGETATION DETECTION IN THE EARTHSHINE SPECTRUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bacteria [7]. A second type of biosignature is provided by signs of stellar light transformation the possible presence of life on this planet. Spectral biosignatures can be of two types. A first type consists of photosynthetic (green) vegetation, non­photosynthetic (dry) and a soil (from [9]). The so­called vegetation red

Lardière, Olivier

162

Vegetation-environment relationships of an inland boreal salt pan C. A. BURCHILLAND N. C. KENKEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with decreasing salinity, but trends in Shannon-Weaver diversity and evenness along the salinity gradient were more complex. Despite the salinity gradient being environmentally continuous, strong vegetational, discontinuity, gradient, halophyte, plant community, salinity. BURCHILL,C. A., et KENKEL,N. C. 1991. Vegetation

Kenkel, Norm

163

Effects of Woody Vegetation Removal on Soil Water Dynamics in a South Texas Shrubland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

removal on various soil textures we studied changes in soil water, rooting depth, and the role of water redistribution by woody vegetation. Woody vegetation was removed using common methods of cut-stump and roller chop across three soil types. Soil water...

Mattox, April Marie

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

Expansion of the world's deserts due to global warming and vegetation-albedo feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2 in surface absorbed solar energy. Although acting on regional scale, such a large negative simulation where the vegetation-albedo feedback was allowed to influence the atmospheric energy balance-14). Vegetation feedback has also been shown to be of key importance in the drying of North Africa during

Zeng, Ning

165

Effects of forestry practices on vegetation structure and bird community of Kibale National Park, Uganda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Uganda Cagan H. Sekercioglu* Center for Conservation Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford on the vegetation structure and bird community of Kibale National Park, Uganda. I compared four forest treatments Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Uganda; Tropical forestry; Selective logging; Vegetation structure

Sekercioglu, Cagan Hakki

166

Nutrient release from combustion residues of two contrasting herbaceous vegetation types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(muffle and flame burning) to combust herbaceous biomass from contrasting nutrient level sites to estimate caused by a fire is the combustion and charring of vegetation. Both C and N contained in plant biomassNutrient release from combustion residues of two contrasting herbaceous vegetation types Benjamin A

Florida, University of

167

Vegetables, Fruit, and Lung Cancer in the Iowa Women's Health Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...65-69, 70-74), total energy (quartile), education...ginger, kelp and seaweeds Dark green leafy vegetables...0-118.5 118.6 Dark green leafy vegetables...Q2 Q3 Q4 (high) Total energy, kcal Male (M) 2157...in Japan. Analysis of survey data on incidence in Aomori...

Kristi A. Steinmetz; John D. Potter; and Aaron R. Folsom

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

COMPUTER SUPPORTED KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY --A CASE STUDY IN FLOW RESISTANCE INDUCED BY VEGETATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPUTER SUPPORTED KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY -- A CASE STUDY IN FLOW RESISTANCE INDUCED BY VEGETATION). The paper firstly outlines elementary data mining principles, particularly when applied to analysis related to the additional resistance to the flow induced by flexible vegetation are presented. The data

Fernandez, Thomas

169

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-11)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-12)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-13)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

172

Vegetation dynamics and exotic plant invasion following high severity crown fire in a southern California conifer forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Early post-fire vegetation dynamics following large, severe forest fires are largely unknown for the southern ... to historic fire suppression. Vegetation in 38 forest stands was surveyed (2004, 2005, and...2 qua...

Janet Franklin

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Changes in Connecticut salt-marsh vegetation as revealed by historical aerial photographs and computer-assisted cartographics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Procedures are discussed for the interpretation of historical aerial photographs for salt-marsh vegetation mapping, as are techniques for computer-assisted analysis of digital vegetation maps. The mappings ind...

Daniel L. Civco; William C. Kennard; Michael W. Lefor

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The impact of cattle grazing on salt marsh and elevated hummock vegetation communities of a Texas barrier island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To assess the effects of cattle herbivory on vegetation community structure and composition in a Texas coastal salt marsh, data measuring several vegetation parameters were collected in four distinct habitats within a heavily grazed marsh over...

Carothers, James Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Variety in Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and the Risk of Lung Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Vegetable and fruit consumption has been hypothesized...cancer risk. The 2007 World Cancer Research Fund...vegetable and fruit consumption and energy intake increased with...fruit and vegetable consumption. Those reporting higher...

Frederike L. Büchner; H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita; Martine M. Ros; Kim Overvad; Christina C. Dahm; Louise Hansen; Anne Tjønneland; Françoise Clavel-Chapelon; Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault; Marina Touillaud; Rudolf Kaaks; Sabine Rohrmann; Heiner Boeing; Ute Nöthlings; Antonia Trichopoulou; Dimosthenis Zylis; Vardis Dilis; Domenico Palli; Sabina Sieri; Paolo Vineis; Rosario Tumino; Salvatore Panico; Petra H.M. Peeters; Carla H. van Gils; Eiliv Lund; Inger T. Gram; Tonje Braaten; María-José Sánchez; Antonio Agudo; Nerea Larrañaga; Eva Ardanaz; Carmen Navarro; Marcial V. Argüelles; Jonas Manjer; Elisabet Wirfält; Göran Hallmans; Torgny Rasmuson; Tim J. Key; Kay-Tee Khaw; Nick Wareham; Nadia Slimani; Anne-Claire Vergnaud; Wei W. Xun; Lambertus A.L.M. Kiemeney; and Elio Riboli

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. Work also includes clearing of a small (<1/4 mile) section of access road. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for detailed information on each section of the referenced transmission lines. BPA will conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and where possible to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The vegetation needing control is mainly Douglas Fir, Alder, and blackberries as indicated in Section 1.2 of the attached checklist. The work involved in the ROW includes: clearing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon pose a hazard to the lines; treating the associated stumps and re-sprouts with herbicide to ensure that the roots are killed preventing new sprouts; and selectively eliminating tall growing vegetation before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing vegetation. All work will take place in existing rights-of-ways and around transmission structures. All work will be accomplished by selective vegetation control methods to assure that there is little potential harm to non-target vegetation and to low-growing plants. The work will provide system reliability and fire protection. Also, all off right-of-way trees that are potentially unstable and will fall within a minimum distance or into the zone where the conductors swing will be removed. Access roads will be treated using mowing and herbicide applications. The work will provide system reliability. The subject transmission lines range from 115kV to 230kV and are made up of accompanying access roads, steel and wooden transmission line structures and associated switching platforms. The minimum clearance ranges from 21 feet for 115kV lines to 23 feet for 230kV lines. ROW easement widths vary along the length of the project. Vegetation control for this project is designed to provide a 3 year maintenance free interval. In summary, the overall vegetation management scheme will be to selectively remove tall growing vegetation then apply selective herbicide treatment using cut stump applications.

N /A

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

177

Record of Decision for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program (DOE/EIS-0285) (07/00)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SYSTEM VEGETATION SYSTEM VEGETATION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Record of Decision DOE/EIS-0285 Cooperating Agencies J U L Y 2 0 0 0 Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Record of Decision Table of Contents Summary of Decision .................................................................................................................................... 1 For Further Information .............................................................................................................................. 2 Background ................................................................................................................................................... 3 Decisions ........................................................................................................................................................

178

Organic Vegetable Organic Vegetable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

marketed separately from conventionally grown produce in order to be profitably sold. Because of the amount of organic material include compost, Purdue University · Cooperative Extension Service · Knowledge to Go

179

Supply Response and Impact of Government-Supported Crops on the Texas Vegetable Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply functions, elasticity estimates, and nonjointness test results consistently indicated that few commodities compete economically in the production of six major Texas vegetables (cabbage, cantaloupes, carrots, onions, potatoes, and watermelons). Significant bias effects caused by government-supported commodities, fixed inputs, and technological change were observed and measured. Nonnested test results for the hypothesis of sequential decision making by vegetable producers were inconclusive, but they gave greater likelihood support to sequential than to contemporaneous decision making. Many crops are produced under provision of gov-ernment programs intended both to prevent severe drops in prices received by farmers and to limit supplies. Diversion payments, price supports, and acreage restrictions are examples of governmental policies designed to stabilize and control field crop production in the U.S, Vegetable production and marketing, on the other hand, are often subject only to minimum standards implemented by grow-ers ’ associations and shippers to ensure quality of the fresh produce. Their prices are allowed to vary according to market conditions prevailing at the time of harvest. Meanwhile, health-conscious con-sumers are enhancing their diets by expanding con-sumption of vegetables. For example, per capita consumption of fresh vegetables in the U.S. has increased more than a third in less than 15 years, rising from 75 to 102 pounds between 1975 and 1989 (USDA). Texas is a major vegetable producing state. In 1989 it ranked sixth among the 50 states in value of vegetables produced and fourth in value of fresh vegetables produced (USDA). Considerable re-sources are devoted to them, and income generated from vegetable production and associated agribus-iness activities contribute substantially to the eco-

Fermin Ornelas; C. Richard Shumway

180

Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

N /A

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a single-fluid diffuse interface model in the ALE-AMR hydrodynamics code to simulate surface tension effects. We show simula- tions and compare them to other surface tension...

182

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sion effects. We show the result of a test case, and compare it to the result without surface tension. The model describes droplet formation nicely. Application The ARRA-funded...

183

Global Emissions of Terpenoid VOCs from Terrestrial Vegetation in the Last Millennium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8 GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signicant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 15 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% 19 20 less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends ofglobal isoprene emissions to be mostly a*ected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signifcant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 16 17 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 18 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Smolander, S.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Kaplan, J. O.; Guenther, Alex B.; Arneth, A.; Riipinen, I.

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ALE-AMR ALE-AMR code Wangyi Liu, John Bernard, Alex Friedman, Nathan Masters, Aaron Fisher, Velemir Mlaker, Alice Koniges, David Eder June 4, 2011 Abstract In this paper we describe an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical state of the two phases. The only change to the existing fluid equations is an additional term in the stress tensor. We show results of applying the model to an expanding Al droplet surrounded by an Al vapor, where additional droplets are created. 1 Introduction The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The

185

EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

63: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak 63: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona Summary DOE's Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western's Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona. For more information on this EA, contact: Ms. Linette King at: lking@wapa.gov. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

186

Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A survey of diffuse CO2 efflux, soil temperature and soil-gas chemistry over areas of localized vegetation-kill on and around the resurgent dome of Long Valley caldera California was performed to evaluate the premise that gaseous and thermal anomalies are related to renewed intrusion of magma. Some kill sites are long-lived features and others have developed in the past few years. Total anomalous CO2 emissions from the

187

Microsoft Word - Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello df.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Linda Sheader and Marilyn Kastens The Monticello Disposal Site, located just south of the town of Monticello, Utah, contains a uranium mill tailings disposal cell with a vegetated cover. Successful long-term performance of the cover is in part dependent upon the success of the cover's plantings. The plants remove moisture from the cover's soil layer, thus minimizing percolation through the tailings and preventing leaching of contaminants from the tailings into groundwater. Since 2000, when revegetation was complete, annual monitoring has been conducted at the site to track the development of the plant communities and to compare them to final success criteria. This paper summarizes changes in vegetation across the site over seven growing seasons.

188

EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak 3: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona Summary DOE's Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western's Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona. For more information on this EA, contact: Ms. Linette King at: lking@wapa.gov. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

189

Effects of dynamic vegetation and topography on hydrological processes in semi-arid areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystems of dry climates represent a particularly interesting object for ecohydrological studies, as water is generally considered to be the key limiting resource. This work focuses on vegetation-water-energy dynamics ...

Ivanov, Valeri Yuryevich, 1974-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

VEGETATION SUCCESSION AND ROOT PENETRATION ON THE LORRAINE COVER USED TO LIMIT ACID MINE DRAINAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 VEGETATION SUCCESSION AND ROOT PENETRATION ON THE LORRAINE COVER USED TO LIMIT ACID MINE DRAINAGE as a fine-grained soil) can be low enough to limit the influx of oxygen, hence reducing the rate

Aubertin, Michel

191

Vegetative composition and community structure associated with beaver ponds in Canaan valley, West Virginia, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Beavers (Castor canadensis...) can cause dramatic changes in vegetative composition and diversity. Although alterations by beaver have been studied extensively, little attention has been paid to the effects beave...

Jerri L. Bonner; James T. Anderson; James S. Rentch…

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Soil Amendments Promote Vegetation Establishment and Control Acidity in Coal Combustion Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of adding various soil amendments and a pyrite oxidation inhibitor to aid in the establishment of vegetation and to reduce acid drainage (AD) from coal fly ash and coal reject (FA + CR*) were assessed...

R. M. Danker; D. C. Adriano; Bon-Jun Koo…

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Assessing general relationships between aboveground biomass and vegetation structure parameters for improved carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Click Here for Full Article Assessing general relationships between aboveground biomass 2010; published 23 June 2010. [1] Lidarbased aboveground biomass is derived based on the empirical relationship between lidarmeasured vegetation height and aboveground biomass, often leading to large

Ni-Meister, Wenge

194

The effects of nutrition education on attitudes and behaviors of children regarding fruits and vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

curriculum has improved nutritional knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding fruits and vegetables. One hundred and thirty - five students, representing ages five through twelve, approximately grades three through five, from four counties across...

Koch, Sharon Elaine, 1976-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Composition and relative health of remnant vegetation fringing lakes along a salinity and waterlogging gradient  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Groundwater salinity for the vegetation quadrats was approximated using ... E in the offline system. Using ArcGIS, salinity transects were created between the well locations where samples were taken and a salinity

T. K. Horsnell; K. R. J. Smettem; D. A. Reynolds…

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Thermal Imaging of Vegetation to Detect CO2 Gas Leaking From Underground  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal imaging of vegetation has been used to detect CO2 gas leaking from an underground gas reservoir. Plant stress caused by increased soil gas concentration results in warmer...

Shaw, Joseph A; Johnson, Jennifer E; Lawrence, Rick; Nugent, Paul W

197

SPECIAL FEATURE: ECOINFORMATICS The Global Index of Vegetation-Plot Databases (GIVD)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resource for vegetation science J ¨urgen Dengler, Florian Jansen, Falko Gl ¨ockler, Robert K. Peet, Miquel, Ohnhorststr. 18, 22609 Hamburg, Germany Jansen, F. (jansen@uni-greifswald.de) & Gl ¨ockler, F. (falko

Peet, Robert K.

198

Improvement in fresh fruit and vegetable logistics quality: berry logistics field studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...environment compiled and edited by Paul Tucker and James DeBonis Improvement in fresh fruit and vegetable logistics quality: berry logistics field studies M. Cecilia do Nascimento Nunes 1 Mike Nicometo 3 Jean Pierre Emond 4 Ricardo Badia Melis...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Improvement in fresh fruit and vegetable logistics quality: berry logistics field studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Articles 1003 168 Theme Issue Intelligent food logistics: decrease waste and improve quality by new technologies...Lang Improvement in fresh fruit and vegetable logistics quality: berry logistics field studies M. Cecilia do Nascimento Nunes...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Coastal Marsh Vegetation Assemblages of Galveston Bay: Insights for the East Texas Chenier Plain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coastal marshes are composed of distinct vegetation assemblages that contribute to ecosystem functions and services over time and space. In recent decades, natural and anthropogenic changes have led to large-scal...

Jeremy S. Johnson; David M. Cairns; Chris Houser

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Vegetation, soils, and surface hydrology of playa landforms in the Rio Grande Plains, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Playas in the Rio Grande Plains of southern Texas were compared with respect to their: 1) size, shape, soil properties, and microtopography, 2) vegetation composition and structure, 3) surface water accumulation potential, and 4) disturbance history...

Farley, Andrea Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic vegetation amplify Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Y N C H E T A L . 2001 American Meteorological Society Summary: vegetation, permafrost, soil, and the atmo- sphere to amplify ecosystem change. MacDonald et al. (1993... the...

203

Expansion of the world's deserts due to vegetation-albedo feedback under global warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a decrease of about 20 W mÃ?2 in surface absorbed solar energy. Although acting on regional scale., 1999]. Vegetation feedback has also been shown to be of key importance in the drying of North Africa

Zeng, Ning

204

Flow and deposition in and around a finite patch of vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This laboratory study describes the flow and deposition observed in and around a finite patch of vegetation located at the wall of a channel. Two patch densities are considered with 2% and 10% solid volume fraction. The ...

Zong, Lijun

205

Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

17 17 Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A Database (Revised November 2000) J. S. Olson, J. A. Watts, and L. J. Allison DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp017 In 1980, this data base and the corresponding map were completed after more than 20 years of field investigations, consultations, and analyses of published literature. They characterize the use and vegetative cover of the Earth's land surface with a 0.5° × 0.5° grid. This world-ecosystem-complex data set and the accompanying map provide a current reference base for interpreting the role of vegetation in the global cycling of CO2 and other gases and a basis for improved estimates of vegetation and soil carbon, of natural exchanges of CO2, and of net historic shifts of carbon between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The

206

CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROTOPOGRAPHY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VEGETATION PATTERNS IN CREATED WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROTOPOGRAPHY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VEGETATION PATTERNS IN CREATED WETLANDS, Virginia, USA 20192 Abstract: Created wetlands are increasingly used to mitigate wetland loss. Thus, identifying wetland creation methods that enhance ecosystem development might increase the likelihood

207

VEMAP 2: Selected Model Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Model Results Model Results The ORNL DAAC announces the release of two data sets from Phase 2 of the Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP). The two data sets contain monthly and annual results, respectively, from experiments conducted to compare the ecological responses of the suite of VEMAP models to projected transient scenarios of climate and atmospheric carbon dioxide for the period 1994 to 2100. The models investigated included five biogeochemical cycling models, which simulate plant production and nutrient cycles but rely on a static land-cover type, and two dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs), which combine biogeochemical cycling processes with dynamic biogeographical processes including succession and fire simulation. VEMAP was an international project studying the response of biogeochemical

208

An evaluation of low-density introductions of triploid grass carp in vegetated small sportfishing impoundments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN EVALUATION OF LOW-DENSITY INTRODUCTIONS OF TRIPLOID GRASS CARP IN VEGETATED SMALL SPORTFISHING IMPOUNDMENTS A Thesis by BRIAN GENE BLACKWELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1993 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences AN EVALUATION OF LOW-DENSITY INTRODUCTIONS OF TRIPLOID GRASS CARP IN VEGETATED SMALL SPORTFISHING IMPOUNDMENTS A Thesis by BRIAN GENE...

Blackwell, Brian Gene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

Process Balances of Vegetable Oil Hydrogenation and Coprocessing Investigations with Middle-Distillates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrogenation of vegetable oil is a promising technology for the production of highly valuable diesel components. ... Finding a sustainable energy supplement as well as the need for carbon dioxide reduction leads to the necessity to integrate more and more renewable energy sources into the transportation fuel markets. ... A possibility for introduction of hydrogenated vegetable oils on the market is the coprocessing in conventional hydrotreater and hydrocracker units in a refinery. ...

Matthias Endisch; Thomas Kuchling; Jan Roscher

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

210

Vegetative covers for sediment control and phosphorus sequestration from dairy waste application fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEGETATIVE COVERS FOR SEDIMENT CONTROL AND PHOSPHORUS SEQUESTRATION FROM DAIRY WASTE APPLICATION FIELDS A Thesis by SUBHASIS GIRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2008 Major Subject: Biological and Agricultural Engineering VEGETATIVE COVERS FOR SEDIMENT CONTROL AND PHOSPHORUS SEQUESTRATION FROM DAIRY WASTE APPLICATION FIELDS A Thesis...

Giri, Subhasis

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

211

Evaluation of Vegetative Roofs' Performance on Energy Consumption in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States are incorporating vegetative roofs. The development in 1998 of the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Rating System, a voluntary green building standard for grading buildings for their environmental performance, has..., we consulted online and in-print publications on vegetative roofs and sustainable architecture. In addition, we approached the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED program, since it is likely that such buildings are LEED certified, or have applied...

Anderson, J.; Azarbayjani, M.

212

Evaluation of vegetable oils for deep frying of batter-breaded meat nuggets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATION OF VEGETABLE OILS FOR DEEP FRYING OF BATIER-BREADED MEAT NUGGETS A Thesis by SHIRLEY ELIZABETH HOUSSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology EVALUATION OF VEGETABLE OILS FOR DEEP FRYING OF BATTER-BREADED MEAT NUGGETS A Thesis by SHIRLEY ELIZABETH HOUSSON Approved as to style and content by: Ki Soon Rhee (Chair...

Housson, Shirley Elizabeth

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Canopy, litter and allelopathic effects of Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei, Buchholz) on understory vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CANOPY, ~ AND ALLELOPATHIC EFFECTS OF ASHE JUNIPER (JUNIPERUS ASHEI, BUCHHOLZ) ON UNDERSTORY VEGETATION A Thesis by LISA YVONNE YAGER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fufillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1993 Major Subject: Range Science CANOPY, LIITER AND ALLELOPATHIC EFFECTS OF ASHE JUNIPER (JUNIPERUS ASHEI, BUCHHOLZ) ON UNDERSTORY VEGETATION A Thesis by LISA YVONNE YAGER Submitted to Texas A...

Yager, Lisa Yvonne

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson Joseph A for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson,a Joseph A. Shaw,a Rick Lawrence,b Paul W. Nugent,a Laura M of these calibrated imagers is imaging of vegetation for CO2 gas leak detection. During a four-week period

Shaw, Joseph A.

215

Relation of Soils, Rainfall and Grazing Management to Vegetation, Western Edwards Plateau of Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Study of Vegetation .................................. 6 ............... Survey Procedure for the Inclined-point-contact Method 6 The Belt-transect Method ....................................................................... 7 Brush Survey.... These belts covered approximately the same area charted by the inclined-point-contact method. The belt transect used in this study was 1 . foot wide and 20 feet long. The zero point on the belt was maintained at the tagged stake. The . vegetation within...

Young, Vernon A. (Vernon Alphus); Thomas, Gerald W.

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Vegetation uptake from burial ground alpha waste trenches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was conducted as part of an evaluation of the potential radiological consequences of reinhabiting the SRS burial ground. The objective was to determine the uptake of buried, low-level, transuranic waste from unlined earthen trenches by forest vegetation. Two tree plots were established in 1979. One plot was put over a trench containing alpha waste and the other in an area without trenches. When the tree seedlings were sampled during 1979 and 1980, and analysized for {sup 239}Pu and {sup 238}Pu, there was only a small difference in radionuclude concentration between trees planted over the trench and those planted on the control plot because of the limited root intrusion into the trench by the seedlings. However, when trees were sample in 1986, 1987, and 1988 and analyzed for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 237}Np activity, the average activity of all of these isotopes was significantly higher over the trenches than in the control plot. These measurements indicate that tree roots will extract transuranic isotopes from buried, low-level waste. The amount of radioisotopes moved from the trenches to the surface is small and the level in the trees is low enough that dose from exposure will be small. The long term effects of transport of radioisotopes from the trenches to the surface soil was evaluated by estimating the accumulation in the surface soil. Transuranic activity in selected food crops was calculated using the soil activity and the literature derived concentration factors. In all cases, the activity of the transuranic isotopes in the edible portion of the plants was quite low. The activity in the leaf tissue was much higher than in the seed. However, it should be noted that in only one case was the activity higher than the naturally occurring activity of {sup 40}K in the pine foliage.

Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Tuckfield, R.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Importance of plutonium contamination on vegetation surfaces at rocky flats, Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vegetation samples collected at Rocky Flats, Colorado were ultrasonically washed to remove attached soil and then analyzed for 239, 240Pu and 238Pu. Mean plutonium concentrations for washed grass, forb and shrub samples were 1.12, 0.61, 0.03 pCi/g, respectively. This compared to a mean of 28.6 pCi/g for unwashed vegetation samples from an earlier study conducted in the same area at Rocky Flats. The mean plutonium isotopic ratio (239,240Pu/238Pu) of 27.2 in vegetation was lower than a ratio of 65.4 in soil, indicating possible differential behavior of the plutonium isotopes in vegetation. Soil attachment to above-ground plant parts ranged from 0.0 to 0.25g soil per g plant. The potential for plutonium contamination on plant parts due to soil attachment was estimated to range from 0.0 to 206 pCi/g. Plutonium on vegetation was concluded to be the major contributor to total plutonium associated with vegetation.

W.J. Arthur III; A.W. Alldredge

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Geosci. Model Dev., 4, 9931010, 2011 www.geosci-model-dev.net/4/993/2011/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for earth system models B. Poulter1,2, P. Ciais2, E. Hodson1, H. Lischke1, F. Maignan2, S. Plummer3, and N, earth system models require a represen- tation of vegetation distributions that are either prescribed products and adapted for earth system models is an important component for reducing the uncertainty

Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

219

New frontiers in oilseed biotechnology: meeting the growing global demand for vegetable oils for food, feed, biofuel, and industrial uses.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetable oils have historically been a valued commodity for food use and to a lesser extent for non-edible applications such as detergents and lubricants. The increasing reliance on biodiesel as a transportation fuel has contributed to rising demand and higher prices for vegetable oils. Biotechnology offers a number of solutions to meet the growing need for affordable vegetable oils and vegetable oils with improved fatty acid compositions for food and industrial uses. New insights into oilseed metabolism and its transcriptional control are enabling biotechnological enhancement of oil content and quality. Alternative crop platforms and emerging technologies for metabolic engineering also hold promise for meeting global demand for vegetable oils and for enhancing nutritional, industrial, and biofuel properties of vegetable oils. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of oilseed metabolism and in the development of new oilseed platforms and metabolic engineering technologies.

Lu, C; Napier, JA; Clemente, TE; Cahoon, EB

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Using Unmanned Helicopters to Assess Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluating vegetation cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. Methods that have sufficient accuracy and improved cost efficiency could dramatically alter how biotic resources are monitored on both public and private lands. This will be of interest to land managers because there are rarely enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, unmanned helicopters were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover during May, June, and July in 2005. The images were used to estimate percent cover for six vegetative cover classes (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forbs, litter, and bare ground). The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Ocular assessments of digital imagery were performed using a software program called SamplePoint, and the results were compared against field measurements collected using a point-frame method to assess accuracy. The helicopter imagery evaluation showed a high degree of agreement with field cover class values for litter, bare ground, and grass, and reasonable agreement for dead shrubs. Shrub cover was often overestimated and forbs were generally underestimated. The helicopter method took 45% less time than the field method to set plots and collect and analyze data. This study demonstrates that UAV technology provides a viable method for monitoring vegetative cover on rangelands in less time and with lower costs. Tradeoffs between cost and accuracy are critical management decisions that are important when managing vegetative conditions across vast sagebrush ecosystems throughout the Intermountain West.

Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Randy Lee

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Remediation of Trichloroethylene-Contaminated Soils by STAR Technology using Vegetable Oil Smoldering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Self-sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation (STAR) is an innovative soil remediation approach based on smoldering combustion that has been demonstrated to effectively destroy complex hydrocarbon nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) with minimal energy input. This is the first study to explore the smoldering remediation of sand contaminated by a volatile NAPL (Trichloroethylene, TCE) and the first to consider utilizing vegetable oil as supplemental fuel for STAR. Thirty laboratory-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the relationship between key outcomes (TCE destruction, rate of remediation) to initial conditions (vegetable oil type, oil:TCE mass ratio, neat versus emulsified oils). Several vegetable oils and emulsified vegetable oil formulations were shown to support remediation of TCE via self-sustaining smoldering. A minimum concentration of 14,000 mg/kg canola oil was found to treat sand exhibiting up to 80,000 mg/kg TCE. On average, 75% of the TCE mass was removed due to volatilization. This proof-of-concept study suggests that injection and smoldering of vegetable oil may provide a new alternative for driving volatile contaminants to traditional vapour extraction systems without supplying substantial external energy.

Madiha Salman; Jason I. Gerhard; David W. Major; Paolo Pironi; Rory Hadden

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Effect of fatty acid composition in vegetable oils on combustion processes in an emulsion burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The use of vegetable oils as a fuel in burners is an alternative which offers certain advantages over the use of vegetable oils in engines. The present work explores the use of four oils: rapeseed, sunflower, soya, and a commercial mixture-seed as heating fuel oil (HFO). The article relates the composition of the fatty acids in the various vegetable oils to the combustion products obtained in an emulsion burner. The work has been carried out in three stages. Firstly, describing the use of vegetable oils as a fuel and determining the fatty acid composition by proton NMR. Secondly, combustion of the vegetable oils studied is performed using an emulsion burner, varying the burner adjustments, and analysing combustion gases. Thirdly, exploring the link between the fatty acids contained in each oil and the combustion efficiency and combustion gas concentration for each oil type. Due to the fatty acids they contain, not all the oils behave equally, even though their description as fuels is very similar.

J. San José; M.A. Sanz-Tejedor; Y. Arroyo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Determining the Potential Distribution of Vegetation, Crops and Agricultural Productivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The terrestrial biosphere component of the Integrated Model to Assess the Greenhouse Effect (IMAGE 2.0) uses changes in land cover to compute dynamically the greenhouse gas fluxes between the terrestrial biosp...

R. Leemans; G. J. van den Born

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Determining the potential distribution of vegetation, crops and agricultural productivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The terrestrial biosphere component of the Integrated Model to Assess the Greenhouse Effect (IMAGE 2.0) uses changes in land cover to compute dynamically the greenhouse gas fluxes between the terrestrial biosp...

R. Leemans; G. J. van den Born

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Photosynthesis, Transpiration, and Water Use Efficiency of Vegetative and Reproductive Shoots of Grassland Species from North-Eastern China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The differences in net photosynthetic rate (P N), transpiration rate (E), and water use efficiency (WUE) between the vegetative and reproductive...Leymus chinensis (Trin.) Tzvel., Puccinellia tenu...

R.Z. Wang

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

State and Transition Modeling History & Current Concepts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management input · Friedel(1991) concentrated on thresholds ­ "...compatible with state and transition theoryState and Transition Modeling History & Current Concepts Tamzen K. Stringham Oregon State vegetation change #12;· Non-equilibrium Models (States, Transitions and Thresholds) ­ Encompass Range

227

Submerged aquatic vegetation and bulrush in Lake Okeechobee as indicators of greater Everglades ecosystem restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lake Okeechobee, Florida, located in the middle of the larger Kissimmee River-Lake Okeechobee-Everglades ecosystem in South Florida, serves a variety of ecosystem and water management functions including fish and wildlife habitat, flood control, water supply, and source water for environmental restoration. As a result, the ecological status of Lake Okeechobee plays a significant role in defining the overall success of the greater Everglades ecosystem restoration initiative. One of the major ecological indicators of Lake Okeechobee condition focuses on the near-shore and littoral zone regions as characterized by the distribution and abundance of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) and giant bulrush (Scirpus californicus (C.A. Mey.) Steud.). The objective of this study is to present a stoplight restoration report card communication system, common to all 11 indicators noted in this special journal issue, as a means to convey the status of SAV and bulrush in Lake Okeechobee. The report card could be used by managers, policy makers, scientists and the public to effectively evaluate and distill information about the ecological status in South Florida. Our assessment of the areal distribution of SAV in Lake Okeechobee is based on a combination of empirical SAV monitoring and output from a SAV habitat suitability model. Bulrush status in the lake is related to a suitability index linked to adult survival and seedling establishment metrics. Overall, presentation of these performance metrics in a stoplight format enables an evaluation of how the status of two major components of Lake Okeechobee relates to the South Florida restoration program, and how the status of the lake influences restoration efforts in South Florida.

Matthew C. Harwell; Bruce Sharfstein

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-40)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2002 9, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-40) William T. Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Allston-Keeler 500 kV Transmission Line ROW exclusive to BLM lands between 8/4 through 27/4. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor with an average corridor width of 150 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Washington and Columbia County, in the State of Oregon, Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

229

Frequently Asked Questions About Southwesterns Vegetation Management Strategy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OK 74103-3502 OK 74103-3502 918-595-6600 www.swpa.gov Vegetation Management Program - Frequently Asked Questions Question. Why does Southwestern have to keep its transmission corridor clear of trees? Answer. Southwestern's vegetation management goals are to promote safety, provide for main- tenance access, and ensure electric system reliability. Trees or other vegetation near a trans- mission line can conduct electricity and increase the chance of unintentional contact with people and pets. If electricity flows through a tree to the ground, that tree essentially becomes "electrified," and anyone touching that tree could sustain serious injury, even death, as electricity seeks a path to ground. Additionally, as the operator of nearly 1,400 miles

230

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-35)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

14, 2001 14, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-35) James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Chehalis-Mayfield No. 1 230 kV Transmission Line ROW and the Mossy Rock-Chehalis Transmission Line ROW, between 7/1 to 27/10. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor with an average corridor width of 162 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Lewis County, WA, being in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

231

Columbia River Gorge Vegetation Management Project Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1162  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

COLUMBIA COLUMBIA RIVER MANAGEMENT PR GORGE OJECT VEGETAT ON Final Environmental Assessment DO E/EA-l 162 BONNEVILLE row,. ..", ",,,,.,,0. W x ? -- -- ------ .- .-- b I . , (, I I I ( t ,1 ,0 , . ,' I , ,- , !" 1 , I I ,; ,, 1 1 I .1 . . COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE VEGETATION MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (Hanford-Ostrander and North BonnevilI&Midway Transmission Line Rights-of-Way) Table of Contents Page . 2 3 pqose and Need Background hbfic evolvement Swq ' ' Decbions to Be Made PROPOSED A~ON AND ~~RNA~S Mtemative k No Action " Manual, Mechnical, and Biological Metbh - Ntemative W. Proposed Action- htegrated Vegetation Management ~) tih Herbicides Herbici& Meth& -. PhedActions Comparison of Mtematives ~ . . . . . . ti~D E~OW~ ~ E_O_~m .. CONSEQ~N~S Affmd Environment . Environment Consquen~ hti Use Soils Vegetation Water Resources WildlfeResources Air Quali@lGlobal Warning

232

Trajectories of change in sagebrush steppe vegetation communities in relation to multiple wildfires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeated perturbations, both biotic and abiotic, can lead to fundamental changes in the nature of ecosystems including changes in state. Sagebrush-steppe communities provide important habitat for wildlife and grazing for livestock. Fire is an integral part of these systems, but there is concern that increased ignition frequencies and invasive species are fundamentally altering these systems. Despite these issues, the majority of studies of fire effects in Artemisia tridentata wyomingensis-dominated systems have focused on the effects of single burns. The Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), in south-central Washington (U.S.A.), was one of the largest areas of continuous shrub-steppe habitat in the state until large wildfires burnt the majority of it in 2000 and 2007. We analysed data from permanent vegetation transects established in 1996 and resampled in 2002 and 2009. Our objective was to describe how the fires, and subsequent post-fire restoration efforts, affected communities successional pathways. Plant communities differed in response to repeated fire and restoration; these differences could largely be ascribed to the functional traits of the dominant species. Low elevation communities, previously dominated by obligate seeders, moved farthest from their initial composition and were dominated by weedy, early successional species in 2009. Higher elevation sites with resprouting shrubs, native bunchgrasses and few invasive species were generally more resilient to the effects of repeated disturbances. Shrub cover has been almost entirely removed from ALE, though there is evidence of recovery where communities were dominated by re-sprouters. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) dominance was reduced by herbicide application in areas where it was previously abundant but increased significantly in untreated areas. Several re-sprouting species, notably Phlox longifolia and Poa secunda, expanded remarkably following competitive release from shrub canopies and/or abundant cheatgrass. Our results suggest that community dynamics can be understood through a state-and-transition model with two axes (shrub/grass and native/invasive abundance), though such models also need to account for differences in plant functional traits and disturbance regimes. We use our results to develop an illustrative model that will be expanded with further research.

Davies, G. M.; Bakker, J. D.; Dettweiler-Robinson, E.; Dunwiddie, Peter W.; Hall, S. A.; Downs, Janelle L.; Evans, J.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The effects of cattle on shoreline vegetation of ponds and tanks in south Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE December I97S Hajor Subject: Wildlife and. Fisheries Sciences THE EFFECTS OF CATTLE ON SHORELINE VEGETATION OF PONDS AND TANKS IN SOUTH TEXAS A Thesis by RICHARD JOHN WHITE Approved as to content and style by: Chairmen of Committee Head... of Department M ber ber December 1978 ABSTRACT Ti e Effe ts of Cattle on Shoreline Vegetation of Ponds a", !d Tanks in "outh Texas. (December i978) Richard John Nhytc, B, Nat ~ Res. , University of New England Chairman of Mvisory Committee: Dr. N ~ J...

Whyte, Richard John

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-09)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from the rights of way and access roads for BPA's McNary-Santiam No. 1 Transmission Line, beginning in the summer of 2000 and ending in July, 2001. This Supplemental Analysis finds that: (1) the proposed actions are substantially consistent with the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285) and ROD; and (2) there are no new circumstances or information relevant to environmental concerns and bearing on the proposed actions or their impacts. Therefore, no further NEPA documentation is required.

N /A

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Influence of Photosynthetic Crown Structure on Potential Productivity of Vegetation, Based Primarily on Mathematical Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and small gravels to the surface could explain the presence of mounds on Rocky Flats. The sorting, causing

Minnesota, University of

236

Theoretical Population Biology 71 (2007) 111 Nonlinear dynamics and pattern bifurcations in a model for vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical Population Biology 71 (2007) 1­11 Nonlinear dynamics and pattern bifurcations observed in aerial photographs of sub- Saharan Africa in the 1950s (MacFadyen, 1950; Hemming, 1965; Wickens in the plant density U because the presence of plant roots in the soil increases water ARTICLE IN PRESS www

Sherratt, Jonathan A.

237

SUN Regulates Vegetative and Reproductive Organ Shape by Changing Cell Division Patterns1[C][W][OA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUN Regulates Vegetative and Reproductive Organ Shape by Changing Cell Division Patterns1[C controlling the elongated fruit shape of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is SUN. In this study, we explored the roles of SUN in vegetative and reproductive development using near isogenic lines (NILs) that differ

van der Knaap, Esther

238

Life Cycle Inventory and Carbon and Water FoodPrint of Fruits and Vegetables: Application to a Swiss Retailer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse production implies electricity use, for example, for lighting and irrigation pumps. ... Different scenarios of the total GWP of the fruits and vegetables assessed reveal a reduction potential of 42% changing from the scenario with air-freighted oversea-asparagus and vegetables produced in heated greenhouses in northern Europe to a supply without air transport and fossil fuel heated greenhouse productions. ...

Franziska Stoessel; Ronnie Juraske; Stephan Pfister; Stefanie Hellweg

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

239

Ecological Modelling xxx (2005) xxxxxx Modelling carbon and water cycles in a beech forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on simulated NEE. Finally 17 parameters, linked to photosynthesis, vegetative respiration and soil water are used to create a set of 17,000 simulations, where the values of the 17 key parameters are randomlyEcological Modelling xxx (2005) xxx­xxx Modelling carbon and water cycles in a beech forest Part I

Boyer, Edmond

240

8 March 2010 Role of dietary iodine and cruciferous vegetables in thyroid cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8 March 2010 1 Role of dietary iodine and cruciferous vegetables in thyroid cancer: A countrywide Rougier, MD4 Pascal Guénel, MD, PhD1,2 Author affiliations 1 Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, CESP: Pascal Guénel, MD, PhD Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer UMRS 1018, Inserm CESP 16 avenue Paul

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Quaternary Science Reviews 21 (2002) 10391059 Lateglacial and early Holocene vegetation development in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development in the Gutaiului Mountains, northwestern Romania Leif Bj.orkmana, *, Angelica Feurdeanb , Kajsa-Bolyai University, Kogalniceanu 1, 3400 Cluj, Romania c (Angstr.om Laboratory, Division of Ion Physics, Box 534, S in the Gutaiului Mountains in northwestern Romania, in order to reconstruct the vegetation development during

Wohlfarth, Barbara

242

Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes Yonghoon Choi and Yang Wang Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State. Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents

Wang, Yang

243

Eighty years of change: vegetation in the montane ecoregion of Jasper National Park, Alberta,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eighty years of change: vegetation in the montane ecoregion of Jasper National Park, Alberta and dis- tribution in the montane ecoregion of Jasper National Park, in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta parc natio- nal de Jasper, situé dans les Montagnes Rocheuses en Alberta, au Canada. Une approche

Macdonald, Ellen

244

Assessing Naturalness in Northern Great Lakes Forests Based on Historical Land-Cover and Vegetation Changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing Naturalness in Northern Great Lakes Forests Based on Historical Land-Cover and Vegetation was developed to assess to what degree landscapes represent a natural state. Protected areas are often regarded into naturalness assessments and the results provide useful information for future park management. More broadly

245

Specialty Crop Profile: Anthony Bratsch, Extension Specialist, Vegetables and Small Fruit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specialty Crop Profile: Pawpaw Anthony Bratsch, Extension Specialist, Vegetables and Small Fruit Introduction Pawpaw (Asimina spp.) is a native fruit crop that is in the beginning phases of domestication.S. The pawpaw is the largest edible tree fruit native to the United States. It is the only temperate member

Liskiewicz, Maciej

246

Flow, Sedimentation, and Biomass Production on a Vegetated Salt Marsh in South Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Flow, Sedimentation, and Biomass Production on a Vegetated Salt Marsh in South Carolina: Toward studies at North Inlet estuary, South Carolina, the biomass of the S. alterniflora on the marsh platform at North Inlet are used to relate biomass to plant area per unit volume, stem diameter, and an empirical

247

Plasticizer Contamination in Edible Vegetable Oil in a U.S. Retail Market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasticizer Contamination in Edible Vegetable Oil in a U.S. Retail Market ... The content of total plasticizers in oil samples was determined to be 210–7558 ?g/kg, which was comparable to the content range in oil marketed in Italy. ... The electron impact energy was 70 eV. ...

Xiaolong Bi; Xiaojun Pan; Shoujun Yuan; Qiquan Wang

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

248

Fruits & vegetables supply chains specificities and stakes as element of discussion on Social-LCA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fruits & vegetables supply chains specificities and stakes as element of discussion on Social-LCA approach, justifying a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), not only from an environmental point of view but from limits that LCA meets integrating social and economic aspects. The elements presented lead to an in

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

249

Vegetation and Fire at the Last Glacial Maximum in Tropical South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Vegetation and Fire at the Last Glacial Maximum in Tropical South America Francis E temperatures. Keywords Charcoal · Last Glacial Maximum · pollen · Quaternary · tropical South America F-mail: Francis.Mayle@ed.ac.uk 89F. Vimeux et al. (eds.), Past Climate Variability in South America

Binford, Michael W.

250

Disease Management for Vegetable Crops Program Leader: Margaret Tuttle McGrath, Associate Professor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affecting vegetables grown on Long Island within organic as well as conventional production systems by and genetic control. Examine impact on diseases of practices to improve soil health: annual compost amendments conducted in 2010 included 1) evaluating registered conventional fungicides and experimentals; 2) examining

Lazzaro, Brian

251

Journal of Vegetation Science && (2012) Salinity tolerance and the decoupling of resource axis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

functional trade-offs are present along a gradient of low to high salinity? Location: New York State, USA and salinity gradients at three sites using principal compo- nents, correlation and fourth-corner analysesJournal of Vegetation Science && (2012) Salinity tolerance and the decoupling of resource axis

Fridley, Jason D.

252

The Earth as an extrasolar planet: The vegetation spectral signature today and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Earth as an extrasolar planet: The vegetation spectral signature today and during the last in an unresolved extrasolar Earth-like planet integrated reflectance spectrum. Here we investigate the potential during these extrema when 1 hal-00351408,version1-9Jan2009 #12;Earth's climate and biomes maps were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

253

The Earth as an extrasolar planet: the vegetation spectral signature today  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Earth as an extrasolar planet: the vegetation spectral signature today and during the last extrasolar Earth-like planet integrated reflectance spectrum. Here, we investigate the potential during these extrema, when Earth's climate and biomes maps were different from today, we are able to test

Arnold, Luc

254

Vegetation and Ecological Characteristics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation and Ecological Characteristics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at The Teakettle Comparisons with Existing Classifications of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests.....................................................................................23 Intensive Measurements of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests ............24 Mixed-Conifer Patch

Standiford, Richard B.

255

Influence of coastal vegetation on the 2004 tsunami wave impact in west Aceh  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coastal vegetation . Science 310 : 643 . 3 Tanaka...Experience of the recent Indian Ocean tsunami...defense against the recent tsunami? Curr Biol 15 : R443...killer tsunamis . Science 326 : 1188 – 1189...thank the German Aerospace Center...uses to the wave advance. Applying a spatial...

Juan Carlos Laso Bayas; Carsten Marohn; Gerd Dercon; Sonya Dewi; Hans Peter Piepho; Laxman Joshi; Meine van Noordwijk; Georg Cadisch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas Justin A. Hogan,1 sequestration sites for possible leaks of the CO2 gas from underground reservoirs, a low-cost multispectral are then flagged for closer inspection with in-situ CO2 sensors. The system is entirely self

Shaw, Joseph A.

257

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT VEGETATION COVER TYPES ON SEDIMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT VEGETATION COVER TYPES ON SEDIMENT by trapping sediment during tidal exchange. They are considered good sediment retention environments, but little is known about the spatial variability of sedimentation within these wetlands, and the role

Lovett, Gary M.

258

Mark E. Uchanksi, PhD Assistant Professor of Vegetable Physiology, Plant and Environmental Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

producers in New Mexico and the desert southwest. Several recent projects have shown the great potential imports from other states. New Mexico vegetable farmers face many unique challenges, which are often. Effect of Rotational Crop Residues on Chile (Capsicum annuum) Germination and Vigor. Hortscience 46(9): S

Johnson, Eric E.

259

Vegetation communities associated with the 100-Area and 200-Area facilities on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington, lies within the broad semi-arid shrub-steppe vegetation zone of the Columbia Basin. Thirteen different habitat types on the Hanford Site have been mapped in Habitat Types on the Hanford Site: Wildlife and Plant Species of Concern (Downs et al. 1993). In a broad sense, this classification is correct. On a smaller scale, however, finer delineations are possible. This study was conducted to determine the plant communities and estimate vegetation cover in and directly adjacent to the 100 and 200 Areas, primarily in relation to waste sites, as part of a comprehensive ecological study for the Compensation Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) characterization of the 100 and 200 Areas. During the summer of 1993, field surveys were conducted and a map of vegetation communities in each area, including dominant species associations, was produced. The field surveys consisted of qualitative community delineations. The community delineations described were made by field reconnaissance and are qualitative in nature. The delineations were made by visually determining the dominant plant species or vegetation types and were based on the species most apparent at the time of inspection. Additionally, 38 transects were run in these plant communities to try to obtain a more accurate representation of the community. Because habitat disturbances from construction/operations activities continue to occur in these areas, users of this information should be cautious in applying these maps without a current ground survey. This work will complement large-scale habitat maps of the Hanford Site.

Stegen, J.A.

1994-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Elephant in the Room Presentation to the Saskatchewan Greenhouse and Vegetable Growers Association of Saskatchewan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Elephant in the Room Presentation to the Saskatchewan Greenhouse and Vegetable Growers Association of Saskatchewan November 14, 2009, by MIKE FURI, Branch Manager Manitoba/Saskatchewan Wholesale Division TGP, Saskatchewan Director Canadian Produce Marketing Association #12;Goals & Benefits · To reduce

Peak, Derek

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Responses of wind erosion to climate-induced vegetation changes on the Colorado Plateau  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...climate-induced vegetation changes on the Colorado Plateau 10.1073/pnas...shrublands to wind erosion on the Colorado Plateau and demonstrate how...Bush (Euonymus alatus), Colorado Blue Spruce (Picea pungens glauca...sediment transport following wildfire in sagebrush steppe . J Arid Environ...

Seth M. Munson; Jayne Belnap; Gregory S. Okin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Ris Energy Report 2 Biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils that have been  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6.2 Risø Energy Report 2 Biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils that have been chemically (canola) oil with methanol. Biodiesel can be burned directly in diesel engines. Robert Diesel himself to producing low-cost biodiesel is to select clever blends of the cheapest feedstocks available, while main

263

The impact of vegetation on fractionation of rare earth elements (REE) during waterrock interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impact of vegetation on fractionation of rare earth elements (REE) during water The fractionation of the rare earth elements (REE) in river water, as well as the immobilization of REE in the river earth elements (REE) principally originate from apatite dissolution during weathering. However, stream

Mailhes, Corinne

264

An end effector based on the Bernoulli principle for handling sliced fruit and vegetables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the design and testing of a gripper developed for the handling of delicate sliced fruit and vegetable products commonly found in the food industry. The device operates on the Bernoulli principle whereby air flow over the surface ... Keywords: Bernoulli effect, Cucumber, End effector, Food, Gripper, Non-contact, Tomato

S. Davis; J. O. Gray; Darwin G. Caldwell

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Overview of vegetation monitoring data, 1952--1983. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The goal of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Members of the HEDR Project`s Environmental Monitoring Data Task have developed databases of historical environmental measurements of such emissions. The HEDR Project is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. This report is the third in a series that documents the information available on measurements of iodine-131 concentrations in vegetation. The first two reports provide the data for 1945--1951. This report provides an overview of the historical documents, which contain vegetation data for 1952--1983. The overview is organized according to the documents available for any given year. Each section, covering one year, contains a discussion of the media sampled, the sampling locations, significant events if there were any, emission quantities, constituents measured, and a list of the documents with complete reference information. Because the emissions which affected vegetation were significantly less after 1951, the vegetation monitoring data after that date have not been used in the HEDR Project. However, access to these data may be of interest to the public. This overview is, therefore, being published.

Duncan, J.P.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Gas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= ) in the silty ice, reaching values as high as 22 mM [Tison et al., 1998]. Ammonium oxalate is produced duringGas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion R. Souchez,1 J prevailing during build-up of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) are not yet established. Here we use results from

Chappellaz, Jérôme

267

VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH WATERSHED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH their environmental impact, innovative practices must be developed that replace ecosystem services lost during systems for urban ecosystem remediation. The stormwater retention performance of a thin-layer green roof

Rosemond, Amy Daum

268

High spatial resolution three-dimensional mapping of vegetation spectral dynamics using computer vision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forestry Forest ecology Computer vision Unmanned aerial systems UAS Unmanned aerial vehicle UAV Forest-dimensional (3D) measurements of vegetation by remote sensing are advancing ecological research and environmental ecologically significant dynamics in canopy color at different heights and a structural shift upward in canopy

Ellis, Erle C.

269

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation using spectral imaging. This has been accom- plished with both visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) sunlight-path laser absorption measurements [14]­[16], in-situ visible and near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectral

Lawrence, Rick L.

270

Vegetables, Fruits, Legumes and Prostate Cancer: A Multiethnic Case-Control Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...adjustment for energy and other potential...included total, dark green, yellow-orange...health interview survey. In Los Angeles...the foods in the dark green and cruciferous...adjustment for total energy intake (r 0...adjusted for total energy intake. Table...3 4 5 (high) Dark green vegetables...

Laurence N. Kolonel; Jean H. Hankin; Alice S. Whittemore; Anna H. Wu; Richard P. Gallagher; Lynne R. Wilkens; Esther M. John; Geoffrey R. Howe; Darlene M. Dreon; Dee W. West; and Ralph S. Paffenbarger, Jr.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Increasing Vegetable and Fruit Intake: Randomized Intervention and Monitoring in an At-Risk Population  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...although the proportion of energy contributed by carbohydrates...1989-1991 Continuing Surveys of Food Intake by Individuals...national population-based survey, found that average...of fiber, and 15% of energy from fat. Similar to...one serving each of dark green vegetables, yellow-orange...

Stephanie A. Smith-Warner; Patricia J. Elmer; Theresa M. Tharp; Lisa Fosdick; Bryan Randall; Myron Gross; James Wood; and John D. Potter

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives Ravigadevi Sambanthamurthi1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives Ravigadevi Sambanthamurthi1 *, Yew , Krishnan Subramaniam5 , Soon-Sen Leow1 , Kenneth C. Hayes6 and Mohd Basri Wahid1 1 Malaysian Palm Oil Board, 6, Persiaran Institusi, Bandar Baru Bangi, 43000 Kajang Selangor, Malaysia 2 Malaysian Palm Oil

Sinskey, Anthony J.

273

142: Model Calibration and Uncertainty HOSHIN V GUPTA1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interrelated water, energy, and vegetation processes. Any computer-based model intended to represent. The model components are aggregated descriptions of real-world hydrologic processes. One consequence measurements of the system response through a process known as model calibration. The objective

Wagener, Thorsten

274

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-28)(9/5/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 5, 2001 September 5, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-28) James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Port Angeles - Sappo No.1 Transmission Line ROW, from struture 1/1 to structure 42/10. Location: The ROW is located in Clallum County, WA, all in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Olympia Region. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is

275

(DOE/EIS-0285-126): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program 2/19/03  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

KEP-4 KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-126- Alvey Fairview Benjamin Tilley - TFE/Alvey Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Alvey Fairview 230kV transmission line from structure 1/1 through structure 64/7. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region in Coos, Douglas, and Lane Counties, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, along access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently

276

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-64): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/26/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6, 2002 6, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-64) Truman Conn - TFP Regional Manager, Walla Walla Region Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for Substations and Non-Electric Facilities in the Walla Walla Region (See Attachment A for a complete list of facilities) Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage vegetation inside and around electrical substations and associated facilities. Vegetation management within the substation shall include the bare ground management of all graveled areas. These areas shall primarily be maintained with the use of herbicides. The management of vegetation outside the substation and associated facilities

277

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-22)(8/17/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 17, 2001 August 17, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-22) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Chief Joseph - Snohomish No.3 and 4 Transmission Line ROW. From STR 94/1 to STR 113/1 Location: The ROW is located in King and Snohomish Counties, WA, in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is

278

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-26)(9/11/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11, 2001 11, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-26) Ben Tilley - TFE/Alvey Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on Reedsport-Fairview #1 Transmission Line Structure 1/5 to 39/4. Location: All ROW are located in Coos and Douglas Counties, OR, all being in the Eugene Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Eugene Region. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently

279

Terrestrial Carbon Sinks for the United States Predicted from MODIS Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate monthly carbon fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems of the conterminous United States ...

Christopher Potter; Steven Klooster; Alfredo Huete; Vanessa Genovese

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Measurement of Surface Energy Fluxes from Two Rangeland Sites and Comparison with a Multilayer Canopy Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rangelands are often characterized by a patchy mosaic of vegetation types, making measurement and modeling of surface energy fluxes particularly challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate surface energy fluxes measured using three eddy ...

Gerald N. Flerchinger; Michele L. Reba; Danny Marks

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Geomorphology and ecohydrology of water-limited ecosystems : a modeling approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of vegetation in shaping landforms and how these landforms respond to disturbances are the subjects of this work. A numerical model is developed to help develop a mechanistic understanding of the hydrological, ...

Collins, Daniel B. G. (Daniel Benjamin Gardiner), 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Spring Thaw and Its Effect on Terrestrial Vegetation Productivity in the Western Arctic Observed from Satellite Microwave and Optical Remote Sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Global satellite remote sensing records show evidence of recent vegetation greening and an advancing growing season at high latitudes. Satellite remote sensing–derived measures of photosynthetic leaf area index (LAI) and vegetation gross and net ...

J. S. Kimball; K. C. McDonald; M. Zhao

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

features a fuel mixer to blend vegetable oil with marine gasa 70:30 fuel ratio of spent vegetable oil and marine gas oilfuel and maintenance costs that were 50% less than a co-generation system running on marine

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Effects of tree cutting and fire on understory vegetation in mixed conifer forests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Mixed conifer forests of western North America are challenging for fire management, as historical fire regimes were highly variable in severity, timing, and spatial extent. Complex fire histories combined with site factors and other disturbances, such insect outbreaks, led to great variation in understory plant communities, and management activities influence future dynamics of both overstory and understory communities. This variation needs to be considered as part of ecosystem-scale efforts to influence future fires and restore the composition and structure of mixed conifer forests. We undertook a systematic review of published studies evaluating effects of tree cutting and fire on understory vegetation in western North American mixed conifer forests. Forty-one studies, published in 50 articles, met inclusion criteria and encompassed projects in seven states in the USA and British Columbia in Canada. Total understory plant abundance (cover, biomass, or density) commonly declined in the short term within 4 years after treatment. This may result from damage to plants during tree cutting operations or fire, heavy loadings of slash, little change or even expansion of tree canopies after low-intensity treatments, herbivory, or drought. In contrast, all 7 studies measuring understories longer than 5 years since treatment reported increases in understory metrics. Treatments in these long-term studies also persistently decreased tree canopy cover. Most or all native species endured (even if reduced in abundance) through cutting operations or fire. A model of understory response has emerged that treatments generally do not eliminate species, and often benefit species absent or uncommon in untreated forest. Groups of native species (e.g., Epilobium spp.) appear fire-dependent, because they are uncommon or absent in unburned mixed conifer forests and after tree cutting alone. Cutting and prescribed fire applied together resulted in the greatest invasion of non-native plants, but non-native cover was minimal compared to native cover. Few studies examined influences of intensity of tree cutting or severity of prescribed fire, but overstory–understory relationships suggest that treatments must substantially reduce overstory density from maximum values (which can exceed 3000 stems ha?1 and 80 m2 ha?1 basal area) and tree canopy cover to forest understory. Few studies examined understory dynamics after wildfire relative to unburned forest, and further work is warranted because wildfire is a likely eventual outcome of passive management in these forests. Across a broad region from the southwestern United States into Canada, prescribed fire and tree cutting consistently increased disturbance-promoted native species in the short term and total understory abundance in the long term. Active management using tree cutting and fire will likely benefit both biodiversity conservation and fire management in current mixed conifer forests.

Scott R. Abella; Judith D. Springer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The direct economic effects of a policy to provide government subsidized price discounts for the purchase of fruit and vegetable by food stamp recipients.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the purchase of fruit and vegetable by food stamp recipients. by Karen M. Jetter Assistant Research Economist price discounts on fresh fruit and vegetable to food stamp recipients. The suggestion for a price discount on fruit and vegetable for food stamps recipients is contained in the 2004 Farm Bill, section 4116

California at Davis, University of

287

The Implementation of Vegetation Management Projects on U.S. Forest Service Lands: The Big Eddy-Ostrander Vegetation Project on the Mt. Hood National Forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Utility forestry has become a primary maintenance issue for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) since August 10, 1996, western United States outage. This issue has been sustained by the massive power outage caused by tree outages in the summer of 2003 in the northeastern United States. One of the responses to the 1996 event by the Bonneville Power Administration was to develop a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the transmission system. The goal of the EIS was to develop a strategy and provide a clear path for managers to implement environmental analysis when developing powerline vegetation management programs on BPA rights-of-way that cross in the Pacific Northwest. The Big Eddy-Ostrander project initiated on U.S. Forest Service lands, proposed the use of herbicides using the EIS as the analysis guide. As a cooperative project with the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Forest Service to control noxious weeds, many items needed to be worked out. These items included: the determination of who was the lead agency for the project, what formats should be used for environmental documents, who could appeal the process, and what did each agency want to see during the environmental analysis process. The end result of the process was that in the summer of 2003, BPA made the first herbicide treatment for vegetation management on the right-of way located in the Zig Zag Ranger District in over 20 years.

William T. Erickson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-41): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/27/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

February 27, 2002 February 27, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-41) William Erickson - TPF/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management around wood poles in Transmission Line ROW's in the Walla Walla Region (see attached checklist for identification). The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridors with the easement width ranging from 0 to 200 feet. Location: The ROWs are located in Walla Walla Region (see checklist). Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation around

289

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-70)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(8-89) memorandum DATE: 7/19/02 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-70) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist TO: Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on sections of the McNary-Ross, McNary-Horse Heaven, Horse Heaven-Harvarlum, Harvarlum-Big Eddy, and Hanford-John Day Transmission lines. The treatment areas are identified in Step 1 of the Planning Steps shown below. The work will involve the control of noxious weeds in the subject rights-of-ways (ROWs). Location: The ROWs are located in Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon and Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington, all being in the Walla Walla and Redmond Regions.

290

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-42)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5, 2002 5, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-42) Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Bob Sweet - TFNF/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Snohomish - Murray #1 from str 1\4 to str 18\5. The proposed work will be to remove both danger and reclaim trees outside and inside the right-of-way, respectively. Right-of-way width varies from 125 to 300 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Snohomish County, WA, being in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to remove both reclaim and danger trees inside and outside the transmission line right of way. BPA crews or contract crews will cut only trees that have

291

Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A Database (NDP-017) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp017 data Data Contributed Jerry S. Olson1, Julia A. Watts1, and Linda J. Allison1 1Work completed while a member of the Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Prepared by R.M. Cushman, D.P. Kaiser, S.B. Jones and L.M. Olsen. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 Managed by University of Tennessee-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 Date Published: September, 1985 (Revised for the web: 2001) Please note that updated versions of this database are available. An updated database using the GLC2000 land cover product (ndp107b) is now

292

Keyword index to citations in "Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation and Eco  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Keyword index to citations in "Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation and Ecosystems: Keyword index to citations in "Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation and Ecosystems: 1990-1999 Literature" (Michael H. Jones and Peter S. Curtis, editors), ORNL/CDIAC-129, July 2000 (http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/epubs/cdiac/cdiac129/cdiac129.html) Numbers following each keyword refer to the numbers preceding the citations in the WordPerfect and ASCII text listings of the bibliography. 1,5-BISPHOSPHATE 1965 1,5-BISPHOSPHATE CARBOXYLASE 98, 878 1,5-BISPHOSPHATE CARBOXYLASE OXYGENASE 370 1,5-DIPHOSPHATE CARBOXYLASE 253 16S RDNA 1452 18TH-CENTURY ENGLAND 45 1989 FACE EXPERIMENT 1155 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLATE OXIDASE 667 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID 524, 762-764, 1241, 1471, 1472, 1622, 1696, 2632 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOL 1368 24-H 317 280-320 NM 2475

293

A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 (NDP-073) image Data image PDF file image Contributed by Michael H. Jones Peter S. Curtis Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology The Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio Prepared by Robert M. Cushman and Antoinette L. Brenkert Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4909 Date Published: November 1999 Prepared for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research Budget Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 managed by LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY RESEARCH CORP. for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-96OR22464

294

Use of Papyrus Files: 1990-1999 Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use of Papyrus Files: 1990-1999 Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation Use of Papyrus Files: 1990-1999 Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation and Ecosystems Use of PapyrusTM Files Users of PapyrusTM on IBM-compatible personal computers (Full Version or Retriever) should use the seven *.bib files constituting this database, whereas users of PapyrusTM on Macintosh personal computers (Full Version or Limited Version) should use the nine *.bb files. How to Download Free Read-Only PapyrusTM software Limited (read-only) versions of PapyrusTM may be downloaded from Research Software Design's web site (http://www.rsd.com/~rsd/). The Retriever for IBM-compatible personal computers may be obtained from web page http://www.teleport.com/~rsd/Utilities7.html by downloading and installing the self-extracting compressed files papzip.exe and paprdoc.exe. In this

295

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-06)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to apply selected herbicides to control annual weeds that are competing with native grasses that were seeded two years ago. Herbicides will also be applied at the base of the existing wooden transmission line poles located in the pasture area. BPA would conduct the vegetation control with the goal of promoting native grass growth and to provide fire protection for the wooden transmission line poles. The pasture area is, for the most part, flat with elevation increasing towards the northwest corner. Slopes are not steep in that area. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

296

Study of technetium uptake in vegetation in the vicinity of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technetium-99 was measured in vegetation and soil collected on and near the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to obtain an estimate of the soil-to-vegetation concentration factors. The concentration factors appear to be lognormally distributed with a geometric mean of 3.4 (Bq/kg dry wt. tissue per Bq/kg dry wt. soil) and a geometric standard deviation of 4.7. A dose commitment was calculated using a hypothetical 3.7 x 10/sup 10/ Bq Tc-99/year release and the actual CY-1981 concentration release of Tc-99. The radiological significance of Tc-99 in the terrestial food chain is substantially less than previously believed.

Acox, T.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Final environmental assessment for vegetation control at VHF stations, microwave stations, electrical substations, and pole yards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Southwestern Power Adm. operates very high frequency (VHF) and microwave radio stations, electrical substations, and pole yards for electric power transmission throughout AR, MO, and OK. Vegetation growth at the stations must be suppressed for safety of operation and personnel. Southwestern has been using a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control for this purpose; Federally- mandated reductions in staff and budgetary resources require Southwestern to evaluate all potentially efficient methods for vegetation control. Three alternatives were examined: no action, mechanical/manual control, and (proposed) a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control. Environmental impacts on air and water quality, wetlands, wildlife, endangered species, archaeological and other resources, farmland, human health, transportation, etc. were evaluated.

NONE

1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

298

Comparison of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Platforms for Assessing Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quick and safe method for monitoring biotic resources was evaluated. Vegetation cover and the amount of bare ground are important factors in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems and assessment of rangeland health. Methods that improve speed and cost efficiency could greatly improve how biotic resources are monitored on western lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species (including sage grouse and pygmy rabbit). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, two UAV platforms, fixed wing and helicopter, were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate percent cover for six different vegetation types (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forb, litter, and bare ground) and (2) locate sage grouse using representative decoys. The field plots were located on the Idaho National Engineering (INL) site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetation cover. A software program called SamplePoint was used along with visual inspection to evaluate percent cover for the six cover types. Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy. The comparison of fixed-wing and helicopter UAV technology against field estimates shows good agreement for the measurement of bare ground. This study shows that if a high degree of detail and data accuracy is desired, then a helicopter UAV may be a good platform to use. If the data collection objective is to assess broad-scale landscape level changes, then the collection of imagery with a fixed-wing system is probably more appropriate.

Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Sera White

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Synthetic cytokinin effects on vegetative propagation of Lilium longiflorum Thunb. 'Ace'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A ', ~/~ '- . g. ~ember August 1974 ABSTRACT Synthetic Cytokinin Effects on Vegetative Propagation oi' Lili 1 ~if1 , h O. 'Ace'. (hog : 1974I Cathy Marie Wilhite, B. S. , Texas Tech University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. A. E. Nightingale Foliar... of her commi ttee, Drs. A. E. Nightingale, H. T. Blackhurst, and M. H. Milford, for their patience, guidance, and understanding. She also appreciates the encouragement of the faculty, secretaries, and fellow graduate students in the Horticulture...

Wilhite, Cathy Marie

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS DOE/EIS-0285/SA-08  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clearing C-trees along the south side of the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The project involves controlling all tall growing trees (C-Trees) within the right-of-way. All work is to be done on the south side of centerline. Target vegetation is the tall growing Firs along the edge of the ROW, all of which is located within the back yards of the property owners along the right-of-way. The density of vegetation is low and consists of C-Trees located within backyards, with the branches growing towards the lines. Due to lack of access and past verbal agreements with the landowners, permission/agreement has been difficult to obtain from the property owners. Permission has now been obtained to remove the C-Trees within their back yards which, will soon be a hazard to our transmission line facility. We are working with the landowners to get them to plant low growing scrubs and ornamentals within the right-of-way and adjacent to the right-of-way. A follow up herbicide treatment is not planned because the trees being cut will not re-sprout. This right-of-way or project area is on a three to four year maintenance schedule. Little or no treatment should be required in the immediate future.

N /A

2001-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

302

Vegetation trends in reclaimed areas at Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine, Grimes County, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetation productivity and cover studies have been conducted annually at the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine since 1989, and multiple annual clippings have been collected since 1991. The primary purpose of these studies was to examine revegetation success, in terms of herbaceous productivity, for various post-mine soil types. However, the studies also contain detailed information on species composition. For the years in which multiple annual clippings have been collected (1991 through 1996), total vegetation cover increased, with the mean proportion of bare ground dropping from 12% in 1991 to 1% in 1996. Relative proportions of most introduced and native grasses were virtually static from 1991 through 1994; in 1995, however, herbicide applications to reduce clover cover resulted in a dramatic increase in total grass cover, especially in bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) and Indiangrass (Sorgastrum nutans). In contrast to the trends of other introduced and native grasses, bahiagrass increased in cover throughout the study period, increasing from 7% in 1991 to 21 % in 1996. Annual and weedy grass species decreased in cover throughout the study period, falling from 12% cover in 1991 to 2% in 1996. This trend of displacement of annuals by perennials is typically observed during ecological succession in natural vegetation communities, and appears to have been accelerated by the herbicide application.

Westerman, C.A. [Morrison Knudsen Corp., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Influence of stand and site conditions on the quality of digital elevation models underlying New Zealand forests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When aerial LiDAR data is used to construct Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) under vegetation, DEM quality will invariably suffer due to attenuation of the laser pulses by the land cover. Although the ratio of ...

Michael S Watt; Thomas Adams; Pete Watt…

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Urban Energy Balance Obtained from the Comprehensive Outdoor Scale Model Experiment. Part I: Basic Features of the Surface Energy Balance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to examine the basic features of the surface energy balance (SEB) using the data obtained from the Comprehensive Outdoor Scale Model (COSMO). COSMO is an idealized miniature city that has no vegetation, no human ...

Toru Kawai; Manabu Kanda

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-12): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 5/15/01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2) 2) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1 Transmission Line ROW. Location: The ROW is located in Pierce and King Counties, WA, being in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the

306

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-04): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 3/27/01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 27, 2001 March 27, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-04) Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on Ponderosa - Pilot Butte 18/2 to 18/4 Relocation Location: The project area is in the City of Bend, OR, in Deschutes County. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from a section of BPA's Ponderosa - Pilot Butte Transmission Line Right-of-way to facilitate relocation of structure 18/3. Work would begin in mid-March and end in April, 2001. Analysis: 1. Description of right-of-way and vegetation management needed: The project involves

307

DOE/EIS-0285-SA-62: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (4/16/02)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DATE April 16, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Covington SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-62) Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Rocky Reach - Maple Valley No. 1 Transmission Line ROW from structure 98/2 to structure 110/1. The transmission line is a 500 kV line. Location: The ROW is located King County, WA. Proposed by: Snohomish Regional Headquarters, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear targeted vegetation along access roads and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. BPA plans to conduct vegetation management along existing access road and

308

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-58) 5/31/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31, 2002 31, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-58) Bill Erickson - TPF/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management at the Lines Creek Microwave site. The proposed work will be accomplished within the fenced area of the facility. Location: The Lines Creek Microwave site is located at SWSW Section 33 T44N R2E within Shoshone County, Idaho, Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes bare ground vegetation management at the microwave site. Bare ground management is needed to prevent fire damage and maintain a vegetation free environment on the site.

309

Using LiDAR and normalized difference vegetation index to remotely determine LAI and percent canopy cover at varying scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: (1) Develop scanning LiDAR and multispectral imagery methods to estimate PCC and LAI over both hardwood and coniferous forests; (2) investigate whether a LiDAR and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data fusion through linear regression...

Griffin, Alicia Marie Rutledge

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

The temporal mapping of riparian vegetation at Leon Creek in Bexar County, Texas from 1987 to 1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 1999 were determined. These areas show the most intense loss or gain of dense vegetation and whether these intense changes are occurring in rural or urban zones. Unsupervised and supervised classifications on 1987 Landsat and 1999 Landsat images were...

Cummins, Karen Leigh

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

Potential influence of climate-induced vegetation shifts on future land use and associated land carbon fluxes in Northern Eurasia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change will alter ecosystem metabolism and may lead to a redistribution of vegetation and changes in fire regimes in Northern Eurasia over the 21st century. Land management decisions will interact with these ...

Kicklighter, D W

312

Impacts of meteorology-driven seed dispersal on plant migration : implications for future vegetation structure under changing climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the impacts among land cover change, future climates and ecosystems are expected to be substantial (e.g., Feddema et al., 2005), there are growing needs for improving the capability of simulating the dynamics of vegetation ...

Lee, Eunjee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Fruit and Vegetable Servings in Local Farm-Sourced and Standard Lunches Offered to Children in a Head Start Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project compared servings of fruits and vegetables consumed in farm-to-school lunches to that in conventional lunches served to students attending a Head Start preschool. The sample used was the student population of a Head Start preschool...

Johnson, Amy M.

2010-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

314

OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY AT 5 YEARS OF AGE IN RELATION TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INTAKE OVER TIME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Childhood overweight and obesity has increased as American diets have evolved to include fewer fruits and vegetables. It is important to evaluate the effect of dietary components on childhood overweight and obesity. Objective...

Cody, Claire McCaslin

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

Health Benefits of Vitamins and Secondary Metabolites of Fruits and Vegetables and Prospects To Increase Their Concentrations by Agronomic Approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fruits and vegetables (FAVs) are an important part of the human diet and a major source of biologically active substances such as vitamins and secondary metabolites. The consumption of FAVs remains globally insufficient, so it should be encouraged, and it ...

Florine Poiroux-Gonord; Luc P. R. Bidel; Anne-Laure Fanciullino; Hélène Gautier; Félicie Lauri-Lopez; Laurent Urban

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

316

Complex Role of Monoacylglycerols in the Oxidation of Vegetable Oils: Different Behaviors of Soybean Monoacylglycerols in Different Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purified vegetable oils were added at increasing amounts (0.5, 1, 2, and 3%) of monoacylglycerols obtained from purified soybean oil and submitted to an oven test (60 °C for 18 days). ...

Vito Michele Paradiso; Francesco Caponio; Giuseppina Bruno; Antonella Pasqualone; Carmine Summo; Tommaso Gomes

2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

317

A newsletter for commercial vegetable growers prepared by the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service March 13, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resistanCe in vegetabLes · neW pubLiCations · upComing events Winter temperatures, Corn fLea beetLe surviva

Ginzel, Matthew

318

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-141- SalemAlbany #2)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1- SalemAlbany #2) 1- SalemAlbany #2) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Salem Albany #2 115 kV transmission line from Salem Substation to Albany Substation. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, within Marion, Polk, and Benton Counties, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission

319

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-140- SalemAlbany1)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0- SalemAlbany1) 0- SalemAlbany1) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Salem Albany #1 115 kV transmission line from Salem Substation to Albany Substation. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Marion, Linn, and Benton County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission

320

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-10): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 5/15/01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0) 0) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Covington-Duwamish No. 1 ROW from the Covington Substation to tower 10/4. Location: The ROW is located in King County, WA, being in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report “SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report”, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

Edwards, Lloyd A. [Leading Solutions, LLC.; Paresol, Bernard [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes and evaluates the concentrations of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr, and total U in understory and overstory vegetation collected from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), its perimeter, and regional background areas in 1998. Comparisons to conservative toxicity reference value safe limits were also made. The arithmetic mean LANL radionuclide concentrations in understory were 501 pCi L{sup {minus}1} for {sup 3}H, 0.581 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 137}Cs, 0.001 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 238}Pu, 0.008 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 239,240}Pu, 0.007 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 241}Am, 1.46 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 90}Sr, and 0.233 {micro}g ash g{sup {minus}1} for total uranium. The mean LANL radionuclide concentrations in overstory were 463 pCi L{sup {minus}1} for {sup 3}H, 1.51 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 137}Cs, 0.0004 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} {sup 238}Pu, 0.008 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 239,240}Pu, 0.014 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 241}Am, 1.97 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 90}Sr, and 0.388 {micro}g ash g{sup {minus}1} for total uranium. Concentrations of radionuclides and total U in both understory and overstory vegetation at LANL generally were not statistically higher than in perimeter and regional background vegetation ({alpha} = 0.05). The exceptions were LANL {sup 3}H > perimeter {sup 3}H (understory) and LANL {sup 3}H background {sup 3}H (overstory). All maximum radionuclide concentrations were lower than toxicity reference values. With the exception of total U, the relationship between contaminant concentration in soil vs. vegetation was insignificant ({alpha} = 0.05). Generally, as the concentration of total U in soil decreased, the concentration in vegetation increased. This held true for both understory and overstory and regardless of whether data were separated by general location (LANL, perimeter, and background) or not. There was no apparent relationship between contaminant concentrations in understory vs. overstory.

G. J. Gonzales; P. R. Fresquez; M. A. Mullen; L. Naranjo, Jr.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Effect of agricultural use of phosphogypsum on trace elements in soils and vegetation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of the disposal of phosphogypsum, one of the main industrial wastes of phosphorus fertilizer production, is reviewed, from the point of view of element pollution of phosphate raw materials, when it is introduced to soil. When phosphogypsum from different phosphorus producing plants in the USSR is used in agriculture, the main element-pollutants are fluorine, sulphur, strontium and rare earth elements. Their concentration in soils and vegetation exceeds Clark values by 20–100 times. The necessity for complex biogeochemical investigations to identify the hazards from these chemical elements in the environment is discussed.

A.V. Gorbunov; M.V. Frontasyeva; S.F. Gundorina; T.L. Onischenko; B.B. Maksjuta; Chen Sen Pal

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Services, Facilities, and Costs of Marketing Vegetables in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000. The railroads have established regular fast-freight schedules for fruit and vegetables as follows : first morning out, Houston; second morning out, Fort Worth; third morning out, Little Rock, Memphis, and New Orleans ; fourth morning out, St. Louis ; fifth... on the right gives the average per cent for the ithree years of carlots shipped by Texas to these markets. Of all carlots #of cabbage shipped into St. Louis, 78 per cent mere from Texas. Dur- ing the same period, Texas furnished 58 per cent for Chicago...

Crawford, G. L. (George Lemuel)

1928-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-113-1): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Updates 9/27/02 SA-113 12/2/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

12/02/02 12/02/02 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-113-1) Updates 9/27/02 SA-113 Bill Erickson, TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: To perform remedial vegetation management for keeping vegetation a safe distance away from electric power facilities and controlling noxious weeds within a section of BPA's Big Eddy-Ostrander Transmission Corridor. During a site review conducted in late fall of 2001, the inspector observed various species of hardwood trees resprouted from stumps. The new vegetative growth encroached on the required "Minimum Safe Distance" between the top of vegetation and the conductor cables. The management action is necessary to reduce the current and potential future hazards that tall- growing vegetation poses to transmission

326

Earth system models: a test using the mid-Holocene in the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Palaeoclimatic reconstructions from proxy data have been compared with climate model outcomes for three decades. It has become evident that explanations of past climates can rely on neither data source alone, the former often being descriptive tools and the latter dependent on model structures and parameterisations. The status of vegetation changes, either as a follower of climate changes or as a modulator of insolation–terrestrial system responses, is vital if proxy records are to be effectively interpreted in climate terms and if models are to be more robust in appropriately incorporating vegetation roles. We use an earth system model (CLIMBER) and proxy data from Southern Hemisphere locations to compare postdictions of mid-Holocene climates. It is concluded that climate simulations and predictions are likely to be inaccurate if vegetation is not properly incorporated, and appropriate models can allow hypotheses to be developed that better explain atmosphere–earth system linkages.

Robert J. Wasson; Martin Claussen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Measurement and Modeling Implications of Transfer and Transformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurement and Modeling Implications of Transfer and Transformation Measurement and Modeling Implications of Transfer and Transformation Processes at the Plant/Air Interface Speaker(s): Randy Maddalena Date: October 13, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro To understand the chemodynamic role of vegetation in a multimedia system, the rate and extent of chemical partitioning from adjacent environmental media and the rate of chemical transformation associated with vegetation need to be determined. An exposure system was used to isolate and expose above ground vegetation to semi-volatile air contaminants. Measurements of phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene in the chamber air and the plant tissue were collected during both the uptake and clearance phase of exposure events. The measurements were fitted to the mass balance of the

328

Hydrogenated soy ethyl ester (HySEE) from ethanol and waste vegetable oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biodiesel is gaining recognition in the United States as a renewable fuel which may be used as an alternative to diesel fuel without any modifications to the engine. Currently the cost of this fuel is the factor that limits its use. One way to reduce the cost of biodiesel is to use a less expensive form of vegetable oil such as waste oil from a processing plant. These operations use mainly hydrogenated soybean oil, some tallow and some Canola as their frying oils. It is estimated that there are several million pounds of waste vegetable oil from these operations. Additional waste frying oil is available from smaller processors, off-grade oil seeds and restaurants. This paper reports on developing a process to produce the first 945 liters (250 gallons) of HySEE using recipes developed at the University of Idaho; fuel characterization tests on the HySEE according to the ASAE proposed Engineering Practice for Testing of Fuels from Biological Materials, X552; short term injector coking tests and performance tests in a turbocharged, DI, CI engine; and a 300 hour screening test in a single cylinder, IDI, CI engine.

Peterson, C.; Reece, D.; Thompson, J. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)] [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Vegetation success, seepage, and erosion on tailing sites reclaimed with cattle and biosolids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reclamation field studies were designed at the Phelps Dodge Morenci Mine in Arizona to evaluate the benefits of biosolids, cattle impact, and other treatment variables on soil-capped tailings. First-year monitoring has provided preliminary data about soil chemical and physical parameters, soil matrix potential profiles, erosion, and vegetation measurements of ground cover, biomass production and frequency. Plots were first seeded in January 1998 with a cover crop of oats or barley. Plots were seeded again in August 1998 with native and native plus non-native plant species. Early productivity from the second seeding was inversely related to seedling density. Plots capped with unamended Gila conglomerate (Gila) materials contained meager plant nutrient levels and produced numerous small seedlings that were poorly rooted and had little standing biomass. Vegetation on the cattle and biosolids treatments was vigorous and productive but at a much lower density than unamended Gila plots. Cattle treatment added little plant-nutrient value to the Gila cap compared to biosolids amendment. However, high rates of biosolids brought excessive salinity. Straw from the cattle treatment provided an effective mulch to improve soil moisture storage but increased the potential for deep seepage. Unamended Gila and biosolids plots had intermediate moisture storage and a modest potential for seepage compared to bare tailings. Mulch cover plus a lower rate of biosolids on Gila is seen as a promising, cost-effective amendment combination for future evaluation.

Vinson, J.; Jones, B.; Milczarek, M.; Hammermeister, D.; Word, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll: Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation, soil, animals, cistern water, and ground water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended as a resource document for the eventual cleanup of Bikini Atoll and contains a summary of the data for the concentrations of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in vegetation through 1987 and in soil through 1985 for 14 islands at Bikini Atoll. The data for the main residence island, Bikini, and the most important island, Eneu, are extensive; these islands have been the subject of a continuing research and monitoring program since 1974. Data for radionuclide concentrations in ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, and pigs from Bikini and Eneu Islands are presented. Also included are general summaries of our resuspension and rainfall data from Bikini and Eneu Islands. The data for the other 12 islands are much more limited because samples were collected as part of a screening survey and the islands have not been part of a continuing research and monitoring program. Cesium-137 is the radionuclide that produces most of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake by terrestrial foods and secondly by direct external gamma exposure. Remedial measures for reducing the /sup 137/Cs uptake in vegetation are discussed. 40 refs., 32 figs., 131 tabs.

Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Stuart, M.L.

1988-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Synthesis of biodiesel from vegetable oils wastewater sludge by in-situ subcritical methanol transesterification: Process evaluation and optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biodiesel are gaining increased public and scientific attention as an alternative to petroleum diesel fuel, driven by factors such as oil price spikes, energy security and environmental concerns. In this study, low grade wastewater sludge originated from wastewater treatment unit of vegetable oil factory as a viable alternative lipid source for biodiesel production was evaluated. The lipid mass fraction of the dry and ash-free sludge was 12.44 ± 0.87%, which mainly comprised of C16–C18 fatty acids. The in-situ transesterification process under subcritical water and methanol conditions was applied as a green pathway to convert lipids into fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). The reaction parameters investigated were temperatures (155–215 °C), pressures (5.5–6.5 MPa) and methanol to lipid mass ratios (1:1, 5:1 and 9:1). The highest FAME yield of 92.67 ± 3.23% was obtained at 215 °C, 6.5 MPa and methanol to lipid mass ratio of 5:1. Statistical analysis based on response surface methodology in 3-factor-3-level central composite designed experiments and analysis of variance were applied to examine the relation between input parameters and the response and to locate the optimum condition. Results showed that 98% of the variability in the response could be adequately explained by the second-order polynomial model. The optimum FAME yield (90.37%) was obtained at 215 °C, 6.5 MPa and methanol to lipid mass ratio of 5.12:1. Experimental validation (N = 3) demonstrated satisfactory agreement between the observed and predicted values with an error of at most 3.3%.

Farrel Gunawan; Alfin Kurniawan; Iwan Gunawan; Yi-Hsu Ju; Aning Ayucitra; Felycia E. Soetaredjo; Suryadi Ismadji

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-36): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (01/22/02)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

24, 2002 24, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-38) Benjamin J. Tilley - TFE/Alvey Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Wendson-Tahkenith #1 & #2 1/1-20/4, Tahkenitch-Gardiner #1/1-2/3 and Tahkenitch-Reedsport #1/1-4/2 Transmission Line ROW's. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor with and average corridor width of 100 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Douglas and Lane County, OR, being in the Eugene Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

333

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-43): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/27/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

February 27, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-43) William T. Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Lower Monumental - McNary 57/2 to 63/5, and Radar Tap 0/4 to 0/10 Transmission Line ROW's. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor with and average corridor width of 165 and 80 feet respectively. Location: The ROW is located in Umatilla and Franklin County, OR, being in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

334

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 150 East Ellensburg Tap  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5, 2003 5, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 150 East Ellensburg Tap Tom Murphy Natural Resource Specialist - TFS/Bell-1 Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the East Ellensburg Tap, 1/6 to 3/19 Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 115 kV Single Circuit Transmission Line with no easement width. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in Kittatas County, WA being in the Spokane Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around transmission line structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the

335

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-119): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 1/29/03  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2003 9, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-119 Snohomish-Murray No. 1 Transmission Line Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Snohomish-Murray No. 1 Transmission Line from structure 2/6 through structure 18/6. Right of way width is 95 feet. Location: The project area is located within Snohomish County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. Total right-of-way acreage is approximately 182.8 acres. Approximately 17 miles of access roads will

336

DOE/EIS-0285; Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (May 2000)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Statement Statement DOE/EIS-0285 Arrow-leaf Balsamroot Cooperating Agencies Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0285) Responsible Agency: Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville), U.S. Department of Energy Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Forest Service (FS), U.S. Department of Agriculture; Bureau of Land Management (BLM), U.S. Department of Interior Title of Proposed Action: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program States Involved: California, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming Abstract: Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation.

337

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-25)(9/5/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5, 2001 5, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/Z992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-25) Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along selected ROW sections of the Ostrander-Pearl transmission line. The ROWs include sections of the Ostrander-Pearl 500 kV line; the Ostrander-McLoughlin 500 kV line; the Big Eddy-Chemawa 230 kV line and the Big Eddy- McLoughlin 230 kV line. Location: The ROW is located in Clackamas County, Oregon, within the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights- of-way and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the

338

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-122): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/19/03  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CSB-2 CSB-2 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-122- Bonneville-Alcoa Ed Tompkins, TFO/LMT Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Bonneville-Alcoa 115kV transmission line Location: The project is located in the BPA Olympia Region in Skamania and Clark Counties, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, along access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans

339

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-81): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 7/9/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 9,2002 July 9,2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-81) Randy Melzer Redmond Deputy Regional Manager - TFR/REDMOND Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for fifteen Substations in The Dalles District. (See list of facilities under planning step 1). Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bare ground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within The Dalles District of the Redmond Region. Analysis: The attached checklist shows the resources that were found during this analysis and what

340

DOE/EIS-0285-SA-50: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission Vegetation Management Program FEIS (3/15/02)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2/27/01 1 2/27/01 1 United States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration DATE: March 15, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-50) Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on Grizzly-Summerlake (Structures 102/1-104/2) and Grizzly-Captain Jack (Structures 103/1-140/4) Transmission Line Corridors. Location: The project area lies east and northeast Klamath Falls, OR, and is located in Lake and Klamath Counties, Redmond Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from the rights of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-74): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 7/1/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2002 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-74) Randy Melzer Redmond Deputy Regional Manager - TFR/REDMOND Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for five Substations in the Malin District. (See list of facilities under planning step 1). Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bare ground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within the Malin District of the Redmond Region. Analysis: The attached checklist shows the resources that were found during this analysis and what mitigation measures are required to protect those resources. In addition,

342

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-127): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/19/03  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

KEP/4 KEP/4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-127- Eugene-Alvey#2 Benjamin Tilley - TFE/Alvey Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Eugene-Alvey 115 kV transmission line from structure 7/1 through structure 12/2m, and along portions of the following adjacent transmission lines: Hawkins-Alvey 115KV and Alvey-Lane 115KV. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region in Lane County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to

343

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-52): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (03/22/02)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

22, 2002 22, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-52) Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on the Ashe-Marion #2 (138/1-150/2), Buckley- Marion (12/1-24/2), McNary-Santiam (109/1-119/3), and John Day-Marion (49/4-50/5) Transmission Line Corridors. Location: The project area lies between Maupin and Pine Grove Oregon, and is in the Redmond Region. The project area begins at on the Ashe-Marion at structure 138/1 and terminates at Wapinitia Road, Pine Grove. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from the

344

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-57): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/10/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0, 2002 0, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/Z992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-57) Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Trojan-Allston Transmission Lines 1 & 2 ROW between 1/1 and 9/1. The lines are 230 kV Single Circuit Transmission Lines having an easement width of 125 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in Columbia County, OR, being in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject

345

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-20)(8/2/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2001 2, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-20) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla - Natural Resource Specialist Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia - Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the McNary-Ross 161/1 to 166/5+346 Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 345kV Single Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 175 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in Clark County, WA, being in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

346

(DOE/EIS-0285//SA-80): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (07/01/02)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SA80 SA80 Rocky Reach - Maple Valley Don Atkinson -- - TFN/Snohomish Bill Erickson -- - TFP/Walla Walla Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for USDA Forest Service Lands Along the Rocky Reach - Maple Valley Transmission Line. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along access roads and around tower structures on USDA Forest Service lands that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See Section 1of the attached checklist for a complete description of the proposal. Analysis: Please see the attached checklist for the resources present. Applicable findings and mitigation measures are discussed below. Planning Steps: 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. Access roads (only) and tower sites (only) will be treated using non-selective methods

347

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-75): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (06/21/02)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June June 21, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/Z-992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA- 75-Ross-Lexington. Jim Jellison -- - TFO/Olympia Ed Tompkins -- - TFO/Ross Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Ross Lexington Transmission Line. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove danger trees as well as unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways, along access roads and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See Section 1.4 of the attached checklist for a complete description of the proposed action. Analysis: Please see the attached checklist for the resources present. Applicable findings and mitigation measures are discussed below. Planning Steps: 1. Identify facility and

348

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-82): Supplemental Analysis for Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (August 13, 2002)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3,2002 3,2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-82 Jeffrey Hathhorn Redmond Deputy Regional Manager - TFI/IDAHO FALLS Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for twenty-four Substations in the Burley District. See list of facilities under planning step 1). Location: See list of facilities under Planning Step 1. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bare ground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within the Burley District of the Idaho Falls Region. Analysis: The attached checklist shows the resources that were found during this analysis and what

349

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-103): Supplemental Analysis for Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (August 12, 2002)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/Z992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-103-Keeler-Pennwalt). Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia Ed Tompkins - TFO/Ross Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Keeler-Pennwalt transmission line and parts of the St. John-Keeler, Rivergate-Keeler, Keeler-Oregon City, & St. John-St. Helens lines. Location: Washington and Multnomah Counties, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to clear targeted vegetation within the Right-of-Ways along access roads and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See Section 1.4 of the attached checklist for a complete description of the proposed action. Analysis: See the attached checklist for the

350

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-105): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (08/22/02)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 105 Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No. 1 James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No.1 and 115kV transmission line from structure 1/1 through structure 7/17. Corridor width varies. The project area is located within Whatcom County, Washington. Location: Transmission line is located at and west of Elbe, Pierce County Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. The right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing

351

(DOE/EIS-0285-SA-100): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 8/15/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5, 5, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-100) Joe Johnson Natural Resource Specialist TFS/Kalispell Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Libby-Conkelly, 1/2 to 26/4 Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 230kV Double Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 125 feet to 250 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in both Lincoln and Flathead County, MT, being in the Spokane Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be in

352

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-56): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/9/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

09, 2002 09, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-56) 2ULRQ $OEUR 2O\PSLD 5HJLRQDO 0DQDJHU Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the following electric yards located in the Ross District: Cape Horn North Bonneville Stevenson Carson Underwood Troutdale Cascade Locks Acton Ross 345kV and J.D. Alcoa Sifton St. Johns Ostrander McLoughlin Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to maintain a weed-free environment in the electrical substations located within the Olympia Region's Ross District. Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage vegetation inside and around electrical

353

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-59): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/19/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 19, 2002 April 19, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-59) James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Chehalis Covington/ Raver Paul / Paul Alston 230 and 500 kV Transmission line Corridor ROW 48/2 to 70/6 and 1/1 to 13/4. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor with a corridor width of 250 to 442 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Thurston County, WA, being in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

354

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-13): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 6/6/01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3) 3) James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Region - Natural Resource Specialist Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Region - Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Naselle Tarlett #1 and #2 transmission line Right of Way (ROW). Location: The ROW is located in Pacific County, WA, Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of

355

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-96) Snohomish District Substations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6) 6) - Snohomish District Substations Dennis Sjoquist - TFN/Snohomish Snohomish Regional Manager Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the following facilities located in the Snohomish District: Bellingham Custer Fidalgo Intalco Lopez Island Monroe Murray, V.M. Snohomish Snoking Whatcom Whatcom Skagit Whatcom San Juan Snohomish Snohomish Snohomish Snohomish Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bareground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within the Snohomish District of the Snohomish Region. Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage vegetation inside and around electrical substations and associated facilities.

356

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-23)(8/17/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DATE: August 17, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-23) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Schultz - Raver No.1 and 2 from 60/3 to 75/5 and the Olympia - Grand Coulee from 70/2 to 70/5 Transmission Line ROW's. Location: The ROW is located in King County, WA, in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways, around tower structures, and along access roads that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be executed in accordance with the National Electrical Safety

357

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-94) Covington District Substations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4) 4) - Covington District Substations Dennis Sjoquist - TFN/Snohomish Snohomish Regional Manager Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the following facilities located in the Covington District: Covington Echo Lake Lynch Creek Maple Valley Narrows Raver, P.J. South Tacoma Steilacoom Surprise Lake Tacoma King King Pierce King Pierce King Pierce Pierce Pierce Pierce Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bareground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within the Covington District of the Snohomish Region. Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage vegetation inside and around electrical substations and associated facilities.

358

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-08): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/23/01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

23, 2001 23, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS DOE/EIS-0285/SA-08 Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Clearing C-trees along the south side of the right-of-way. Location: Raver - Covington Line 1, between towers 6/5 and 7/2. Work will be performed in the State of Washington. Proposed by: BPA Snohomish Region. Analysis: This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). Planning Steps 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. The project involves controlling all tall growing trees (C-Trees) within the right-of-way. All

359

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-07): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/18/01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

18, 2001 18, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-07) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on section of three ROWs. The ROWs include selected sections of the McNary Powerhouse, the present and proposed new sections of the McNary-Roundup and the McNary Switchyard South Transmission lines. Location: All ROW are located east Umatilla, OR., all being in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject

360

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-17)(7/24/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DATE: July 24, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-17) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along selected sections of the Schulz - Raver No.1, 2, 3 & 4, Olymplia - Grand Coulee NO. 1 Transmission Line ROW's. Location: The ROW's are located in Pierce and King Counties, WA, in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be executed in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA

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361

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-78): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (07/01/02)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-78) Randy Melzer Redmond Deputy Regional Manager - TFR/REDMOND Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for ten Substations in the Redmond District. (See list of facilities listed under planning step 1). Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bare ground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within the Redmond District of the Redmond Region. Analysis: The attached checklist shows the resources that were found during this analysis and what mitigation measures are required to protect those resources. In

362

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-55): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/12/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2002 2, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Covington SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-55) Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Raver - Paul No. 1 Transmission Line ROW from structure 15/5 to 29/3. The transmission line is a 500 kV line. Location: The ROW is located Pierce County, WA. Proposed by: Snohomish Regional Headquarters, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line, including both Reclaim and Danger Trees. Also, access road clearing will be

363

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-27): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 10/22/01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 22, 2001 October 22, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-27) Ben Tilley - TFE/Alvey Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Marion-Alvey #1 from structure 14/5 to 64/3 and the Marion-Lane #1 from structure 14/5 to 70/2. Both lines describe the same segment of ROW between structures 14/5 and 45/2. Location: All ROW are located in Marion, Linn, and Lane Counties, OR, all being in the Eugene Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Eugene Region. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways, around tower structures, and associated access roads that may impede the operation and

364

The effects of fall and spring burning on water quality and vegetative cover in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRE EPFECTS OF FALL AND SPRING BURNING ON WATER QUALITY AND VEGETATIVE COVER IN TRE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF TEKAS A Thesis by NICK ERNEST GARZA Jr. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1983 Major Subject: Range Science THE EFFECTS OF FALL AND SPRING BURNING ON WATER QUALITY AND VEGETATIVE COVER IN THE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF TEXAS A Thesis by NICK ERNEST GARZA Jr. Approved as to style...

Garza, Nick Ernest

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

365

Mathematical model of material kinematics in an axial threshing unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a study of the movement of vegetal material through the threshing space of an axial threshing unit. The developed kinematical equations are based on a nonlinear law governing the non-uniform movement of the material on an uneven helical ... Keywords: Combine harvester, Computer simulation, Grain Kinematics, Grain Separation, Modeling

Petre I. Miu; Heinz-Dieter Kutzbach

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Remote Sens. 2012, 4, 327-353; doi:10.3390/rs4020327 Remote Sens. 2012, 4, 327-353; doi:10.3390/rs4020327 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing Article Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Jungho Im 1, *, John R. Jensen 2 , Ryan R. Jensen 3 , John Gladden 4 , Jody Waugh 5 and Mike Serrato 4 1 Department of Environmental Resources Engineering, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA 2 Department of Geography, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA; E-Mail: johnj@mailbox.sc.edu 3 Department of Geography, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84605, USA; E-Mail: ryan.jensen@byu.edu 4 Savannah River National Laboratory, Department of Energy, Aiken, SC 29808, USA;

367

Geothermal environmental assessment baseline study: vegetation and soils of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Resource Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Identification and elemental concentrations of indigenous soil and plant systems found on the Roosevelt Hot Spring KGRA are described. Twenty-three different soils and five separate plant communities are geographically mapped and identified. One hundred forty-seven plant species were identified. Forbs, shrubs, and grasses are represented by 58, 53, and 36 species respectively. Three sites, each measuring 25 hectares, were selected for long-term vegetative assessment. At these locations a permanent enclosure measuring 24.4 meters x 24.4 meters was constructed to assess long-term effects of livestock grazing. Biomass, plant species, percentage composition, ground cover and livestock carrying capacities were determined at each site. Surface soils and Artemisia tridentata leaf tissue were collected for elemental analysis.

Brown, K.W.; Wiersma, G.B.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Synthesis, droplet combustion, and sooting characteristics of biodiesel produced from waste vegetable oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In light of the potential of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME, i.e. biodiesel) as a renewable energy source, an innovative acid catalyzed process was developed for the synthesis of biodiesel from waste vegetable oils. The synthesized biodiesels were analytically characterized for their major components, molar fraction and molecular weight of each component, the average molecular weight, and the heat of combustion. Their droplet combustion characteristics in terms of the burning rate, flame size, and sooting tendency were subsequently determined in a high-temperature, freely-falling droplet apparatus. Results show that the biodiesel droplet has higher burning rate, and that biodiesel in general has a lower propensity to soot because its molecular oxygen content promotes the oxidation of the soot precursors.

Li, T. X.; Zhu, D. L.; Akafuah, N.; Saito, K.; Law, C. K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, V.P.; Barron, M.H.; Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, Vincent P. (Los Alamos, NM); Barron, Michael H. (Los Alamos, NM); Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Performance of SVO Performance of SVO While straight vegetable oil or mixtures of SVO and diesel fuel have been used by some over the years, research has shown that SVO has technical issues that pose barriers to widespread acceptance. The published engineering literature strongly indicates that the use of SVO will lead to reduced engine life. This reduced engine life is caused by the buildup of carbon deposits inside the engine, as well as negative impacts of SVO on the engine lubricant. Both carbon deposits and excessive buildup of SVO in the lubricant are caused by the very high boiling point and viscosity of SVO relative to the required boiling range for diesel fuel. The carbon buildup doesn't necessarily happen quickly but instead over a longer period. These conclusions are

372

Woody vegetation and succession on the Fonde surface mine demonstration area, Bell County, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long term impact of surface mining on vegetation and plant succession has always been of concern to environmentalists and residents of Appalachia. The Fonde Surface Mine Demonstration Area is a 7.3-ha, NE-NW-aspect contour coal mine at an elevation of 562 m. It was reclaimed in 1965 to show state-of-the-art surface mine reclamation techniques consistent with then-current law and regulations after coal mining in 1959 and 1963. The mine spoils were lightly graded to control erosion and crates a bench with water control and two sediment ponds. Soil pH ranged from 2.8 to 5.9. About 80 percent of the mine was planted with 18 tree and shrub species including plantations of mixed pine, mixed hardwoods, black locust, and shrubs for wildlife. In a complete floristic inventory conducted 25 years later, the authors found the woody flora consisted of 34 families, 53 genera, and 70 species including 7 exotics. This inventory of the Fonde mine shows that a diverse forest vegetation can be reestablished after extreme disturbances in Appalachia. Black locust, yellow poplar, and Virginia pine reproduction varied significantly among plantation types. Canopy tree species significantly affected ground layer cover, total species richness, number of tree seedling species, and total number of tree seedlings present. Mine soil type affected ground layer percent cover and total species richness. Pre-SMCRA (Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977) reclaimed and inventoried mines can be used to evaluate biodiversity on post-SMCRA mines.

Wade, G.L.; Thompson, R.L.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Fruits & Veggies On the Go! You know that eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is good for you, but  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fruits & Veggies On the Go! You know that eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is good for you, but you're constantly on the go. See how you can fit fruits and veggies into your everyday world. Fruits and vegetables can be a part of a balanced diet any- time, anywhere. Fruits and veggies

Burke, Peter

374

Vegetation and Ecological Charactistics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at the Teakettle Experimental Forest Figure 37--Density of tree seed-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation and Ecological Charactistics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at the Teakettle,900 and 2,300 m, mixed-conifer forest predominates, although red fir is locally common along riparian.38 #12;Vegetation and Ecological Characteristics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at the Teakettle

Standiford, Richard B.

375

Invertebrates and vegetation of field margins adjacent to crops subject to contrasting herbicide regimes in the Farm Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide–tolerant crops  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...half-fields. Although drift of agrochemicals is dependent on several factors...vegetation and the effects of agrochemical drift: botanical change...Factors affecting the species composition of arable boundary vegetation...effect of arable field margin composition on invertebrate biodiversity...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A tiered approach for the human health risk assessment for consumption of vegetables from with cadmium-contaminated land in urban areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Consumption of vegetables that are grown in urban areas takes place worldwide. In developing countries, vegetables are traditionally grown in urban areas for cheap food supply. In developing and developed countries, urban gardening is gaining momentum. A problem that arises with urban gardening is the presence of contaminants in soil, which can be taken up by vegetables. In this study, a scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables from cadmium-contaminated land. Starting from a contaminated site, the procedure follows a tiered approach which is laid out as follows. In Tier 0, the plausibility of growing vegetables is investigated. In Tier 1 soil concentrations are compared with the human health-based Critical soil concentration. Tier 2 offers the possibility for a detailed site-specific human health risk assessment in which calculated exposure is compared to the toxicological reference dose. In Tier 3, vegetable concentrations are measured and tested following a standardized measurement protocol. To underpin the derivation of the Critical soil concentrations and to develop a tool for site-specific assessment the determination of the representative concentration in vegetables has been evaluated for a range of vegetables. The core of the procedure is based on Freundlich-type plant–soil relations, with the total soil concentration and the soil properties as variables. When a significant plant–soil relation is lacking for a specific vegetable a geometric mean of BioConcentrationFactors (BCF) is used, which is normalized according to soil properties. Subsequently, a ‘conservative’ vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor is calculated as basis for the Critical soil concentration (Tier 1). The tool to perform site-specific human health risk assessment (Tier 2) includes the calculation of a ‘realistic worst case’ site-specific vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. -- Highlights: • A scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables. • Uptake characteristics of cadmium in a series of vegetables is represented by a vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. • Calculations and measurement steps are combined.

Swartjes, Frank A., E-mail: frank.swartjes@rivm.nl; Versluijs, Kees W.; Otte, Piet F.

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Assessing the flammability of surface fuels beneath ornamental vegetation in wildland urban interfaces in Provence (south-eastern France)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

characteristics according to the composition of their litter. Hierarchical cluster analysis ranked the sevenAssessing the flammability of surface fuels beneath ornamental vegetation in wildland� urbanA A Irstea UR EMAX, 3275 route de C�zanne, CS 40061, F-13182 Aix-en-Provence, cedex 5, France. B

Boyer, Edmond

378

Estimating Water Consumption of Potential Natural Vegetation on Global Dry Lands: Building an LCA Framework for Green Water Flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estimating Water Consumption of Potential Natural Vegetation on Global Dry Lands: Building an LCA Framework for Green Water Flows ... This study aimed to provide a framework for assessing direct soil-water consumption, also termed green water in the literature, in life cycle assessment (LCA). ... This was an issue that LCA had not tackled before. ...

Montserrat Núñez; Stephan Pfister; Philippe Roux; Assumpció Antón

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

379

Exploring the relationships between vegetation measurements and temperature in residential areas by integrating LIDAR and remotely sensed imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at higher resolutions is much more difficult to obtain. This has allowed researchers to study urban heat island dynamics at a micro-scale. However, this study suggests that a vegetation index alone might not be the best surrogate variable for providing...

Clemonds, Matthew A

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Effects of juniper removal by shearing and dozing on seedbed preparation and vegetation establishment in the Lampasas Cut Plain, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and surface depressions were recorded. After germination, when the plants were large enough to identify, vegetation was sampled at 20-24 locations in each plot. At each sample location a quadrat was placed on the transect, and total herbaceous, grass, forb...

Mannel, Cheryl K.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Elephant seasonal vegetation preferences across dry and wet savannas Scott R. Loarie a,*, Rudi J. van Aarde b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elephant seasonal vegetation preferences across dry and wet savannas Scott R. Loarie a,*, Rudi J Accepted 8 August 2009 Available online 6 October 2009 Keywords: African elephants Conservation ecology Land use change Habitat selection a b s t r a c t As African savanna elephants (Loxodonta africana

Pretoria, University of

382

Hydrologic and Vegetative Removal of Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Toxoplasma gondii Surrogate Microspheres in Coastal Wetlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in higher-density aquatic solutions. In addition...However, different aquatic plants may vary in their...commonly used for landscape restoration. The presence of bulrush...vegetation within wetland restoration projects will not only promote healthier ecosystems but also enhance parasite...

Jennifer N. Hogan; Miles E. Daniels; Fred G. Watson; Stori C. Oates; Melissa A. Miller; Patricia A. Conrad; Karen Shapiro; Dane Hardin; Clare Dominik; Ann Melli; David A. Jessup; Woutrina A. Miller

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

383

The influence of increasing population size and vegetation productivity on elephant distribution in the Kruger National Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-cell occupancy increased with population size, while grid-cell-specific density became less variable. In additionThe influence of increasing population size and vegetation productivity on elephant distribution Research Unit, Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa

Pretoria, University of

384

DOE/EIS-0285/SA-101: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS Spokane Region (9/13/02)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

13, 13, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-101) Spokane Region Michael F. Brock - TFS/BELL-1 Regional Manager, Spokane Region Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for Substations and Non-Electric Facilities (See Attachment A for a complete list of facilities) Location: Spokane Region. (See Attachment A) Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage vegetation inside and around electrical substations and associated facilities. Vegetation management within the substation shall include the bare ground management of all graveled areas. These areas shall primarily be maintained with the use of herbicides. The management of vegetation outside the substation and associated facilities shall include: 1) bare

385

Assessing certainty and uncertainty in riparian habitat suitability models by identifying parameters with extreme outputs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to introduce a computationally efficient uncertainty assessment approach using an index-based habitat suitability model. The approach focuses on uncertainty in ecological knowledge regarding parameters of index curves and weights. ... Keywords: Habitat model, Riparian vegetation, Suitability index, Uncertainty

Baihua Fu, Joseph H. A. Guillaume

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Reducing spread in climate model projections of a September ice-free Arctic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...15). Relative to the CMIP3, a more diverse set of model types is included in the CMIP5 (i.e., climate/Earth system models with more interactive components such as atmospheric chemistry, aerosols, dynamic vegetation, ice sheets, and...

Jiping Liu; Mirong Song; Radley M. Horton; Yongyun Hu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Snow modelling in the Hadley Centre GCM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Hadley Centre GCM, in common with most other GCMs, currently uses very simple representations of snowpack processes, but physically-based parametrizations are being developed which offer more realistic representations of interactions between snowpacks and the atmosphere. Improved representations of snow albedos, heterogeneous snow cover, and interactions between snow cover and vegetation canopies are discussed. Comparisons are shown between parametrizations, observations and detailed process models.

Richard Essery

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Patch mosaic of developmental stages in central European natural forests along vegetation gradient  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The shifting mosaic of patches in different phases of forest development is a widely used framework for describing stand dynamics, structure and biodiversity in European temperate forests. In spite of the common application of patch mapping of developmental stages/phases, an objective and quantified evaluation of patch mosaics has been missing. This approach identifies patches of forest stand according to a developmental trajectory, from Growth, through an Optimum stage to Breakdown. Here we present the first attempt to compare quantitative and qualitative characteristics of patch mosaics of stand developmental stages using three decades of extensive data in five study sites along a vegetation gradient. We do this using the same, observer independent method based on an artificial neural network classifier. We also used the historical stem position datasets to evaluate the change of mosaic characteristics in time. Resulting patch patterns were analyzed by standard mosaic metrics commonly used in landscape ecology, evaluating area, shape, aggregation and connectivity of patches. The mean patch size of the mosaic of four developmental stages showed a relatively narrow range of 570–800 m2 in all study sites and censuses. The shape of patches in all sites and years had no significant differences, and the aggregation of patches of the same type was similar in all sites at the mosaic level. Conversely, we did find some stage-specific patterns. For example, the Growth stage was usually the most abundant (covering 25–50% of the stand), and had the highest mean patch size, ranging between 590 and 2800 m2. The Growth stage patches also had the most complex shapes. On the contrary, the Breakdown stage usually had the opposite values, forming constantly small (250–720 m2), simple and scattered patches in the mosaic. These basic traits were found in all study sites and were stable in time. We also found some common trends in the dataset, such as increasing mean patch size of the Breakdown stage along the altitudinal vegetation gradient. The complex Steady State stage was generally more abundant than expected according to results of other studies and thus might indicate processes that have not been well described in previous, subjective, applications of the patch mosaic paradigm.

Kamil Král; Sean M. McMahon; David Janík; Dušan Adam; TomᚠVrška

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Effect of Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT) on the Aerobic Biodegradation of a Model Vegetable Oil in Aquatic Media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Becker, P.; Koster, D.; Popov, M. N.; Markossian, S.; Antranikian, G.; Markl, H.The biodegradation of olive oil and the treatment of lipid-rich wool scouring wastewater under aerobic thermophilic conditions Water Resour. ... The biodegradation of olive oil and the treatment of lipid-rich wool scouring wastewater under aerobic thermophilic conditions ... The biodegrdn. of olive oil and the treatment of the lipid-rich wool scouring wastewater were studied under aerobic thermophilic (65°) conditions using Bacillus thermoleovorans IHI-91. ...

Darine A. Salam; Makram T. Suidan; Albert D. Venosa

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMVAR GPPCAL-CMCD CNT-CMCD ORC-STD FM-BF-NOSNAG AverageEC obs. period CMCD HHCD for only EC obs. period CMCD ORC-STD ORC-FM-NOSNAG Standard ORCHIDEE with fire and without

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Final report on LDRD project : biodiesel production from vegetable oils using slit-channel reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents work done for a late-start LDRD project, which was carried out during the last quarter of FY07. The objective of this project was to experimentally explore the feasibility of converting vegetable (e.g., soybean) oils to biodiesel by employing slit-channel reactors and solid catalysts. We first designed and fabricated several slit-channel reactors with varying channel depths, and employed them to investigate the improved performance of slit-channel reactors over traditional batch reactors using a NaOH liquid catalyst. We then evaluated the effectiveness of several solid catalysts, including CaO, ZnO, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, calcium gluconate, and heteropolyacid or HPA (Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}), for catalyzing the soybean oil-to-biodiesel transesterification reaction. We found that the slit-channel reactor performance improves as channel depth decreases, as expected; and the conversion efficiency of a slit-channel reactor is significantly higher when its channel is very shallow. We further confirmed CaO as having the highest catalytic activity among the solid catalysts tested, and we demonstrated for the first time calcium gluconate as a promising solid catalyst for converting soybean oil to biodiesel, based on our preliminary batch-mode conversion experiments.

Kalu, E. Eric (FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL); Chen, Ken Shuang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The use of oil shale ash in the production of biodiesel from waste vegetable oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil shale ash obtained from combustion of local oil shale deposits was used in this study as a heterogeneous catalyst to produce biodiesel from waste vegetable oil (WVO). Two alcohols with high and low boiling points ethanol and ethylene glycol were used for oil shale catalytic esterification of the WVO. Results show that the esterification of wastes of oil utilizing wastes of oil shale combustion can be used to produce biodiesel. Additionally it was found that in order to make the oil shale ash an effective catalyst for transesterification high reaction temperature is required. Therefore the results have indicated that high biodiesel yield is obtained when using ethylene glycol at high temperature while the yield is low when solid catalytic reaction is performed using ethanol at low temperature. The maximum obtained yield was 75?wt. % utilizing ethylene glycol at 150?°C whereas this yield decreased to 69.9?wt. % as the operating temperature was reduced to 100?°C. On the other hand when using ethanol the yield of biodiesel was relatively low (11?wt. % at 60?°C and 9?wt. % at 80?°C).

A. Al-Otoom; M. Allawzi; A. Ajlouni; F. Abu-Alrub; M. Kandah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Current vegetation characteristics within tree-kill zones of F- and H-Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetation of two wetland areas previously adversely affected by outcropping groundwater was characterized to evaluate the type and extent of revegetation. When the damage first became evident in the late 1970s and early 1980s the areas were examined and described to try to establish the cause of the extensive tree mortality. The F- and H-Area seepage basins above the wetland areas received waste products from the separation areas beginning in 1955. The operation, estimated loading, and current status of the basins were summarized by Killian et al. Analysis of soil and water at the affected seeplines where the tree-kill was occurring confirmed that the surface water was strongly influenced by constituents of the F- and H-Area seepage basins. While no single cause of the forest mortality was defined, alterations in the hydrology and siltation patterns, pH changes, increased conductivity, and increased levels of sodium, nitrogen compounds, and aluminum were believed to be interacting to cause the mortality.

Nelson, E.A.; Irwin, J.E.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Biodiesel production from vegetable oil and waste animal fats in a pilot plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, corn oil as vegetable oil, chicken fat and fleshing oil as animal fats were used to produce methyl ester in a biodiesel pilot plant. The FFA level of the corn oil was below 1% while those of animal fats were too high to produce biodiesel via base catalyst. Therefore, it was needed to perform pretreatment reaction for the animal fats. For this aim, sulfuric acid was used as catalyst and methanol was used as alcohol in the pretreatment reactions. After reducing the FFA level of the animal fats to less than 1%, the transesterification reaction was completed with alkaline catalyst. Due to low FFA content of corn oil, it was directly subjected to transesterification. Potassium hydroxide was used as catalyst and methanol was used as alcohol for transesterification reactions. The fuel properties of methyl esters produced in the biodiesel pilot plant were characterized and compared to EN 14214 and ASTM D6751 biodiesel standards. According to the results, ester yield values of animal fat methyl esters were slightly lower than that of the corn oil methyl ester (COME). The production cost of COME was higher than those of animal fat methyl esters due to being high cost biodiesel feedstock. The fuel properties of produced methyl esters were close to each other. Especially, the sulfur content and cold flow properties of the COME were lower than those of animal fat methyl esters. The measured fuel properties of all produced methyl esters met ASTM D6751 (S500) biodiesel fuel standards.

Ertan Alptekin; Mustafa Canakci; Huseyin Sanli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-144-Custer-Intalco #2)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4-Custer-Intalco #2) 4-Custer-Intalco #2) Don Atkinson Natural Resource Specialist - TFN/SNOHOMISH Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for portion of the Custer-Intalco #2 230 kV transmission line located from tower structure 1/1 to 7/5. Location: Project location is in BPA Snohomish Region in Whatcom County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to clear targeted vegetation within the right-of- way, along access roads and around towers that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. See Section 1.4 of the attached checklists for a complete description of the proposed action. Analysis: Please see the attached checklist for the resources present. Applicable findings and

397

DOE/EIS-0285; Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (May 2000)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Purpose, Need and Issues Purpose, Need and Issues S-1 Summary In this summary: ΠPurpose, Need, and Issues ΠMethods and Their Impacts ΠPlanning Steps ΠProgram Alternatives and Their Impacts Purpose, Need and Issues Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is responsible for maintaining a network of 15,000 miles of electric transmission lines and 350 substations. This electric transmission system operates in seven states of the Pacific Northwest. (See Figure S-1.) Those states offer a great diversity of vegetation (from trees to brush to grasses), which can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and neighboring members of the public, or interfere with our ability to maintain our system. We need to keep vegetation a safe distance away from our electric power facilities and control

398

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-120): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEISq 2/10/03  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0, 2003 0, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-120 Hanford-Ostrander Corridor Maintenance William Erickson TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Hanford-Ostrander Transmission Line Corridor from Tower 10/4 to Tower 17/2 + 770. The line is a 500kV Single Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 300 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor as referenced on the attached checklist. Location: The subject right-of-way is located in Benton County, WA. In the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

399

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-06): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/13/01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4/13/01 4/13/01 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-06) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management of annual weeds on seven acres of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) owned pastureland at the Walla Walla Substation. Location: The pastureland is adjacent to the Walla Walla Substation and is located east and north of the fenced substation, all within the BPA property boundary. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to apply selected herbicides to control annual weeds that are competing with native grasses that were seeded two years ago. Herbicides will also

400

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA=32): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (11/15/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 15, 2001 November 15, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285-SA-32) Bill Erickson - TPF/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Re-vegetation Plot Study along the Lower Monumental-McNary Transmission Line ROW. The study area sections are located near structures 38/4 and 39/3. The line is a 500kV Single Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 165 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor as indicated on the attached checklist. Location: The ROW is located in Walla Walla County, WA being in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-37): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 1/17/03  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

17, 2002 17, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Covington SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-37) Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Bob Sweet - TFNF/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Monroe-Custer No.1 Transmission Line ROW from 29/1+915 to 45/4+975. The transmission line is 500 kV single circuit transmission line. Project includes adjacent Monroe-Custer No.2 and Arlington-Bellingham single circuit transmission lines having a combined ROW width of 421.5 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in Snohomish and Skagit Counties, WA. Proposed by: Snohomish Regional Headquarters, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

402

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-125): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/18/03  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 (Echo Lake-Maple Valley #1 [Mile 1-9], Adno 8258) 5 (Echo Lake-Maple Valley #1 [Mile 1-9], Adno 8258) Don Atkinson - TFN/SNOHOMISH Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for portion of the Echo Lake - Maple Valley #1 500 kV transmission line located from tower structure 1/1 to 9/2. Location: Project location is entirely within King county, Washington and is within the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to clear targeted vegetation within the Right-of- Ways along access roads and around towers that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. See Section 1.4 of the attached checklists for a complete description of the proposed action. Analysis: Please see the attached checklist for the resources present. Applicable findings and

403

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-14): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 6/6/01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4) 4) Bill Erickson - TFP/ Walla Walla Region Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management at the Teakean Butte Microwave site. Location: Clearwater County, ID, Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to remove 28 danger trees and dense brush from the microwave site in order to provide a 75 -80 foot safety buffer for fire control and Microwave Beam path. The work will protect BPA's investment at the site and provide system reliability. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. Analysis: This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision

404

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285-SA-33)(11/27/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 27, 2001 November 27, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/Z992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS- 0285/SA-33) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the St Helens-Allston Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 115 kV Single Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 100 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Columbia County, OR, being in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear danger trees from varying widths of the indicated transmission line right-of-way that are approaching electrical clearance zones in accordance

405

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-11): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 5/15/01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1) 1) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Covington-Maple Valley No. 2 Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 345kV Single Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 150 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in selected sections along the entire transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in King County, WA, being in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with

406

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-37): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 1/17/03  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

17, 2002 17, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Covington SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-37) Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Bob Sweet - TFNF/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Monroe-Custer No.1 Transmission Line ROW from 29/1+915 to 45/4+975. The transmission line is 500 kV single circuit transmission line. Project includes adjacent Monroe-Custer No.2 and Arlington-Bellingham single circuit transmission lines having a combined ROW width of 421.5 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in Snohomish and Skagit Counties, WA. Proposed by: Snohomish Regional Headquarters, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

407

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-34) (12/3/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, 2001 3, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/Z992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-34) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the McNary-Ross Transmission Line ROW between 152/3+2120 to 153/4. The line is 345 kV Single Circuit Transmission Line (project includes adjacent N. Bonneville-Ross 230 kV Single Circuit Transmission Line) having a combined easement width of 300 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in Skamania County, WA, being in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

408

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Manaement Program FEIS 6/19/01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

United States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration DATE: June 19, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15) Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation management on selected sections of ROWs in the Ross-St. John and Ross-Carborundum transmission line ROWs. The ROWs include sections of the Ross-St. John 230Kv line; the Ross-Rivergate 230Kv line; the Ross-Alcoa 115Kv line; the Ross-Carborundum 115Kv line and the Clark PUD 115Kv line. Location: The ROWs span sections of Vancouver Washington and Portland Oregon and are all

409

Flue gas desulfurization sludge: establishment of vegetation on ponded and soil-applied waste. Final report January 1977-September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives results of research to identify and evaluate forms of vegetation and methods of their establishment for reclaiming retired flue gas desulfurization sludge ponds. Also studied were the soil liming value of limestone scrubber sludge (LSS) and plant uptake and percolation losses of some chemical nutrients in the sludge. Several vegetation schemes were evaluated between 1977 and 1982 for covering and stabilizing LSS at Colbert Steam Plant, Cherokee, AL, and Shawnee Steam Plant, Paducah, KY. Eleven tree and 10 grass or legume species were tested for adaptability and survival when planted directly in LSS or in LSS amended with soil, municipal sewage sludge, or standard potting mix. Other studies indicated that LSS apparently has sufficient unreacted limestone to be a satisfactory soil liming agent.

Giordano, P.M.; Mays, D.A.; Soileau, J.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-123): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/20/03  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

20, 2003 20, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-123 Malin-Hilltop Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on Malin-Hilltop (Structures 20/5-29/1). Location: The project area lies to the southeast of Klamath Falls, OR, and is located in Modoc County, California. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administrationn (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: Trees are located under and adjacent to conductors. Should a fire occur, these trees are a hazard to the line and could cause serious damage to the conductors, resulting in significant problems for the transmission grid. BPA plans on

411

EA-1982: Parker-Davis Transmission System Routine Operation and Maintenance Project and Proposed Integrated Vegetation Management Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed continuation of operations and maintenance activities and implementation of a vegetation management program on Western’s Parker-Davis Transmission System. These actions would occur on existing transmission line and access road rights-of-way, and at substations and maintenance facilities associated with the transmission system.

412

Applicability of the “Gallet equation” to the vegetation clearances of NERC Reliability Standard FAC-003-2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NERC has proposed a standard to use to specify clearances between vegetation and power lines. The purpose of the rule is to reduce the probability of flashover to a calculably low level. This report was commissioned by FERC’s Office of Electrical Reliability. The scope of the study was analysis of the mathematics and documentation of the technical justification behind the application of the Gallet equation and the assumptions used in the technical reference paper

Kirkham, Harold

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-99): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS -Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1 8/29/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 9, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-99-Olympia-Grand Coulee No. 1 Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Olympia-Grand Coulee No. 1, 287 kV transmission line from structure 53/4 through structure 64/1. Corridor width is 125 feet. Location: The project area is located within King County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. Approximately 163 acres will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Vegetation management is required for unimpeded

414

DOE/EIS-0285-SA-137: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - Chemawa-Salem 1&2 (4/1/03)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7- Chemawa-Salem1&2) 7- Chemawa-Salem1&2) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Chemawa-Salem #1 115 kV and #2 230 kV transmission lines from Chemawa Substation to Salem Substation. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Marion County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-

415

A comparison between yellow-green and green cultivars of four vegetable species in pigments, ascorbate, photosynthesis, energy dissipation, and photoinhibition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Yellow-green foliage cultivars of four vegetables grown outdoors,...i.e., Chinese mustard (Brassica rapa), Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and Chinese amaranth (Am...

J. -H. Weng; L. -F. Chien; C. -Y. Jiang; F. -C. Shih; H. -Y. Chen

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Global Warming and Tropical Land-Use Change: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Biomass Burning, Decomposition and Soils in Forest Conversion, Shifting Cultivation and Secondary Vegetation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tropical forest conversion, shiftingcultivation and clearing of secondary vegetation makesignificant...9 t of biomasscarbon of these types is exposed to burning annually,of which 1.1×109 t is emitted to the atmos...

Philip M. Fearnside

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The effects of nutrition education and gardening on attitudes, preferences and knowledge of 2nd-5th graders regarding fruits and vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in minority populations. Past studies have reported that a horticulture-based curriculum, including gardening, can improve children's attitudes toward eating fruits and vegetables. To investigate whether children of a minority population can benefit from...

Nolan, Geralyn A.

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

418

Recent Climate-Driven Increases in Vegetation Productivity for the Western Arctic: Evidence of an Acceleration of the Northern Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Northern ecosystems contain much of the global reservoir of terrestrial carbon that is potentially reactive in the context of near-term climate change. Annual variability and recent trends in vegetation productivity across Alaska and northwest ...

J. S. Kimball; M. Zhao; A. D. McGuire; F. A. Heinsch; J. Clein; M. Calef; W. M. Jolly; S. Kang; S. E. Euskirchen; K. C. McDonald; S. W. Running

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Spatial variations in soil and plant delta 13 C and delta 15 N values in a subtropical savanna: implications for vegetation change and nutrient dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lower-lying portions of the landscape are dominated by closed-canopy woodlands. I used soil ?13C in conjunction with aerial photography and geostatistics to quantify landscape-scale vegetation dynamics in uplands of this savanna parkland. Spatial...

Bai, E

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

DOE/EIS-0285-SA-136: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - Oregon City-Chemawal 1&2 (4/1/03)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6- Oregon City-Chemawa1&2) 6- Oregon City-Chemawa1&2) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Oregon City-Chemawa #1 and #2 115 kV transmission lines from Oregon City Substation to Chemawa Substation. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Washington and Marion Counties, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that

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421

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA 84): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS Monroe-Custer No.1 7/1/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July July 1, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 84 Monroe-Custer No.l Don Atkinson -- - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Monroe-Custer No. 1500kV transmission line from structure 61/1 through structure 88/4. This project includes contemporaneous vegetation management along the Monroe-Custer No. 2 500kV and the Arlington-Bellingham 230kV transmission line corridors which run parallel to the subject transmission line. Corridor width varies from 140 to 825 feet. (All structure locations referenced in this SA refer to the Monroe-Custer No. 1.) The project area is located within Whatcom County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the

422

Diagenesis in seagrass vegetated sediments: biogeochemical processes on diurnal time scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................. xii CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION...................................................................................... 1 Objectives................................................................................................... 1 Background............................................................................ 90 Model Results and Discussion ................................................................... 92 Summary .................................................................................................... 107 V CONCLUSIONS...

Hebert, Andrew Brian

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Combined effects of nitrogen fertilization and biochar on the net global warming potential, greenhouse gas intensity and net ecosystem economic budget in intensive vegetable agriculture in southeastern China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Field experiments were conducted to determine the effects of nitrogen (N) fertilization and biochar addition on the net global warming potential (net GWP), greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) and net ecosystem economic budget (NEEB). These experiments were conducted in an intensive vegetable field with 4 consecutive vegetable crops in 2012 and 2013 in southeastern China. The experiment was conducted with a 32 factorial design in triplicate at N fertilizer rates of 0, 1475, 1967 kg N ha?1 and biochar rates of 0, 20, and 40 t ha?1. Although CH4 emissions were not obviously affected by N fertilization, N2O emissions increased by 27.2–116.2% and the net GWP increased by 30.6–307.2%. Consequently, the GHGI increased significantly, but vegetable yield and the NEEB did not improve. Furthermore, biochar amendments did not significantly influence CH4 emissions, but significantly decreased the N2O emissions by 1.7–25.4%, the net GWP by 89.6–700.5%, and the GHGI by 89.5–644.8%. In addition, vegetable yields significantly increased by 2.1–74.1%, which improved the NEEB. Thus, N fertilization did not increase vegetable yields or the NEEB. However, N fertilization did increase the net GWP and GHGI. In contrast, biochar additions resulted in lower N2O emissions and net GWP and GHGI, but increased vegetable yield and the NEEB in the intensive vegetable production system. Therefore, appropriate biochar amendment should be studied to combat changing climate and to improve the economic profits of vegetable production.

B. Li; C.H. Fan; H. Zhang; Z.Z. Chen; L.Y. Sun; Z.Q. Xiong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

VEGETATION MEDIATED THE IMPACTS OF POSTGLACIAL CLIMATIC CHANGE ON FIRE REGIMES IN THE SOUTHCENTRAL BROOKS RANGE, ALASKA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine direct and indirect impacts of millennial-scale climatic change on fire regimes in the southcentral Brooks Range, Alaska, using four lake-sediment records and existing paleoclimate interpretations. New techniques are introduced to identify charcoal peaks semi-objectively and detect statistical differences in fire regimes. Peaks in charcoal accumulation rates (CHARs) provide estimates of fire return intervals (FRIs) which are compared between vegetation zones described by fossil pollen and stomata. Climatic warming from ca 15-9 ka BP (calendar years before CE 1950) coincides with shifts in vegetation from herb tundra to shrub tundra to deciduous woodlands, all novel species assemblages relative to modern vegetation. Two sites cover this period and show increased CHARs and decreased FRIs with the transition from herb to shrub tundra ca 13.3-14.3 ka BP. Short FRIs in the Betula-dominated shrub tundra (mean [m] FRI 144 yr; 95% CI 119-170) primarily reflect the effects of flammable, continuous fuels on the fire regime. FRIs increased significantly with the transition to Populus-dominated deciduous woodlands ca 10.5 ka BP (mFRI 251 yr [158-352]), despite evidence of warmer- and drier-than-present summers. We attribute reduced fire activity under these conditions to low flammability of deciduous fuels. Three sites record the mid to late Holocene, when cooler and moister conditions allowed Picea glauca forest-tundra and P. mariana boreal forests to establish ca 8 and 5.5 ka BP. Forest-tundra FRIs did not differ significantly from the previous period (mFRIs range from 131-238 yr), but FRIs decreased with the transition to boreal forest (mFRI 145 yr [129-163]). Overall, fire-regime shifts in the study area showed greater correspondence with vegetation characteristics than with inferred climate, and we conclude that vegetation mediated the impacts of millennial-scale climatic change on fire regimes by modifying landscape flammability. Our findings emphasize the importance of biological-physical feedbacks in determining the response of arctic and subarctic ecosystems to past, and by inference, future climatic change.

Higuera, P E; Brubaker, L B; Anderson, P M; Hu, F S; Brown, T A

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

426

The biophysical link between climate, water, and vegetation in bioenergy agro-ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Land use change for bioenergy feedstocks is likely to intensify as energy demand rises simultaneously with increased pressure to minimize greenhouse gas emissions. Initial assessments of the impact of adopting bioenergy crops as a significant energy source have largely focused on the potential for bioenergy agroecosystems to provide global-scale climate regulating ecosystem services via biogeochemical processes. Such as those processes associated with carbon uptake, conversion, and storage that have the potential to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). However, the expansion of bioenergy crops can also lead to direct biophysical impacts on climate through water regulating services. Perturbations of processes influencing terrestrial energy fluxes can result in impacts on climate and water across a spectrum of spatial and temporal scales. Here, we review the current state of knowledge about biophysical feedbacks between vegetation, water, and climate that would be affected by bioenergy-related land use change. The physical mechanisms involved in biophysical feedbacks are detailed, and interactions at leaf, field, regional, and global spatial scales are described. Locally, impacts on climate of biophysical changes associated with land use change for bioenergy crops can meet or exceed the biogeochemical changes in climate associated with rising GHG's, but these impacts have received far less attention. Realization of the importance of ecosystems in providing services that extend beyond biogeochemical GHG regulation and harvestable yields has led to significant debate regarding the viability of various feedstocks in many locations. The lack of data, and in some cases gaps in knowledge associated with biophysical and biochemical influences on land–atmosphere interactions, can lead to premature policy decisions.

Justin E. Bagley; Sarah C. Davis; Matei Georgescu; Mir Zaman Hussain; Jesse Miller; Stephen W. Nesbitt; Andy VanLoocke; Carl J. Bernacchi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Remote sensing data assimilation for a prognostic phenology model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predicting the global carbon and water cycle requires a realistic representation of vegetation phenology in climate models. However most prognostic phenology models are not yet suited for global applications, and diagnostic satellite data can be uncertain and lack predictive power. We present a framework for data assimilation of Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) and Leaf Area Index (LAI) from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to constrain empirical temperature, light, moisture and structural vegetation parameters of a prognostic phenology model. We find that data assimilation better constrains structural vegetation parameters than climate control parameters. Improvements are largest for drought-deciduous ecosystems where correlation of predicted versus satellite-observed FPAR and LAI increases from negative to 0.7-0.8. Data assimilation effectively overcomes the cloud- and aerosol-related deficiencies of satellite data sets in tropical areas. Validation with a 49-year-long phenology data set reveals that the temperature-driven start of season (SOS) is light limited in warm years. The model has substantial skill (R = 0.73) to reproduce SOS inter-annual and decadal variability. Predicted SOS shows a higher inter-annual variability with a negative bias of 5-20 days compared to species-level SOS. It is however accurate to within 1-2 days compared to SOS derived from net ecosystem exchange (NEE) measurements at a FLUXNET tower. The model only has weak skill to predict end of season (EOS). Use of remote sensing data assimilation for phenology model development is encouraged but validation should be extended with phenology data sets covering mediterranean, tropical and arctic ecosystems.

Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Stockli, Reto [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Evaluation of HadGEM2 model Hadley Centre technical note 74  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of HadGEM2 model Hadley Centre technical note 74 W.J. Collins, N. Bellouin, M. Doutriaux for attention in HadGEM2. HadGEM2 has substantially improved mean SSTs and wind stress and improved tropical SST. The TRIFFID vegetation scheme had been used in a configuration from a previous generation of Hadley Centre

Reichler, Thomas

429

The influence of the land surface on hydrometeorology and ecology: new advances from modeling and satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and satellite remote sensing Venkat Lakshmi, Seungbum Hong, Eric E. Small and Fei Chen ABSTRACT The importance role in climate and weather modeling. However, their quantification has been challenging due temperature (TSK), and vegetation water content (VegWC) derived from satellite sensors such as Moderate

Small, Eric

430

Research on Methane-Electricity-Heatpump System Model in Cold Area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heat energy loss of methane liquid is the most important reason for low temperature of methane biochemical reaction in cold area by energy-flow analysis. The heat energy recovery of methane liquid can build a self-energizing system. Vegetable greenhouses ... Keywords: cold area, self-energizing, methane, heat pump, model

Zhang Chenghu; Pan Yawen; Ma Fang; Sun Dexing; Qiu Shan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Use of soil and vegetation spectroradiometry to investigate crop water use efficiency of a drip irrigated tomato  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An agronomic research was conducted in Tuscany (Central Italy) to evaluate the effects of an advanced irrigation system on the water use efficiency (WUE) of a tomato crop and to investigate the ability of soil and vegetation spectroradiometry to detect and map WUE. Irrigation was applied following an innovative approach based on CropSense system. Soil water content was monitored at four soil depths (10, 20, 30 and 50 cm) by a probe. Rainfall during the crop cycle reached 162 mm and irrigation water applied with a drip system amounted to 207 mm, distributed with 16 irrigation events. Tomato yield varied from 7.10 to 14.4 kg m?2, with a WUE ranging from 19.1 to 38.9 kg m?3. The irrigation system allowed a high yield levels and a low depth of water applied, as compared to seasonal ET crop estimated with Hargraves’ formula and with the literature data on irrigated tomato. Measurements were carried out on geo-referenced points to gather information on crop (crop yield, eighteen Vegetation indices, leaf area index) and on soil (spectroradiometric and traditional analysis). Eight VIs, out of nineteen ones analyzed, showed a significant relationship with georeferenced yield data; PVI maps seemed able to return the best response, before harvesting, to improve the knowledge of the area of cultivation and irrigation system. CropSense irrigation system reduced seasonal irrigation volumes. Some vegetation indexes were significantly correlated to tomato yield and well identify, a posteriori, crop area with low WUE; spectroradiometry can be a valuable tool to improve irrigated tomato field management.

S. Marino; M. Aria; B. Basso; A.P. Leone; A. Alvino

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Radionuclide Concentrations in soils an Vegetation at Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Area G During 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil samples were collected at 15 locations and unwashed overstory and understory vegetation samples were collected at nine locations within and around the perimeter of Area G, the primary disposal facility for low-level radioactive solid waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These samples were analyzed for {sup 3}H, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 238}U. Soil samples collected at Area G contained detectable concentrations of 3H (27%), {sup 239,240}Pu (60%), {sup 238}Pu (40%), and {sup 241}Am (47%) above regional statistical reference levels (RSRLs). In contrast, the levels of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and U in all of the soil samples at Area G were either nondetectable or within RSRLs. The highest levels of {sup 3}H in soils were detected in the southwestern portion of Area G near the {sup 3}H shafts, whereas the highest concentrations of the Pu isotopes were detected in the northern and northeastern portions. All concentrations of {sup 3}H and Pu in soils, however, were far below LANL screening action levels. As for vegetation, most radionuclides in/on plants were either nondetectable or within RSRLs. The exceptions were {sup 3}H in overstory and some understory vegetation, particularly in the southwestern portion of Area G, which correlated very well with the soils data in that area. Also, there was some foliar contamination from {sup 241}Am and Pu isotopes in/on a few plant samples--the highest concentrations occurring in the northern section of Area G.

P.R. Fresquez; E.A. Lopez

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Effects of various uranium leaching procedures on soil: Short-term vegetation growth and physiology. Progress report, April 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant volumes of soil containing elevated levels of uranium exist in the eastern United States. The contamination resulted from the development of the nuclear industry in the United States requiring a large variety of uranium products. The contaminated soil poses a collection and disposal problem of a magnitude that justifies the development of decontamination methods. Consequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program to address the problem. The fundamental goal of the USID task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than what can be done using current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics and without generating waste that is difficult to manage and/or dispose of. However, procedures developed for removing uranium from contaminated soil have involved harsh chemical treatments that affect the physicochemical properties of the soil. The questions are (1) are the changes in soil properties severe enough to destroy the soil`s capacity to support and sustain vegetation growth and survival? and (2) what amendments might be made to the leached soil to return it to a reasonable vegetation production capacity? This study examines the vegetation-support capacity of soil that had been chemically leached to remove uranium. The approach is to conduct short-term germination and phytotoxicity tests for evaluating soils after they are subjected to various leaching procedures followed by longer term pot studies on successfully leached soils that show the greatest capacity to support plant growth. This report details the results from germination and short-term phytotoxicity testing of soils that underwent a variety of leaching procedures at the bench scale at ORNL and at the pilot plant at Fernald.

Edwards, N.T.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

DOE/EIS-0285; Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (May 2000)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Statement - Appendices Statement - Appendices DOE/EIS-0285 Arrow-leaf Balsamroot Cooperating Agencies Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0285 APPENDICES May 2000 Table of Contents Appendix A - Public Involvement: Publications Appendix B - Biological Weed Control Agents Appendix C - Bonneville Pesticide Applicator Certification Plan Appendix D - Sample Educational Information Appendix E - Clearance Criteria Appendix F - FS Mitigation Measures and Background Appendix G - BLM Mitigation Measures and Background Appendix H - Herbicide Fact Sheets 2,4-D Azafenidin Bromacil Chlorsulfuron Clopyralid Dicamba Dichlobenil Diuron Fosamine Ammonium Glyphosate Halosulfuron-methyl Hexazinone Imazapyr Isoxaben Mefluidide Metsulfuron-methyl

435

A vegetational analysis of an East Texas bottomland hardwood area with special emphasis on wood duck habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and was an example of good wood duck habitat. It consisted of a series of four sloughs in the southeastern portion of the Area, 40 m east of the Angelina River (Fig. 4). This area of sloughs and the intervening land was 3. 41 ha. Slough B was found within...A VEGETATIONAL ANALYSIS OF AN EAST TEXAS BOTTOMLAND HARDWOOD AREA WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON WOOD DUCK HABITAT A Thesis by WILLIAM IRL MORRILL Sumitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

Morrill, William Irl

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Measurements and Linear Wave Theory Based Simulations of Vegetated Wave Hydrodynamics for Practical Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density exceeding some threshold where maximum wave attenuation capabilities are exceeded and lowering of damping ensues. Additionally, wave attenuation increased with higher stem spatial variation due to less wake sheltering. A one-dimensional model...

Anderson, Mary Elizabeth

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

437

Projected Future Changes in Vegetation in Western North America in the Twenty-First Century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rapid and broad-scale forest mortality associated with recent droughts, rising temperature, and insect outbreaks has been observed over western North America (NA). Climate models project additional future warming and increasing drought and water ...

Xiaoyan Jiang; Sara A. Rauscher; Todd D. Ringler; David M. Lawrence; A. Park Williams; Craig D. Allen; Allison L. Steiner; D. Michael Cai; Nate G. McDowell

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Field testing of paper/polymerized vegetable oil mulches for enhancing growth of eastern cottonwood trees for pulp  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Field studies of biodegradable polymerized vegetable oil-coated paper mulches were conducted to determine if these could replace non-degradable polyethylene mulches for stopping weeds and promoting growth of cottonwood trees. Tests were conducted over two growing seasons in two adjacent field sites in southeastern Missouri. At the end of the 2001 season, eastern cottonwood trees grown on the coated paper mulches had average heights (4.57–4.66 m, 15.0–15.3 ft), which were not significantly different from the control black polyethylene mulch (4.75 m, 15.6 ft). Tree heights were significantly less for uncoated paper mulch (4.45 m, 14.6 ft) or no mulch (3.90 m, 12.8 ft), presumably due to heavy weed growth around the trees. Uncoated paper mulch was extensively degraded after only about 4 weeks, while the coated paper persisted until the fall. Addition of ZnO to the oil coating delayed the onset of visible degradation, such as the formation of holes and tears, especially near the buried edge and above the drip tube. Similar results were seen for the 2002 study except that weed growth was not extensive so that tree heights for the mulched and bare plots were not significantly different. These results suggest that polymerized vegetable oil-coated paper mulches can function as effective mulches during the first year of tree growth, and thus, eliminate the need to use non-degradable polyethylene mulches.

Randal L. Shogren; Randall J. Rousseau

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

(DOE/EIS-0285-SA-115): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS, Shelton-Fairmount # 1-4 12/20/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0, 0, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 115, Shelton- Fairmount # 1-4. James A. Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Shelton Fairmount # 1-4 230kV & 115kV transmission lines corridor from structure 34/3 through structure 60/2 (reference line ADNO 8354). Right of way width averages 258 feet. Location: The project area is located in Jefferson County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridors. Approximately 26 miles of right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and

440

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-121): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-121): 2/12/03  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2003 2, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-121 Murry-Custer No. 1 Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Murry-Custer No.1 transmission line from structure 1/1 through structure 6/2. Corridor width is 125 feet. Location: The project area is located within Snohomish County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. Approximately 77.5 acres of right-of-way, 6 miles of access road, and 48 structure sites will be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

(DOE/EIS-0285-SA-117): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - (Ross Complex) 1/16/03  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

16, 2003 16, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/CSB-2 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-117- (Ross Complex) Paul Martin TFHV/CSB2 Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the non-electric portions of the Bonneville Power Administration's Ross Complex Location: The Ross Complex is located at 5411 NE Highway 99, Vancouver, Clark County, Washington in the BPA Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage and maintain grounds and landscaping in the non-electrical portions of the Ross Facility. Vegetation management at the Facility shall include: 1) bare ground management of graveled storage areas, perimeter roads and parking

442

EIS(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-61) Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/15/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 15, 2002 April 15, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-61 Tom Murphy - TFS/Bell-1 - Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Bell-Boundary No.3, 84/4 to 96/1 Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 230kV Double Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 100 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in both Stevens and Pend Oreille County, WA, being in the Spokane Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-

443

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIT (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-95) Chehalis-Olympia No. 1 and Chehalis-Centralia No. 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5) 5) Chehalis-Olympia No.l and Chehalis-Centralia No. 2 James A. Jellison - TFO/Olympia Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation management along the Chehalis-Olympia No. 1 and Chehalis-Centralia No. 2, 230kV transmission line. The project area is located within Lewis and Thurston Counties, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. The right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Approximately 29 miles of access roads and corridor will be treated. Vegetation management is required for unimpeded operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See

444

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-110): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS-Covington-Columbia No. 3) 10/2/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS DOE/EIS-0285/SA-110-Covington-Columbia No. 3 Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Covington-Columbia No. 3, 230kV transmission lines from structure 1/1 through structure 12/1. Corridor width varies from 150 feet to 537.5 feet. The project area is located within King County, Washington. Location: The project area is located within King County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. Approximately 568.4 acres of the right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include

445

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA- 129) Ashe-Marion #2 [Mile 150-157]  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7, 2003 7, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA- 129 Ashe-Marion #2 [Mile 150-157] Elizabeth Johnson Natural Resource Specialist- TFR/The Dalles Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Ashe-Marion #2 500 kV transmission line from structure 150/2 through structure 157/7 (reference line). The Buckley-Marion #1 transmission line is also present within the proposed corridor. Right of way width averages 135 feet. Location: The project location is within Wasco County, Oregon near the city of Pine Grove, and is within the Redmond Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-

446

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-114): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program EIS (Chehalis-Raymond #1, ADNO 8114) 12/5/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December December 5, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-114) (Chehalis-Raymond #1, ADNO 8114) Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for portion of the Chehalis-Raymond #1 115 kV transmission line Location: Project location is within Lewis and Pacific counties, Washington and is within the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to clear targeted vegetation within the Right-of- Ways along access roads and around towers that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. See Section 1.4 of the attached checklists for a complete description of the proposed action. Analysis: Please see the attached checklist for the resources

447

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-132 (Big Eddy-Ostrander #1)(3/19/03)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2003 9, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-132 (Big Eddy-Ostrander #1) Libby Johnson Natural Resource Specialist - TFR/THE DALLES Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for portion of the Big Eddy - Ostrander #1 500 kV transmission line located from tower structure 31/2 to 39/3. Location: Project location is in BPA Redmond Region in Hood River County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to clear targeted vegetation within the Right-of- Ways along access roads and around towers that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. See Section 1.4 of the attached checklists for a complete

448

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-149-Captain Jack-Malin #1)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8, 2003 8, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-149-Captain Jack-Malin #1) Elizabeth Johnson Natural Resource Specialist - TFR/The Dalles Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Captain Jack-Malin #1 500 kV transmission line from structure 2/4 to Malin Substation (reference line). Right of way width averages 150 feet. Location: The project location is within Klamath County, Oregon near the city of Malin, and is within the Redmond Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridors.

449

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA 118): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program EIS, Holcomb-Naselle 115kV)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7, 2003 7, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-SA 118, Holcomb - Naselle 115 kV. James A. Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Holcomb Naselle 115kV transmission line corridor from structure 1/1 through structure 21/10. Right of way width averages 100 feet. Location: The project area is located in Pacific County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. Approximately 21 miles of right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective

450

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-148- McNary Wildlife (McNary-Santiam #2))  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-148- McNary Wildlife (McNary-Santiam #2)) Mark Newbill - TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Joint project with US Forest Service for vegetation control for the McNary- Santiam #2 230 kV transmission line that enhances wildlife habitat under powerlines. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region within Marion County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in cooperation with US Forest Service. Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way by hand cutting or machine mowing. The overall goal is to remove small fir trees, brushy

451

DOE/EIS-0285-SA-138: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (Raver-Echo Lake #1) (4/3/03)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 (Raver-Echo Lake #1 8 (Raver-Echo Lake #1 Don Atkinson Natural Resource Specialist - TFN/SNOHOMISH Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for portion of the Raver - Echo Lake #1 500 kV transmission line located from tower structure 4/1 to 13/1. Location: Project location is within King County, Washington and is within the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to clear targeted vegetation within the right-of- way. BPA proposes to clear along access roads and remove danger trees outside the right-of-way where appropriate. Project is to remove vegetation that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See Section 1.1 through 1.4 of the attached checklists for a complete description of the proposed action.

452

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-130- Keeler-Tillamook)(3/10/03)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0, 2003 0, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-130- Keeler-Tillamook) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Keeler Tillamook 115 kV transmission line from structure 1/7 through structure 58/2, and along adjacent portions of the Keeler-Forest Grove #2 115KV transmission line. In addition the project includes 11miles of the 115KV Timber Tap. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Tillamook and Washington Counties, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-

453

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-146-Custer-Ingledow No.1&2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-146-Custer-Ingledow No.1&2 Don Atkinson Natural Resource Specialist - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for portion of the Custer-Ingledow No.1&2 500 kV transmission line located from tower structure 1/4 to 9/6. Location: Project location is in BPA Snohomish Region in Whatcom County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to clear targeted vegetation within the Right-of- Ways along access roads and around towers that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. See Section 1.4 of the attached checklists for a complete

454

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-142- KeelerOregon City #2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2- KeelerOregon City #2) 2- KeelerOregon City #2) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Keeler-Oregon City #2 115 kV transmission line from Keeler Substation to Oregon City Substation. Includes 5 miles of the St. Johns- Oregon City #2 69 kV transmission line. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Washington County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation via hand cutting along the right-of-way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with

455

The Impact of Observed Vegetation Changes on LandAtmosphere Feedbacks During Drought  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Desalination and Reuse Centre, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi conditions of the advanced research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model to assess the influence. 2010). Some changes in the climate and extreme weather events in Australia have been attributed

Evans, Jason

456

Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Colorectal Adenomas in the Nurses' Health Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...large sample size, and a response rate exceeding 90. The large...data on food preparation and storage, which can alter the nutrient...of a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Am J Epidemiol...approaches for adjusting for total energy intake and modeling repeated...

Karin B. Michels; Edward Giovannucci; Andrew T. Chan; Rohit Singhania; Charles S. Fuchs; and Walter C. Willett

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Modeling of hydroecological feedbacks predicts distinct classes of landscape pattern, process, and restoration potential in shallow aquatic ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that interactions between vegetation and flow cause the emergence of channel patterns that are distinct from the standard Schumm classification of river channels. Although landscape pattern is known to be linked to ecosystem services such as habitat provision, pollutant removal, and sustaining biodiversity, the mechanisms responsible for the development and stability of different landscape patterns in shallow, vegetated flows have remained poorly understood. Fortunately, recent advances have made possible large-scale models of flow through vegetated environments that can be run over a range of environmental variables and over timescales of millennia. We describe a new, quasi-3D cellular automata model that couples simulations of shallow-water flow, bed shear stresses, sediment transport, and vegetation dynamics in an efficient manner. That efficiency allowed us to apply the model widely in order to determine how different hydroecological feedbacks control landscape pattern and process in various types of wetlands and floodplains. Distinct classes of landscape pattern were uniquely associated with specific types of allogenic and autogenic drivers in wetland flows. Regular, anisotropically patterned wetlands were dominated by allogenic processes (i.e., processes driven by periodic high water levels and flow velocities that redistribute sediment), relative to autogenic processes (e.g., vegetation production, peat accretion, and gravitational erosion). These anistropically patterned wetlands are therefore particularly prone to hydrologic disturbance. Other classes of wetlands that emerged from simulated interactions included maze-patterned, amorphous, and topographically noisy marshes, open marsh with islands, banded string-pool sequences perpendicular to flow, parallel deep and narrow channels flanked by marsh, and ridge-and-slough patterned marsh oriented parallel to flow. Because vegetation both affects and responds to the balance between the transport capacity of the flow and sediment supply, these vegetated systems exhibit a feedback that is not dominant in most rivers. Consequently, unlike in most rivers, it is not possible to predict the “channel pattern” of a vegetated landscape based only on discharge characteristics and sediment supply; the antecedent vegetation pattern and vegetation dynamics must also be known. In general, the stability of different wetland pattern types is most strongly related to factors controlling the erosion and deposition of sediment at vegetation patch edges, the magnitude of sediment redistribution by flow, patch elevation relative to water level, and the variability of erosion rates in vegetation patches with low flow-resistance. As we exemplify in our case-study of the Everglades ridge and slough landscape, feedback between flow and vegetation also causes hysteresis in landscape evolution trajectories that will affect the potential for landscape restoration. Namely, even if the hydrologic conditions that historically produced higher flows are restored, degraded portions of the ridge and slough landscape are unlikely to revert to their former patterning. As wetlands and floodplains worldwide become increasingly threatened by climate change and urbanization, the greater mechanistic understanding of landscape pattern and process that our analysis provides will improve our ability to forecast and manage the behavior of these ecosystems.

Laurel G. Larsen; Judson W. Harvey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Radionuclide Concentrations in Terrestrial Vegetation and Soil Samples On and Around the Hanford Site, 1971 Through 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring is conducted on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to comply with DOE Orders and federal and state regulations. Major objectives of the monitoring are to characterize contaminant levels in the environment and to determine site contributions to the contaminant inventory. This report focuses on surface soil and perennial vegetation samples collected between 1971 and 2008 as part of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Surface Environmental Surveillance Project performed under contract to DOE. Areas sampled under this program are located on the Hanford Site but outside facility boundaries and on public lands surrounding the Hanford Site. Additional samples were collected during the past 8 years under DOE projects that evaluated parcels of land for radiological release. These data were included because the same sampling methodology and analytical laboratory were used for the projects. The spatial and temporal trends of six radionuclides collected over a 38-year period were evaluated. The radionuclides----cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239/240, and uranium (reported either as uranium-238 or total uranium)----were selected because they persist in the environment and are still being monitored routinely and reported in Hanford Site environmental reports. All these radionuclides were associated with plutonium production and waste management of activities occurring on the site. Other sources include fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, which ended in 1980, and the Chernobyl explosion in 1986. Uranium is also a natural component of the soil. This assessment of soil and vegetation data provides important information on the distribution of radionuclides in areas adjacent to industrial areas, established perimeter locations and buffer areas, and more offsite nearby and distant locations. The concentrations reflect a tendency for detection of some radionuclides close to where they were utilized onsite, but as one moves to unindustrialized areas on the site, surrounding buffer areas and perimeter location into the more distant sites, concentrations of these radionuclides approach background and cannot be distinguished from fallout activity. More importantly, concentrations in soil and vegetation samples did not exceed environmental benchmark concentrations, and associated exposure to human and ecological receptors were well below levels that are demonstratively hazardous to human health and the environment.

Simmons, Mary Ann; Poston, Ted M.; Fritz, Brad G.; Bisping, Lynn E.

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

459

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-46): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/27/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6) 6) William T. Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Franklin County noxious weed management along BPA rights-of-ways, transmission structures, roads, and switches listed in Attachment 1. Attachment 1 identifies the ROW, ROW width, and ROW length of the proposed action. Includes all BPA 115kV, 230kV, and 500 kV ROWs in Franklin County, Washington. Location: The ROWs are all located in Franklin County, Washington in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear noxious and/or unwanted low-growing vegetation in all BPA ROWs in Franklin County, Washington. In a cooperative effort, BPA, through landowners and the Franklin County Weed Control Board, plan to eradicate noxious plants and other

460

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-45): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/27/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5) 5) William T. Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Benton County noxious weed management along BPA rights-of-ways, transmission structures, roads, and switches listed in Attachment 1. Attachment 1 identifies the ROW, ROW width, and ROW length of the proposed action. Includes all BPA 115kV, 230kV, 345kV and 500 kV ROWs in Benton County, Washington. Location: The ROWs are all located in Benton County, Washington, Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear noxious and/or unwanted low-growing vegetation in all BPA ROWs in Benton County, Washington. In a cooperative effort, BPA, through landowners and the Benton County Weed Control Board, plan to eradicate noxious plants and other

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-02): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 3/9/01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3/09/01 3/09/01 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-02) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Danger tree clearing on nine ROWs. Locations are: the Franklin-Badger Canyon #2; Hedges Tap; White Bluffs-Richland; Grandview-Richland; Badger Canyon-Richland; Franklin- Riverview; Taylor Flats Tap; Walla Walla-Pendleton; and McNary-Slatt Transmission lines. Location: All ROWs are located in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear danger trees from varying widths of the indicated transmission line rights-of way that are approaching electrical clearance zones in

462

Vegetation and Ecological Charactistics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at the Teakettle Experimental Forest in tree clusters or, where unobstructed in gaps there are few trees. Although the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation and Ecological Charactistics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at the Teakettle requirement, many forest inventories in mixed conifer may not produce accurate estimates of mean basal area Patch Conditions Mixed-conifer forests do not have continuous canopy cover, and vegetation is highly

Standiford, Richard B.

463

Agriculture model development to improve performance of the Community Land  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agriculture model development to improve performance of the Community Land Agriculture model development to improve performance of the Community Land Model April 3, 2013 The important relationships between climate change and agriculture are uncertain, particularly the feedbacks related to the carbon cycle. Nevertheless, vegetation models have not yet considered the full impacts of management practices and nitrogen feedbacks on the carbon cycle. We are working to meet this need. We have integrated three crop types (corn, soybean, and spring wheat) into the Community Land Model (CLM). In developing the agriculture version of CLM, we added plant processes related to management practices and nitrogen cycling. A manuscript documenting our changes to CLM has been accepted for publication in Geoscientific Model Development Discussions ("Modeling

464

Basic model Basic model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early days Basic model Literature Classical literature Bayes pre-MCMC Bayes post-MCMC Basic model systems via latent factors Hedibert Freitas Lopes Booth School of Business University of Chicago Col / 66 #12;Early days Basic model Literature Classical literature Bayes pre-MCMC Bayes post-MCMC Basic

Liu, I-Shih

465

Dietary Intake of Vegetables and Fruits and the Modification Effects of GSTM1 and NAT2 Genotypes on Bladder Cancer Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...we used the false discovery rate function in the...to estimate the false discovery rate based on the Benjamini-Hochberg...calculated the false discovery rate-adjusted p-values...17) 0.001 Total energy (kcal) 2,299.38...consumed significantly more dark-green, orange vegetables...

Jie Lin; Ashish Kamat; Jian Gu; Meng Chen; Colin P. Dinney; Michele R. Forman; and Xifeng Wu

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

-Predictors of moss and liverwort species diversity of microsites in conifer-dominated boreal forest -189 Journal of Vegetation Science 15: 189-198, 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-diversity) ­ in three conifer-dominated boreal forest stands of northern Alberta, Canada are described. We examined- Predictors of moss and liverwort species diversity of microsites in conifer-dominated boreal forest - 189 Journal of Vegetation Science 15: 189-198, 2004 © IAVS; Opulus Press Uppsala. Abstract

Macdonald, Ellen

467

Effects of Cruciferous Vegetable Consumption on Urinary Metabolites of the Tobacco-Specific Lung Carcinogen 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-Pyridyl)-1-Butanone in Singapore Chinese  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...chromatography purification, and quantitation by gas chromatography with nitrosamine selective...vegetables, and lung cancer risk in women: the Missouri womens health study (United States...and on methods of analysis in respect of oil seeds. Official Journal of the European...

Stephen S. Hecht; Steven G. Carmella; Patrick M.J. Kenney; Siew-Hong Low; Kazuko Arakawa; and Mimi C. Yu

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Low-Emission Premixed Porous Inert Media (PIM) Burner System Fueled with Vegetable (Rapeseed) Oil Using a Flow Velocity Flame Stabilization Technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

† Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, University of Tanta, Tanta, Egypt ... In the present work, the suitability of vegetable (rapeseed) oil as a renewable, biodegradable, and environmentally friendly source of energy to operate porous inert medium (PIM) atmospheric burners was examined. ...

Ayman Bakry; A. Al-Salaymeh; Ala H. Al-Muhtaseb; A. Abu-Jrai; D. Trimis; F. Durst

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

469

EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOE’s Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Western’s proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska.

470

CHANGES IN 137 CS CONCENTRATIONS IN SOIL AND VEGETATION ON THE FLOODPLAIN OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER OVER A 30 YEAR PERIOD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

{sup 137}Cs released during 1954-1974 from nuclear production reactors on the Savannah River Site, a US Department of Energy nuclear materials production site in South Carolina, contaminated a portion of the Savannah River floodplain known as Creek Plantation. {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations have been measured in Creek Plantation since 1974 making it possible to calculate effective half-lives for {sup 137}Cs in soil and vegetation and assess the spatial distribution of contaminants on the floodplain. Activity concentrations in soil and vegetation were higher near the center of the floodplain than near the edges as a result of frequent inundation coupled with the presence of low areas that trapped contaminated sediments. {sup 137}Cs activity was highest near the soil surface, but depth related differences diminished with time as a likely result of downward diffusion or leaching. Activity concentrations in vegetation were significantly related to concentrations in soil. The plant to soil concentration ratio (dry weight) averaged 0.49 and exhibited a slight but significant tendency to decrease with time. The effective half-lives for {sup 137}Cs in shallow (0-7.6 cm) soil and in vegetation were 14.9 (95% CI = 12.5-17.3) years and 11.6 (95% CI = 9.1-14.1) years, respectively, and rates of {sup 137}Cs removal from shallow soil and vegetation did not differ significantly among sampling locations. Potential health risks on the Creek Plantation floodplain have declined more rapidly than expected on the basis of radioactive decay alone because of the relatively short effective half-life of {sup 137}Cs.

Paller, M.; Jannik, T.; Fledderman, P.

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

471

A framework for benchmarking land models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine data–model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models to improve their prediction performance skills.

Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, J.; Abramowitz, G.; Bacour, C.; Blyth, E.; Carvalhais, N.; Ciais, Philippe; Dalmonech, D.; Fisher, J.B.; Fisher, R.; Friedlingstein, P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jones, C.; Koven, C.; Lawrence, David M.; Li, D.J.; Mahecha, M.; Niu, S.L.; Norby, Richard J.; Piao, S.L.; Qi, X.; Peylin, P.; Prentice, I.C.; Riley, William; Reichstein, M.; Schwalm, C.; Wang, Y.; Xia, J. Y.; Zaehle, S.; Zhou, X. H.

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

472

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

473

Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA 107): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS, Elma-Cosmopolis #1 9/5/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7, 7, Elma-Cosmopolis #1. James A. Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Elma-Cosmopolis #1 115kV transmission line corridor from structure 11/7 through structure 20/3. Right of way width averages 100 feet. Location: The project area is located in Grays Harbor County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridors. Approximately 8 miles of right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Approximately 2.8 miles of access roads will be cleared using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Tower sites

475

DOE/EIS-0285-SA-139: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - Little Goose-Lower Granite Corridor Maintenance (4/3/03)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9-Little Goose-Lower Granite Corridor Maintenance 9-Little Goose-Lower Granite Corridor Maintenance William Erickson Natural Resource Specialist - TFP/Walla Walla Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Little Goose-Lower Granite #1 and #2 Transmission Line Corridor from Towers 4/3 to 8/1. The right-of-way has an easement width of 258 feet and contains two 500kV Single Circuit Transmission Lines. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor as referenced in the attached checklist. Location: The subject right-of-way is located in Columbia County, WA., being in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: The work will be accomplished by an Integrated Vegetation Management approach using a combination of manual, mechanical, herbicides and biological

476

DOE/EIS-0285/SA-134: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (Bandon-Rogue-GoldBeach)(3/24/03)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4, 2003 4, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-134-Bandon-Rogue-GoldBeach) Ben Tilley Natural Resource Specialist - TFE/Alvey Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Bandon-Rogue-Gold Beach transmission line corridor. This corridor includes the Bandon-Rogue #1 115 kV transmission line from Bandon Substation to Rogue Substation and the Rogue-Gold Beach #1 and #2 115kV transmission lines, starting at Rogue Substation and ending at Gold Beach Substation. In addition the project includes adjacent portions of the Fairview-Rogue #1 230 kV Transmission Line. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Coos and Curry Counties, Oregon.

477

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-63): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS, North Bonneville-Midway and Hanford-Ostrander 4/22/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2002 2, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS, North Bonneville-Midway and Hanvor-Ostrander (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-63) Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on the North Bonneville-Midway and Hanford- Ostrander transmission line right-of-way (approx. 702 acres). The project area begins at the North Bonneville Substation and terminates at structure 25/3+500. For most of the length of the right-of-way, the width is 300 feet wide on the North Bonneville-Midway Line and 150 feet wide for the Hanford- Ostrander Line. Location: The ROW is located in North Bonneville, Skamania County, OR, being in the

478

Chefs move to schools. A pilot examination of how chef-created dishes can increase school lunch participation and fruit and vegetable intake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract To demonstrate the feasibility of introducing a main dish designed by a professional chef in the National School Lunch Program and to document the impact on child participation, a chef was recruited to design pizza to be served in an upstate New York school district. The pizza was designed to meet both the cost and ingredient requirements of the NSLP. High school students were significantly more likely to select the pizza prepared by the chef. While the chef had no significant impact on main dish consumption given selection, more students took a vegetable and vegetable consumption increased by 16.5%. This pilot study demonstrates the plausibility of using chefs to boost participation in the school lunch program, and potentially increase nutrition through side selection, among high school students.

David R. Just; Brian Wansink; Andrew S. Hanks

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA 108): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS Satsop-Aberdeen #2 9/5/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8, 8, Satsop-Aberdeen #2. James A. Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Satsop-Aberdeen #2 230kV transmission line corridor from structure 1/1 through structure 11/5 (reference line). Other lines which are present in the proposed corridor are the Satsop-Aberdeen #3 230 kV, South Elma-Cosmopolis 115kV, and Aberdeen tap to South Elma-Cosmospolis 115kV. Right of way width averages 238 feet. Location: The project area is located in Grays Harbor County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridors. Approximately 11 miles of right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide

480

Influence of application methods and varying rates of uniconazol on the vegetative and reproductive response of pecan trees, Carya illinoensis (Wang) K. Koch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFLUENCE OF APPLICATION METHODS AND VARYING RATES OF UNICONAZOL ON THE VEGETATIVE AND REPRODUCTIVE RESPONSE OF PECAN ~, Carye illinoertsis (Wang) K Koch A Thesis CHARLES JORDAN GRAHAM Submitted to the OIIice of Graduate Studies of Texas A..., Carya illinoensis (Wang) K. Koch A Thesis CHARLES JORDAN GRAHAM Approved as to style and content by: J. enton Storey (Chairman of Committee) eorge y McEachern (Member) anklin ong (Member) David Wm. Reed (Head of Department) May 1990 ABSTRACT...

Graham, Charles Jordan

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mapss vegetation modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-111) - (Fairview-Brandon #1, Fairview-Brandon #2 and Fairview-Rogue #1access road, danger tree and structure clearing) 9/25/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

25, 25, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-111) - (Fairview-Bandon #1, Fairview-Bandon #2 and Fairview-Rogue #1access road, danger tree and structure clearing) Benjamin Tilley Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Fairview-Bandon #1and #2 and Fairview- Rogue #1 transmission lines. Location: Throughout the Fairview-Bandon #1, Fairview-Bandon #2 and Fairview-Rogue #1 corridors located within Coos and Curry counties in Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: Tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the line will be removed. Vegetation that will grow tall will be selectively eliminated before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing

482

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-109): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - (Santiam-Alvey # 1 #2 access road and structure clearing) 9/9/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 9, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-109) - (Santiam-Alvey # 1 and #2 access road and structure clearing) Benjamin Tilley Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Santiam-Alvey # 1 and #2 transmission line. Location: Throughout the Santiam-Alvey # 1 and #2 corridor located within Linn and Lane counties in Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: Tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the line will be removed. Vegetation that will grow tall will be selectively eliminated before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing species. Cut-stump or follow- up herbicide treatments on re-sprouting-type species will be carried out to ensure

483

(DOE/EIS-0285-SA-104): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - Lynch Creek Tap to LaGrande-Cowlitz No.1 8/21/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1, 1, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-104-Lynch Creek Tap to LaGrande-Cowlitz No. 1 James A. Jellison - TFO/Olympia Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Lynch Creek to LaGrande-Cowlitz No. 1 Location: Near the town of Eatonville, Pierce County Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. The right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Approximately 29 miles of access roads and corridor will be treated. Vegetation management is required

484

Rapid response of alpine timberline vegetation to the Younger Dryas climate oscillation in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...provides a tangible constraint for the validation of Earth system models that investigate the sensitivity of atmospheric circulation...provides a tangible constraint for the validation of Earth system models that investigate the sensitivity of atmospheric circulation...

485

Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 – Air and Water Volume 2 – Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Chapter 17 Vegetation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the cities of Kelso, Longview, Castle Rock, Vancouver, and Camas in Washington, and Troutdale and Fairview in Oregon. Agriculture and production forests are common in rural areas...

487

Specialty Vegetables in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-round and oblong. Fruit range from 8 to 12 pounds. CuUure. This warm weather, vining crop is grown as watermelon. Mushrooms (Enoki, Pleurotus, Shiitake) , Description. The popularity of different species and varieties of mushrooms has increased in the past... the fresh market. Other mush room varieties whose popularity is increasing include enoki, pleurotus and shiitake. Enoki mushrooms are creamy white with long slender stems that are topped with small round caps. They are mild flavored mushrooms with a...

Longbrake, Thomas D.; Baker, Marvin L.; Cotner, Sam; Parsons, Jerry; Roberts, Roland; Stein, Larry

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Vegetable oil fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article, the future role of renewable agricultural resources in providing fuel is discussed. it was only during this century that U.S. farmers began to use petroleum as a fuel for tractors as opposed to forage crop as fuel for work animals. Now farmers may again turn to crops as fuel for agricultural production - the possible use of sunflower oil, soybean oil and rapeseed oil as substitutes for diesel fuel is discussed.

Bartholomew, D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Insects Attacking Vegetable Crops.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-brown or brownish- gray moths with wing expanse of about 1% inches and a small but prominent white dot near the center of each forewing. Larva. Young worms are pale green and have looping habits; older worms do not loop while crawling. The mature larva... hosts. Description: Adult. Forewings are grayish- brown with a pale spot near the middle of the front margin and have an expanse of about 1% inches. Hind wings are silvery-white with a darker front margin. Larva. Bright green with dark lateral...

Newton, Weldon H.; Deer, James A.; Hamman, Philip J.; Wolfenbarger, Dan A.; Harding, James A.; Schuster, Michael F.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

491

The Holocene climate evolution in the high-latitude Southern Hemisphere simulated by a coupled atmosphere-sea ice-ocean-vegetation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 a) b) Sea-ice area -2.0 -1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.5 -9000 -8000 -7000 -6000 -5000 -4000 -3000 -2000 concentrations 500 550 600 650 700 750 -9000 -8000 -7000 -6000 -5000 -4000 -3000 -2000 -1000 0 Time [yr] CH4conc -8000 -7000 -6000 -5000 -4000 -3000 -2000 -1000 0 Time [yr] W/m 2 JAN FEBDEC MAR AUG NOV OCTSEP JUL CH4

Renssen, Hans

492

Modeling Tidal Marsh Distribution with Sea-Level Rise: Evaluating the Role of Vegetation, Sediment, and Upland Habitat in Marsh Resiliency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 2110 at China Camp with 52 cm/century, 100 cm/century,Camp and Rush Ranch) exhibited little response to SLR under the 52 cm/century

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Modeling Tidal Marsh Distribution with Sea-Level Rise: Evaluating the Role of Vegetation, Sediment, and Upland Habitat in Marsh Resiliency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and patterns across a salinity gradient using high spatialacross the estuarine salinity gradient. Four tidal marshesconcentrations across a salinity gradient would more

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Modeling Tidal Marsh Distribution with Sea-Level Rise: Evaluating the Role of Vegetation, Sediment, and Upland Habitat in Marsh Resiliency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of carbon sequestration potential in coastalMilan CS (2012) Carbon sequestration and sediment accretion29] and links to carbon sequestration potential [30]. Some

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Modeling Tidal Marsh Distribution with Sea-Level Rise: Evaluating the Role of Vegetation, Sediment, and Upland Habitat in Marsh Resiliency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and 180 cm/century sea-level rise at mid suspended sedimentCouncil (2012) Sea-level rise for the coasts of California,to projecting future sea-level rise. Science 315: 368–370.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Modeling soil salinity distribution along topographic gradients in tidal salt marshes in Atlantic and Gulf coastal regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil salinity plays a very important role in determining the distribution of vegetation, plant productivity, and biogeochemical processes in coastal marsh ecosystems. Salinity gradients and salinity–vegetation associations in salt marshes have often been observed but rarely explained. A quantitative and systematic study on the soil salinity distribution in salt marshes is not only important to the understanding of coastal marsh ecosystems but also to the development of a potentially useful ecological and environmental indicator. In this research, we developed a salt marsh soil salinity model based on an existing salt and water balance model with modifications to several key features to examine the impacts of tidal forcing, climate, soil, vegetation, and topography on soil salinity distributions of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal marshes. This model was calibrated and validated using field observations from the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) of northwestern Florida, USA. The results showed that the model had good agreement (r2 = 0.84, n = 15, P salinity maximum in a coastal salt marsh. Simulations indicate that tidal irregularity primarily controls the width of the salinity maximum band. Evapotranspiration, temperature, hydraulic conductivity, and incoming tidal salinity significantly affect the salinity maximum band, which may lead to the formation of salt barrens/flats when reaching a threshold level.

Hongqing Wang; Y. Ping Hsieh; Mark A. Harwell; Wenrui Huang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Modeling & Simulation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling & Simulation Modeling & Simulation Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this...

498

Interactions of CO{sub 2} with temperature and other climate variables: response of vegetation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this project were: (1) to examine experimentally, for major crop species, the interacting effects of CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and water availability on plant growth and development, (2) to model these interactions, and (3) to continue developing physiologically-based mechanistic models for predicting crop response to increased CO{sub 2} concentration and future global climate change. To meet these objectives, controlled-environment studies were conducted on cotton, lemon, rice, and soybean and a long-term open-top chamber study was continued on orange. Much progress was made on development of plant growth models for cotton, wheat, rice, and soybean. In addition, there were two special modeling efforts which have the potential for contributing to all of the crop models. These efforts are concerned with modeling root growth and physical and chemical processes in soil and with modeling the effect of stomatal aperture on photosynthesis and transpiration rates as a function of CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and vapor pressure deficit. The root growth and soil process modeling is important because it enables us to estimate the water available to the plant. The modeling of effects of stomatal aperture on photosynthesis and transpiration rates enables them to estimate dry weight gain and water use by the plant. These are both important components of the interaction of CO{sub 2} concentration with temperature and water availability. The work on stomatal aperture, photosynthesis, and transpiration has the added benefit of allowing us to improve predictions of energy partitioning by the terrestrial biosphere. The lack of realistic energy partitioning is a serious deficiency of the present general circulation models which are used to predict how climate will change. An additional important aspect of the rice experiments is a study of methane emissions of paddy-grown (i.e., flooded) rice grown under two levels of CO{sub 2} and three temperature regimes.

Knipling, E.B.

1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

499

Chernobyl doses. Volume 3. Habitat and vegetation near the Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor Station. Technical report, 29 September 1987-28 February 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume presents a detailed exposition on the soils, climate, and vegetation of the Poles'ye region of Ukraine and Belorussia with emphasis on the area around the Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor Station. This data provides background for interpretation of multispectral satellite imagery of the area. Volume 1 uses these images and the information of this report to analyze the radiation response of the canopy of the coniferous forests in the immediate vicinity of the reactor station after the accident of 26 April 1986.... Chernobyl, Forest damage, Landsat, Change detection, Conifer stress, Fallout, Ionizing radiation, Multispectral imagery.

Painter, E.L.; Whicker, F.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Green and Sensitive Supercritical Fluid Chromatographic–Tandem Mass Spectrometric Method for the Separation and Determination of Flutriafol Enantiomers in Vegetables, Fruits, and Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Green and Sensitive Supercritical Fluid Chromatographic–Tandem Mass Spectrometric Method for the Separation and Determination of Flutriafol Enantiomers in Vegetables, Fruits, and Soil ... Typical conditions were as follows: the cone voltage of flutriafol was 24 V; m/z 302.2 was selected as the precursor ion for flutriafol, m/z 123.04 for its product quantitative ion, and m/z 70.05 for its qualitative ion when the collision energy was set at 28 and 58 V. ...

Yan Tao; Fengshou Dong; Jun Xu; Xingang Liu; Youpu Cheng; Na Liu; Zenglong Chen; Yongquan Zheng

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z