Sample records for mapp npcc serc

  1. SERC Grants Interactive Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View SERC Grants in a larger map. To report corrections, please email SustainableEnergyWAP@ee.doe.gov.

  2. Critical in PROJECT TITLE COMMENTS BPA NPCC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PLANNING AND CONSERVATION COUNCIL AND BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION "RANKINGS" FOR PROJECTS UNDER in annual planning budget and feasibility of approach to achieve efficiencies. BPA reduced by $250PROJECT NUMBER (BiOp Critical in Italics) PROJECT TITLE COMMENTS BPA NPCC 35019 Develop

  3. SERC Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 <Department of iiBiodiesel | Department ofSERC Projects SERC

  4. Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies- Solar Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document provides a transcript of the of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics webinar, presented on 10/20/2011 by Peter McNutt.

  5. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Geothermal...

  6. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of a presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Geothermal...

  7. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on Vermont's innovative strategy for helping low-income families save energy through its Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) program. sercvthighlight.pdf More...

  8. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Low-Income Weatherization Efforts. sercmthighlight.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy...

  9. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC)- Solar Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Solar Photovoltaics.

  10. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC)- On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters.

  11. Property:EIA/861/NercSerc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to: navigation,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpNercSerc Jump

  12. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Case study on Vermont's innovative strategy for helping low-income families save energy through its Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) program. The DOE Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) granted Vermont to give its weatherization clients access to solar energy systems and one-on-one assistance from energy efficiency coaches to help clients achieve meaningful and long-lasting reductions in their energy bills. Vermont-SERC is administered by the Vermont Office of Economic Opportunity and is carried out by five local weatherization agencies. The purpose of the program is to identify technologies and new approaches-in this case, solar energy and energy efficiency coaches-that can improve weatherization services to low-income clients. The program selects households that have previously received weatherization services. This has several advantages. First, the clients already understand how weatherization works and are willing to strive for additional energy savings. Second, the weatherization agencies are working with clients who have previously had weatherization and therefore have complete energy usage data from utility bills collected during the first energy upgrade installation. This allows the agencies to select the best potential candidates for solar energy. Agencies have existing knowledge of the homes and can pre-screen them for potential structural problems or lack of south-facing exposure.

  13. Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections Email: oar.cpo.mapp@noaa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth system models to better simulate the climate system? Can we improve intraseasonal to seasonal mission, MAPP supports the development of advanced Earth system models that can predict climate variations, and the external research community. MAPP Objectives · Improve Earth system models · Achieve an integrated Earth

  14. MAPP 7.10 -Procedures for Standardized Training in Animal Care & Use I Training Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    MAPP 7.10 - Procedures for Standardized Training in Animal Care & Use I Training Program 1. On behalf of the AUS, the ACVS Research Education Team will: 1.1 Develop appropriate training programs with reference to CCAC requirements; 1.2 Assess the training requirements of all personnel at the University

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - Till.ppt

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Utilities (E.ON)* TVA Big Rivers Electric Coop Ameren* AECI Batesville Balancing Authority NPCC MRO RFC SPP SERC FRCC Central TVA & CPPP - Central to the Eastern...

  16. An In-situ materials analysis particle probe (MAPP) diagnostic to study particle density control and hydrogenic fuel retention in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allain, Jean Paul [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign] (ORCID:000000031348262X)

    2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A new materials analysis particle probe (MAPP) was designed, constructed and tested to develop understanding of particle control and hydrogenic fuel retention in lithium-based plasma-facing surfaces in NSTX. The novel feature of MAPP is an in-situ tool to probe the divertor NSTX floor during LLD and lithium-coating shots with subsequent transport to a post-exposure in-vacuo surface analysis chamber to measure D retention. In addition, the implications of a lithiated graphite-dominated plasma-surface environment in NSTX on LLD performance, operation and ultimately hydrogenic pumping and particle control capability are investigated in this proposal. MAPP will be an invaluable tool for erosion/redeposition simulation code validation.

  17. Monitoring SERC Technologies — Solar Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Market Transformation Center electrical engineer Peter McNutt about Solar Photovoltaics and how to properly monitor its installation.

  18. Solar Energy Research Center (SERC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou areInnovationPriority |GoingSolar - * . .

  19. NPCC emphasizes that the DOE 2012 congestion analysis should...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    analysis should consider the northeast as a whole, not only modeling those transmission, demand response, and generating resource projects in the United States, but also those...

  20. Property:EIA/861/NercNpcc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationType JumpDOEInvolve JumpallowedAltFuelVehicle

  1. Monitoring SERC Technologies — Solar Hot Water

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by National Renewable Energy Laboratory analyst Eliza Hotchkiss on Solar Hot Water systems and how to properly monitor their installation.

  2. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    electricity. And I have three pictures here. The one on the left is the ground source heat pump system and shows the loop field being buried underground that will be used for...

  3. SERC Grant Webinar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913 |DepartmentEECBG ReportingGrant

  4. SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913 |DepartmentEECBG

  5. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic Safety

  6. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps | Department of

  7. The glass beakers of the eleventh-century Serc?e Limani shipwreck: a preliminary study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitson-MimMack, Joy Joan

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and composed of deep shades. And las+ly, despite 'ooth vessel shapes having engraved examples, the design themes on short cylinders are significantly 'ess varied than those on truncated cones. The beaker is one of the most ancient forms of drinking vessels... and Classification to the Sixteenth Century New York 1927 2 vole. L'E o ue romaine Musee d'Histoire et d' Art, La Verrerie de 1' ' 66 * 1 6~1969 Ettinghausen R. Ettinghausen, "The 'Beveled Style' in the Post-Samarra Period, " in George C. Miles, ed...

  8. The glass beakers of the eleventh-century Serc?e Limani shipwreck: a preliminary study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitson-MimMack, Joy Joan

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Islamic Glass: A Brief History (New York 1986). JGS Journal of Glass Studies. Karanis D. B. Harden, Roman Glass from Karanis (University of Michigan Studies, Humanistic Series 41, Ann Arbor, Michigan 1936). ~Kt t K t Ko tische Kunst: Christentum am...THE GLASS BEAKERS OF THE ELEVENTH-CENTURY SERGE LIMANI SHIPNRECK-- A PRELIMINAR1' STUDY A Thesis by JOY JOAN KITSON-MINMACK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  9. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    upgrade measures to maximize savings. sercmdhighlight.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Fact Sheet July 2011 Building America Webinar:...

  10. SERC Community-Based Social Marketing for Weatherization Programs Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A presentation sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy about fostering sustainable behaviors in a community for saving energy.

  11. Monitoring SERC Technologies: On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by Ethan MacCormick, VP for Services to Energy Businesses at Performance Systems Development, about On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters and how to properly monitor the installation.

  12. Monitoring SERC Technologies —Geothermal/Ground Source Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by National Renewable Energy Laboratory Project Leader Dave Peterson about Geothermal/Ground Source Heat Pumps and how to properly monitor its installation.

  13. The history of the anchorage at Serce Liman, Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slane, Dorothy Anne

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    opposite the island of Rhodes there is a small natural harbor known as Serge Liman (Fig. 1, p. 2). Bere an eleventh-century A. B. shipwreck was excavated between 1977 and 1979 by the Institute of Nautical Archaeology (INA) in conjunction with Texas As...M University (Bass and van Doorninck 1978: 119). During the course of this excavation, broken pottery was observed scattered on the slope above the wrecksite and was also found beneath the ship's hull remains. The pottery, examined in passing, did...

  14. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Idaho Highlight |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -BlueprintThis documentEnergy Local Government

  15. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Maryland |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -BlueprintThis documentEnergy Local GovernmentDepartment of

  16. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Montana |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -BlueprintThis documentEnergy Local GovernmentDepartment

  17. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight (Fact

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -BlueprintThis documentEnergy Local

  18. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps | Department ofDepartment

  19. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps | Department

  20. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Idaho Highlight

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps | Department Idaho

  1. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Maryland

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps | Department Idaho

  2. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Montana

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps | Department IdahoMontana

  3. The glass lamps from the 11th-century shipwreck at Serc?e Liman, Turkey: a thesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morden, Margaret Elizabeth

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    writ1ng during the 4th century, describes a hanging lamp in the following terms: "From the center of panelled ceil1ngs 1n spac1ous rooms . . . openwork bronze lamps were suspended by cable . like a kind of tree w1th pliant vine-like branches... to the three major forms of lamp development discussed earlier. Paul the S1lentiary, in h1s description of Sancta Soph1a in Constantinople, describes the lighting of the entire church (see Appendix III). In the center of the church a lamp was suspended 37...

  4. PART 2. Narrative Project ID: New resident fish monitoring project called for by NPCC' Mainstem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    years except the lowest 20th percentile water supply; during drought years, the draft could be increased the lowest 20th percentile water supply; during drought years, the summer draft could be increased to 20 feet

  5. Overview of Avista GHG Modeling NPCC Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Gas CO2 Emissions A Bridge to a Low Carbon Future, or the Future? 815 1,190 lbs/MWh Gas CCCT has 210 CCCT CT Colstrip 3/4 #12;6/5/2013 2 Avista CO2 Emissions Forecast Rising emissions overall 2030 2031 2032 2033 #12;6/5/2013 4 WECC CO2 Emissions Forecast CO2 Prices

  6. Three-Step Review Process. NPCC, November 2006, document 2006-21 Three-Step Review Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    significantly the number of fish being introduced; (d) change stocks or the number of stocks, and/or (e) change to take place, so that efforts are not restrictive, and still close enough to provide choices to be made

  7. The rig of the eleventh-century ship at Serce Liman, Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Sheila Diane

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was designed for maximum cargo capacity. The hydrostatic properties of this hull were such that it probably would have retained sufficient righting ability and speed with a double-lateen rig. Thus, the proposed two-masted lateen rig for this ship would have... and Recording Procedures Off-Site Recording Procedures Preliminary Hull Reconstruction Hull Remains Ship's Gear: Anchors Ship's Gear: Rigging Elements Ship's Cargo: Date and Nationality of the Vessel 1 3 8 9 11 16 16 19 CHAPTER II. MEDIEVAL RIGS...

  8. The gaming pieces from the glass wreck at Serce Limani, Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassavoy, Kenneth Albert

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE GAMING PIECES FROM THE GLASS WRECK AT SERgE LIMANI, TURKEY A Thesis by KENNETH ALBERT CASSAVOY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August... ml (Member) g n M. Bryant Jr (Head, Anthropo gy August 1985 ABSTRACT The Gaming Pieces from the Glass Wreck at Serge Limani, Turkey. (August 1985) Kenneth Albert Cassavoy, B. A. , Trent University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. George F...

  9. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight (Fact Sheet), Weatherization And Intergovernmental Programs (WIP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps | Department

  10. Nachlass Ruth Alexander -Zeilberger: Mappe IV: Singspiel, verfasst von Ruth Alexander in Mnchen, 1936/37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeilberger, Doron

    Kinderheim, als auch einzelne Betreuerin- nen gewürdigt. Tante Gerti zum Beispiel sorgt nicht nur für den

  11. EIS-0465: Pepco Holdings, Inc. Mid-Atlantic Power Path (MAPP) Project, Prince George's, Calvert, and Wicomico Counties, Maryland, and Sussex County, Delaware

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pepco Holdings, Inc., cancelled its proposed Phase II of the Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway transmission line project and DOE cancelled preparation of an EIS on the potential environmental impacts of a proposed federal loan guarantee for the project.

  12. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15. SRCE SERC Central 16. SRVC SERC VACAR 17. SPNO SPP North 18. SPSO SPP South 19. AZNM WECC Southwest 20. CAMX WECC California 21. NWPP WECC Northwest 22. RMPA WECC Rockies...

  13. Questions Asked during the Financing Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets Transcript Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar...

  14. Appendix A -1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A - 1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program The 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program is the fifth revision of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program since the NPCC principles. The 2000 NPCC Fish and Wildlife Program marks a significant departure from past versions, which

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 9,060 35 Electric Utilities 152 46...

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. 2012 Summary statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,235 50 Electric Utilities 329 45...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2012 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,323 44 Electric Utilities 1,121 41...

  18. DOE Webinar ? Residential Geothermal Heat Pump Retrofits (Presentatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - GeothermalGround-Source Heat Pumps Measuring the Costs and Economic, Social, and Environmental Benefits of Nationwide...

  19. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report covers the states that largely fall into the Southeastern Reliability Corporation (SERC) region: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

  20. An Examination of Temporal Trends in Electricity Reliability Based on Reports from U.S. Electric Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SAIDI SAIFI SERC SPP TRE WECC Alaska Systems CoordinatingElectricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Midwest ReliabilityCoordinating Council (WECC). Completeness of reported

  1. Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scown, Corinne Donahue

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic Produced Water Renewable Fuels Association ReliabilityFirst Corporation Reverse Osmosis Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage Soybean Meal Synthetic Crude Oil SERC Reliability

  2. INTRODUCTION NIH NIDDK U01 DK082342-01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    , MAPP Data Coordinating Core, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA METHODS · Diffusion. · White matter mean diffusivity in a tract stretching between the corona radiata and superior longitudinal

  3. Timeline Variability The Variability of Binding Time of Variation Points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Eelco Visser Technical Report UU-CS-2003-052 Institute of Information and Computing Sciences Utrecht-3275 Address: Eelco Dolstra Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80089, 3508 TB Utrecht, The Netherlands eelco@cs.uu.nl Gert Florijn SERC, P.O. Box 424, 3500 AK Utrecht, The Netherlands florijn@serc.nl Eelco Visser Utrecht

  4. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Principal Economist at Itron Inc., in interpreting and analyzing Itron energy efficiency data. Likewise: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Schatz Energy Research Center #12; Prepared by: Primary Alstone, Adam Schumaker, Colin Sheppard, and Jim Zoellick, SERC Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) 1

  5. The same or just much the same? Problems with coreference from the reader's perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ". The poet handed over part of the prize to the "SERCE" Foundation. the first task should identify precision cz nagrody ­ part of the prize nagrody ­ the prize poetka ­ the poet Fundacji ,,SERCE, poetk ­ Wislawa Szymborska, her, the poet Nagrod Nobla, nagrody ­ the Nobel Prize, the prize. All

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2012 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,083 18 Electric Utilities 21,280...

  7. Modeling Interregional Transmission Congestion in the National Energy Modeling System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Lesieutre, Bernard; Marnay, Chris; Wang, Juan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration. 2005a. Annual Energy Outlook 2005. EIA/DOE.RON SERC TWh WECC Annual Energy Outlook U.S. Department ofAccording to the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2004 Reference

  8. Cornell University, Office of Sponsored Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lab of O - Programs SERC BUILDING THE FIELD OF PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 68149 $ 22 $ 73,881.00 FORTIER, LISA Clinical Sciences NYS HEALTH STEM CELL TRAINING OF VETERINARY STUDENTS

  9. Modeling Interregional Transmission Congestion in the National Energy Modeling System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Lesieutre, Bernard; Marnay, Chris; Wang, Juan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5 Figure 1-4 Four-Node Example Based on the WECC6 Figure 1-5 Four-Node Example Based on the WECCPAE PBA RA RON SERC TWh WECC Annual Energy Outlook U.S.

  10. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation Virginia-Carolina XLS Table 58.17. Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool North XLS Table 58.18. Renewable Energy...

  11. Development of Conceptual Framework Renewable Energy Certificate Mechanism for India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Delhi Electricity Regulatory Commission DMRPS Dynamic Minimum Renewable Purchase Standard EA 2003 Renewable Obligation Certificate RPS Renewable Purchase Specification RPO Renewable Purchase Obligation RPC Regional Power Committee Rs Rupees SERC State Electricity Regulatory Commission SLDC State Load Despatch

  12. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MISO MP MRO MWDRI M&V NYISO PJM PUC RAP RFC RTO RTP SERC AirRTOs such as New England or PJM. In 2005 MISO became theEdison is a member of PJM). Interruptible (Total = 3398, N =

  13. *Support from EPRI, NSF and ORNL for this work is gratefully acknowledged.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    of the power produced, rights of way and assts, but it also creates challenges: · 1) Regulatory Challenges be taken into account. #12;0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 1.1 1989 1994 1999 2004 2009 TransmissionCapacity(1989=1) NPCC TRANSMISSIONINVESTMENT(billion1999-$/ -$117 million/year Transmission investment ($) since 1975 Transmission capacity

  14. ISRP Retrospective Report:ISRP Retrospective Report: 19971997 20052005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .D., NPCC #12;ISRP RetrospectiveISRP Retrospective ·· Presents an overview of ISRP activities from 1997 toPresents an overview of ISRP activities from 1997 to 2005 and evaluates the cumulative effect of our2005 and evaluates

  15. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Kennecott Energy comments on 5 year plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    applaud the NPCC's forward thinking when it comes to coal gasification and Kennecott Energy is involved in a number of initiatives that would help make coal gasification an economic reality. However, until plan and would like to submit comments on the plan as it pertains to the future use of coal. Kennecott

  16. CHRONICLE 46, No.5, December 2011 He Kupu Whakamahara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    recognition for his work. Dr Mark Quigley (Geological Sciences) has been presented with the New Zealand of Science and Innovation, Dr Wayne Mapp, at a ceremony held in Wellington recently. Dr Quigley, a senior

  17. Evolution of the Midwest ISO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    -Transmission Owning Members Marketers · Allegheny Energy Supply · American Electric Power Co. · Automated Power Transmission System Operator, Inc. MAPP Fall Conference August 28, 2002 #12;Overview · General Background Information · MISO Today · MISO Evolution #12;General Background Information #12;General Utility Background

  18. DOE: Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Daniel, EPRI; Tuohy, Aidan, EPRI; Deb, Sidart, LCG Consulting; Jampani, Srinivas, LCG Consulting; Kirby, Brendan, Consultant; King, Jack, Consultant

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The DOE-funded project 'Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' aims to evaluate the benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of different balancing approaches with increasing levels of inter-regional cooperation. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. The primary analysis of the project is based on unit commitment (UC) and economic dispatch (ED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The UC/ED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as accurately as possible realizing that all such future scenario models are quite uncertain. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy. The analysis aspects of the project comprised 4 primary tasks: (1) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with only 7 GW of installed wind capacity in SPP for internal SPP consumption with no intended wind exports to SERC. This model is referred to as the 'Non-RES' model as it does not reflect the need for the SPP or SERC BAs to meet a federal Renewable Energy Standard (RES). (2) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of the Non-RES model for the year 2022 to provide project stakeholders with confidence in the model and analytical framework for a scenario that is similar to the existing system and more easily evaluated than the high-wind transfer scenarios that are analyzed subsequently. (3) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with sufficient installed wind capacity in SPP (approximately 48 GW) for both SPP and the participating SERC BAs to meet an RES of 20% energy. This model is referred to as the 'High-Wind Transfer' model with several different scenarios represented. The development of the High-Wind Transfer model not only included identification and allocation of SPP wind to individual SERC BAs, but also included the evaluation of various methods to allow the model to export the SPP wind to SERC without developing an actual transmission plan to support the transfers. (4) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of several different High-Wind Transfer model scenarios for the year 2022 to determine balancing costs and potential benefits of collaboration among SPP and SERC BAs to provide the required balancing.

  19. Development progress of the Materials Analysis and Particle Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia, M., E-mail: mlucia@pppl.gov; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boyle, D. P.; Schmitt, J. C.; Onge, D. A. St. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Bedoya, F.; Allain, J. P. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) is a compact in vacuo surface science diagnostic, designed to provide in situ surface characterization of plasma facing components in a tokamak environment. MAPP has been implemented for operation on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), where all control and analysis systems are currently under development for full remote operation. Control systems include vacuum management, instrument power, and translational/rotational probe drive. Analysis systems include onboard Langmuir probes and all components required for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy, direct recoil spectroscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy surface analysis techniques.

  20. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C8, supplbment au no 12, Tome 47, dkcembre 1986

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    [ O S ~ ( C O ) ~ ~ ]avec HS(CH2)jSIL conduit la formation de HOs3(CO)10 [S(CH2)3 S I ~ ]dont la on Line 7 of the Synchrotron Radiation Source at the SERC Daresbury Laboratory. The procedures used

  1. Aging of Development: the Saemangeum Tideland Reclamation Project (STRP) in South Korea and Sustainable Development of the Two Townships in and out of the STRP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, In Huck

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    quality (or its improvement methods) and the change of the coastal or ocean ecosystem. For example, the Saemangeum Environmental Research Center (SERC) was founded by the researchers of oceanography, environmentology, chemistry, chemical engineering... to the Fieldwork Sites ........................................................................ 34 2.3 Methods.................................................................................................................... 37 2.3.1 Surveys and interviews...

  2. Chile-Japan Joint Workshop for Non-ferrous Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    , University of Chile Director, Energy Center, Solar Energy Research Center (SERC-Chile), University of Chile break 16:00­18:00 Session-III Chair: Prof. Leandro A. Voisin (University of Chile) Energy Challenges materials under strict environmental regulations to preserve mineral resources. is endowed unit develops new

  3. Composite Interfaces, Vol. 12, No. 1-2, pp. 125140 (2005) Also available online -www.vsppub.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. After it was heated at 180 C for 5 min, the `activated-extracted remains with infrared (IR). It was reported To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: johnzlu a hydrolyzed form to an anhydride form by heating. MAPP-treated wood fiber was extracted with toluene for 24 h

  4. EIS-0300: Minnesota Agri-Power Project: Biomass for Rural Development, Granite Falls, Minnesota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE and the Minnesota Environmental Quality Boards' [MEQB, a Minnesota State agency] decision to support a proposal by the Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) to construct and operate a 75–103 megawatt biomass fueled gasifier and electric generating facility, known as the Minnesota Agri-Power Plant (MAPP), and associated transmission lines and alfalfa processing facilities.

  5. Clinch River Breeder Reactor: an assessment of need for power and regulatory issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamblin, D M; Tepel, R C; Bjornstad, D J; Hill, L J; Cantor, R A; Carroll, P J; Cohn, S M; Hadder, G R; Holcomb, B D; Johnson, K E

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a research effort designed to assist the US Department of Energy in: (1) reviewing the need for power from the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) in the Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) region, not including Florida, and (2) isolating specific regulatory and institutional issues and physical transmission capacities that may constrain the market for CRBR power. A review of existing electric power wheeling arrangements in the Southeast and specific federal and state regulatory obstacles that may affect power sales from the CRBR was undertaken. This review was a contributing factor to a decision to target the service territory to SERC-less Florida.

  6. 6 A QUANTUM LEAP 13 THE POWER OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaumont, Christopher

    applications in materials research are grounded in the basic sciences of physics, chemistry, engineeringSerc ­ nATUrAl ScienceS AnD enGineerinG reSeArch coUncil oF cAnADA makes strategic investments in Canada's researchers pursue projects with social and economic benefits in virtually any sector. The fund helps Nova

  7. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, Final Report For the Performance Period May 1, 2008 through April 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampson, Melvin R. [The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

    2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima-Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a joint project of the Yakama Nation (lead entity) and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and is sponsored in large part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with oversight and guidance from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). It is among the largest and most complex fisheries management projects in the Columbia Basin in terms of data collection and management, physical facilities, habitat enhancement and management, and experimental design and research on fisheries resources. Using principles of adaptive management, the YKFP is attempting to evaluate all stocks historically present in the Yakima subbasin and apply a combination of habitat restoration and hatchery supplementation or reintroduction, to restore the Yakima Subbasin ecosystem with sustainable and harvestable populations of salmon, steelhead and other at-risk species. The original impetus for the YKFP resulted from the landmark fishing disputes of the 1970s, the ensuing legal decisions in United States versus Washington and United States versus Oregon, and the region's realization that lost natural production needed to be mitigated in upriver areas where these losses primarily occurred. The YKFP was first identified in the NPCC's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) and supported in the U.S. v Oregon 1988 Columbia River Fish Management Plan (CRFMP). A draft Master Plan was presented to the NPCC in 1987 and the Preliminary Design Report was presented in 1990. In both circumstances, the NPCC instructed the Yakama Nation, WDFW and BPA to carry out planning functions that addressed uncertainties in regard to the adequacy of hatchery supplementation for meeting production objectives and limiting adverse ecological and genetic impacts. At the same time, the NPCC underscored the importance of using adaptive management principles to manage the direction of the Project. The 1994 FWP reiterated the importance of proceeding with the YKFP because of the added production and learning potential the project would provide. The YKFP is unique in having been designed to rigorously test the efficacy of hatchery supplementation. Given the current dire situation of many salmon and steelhead stocks, and the heavy reliance on artificial propagation as a recovery tool, YKFP monitoring results will have great region-wide significance. Supplementation is envisioned as a means to enhance and sustain the abundance of wild and naturally-spawning populations at levels exceeding the cumulative mortality burden imposed on those populations by habitat degradation and by natural cycles in environmental conditions. A supplementation hatchery is properly operated as an adjunct to the natural production system in a watershed. By fully integrating the hatchery with a naturally-producing population, high survival rates for the component of the population in the hatchery can raise the average abundance of the total population (hatchery component + naturally-producing component) to a level that compensates for the high mortalities imposed by human development activities and fully seeds the natural environment. The objectives of the YKFP are to: use Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) and other modeling tools to facilitate planning for project activities, enhance existing stocks, re-introduce extirpated stocks, protect and restore habitat in the Yakima Subbasin, and operate using a scientifically rigorous process that will foster application of the knowledge gained about hatchery supplementation and habitat restoration throughout the Columbia River Basin. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until results are published in the peer-reviewed literature. The following is a brief summary of current YKFP activities by species.

  8. Growth control of the eukaryote cell: A systems biology study in yeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castrillo, Juan I; Zeef, Leo A; Hoyle, David C; Zhang, Nianshu; Hayes, Andrew; Gardner, David C J; Cornell, Michael J; Petty, June; Hakes, Luke; Wardleworth, Leanne; Rash, Bharat; Brown, Marie; Dunn, Warwick B; Broadhurst, David; O'Donoghue, Kerry; Hester, Svenja S; Dunkley, Tom P J; Hart, Sarah; Swainston, Neil; Li, Peter; Gaskell, Simon J; Paton, Norman W; Lilley, Kathryn S; Kell, Douglas B; Oliver, Stephen G

    2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    -line. At appropriate intervals, culture samples were collected for determination of biomass concentration. Biomass levels were monitored both spectrophotometrically at a wavelength of 600 nm, and by dry weight. Dry weight measurements were determined as described... , corresponding to the biological process: tRNA aminoacylation for protein translation (GO tool: GenMAPP). Colour code as in Fig. S17. Fig. S20. Storage vacuole. Groups of genes significantly up-regulated and down-regulated corresponding to the cellular...

  9. Geometria Differenziale. a.a. 2007-08. Prof. P. Piazza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piazza, Paolo

    delle funzioni v = ±r sin u, u [0, 2] Calcolare l'area della regione R := (Q) e verificare che Area parametrizzazione (u, v) (u, v, uv) e base di arrivo la base canonica di R. Determinare il vettore tangente wP TP) Utilizzare (i) e (ii) per determinare le due mappe OW Hom(V0, W) , OW Hom(V0, W) una inversa dell

  10. SF-424 A Budget Information - Non Construction Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 <Department of iiBiodiesel | Department ofSERC1 OMB Control

  11. Property:EIA/861/NercWecc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to: navigation,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpNercSerc

  12. Property:Email | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to: navigation,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpNercSercProperty

  13. Liquid Lithium Divertor and Scrape-Off-Layer Interactions on the National Spherical Torus Experiment: 2010 ? 2013 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The implementation of the liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in NSTX presented a unique opportunity in plasma-material interactions studies. A high density Langmuir Probe (HDLP) array utilizing a dense pack of triple Langmuir probes was built at PPPL and the electronics designed and built by UIUC. It was shown that the HDLP array could be used to characterize the modification of the EEDF during lithium experiments on NSTX as well as characterize the transient particle loads during lithium experiments as a means to study ELMs. With NSTX being upgraded and a new divertor being installed, the HDLP array will not be used in NSTX-U. However UIUC is currently helping to develop two new systems for depositing lithium into NSTX-U, a Liquid Lithium Pellet Dripper (LLPD) for use with the granular injector for ELM mitigation and control studies as well as an Upward-Facing Lithium Evaporator (U-LITER) based on a flash evaporation system using an electron beam. Currently UIUC has Daniel Andruczyk Stationed at PPPL and is developing these systems as well as being involved in preparing the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP) for use in LTX and NSTX-U. To date the MAPP preparations have been completed. New sample holders were designed by UIUC?s Research Engineer at PPPL and manufactured at PPPL and installed. MAPP is currently being used on LTX to do calibration and initial studies. The LLPD has demonstrated that it can produce pellets. There is still some adjustments needed to control the frequency and particle size. Equipment for the U-LITER has arrived and initial test are being made of the electron beam and design of the U-LITER in progress. It is expected to have these ready for the first run campaign of NSTX-U.

  14. The Annotated Mina, Volume One

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .G. Wodehouse books. Alert Harkers have also seen a resemblance to E. F. Benson’s Lucia and Mapp; this was unintentional on my part. 4 There have been many instances within fandom of well-known fans attempting to persuade or encourage their ‘friends...’ to send them money or buy them gifts. Examples include Cousin Jean asking for money to take a year off and write fanfiction, and efforts to buy Cassie Clare (the former Cassie Claire) an iPod. Embitca. ‘Can’t We Just Buy You an iPod?’ Fandom Wank 10...

  15. Analysis of Unit-Level Changes in Operations with Increased SPP Wind from EPRI/LCG Balancing Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The Department of Energy funded the project 'Integrating Midwest Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' to be led by EPRI in coordination with the main authorities for the regions: SPP, Entergy, TVA, Southern Company and OPC. EPRI utilized several subcontractors for the project including LCG, the developers of the model UPLAN. The study aims to evaluate the operating cost benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of regional cooperation for integrating mid-western wind energy into southeast electricity markets. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. DOE funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide additional support to the project, including a review of results and any side analysis that may provide additional insight. This report is a unit-by-unit analysis of changes in operations due to the different scenarios used in the overall study. It focuses on the change in capacity factors and the number of start-ups required for each unit since those criteria summarize key aspects of plant operations, how often are they called upon and how much do they operate. The primary analysis of the overall project is based on security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC) and economic dispatch (SCED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The SCUC/SCED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as best as possible in the model. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy.

  16. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  17. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  18. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA)

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  19. Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

    2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

  20. Human Capacity Building in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy System Maintenance for the Yurok Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, R. A.' Zoellick, J J.

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    From July 2005 to July 2007, the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in the implementation of a program designed to build the Tribe’s own capacity to improve energy efficiency and maintain and repair renewable energy systems in Tribal homes on the Yurok Reservation. Funding for this effort was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Tribal Program under First Steps grant award #DE-FG36-05GO15166. The program’s centerpiece was a house-by-house needs assessment, in which Tribal staff visited and conducted energy audits at over fifty homes. The visits included assessment of household energy efficiency and condition of existing renewable energy systems. Staff also provided energy education to residents, evaluated potential sites for new household renewable energy systems, and performed minor repairs as needed on renewable energy systems.

  1. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) uses a combination of techniques to collect physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered and threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities designed to restore native fishes and their habitats.

  2. Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Thomas, J.; Papanikolas, John, P.

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER INSTRUMENTATION FACILITY The mission of the Solar Energy Research Center (UNC SERC) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) is to establish a world leading effort in solar fuels research and to develop the materials and methods needed to fabricate the next generation of solar energy devices. We are addressing the fundamental issues that will drive new strategies for solar energy conversion and the engineering challenges that must be met in order to convert discoveries made in the laboratory into commercially available devices. The development of a photoelectrosynthesis cell (PEC) for solar fuels production faces daunting requirements: (1) Absorb a large fraction of sunlight; (2) Carry out artificial photosynthesis which involves multiple complex reaction steps; (3) Avoid competitive and deleterious side and reverse reactions; (4) Perform 13 million catalytic cycles per year with minimal degradation; (5) Use non-toxic materials; (6) Cost-effectiveness. PEC efficiency is directly determined by the kinetics of each reaction step. The UNC SERC is addressing this challenge by taking a broad interdisciplinary approach in a highly collaborative setting, drawing on expertise across a broad range of disciplines in chemistry, physics and materials science. By taking a systematic approach toward a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of each step, we will be able to gain unique insight and optimize PEC design. Access to cutting-edge spectroscopic tools is critical to this research effort. We have built professionally-staffed facilities equipped with the state-of the-art instrumentation funded by this award. The combination of staff, facilities, and instrumentation specifically tailored for solar fuels research establishes the UNC Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility as a unique, world-class capability. This congressionally directed project funded the development of two user facilities: TASK 1: SOLAR DEVICE FABRICATION LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT The space allocated for this laboratory was �¢����shell space�¢��� that required an upfit in order to accommodate nano-fabrication equipment in a quasi-clean room environment. This construction project (cost $279,736) met the non-federal cost share requirement of $250,000 for this award. The central element of the fabrication laboratory is a new $400,000+ stand-alone system, funded by other sources, for fabricating and characterizing photovoltaic devices, in a state-of-the-art nanofabrication environment. This congressionally directed project also included the purchase of an energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) detector for a pre-existing transmission electron microscope (TEM). This detector allows elemental analysis and elemental mapping of materials used to fabricate solar energy devices which is a key priority for our research center. TASK 2: SOLAR ENERGY SPECTROSCOPY LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT (INSTRUMENTATION) This laboratory provides access to modern spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation for characterizing devices, materials and components on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds and for elucidating mechanisms. The goals of this congressionally directed project included the purchase and installation of spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation that would substantially and meaningfully enhance the capabilities of this laboratory. Some changes were made to the list of equipment proposed in the original budget. These changes did not represent a change in scope, approach or aims of this project. All of the capabilities and experiments represented in the original budget were maintained. The outcome of this Congressionally Directed Project has been the development of world-class fabrication and spectroscopy user facilities for solar fuels research at UNC-CH. This award has provided a significant augmentation of our pre-existing instrumentation capabilities which were funded by earlier UNC SERC projects, including the Energy Frontier

  3. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be developed and sold to the wholesale electricity market. • Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems – These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

  4. Contingency Analysis of Cascading Line Outage Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas L Baldwin; Magdy S Tawfik; Miles McQueen

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the US power systems continue to increase in size and complexity, including the growth of smart grids, larger blackouts due to cascading outages become more likely. Grid congestion is often associated with a cascading collapse leading to a major blackout. Such a collapse is characterized by a self-sustaining sequence of line outages followed by a topology breakup of the network. This paper addresses the implementation and testing of a process for N-k contingency analysis and sequential cascading outage simulation in order to identify potential cascading modes. A modeling approach described in this paper offers a unique capability to identify initiating events that may lead to cascading outages. It predicts the development of cascading events by identifying and visualizing potential cascading tiers. The proposed approach was implemented using a 328-bus simplified SERC power system network. The results of the study indicate that initiating events and possible cascading chains may be identified, ranked and visualized. This approach may be used to improve the reliability of a transmission grid and reduce its vulnerability to cascading outages.

  5. Hydrogen Technology and Energy Curriculum (HyTEC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagle, Barbara

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Hall of Science of the University of California, Berkeley has collaborated with scientists and engineers, a local transit agency, school districts, and a commercial curriculum publisher to develop, field-test nationally, and publish a two-week curriculum module on hydrogen and fuel cells for high school science. Key partners in this project are the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) of Humboldt State University, the Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), FilmSight Productions, Lab-Aids, Inc., and 32 teachers and 2,370 students in field-test classrooms in California, Connecticut, Ohio, New York, South Carolina, and Washington. Field-test teachers received two to three days of professional development before teaching the curriculum and providing feedback used for revision of the curriculum. The curriculum, titled Investigating Alternative Energy: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells and published by Lab-Aids, Inc., includes a teachers guide (with lesson plans, resources, and student handout pages), two interactive computer animations, a video, a website, and a laboratory materials kit. The project has been disseminated to over 950 teachers through awareness workshops at state, regional, and national science teacher conferences.

  6. Evaluation of Two CEDA Weatherization Pilot Implementations of an Exterior Insulation and Over-Clad Retrofit Strategy for Residential Masonry Buildings in Chicago

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, K.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examines the implementation of an exterior insulation and over-clad strategy for brick masonry buildings in Chicago. The strategy was implemented at a free-standing two story two-family dwelling and a larger free-standing multifamily building. The test homes selected for this research represent predominant housing types for the Chicago area. High heating energy use typical in these buildings threaten housing affordability. Uninsulated mass masonry wall assemblies also have a strongly detrimental impact on comfort. Significant changes to the performance of masonry wall assemblies is generally beyond the reach of typical weatherization (Wx) program resources. The Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County, Inc. (CEDA) has secured a Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) innovation grant sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). This grant provides CEDA the opportunity to pursue a pilot implementation of innovative approaches to retrofit in masonry wall enclosures. The exterior insulation and over-clad strategy implemented through this project was designed to allow implementation by contractors active in CEDA weatherization programs and using materials and methods familiar to these contractors. The retrofit measures are evaluated in terms of feasibility, cost and performance. Through observations of the strategies implemented, the research described in this report identifies measures critical to performance as well as conditions for wider adoption. The research also identifies common factors that must be considered in determining whether the exterior insulation and over-clad strategy is appropriate for the building.

  7. Addressing the challenges of plasma-surface interactions in NSTX-U*

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaita, Robert; Abrams, Tyler; Jaworski, Michael; Lucia, Matthew; Nichols, Jacob H.; Skinner, Charles H.; Stotler, Daren; Allain, Jean Paul; Bedoya, Felipe

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of conditioning plasma-facing components (PFCs) has long been recognized as a critical element in obtaining high-performance plasmas in magnetic confinement devices. Lithium coatings, for example, have been used for decades for conditioning PFCs. Since the initial studies on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, experiments on devices with different aspect ratios and magnetic geometries like the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) continue to show the relationship between lithium PFCs and good confinement and stability. While such results are promising, their empirical nature do not reflect the detailed relationship between PFCs and the dynamic conditions that occur in the tokamakmore »environment. A first step developing an understanding such complexity will be taken in the upgrade to NSTX (NSTX-U) that is nearing completion. New measurement capabilities include the Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) for in situ surface analysis of samples exposed to tokamak plasmas. The OEDGE suite of codes, for example, will provide a new way to model the underlying mechanisms for such material migration in NSTX-U. This will lead to a better understanding of how plasma-facing surfaces evolve during a shot, and how the composition of the plasma facing surface influences the discharge performance we observe. This paper will provide an overview of these capabilities, and highlight their importance for NSTX-U plans to transition from carbon to high-Z PFCs.« less

  8. Addressing the challenges of plasma-surface interactions in NSTX-U*

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaita, Robert [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Abrams, Tyler [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Jaworski, Michael [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lucia, Matthew [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Nichols, Jacob H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Skinner, Charles H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Stotler, Daren [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Allain, Jean Paul [University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Bedoya, Felipe [University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of conditioning plasma-facing components (PFCs) has long been recognized as a critical element in obtaining high-performance plasmas in magnetic confinement devices. Lithium coatings, for example, have been used for decades for conditioning PFCs. Since the initial studies on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, experiments on devices with different aspect ratios and magnetic geometries like the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) continue to show the relationship between lithium PFCs and good confinement and stability. While such results are promising, their empirical nature do not reflect the detailed relationship between PFCs and the dynamic conditions that occur in the tokamak environment. A first step developing an understanding such complexity will be taken in the upgrade to NSTX (NSTX-U) that is nearing completion. New measurement capabilities include the Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) for in situ surface analysis of samples exposed to tokamak plasmas. The OEDGE suite of codes, for example, will provide a new way to model the underlying mechanisms for such material migration in NSTX-U. This will lead to a better understanding of how plasma-facing surfaces evolve during a shot, and how the composition of the plasma facing surface influences the discharge performance we observe. This paper will provide an overview of these capabilities, and highlight their importance for NSTX-U plans to transition from carbon to high-Z PFCs.

  9. StreamNet; Northwest Aquatic Information Network, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Bruce (Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Portland, OR); Roger, Phil (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Butterfield, Bart (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    StreamNet is a cooperative data compilation, development, and distribution project involving the state, tribal and federal fish and wildlife agencies in the Columbia River basin. It is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through the Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), and is administered by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). The project is organized to perform three broad functions: Agency support: The project supports staff in the Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington state fish and wildlife agencies; the Columbia River Inter Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC); and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) who locate, obtain, quality check and format specific types of fish related data. They convert these data into a standard data exchange format (DEF) and submit them, with references, to the regional StreamNet office. Regional Support: The regional component of StreamNet at PSMFC administers the project, coordinates with the FWP and other regional entities, and disseminates data regionally. As data are received from cooperators they are again quality checked then imported into the StreamNet database. Access to the data is provided on-line via a tabular data query system and interactive map applications at www.streamnet.org. The web site also provides access to independent data sets from other projects, pre-sorted data sets useful for specific purposes (such as for a recent pesticide spraying ruling or subbasin assessments), and general fish information for education purposes. Reference Support: The StreamNet Library, located at CRITFC, maintains access to all reference documents supporting the data in the StreamNet database, and provides full library services for patrons interested in fish and wildlife in the Pacific Northwest. The StreamNet Library also maintains probably the largest collection of agency gray literature related to fish and wildlife resources in the basin. The library participates in the Inter Library Loan program, and can exchange literature worldwide. This report summarizes StreamNet Project activities during fiscal year 2004 (FY-04). Detailed descriptions of accomplishments by individual objective and task are provided in the Project's quarterly progress reports, available on the reports and publications page of the StreamNet web site.

  10. Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

  11. The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty [Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

    2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The UBNPMEP is coordinated with two Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) research projects that also monitor and evaluate the success of the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. This project deals with the natural production component of the plan, and the ODFW projects evaluate hatchery operations (project No. 1990-005-00, Umatilla Hatchery M & E) and smolt outmigration (project No. 1989-024-01, Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River). Collectively these three projects monitor and evaluate natural and hatchery salmonid production in the Umatilla River Basin. The need for natural production monitoring has been identified in multiple planning documents including Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Volume I, 5b-13 (CRITFC 1996), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), the Umatilla Basin Annual Operation Plan, the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (CTUIR & ODFW 2001), the Subbasin Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 2004), and the Comprehensive Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 2006). Natural production monitoring and evaluation is also consistent with Section III, Basinwide Provisions, Strategy 9 of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, NPCC 2004). The Umatilla Basin M&E plan developed along with efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), and enhance summer steelhead (O. mykiss). The need for restoration began with agricultural development in the early 1900's that extirpated salmon and reduced steelhead runs (Bureau of Reclamation, BOR 1988). The most notable development was the construction and operation of Three Mile Falls Dam (TMD) and other irrigation projects which dewatered the Umatilla River during salmon migrations. CTUIR and ODFW developed the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan to restore fisheries to the basin. The plan was completed in 1990 and included the following objectives which were updated in 1999: (1) Establish hatchery and natural runs of Chinook and coho salmon. (2) Enhance existing summer steelhead populations through a hatchery program. (3) Provide sustainable tribal and non-tribal harvest of salmon and steelhead. (4) Maintain the genetic characteristics of salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. (5) Increase annual returns to Three Mile Falls Dam to 31,500 adult salmon and steelhead. In the past the M&E project conducted long-term monitoring activities as well as two and three-year projects that address special needs for adaptive management. Examples of these projects include adult passage evaluations, habitat assessment surveys (Contor et al. 1995, Contor et al. 1996, Contor et al. 1997, Contor et al. 1998), and genetic monitoring (Currens & Schreck 1995, Narum et al. 2004). The project's goal is to provide quality information to managers and researchers working to restore anadromous salmonids to the Umatilla River Basin. The status of completion of each of BPA's standardized work element was reported in 'Pisces'(March 2008) and is summarized.

  12. Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

  13. Spinning Reserve From Responsive Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.J.

    2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Responsive load is the most underutilized reliability resource available to the power system today. It is currently not used at all to provide spinning reserve. Historically there were good reasons for this, but recent technological advances in communications and controls have provided new capabilities and eliminated many of the old obstacles. North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC), Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Northeast Power Coordinating Council (NPCC), New York State Reliability Council (NYSRC), and New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) rules are beginning to recognize these changes and are starting to encourage responsive load provision of reliability services. The Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostats provide an example of these technological advances. This is a technology aimed at reducing summer peak demand through central control of residential and small commercial air-conditioning loads. It is being utilized by Long Island Power Authority (LIPA), Consolidated Edison (ConEd), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). The technology is capable of delivering even greater response in the faster spinning reserve time frame (while still providing peak reduction). Analysis of demand reduction testing results from LIPA during the summer of 2002 provides evidence to back up this claim. It also demonstrates that loads are different from generators and that the conventional wisdom, which advocates for starting with large loads as better ancillary service providers, is flawed. The tempting approach of incrementally adapting ancillary service requirements, which were established when generators were the only available resources, will not work. While it is easier for most generators to provide replacement power and non-spinning reserve (the slower response services) than it is to supply spinning reserve (the fastest service), the opposite is true for many loads. Also, there is more financial reward for supplying spinning reserve than for supplying the other reserve services as a result of the higher spinning reserve prices. The LIPAedge program (LIPA's demand reduction program using Carrier ComfortChoice thermostats) provides an opportunity to test the use of responsive load for spinning reserve. With potentially 75 MW of spinning reserve capability already installed, this test program can also make an important contribution to the capacity needs of Long Island during the summer of 2003. Testing could also be done at ConEd ({approx}30 MW), SCE ({approx}15 MW), and/or SDG&E ({approx}15 MW). This paper is divided into six chapters. Chapter 2 discusses the contingency reserve ancillary services, their functions in supporting power system reliability, and their technical requirements. It also discusses the policy and tariff requirements and attempts to distinguish between ones that are genuinely necessary and ones that are artifacts of the technologies that were historically used to provide the services. Chapter 3 discusses how responsive load could provide contingency reserves (especially spinning reserve) for the power system. Chapter 4 specifically discusses the Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostat technology, the LIPAedge experience with that technology, and how the technology could be used to supply spinning reserve. Chapter 5 discusses a number of unresolved issues and suggests areas for further research. Chapter 6 offers conclusions and recommendations.

  14. Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) - Year 5 : Annual Report for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marmorek, David R.; Porter, Marc; Pickard, Darcy; Wieckowski, Katherine

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) is a coordinated effort to improve the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key monitoring and evaluation questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP was initiated by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) in October 2003. The project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program (NPCC). CSMEP is a major effort of the federal state and Tribal fish and wildlife managers to develop regionally integrated monitoring and evaluation (M&E) across the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP has focused its work on five monitoring domains: status and trends monitoring of populations and action effectiveness monitoring of habitat, harvest, hatcheries, and the hydrosystem. CSMEP's specific goals are to: (1) interact with federal, state and tribal programmatic and technical entities responsible for M&E of fish and wildlife, to ensure that work plans developed and executed under this project are well integrated with ongoing work by these entities; (2) document, integrate, and make available existing monitoring data on listed salmon, steelhead, bull trout and other fish species of concern; (3) critically assess strengths and weaknesses of these data for answering key monitoring questions; and (4) collaboratively design, implement and evaluate improved M&E methods with other programmatic entities in the Pacific Northwest. During FY2008 CSMEP biologists continued their reviews of the strengths and weaknesses (S&W) of existing subbasin inventory data for addressing monitoring questions about population status and trends at different spatial and temporal scales. Work was focused on Lower Columbia Chinook and steelhead, Snake River fall Chinook, Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and steelhead, and Middle Columbia River Chinook and steelhead. These FY2008 data assessments and others assembled over the years of the CSMEP project can be accessed on the CBFWA public website. The CSMEP web database (http://csmep.streamnet.org/) houses metadata inventories from S&W assessments of Columbia River Basin watersheds that were completed prior to FY2008. These older S&W assessments are maintained by StreamNet, but budget cutbacks prevented us from adding the new FY2008 assessments into the database. Progress was made in FY2008 on CSMEP's goals of collaborative design of improved M&E methods. CSMEP convened two monitoring design workshops in Portland (December 5 and 6, 2007 and February 11 and 12, 2008) to continue exploration of how best to integrate the most robust features of existing M&E programs with new approaches. CSMEP continued to build on this information to develop improved designs and analytical tools for monitoring the status and trends of fish populations and the effectiveness of hatchery and hydrosystem recovery actions within the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP did not do any new work on habitat or harvest effectiveness monitoring designs in FY2008 due to budget cutbacks. CSMEP presented the results of the Snake Basin Pilot Study to the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) in Portland on December 7, 2008. This study is the finalization of CSMEP's pilot exercise of developing design alternatives across different M&E domains within the Snake River Basin spring/summer Chinook ESU. This work has been summarized in two linked reports (CSMEP 2007a and CSMEP 2007b). CSMEP participants presented many of the analyses developed for the Snake Basin Pilot work at the Western Division American Fisheries Society (AFS) conference in Portland on May 4 to 7, 2008. For the AFS conference CSMEP organized a symposium on regional monitoring and evaluation approaches. A presentation on CSMEP's Cost Integration Database Tool and Salmon Viability Monitoring Simulation Model developed for the Snake Basin Pilot Study was also given to the Pacific Northwest Aquatic monitoring Partnership (PNAMP) stee

  15. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVI : Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the University of Washington developed a new statistical model to analyze the combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged salmon migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine), has been used to estimate survival and transportation effects on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin from 1996 to 2003. Those results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on both a systemwide basis, incorporating all transport dams analyzed, and a dam-specific basis. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 5,000 tagged smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few tagged hatchery steelhead were transported in these years, no transportation effects are estimated for steelhead. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.71% with a standard error (SE) of 0.18% for spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2003, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. For summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin, the estimates of annual SAR averaged 1.15% (SE=0.31%). Only for the release years 1999 and 2000 did the Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for hatchery steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.45% (SE=0.11%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2003. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2003), it was estimated that on average approximately 86% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook, and 74% for steelhead, occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the systemwide T/I are weighted averages of the dam-specific T/I ratios for each transport dam (with {ge} 5,000 tagged fish transported), weighted by the probabilities of being transported at each dam. The systemwide T/I compares the observed SAR under the existing transportation system with the expected SAR if the transportation system had not been operated. Estimates of 1.0 indicate that the systemwide transportation program has no effect on SAR, while estimates > 1.0 indicate that the transportation program increases SAR. Excluding the 2001 release group, the geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.15 (SE=0.03) for release years 1997 through 2003. The geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.28 (SE=0.13) for release years 1997 through 2000 and 2003. Estimates were much higher for the 2001 release groups. These estimates reflect transportation from Lower Granite and/or Little Goose for most release years, depending on the number of tagged smolts actually transported at each dam during each release year. Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of post-Bonneville survival to Lower Granite Dam of transported fish to that of nontransported ('inriver') fish. Excluding the 2001 release year, the geometric mean of the D estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin

  16. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

    2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos