National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for maos sbs s2

  1. Nucleon form factors program with SBS at JLAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-12-01

    The physics of the nucleon form factors is the basic part of the Jefferson Laboratory program. We review the achievements of the 6-GeV era and the program with the 12- GeV beam with the SBS spectrometer in Hall A, with a focus on the nucleon ground state properties.

  2. Evidence that formulations of the selective MAO-B inhibitor, selegiline, which bypass first-pass metabolism, also inhibit MAO-A in the human brain

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D.; Shumay, Elena; McCall-Perez, Fred; Gilmor, Michelle; Jayne, Millard; Wang, Gene-Jack; Alexoff, David L.; Apelskog-Torres, Karen; et al

    2015-10-29

    Selegiline (L-deprenyl) is a selective, irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) at the conventional dose (10 mg/day oral) that is used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. However, controlled studies have demonstrated antidepressant activity for high doses of oral selegiline and for transdermal selegiline suggesting that when plasma levels of selegiline are elevated, brain MAO-A might also be inhibited. Zydis selegiline (Zelapar®) is an orally disintegrating formulation of selegiline, which is absorbed through the buccal mucosa producing higher plasma levels of selegiline and reduced amphetamine metabolites compared to equal doses of conventional selegiline. Although there is indirect evidence thatmore » Zydis selegiline at high doses loses its selectivity for MAO-B, there is no direct evidence that it also inhibits brain MAO-A in humans. We measured brain MAO-A in 18 healthy men after a 28-day treatment with Zydis selegiline (2.5, 5.0, or 10 mg/day) and in 3 subjects receiving the selegiline transdermal system (Emsam patch, 6 mg/day) using PET and the MAO-A radiotracer [¹¹C]clorgyline. We also measured dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in three subjects from the 10 mg group. The 10 mg Zydis selegiline dose significantly inhibited MAO-A (36.9 ± 19.7%, range 11–70%, p<0.007)) but not DAT; and while Emsam also inhibited MAO-A (33.2 ± 28.9 (range 9-68%) the difference did not reach significance (p=0.10)) presumably because of the small sample size. Our results provide the first direct evidence of brain MAO-A inhibition in humans by formulations of selegiline, which are currently postulated but not verified to target brain MAO-A in addition to MAO-B.« less

  3. Evidence that formulations of the selective MAO-B inhibitor, selegiline, which bypass first-pass metabolism, also inhibit MAO-A in the human brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D.; Shumay, Elena; McCall-Perez, Fred; Gilmor, Michelle; Jayne, Millard; Wang, Gene-Jack; Alexoff, David L.; Apelskog-Torres, Karen; Hubbard, Barbara; Carter, Pauline; King, Payton; Fahn, Stanley; Telang, Frank; Shea, Colleen; Xu, Youwen; Muench, Lisa

    2015-10-29

    Selegiline (L-deprenyl) is a selective, irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) at the conventional dose (10 mg/day oral) that is used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. However, controlled studies have demonstrated antidepressant activity for high doses of oral selegiline and for transdermal selegiline suggesting that when plasma levels of selegiline are elevated, brain MAO-A might also be inhibited. Zydis selegiline (Zelapar®) is an orally disintegrating formulation of selegiline, which is absorbed through the buccal mucosa producing higher plasma levels of selegiline and reduced amphetamine metabolites compared to equal doses of conventional selegiline. Although there is indirect evidence that Zydis selegiline at high doses loses its selectivity for MAO-B, there is no direct evidence that it also inhibits brain MAO-A in humans. We measured brain MAO-A in 18 healthy men after a 28-day treatment with Zydis selegiline (2.5, 5.0, or 10 mg/day) and in 3 subjects receiving the selegiline transdermal system (Emsam patch, 6 mg/day) using PET and the MAO-A radiotracer [¹¹C]clorgyline. We also measured dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in three subjects from the 10 mg group. The 10 mg Zydis selegiline dose significantly inhibited MAO-A (36.9 ± 19.7%, range 11–70%, p<0.007)) but not DAT; and while Emsam also inhibited MAO-A (33.2 ± 28.9 (range 9-68%) the difference did not reach significance (p=0.10)) presumably because of the small sample size. Our results provide the first direct evidence of brain MAO-A inhibition in humans by formulations of selegiline, which are currently postulated but not verified to target brain MAO-A in addition to MAO-B.

  4. All solid-state SBS phase conjugate mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.

    1999-03-09

    A stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugate laser mirror uses a solid-state nonlinear gain medium instead of the conventional liquid or high pressure gas medium. The concept has been effectively demonstrated using common optical-grade fused silica. An energy threshold of 2.5 mJ and a slope efficiency of over 90% were achieved, resulting in an overall energy reflectivity of >80% for 15 ns, 1 um laser pulses. The use of solid-state materials is enabled by a multi-pass resonant architecture which suppresses transient fluctuations that would otherwise result in damage to the SBS medium. This all solid state phase conjugator is safer, more reliable, and more easily manufactured than prior art designs. It allows nonlinear wavefront correction to be implemented in industrial and defense laser systems whose operating environments would preclude the introduction of potentially hazardous liquids or high pressure gases. 8 figs.

  5. All solid-state SBS phase conjugate mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, Clifford B. (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugate laser mirror uses a solid-state nonlinear gain medium instead of the conventional liquid or high pressure gas medium. The concept has been effectively demonstrated using common optical-grade fused silica. An energy threshold of 2.5 mJ and a slope efficiency of over 90% were achieved, resulting in an overall energy reflectivity of >80% for 15 ns, 1 um laser pulses. The use of solid-state materials is enabled by a multi-pass resonant architecture which suppresses transient fluctuations that would otherwise result in damage to the SBS medium. This all solid state phase conjugator is safer, more reliable, and more easily manufactured than prior art designs. It allows nonlinear wavefront correction to be implemented in industrial and defense laser systems whose operating environments would preclude the introduction of potentially hazardous liquids or high pressure gases.

  6. Properties of dark solitons under SBS in focused beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bel'dyugin, Igor' M; Erokhin, A I; Efimkov, V F; Zubarev, I G; Mikhailov, S I

    2012-12-31

    Using the method of four-wave probing of the waist of the laser beam focused into the bulk of a short active medium (L || {tau}c, where L is the length of the active medium, {tau} is the pulse duration, and c is the speed of light), we have studied the dynamics of the behaviour of a dark soliton, appearing upon a jump of the input Stokes signal phase by about {pi} under SBS. The computer simulation has shown that when spontaneous noises with the gain increment {Gamma}, exceeding the self-reflection threshold by 2 - 3 times, are generated, the dark soliton propagates along the interaction region for the time t Almost-Equal-To T{sub 2}{Gamma}{sub th}/2, where T{sub 2} is the the lifetime of acoustic phonons, and {Gamma}{sub th} = 25 - 30 is the stationary threshold gain increment. (special issue devoted to the 90th anniversary of n.g. basov)

  7. LANL/Green Star Tests of the Green Star SBS-60 Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. E. Sampson; D. T. Vo; T. L. Cremers; P. A. Hypes; Y. P. Seldiakov; A. B. Dorin; M. V. Kondrashov; V. I. Timoshin

    2001-06-01

    We report on joint testing of the Russian-designed and manufactured single board spectrometer SBS-60 from Green Star Ltd. of Moscow. The SBS-60 will be used to make material control and accountability measurements on plutonium in the Russian plutonium disposition program. We compared three SBS-60 units of two different designs with three commonly used commercial US data acquisition systems by making measurements with three different HPGe detector systems. The measurements were performed to test if the gamma-ray spectral data of plutonium samples from the SBS-60 was suitable for analysis for the isotopic composition of plutonium using the Los Alamos FRAM isotopic analysis software. Each detector fed its signal to two data acquisition systems, one SBS-60 and one commercial US system. The data from the two systems were analyzed by FRAM and compared. In addition, we characterized the throughput, resolution, and stability of the SBS-60 data acquisition system in comparison with the commercial US systems. This report presents detailed results of all the tests performed.

  8. Large size GEM for Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) polarimeter for Hall A 12GeV program at JLab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Sacher, Seth; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    We report on the R&D effort in the design and construction of a large size GEM chamber for the Proton Polarimeter of the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab). The SBS Polarimeter trackers consist of two sets of four large chambers of size 200 cm x 60 cm2. Each chamber is a vertical stack of four GEM modules with an active area of 60 cm x 50 cm. We have built and tested several GEM modules and we describe in this paper the design and construction of the final GEM as well as the preliminary results on performances from tests carried out in our detector lab and with test beams at (Fermilab).

  9. Large size GEM for Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) polarimeter for Hall A 12GeV program at JLab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Sacher, Seth; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    We report on the R&D effort in the design and construction of a large size GEM chamber for the Proton Polarimeter of the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab). The SBS Polarimeter trackers consist of two sets of four large chambers of size 200 cm x 60 cm2. Each chamber is a vertical stack of four GEM modules with an active area of 60 cm x 50 cm. We have built and tested several GEM modules and we describe in this paper the design and construction of the final GEM as well asmore » the preliminary results on performances from tests carried out in our detector lab and with test beams at (Fermilab).« less

  10. DOE/EIS-0283-S2

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE/EIS-0283-S2 April 2015 Volume 2 (Appendices A through L) Final Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement U.S. Department of Energy Office of Material Management and Minimization and Office of Environmental Management Washington, DC AVAILABILITY OF THE FINAL SURPLUS PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION SUPPLEMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT (SPD Supplemental EIS) For further information on this SPD Supplemental EIS, or to request a copy, please contact: Sachiko McAlhany,

  11. DOE/EIS-0283-S2

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    DOE/EIS-0283-S2 April 2015 Volume 2 (Appendices A through L) Final Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement U.S. Department of Energy Office of Material Management and Minimization and Office of Environmental Management Washington, DC AVAILABILITY OF THE FINAL SURPLUS PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION SUPPLEMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT (SPD Supplemental EIS) For further information on this SPD Supplemental EIS, or to request a copy, please contact: Sachiko

  12. TIME DELAY AND ACCRETION DISK SIZE MEASUREMENTS IN THE LENSED QUASAR SBS 0909+532 FROM MULTIWAVELENGTH MICROLENSING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hainline, Laura J.; Morgan, Christopher W.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Landaal, Zachary D. [Department of Physics, United States Naval Academy, 572C Holloway Rd, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States); Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy [United States Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 West Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001-8521 (United States); Goicoechea, L. J.; Shalyapin, V. N. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, Avda. de Los Castros s/n, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Falco, Emilio E., E-mail: hainline@usna.edu, E-mail: cmorgan@usna.edu, E-mail: macleod@usna.edu, E-mail: m123894@usna.edu, E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: trudy@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: goicol@unican.es, E-mail: vshal@ukr.net, E-mail: falco@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    We present three complete seasons and two half-seasons of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) r-band photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasar SBS 0909+532 from the U.S. Naval Observatory, as well as two seasons each of SDSS g-band and r-band monitoring from the Liverpool Robotic Telescope. Using Monte Carlo simulations to simultaneously measure the system's time delay and model the r-band microlensing variability, we confirm and significantly refine the precision of the system's time delay to {Delta}t{sub AB} = 50{sub -4}{sup +2} days, where the stated uncertainties represent the bounds of the formal 1{sigma} confidence interval. There may be a conflict between the time delay measurement and a lens consisting of a single galaxy. While models based on the Hubble Space Telescope astrometry and a relatively compact stellar distribution can reproduce the observed delay, the models have somewhat less dark matter than we would typically expect. We also carry out a joint analysis of the microlensing variability in the r and g bands to constrain the size of the quasar's continuum source at these wavelengths, obtaining log {l_brace}(r{sub s,r}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 15.3 {+-} 0.3 and log {l_brace}(r{sub s,g}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 14.8 {+-} 0.9, respectively. Our current results do not formally constrain the temperature profile of the accretion disk but are consistent with the expectations of standard thin disk theory.

  13. EIS-0158-S2: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -S2: Record of Decision EIS-0158-S2: Record of Decision Sale of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California The Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing this...

  14. EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Disposition of Certain Plutonium Materials Stored at the Savannah River Site For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http://energy.gov/node/299815. Download Document PDF icon EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination More Documents & Publications EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Second Amended Notice of Intent

  15. EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Preferred Alternative | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Notice of Preferred Alternative EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Preferred Alternative Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement The U.S. Department of...

  16. EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS), DOEEIS-0283-S2. DOE is evaluating, among many other things,...

  17. EIS-0082-S2: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Impact Statement EIS-0082-S2: Draft Environmental Impact Statement The Department of Energy (DOE) limits electronic access to certain NEPA documents on this website due to the...

  18. EIS-0236-S2: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on: (1) wheter to proceed with a Modern Pit Facility (MPF); and (2) if so, where to locate a MPF. EIS-0236-S2-DEIS-Summary-200...

  19. EIS-0236-S2: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on: (1) whether to proceed with a Modern Pit Facility (MPF); and (2) if so, where to locate a MPF. EIS-0236-S2-DEIS-Summary-200...

  20. EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http:energy.govnode299815. Download Document PDF icon EIS-0283-S2: Interim...

  1. EA-1440-S2: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    S2: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1440-S2: Final Environmental Assessment National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site at Golden Colorado Supplement 2 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing an action (the Proposed Action) consisting of the construction and operation of the following five site development projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) South Table Mountain (STM) site at Golden, Colorado: The Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF),

  2. EIS-0026-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0026-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Carlsbad Area Office, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase SEIS-II evaluates environmental impacts resulting from the various treatment options; the transportation of TRU waste to WIPP using truck, a combination of truck and regular rail service, and a combination of truck and dedicated rail service; and the disposal of this waste in the repository. Evaluated

  3. EIS-0082-S2: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Record of Decision EIS-0082-S2: Record of Decision Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives, Aiken, South Carolina The Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (Salt Processing SEIS, DOE/EIS-0082-S2) considered alternatives for separating the high-activity fraction from the low- activity fraction of the high-level radioactive salt waste now stored in underground tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on

  4. EIS-0236-S2: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy S2: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0236-S2: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Stockpile Stewardship and Management for a Modern Pit Facility DOE's NNSA is responsible for the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, including production readiness required to maintain that stockpile. Pursuant to National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, NNSA has prepared a Supplement to the

  5. EIS-0283-S2: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Impact Statement | Department of Energy 83-S2: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0283-S2: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Summary This Supplemental EIS (SEIS) analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with changes to the surplus plutonium disposition program, including changes to the inventory of surplus plutonium and proposed new alternatives. The Final SEIS does not identify a preferred

  6. EIS-0082-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0082-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Savannah River Site Salt Processing This SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for separating the high-activity fraction from the low-activity fraction of the high-level radioactive waste salt solutions now stored in underground tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The high-activity fraction of the high-level

  7. EIS-0283-S2: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0283-S2: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Surplus Plutonium Disposition This Draft SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for disposition of 13.1 metric tons (14.4 tons) of surplus plutonium for which DOE has not made a disposition decision, including 7.1 metric tons (7.8 tons) of plutonium from pits that were declared excess to national defense needs after publication of the 2007

  8. Superconductivity versus structural phase transition in the closely related Bi2Rh3.5S2 and Bi2Rh3S2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; Xie, Weiwei; Lin, Qisheng; Taufour, Valentin; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Miller, Gordon J.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-05-19

    Single crystals of Bi2Rh3S2 and Bi2Rh3.5S2 were synthesized by solution growth, and the crystal structures and thermodynamic and transport properties of both compounds were studied. In the case of Bi2Rh3S2, a structural first-order transition at around 165 K is identified by single-crystal diffraction experiments, with clear signatures visible in resistivity, magnetization, and specific heat data. No superconducting transition for Bi2Rh3S2 was observed down to 0.5 K. In contrast, no structural phase transition at high temperature was observed for Bi2Rh3.5S2; however, bulk superconductivity with a critical temperature, Tc ≈ 1.7 K, was observed. The Sommerfeld coefficient γ and the Debye temperaturemore » (ΘD) were found to be 9.41 mJ mol–1K–2 and 209 K, respectively, for Bi2Rh3S2, and 22 mJ mol–1K–2 and 196 K, respectively, for Bi2Rh3.5S2. As a result, the study of the specific heat in the superconducting state of Bi2Rh3.5S2 suggests that Bi2Rh3.5S2 is a weakly coupled, BCS superconductor.« less

  9. Defects Engineered Monolayer MoS2 for Improved Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ye, Gonglan; Gong, Yongji; Lin, Junhao; Li, Bo; He, Yongmin; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Zhou, Wu; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2016-01-13

    MoS2 is a promising, low-cost material for electrochemical hydrogen production due to its high activity and stability during the reaction. Our work represents an easy method to increase the hydrogen production in electrochemical reaction of MoS2 via defect engineering, and helps to understand the catalytic properties of MoS2.

  10. EIS-0283-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy 283-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0283-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Surplus Plutonium Disposition For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http://energy.gov/node/299815. Download Document PDF icon EIS-0283-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement More

  11. EIS-0283-S2: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy -S2: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0283-S2: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Surplus Plutonium Disposition The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces the availability of the Draft Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD Supplemental EIS; DOE/EIS-0283-S2) for public comment. DOE also is

  12. EIS-0283-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on this project, see the project webpage: http:energy.govnode299815. Download Document EIS-0283-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact...

  13. EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http:energy.govnode299815. Download Document EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental...

  14. Raman vibrational spectra of bulk to monolayer Re S 2 with lower...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Raman vibrational spectra of bulk to monolayer Re S 2 with lower symmetry Authors: Feng, Yanqing ; Zhou, Wei ; Wang, Yaojia ; Zhou, Jian ; Liu, Erfu ; Fu, Yajun ; Ni, ...

  15. EIS-0283-S2: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EIS; DOEEIS-0283-S2) for public comment. DOE also is announcing the dates, times and locations for pulic hearings to receive comments on the Draft SPD Supplemental...

  16. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http:energy.govnode299815. Download Document EIS-0283-S2: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of...

  17. EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Extension of Public Review and Comment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NM. For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http:energy.govnode299815. Download Document EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Extension of Public Review and Comment...

  18. Low-dimensional hyperthin FeS2 nanostructures for efficient and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jasion, Daniel; Qiao, Qiao; Barforoush, Joseph M.; Zhu, Yimei; Ren, Shenqiang; Leonard, Kevin C.

    2015-10-05

    We report a scalable, solution-processing method for synthesizing low-dimensional hyperthin FeS2 nanostructures, and we show that 2D FeS2 disc nanostructures are an efficient and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst. By changing the Fe:S ratio in the precursor solution, we were able to preferentially synthesize either 1D wire or 2D disc nanostructures. The 2D FeS2 disc structure has the highest electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction, comparable to platinum in neutral pH conditions. Moreover, the ability of the FeS2 nanostructures to generate hydrogen was confirmed by scanning electrochemical microscopy, and the 2D disc nanostructures were able to generate hydrogen for overmore » 125 h.« less

  19. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DOEEIS-0369) (November 2006 - 71 FR 65785) More Documents & Publications EIS-0250-S1: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional Public Meeting EIS-0250-S2 and...

  20. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca...

  1. Materials Data on FeS2 (SG:205) by Materials Project (Dataset) | Data

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Explorer FeS2 (SG:205) by Materials Project Title: Materials Data on FeS2 (SG:205) by Materials Project Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations Authors: Kristin Persson Publication Date: 2014-11-02 OSTI Identifier: 1183906 Report Number(s): mp-226 DOE Contract

  2. EIS-0082-S2: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amended Record of Decision EIS-0082-S2: Amended Record of Decision Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives The Department of Energy (DOE), pursuant to 10 CFR 1021.315, is amending its Record of Decision: Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives issued on October 17, 2001 (66 FR 52752). At that time the Department decided to implement the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) technology, one of the alternative technologies evaluated in DOE/EIS- 0082-S2 (Savannah River Site Salt

  3. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement and Conduct Additional Public Scoping | Department of Energy 283-S2: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement and Conduct Additional Public Scoping EIS-0283-S2: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement and Conduct Additional Public Scoping Surplus Plutonium Disposition The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to modify the

  4. EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Statement | Department of Energy 283-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Surplus Plutonium Disposition at the Savannah River Site The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) intends to prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of plutonium disposition capabilities that would be constructed and

  5. EIS-0283-S2: Second Amended Notice of Intent | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Second Amended Notice of Intent EIS-0283-S2: Second Amended Notice of Intent Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to modify the scope of the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD Supplemental EIS, DOE/EIS-0283-S2) and to conduct additional public scoping. DOE issued its Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare the SPD Supplemental EIS on March 28, 2007, and issued an

  6. Constraining the range of Yukawa gravity interaction from S2 star orbits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borka, D.; Jovanovi?, V. Borka; Jovanovi?, P.; Zakharov, A.F. E-mail: pjovanovic@aob.rs E-mail: zakharov@itep.ru

    2013-11-01

    We consider possible signatures for Yukawa gravity within the Galactic Central Parsec, based on our analysis of the S2 star orbital precession around the massive compact dark object at the Galactic Centre, and on the comparisons between the simulated orbits in Yukawa gravity and two independent sets of observations. Our simulations resulted in strong constraints on the range of Yukawa interaction ? and showed that its most probable value in the case of S2 star is around 5000 - 7000 AU. At the same time, we were not able to obtain reliable constrains on the universal constant ? of Yukawa gravity, because the current observations of S2 star indicated that it may be highly correlated with parameter ? in the range (0 < ? < 1). For ? > 2 they are not correlated. However, the same universal constant which was successfully applied to clusters of galaxies and rotation curves of spiral galaxies (? = 1/3) also gives a satisfactory agreement with the observed orbital precession of the S2 star, and in that case the most probable value for the scale parameter is ? ? 30001500 AU. Also, the Yukawa gravity potential induces precession of S2 star orbit in the same direction as General Relativity for ? > 0 and for ? < ?1, and in the opposite direction for ?1 < ? < 0. The future observations with advanced facilities, such as GRAVITY or/and European Extremely Large Telescope, are needed in order to verify these claims.

  7. Controlling the metal to semiconductor transition of MoS2 and WS2 in solution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chou, Stanley Shihyao; Yi-Kai Huang; Kim, Jaemyung; Kaehr, Bryan James; Foley, Brian M.; Lu, Ping; Conner Dykstra; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Jiaxing Huang; et al

    2015-01-22

    Lithiation-exfoliation produces single to few-layered MoS2 and WS2 sheets dispersible in water. However, the process transforms them from the pristine semiconducting 2H phase to a distorted metallic phase. Recovery of the semiconducting properties typically involves heating of the chemically exfoliated sheets at elevated temperatures. Therefore, it has been largely limited to sheets deposited on solid substrates. We report the dispersion of chemically exfoliated MoS2 sheets in high boiling point organic solvents enabled by surface functionalization and the controllable recovery of their semiconducting properties directly in solution. Ultimately, this process connects the scalability of chemical exfoliation with the simplicity of solutionmore » processing, enabling a facile method for tuning the metal to semiconductor transitions of MoS2 and WS2 within a liquid medium.« less

  8. Rapid first-cycle lithiation strategy for enhanced performance of Li-MoS2

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    batteries as identified by in situ studies. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Rapid first-cycle lithiation strategy for enhanced performance of Li-MoS2 batteries as identified by in situ studies. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rapid first-cycle lithiation strategy for enhanced performance of Li-MoS2 batteries as identified by in situ studies. Abstract not provided. Authors: Jiayu Wan ; Wenzhong Bao ; Yang Liu ; Jiaqi Dai ; Fei Shen ; Lihui Zhou ; Xinghan Cai ; Dan Urban ;

  9. Site-dependent free energy barrier for proton reduction on MoS2 edges

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Site-dependent free energy barrier for proton reduction on MoS2 edges Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Site-dependent free energy barrier for proton reduction on MoS2 edges Authors: Choi, W ; Wood, B C ; Schwegler, E ; Ogitsu, T Publication Date: 2013-05-30 OSTI Identifier: 1113397 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-639087 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry C,

  10. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Amended Notice of Intent To Expand the Scope of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy S2 and EIS-0369: Amended Notice of Intent To Expand the Scope of the Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Amended Notice of Intent To Expand the Scope of the Environmental Impact Statement Alignment, Construction, and Operation of a Rail Line to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada The Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) is providing this Amended Notice of Intent to expand the scope

  11. Gas-to-cluster effects in S 2p-excited SF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flesch, Roman; Serdaroglu, Ertugrul; Ruehl, Eckart; Brykalova, Xenia O.; Kan, Elena I.; Klyushina, Ekaterina S.; Krivosenko, Yuri S.; Pavlychev, Andrey A.

    2013-04-14

    High resolution X-ray spectroscopic studies on free SF{sub 6} molecules and SF{sub 6} clusters near the S 2p ionization thresholds are reported. Spectral changes occurring in clusters for the intense molecular-like S 2p{sub 1/2,3/2}{yields} 6a{sub 1g}-, 2t{sub 2g}-, and 4e{sub g}-resonances are examined in detail. Neither gas-to-cluster spectral shifts nor changes in peak shape are observed for the pre-edge 6a{sub 1g}-band. Significant changes in band shape and distinct gas-to-cluster shifts occur in the S 2p{sub 1/2,3/2}{yields} 2t{sub 2g}- and 4e{sub g}-transitions. These are found in the S 2p-ionization continua. The quasiatomic approach is used to assign the experimental results. It is shown that a convolution of asymmetric and symmetric contributions from Lorentzian and Gaussian line shapes allows us to model the spectral distribution of oscillator strength for the S 2p{sub 1/2,3/2}{yields} 2t{sub 2g}-, and 4e{sub g}-transitions. The asymmetry is due to trapping of the photoelectron within the finite size potential barrier. The Lorentzian contribution is found to be dominating in the line shape of the S 2p{yields} 2t{sub 2g}- and 4e{sub g}-bands. The spectroscopic parameters of the spin-orbit components of both the 2t{sub 2g}- and 4e{sub g}-bands are extracted and their gas-to-cluster changes are analyzed. The photoelectron trapping times in free and clustered SF{sub 6} molecules are determined. Specifically, it is shown that spectral changes in clusters reflected in core-to-valence-transitions are due to a superposition of the singly scattered photoelectron waves at the neighboring molecules with the primary and multiply scattered waves within the molecular cage.

  12. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement and Conduct Additional Public Scoping | Department of Energy The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to modify the scope of the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement and to conduct additional public scoping. For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http://energy.gov/node/299815. Download Document PDF icon EIS-0283-S2: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the

  13. EIS-0283-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http://energy.gov/node/299815. Download Document PDF icon EIS-0283-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement More Documents & Publications EIS-0403: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0478: EPA Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0490:

  14. EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Extension of Public Review and Comment Period and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Announcement of an Additional Public Hearing | Department of Energy Draft Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement DOE has extended the comment period for the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemential EIS through October 10 and announces an additional Public Hearing in Espanola, NM. For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http://energy.gov/node/299815. Download Document PDF icon EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Extension of Public Review and

  15. EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Impact Statement | Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) intends to prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of plutonium disposition capabilities that would be constructed and operated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http://energy.gov/node/299815. Download Document PDF icon EIS-0283-S2:

  16. One-loop matching of Delta S=2 four-quark operators with improved staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becher, Thomas; Gamiz, Elvira; Melnikov, Kirill; /Hawaii U.

    2005-07-01

    We compute O(alpha{sub s}) lattice-to-continuum perturbative matching coefficients for the Delta S=2 flavor changing four-quark operators for the Asqtad improved staggered action. In conjunction with lattice simulations with three flavors of light, dynamical quarks, our results yield an unquenched determination of B{sub K}, the parameter that determines the amount of indirect CP violation in the neutral kaon system. Its value is an important input for the unitarity triangle analysis of weak decays.

  17. EIS-0082-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Impact Statement | Department of Energy Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0082-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Alternatives to the In-Tank Precipitation Process at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina The Department of Energy (DOE) intends to prepare a supplemental environmental impact statement (SEIS) on the proposed replacement of the in-tank precipitation (ITP) process at the Savannah River

  18. Exciton-dominated dielectric function of atomically thin MoS2 films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Yiling; Yu, Yifei; Cai, Yongqing; Li, Wei; Gurarslan, Alper; Peelaers, Hartwin; Aspnes, David E.; Van de Walle, Chris G.; Nguyen, Nhan V.; Zhang, Yong -Wei; et al

    2015-11-24

    We systematically measure the dielectric function of atomically thin MoS2 films with different layer numbers and demonstrate that excitonic effects play a dominant role in the dielectric function when the films are less than 5–7 layers thick. The dielectric function shows an anomalous dependence on the layer number. It decreases with the layer number increasing when the films are less than 5–7 layers thick but turns to increase with the layer number for thicker films. We show that this is because the excitonic effect is very strong in the thin MoS2 films and its contribution to the dielectric function maymore » dominate over the contribution of the band structure. We also extract the value of layer-dependent exciton binding energy and Bohr radius in the films by fitting the experimental results with an intuitive model. The dominance of excitonic effects is in stark contrast with what reported at conventional materials whose dielectric functions are usually dictated by band structures. Lastly, the knowledge of the dielectric function may enable capabilities to engineer the light-matter interactions of atomically thin MoS2 films for the development of novel photonic devices, such as metamaterials, waveguides, light absorbers, and light emitters.« less

  19. Two spatially separated phases in semiconducting Rb0.8Fe1.5S2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Meng; Tian, Wei; Valdivia, P.; Chi, Songxue; Bourret-Courchesne, E. D.; Dai, Pengcheng; Birgeneau, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    We report neutron scattering and transport measurements on semiconducting Rb0.8Fe1.5S2, a compound isostructural and isoelectronic to the well-studied A0.8FeySe2(A = K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K) superconducting systems. Both resistivity and dc susceptibility measurements reveal a magnetic phase transition at T = 275 K. Neutron diffraction studies show that the 275 K transition originates from a phase with rhombic iron vacancy order which exhibits an in-plane stripe antiferromagnetic ordering below 275 K. In addition, the stripe antiferromagnetic phase interdigitates mesoscopically with an ubiquitous phase with 5 5 iron vacancy order. This phase has a magnetic transition at TN = 425 K andmore » an iron vacancy order-disorder transition at TS = 600 K. These two different structural phases are closely similar to those observed in the isomorphous Se materials. Based on the close similarities of the in-plane antiferromagnetic structures, moments sizes, and ordering temperatures in semiconducting Rb0.8Fe1.5S2 and K0.81Fe1.58Se2, we argue that the in-plane antiferromagnetic order arises from strong coupling between local moments. Superconductivity, previously observed in the A0.8FeySe2 zSz system, is absent in Rb0.8Fe1.5S2, which has a semiconducting ground state. The implied relationship between stripe and block antiferromagnetism and superconductivity in these materials as well as a strategy for further investigation is discussed in this paper.« less

  20. DES13S2cmm: The first superluminous supernova from the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Papadopoulos, A.; Plazas, A. A.; D"Andrea, C. B.; Sullivan, M.; Nichol, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Biswas, R.; Brown, P. J.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Finley, D. A.; et al

    2015-03-23

    We present DES13S2cmm, the first spectroscopically-confirmed superluminous supernova (SLSN) from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We briefly discuss the data and search algorithm used to find this event in the first year of DES operations, and outline the spectroscopic data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope to confirm its redshift (z = 0.663 ± 0.001 based on the host-galaxy emission lines) and likely spectral type (type I). Using this redshift, we find MpeakU = –21.05+0.10–0.09 for the peak, rest-frame U-band absolute magnitude, and find DES13S2cmm to be located in a faint, low-metallicity (sub-solar), low stellar-mass hostmore » galaxy (log(M/M⊙) = 9.3 ± 0.3), consistent with what is seen for other SLSNe-I. We compare the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm to fourteen similarly well-observed SLSNe-I in the literature and find it possesses one of the slowest declining tails (beyond +30 days rest frame past peak), and is the faintest at peak. Moreover, we find the bolometric light curves of all SLSNe-I studied herein possess a dispersion of only 0.2–0.3 magnitudes between +25 and +30 days after peak (rest frame) depending on redshift range studied; this could be important for ‘standardising’ such supernovae, as is done with the more common type Ia. We fit the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm with two competing models for SLSNe-I – the radioactive decay of ⁵⁶Ni, and a magnetar – and find that while the magnetar is formally a better fit, neither model provides a compelling match to the data. Although we are unable to conclusively differentiate between these two physical models for this particular SLSN-I, further DES observations of more SLSNe-I should break this degeneracy, especially if the light curves of SLSNe-I can be observed beyond 100 days in the rest frame of the supernova.« less

  1. DES13S2cmm: The first superluminous supernova from the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papadopoulos, A.; Plazas, A. A.; D"Andrea, C. B.; Sullivan, M.; Nichol, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Biswas, R.; Brown, P. J.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Finley, D. A.; Fischer, J. A.; Foley, R. J.; Goldstein, D.; Gupta, R. R.; Kessler, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Lidman, C.; March, M.; Nugent, P. E.; Sako, M.; Smith, R. C.; Spinka, H.; Wester, W.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F.; Allam, S. S.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, J. P.; Bernstein, R. A.; Carnero, A.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Eifler, T.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J. A.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Ogando, R.; Roe, N. A.; Romer, A. K.; Rykoff, E.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Soares-Santos, M.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, L. D.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.

    2015-03-23

    We present DES13S2cmm, the first spectroscopically-confirmed superluminous supernova (SLSN) from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We briefly discuss the data and search algorithm used to find this event in the first year of DES operations, and outline the spectroscopic data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope to confirm its redshift (z = 0.663 0.001 based on the host-galaxy emission lines) and likely spectral type (type I). Using this redshift, we find MpeakU = 21.05+0.100.09 for the peak, rest-frame U-band absolute magnitude, and find DES13S2cmm to be located in a faint, low-metallicity (sub-solar), low stellar-mass host galaxy (log(M/M?) = 9.3 0.3), consistent with what is seen for other SLSNe-I. We compare the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm to fourteen similarly well-observed SLSNe-I in the literature and find it possesses one of the slowest declining tails (beyond +30 days rest frame past peak), and is the faintest at peak. Moreover, we find the bolometric light curves of all SLSNe-I studied herein possess a dispersion of only 0.20.3 magnitudes between +25 and +30 days after peak (rest frame) depending on redshift range studied; this could be important for standardising such supernovae, as is done with the more common type Ia. We fit the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm with two competing models for SLSNe-I the radioactive decay of ??Ni, and a magnetar and find that while the magnetar is formally a better fit, neither model provides a compelling match to the data. Although we are unable to conclusively differentiate between these two physical models for this particular SLSN-I, further DES observations of more SLSNe-I should break this degeneracy, especially if the light curves of SLSNe-I can be observed beyond 100 days in the rest frame of the supernova.

  2. DES13S2cmm: The first superluminous supernova from the dark energy survey

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Papadopoulos, A.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Sullivan, M.; Nichol, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Biswas, R.; Brown, P. J.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Finley, D. A.; Fischer, J. A.; et al

    2015-03-23

    We present DES13S2cmm, the first spectroscopically-confirmed superluminous supernova (SLSN) from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We briefly discuss the data and search algorithm used to find this event in the first year of DES operations, and outline the spectroscopic data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope to confirm its redshift (z = 0.663 0.001 based on the host-galaxy emission lines) and likely spectral type (type I). Using this redshift, we find MUpeak = -21.05????-0.09 for the peak, rest-frame U-band absolute magnitude, and find DES13S2cmm to be located in a faint, low metallicity (sub-solar), low stellar-massmorehost galaxy (log(M/M_sun) = 9.3 0.3); consistent with what is seen for other SLSNe-I. We compare the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm to fourteen similarly well-observed SLSNe-I in the literature and find it possesses one of the slowest declining tails (beyond +30 days rest frame past peak), and is the faintest at peak. Moreover, we find the bolometric light curves of all SLSNe-I studied herein possess a dispersion of only 0.2-0.3 magnitudes between +25 and +30 days after peak (rest frame) depending on redshift range studied; this could be important for 'standardising' such supernovae, as is done with the more common type Ia. We fit the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm with two competing models for SLSNe-I - the radioactive decay of ??Ni, and a magnetar - and find that while the magnetar is formally a better fit, neither model provides a compelling match to the data. Although we are unable to conclusively differentiate between these two physical models for this particular SLSN-I, further DES observations of more SLSNe-I should break this degeneracy, especially if the light curves of SLSNe-I can be observed beyond 100 days in the rest frame of the supernova.less

  3. Tensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yungang; Wang, Zhiguo; Yang, Ping; Zu, Xiaotao; Yang, Li; Sun, Xin; Gao, Fei

    2012-11-01

    Developing approaches to effectively induce and control the magnetic states is critical to the use of magnetic nanostructures in quantum information devices but is still challenging. Here we have demonstrated, by employing the density functional theory calculations, an existence of infinite magnetic sheets with structural integrity and magnetic homogeneity. Examination from a series of transition metal dichalcogenides shows that the biaxial tensile strained NbS2 and NbSe2 structures can be magnetized with a ferromagnetic character due to the competitive effects of through-bond interaction and through-space interaction. The estimated Curie temperatures (387 and 542 K under the 10% strain for NbS2 and NbSe2 structures, respectively) suggest that the unique ferromagnetic character can be achieved above room temperature. The self-exchange of population between 4d orbitals of Nb atom that leads to the exchange splitting is the mechanism behind the transition of the spin moment. The induced magnetic moments can be significantly enhanced by the tensile strain, even giving rise to half-metallic character with the strong spin polarization around the Fermi level. Given the recent progress that the desired strain can be achieved on two-dimensional nanostructures, such as graphene and BN layer in a controlled way, we believe that our calculated results are suitable for experimental verification and implementation opening a new path to explore the spintronics in pristine two-dimensional nanostructures.

  4. Coupled spin and valley physics in monolayer MoS2 and group-VI dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Di; Liu, G. B.; Feng, wanxiang; Xu, Xiaodong; Yao, Wang

    2012-01-01

    We show that inversion symmetry breaking together with spin-orbit coupling leads to coupled spin and valley physics in monolayer MoS2 and group-VI dichalcogenides, making possible controls of spin and valley in these 2D materials. The spin-valley coupling at the valence band edges suppresses spin and valley relaxation, as flip of each index alone is forbidden by the 0.1 eV valley contrasting spin splitting. Valley Hall and spin Hall effects coexist in both electron-doped and hole-doped systems. Optical interband transitions have frequency-dependent polarization selection rules which allow selective photoexcitation of carriers with various combination of valley and spin indices. Photo-induced spin Hall and valley Hall effects can generate long lived spin and valley accumulations on sample boundaries. The physics discussed here provides a route towards the integration of valleytronics and spintronics in multi-valley materials with strong spin-orbit coupling and inversion symmetry breaking.

  5. PROBING THE SOLAR WIND ACCELERATION REGION WITH THE SUN-GRAZING COMET C/2002 S2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, S.; Raymond, J. C.; Lamy, P.; Uzzo, M.; Dobrzycka, D.

    2015-01-01

    Comet C/2002 S2, a member of the Kreutz family of sungrazing comets, was discovered in white-light images of the Large Angle and Spectromeric Coronagraph Experiment coronagraph on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) on 2002 September 18 and observed in H I Ly? emission by the SOHO Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) instrument at four different heights as it approached the Sun. The H I Ly? line profiles detected by UVCS are analyzed to determine the spectral parameters: line intensity, width, and Doppler shift with respect to the coronal background. Two-dimensional comet images of these parameters are reconstructed at the different heights. A novel aspect of the observations of this sungrazing comet data is that, whereas the emission from most of the tail is blueshifted, that along one edge of the tail is redshifted. We attribute these shifts to a combination of solar wind speed and interaction with the magnetic field. In order to use the comet to probe the density, temperature, and speed of the corona and solar wind through which it passes, as well as to determine the outgassing rate of the comet, we develop a Monte Carlo simulation of the H I Ly? emission of a comet moving through a coronal plasma. From the outgassing rate, we estimate a nucleus diameter of about 9 m. This rate steadily increases as the comet approaches the Sun, while the optical brightness decreases by more than a factor of 10 and suddenly recovers. This indicates that the optical brightness is determined by the lifetimes of the grains, sodium atoms, and molecules produced by the comet.

  6. Two spatially separated phases in semiconducting Rb 0.8 Fe 1.5 S 2 (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | DOE PAGES Two spatially separated phases in semiconducting Rb 0.8 Fe 1.5 S 2 « Prev Next » Title: Two spatially separated phases in semiconducting Rb 0.8 Fe 1.5 S 2 Authors: Wang, Meng ; Tian, Wei ; Valdivia, P. ; Chi, Songxue ; Bourret-Courchesne, E. ; Dai, Pengcheng ; Birgeneau, R. J. Publication Date: 2014-09-26 OSTI Identifier: 1180514 Grant/Contract Number: AC02-05CH11231; AC03-76SF008 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal

  7. A High-Yield Synthesis of Chalcopyrite CuInS2Nanoparticles with Exceptional Size Control

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Chivin; Gardner, Joseph S.; Shurdha, Endrit; Margulieux, Kelsey R.; Westover, Richard D.; Lau, Lisa; Long, Gary; Bajracharya, Cyril; Wang, Chongmin; Thurber, Aaron; et al

    2009-01-01

    We report high-yield and efficient size-controlled syntheses of Chalcopyrite CuInS2nanoparticles by decomposing molecular single source precursors (SSPs) via microwave irradiation in the presence of 1,2-ethanedithiol at reaction temperatures as low as 100C and times as short as 30?minutes. The nanoparticles sizes were 1.8?nm to 10.8?nm as reaction temperatures were varied from 100C to 200C with the bandgaps from 2.71?eV to 1.28?eV with good size control and high yields (64%95%). The resulting nanoparticles were analyzed by XRD, UV-Vis, ICP-OES, XPS, SEM, EDS, and HRTEM. Titration studies by1H NMR using SSP1with 1,2-ethanedithiol and benzyl mercaptan were conducted to elucidate the formation ofmoreChalcopyrite CuInS2nanoparticles.less

  8. One-loop matching of {delta}S=2 four-quark operators with improved staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becher, Thomas; Gamiz, Elvira; Melnikov, Kirill

    2005-10-01

    We compute O({alpha}{sub s}) lattice-to-continuum perturbative matching coefficients for the {delta}S=2 flavor changing four-quark operators for the Asqtad improved staggered action. In conjunction with lattice simulations with three flavors of light, dynamical quarks, our results yield an unquenched determination of B{sub K}, the parameter that determines the amount of indirect CP violation in the neutral kaon system. Its value is an important input for the unitarity triangle analysis of weak decays.

  9. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solarphotovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP)...

  10. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Transportation Sector Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) By Major Source, 1949-2014 By Major Source, Monthly Total, January-November Total, Monthly . 36 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 2013 2014 2015 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Petroleum Natural Gas Renewable Energy J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Petroleum Natural Gas

  11. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Table 2.5 Transportation Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Electricity Retail Sales e Electrical System Energy Losses f Total Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy b Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Biomass 1950 Total .................... 1,564 130 6,690 8,383 NA 8,383 23 86 8,492 1955 Total .................... 421 254 8,799 9,474 NA 9,474 20 56 9,550 1960 Total .................... 75 359 10,125 10,560 NA 10,560 10 26 10,596 1965 Total

  12. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) By Major Source, 1949-2014 By Major Source, Monthly Total, January-November By Major Source, November 2015 . 38 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 2013 2014 2015 Nuclear Electric Power Natural Gas Petroleum Renewable Energy Coal Renewable Energy Natural Gas 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M

  13. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 Table 2.6 Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy b Elec- tricity Net Imports e Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum Total Hydro- electric Power d Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total ...................... 2,199 651 472 3,322 0 1,346 NA NA NA 5 1,351 6 4,679 1955 Total ...................... 3,458 1,194 471 5,123 0 1,322 NA NA NA 3 1,325 14 6,461 1960 Total

  14. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 Table 2.7 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency, Fiscal Years (Trillion Btu) Fiscal Year a Agri- culture Defense Energy GSA b HHS c Interior Justice NASA d Postal Service Trans- portation Veterans Affairs Other e Total 1975 .............. 9.5 1,360.2 50.4 22.3 6.5 9.4 5.9 13.4 30.5 19.3 27.1 10.5 1,565.0 1976 .............. 9.3 1,183.3 50.3 20.6 6.7 9.4 5.7 12.4 30.0 19.5 25.0 11.2 1,383.4 1977 ..............

  15. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Table 2.8 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Source, Fiscal Years (Trillion Btu) Fiscal Year a Coal Natural Gas b Petroleum Other Mobility Fuels f Elec- tricity Purchased Steam and Other g Total Aviation Gasoline Fuel Oil c Jet Fuel LPG d Motor Gasoline e Total 1975 .............. 77.9 166.2 22.0 376.0 707.4 5.6 63.2 1,174.2 0.0 141.5 5.1 1,565.0 1976 .............. 71.3 151.8 11.6 329.7 610.0 4.7 60.4 1,016.4 .0 139.3 4.6 1,383.4 1977 .............. 68.4 141.2 8.8 348.5 619.2 4.1 61.4

  16. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Quadrillion Btu) Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2014 Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, Monthly By Sector, November 2015 28 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 Transportation Residential 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 Industrial Transportation Residential Commercial J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 1 2 3 4 Industrial

  17. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    29 Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu) End-Use Sectors Electric Power Sector c,d Balancing Item g Primary Total h Residential Commercial a Industrial b Transportation Primary e Total f Primary e Total f Primary e Total f Primary e Total f Primary e 1950 Total ...................... 4,829 5,989 2,834 3,893 13,890 16,241 8,383 8,492 4,679 (s) 34,616 1955 Total ...................... 5,608 7,278 2,561 3,895 16,103 19,485 9,474 9,550 6,461 (s) 40,208 1960 Total

  18. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Table 2.2 Residential Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Electricity Retail Sales e Electrical System Energy Losses f Total Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy b Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum Total Geo- thermal Solar/ PV d Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................... 1,261 1,240 1,322 3,824 NA NA 1,006 1,006 4,829 246 913 5,989 1955 Total .................... 867 2,198 1,767 4,833 NA NA 775 775 5,608 438 1,232 7,278 1960 Total .................... 585

  19. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table 2.3 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Elec- tricity Retail Sales f Electrical System Energy Losses g Total Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy b Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum d Total Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................... 1,542 401 872 2,815 NA NA NA NA 19 19 2,834 225 834 3,893 1955 Total .................... 801 651 1,095 2,547 NA NA NA NA 15 15 2,561 350 984 3,895 1960 Total

  20. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Table 2.4 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Elec- tricity Retail Sales g Electrical System Energy Losses h Total e Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy b Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum d Total e Hydro- electric Power f Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................... 5,781 3,546 3,960 13,288 69 NA NA NA 532 602 13,890 500 1,852 16,241 1955 Total .................... 5,620 4,701 5,123 15,434 38 NA NA NA 631 669 16,103 887

  1. Word Pro - S2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... tion sector fuel ethanol (minus denaturant) consumption; minus refinery and blender net inputs of renewable fuels (excluding fuel ethanol) from U.S. Energy Information ...

  2. Word Pro - S2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, Monthly By Sector, November 2015 28 U.S. Energy Information ... (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. b Industrial sector, ...

  3. Word Pro - S2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2015 32 U.S. Energy Information Administration Monthly Energy Review February 2016 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 Electricity a ...

  4. Word Pro - S2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total, January-November By Major Source, November 2015 30 U.S. Energy Information Administration Monthly Energy Review February 2016 Natural Gas Electricity a Petroleum Coal 1950 ...

  5. Word Pro - S2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total, January-November By Major Source, November 2015 34 U.S. Energy Information Administration ... Natural Gas Petroleum Electricity a Renewable Energy J F M A M J J A S O N D J ...

  6. MoS2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a decline in air quality worldwide. A recent New York Times article described the major impact a growing Chinese economy will have on sulfur pollution causing an increase in acid...

  7. Efficient Interlayer Relaxation and Transition of Excitons in Epitaxial and Non-epitaxial MoS2/WS2 Heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Yifei; Hu, Shi; Su, Liqin; Huang, Lujun; Liu, Yi; Jin, Zhenghe; Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Kim, Ki Wook; Zhang, Yong; et al

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor heterostructurs provide a powerful platform for the engineering of excitons. Here we report on the excitonic properties of two-dimensional (2D) heterostructures that consist of monolayer MoS2 and WS2 stacked epitaxially or non-epitaxially in the vertical direction. We find similarly efficient interlayer relaxation and transition of excitons in both the epitaxial and non-epitaxial heterostructures. This is manifested by a two orders of magnitude decrease in the photoluminescence and an extra absorption peak at low energy region of both heterostructures. The MoS2/WS2 heterostructures show weak interlayer coupling and essentially act as an atomic-scale heterojunction with the intrinsic band structures of themore » two monolayers largely preserved. They are particularly promising for the applications that request efficient dissociation of excitons and strong light absorption, including photovoltaics, solar fuels, photodetectors, and optical modulators. Our results also indicate that 2D heterostructures promise to provide capabilities to engineer excitons from the atomic level without concerns of interfacial imperfection.« less

  8. A High-Yield Synthesis of Chalcopyrite CuIn S 2 Nanoparticles with Exceptional Size Control

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Chivin; Gardner, Joseph S.; Shurdha, Endrit; Margulieux, Kelsey R.; Westover, Richard D.; Lau, Lisa; Long, Gary; Bajracharya, Cyril; Wang, Chongmin; Thurber, Aaron; et al

    2009-01-01

    We repormore » t high-yield and efficient size-controlled syntheses of Chalcopyrite CuIn S 2 nanoparticles by decomposing molecular single source precursors (SSPs) via microwave irradiation in the presence of 1,2-ethanedithiol at reaction temperatures as low as 100 ° C and times as short as 30 minutes. The nanoparticles sizes were 1.8 nm to 10.8 nm as reaction temperatures were varied from 100 ° C to 200 ° C with the bandgaps from 2.71 eV to 1.28 eV with good size control and high yields (64%–95%). The resulting nanoparticles were analyzed by XRD, UV-Vis, ICP-OES, XPS, SEM, EDS, and HRTEM. Titration studies by 1 H NMR using SSP 1 with 1,2-ethanedithiol and benzyl mercaptan were conducted to elucidate the formation of Chalcopyrite CuIn S 2 nanoparticles.« less

  9. Second-harmonic generation of TEA CO2 10. 6-micrometer laser light in AgGaS2 crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bangmin, Z.; Dinghua, W.

    1991-05-03

    Characteristics of AgGaS2 crystal for frequency doubling of TEA CO2 10.6 micrometer laser light were investigated. When the crystal was 4.3mm long, the maximum conversion frequency was 0.122 percent. In recent years, much progress was made in expanding the range of laser wavebands by utilizing the nonlinear effects. In the medium-infrared waveband, the CO2 laser is a relatively ideal light source and can output tens of laser spectral lines within the range 8.7 to 11.8 micrometers. With double frequency, tunable output can be obtained within the range 4.3 to 5.9 micrometers. Since the advent of CO2 lasers, researchers have conducted numerous research tasks in this area. However, since it is relatively difficult to obtain high-quality and large infrared nonlinear optical crystals, such work still remains at the laboratory research stage without practical applications.

  10. Exciton diamagnetic shifts and valley Zeeman effects in monolayer WS2 and MoS2 to 65 Tesla

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stier, Andreas V.; McCreary, Kathleen M.; Jonker, Berend T.; Kono, Junichiro; Crooker, Scott A.

    2016-02-09

    In bulk and quantum-confined semiconductors, magneto-optical studies have historically played an essential role in determining the fundamental parameters of excitons (size, binding energy, spin, dimensionality and so on). Here we report low-temperature polarized reflection spectroscopy of atomically thin WS2 and MoS2 in high magnetic fields to 65 T. Both the A and B excitons exhibit similar Zeeman splittings of approximately –230 μeV T–1 (g-factor ≃–4), thereby quantifying the valley Zeeman effect in monolayer transition-metal disulphides. Crucially, these large fields also allow observation of the small quadratic diamagnetic shifts of both A and B excitons in monolayer WS2, from which radiimore » of ~1.53 and ~1.16 nm are calculated. Further, when analysed within a model of non-local dielectric screening, these diamagnetic shifts also constrain estimates of the A and B exciton binding energies (410 and 470 meV, respectively, using a reduced A exciton mass of 0.16 times the free electron mass). Lastly, these results highlight the utility of high magnetic fields for understanding new two-dimensional materials.« less

  11. Electron-hadron correlations in pp collisions at {radical}(s) = 2.76TeV with the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Oliveira Filho, Elienos P.; Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2013-03-25

    In this work we are studying the relative beauty to charm production in pp collisions at {radical}(s) = 2.76TeV, through correlations between electrons from heavy-flavour decay and charged hadrons, with the ALICE detector at the LHC. This study represents a baseline for the analysis in heavy-ion collisions where heavy flavour production is a powerful tool to study the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP).

  12. Optimization Method to Branch and Bound Large SBO State Spaces Under Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment via use of LENDIT Scales and S2R2 Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph W. Nielsen; Akira Tokurio; Robert Hiromoto; Jivan Khatry

    2014-06-01

    Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) methods have been developed and are quite effective in evaluating risk associated with complex systems, but lack the capability to evaluate complex dynamic systems. These time and energy scales associated with the transient may vary as a function of transition time to a different physical state. Dynamic PRA (DPRA) methods provide a more rigorous analysis of complex dynamic systems, while complete, results in issues associated with combinatorial explosion. In order to address the combinatorial complexity arising from the number of possible state configurations and discretization of transition times, a characteristic scaling metric (LENDIT length, energy, number, distribution, information and time) is proposed as a means to describe systems uniformly and thus provide means to describe relational constraints expected in the dynamics of a complex (coupled) systems. Thus when LENDIT is used to characterize four sets state, system, resource and response (S2R2) describing reactor operations (normal and off-normal), LENDIT and S2R2 in combination have the potential to branch and bound the state space investigated by DPRA. In this paper we introduce the concept of LENDIT scales and S2R2 sets applied to a branch-and-bound algorithm and apply the methods to a station black out transient (SBO).

  13. Measurement of electrons from semileptonic heavy-flavor hadron decays in pp collisions at s=2.76TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; et al

    2015-01-07

    The pT-differential production cross section of electrons from semileptonic decays of heavy-flavor hadrons has been measured at midrapidity in proton-proton collisions at √s = 2.76  TeV in the transverse momentum range 0.5 < pT < 12  GeV/c with the ALICE detector at the LHC. The analysis was performed using minimum bias events and events triggered by the electromagnetic calorimeter. Predictions from perturbative QCD calculations agree with the data within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties.

  14. Word Pro - S2.lwp

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solarphotovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP)...

  15. Word Pro - S2.lwp

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 By Selected End Use¹ By Energy Source 48 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Excludes inputs of unallocated energy sources (5,820 trillion Btu). 2 Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Excludes steam and hot water. 3 Excludes coal coke and breeze. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Natural gas liquids. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Source: Table 2.3. 3.3 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.2

  16. Word Pro - S2.lwp

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2012 (Quadrillion Btu) 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial

  17. Evidence of the 2s2p({sup 1}P) doubly excited state in the harmonic generation spectrum of helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngoko Djiokap, J. M.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2011-07-15

    By solving the two-active-electron time-dependent Schroedinger equation in an intense, ultrashort laser field, we investigate evidence of electron correlations in the high-order harmonic generation spectrum of helium. As the frequency of the driving laser pulse varies from 4.6 to 6.6 eV, the 13th, 11th, and 9th harmonics sequentially become resonant with the transition between the ground state and the isolated 2s2p({sup 1}P) autoionizing state of helium, which dramatically enhances these harmonics and changes their profiles. When each of the 9th and 13th harmonics are in resonance with this autoionizing state, there is also a low-order multiphoton resonance with a Rydberg state, resulting in a particularly large enhancement of these harmonics relative to neighboring harmonics. When the 11th harmonic is in resonance with the 2s2p({sup 1}P) autoionizing state, the 13th harmonic is simultaneously in resonance with numerous higher-energy autoionizing states, resulting in a competition between these two harmonics for intensity. These results demonstrate that even electron correlations occurring over a narrow energy interval can have a significant effect on strong-field processes such as harmonic generation.

  18. Assessment of the LV-S2 & LV-S3 Stack Sampling Probe Locations for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Amidan, Brett G.

    2014-09-30

    This document reports on a series of tests conducted to assess the proposed air sampling locations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Group 1-2A exhaust stacks with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. The LV-C2, LV-S2, and LV-S3 exhaust stacks were tested together as a group (Test Group 1-2A). This report only covers the results of LV-S2 and LV-S3; LV-C2 will be reported on separately. Federal regulations1 require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria established by the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. 2 These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

  19. Measurement of Υ(1S + 2S +3S) production in p + p and Au + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-02-24

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ(1S + 2S + 3S), was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au+Au and p+p collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV. The Υ(1S + 2S + 3S) → e⁺e⁻ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beedσ/dy = 108 ± 38 (stat) ± 15 (syst) ± 11 (luminosity) pb in p+p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au+Au collisions indicates a suppression of themore »total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p+p collision data. Thus, the suppression is consistent with measurements at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.« less

  20. Measurement of Υ(1S + 2S +3S) production in p + p and Au + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-02-24

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ(1S + 2S + 3S), was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au+Au and p+p collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV. The Υ(1S + 2S + 3S) → e⁺e⁻ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beedσ/dy = 108 ± 38 (stat) ± 15 (syst) ± 11 (luminosity) pb in p+p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au+Au collisions indicates a suppression of themore » total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p+p collision data. Thus, the suppression is consistent with measurements at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.« less

  1. Spin-Orbit Coupling Induced Anisotropy in the Magnetotransport of the Chiral Helimagnet Cr1=3NbS2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandrus, D.; Parker, David S; Ghimire, Nirmal J; Bornstein, Alexander; Chapman, Benjamin; Lee, Minyhea

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) has been crucial for controlling magnetic anisotropy in magnetic multilayer films. It has been shown that electronic structure can be altered via interface SOC by varying the superlattice structure, resulting in spontaneous magnetization perpendicular or parallel to the plane. In lieu of magnetic thin films, we study the similarly anisotropic helimagnet Cr1/3NbS2 where the spin-polarization direction, controlled by the applied magnetic field, can modify the electronic structure. As a result, the direction of spin polarization can modulate the density of states and in turn affect the in-plane electrical conductivity. In Cr1/3NbS2, we found an enhancement of in-plane conductivity when the spin polarization is out-of-plane as compared to in-plane spin polarization. This is consistent with the increase in density of states near the Fermi energy at the same spin configuration, found from first-principles calculations. We also observe unusual field dependence of the Hall signal in the same temperature range. This is unlikely to originate from the noncollinear spin texture but rather further indicates strong dependence of electronic structure on spin orientation relative to the plane.

  2. Table of Contents: Accelerating Cleanup, Paths to Closure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S. SITE SUMMARY S.1. SITE SUMMARY NAME .................................................................................................................................. 1 S.2. SITE SUMMARY NARRATIVES........................................................................................................................ 1 S.3. SITE SUMMARY ASSUMPTIONS (SECTION S.7. IN THE 2/28/97 SBS) ................................................................ 2 S.4. GEOGRAPHIC SITE NAME WASTE ISOLATION

  3. ARM - Instrument - ccn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA retired SBS S2 Browse Data Browse Plots Steamboat Springs CO, Christie Peak...

  4. ARM - Instrument - aos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA retired SBS S2 Browse Data Steamboat Springs CO, Christie Peak retired TMP S1...

  5. Single Use Letter Report for the Verification and Validation of the RADNUC-2A and ORIGEN2 S.2 Computer Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACKER, M.J.

    2000-06-20

    This report documents the verification and validation (V&V) activities undertaken to support the use of the RADNUC2-A and ORIGEN2 S.2 computer codes for the specific application of calculating isotopic inventories and decay heat loadings for Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) activities as described herein. Two recent applications include the reports HNF-SD-SNF-TI-009, 105-K Basin Material Design Basis Feed Description for Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Facilities, Volume 1, Fuel (Praga, 1998), and HNF-3035, Rev. 0B, MCO Gas Composition for Low Reactive Surface Areas (Packer, 1998). Representative calculations documented in these two reports were repeated using RADNUC2-A, and the results were identical to the documented results. This serves as verification that version 2A of Radnuc was used for the applications noted above; the same version was tested herein, and perfect agreement was shown. Comprehensive V&V is demonstrated for RADNUC2-A in Appendix A.

  6. Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Luyi; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.; Chen, Weibing; Yuan, Jiangtan; Zhang, Jing; Lou, Jun; Crooker, Scott  A.

    2015-08-03

    The recently discovered monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) provide a fertile playground to explore new coupled spin–valley physics. Although robust spin and valley degrees of freedom are inferred from polarized photoluminescence (PL) experiments PL timescales are necessarily constrained by short-lived (3–100 ps) electron–hole recombination9, 10. Direct probes of spin/valley polarization dynamics of resident carriers in electron (or hole)-doped TMDCs, which may persist long after recombination ceases, are at an early stage. Here we directly measure the coupled spin–valley dynamics in electron-doped MoS2 and WS2 monolayers using optical Kerr spectroscopy, and reveal very long electron spin lifetimes, exceeding 3 ns atmore » 5 K (2-3 orders of magnitude longer than typical exciton recombination times). In contrast with conventional III–V or II–VI semiconductors, spin relaxation accelerates rapidly in small transverse magnetic fields. Supported by a model of coupled spin–valley dynamics, these results indicate a novel mechanism of itinerant electron spin dephasing in the rapidly fluctuating internal spin–orbit field in TMDCs, driven by fast inter-valley scattering. Additionally, a long-lived spin coherence is observed at lower energies, commensurate with localized states. These studies provide insight into the physics underpinning spin and valley dynamics of resident electrons in atomically thin TMDCs.« less

  7. Out-of-plane spin-orientation dependent magnetotransport properties in the anisotropic helimagnet CR1/3NbS2 [Spin-Orbit Coupling Induced Anisotropy in the Magnetotransport of the Chiral Helimagnet Cr1=3NbS2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bornstein, Alexander C.; Chapman, Benjamin J.; Ghimire, Nirmal J.; Mandrus, David G.; Parker, David S.; Lee, Minhyea

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the role of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) has been crucial for controlling magnetic anisotropy in magnetic multilayer films. It has been shown that electronic structure can be altered via interface SOC by varying the superlattice structure, resulting in spontaneous magnetization perpendicular or parallel to the plane. In lieu of magnetic thin films, we study the similarly anisotropic helimagnet Cr1/3NbS2 where the spin-polarization direction, controlled by the applied magnetic field, can modify the electronic structure. As a result, the direction of spin polarization can modulate the density of states and in turn affect the in-plane electrical conductivity. In Cr1/3NbS2, we foundmore » an enhancement of in-plane conductivity when the spin polarization is out-of-plane as compared to in-plane spin polarization. This is consistent with the increase in density of states near the Fermi energy at the same spin configuration, found from first-principles calculations. We also observe unusual field dependence of the Hall signal in the same temperature range. This is unlikely to originate from the noncollinear spin texture but rather further indicates strong dependence of electronic structure on spin orientation relative to the plane.« less

  8. Characterization of fundamental catalytic properties of MoS2/WS2 nanotubes and nanoclusters for desulfurization catalysis - a surface temperature study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U. Burghaus

    2012-07-05

    The prior project consisted of two main project lines. First, characterization of novel nanomaterials for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) applications. Second, studying more traditional model systems for HDS such as vapor-deposited silica-supported Mo and MoSx clusters. In the first subproject, we studied WS2 and MoS2 fullerene-like nanoparticles as well as WS2 nanotubes. Thiophene (C4H4S) was used as the probe molecule. Interestingly, metallic and sulfur-like adsorption sites could be identified on the silica-supported fullerene-particles system. Similar structures are seen for the traditional system (vapor-deposited clusters). Thus, this may be a kinetics fingerprint feature of modern HDS model systems. In addition, kinetics data allowed characterization of the different adsorption sites for thiophene on and inside WS2 nanotube bundles. The latter is a unique feature of nanotubes that has not been reported before for any inorganic nanotube system; however, examples are known for carbon nanotubes, including prior work of the PI. Although HDS has been studied for decades, utilizing nanotubes as nanosized HDS reactors has never been tried before, as far as we know. This is of interest from a fundamental perspective. Unfortunately, the HDS activity of the nanocatalysts at ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions was close to the detection limit of our techniques. Therefore, we propose to run experiments at ambient pressure on related nanopowder samples as part of the renewal application utilizing a now-available GC (gas chromatograph) setup. In addition, Ni and Co doped nanocatalyts are proposed for study. These dopants will boost the catalytic activity. In the second subproject of the prior grant, we studied HDS-related chemistry on more traditional supported cluster catalysts. Mo clusters supported by physical vapor deposition (PVD) on silica have been characterized. Two reaction pathways are evident when adsorbing thiophene on Mo and MoSx clusters: molecular adsorption and dissociation. PVD Mo clusters turned out to be very reactive toward thiophene bond activation. Sulfur and carbon residuals form, which poison the catalyst and sulfide the Mo clusters. Sulfided silica-supported MoSx samples are not reactive toward thiophene bond activation. In addition to S and C deposits, H2, H2S, and small organic molecules were detected in the gas phase. Catalyst reactivation procedures, including O2 and atomic hydrogen treatments, have been tested. Cluster size effects have been seen: thiophene adsorbs molecularly with larger binding energies on smaller clusters. However, larger clusters have smaller activation energy for C4H4S bond activation than smaller clusters. The latter is consistent with early catalysis studies. Kinetics and dynamics parameters have been determined quantitatively. We spent a significant amount of time on upgrades of our equipment. A 2nd-hand refurbished X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) has been integrated into the existing molecular beam scattering system and is already operational (supported by the DoE supplemental grant available in October 2009). We also added a time of flight (TOF) system to the beam scattering apparatus and improved on the accessible impact energy range (new nozzle heater and gas mixing manifold) for the beam scattering experiments. In addition, a GC-based powder atmospheric flow reactor for studies on powder samples is now operational. Furthermore, a 2nd UHV kinetics system has been upgraded as well. In summary, mostly single crystal systems have so far been considered in basic science studies about HDS. Industrial catalysts, however, can be better approximated with the supported cluster systems that we studied in this project. Furthermore, an entirely new class of HDS systems, namely fullerene-like particles and inorganic nanotubes, has been included. Studying new materials and systems has the potential to impact science and technology. The systems investigated are closely related to energy and environmental-related surface science/catalysis. This prior project, conducted at NDSU by a sma

  9. Materials Data on RbAg2SbS4 (SG:154) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Six years' operating experience at Ardjuna field helps prove out LPG SBS system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smulders, L.H.

    1983-02-21

    The permanent yoke mooring system and the two-product flexpipe riser of the Arjuna Sakti LPG storage barge have completely lived up to their expectations. The LPG offtake system, the terminaling function of the storage unit, has also performed extremely well. Experience gained at Ardjuna provides confidence for future openocean mooring of large methanol or LNG plants. Mooring systems of these future units will likely have a different configuration, such as the single anchor leg storage (SALS) mooring. However, the basic system components have been used, both at Ardjuna and in comparable situations elsewhere in the world. Engineers who are working on floating, large scale, gas processing plants for mooring in the open ocean could profitably join their efforts in a team comprised of process specialists, naval architects, and mooring experts. Specific areas of consideration should be: length-to-beam and lengthto-depth ratios and shape of bow. This could result in a storage/process barge design with better motion characteristics and lower mooring forces than proposed at present.

  11. EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Processing of Plutonium Materials from the DOE Standard 3013 Surveillance Program in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site

  12. EIS-0283-S2-IAD-2009.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  13. EIS-0283-S2-IAD-2012.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  14. Assessment of the Group 5-6 (LB C2, LB S2, LV S1) Stack Sampling Probe Locations for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Piepel, Gregory F.

    2011-03-11

    This document reports on a series of tests to assess the proposed air sampling locations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Group 5-6 exhaust stacks with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. The LB-C2, LV-S1, and LB S2 exhaust stacks were tested together as a group (Test Group 5-6) because the common factor in their design is that the last significant flow disturbance upstream of the air sampling probe is a reduction in duct diameter. Federal regulations( ) require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream. The testing on scale models of the stacks conducted for this project was part of the River Protection ProjectWaste Treatment Plant Support Program under Contract No. DE-AC05-76RL01830 according to the statement of work issued by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI, 24590-QL-SRA-W000-00101, N13.1-1999 Stack Monitor Scale Model Testing and Qualification, Revision 1, 9/12/2007) and Work Authorization 09 of Memorandum of Agreement 24590-QL-HC9-WA49-00001. The internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) project for this task is 53024, Work for Hanford Contractors Stack Monitoring. The testing described in this document was further guided by the Test Plan Scale Model Testing the Waste Treatment Plant LB-C2, LB-S2, and LV-S1 (Test Group 5-6) Stack Air Sampling Positions (TP-RPP-WTP-594). The tests conducted by PNNL during 2009 and 2010 on the Group 5-6 scale model systems are described in this report. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross-section at the designed sampling probe locations and at five duct diameters up and downstream from the design location to accommodate potential construction variability. The tests were done only at the design sampling probe location on the scale model of LB-S2 because that ductwork was already constructed. The ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 criteria and the corresponding results of the test series on the scale models are summarized in this report.

  15. New thermotropic chiral nematic copolymers using (1S,2S,3S,5R)-(+)- and (1R,2R,3R,5S)-([minus])-isopinocampheol as building blocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.H.; Tsai, M.L. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Lab. for Laser Energetics)

    1990-01-01

    Thermotropic chiral nematic side-chain copolymers were synthesized and characterized by using (1S,2S,3S,5R)-(+)- and (1R,2R,3R,5S)-([minus])-isopinocampheol as the chiral building blocks. The helical twisting power was found to correlate with the volume swept out by the chiral pendant group via rotation for a given nematogenic monomer. However, the enhanced mesomorphic order introduced in both the nematogenic and chiral monomers as a result of an increased extent of conjugation or a shortened spacer length was found to reduce the helical twisting power of the resultant copolymer. Hence, both factors have to be taken into account as the helical twisting power of a copolymer system is to be optimized for a specific application. The present work also generalized the previous observation that the inversion of chirality of the pendant group results in helical sense reversal, although the role of the absolute configuration of the chiral moiety is not yet clearly understood.

  16. Assessment of the Group 3-4 (HV-S1, HV-S2, IHLW-S1) Stack Sampling Probe Locations for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Antonio, Ernest J.

    2013-01-01

    This document reports on a series of tests conducted to assess the proposed air sampling locations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Group 3-4 exhaust stacks with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. The HV-S1, HV-S2, and IHLW-S1 exhaust stacks were tested together as a group (Test Group 3-4) because they share a geometric attribute: the common factor in their design is that the last significant flow disturbance upstream of the air sampling probe is a jog (i.e., two conjoined bends of equal and opposite curvature resulting in a change in elevation of the duct). Federal regulations require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to criteria established by the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

  17. RSE Table S2.1 and S2.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1, 2, and 4 fuel oils and Nos. 1, 2, and 4" "diesel fuels." " (c) 'Natural Gas' ... gas brokers, marketers," "and any marketing subsidiaries of utilities." " (d) ...

  18. Electron-impact excitation of the (2p{sup 2}) {sup 1}D and (2s2p) {sup 1}P{sup o} autoionizing states of helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sise, Omer; Dogan, Mevlut; Okur, Ibrahim; Crowe, Albert

    2011-08-15

    An experimental study of the excitation of the (2p{sup 2}) {sup 1}D and (2s2p) {sup 1}P{sup o} autoionizing states of helium by 250-eV electron impact is presented. The ejected-electron angular distributions and energy spectra are measured in coincidence with the corresponding scattered electrons for a scattering angle of -13 deg. and for a range of ejected-electron angles in both the forward and backward directions. Resonance profiles are analyzed in terms of the Shore-Balashov parametrization to obtain the resonance asymmetry A{sub {mu}} and yield B{sub {mu}} parameters and the direct ionization cross section f. The spectra and their parameters are compared to the previous measurements of Lower and Weigold [J. Phys. B. 23, 2819 (1990)] and McDonald and Crowe [J. Phys. B 26, 2887 (1993)]. Comparison is also made with the recent theoretical triply differential cross-section calculations based on the first and second Born approximations. In general, good qualitative agreement is found between the experimental results. Some differences are found at the forward and backward directions. These differences in the shape and magnitude of the cross sections are attributed to the different incoming electron energies used in the experiments. The second Born approximation with inclusion of the three-body Coulomb interaction in the final state agrees reasonably well with experiments in the binary region. However, the {sup 1}P{sup o} resonance yield parameter B{sub {mu}} is significantly overestimated at the recoil region, giving a relatively large recoil peak, in contradiction to the experiment. There is also a discrepancy between the two theories available for the {sup 1}D resonance yield parameter B{sub {mu}} in this region. Remaining discrepancies between theories and experiments are also discussed.

  19. GPU accelerated fully space and time resolved numerical simulations of self-focusing laser beams in SBS-active media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mauger, Sarah; Colin de Verdière, Guillaume; Bergé, Luc; Skupin, Stefan; Friedrich Schiller University, Institute of Condensed Matter Theory and Optics, 07743 Jena

    2013-02-15

    A computer cluster equipped with Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) is used for simulating nonlinear optical wave packets undergoing Kerr self-focusing and stimulated Brillouin scattering in fused silica. We first recall the model equations in full (3+1) dimensions. These consist of two coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations for counterpropagating optical beams closed with a source equation for light-induced acoustic waves seeded by thermal noise. Compared with simulations on a conventional cluster of Central Processing Units (CPUs), GPU-based computations allow us to use a significant (16 times) larger number of mesh points within similar computation times. Reciprocally, simulations employing the same number of mesh points are between 3 and 20 times faster on GPUs than on the same number of classical CPUs. Performance speedups close to 45 are reported for isolated functions evaluating, e.g., the optical nonlinearities. Since the field intensities may reach the ionization threshold of silica, the action of a defocusing electron plasma is also addressed.

  20. EIS-0158-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Program Environmental Impact Report for the Sale of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 at Elk Hills, California

  1. EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE plans to extend the KAMS Area into the current Final Storage Area and Presentation Room to store additional quantities of surplus plutonium, and, potentially, plutonium alloys. ...

  2. EIS-0283-S2: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Once a preferred alternative is identified, DOE will announce its preference in a Federal ... Once a preferred alternative is identified, DOE will announce its preference in a Federal ...

  3. EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Use of H-CanyonHB-Line to Prepare Feed for the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication at the Savannah River Site) During Fiscal Year 2012, DOE will initiate activities in the H-Canyon and...

  4. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Disposition of Plutonium Materials from the Department of Energy Standard 3013 Surveillance Program at the Savannah River Site (Amending Interim Action Determination of 12/08/2008)

  5. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Certain Plutonium Materials at the K-Area Complex, Savannah River Site DOE has reviewed the environmental analysis relevant to preparation for disposition in the HB-Line and K-Area ...

  6. EIS-0283-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Statement This Final SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for disposition of 13.1 metric tons (14.4 tons) of surplus plutonium for which a disposition...

  7. EIS-0283-S2-Amended_IAD-2013.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  8. EIS-0283-S2-IntActDet-2011.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  9. Method for pulse control in a laser including a stimulated brillouin scattering mirror system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz B. (Rocklin, CA)

    2007-10-23

    A laser system, such as a master oscillator/power amplifier system, comprises a gain medium and a stimulated Brillouin scattering SBS mirror system. The SBS mirror system includes an in situ filtered SBS medium that comprises a compound having a small negative non-linear index of refraction, such as a perfluoro compound. An SBS relay telescope having a telescope focal point includes a baffle at the telescope focal point which blocks off angle beams. A beam splitter is placed between the SBS mirror system and the SBS relay telescope, directing a fraction of the beam to an alternate beam path for an alignment fiducial. The SBS mirror system has a collimated SBS cell and a focused SBS cell. An adjustable attenuator is placed between the collimated SBS cell and the focused SBS cell, by which pulse width of the reflected beam can be adjusted.

  10. Stimulated Brillouin scattering mirror system, high power laser and laser peening method and system using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz B. (Rocklin, CA)

    2007-04-24

    A laser system, such as a master oscillator/power amplifier system, comprises a gain medium and a stimulated Brillouin scattering SBS mirror system. The SBS mirror system includes an in situ filtered SBS medium that comprises a compound having a small negative non-linear index of refraction, such as a perfluoro compound. An SBS relay telescope having a telescope focal point includes a baffle at the telescope focal point which blocks off angle beams. A beam splitter is placed between the SBS mirror system and the SBS relay telescope, directing a fraction of the beam to an alternate beam path for an alignment fiducial. The SBS mirror system has a collimated SBS cell and a focused SBS cell. An adjustable attenuator is placed between the collimated SBS cell and the focused SBS cell, by which pulse width of the reflected beam can be adjusted.

  11. Materials Data on Ag3AuS2 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on KFeS2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on K(CoS)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Photo-oxidation method using MoS2 nanocluster materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcoxon, Jess P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A method of photo-oxidizing a hydrocarbon compound is provided by dispersing MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters in a solvent containing a hydrocarbon compound contaminant to form a stable solution mixture and irradiating the mixture to photo-oxide the hydrocarbon compound. Hydrocarbon compounds of interest include aromatic hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbons. MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters with an average diameter less than approximately 10 nanometers are shown to be effective in decomposing potentially toxic aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as phenol, pentachlorophenol, chlorinated biphenols, and chloroform, into relatively non-toxic compounds. The irradiation can occur by exposing the MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters and hydrocarbon compound mixture with visible light. The MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters can be introduced to the toxic hydrocarbons as either a MoS.sub.2 solution or deposited on a support material.

  15. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nevada Rail Alignment for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

  16. Materials Data on Ba(FeS2)2 (SG:87) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. EIS-0283-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Supplemental

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EPA announced the availability of a final supplemental EIS that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for disposition of 13.1 metric tons (14.4 tons) of surplus plutonium for which a disposition path is not assigned, including 7.1 metric tons (7.8 tons) of plutonium from pits that were declared excess to national defense needs after publication of the 2007

  18. Materials Data on FeS2 (SG:205) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on TaS2 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Na2S2O5 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Na2S2O7 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on FeS2 (SG:58) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on TlGeS2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on DyTlS2 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Ca(ScS2)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Ca(SmS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Ca(LaS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Ca(GdS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Ca(DyS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Ca(NdS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on RuS2 (SG:205) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Mg(AlS2)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Site-dependent free energy barrier for proton reduction on MoS2...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 14 SOLAR ENERGY...

  14. Materials Data on Fe3H10S2NO14 (SG:160) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on H30S2O21 (SG:8) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. EIS-0026-S-2; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Final...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    by calling 1 (800) 336-9477 COVER SHEET Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Title: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement...

  17. Alternative S2 Hinge Regions of the Myosin Rod Affect Myofibrillar Structure and Myosin Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Mark S.; Dambacher, Corey M.; Knowles, Aileen F.; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Swank, Douglas M.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Maughan, David W.

    2009-07-01

    The subfragment 2/light meromyosin 'hinge' region has been proposed to significantly contribute to muscle contraction force and/or speed. Transgenic replacement of the endogenous fast muscle isovariant hinge A (exon 15a) in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle with the slow muscle hinge B (exon 15b) allows examination of the structural and functional changes when only this region of the myosin molecule is different. Hinge B was previously shown to increase myosin rod length, increase A-band and sarcomere length, and decrease flight performance compared to hinge A. We applied additional measures to these transgenic lines to further evaluate the consequences of modifying this hinge region. Structurally, the longer A-band and sarcomere lengths found in the hinge B myofibrils appear to be due to the longitudinal addition of myosin heads. Functionally, hinge B, although a significant distance from the myosin catalytic domain, alters myosin kinetics in a manner consistent with this region increasing myosin rod length. These structural and functional changes combine to decrease whole fly wing-beat frequency and flight performance. Our results indicate that this hinge region plays an important role in determining myosin kinetics and in regulating thick and thin filament lengths as well as sarcomere length.

  18. Materials Data on K(CoS)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. EIS-0082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for separating the high-activity fraction from the low-activity fraction of the high-level radioactive waste salt solutions...

  20. Materials Data on BaHgS2 (SG:26) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Amended Notice of Intent To Expand...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Impact Statement Alignment, Construction, and Operation of a Rail Line to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada The Department of Energy (DOE or the...

  2. EIS-0250-S1 and EIS-0250-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statements Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca...

  3. EIS-0250-S1 and EIS-0250-S2: DOE Notice of Availability of the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NV and Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada--Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor The...

  4. EIS-0082-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from liquid high-level radioactive waste before vitrifying the high-activity fraction of the waste in the Defense Waste Processing Facility and disposing of the...

  5. Materials Data on FeS2 (SG:58) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Ca(ScS2)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Cd(GaS2)2 (SG:82) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Fe(RhS2)2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-24

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Fe(SbS2)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Raman vibrational spectra of bulk to monolayer Re S 2 with lower...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This content will become publicly available on August 25, 2016 Prev Next Title: ... become publicly available on August 25, 2016 Publisher's Version of Record 10.1103...

  11. Materials Data on Zn3S2O9 (SG:11) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Mn(NbS2)3 (SG:182) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-05-16

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Site-dependent free energy barrier for proton reduction on MoS2...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 14 SOLAR ENERGY

  14. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS2: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jin, Wencan; Yeh, Po -Chun; Zaki, Nader; Zhang, Datong; Liou, Jonathan T.; Dadap, Jerry I.; Barinov, Alexey; Yablonskikh, Mikhail; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Sutter, Peter; et al

    2015-03-17

    We report the directly measured electronic structure of exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) using micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Measurements of both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ elucidate the effects of interaction with a substrate. Thus, a suggested relaxation of the in-plane lattice constant is found for both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ crystals. For suspended MoS₂, a careful investigation of the measured uppermost valence band gives an effective mass at Γ¯ and Κ¯ of 2.00m₀ and 0.43m₀, respectively. We also measure an increase in the band linewidth from the midpoint of Γ¯Κ¯ to the vicinity of Κ¯ and briefly discussmore » its possible origin.« less

  15. EIS-0026-S2: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SEIS-II evaluates environmental impacts resulting from the various treatment options; the transportation of TRU waste to WIPP using truck, a combination of truck and regular rail service, and a...

  16. Second update The Gordon Bell Competetion entry gb110s2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vranas, P; Soltz, R

    2006-11-12

    Since the update to our entry of October 20th we have just made a significant improvement. We understand that this is past the deadline for updates and very close to the conference date. However, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has just updated the BG/L system software on their full 64 BG/L supercomputer to IBM-BGL Release 3. As we discussed in our update of October 20 this release includes our custom L1 and SRAM access functions that allow us to achieve higher sustained performance. Just a few hours ago we got access to the full system and obtained the fastest sustained performance point. In the full 131,072 CPU-cores system QCD sustains 70.9 Teraflops for the Dirac operator and 67.9 teraflops for the full Conjugate Gradient inverter. This is about 20% faster than our last update. We attach the corresponding speedup figure. As you can tell the speedup is perfect. This figure is the same as Figure 1 of our October 20th update except that it now includes the 131,072 CPU-cores point.

  17. Materials Data on CuSbS2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Sr(NdS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Sr(GaS2)2 (SG:70) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Sr(GdS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Sr(ErS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Sr(SmS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Sr(InS2)2 (SG:70) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Sr(AsS2)2 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Sr(AlS2)2 (SG:70) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Sr(PrS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Sr(ScS2)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Sr(CeS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Sr(LaS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain—Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor and Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

  11. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada—Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor and Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

  12. Materials Data on IrS2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on RbSbS2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on NaFeS2 (SG:23) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. EIS-0283-S2-InterimActionDetermation_04_25_13.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  16. EIS-0283-S2_SPD_Vol_3_Comment_Response.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  17. Glass melter system technologies for vitrification of high-sodium-content low-level, radioactive, liquid wastes: Phase 1, SBS demonstration with simulated low-level waste. Final test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, M.J.; Scotto, M.V.; Shiao, S.Y.

    1995-12-31

    The attached vendor report was prepared for Westinghouse Hanford Company by Babcock & Wilcox as documentation of the Phase I Final Test Report, Cyclone Combustion Melter Demonstration.

  18. THIRTY NEW LOW-MASS SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Hebb, Leslie; Cameron, Andrew C.; Liu, Michael C.; Neill Reid, I. E-mail: Andrew.Cameron@st-and.ac.u E-mail: mliu@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2010-06-20

    As part of our search for young M dwarfs within 25 pc, we acquired high-resolution spectra of 185 low-mass stars compiled by the NStars project that have strong X-ray emission. By cross-correlating these spectra with radial velocity standard stars, we are sensitive to finding multi-lined spectroscopic binaries. We find a low-mass spectroscopic binary fraction of 16% consisting of 27 SB2s, 2 SB3s, and 1 SB4, increasing the number of known low-mass spectroscopic binaries (SBs) by 50% and proving that strong X-ray emission is an extremely efficient way to find M-dwarf SBs. WASP photometry of 23 of these systems revealed two low-mass eclipsing binaries (EBs), bringing the count of known M-dwarf EBs to 15. BD-22 5866, the ESB4, was fully described in 2008 by Shkolnik et al. and CCDM J04404+3127 B consists of two mid-M stars orbiting each other every 2.048 days. WASP also provided rotation periods for 12 systems, and in the cases where the synchronization time scales are short, we used P{sub rot} to determine the true orbital parameters. For those with no P{sub rot}, we used differential radial velocities to set upper limits on orbital periods and semimajor axes. More than half of our sample has near-equal-mass components (q > 0.8). This is expected since our sample is biased toward tight orbits where saturated X-ray emission is due to tidal spin-up rather than stellar youth. Increasing the samples of M-dwarf SBs and EBs is extremely valuable in setting constraints on current theories of stellar multiplicity and evolution scenarios for low-mass multiple systems.

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Filter by Author Liu, Jin (20) Lin, Jung-Fu (7) Prakapenka, Vitali B. (7) Mao, Zhu (5) ... pressure and temperature Liu, Jin ; Lin, Jung-Fu ; Mao, Zhu ; Prakapenka, Vitali B. ...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Hauri, Erik H. (1) Jacobsen, Steven D. (1) Lin, Jung-Fu (1) Mao, Zhu (1) McCammon, ... of state of bridgmanite Mao, Zhu ; Lin, Jung-Fu ; Yang, Jing ; Inoue, Toru ; ...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Hahn, Oliver (1) Mao, Yao-Yuan (1) Wechsler, Risa H. (1) Wu, Hao-Yi (1) Save Results Save ... Menlo Park SLAC ETH, Zurich ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; Behroozi, Peter S. ; Mao, Yao-Yuan ; ...

  2. 1s-2p Excitation of Atomic Hydrogen by Electron Impact Studied Using the Angular Correlation Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yalim, H.A.; Cvejanovic, D.; Crowe, A.

    1997-10-01

    Excitation of the 2p state of atomic hydrogen by electron impact was studied using the electron-photon angular correlation technique with the aim of resolving a long-standing and serious discrepancy between theories and previous experiments at large scattering angles. At a scattering angle of 100{degree}, where the discrepancy was greatest, the present result shows excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted correlations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. EIS-0250-S1 and EIS-0250-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV and Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada--Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor

  4. Boron uptake in tumors, cerebrum and blood from [10B]NA4B24H22S2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, Daniel N.; Micca, Peggy L.; Fairchild, Ralph G.

    1988-01-01

    A stable boronated (.sup.10 B-labeled) compound, sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate is infused in the form of the disulfide dimer, [.sup.10 B]Na.sub.4 B.sub.24 H.sub.22 S.sub.2, at a dose of about 200 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight. The infusion is performed into the blood or peritoneal cavity of the patient slowly over a period of many days, perhaps one week or more, at the rate of roughly 1 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight per hour. Use of this particular boronated dimer in the manner or similarly to the manner so described permits radiotherapeutically effective amounts of boron to accumulate in tumors to be treated by boron neutron capture radiation therapy and also permits sufficient retention of boron in tumor after the cessation of the slow infusion, so as to allow the blood concentration of .sup.10 B to drop or to be reduced artificially to a radiotherapeutically effective level, less than one-half of the concentration of .sup.10 B in the tumor.

  5. Controlled Nucleation and Growth Process of Li2S2/Li2S in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Zuo, Pengjian; Koech, Phillip K.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2013-09-20

    Lithium-sulfur battery is a promising next-generation energy storage system because of its potentially three to five times higher energy density than that of traditional lithium ion batteries. However, the dissolution and precipitation of soluble polysulfides during cycling initiate a series of key-chain reactions that significantly shorten battery life. Herein, we demonstrate that through a simple but effective strategy, significantly improved cycling performance is achieved for high sulfur loading electrodes through controlling the nucleation and precipitation of polysulfieds on the electrode surface. More than 400 or 760 stable cycling are successfully displayed in the cells with locked discharge capacity of 625 mAh g-1 or 500 mAh g-1, respectively. The nucleation and growth process of dissolved polysulfides has been electrochemically altered to confine the thickness of discharge products passivated on the cathode surface, increasing the utilization rate of sulfur while avoiding severe morphology changes on the electrode. More importantly, the exposure of new lithium metal surface to the S-containing electrolyte is also greatly reduced through this strategy, largely minimizing the anode corrosion caused by polysulfides. This work interlocks the electrode morphologies and its evolution with electrochemical interference to modulate cell performances by using Li-S system as a platform, providing different but critical directions for this community.

  6. EIS-0158-S2: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement, the supplement to DOE/EIS-0158, to analyze the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the sale of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in Kern County, California to Occidental Petroleum Corporation.

  7. Materials Data on MgH8C2S2(NO2)2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. EIS-0250-S1 and EIS-0250-S2: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV and Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada--Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor

  9. Exascale design space exploration and co-design - 1-s2.0-S0167739X13000782-main.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    u t u r e G e n e r a t i o n C o m p u t e r S y s t e m s 3 0 ( 2 0 1 4 ) 4 6 - 5 8 C o n t e n t s l i s t s a v a i l a b l e a t S c i e n c e D i r e c t F u t u r e G e n e r a t i o n C o m p u t e r S y s t e m s j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / f g c s E x a s c a l e d e s i g n s p a c e e x p l o r a t i o n a n d c o - d e s i g n S . S . D o s a n j h a , R . F . B a r r e t t b , , D . W . D o e r f l e r b , S . D . H a m m o n d b

  10. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: DOE Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alignment, Construction, and Operation of a Rail Line to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV

  11. Materials Data on CrH8C4(S2N3)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on CdH8C4(S2N3)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on MgH8C2S2(NO2)2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Cs2Ti(AgS2)2 (SG:132) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Savannah River Site Marks Waste Processing Milestone with Melter’s 2,000th Waste Canister

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – The second melter to operate in the 16-year history of the nation’s largest radioactive waste glassification plant shows no signs of slowing after recently pouring its 2,000 canister of glass-formed hazardous waste.

  16. Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Synthesis via Methanol and Dimethyl Ether Intermediates: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Zhu, Yunhua; Gray, Michel J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Wang, Yong; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Palo, Daniel R.

    2013-11-26

    The objective of the work was to enhance price-competitive, synthesis gas (syngas)-based production of transportation fuels that are directly compatible with the existing vehicle fleet (i.e., vehicles fueled by gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, etc.). To accomplish this, modifications to the traditional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process were investigated. In this study, we investigated direct conversion of syngas to distillates using methanol and dimethyl ether intermediates. For this application, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 (PdZnAl) catalyst previously developed for methanol steam reforming was evaluated. The PdZnAl catalyst was shown to be far superior to a conventional copper-based methanol catalyst when operated at relatively high temperatures (i.e., >300°C), which is necessary for MTG-type applications. Catalytic performance was evaluated through parametric studies. Process conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas-hour-space velocity, and syngas feed ratio (i.e., hydrogen:carbon monoxide) were investigated. PdZnAl catalyst formulation also was optimized to maximize conversion and selectivity to methanol and dimethyl ether while suppressing methane formation. Thus, a PdZn/Al2O3 catalyst optimized for methanol and dimethyl ether formation was developed through combined catalytic material and process parameter exploration. However, even after compositional optimization, a significant amount of undesirable carbon dioxide was produced (formed via the water-gas-shift reaction), and some degree of methane formation could not be completely avoided. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 used in combination with ZSM-5 was investigated for direct syngas-to-distillates conversion. High conversion was achieved as thermodynamic constraints are alleviated when methanol and dimethyl are intermediates for hydrocarbon formation. When methanol and/or dimethyl ether are products formed separately, equilibrium restrictions occur. Thermodynamic relaxation also enables the use of lower operating pressures than what would be allowed for methanol synthesis alone. Aromatic-rich hydrocarbon liquid (C5+), containing a significant amount of methylated benzenes, was produced under these conditions. However, selectivity control to liquid hydrocarbons was difficult to achieve. Carbon dioxide and methane formation was problematic. Furthermore, saturation of the olefinic intermediates formed in the zeolite, and necessary for gasoline production, occurred over PdZnAl. Thus, yield to desirable hydrocarbon liquid product was limited. Evaluation of other oxygenate-producing catalysts could possibly lead to future advances. Potential exists with discovery of other types of catalysts that suppress carbon dioxide and light hydrocarbon formation. Comparative techno-economics for a single-step syngas-to-distillates process and a more conventional MTG-type process were investigated. Results suggest operating and capital cost savings could only modestly be achieved, given future improvements to catalyst performance. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increased single-pass yield to hydrocarbon liquid is a primary need for this process to achieve cost competiveness.

  17. EIS-0005-S2: Bonneville Power Administration Proposed FY 1979 Program Facility Planning Supplement Southwest Oregon Area Service, Supplemental

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statement, one of a series prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration on various facets of its construction and maintenance activities, addresses the potential impact of a major new facility proposed for fiscal year 1979. To allow power generated in Wyoming to be delivered to Southwest Oregon and to facilitate the exchange of electric power between the Pacific Northwest and the Middle Snake region, two basic plans of service, each with two corridor routing options, have been identified to meet system requirements. BPA proposes construction of the following two transmission facilities: (1) a 500-kV line from Idaho Power Company's Brownlee Substation in Idaho to BPA's Slatt Substation near Arlington, Oregon, and (2) a 500-kV line from Buckley (near Maupin, Oregon) to Malin, Oregon. This statement must be reviewed and used in conjunction with the overall programmatic environmental statement entitled ""The Role of the Bonneville Power Administration in the Pacific Northwest Power Supply System, Including Its Participation in the Hydro-Thermal Power Program: A Program Environmental Statement and Planning Report (The ""Role EIS""), particularly Appendix B - BPA Power Transmission.

  18. EIS-0236-S2: Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on Stockpile Stewardship and Management for a Modern Pit Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's NNSA is responsible for the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, including production readiness required to maintain that stockpile. Pursuant to National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, NNSA has prepared a Supplement to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on: (1) whether to proceed with a Modern Pit Facility (MPF); and (2) if so, where to locate a MPF.

  19. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinsons disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variables which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.

  20. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variablesmore » which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.« less

  1. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variables which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.

  2. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, Clifford B. (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); George, Edward V. (Livermore, CA); Miller, John L. (Pleasanton, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  3. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; George, E.V.; Miller, J.L.; Krupke, W.F.

    1993-11-09

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  4. Rhapsody: II. Subhalo Properties and the Impact of Tidal Stripping...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SLAC Michigan U. ; Hahn, Oliver ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC ETH, Zurich ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; Behroozi, Peter S. ; Mao, Yao-Yuan ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC Publication Date:...

  5. The Dependence of Subhalo Abundance on Halo Concentration (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Dependence of Subhalo Abundance on Halo Concentration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Dependence of Subhalo Abundance on Halo Concentration Authors: Mao,...

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Tetrahedrally coordinated carbonates in Earth;s lower mantle Boulard, Eglantine ; Pan, Ding ; Galli, Giulia ; Liu, Zhenxian ; Mao, Wendy L. ; Stanford) ; UC) ; CIW) February 2015 ...

  7. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... ; Liu, Yinong ; Liu, Zhenyang ; Mao, Shengcheng ; Han, Xiaodong ; Ren, Yang This study investigated the elastic deformation behaviour of Nb nanowires embedded in a NiTi matrix. ...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lin, Chuanlong (8) Sinogeikin, Stanislav (8) Smith, Jesse S. (8) Chow, Paul (7) Mao, Wendy ... using rapid compression and decompression Smith, Jesse S. ; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V. ; ...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Zhang Jianzhong (9) Wang, Liping (8) He, Duanwei (6) Jin, Changqing (5) Mao, Ho-kwang (5) ... Sci.) ; LANL) August 2013 Crystal Structures, Elastic Properties, and Hardness of ...

  10. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    team at Los Alamos National Laboratory poses in front of the MAOS Aerosol and Chemistry units. From left to right: Kyle Gorkowski, Alison Aitken, Paul Ortega, Anna Trugman,...

  11. Structure of the oxygen-annealed chalcogenide superconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    x Authors: Hu, Hefei ; Zuo, Jian-Min ; Zheng, Mao ; Eckstein, James N. ; Park, Wan Kyu ; Greene, Laura H. ; Wen, Jinsheng ; Xu, Zhijun ; Lin, Zhiwei ; Li, Qiang ; Gu,...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mao, Ninghui" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report ...

  13. Temperature and productivity

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (1968) performed experiments with 36 female and 36 male students in a climate chamber. ... Witterseh, T. 2000. Environmental perception, SBS symptoms and performance of office ...

  14. ABSTRACT

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (1968) performed experiments with 36 female and 36 male students in a climate chamber. ... Witterseh T. 2001. Environmental perception, SBS symptoms and performance of office work ...

  15. Gas-filled hohlraum experiments at the national ignition facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernndez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Goldman, S. R.; Grimm, B. M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Lanier, N. E.; Rose, H. A.; Schmidt, D. M.; Swift, D. C.; Workman, J. B.; Alvarez, Sharon; Bower, Dan.; Braun, Dave.; Campbell, K.; DeWald, E.; Glenzer, S.; Holder, J.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Kimbrough, Joe; Kirkwood, Robert; Landen, O. L.; Mccarville, Tom; Macgowan, B.; Mackinnon, A.; Niemann, C.; Schein, J.; Schneider, M; Watts, Phil; Young, Ben-li 194154; Young B.

    2004-01-01

    The summary of this paper is: (1) We have fielded on NIF a gas-filled hohlraum designed for future ignition experiments; (2) Wall-motion measurements are consistent with LASNEX simulations; (3) LPI back-scattering results have confounded expectations - (a) Stimulated Brillouin (SBS) dominates Raman (SRS) for any gas-fill species, (b) Measured SBS time-averaged reflectivity values are high, peak values are even higher, (c) SRS and SBS peak while laser-pulse is rising; and (4) Plasma conditions at the onset of high back-scattering yield high SBS convective linear gain - Wavelengths of the back-scattered light is predicted by linear theory.

  16. Specific heat investigation for line nodes in heavily overdoped B a 1 - x K x F e 2 A s 2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, J. S.; Stewart, G. R.; Liu, Yong; Lograsso, Thomas A.

    2015-06-10

    Previous research has found that the pairing symmetry in the iron-based superconductor Ba1-xKxFe2As2 changes from nodeless s wave near optimally doped, x?0.4-0.55 and Tc>30K, to nodal (either d wave or s wave) at the pure end point, x=1 and Tc1-xKxFe2As2,x=0.91,more0.88, and 0.81. The values for Tcmid are 5.6, 7.2, and 13 K and for Hc2?4.5, 6, and 20 T, respectively. The data can be analyzed in a two-gap scenario, ?2/?1?4, with the magnetic field dependence of ?(=C/T as T?0) showing an anisotropic S-shaped behavior vs H, with the suppression of the lower gap by 1 T and ??H1/2 overall. Although such a nonlinear ? vs H is consistent with deep minima or nodes in the gap structure, it is not clear evidence for one, or both, of the gaps being nodal in these overdoped samples. Thus, following the established theoretical analysis of the specific heat of d-wave cuprate superconductors containing line nodes, we present the specific heat normalized by H1/2 plotted vs T/H1/2 of these heavily overdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2 samples whichthanks to the absence of magnetic impurities in our sampleconvincingly shows the expected scaling for line node behavior for the larger gap for all three compositions. There is, however, no clear observation of the nodal behavior C??T2 in zero field at low temperatures, with ??2mJ/molK3 being consistent with the data. This, together with the scaling, leaves open the possibility of extreme anisotropy in a nodeless larger gap, ?2, such that the scaling works for fields above 0.250.5 T (0.20.4 K in temperature units), where this is an estimate for the size of the deep minima in the ?2~20-25K gap. Therefore, the location of the change from nodeless to nodal gaps between optimally doped and heavily overdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2 based on the present work may be closer to the KFe2As2 end point than x=0.91.less

  17. Measurement of the underlying event activity using charged-particle jets in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-09-21

    A measurement of the underlying event (UE) activity in proton-proton collisions is performed using events with charged-particle jets produced in the central pseudorapidity region (|η jet| < 2) and with transverse momentum 1 ≤ pT jet < 100 GeV. The analysis uses a data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The UE activity is measured as a function of pT jet in terms of the average multiplicity and scalar sum of transverse momenta (pT) of charged particles, with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV, in the azimuthal region transverse to the highest pT jet direction. By further dividing the transverse region into two regions of smaller and larger activity, various components of the UE activity are separated. As a result, the measurements are compared to previous results at 0.9 and 7 TeV, and to predictions of several Monte Carlo event generators, providing constraints on the modelling of the UE dynamics

  18. Measurement of the underlying event activity using charged-particle jets in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 2.76 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-09-21

    A measurement of the underlying event (UE) activity in proton-proton collisions is performed using events with charged-particle jets produced in the central pseudorapidity region (|η jet| < 2) and with transverse momentum 1 ≤ pT jet < 100 GeV. The analysis uses a data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The UE activity is measured as a function of pT jet in terms of the average multiplicity and scalar sum of transverse momenta (pT) of charged particles, with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV, in the azimuthal regionmore » transverse to the highest pT jet direction. By further dividing the transverse region into two regions of smaller and larger activity, various components of the UE activity are separated. As a result, the measurements are compared to previous results at 0.9 and 7 TeV, and to predictions of several Monte Carlo event generators, providing constraints on the modelling of the UE dynamics« less

  19. Characterization of the LiSi/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/FeS(2) System for Potential Use as a Geothermal Borehole Power Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GUIDOTTI, RONALD A.; REINHARDT, FREDERICK W.

    1999-10-18

    We are continuing to study the suitability of modified thermal-battery technology as a potential power source for geothermal borehole applications. Previous work focused on the LiSi/FeS{sub 2} couple over a temperature range of 350 C to 400 C with the LiBr-KBr-LiF eutectic, which melts at 324.5 C. In this work, the discharge processes that take place in LiSi/CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic/FeS{sub 2} thermal cells were studied at temperatures between 250 C and 400 C using pelletized cells with immobilized electrolyte. The CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic was selected because of its lower melting point (228.5 C). Incorporation of a quasi-reference electrode allowed the determination of the relative contribution of each electrode to the overall cell polarization. The results of single-cell tests and limited battery tests are presented, along with preliminary data for battery stacks tested in a simulated geothermal borehole environment.

  20. Influence of pump wavelength and core size on stimulated Brillouin scattering spectra of acoustically antiguiding optical fibres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Likhachev, M E; Alekseev, V V; Bubnov, M M [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Yashkov, M V; Vechkanov, N N; Gur'yanov, A N [G.G.Devyatykh Institute of Chemistry of High-Purity Substances, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation); Peyhambarian, N; Temyanko, V; Nagel, J [College of Optical Sciences University of Arizona, 1630 E. University Blvd.Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-11-30

    Optical fibres having an acoustically antiguiding structure produced by alumina doping of their core have been fabricated and investigated. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) spectra of the fibres have been measured and calculated theoretically. The results demonstrate that the shape of the SBS spectrum of the acoustically antiguiding fibres strongly depends on the pump wavelength, core size and dopant profile across the fibre. A considerable broadening of the SBS gain spectrum is only possible at certain guidance parameters of the fibre and a fixed operating wavelength. (fibre and integrated-optical structures)

  1. Modified magnetism within the coherence volume of superconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Leiner J. ; Thampy V. ; Christianson, A. D. ; Abernathy, D. L. ; Stone, M. B. ; Lumsden, M. D. ; Sefat, A. S. ; Sales, B. C. ; Hu, Jin ; Mao, Zhiqiang ; Bao, Wei ; ...

  2. Effects of pressure and distortion on superconductivity in Tl...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2CaCusubscript 2Osubscript 8+delta Authors: Zhang, Jian-Bo ; Struzhkin, Viktor V ; Yang, Wenge ; Mao, Ho-Kwang ; Lin, Hai-Qing ; Ma, Yong-Chang ; Wang, Nan-Lin ; Chen,...

  3. Structure of the oxygen-annealed chalcogenide superconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fe1.08Te0.55Se0.45Ox Authors: Hu, Hefei ; Zuo, Jian-Min ; Zheng, Mao ; Eckstein, James N. ; Park, Wan Kyu ; Greene, Laura H. ; Wen, Jinsheng ; Xu, Zhijun ; Lin, Zhiwei ; Li,...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prakapenka, Vitali B. (65) Prakapenka, Vitali (17) Lin, Jung-Fu (14) Dera, Przemyslaw (13) ... of state of bridgmanite Mao, Zhu ; Lin, Jung-Fu ; Yang, Jing ; Inoue, Toru ; ...

  5. Superhard Monoclinic Polymorph of Carbon (Journal Article) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    graphite above 13.4 GPa. The simulated x-ray diffraction pattern and near K-edge spectroscopy are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data W.L. Mao et al., Science...

  6. In Focus: Dented Diamonds, Carbon Cages, and Exceptional Potential...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    This work, featured in the Office of Science's In Focus, was supported by the Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments (EFree) center, an EFRC led by Ho-kwang Mao at the ...

  7. Section 68

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARMpost97 285 Longwave Radiative Forcing in Global Climate Models (a) F. Baer, J. Mao, C. Wang and R. G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park,...

  8. SSRL Seminar Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hiring Filamentous Bacteriophage for Targeted Cancer Treatment SSRL Seminar Tuesday, August 24, 2010 11:00 - 12:30 SSRL Conference room -137-322 Chuanbin Mao Department of...

  9. Experimental observation of incoherent-coherent crossover and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Liu, Z. K. ; Yi, M. ; Zhang, Y. ; Hu, J. ; Yu, R. ; Zhu, J.-X. ; He, R.-H. ; Chen, Y. L. ; Hashimoto, M. ; Moore, R. G. ; Mo, S.-K. ; Hussain, Z. ; Si, Q. ; Mao, Z. Q. ; ...

  10. Rhapsody: I. Structural Properties and Formation History from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Wu, Hao-Yi ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC Michigan U. ; Hahn, Oliver ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; Mao, Yao-Yuan ; Behroozi, Peter S. ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC Publication Date: ...

  11. Vibrational and structural properties of tetramethyltin under...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    properties of tetramethyltin under pressure Authors: Qin, Zhen-Xing ; Chen, Xiao-Jia ; Zhang, Chao ; Tang, Ling-Yun ; Zhong, Guo-Hua ; Lin, Hai-Qing ; Meng, Yue ; Mao,...

  12. Rami Hourani | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 15296-15299 (2011). 10.1021ja2063082 Xu, Ting; Zhao, Nana; Ren, Feng; Hourani, Rami; Lee, Ming Tsang; Shu, Jessica Y; Mao, Samuel; and Helms,...

  13. Brett Helms | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 15296-15299 (2011). 10.1021ja2063082 Xu, Ting; Zhao, Nana; Ren, Feng; Hourani, Rami; Lee, Ming Tsang; Shu, Jessica Y; Mao, Samuel; and Helms,...

  14. Ting Xu | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 15296-15299 (2011). 10.1021ja2063082 Xu, Ting; Zhao, Nana; Ren, Feng; Hourani, Rami; Lee, Ming Tsang; Shu, Jessica Y; Mao, Samuel; and Helms,...

  15. Subnanometer Porous Thin Films by the Co-assembly of Nanotube...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Co-assembly of Nanotube Subunits and Block Copolymers Previous Next List Ting Xu, Nana Zhao, Feng Ren, Rami Hourani, Ming Tsang Lee, Jessica Y. Shu, Samuel Mao, and Brett A....

  16. ARM - Instrument - mfr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central Facility, Lamont, OK ARM Mobile Facility AWR M1 Browse Data McMurdo Station Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica; AMF2 MAO M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Manacapuru, Amazonas,...

  17. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mao-Hua Full Text Available November 2014, American Physical Society Connecting Thermoelectric Performance and Topological-Insulator Behavior: Bi 2 Te 3 and Bi 2 Te 2 Se from...

  18. Long-pulse-width narrow-bandwidth solid state laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A long pulse laser system emits 500-1000 ns quasi-rectangular pulses at 527 nm with near diffraction-limited divergence and near transform-limited bandwidth. The system consists of one or more flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass zig-zag amplifiers, a very low threshold stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phase conjugator system, and a free-running single frequency Nd:YLF master oscillator. Completely passive polarization switching provides eight amplifier gain passes. Multiple frequency output can be generated by using SBS cells having different pressures of a gaseous SBS medium or different SBS materials. This long pulse, low divergence, narrow-bandwidth, multi-frequency output laser system is ideally suited for use as an illuminator for long range speckle imaging applications. Because of its high average power and high beam quality, this system has application in any process which would benefit from a long pulse format, including material processing and medical applications.

  19. Long-pulse-width narrow-bandwidth solid state laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.

    1997-11-18

    A long pulse laser system emits 500-1000 ns quasi-rectangular pulses at 527 nm with near diffraction-limited divergence and near transform-limited bandwidth. The system consists of one or more flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass zig-zag amplifiers, a very low threshold stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phase conjugator system, and a free-running single frequency Nd:YLF master oscillator. Completely passive polarization switching provides eight amplifier gain passes. Multiple frequency output can be generated by using SBS cells having different pressures of a gaseous SBS medium or different SBS materials. This long pulse, low divergence, narrow-bandwidth, multi-frequency output laser system is ideally suited for use as an illuminator for long range speckle imaging applications. Because of its high average power and high beam quality, this system has application in any process which would benefit from a long pulse format, including material processing and medical applications. 5 figs.

  20. ARM - Datastreams - tsiskyimage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA retired SBS M1 Browse Data Steamboat Springs CO, Valley Site; AMF2 retired TMP M1...

  1. ARM - Datastreams - skyrad20s

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retired PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA retired SBS M1 Browse Data Steamboat Springs CO, Valley Site; AMF2 retired...

  2. ARM - Instrument - mpl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Browse Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA retired SBS S1 Browse Data Steamboat Springs CO, Thunderhead Lodge TMP M1 Browse...

  3. ARM - Instrument - gndrad

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA retired SBS M1 Browse Data Steamboat Springs CO, Valley Site; AMF2 retired TMP M1...

  4. ARM - Instrument - sonde

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA retired SBS M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Steamboat Springs CO, Valley Site; AMF2...

  5. ARM - Datastreams - sondewnpn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA retired SBS M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Steamboat Springs CO, Valley Site; AMF2...

  6. Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Gary Smith Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) November 18, 2010 2 Rough Flowsheet Diagram Tank Farm Evaporator Pretreatment Evaporator IDF ETF HLW LAW Vit Secondary SBS WESP Melter Supplemental ? Repository Secondary -Caustic Scrub (LAW Vit) -HEPA Filters -Carbon Beds -Silver Mordenite (HLW Vit) -Other operating wastes Recycle Options * Continuous recycle of the SBS/WESP bottoms from LAW vitrification are assumed in baseline - could consider purges and

  7. Reye's syndrome: salicylate and mitochondrial monoamine oxidase function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faraj, B.A.; Caplan, D.; Lolies, P.

    1986-03-01

    It has been suggested that aspirin is somehow linked with the onset of Reye's syndrome (RS). A general feature of Reye's syndrome is severe impairment of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) function. The main objective of this investigation was to study the effect of salicylate on platelet mitochondrial MAO activity in three groups: group A (healthy children, n = 21) and group C (healthy adults, n = 10). Platelet MAO was measured by radio-enzymatic technique with /sup 14/C-tyramine as a substrate. The results showed that salicyclate (10 mM) had a 20 to 60 percent inhibitory effect on platelet MAO function in only 1, 3 and 2 of the subjects in group A, B and C. Furthermore, there was an association between low enzyme activity and salicylate MAO inhibitory effect in these subjects. These preliminary findings suggest that salicylate may induce deterioration in mitochondrial function in susceptible individuals and that the assessment of salicylate MAO inhibitory effect may identify those who may be at risk to develop aspirin poisoning and Reye's syndrome.

  8. Phase conjugation research: Final report, June 1, 1986--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, W.P.; Rockwell, D.A.; Turley, R.S.; Wandzura, S.M.

    1989-02-01

    The work performed on this contract has resulted in a significant improvement in the understanding of the temporal behavior of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and in the modeling of this phenomenon. In particular, we have demonstrated that: SBS generally does not have a steady-state, and therefore, that steady-state modeling is not appropriate; amplitude, phase and fidelity fluctuations of the Stokes wave are correlated; a small amount of feedback produces a steady-state for SBS in a bulk medium, but does not for SBS in a fiber or long lightguides; and 3d SBS modeling is practical. The main body of the report begins with the mathematical description of the SBS process, including the important time dependence. The fluctuation-dissipation theorem is employed to derive the strength of the noise term that drives the process. The next section discusses the algorithms employed in the calculations, and is followed by a review of the results, first in one and then in two spatial dimensions. We conclude with suggestions for further research. 21 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Event activity dependence of Y(nS) production in $$\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$$=5.02 TeV pPb and $$\\sqrt{s}$$=2.76 TeV pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-04-15

    The production of Y(1S), Y(2S), and Y(3S) is investigated in pPb and pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV and 2.76 TeV, respectively. The datasets correspond to integrated luminosities of about 31 nb–1 (pPb) and 5.4 pb–1 (pp), collected in 2013 by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Upsilons that decay into muons are reconstructed within the rapidity interval (yCM) < 1.93 in the nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass frame. Their production is studied as a function of two measures of event activity, namely the charged-particle multiplicity measured in the pseudorapidity interval |η| < 2.4, and the sum ofmore » transverse energy deposited at forward pseudorapidity, 4.0 < |η|< 5.2. The Y cross sections normalized by their event activity integrated values, Y(nS)/, are found to rise with both measures of the event activity in pp and pPb. In both collision systems, the ratios of the excited to the ground state cross sections, Y(nS)/Y(1S), are found to decrease with the charged-particle multiplicity, while as a function of the transverse energy the variation is less pronounced. Lastly, the event activity integrated double ratios, [Y(nS)/Y(1S)]pPb / [Y(nS)/Y(1S)]pp, are also measured and found to be 0.83 +/- 0.05 (stat.) +/- 0.05 (syst.) and 0.71 +/- 0.08 (stat.) +/- 0.09 (syst.) for Y(2S) and Y(3S), respectively.« less

  10. EIS-0250-S2: Supplemental EIS for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This SEIS is to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating a railroad for shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from an existing rail line in Nevada to a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The purpose of the evaluation is to assist the Department in deciding whether to construct and operate a railroad in Nevada, and if so, in which corridor and along which specific alignment within the selected corridor.

  11. Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant U. S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposition Project - 13460

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanochko, Ronald M. [Washington River Protection Solutions, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Corcoran, Connie [AEM Consulting, LLC, 1201 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [AEM Consulting, LLC, 1201 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix [1]. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility [2]. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling. This study [2] concluded that SBS direct disposal is a viable option to the WTP baseline. The results show: - Off-site transportation and disposal of the SBS condensate is achievable and cost effective. - Reduction of approximately 4,325 vitrified WTP Low Activity Waste canisters could be realized. - Positive WTP operational impacts; minimal WTP construction impacts are realized. - Reduction of mass flow from the LAW Facility to the Pretreatment Facility by 66%. - Improved Double Shell Tank (DST) space management is a benefit. (authors)

  12. Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant U. S. Department Of Energy Office Of River Protection Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposition Project - Abstract # 13460

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanochko, Ronald M; Corcoran, Connie

    2012-11-15

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling.

  13. Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations, VOCS, environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, M.G.; Erdmann, C.A.

    2002-10-01

    Using the 100 office-building Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study dataset, we performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the associations between indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} (dCO{sub 2}) concentrations and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (Lresp) Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Using principal components analysis we identified a number of possible sources of 73 measured volatile organic compounds in the office buildings, and assessed the impact of these VOCs on the probability of presenting the SBS symptoms. Additionally we included analysis adjusting for the risks for predisposition of having SBS symptoms associated with the allergic, asthmatic, and environmentally sensitive subpopulations within the office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependant associations (p<0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100-ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average significantly reduce the prevalence of several SBS symptoms, up to 80%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. VOC sources were observed to play an role in direct association with mucous membrane and lower respiratory irritation, and possibly to be indirectly involved in indoor chemical reactions with ozone that produce irritating compounds associated with SBS symptoms. O-xylene, possibly emitted from furniture coatings was associated with shortness of breath (OR at the maximum concentration = 8, p < 0.05). The environmental sensitivities of a large subset of the office building population add to the overall risk of SBS symptoms (ORs ranging from 2 to above 11) within the buildings.

  14. Reduction of stimulated Brillouin backscattering with plasma beam smoothing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yahia, V.; Loisel, G.; Baccou, C.; Labaune, C.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Depierreux, S.; Goyon, C.; Teychenné, D.; Borisenko, N. G.; Orekhov, A.; Rienecker, T.; Rosmej, O.

    2015-04-15

    Plasma induced incoherence (PII) can strongly modify the growth rates of stimulated scattering instabilities. A special double-target design was used to quantify the effect of PII on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). Successive shots using all or part of these targets led to the characterization of temporal and spatial incoherence of a laser pulse after propagation through a foam plasma and to the quantification of the reduction of SBS from the second target. Numerical simulations were used to identify the main physical mechanisms in play.

  15. Advanced Ceramic Filter For Diesel Emission Control | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ceramic Filter For Diesel Emission Control Advanced Ceramic Filter For Diesel Emission Control 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Dow Automotive PDF icon 2004_deer_mao.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Evaluation of Downsized Dow ACM DPF fundamental Modeling and Experimental Studies of Acicular Mullite Diesel Particulate Filters Tailored Acicular Mullite Substrates for Multifunctional Diesel Particulate Filters

  16. Microsoft Word - 08071744_DocProd.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shirley Basin South, Wyoming Disposal Site January 2009 LMS/SBS/S00808 This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August 2008, Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site January 2009 RIN 08071744 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map

  17. Microsoft Word - 08101885 DVP.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site April 2009 LMS/SBS/S01008 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-October 2009, Shirley Basin, Wyoming April 2009 RIN 08101885 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ............................................2 Data Assessment

  18. Microsoft Word - 09072450 DVP.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site October 2009 LMS/SBS/S00709 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-July 2009 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming October 2009 RIN 09072450 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ............................................2 Data Assessment

  19. Microsoft Word - 10063127 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site October 2010 LMS/SBS/S00610 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2010, Shirley Basin South, Wyoming October 2010 RIN 10063127 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ............................................3 Data Assessment Summary

  20. Microsoft Word - RIN 11063905 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site September 2011 LMS/SBS/S00611 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2011, Shirley Basin South, Wyoming September 2011 RIN 11063905 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ............................................3 Data Assessment Summary

  1. Microsoft Word - RIN 12064635 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Water Sampling at the Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Site September 2012 LMS/SBS/S00612 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2012, Shirley Basin South, Wyoming September 2012 RIN 12064635 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ............................................3 Data Assessment

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sampling at the Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site September 2013 LMS/SBS/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Shirley Basin South, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065426 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ............................................3 Data Assessment

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site October 2015 LMS/SBS/S00715 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-Shirley Basin South, Wyoming October 2015 RIN 15067185 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ...........................................3 Data Assessment Summary

  4. Stimulated scattering in laser driven fusion and high energy density physics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, L. Albright, B. J.; Rose, H. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Finnegan, S. M.; Bergen, B.; Bowers, K. J.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Milovich, J.

    2014-09-15

    In laser driven fusion and high energy density physics experiments, one often encounters a k?{sub D} range of 0.15?SBS), LDI, and re-scatter, together with three dimensional effects, are examined. Effects of collisions are found to include de-trapping as well as cross-speckle electron temperature variation from collisional heating, the latter of which reduces gain, introduces a positive frequency shift that counters the trapping-induced negative frequency shift, and affects SRS and SBS saturation. Bowing and breakup of ion-acoustic wavefronts saturate SBS and cause a dramatic, sharp decrease in SBS reflectivity. Mitigation of SRS and SBS in the strongly nonlinear trapping regime is discussed.

  5. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FacilitiesInstruments AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 MAOS Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments McMurdo Station, Antarctica, 2015-2016 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, to San Francisco, California, 2015 Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs,

  6. Connecting Thermoelectric Performance and Topological-Insulator Behavior:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bi₂Te₃ and Bi₂Te₂Se from First Principles (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: Connecting Thermoelectric Performance and Topological-Insulator Behavior: Bi₂Te₃ and Bi₂Te₂Se from First Principles « Prev Next » Title: Connecting Thermoelectric Performance and Topological-Insulator Behavior: Bi₂Te₃ and Bi₂Te₂Se from First Principles Authors: Shi, Hongliang ; Parker, David ; Du, Mao-Hua ; Singh, David J. Publication Date: 2015-01-20 OSTI

  7. The Eating Habits of Milky Way Mass Halos: Destroyed Dwarf Satellites and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Metallicity Distribution of Accreted Stars (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The Eating Habits of Milky Way Mass Halos: Destroyed Dwarf Satellites and the Metallicity Distribution of Accreted Stars Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Eating Habits of Milky Way Mass Halos: Destroyed Dwarf Satellites and the Metallicity Distribution of Accreted Stars Authors: Deason, Alis J. ; Mao, Yao-Yuan ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC Publication Date: 2016-02-02 OSTI

  8. Thermal equation of state and spin transition of magnesiosiderite at high

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pressure and temperature (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Thermal equation of state and spin transition of magnesiosiderite at high pressure and temperature Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal equation of state and spin transition of magnesiosiderite at high pressure and temperature Authors: Liu, Jin ; Lin, Jung-Fu ; Mao, Zhu ; Prakapenka, Vitali B. Publication Date: 2014-01-02 OSTI Identifier: 1161497 DOE Contract Number:

  9. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15, 2015 [Facility News, Feature Stories and Releases] Studying the Amazon Basin's Climate by Air and by Land Bookmark and Share Second Intensive Operational Period Concludes for Green Ocean Amazon Campaign Partially obscured by aerosols in the atmosphere due to a large forest fire northeast of Manaus, the sun sets over the ARM Facility's Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) located southwest of Manaus, Brazil, at the T-3 site in Manacapuru where a Cimel Sunphotometer measures the optical

  10. ARM - Guidelines : Annual Facility Call

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Facility Call Guidelines Overview Annual Facility Call Small Field Campaigns Review Criteria Expectations for Principal Investigators Forms Propose a Campaign Instrument Support Request (ISR) Form (Word, 89KB) Documentation Steps for Submitting Field Campaign Data and Metadata Field Campaign Guidelines (PDF, 574KB) Guidelines : Annual Facility Call Proposals for field campaigns that include deployment of an ARM Mobile Facility (AMF), the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS), or ARM

  11. ARM - Mobile Aerosol Observing System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 MAOS Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments McMurdo Station, Antarctica, 2015-2016 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, to San Francisco, California, 2015 Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011

  12. ARM - AMF1 Baseline Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FacilitiesAMF1 Baseline Instruments AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 MAOS Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments McMurdo Station, Antarctica, 2015-2016 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, to San Francisco, California, 2015 Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat

  13. ARM - AMF2 Management and Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management and Operations AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 MAOS Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments McMurdo Station, Antarctica, 2015-2016 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, to San Francisco, California, 2015 Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs,

  14. ARM - AMF3 Baseline Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FacilitiesAMF3 Baseline Instruments AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 MAOS Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments McMurdo Station, Antarctica, 2015-2016 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, to San Francisco, California, 2015 Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat

  15. Vehicle Evaluation of Downsized Dow ACM DPF | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation of Downsized Dow ACM DPF Vehicle Evaluation of Downsized Dow ACM DPF Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. PDF icon 2006_deer_mao.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Ceramic Filter For Diesel Emission Control Experimental Diesel Particulate Filter Capabilities at PNNL fundamental Modeling and Experimental Studies of Acicular Mullite Diesel

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mao, Ninghui" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium,

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mao, Yao-Yuan" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium,

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mao, Ho-kwang" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium,

  19. Structure Evolution and Pulverization of Tin Nanoparticles during

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lithiation-Delithiation Cycling. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Structure Evolution and Pulverization of Tin Nanoparticles during Lithiation-Delithiation Cycling. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure Evolution and Pulverization of Tin Nanoparticles during Lithiation-Delithiation Cycling. Abstract not provided. Authors: Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh ; Liu, Yang ; Wang, Jiangwei ; Fan, Feifei ; Mao, Scott ; Liu, Xiaohua ; Zhu, Ting Publication Date:

  20. Recap and Conclusions to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Presentations

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recap & Conclusions to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Presentations Gary Smith Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) November 18, 2010 2 Rough Flowsheet Diagram Tank Farm Evaporator Pretreatment Evaporator IDF ETF HLW LAW Vit Secondary SBS WESP Melter Supplemental ? Repository Secondary -Caustic Scrub (LAW Vit) -HEPA Filters -Carbon Beds -Silver Mordenite (HLW Vit) -Other operating wastes Fate of Tc-99 at WTP * WTP flowsheet Tc partitions: - approximately 77.1% to supplemental LAW treatment -

  1. Experimental Ion Exchange Column With SuperLig 639 And Simulant Formulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morse, Megan; Nash, C.

    2013-08-26

    SuperLig639 ion exchange resin was tested as a retrieval mechanism for pertechnetate, through decontamination of a perrhenate spiked 5M Simple Average Na{sup +} Mass Based Simulant. Testing included batch contacts and a three-column ion exchange campaign. A decontamination of perrhenate exceeding 99% from the liquid feed was demonstrated. Analysis of the first formulation of a SBS/WESP simulant found unexpectedly low concentrations of soluble aluminum. Follow-on work will complete the formulation.

  2. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Seminar Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Series Dr. Sergey Pershoguba Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (NORDITA) Postdoctoral Fellow Skyrmion-induced Bound States in a Superconductor Wednesday, January 20, 2016 11:00 - Noon IMS/MPA Conference Room, TA-3, Bldg 32, Rm 134 Abstract: We consider a superconductor proximity coupled to a two-dimensional ferromagnetic film with a skyrmion texture. We predict the skyrmion bound states (SBS) that are induced in the superconductor, similar to the well-known Yu- Shiba-Rusinov (YSR) states.

  3. Stimulated Brillouin scattering in solid aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chitanvis, S.M.

    1988-08-01

    We estimate the differential scattering cross-section due to SBS in a glass bead which is much larger than the wavelength of a high energy laser beam which irradiates it. We consider three possible scenarios: neither the incident nor the Stokes wavelength is on a Mie resonance; only the Stokes wavelength is on resonance; and the incident wavelength and the Stokes wavelength are on a Mie resonance. For the first two cases, we find that the SBS scattering cross-section is extremely small compared to the geometric/Mie cross-section. It follows as a corollary that SBS in a glass bead will be insufficient to shatter it in these two cases. In the last case, it is quite possible that due to the buildup of high fields on-resonance within the spherical bead, the bead might be shattered. The chance of such an event occurring in a polydisperse distribution of spherical beads is generally not expected to be very high. 3 figs.

  4. Laser parametric instability experiments of a 3ω, 15 kJ, 6-ns laser pulse in gas-filled hohlraums at the Ligne d'Intégration Laser facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rousseaux, C.; Huser, G.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.; Alozy, E.; Villette, B.; Wrobel, R.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.

    2015-02-15

    Experimental investigation of stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin (SBS) scattering have been obtained at the Ligne-d'Intégration-Laser facility (LIL, CEA-Cesta, France). The parametric instabilities (LPI) are driven by firing four laser beamlets (one quad) into millimeter size, gas-filled hohlraum targets. A quad delivers energy on target of 15 kJ at 3ω in a 6-ns shaped laser pulse. The quad is focused by means of 3ω gratings and is optically smoothed with a kinoform phase plate and with smoothing by spectral dispersion-like 2 GHz and/or 14 GHz laser bandwidth. Open- and closed-geometry hohlraums have been used, all being filled with 1-atm, neo-pentane (C{sub 5}H{sub 12}) gas. For SRS and SBS studies, the light backscattered into the focusing optics is analyzed with spectral and time resolutions. Near-backscattered light at 3ω and transmitted light at 3ω are also monitored in the open geometry case. Depending on the target geometry (plasma length and hydrodynamic evolution of the plasma), it is shown that, at maximum laser intensity about 9 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}, Raman reflectivity noticeably increases up to 30% in 4-mm long plasmas while SBS stays below 10%. Consequently, laser transmission through long plasmas drops to about 10% of incident energy. Adding 14 GHz bandwidth to the laser always reduces LPI reflectivities, although this reduction is not dramatic.

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - Pajarito Aerosol Coupling to Ecosystems PACE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsPajarito Aerosol Coupling to Ecosystems PACE ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Pajarito Aerosol Coupling to Ecosystems PACE 2011.12.16 - 2012.04.29 Lead Scientist : Manvendra Dubey For data sets, see below. Abstract The primary goal of the Pajarito Aerosol Couplings to Ecosystems (PACE) IOP is to demonstrate routine MAOS field operations and finesse instrumental and operational

  6. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 2, 2013 Time: 11:00 am Speaker: Prof. Lian-Mao Peng, Peking University Title: Carbon Nanotube Electronics: Extending the Moore Law to the End of the Roadmap and Beyond Location: 67-3111 Chemla room Hosted by: Gary Ren Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are quasi-one-dimensional materials with unique properties and are ideal material for nanoelectronics. In particular, perfect n-type [1-2] and p-type [3] contacts are now available for controlled injection of electrons into the conduction band and

  7. Modified magnetism within the coherence volume of superconducting Fe1+delta

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SexTe1-x (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Modified magnetism within the coherence volume of superconducting Fe1+delta SexTe1-x Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modified magnetism within the coherence volume of superconducting Fe1+delta SexTe1-x Authors: Leiner J. ; Thampy V. ; Christianson, A. D. ; Abernathy, D. L. ; Stone, M. B. ; Lumsden, M. D. ; Sefat, A. S. ; Sales, B. C. ; Hu, Jin ; Mao, Zhiqiang ; Bao, Wei ; Broholm, C. Publication Date: 2014-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1174093

  8. Pressure-induced ferroelectric to paraelectric transition in LiTaO3 and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Li,Mg)TaO3 (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Pressure-induced ferroelectric to paraelectric transition in LiTaO3 and (Li,Mg)TaO3 This content will become publicly available on February 16, 2017 Title: Pressure-induced ferroelectric to paraelectric transition in LiTaO3 and (Li,Mg)TaO3 Authors: Yamanaka, Takamitsu [1] ; Nakamoto, Yuki [2] ; Takei, Fumihiko [3] ; Ahart, Muhtar [1] ; Mao, Ho-kwang [4] ; Hemley, Russell J. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution

  9. Pressure-induced ferroelectric to paraelectric transition in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LiTaO[subscript 3] and (Li,Mg)TaO[subscript 3] (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Pressure-induced ferroelectric to paraelectric transition in LiTaO[subscript 3] and (Li,Mg)TaO[subscript 3] Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pressure-induced ferroelectric to paraelectric transition in LiTaO[subscript 3] and (Li,Mg)TaO[subscript 3] Authors: Yamanaka, Takamitsu ; Nakamoto, Yuki ; Takei, Fumihiko ; Ahart, Muhtar ; Mao, Ho-kwang ; Hemley, Russell J. [1] ; Osaka) [2] ; CHPSTAR- China)

  10. Pressure-induced ferroelectric to paraelectric transition in LiTaO3 and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Li,Mg)TaO3 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Pressure-induced ferroelectric to paraelectric transition in LiTaO3 and (Li,Mg)TaO3 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on February 16, 2017 Title: Pressure-induced ferroelectric to paraelectric transition in LiTaO3 and (Li,Mg)TaO3 Authors: Yamanaka, Takamitsu [1] ; Nakamoto, Yuki [2] ; Takei, Fumihiko [3] ; Ahart, Muhtar [1] ; Mao, Ho-kwang [4] ; Hemley, Russell J. [1] + Show Author

  11. Rhapsody: I. Structural Properties and Formation History from a Statistical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sample of Re-simulated Cluster-size Halos (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Rhapsody: I. Structural Properties and Formation History from a Statistical Sample of Re-simulated Cluster-size Halos Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rhapsody: I. Structural Properties and Formation History from a Statistical Sample of Re-simulated Cluster-size Halos Authors: Wu, Hao-Yi ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Michigan U. ; Hahn, Oliver ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; Mao, Yao-Yuan ; Behroozi, Peter S. ;

  12. Effects of the Fe[superscript 3+] spin transition on the equation of state

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of bridgmanite (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Effects of the Fe[superscript 3+] spin transition on the equation of state of bridgmanite Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of the Fe[superscript 3+] spin transition on the equation of state of bridgmanite Authors: Mao, Zhu ; Lin, Jung-Fu ; Yang, Jing ; Inoue, Toru ; Prakapenka, Vitali B. [1] ; UC) [2] ; CHPSTAR- China) [2] ; Ehime U) [2] + Show Author Affiliations (Texas) (

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 2 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Mao, Zhu" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Select page number Go to page: 1 of 2 1 » Next » Everything19 Electronic Full Text0 Citations19 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject x-ray diffraction (6) diamonds (4) geosciences (4) catalysis (heterogeneous),

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "UDF)" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Everything1 Electronic Full Text0 Citations1 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject Filter by Author Bindi, Luca (1) Fei, Yingwei (1) Hemley, Russell J. (1) Mao, H.-K. (1) Park, Changyong (1) Prakapenka, Vitali B.

  15. Broken Symmetry

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    - Physics, as we know it, attempts to interpret the diverse natural phenomena as particular manifestations of general laws. This vision of a world ruled by general testable laws is relatively recent in the history of mankind. Basically it was initiated by the Galilean inertial principle. The subsequent rapid development of large-scale physics is certainly tributary to the fact that gravitational and electromagnetic forces are long-range and hence can be perceived directly without the mediation of highly sophisticated technical devices. - The discovery of subatomic structures and of the concomitant weak and strong short-range forces raised the question of how to cope with short-range forces in relativistic quantum field theory. The Fermi theory of weak interactions, formulated in terms of point-like current-current interaction, was well-defined in lowest order perturbation theory and accounted for existing experimental data.However, it was inconsistent in higher orders because of uncontrollable divergent quantum fluctuations. In technical terms, in contradistinction to quantum electrodynamics, the Fermi theorywas not ?renormalizable?. This difficulty could not be solved by smoothing the point-like interaction by a massive, and therefore short-range, charged ?vector? particle exchange: theories with massive charged vector bosons were not renormalizable either. In the early nineteen sixties, there seemed to be insuperable obstacles to formulating a consistent theory with short-range forces mediated by massive vectors. - The breakthrough came from the notion of spontaneous symmetry breaking which arose in the study of phase transitions and was introduced in field theory by Nambu in 1960. - Ferromagnets illustrate the notion in phase transitions. Although no direction is dynamically preferred, the magnetization selects a global orientation. This is a spontaneous broken symmetry(SBS)of rotational invariance. Such continuous SBS imply the existence of ?massless? modes (here spin-waves), which are the ancestors of the NG bosons discussed below. Fluctuations of the order parameter (the magnetization) are described by a ?massive? SBS mode. - In field theory, Nambu showed that broken chiral symmetry from a spontaneous generation of hadron masses induces massless pseudoscalar modes (identified with a massless limit of pion fields). This illustrates a general phenomenon made explicit by Goldstone: massless Nambu-Goldstone (NG) bosons are a necessary concomitant of spontaneously broken continuous symmetries. Massive SBS scalars bosons describe, as in phase transitions, the fluctuations of the SBS order parameters. - In 1964, with Robert Brout, we discovered a mechanism based on SBS by which short range interactions are generated from long range ones. A similar proposal was then made independently by Higgs in a different approach. Qualitatively, our mechanism works as follows. The long range fundamental electromagnetic and gravitational interactions are governed by extended symmetries,called gauge symmetries, which were supposed to guarantee that the elementary field constituents which transmit the forces, photons or gravitons, be massless. We considered a generalization of the electromagnetic ?vector? field, known as Yang-Mills fields, and coupled them to fields which acquire from SBS constant values in the vacuum. These fields pervade space, as did magnetization, but they have no spatial orientation: they are ?scalar?? fields. The vector Yang-Mills fields which interact with the scalar fields become massive and hence the forces they mediate become short ranged. We also showed that the mechanism can survive in absence of elementary scalar fields. - Because of the extended symmetries, the nature of SBS is profoundly altered: the NG fields are absorbed into the massive vector Yang-Mills fields and restore the gauge symmetry. This has a dramatic consequence. To confront precision experiments, the mechanism should be consistent at the quantum mechanical level, or in technical terms, should yield a ?renormalizable? theory. From our analysis of the preserved gauge symmetry, we suggested in 1966 that this is indeed the case, in contradistinction to the aforementioned earlier theories of charged massive vector fields. The full proof of ?renormalizability? is subtle and was achieved in the impressive work of ?t Hooft and Veltman. One gains some insight into the subtleties by making explicit the equivalence of Higgs? approach with ours. - To a large extend, the LHC was build to detect the massive SBS scalar boson, i.e. the fluctuations of the scalar field. More elaborate realizations of the mechanism without elementary scalars are possible, but their experimental confirmation may (or may not) be outside the scope of present available technology. - The mechanism of Brout, Englert and Higgs unified in the same theoretical framework short- and long-range forces. It became the cornerstone of the electroweak theory and opened the way to a modern view on unified laws of nature.

  16. FAA Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) operated by Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Hartman, Roger D.

    2010-09-01

    Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) objectives are: (1) Enhance aircraft safety and reliability; (2) Aid developing advanced aircraft designs and maintenance techniques; (3) Provide our customers with comprehensive, independent, and quantitative/qualitative evaluations of new and enhanced inspection, maintenance, and repair techniques; (4) Facilitate transferring effective technologies into the aviation industry; (5) Support FAA rulemaking process by providing guidance on content & necessary tools to meet requirements or recommendations of FARs, ADs, ACs, SBs, SSIDs, CPCP, and WFD; and (6) Coordinate with and respond to Airworthiness Assurance Working Group (AAWG) in support of FAA Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC).

  17. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  18. A 1-Joule laser for a 16-fiber injection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honig, J

    2004-04-06

    A 1-J laser was designed to launch light down 16, multi-mode fibers (400-{micro}m-core dia.). A diffractive-optic splitter was designed in collaboration with Digital Optics Corporation (DOC), and was delivered by DOC. Using this splitter, the energy injected into each fiber varied <1%. The spatial profile out of each fiber was such that there were no ''hot spots,'' a flyer could successfully be launched and a PETN pellet could be initiated. Preliminary designs of the system were driven by system efficiency where a pristine TEM{sub 00} laser beam would be required. The laser is a master oscillator, power amplifier (MOPA) consisting of a 4-mm-dia. Nd:YLF rod in the stable, q-switched oscillator and a 9.5-mm-dia. Nd:YLF rod in the double-passed amplifier. Using a TEM{sub 00} oscillator beam resulted in excellent transmission efficiencies through the fibers at lower energies but proved to be quite unreliable at higher energies, causing premature fiber damage, flyer plate rupture, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). Upon further investigation, it was found that both temporal and spatial beam formatting of the laser were required to successfully initiate the PETN. Results from the single-mode experiments, including fiber damage, SRS and SBS losses, will be presented. In addition, results showing the improvement that can be obtained by proper laser beam formatting will also be presented.

  19. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowers, Mark (Modesto, CA); Hankla, Allen (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90.degree. such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system.

  20. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowers, M.; Hankla, A.

    1996-07-09

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90{degree} such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system. 5 figs.

  1. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, Clifford B. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  2. Indoor carbon dioxide concentrations and sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study revisited: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdmann, Christine A.; Steiner, Kate C.; Apte, Michael G.

    2002-02-01

    In previously published analyses of the 41-building 1994-1996 USEPA Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) dataset, higher workday time-averaged indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} concentrations (dCO{sub 2}) were associated with increased prevalence of certain mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, even at peak dCO{sub 2} concentrations below 1,000 ppm. For this paper, similar analyses were performed using the larger 100-building 1994-1998 BASE dataset. Multivariate logistic regression analyses quantified the associations between dCO{sub 2} and the SBS symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Adjusted dCO{sub 2} prevalence odds ratios for sore throat and wheeze were 1.17 and 1.20 per 100-ppm increase in dCO{sub 2} (p <0.05), respectively. These new analyses generally support our prior findings. Regional differences in climate, building design, and operation may account for some of the differences observed in analyses of the two datasets.

  3. Causes of Indoor Air Quality Problems in Schools: Summary of Scientific Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayer, C.W.

    2001-02-22

    In the modern urban setting, most individuals spend about 80% of their time indoors and are therefore exposed to the indoor environment to a much greater extent than to the outdoors (Lebowitz 1992). Concomitant with this increased habitation in urban buildings, there have been numerous reports of adverse health effects related to indoor air quality (IAQ) (sick buildings). Most of these buildings were built in the last two decades and were constructed to be energy-efficient. The quality of air in the indoor environment can be altered by a number of factors: release of volatile compounds from furnishings, floor and wall coverings, and other finishing materials or machinery; inadequate ventilation; poor temperature and humidity control; re-entrainment of outdoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs); and the contamination of the indoor environment by microbes (particularly fungi). Armstrong Laboratory (1992) found that the three most frequent causes of IAQ are (1) inadequate design and/or maintenance of the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, (2) a shortage of fresh air, and (3) lack of humidity control. A similar study by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH 1989) recognized inadequate ventilation as the most frequent source of IAQ problems in the work environment (52% of the time). Poor IAQ due to microbial contamination can be the result of the complex interactions of physical, chemical, and biological factors. Harmful fungal populations, once established in the HVAC system or occupied space of a modern building, may episodically produce or intensify what is known as sick building syndrome (SBS) (Cummings and Withers 1998). Indeed, SBS caused by fungi may be more enduring and recalcitrant to treatment than SBS from multiple chemical exposures (Andrae 1988). An understanding of the microbial ecology of the indoor environment is crucial to ultimately resolving many IAQ problems. The incidence of SBS related to multiple chemical sensitivity versus bioaerosols (aerosolized microbes), or the contribution of the microorganisms to the chemical sensitivities, is not yet understood. If the inhabitants of a building exhibit similar symptoms of a clearly defined disease with a nature and time of onset that can be related to building occupancy, the disease is generally referred to as ''building-related illness.'' Once the SBS has been allowed to elevate to this level, buildings are typically evacuated and the costs associated with disruption of the building occupants, identification of the source of the problem, and eventual remediation can be significant. Understanding the primary causes of IAQ problems and how controllable factors--proper HVAC system design, allocation of adequate outdoor air, proper filtration, effective humidity control, and routine maintenance--can avert the problems may help all building owners, operators, and occupants to be more productive (Arens and Baughman 1996). This paper provides a comprehensive summary of IAQ research that has been conducted in various types of facilities. However, it focuses primarily on school facilities because, for numerous reasons that will become evident, they are far more susceptible to developing IAQ problems than most other types of facilities; and the occupants, children, are more significantly affected than adults (EPA 1998).

  4. Form Approved

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    -----.- -"..::*::.,". ' " .-:.*- *- .- --* --.V- -.,---. :.-;-:;;5: F|g;- , . , J:;.-;:;. .::;:; ;; ;as 1970 '*:>'::S2i-:: ': r- ::' * * '* * * - * ' 06 f 1...

  5. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION /

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    / @ St& i900.955 L' E+t Pk. S. W., Washingron. D.C. 20024-2174. Tdephonr: (202) 4884400 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA CA,OLf Mr. Andrew'Wallo. III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site c r-05 Deconnnissioning Projects f-L .0-d U.S. Department of Energy lr\/.QL Germantown, Maryland ,20,54B ., iAl*Oz I., a,:,. :.. ,.. i. ,i < Dear Mr. Wallo: 1hJ *o-o1 flA.QS ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES MA.o-05 rl D.OF The attached elimination recommendation was prepared

  6. Microwave modeling of laser plasma interactions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    For a large laser fusion targets and nanosecond pulse lengths, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and self-focusing are expected to be significant problems. The goal of the contractual effort was to examine certain aspects of these physical phenomena in a wavelength regime (lambda approx.5 cm) more amenable to detailed diagnostics than that characteristic of laser fusion (lambda approx.1 micron). The effort was to include the design, fabrication and operation of a suitable experimental apparatus. In addition, collaboration with Dr. Neville Luhmann and his associates at UCLA and with Dr. Curt Randall of LLNL, on analysis and modelling of the UCLA experiments was continued. Design and fabrication of the TRW experiment is described under ''Experiment Design'' and ''Experimental Apparatus''. The design goals for the key elements of the experimental apparatus were met, but final integration and operation of the experiment was not accomplished. Some theoretical considerations on the interaction between Stimulated Brillouin Scattering and Self-Focusing are also presented.

  7. Hohlraum Energetics and Implosion Symmetry with Elliptical Phase Plates Using a Multi-Cone Beam Geometry on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Seka, W.; Epstein, R.; Loucks, S.J.; McCrory, R.L.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Jones, O.S.; Callahan, D.A.; Amendt, P.A.; Meezan, N.B.; Suter, L.J.; Rosen, M.D.; Landen, O.L.; DeWald, E.L.; Glenzer, S.H.; Sorce, C.; Dixit, S.; Turner, R.E.; MacGowan, B.J.

    2008-07-21

    Hohlraum energetics and implosion-symmetry experiments were conducted on the OMEGA Laser System using laser beams arranged in three cones and smoothed with elliptical phase plates. The peak radiation temperature (Tr) increased by 17 eV, with phase plates for gas-filled halfraums irradiated with 20 beams using a ~7-kJ shaped laser pulse (PS26), corresponding to a 44% increase in the peak x-ray flux. The improved coupling correlates with reduced, cone-dependent losses from stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). Phase plates reduce SRS and SBS by controlling the on-target laser-intensity envelope and the speckle modal power spectrum. An implosion symmetry scan was performed by varying the length and beam pointing of vacuum and gas-filled, thin-walled (3 um) Au hohlraums irradiated with 40 beams using a ~14-kJ PS26. Gated-x-ray (hv > 3 keV) images taken along radial and axial views of the self-emission from Ar-doped, D2-filled, plastic-shell implosions quantified the indirect-drive-implosion symmetry. A shift in symmetry was observed between vacuum and gas-filled hohlraums having identical beam pointing. The ratio of x-ray drive at the poles of the capsule relative to the waist increased for the gas-filled hohlraum. Levels of hard-x-ray production (hv > 20 keV) and SRS were reduced with trace amounts of high-Z dopants (i.e., Ne, Kr) in the hohlraum plasma, while the peak Tr increased ~5 eV.

  8. Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 2.3 Wave Period Range(s) 2.3 Current Velocity...

  9. A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for future theory development. Top: Absorption of a photon by an He- ion in the 1s2s2p 4Po ground state boosts a 1s electron into an empty 2p orbital, forming the triply excited...

  10. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monolayer Behavior Retained in Bulk Semiconducting Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Comparison of the structure of ReS2 with the conventional structure of sTMDs such as MoS2 from...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Filter by Author Beck, T. (2) Berryhill, J. (2) Bondioli, M. (2) Bruinsma, M. (2) Burke, S. (2) Callahan, D. (2) Campagnari, C. (2) Cunha, A. (2) Curry, S. (2) Eisner, A.M. (2) ...

  12. crd title p1.ai | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Amended Notice of Intent To Expand the Scope of the Environmental Impact Statement

  13. Development of the scintillator-based probe for fast-ion losses in the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y. P. Liu, Yi; Yuan, G. L.; Song, X. Y.; Yang, J. W.; Li, X.; Chen, W.; Li, Y.; Yan, L. W.; Song, X. M.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Luo, X. B.; Liu, Y. Q.; Hua, Y.; Isobe, M.

    2014-05-15

    A new scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) has been developed and operated in the HL-2A tokamak [L. W. Yan, X. R. Duan, X. T. Ding, J. Q. Dong, Q. W. Yang, Yi Liu, X. L. Zou, D. Q. Liu, W. M. Xuan, L. Y. Chen, J. Rao, X. M. Song, Y. Huang, W. C. Mao, Q. M. Wang, Q. Li, Z. Cao, B. Li, J. Y. Cao, G. J. Lei, J. H. Zhang, X. D. Li, W. Chen, J. Chen, C. H. Cui, Z. Y. Cui, Z. C. Deng, Y. B. Dong, B. B. Feng, Q. D. Gao, X. Y. Han, W. Y. Hong, M. Huang, X. Q. Ji, Z. H. Kang, D. F. Kong, T. Lan, G. S. Li, H. J. Li, Qing Li, W. Li, Y. G. Li, A. D. Liu, Z. T. Liu, C. W. Luo, X. H. Mao, Y. D. Pan, J. F. Peng, Z. B. Shi, S. D. Song, X. Y. Song, H. J. Sun, A. K. Wang, M. X. Wang, Y. Q. Wang, W. W. Xiao, Y. F. Xie, L. H. Yao, D. L. Yu, B. S. Yuan, K. J. Zhao, G. W. Zhong, J. Zhou, J. C. Yan, C. X. Yu, C. H. Pan, Y. Liu, and the HL-2A Team , Nucl. Fusion 51, 094016 (2011)] to measure the losses of neutral beam ions. The design of the probe is based on the concept of the ?-particle detectors on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) using scintillator plates. The probe is capable of traveling across an equatorial plane port and sweeping the aperture angle rotationally with respect to the axis of the probe shaft by two step motors, in order to optimize the radial position and the collimator angle. The energy and the pitch angle of the lost fast ions can be simultaneously measured if the two-dimensional image of scintillation light intensity due to the impact of the lost fast ions is detected. Measurements of the fast-ion losses using the probe have been performed during HL-2A neutral beam injection discharges. The clear experimental evidence of enhanced losses of beam ions during disruptions has been obtained by means of the SLIP system. A detailed description of the probe system and the first experimental results are reported.

  14. Development And Initial Testing Of Off-Gas Recycle Liquid From The WTP Low Activity Waste Vitrification Process - 14333

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Adamson, Duane J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Morse, Megan M.

    2014-01-07

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flow was designed to pre-treat feed from the Hanford tank farms, separate it into a High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fraction and vitrify each fraction in separate facilities. Vitrification of the waste generates an aqueous condensate stream from the off-gas processes. This stream originates from two off-gas treatment unit operations, the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrospray Precipitator (WESP). Currently, the baseline plan for disposition of the stream from the LAW melter is to recycle it to the Pretreatment facility where it gets evaporated and processed into the LAW melter again. If the Pretreatment facility is not available, the baseline disposition pathway is not viable. Additionally, some components in the stream are volatile at melter temperatures, thereby accumulating to high concentrations in the scrubbed stream. It would be highly beneficial to divert this stream to an alternate disposition path to alleviate the close-coupled operation of the LAW vitrification and Pretreatment facilities, and to improve long-term throughput and efficiency of the WTP system. In order to determine an alternate disposition path for the LAW SBS/WESP Recycle stream, a range of options are being studied. A simulant of the LAW Off-Gas Condensate was developed, based on the projected composition of this stream, and comparison with pilot-scale testing. The primary radionuclide that vaporizes and accumulates in the stream is Tc-99, but small amounts of several other radionuclides are also projected to be present in this stream. The processes being investigated for managing this stream includes evaporation and radionuclide removal via precipitation and adsorption. During evaporation, it is of interest to investigate the formation of insoluble solids to avoid scaling and plugging of equipment. Key parameters for radionuclide removal include identifying effective precipitation or ion adsorption chemicals, solid-liquid separation methods, and achievable decontamination factors. Results of the radionuclide removal testing indicate that the radionuclides, including Tc-99, can be removed with inorganic sorbents and precipitating agents. Evaporation test results indicate that the simulant can be evaporated to fairly high concentration prior to formation of appreciable solids, but corrosion has not yet been examined.

  15. Zonal flow dynamics in the double tearing mode with antisymmetric shear flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Aohua [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 6110011 (Japan); Li, Jiquan, E-mail: lijq@energy.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 6110011 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 6110011 (Japan); Liu, Jinyuan, E-mail: jyliu@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Kishimoto, Yasuaki [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 6110011 (Japan) [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 6110011 (Japan); Institude of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 6110011 (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    The generation dynamics and the structural characteristics of zonal flows are investigated in the double tearing mode (DTM) with antisymmetric shear flows. Two kinds of zonal flow oscillations are revealed based on reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations, which depend on the shear flow amplitudes corresponding to different DTM eigen mode states, elaborated by Mao et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20, 022114 (2013)]. For the weak shear flows below an amplitude threshold, v{sub c}, at which two DTM eigen states with antisymmetric or symmetric magnetic island structure are degenerated, the zonal flows grow oscillatorily in the Rutherford regime during the nonlinear evolution of the DTMs. It is identified that the oscillation mechanism results from the nonlinear interaction between the distorted islands and the zonal flows through the modification of shear flows. However, for the medium shear flows above v{sub c} but below the critical threshold of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, an oscillatory growing zonal flow occurs in the linear phase of the DTM evolution. It is demonstrated that the zonal flow oscillation originates from the three-wave mode coupling or a modulation instability pumped by two DTM eigen modes with the same frequency but opposite propagating direction. With the shear flows increasing, the amplitude of zonal flow oscillation increases first and then decreases, whilst the oscillation frequency as twice of the Doppler frequency shift increases. Furthermore, impacts of the oscillatory zonal flows on the nonlinear evolution of DTM islands and the global reconnection are also discussed briefly.

  16. The Behavior of Hydrogen Under Extreme Conditions on Ultrafast Timescales (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mao, Ho-kwang (Director, Center for Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments); EFree Staff

    2011-11-02

    'The Behavior of Hydrogen Under Extreme Conditions on Ultrafast Timescales ' was submitted by the Center for Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments (EFree) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. EFree is directed by Ho-kwang Mao at the Carnegie Institute of Washington and is a partnership of scientists from thirteen institutions.The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments is 'to accelerate the discovery and creation of energy-relevant materials using extreme pressures and temperatures.' Research topics are: catalysis (CO{sub 2}, water), photocatalysis, solid state lighting, optics, thermelectric, phonons, thermal conductivity, solar electrodes, fuel cells, superconductivity, extreme environment, radiation effects, defects, spin dynamics, CO{sub 2} (capture, convert, store), greenhouse gas, hydrogen (fuel, storage), ultrafast physics, novel materials synthesis, and defect tolerant materials.

  17. The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkowitz, CM; Berg, LK; Cziczo, DJ; Flynn, CJ; Kassianov, EI; Fast, JD; Rasch, PJ; Shilling, JE; Zaveri, RA; Zelenyuk, A; Ferrare, RA; Hostetler, CA; Cairns, B; Russell, PB; Ervens, B

    2011-07-27

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) field campaign will provide a detailed set of observations with which to (1) perform radiative and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure studies, (2) evaluate a new retrieval algorithm for aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the presence of clouds using passive remote sensing, (3) extend a previously developed technique to investigate aerosol indirect effects, and (4) evaluate the performance of a detailed regional-scale model and a more parameterized global-scale model in simulating particle activation and AOD associated with the aging of anthropogenic aerosols. To meet these science objectives, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility will deploy the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics at a location subject to both clear and cloudy conditions, and clean and polluted conditions. These observations will be supplemented by two aircraft intensive observation periods (IOPs), one in the summer and a second in the winter. Each IOP will deploy one, and possibly two, aircraft depending on available resources. The first aircraft will be equipped with a suite of in situ instrumentation to provide measurements of aerosol optical properties, particle composition and direct-beam irradiance. The second aircraft will fly directly over the first and use a multi-wavelength high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and scanning polarimeter to provide continuous optical and cloud properties in the column below.

  18. In situ growth of ZrO{sub 2}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-crystalline ceramic coatings via micro arc oxidation of aluminum substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoaei-Rad, V.; Bayati, M.R.; Zargar, H.R.; Javadpour, J.; Golestani-Fard, F.; Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-195, Tehran

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ? ZrO{sub 2}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers were fabricated by MAO process. ? A formation mechanism was also proposed. ? Effect of voltage and electrolyte composition on layers properties was studied. -- Abstract: Micro arc oxidation technique was employed to grow zirconiaalumina porous layers. Considering XPS, XRD, and EDX results, the layers mainly consisted of ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, monoclinic ZrO{sub 2}, tetragonal ZrO{sub 2}. Fractions of these phases were observed to change based on the fabrication conditions. Zirconia phases formed not only on the surface, but also in the layers depth. Increasing the voltage as well as utilizing thicker electrolytes resulted in higher zirconium concentration. The average crystalline size of the ZrO{sub 2} and the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases was determined as about 57 and 75 nm. AFM studies revealed that the surface roughness increased with voltage and electrolyte concentration. Morphological evaluations, performed by SEM, showed that the microstructure of the layers strongly depended on the synthesis conditions. The layers revealed a porous structure with a pores size of 40300 nm. Microcracks were observed to appear when the electrolyte concentration and the applied voltage increased. Finally, a formation mechanism was put forward with emphasis on the chemical and the electrochemical foundations.

  19. In situ derivation of sulfur activated TiO{sub 2} nano porous layers through pulse-micro arc oxidation technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayati, M.R.; Golestani-Fard, F.; Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-195, Tehran ; Moshfegh, A.Z.; Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 14588-89694, Tehran ; Molaei, Roya

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} S-TiO{sub 2} layers were grown by MAO technique under pulse current for the first time. {yields} Effect of growth parameters on chemical composition, topography, and morphology of the layers was studied. {yields} A correlation between photocatalytic performance and growth conditions was proposed. -- Abstract: Micro arc oxidation technique, as a facile and efficient process, was employed to grow sulfur doped titania porous layers. This research sheds light on the photocatalytic performance of the micro arc oxidized S-TiO{sub 2} nano-porous layers fabricated under pulse current. Morphological and topographical studies, performed by SEM and AFM techniques, revealed that increasing the frequency and/or decreasing the duty cycle resulted in formation of finer pores and smoother surfaces. XRD and XPS results showed that the layers consisted of anatase and rutile phases whose fraction was observed to change depending on the synthesis conditions. The highest anatase relative content was obtained at the frequency of 500 Hz and the duty cycle of 5%. Furthermore, photocatalytic activity of the layers was examined by measuring the decomposition rate of methylene blue under both ultraviolet and visible photo irradiations. Maximum photodegradation reaction rate constants over the pulse-grown S-TiO{sub 2} layers were respectively measured as 0.0202 and 0.0110 min{sup -1} for ultraviolet and visible irradiations.

  20. A STUDY OF GRAVITATIONAL LENS CHROMATICITY WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz, J. A.; Mosquera, A. M.; Mediavilla, E.; Kochanek, C. S.; Falco, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    We report Hubble Space Telescope observations of six gravitational lenses with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. We measured the flux ratios between the lensed images in seven filters from 8140 #Angstrom# to 2200 #Angstrom#. In three of the systems, HE0512-3329, B1600+434, and H1413+117, we were able to construct UV extinction curves partially overlapping the 2175 #Angstrom# feature and characterize the properties of the dust relative to the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. In HE1104-1804, we detect chromatic microlensing and use it to study the physical properties of the quasar accretion disk. For a Gaussian model of the disk exp (- r{sup 2}/2r{sup 2}{sub s}), scaling with wavelength as r{sub s} {proportional_to}{lambda}{sup p}, we estimate r{sub s} ({lambda}3363) = 4{sup +4}{sub -2} (7 {+-} 4) light days and p = 1.1 {+-} 0.6 (1.0 {+-} 0.6) for a logarithmic (linear) prior on r{sub s} . The remaining two systems, FBQ0951+2635 and SBS1520+530, yielded no useful estimates of extinction or chromatic microlensing.

  1. A NEW SUB-PERIOD-MINIMUM CATACLYSMIC VARIABLE WITH PARTIAL HYDROGEN DEPLETION AND EVIDENCE OF SPIRAL DISK STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Littlefield, C.; Garnavich, P.; Magno, K.; Applegate, A.; Pogge, R.; Irwin, J.; Marion, G. H.; Kirshner, R.; Vinko, J.

    2013-06-15

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy and photometry of CSS 120422:111127+571239 (=SBS 1108+574), a recently discovered SU UMa-type dwarf nova whose 55 minute orbital period is well below the cataclysmic variable (CV) period minimum of {approx}78 minutes. In contrast with most other known CVs, its spectrum features He I emission of comparable strength to the Balmer lines, implying a hydrogen abundance less than 0.1 of long-period CVs-but still at least 10 times higher than that in AM CVn stars. Together, the short orbital period and remarkable helium-to-hydrogen ratio suggest that mass transfer in CSS 120422 began near the end of the donor star's main-sequence lifetime, meaning that this CV is a strong candidate progenitor of an AM CVn system as described by Podsiadlowski et al. Moreover, a Doppler tomogram of the H{alpha} line reveals two distinct regions of enhanced emission. While one is the result of the stream-disk impact, the other is probably attributable to spiral disk structure generated when material in the outer disk achieves a 2:1 orbital resonance with respect to the donor.

  2. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  3. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Dane, C. Brent; Tiszauer, Detlev H.

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  4. Changing ventilation rates in U.S. offices: Implications for health, work performance, energy, and associated economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Black, Douglas; Brunner, Gregory

    2011-07-01

    This paper provides quantitative estimates of benefits and costs of providing different amounts of outdoor air ventilation in U.S. offices. For four scenarios that modify ventilation rates, we estimated changes in sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, work performance, short-term absence, and building energy consumption. The estimated annual economic benefits were $13 billion from increasing minimum ventilation rates (VRs) from 8 to 10 L/s per person, $38 billion from increasing minimum VRs from 8 to 15 L/s per person, and $33 billion from increasing VRs by adding outdoor air economizers for the 50% of the office floor area that currently lacks economizers. The estimated $0.04 billion in annual energy-related benefits of decreasing minimum VRs from 8 to 6.5 L/s per person are very small compared to the projected annual costs of $12 billion. Benefits of increasing minimum VRs far exceeded energy costs while adding economizers yielded health, performance, and absence benefits with energy savings.

  5. WORKSHOP ?PHYSICS FOR HEALTH IN EUROPE?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    2-4 February 2010 at CERN This event will be will be available live via the Webcast Service and transmitted in parallel to:IT auditorium,Salle Anderssen 40-S2-A01(Tuesday 2nd February)BE auditorium (all day), Salle 40-S2-01 (only between 08:00- 14:00) (Wednesday 3rd February)BE auditorium, Salle Curie 40-S2-C01(Thursday 4th February)

  6. WORKSHOP ?PHYSICS FOR HEALTH IN EUROPE?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    2-4 February 2010 at CERN This event will be will be available live via the Webcast Service and transmitted in parallel to:IT auditorium, Salle Anderssen 40-S2-A01(Tuesday 2nd February)BE auditorium (all day), Salle 40-S2-01 (only between 08:00- 14:00) (Wednesday 3rd February)BE auditorium, Salle Curie 40-S2-C01(Thursday 4th February)   

  7. Annihilation diagrams in two-body nonleptonic decays of charmed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Bedaque, P. ; Das, A. 1 ; Mathur, V.S. 2 + Show Author Affiliations (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)) (Department of Physics and ...

  8. Louisiana's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Louisiana's 2nd congressional district Entergy New Orleans Inc Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLouisiana%27s2ndcongressionaldistrict&oldid192538...

  9. Pennsylvania's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PECO Energy Co Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titlePennsylvania%27s2ndcongressionaldistrict&oldid198301" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs...

  10. Florida's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Tallahassee, Florida (Utility Company) Talquin Electric Coop, Inc Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFlorida%27s2ndcongressionaldistrict&oldid182772...

  11. Tennessee's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Tennessee's 2nd congressional district Knoxville Utilities Board Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTennessee%27s2ndcongressionaldistrict&oldid204320...

  12. EA-1736: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    conventional two-step S2D process consisting of separate ... refrigeration plant and an extensive distribution system. ... describes the conceptual design of the system including ...

  14. Carmanah Technologies Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Columbia, Canada Zip: V9A 3S2 Sector: Solar Product: Canadian manufacturer of solar balance of systems (mounts, converters, inverters), battery chargers, and distributor of...

  15. 1. CNTRAT IDCODE PAGE OF PGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IDCODE PAGE OF PGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 OTATI OEPG FIP 5S 2, AMENDMENTMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE (MIJY) 4. REQUISITIONPURCHASE REQ....

  16. EIS-0361: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0250-S1 and EIS-0250-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental...

  17. EIS-0396: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Programmatic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0250-S1 and EIS-0250-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental...

  18. Solar Energy International | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    International Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Energy International Address: 76 S. 2nd St. Carbondale, CO 81623 Place: Carbondale, Colorado Zip: 81623 Website:...

  19. EA-1736: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico The Environmental Assessment...

  20. EA-1736: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, Los Alamos, New Mexico Based on the...

  1. Commercial Reference Buildings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference Building Types1 , which represent approximately 70% of the commercial buildings in the U.S. 2. Whole building energy analysis data (developed using EnergyPlus...

  2. Other Notices | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Canal Intertie Project July 19, 2010 EIS-0283-S2: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement and Conduct Additional Public...

  3. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to Egypt (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 2,947

  4. Dynamic Structural Response and Deformations of Monolayer MoS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Dynamic Structural Response and Deformations of Monolayer MoS 2 Visualized by Femtosecond Electron Diffraction Citation Details ...

  5. Single line-of-sight dual energy backlighter for mix width experiments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    S. A. ; Felker, S. ; Seugling, R. ; Doane, D. ; Wallace, R. 1 ; Guymer, T. M. ; Moore, A. S. 2 ; Whiting, N. ; Sorce, C. 3 + Show Author Affiliations Lawrence Livermore ...

  6. Latest Documents and Notices | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 28, 2015 EA-2024: Final Environmental Assessment Gap Material Plutonium - Transport, Receipt, and Processing December 24, 2015 EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Preferred Alternative...

  7. Virginia Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 158 272 2,143 1970's 2,175 2,286 278 320 112 1,079 1980's 22 1990's 0 2,369 2,378 2000's 2,455...

  8. Backlighter development at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Zinc to Zirconium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barrios, M. A.; Fournier, K. B.; Regan, S. P.; Landen, O.; May, M.; Opachich, Y. P.; Widmann, K.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W.

    2013-06-07

    A K-shell X-ray emission from laser-irradiated planar Zn, Ge, Br, and Zr foils was measured at the National Ignition Facility for laser irradiances in the range of 0.6–9.5 × 1015 W/cm 2. The incident laser power had a pre-pulse to enhance the laser-to-X-ray conversion efficiency (CE) of a 2–5 ns constant-intensity pulse used as the main laser drive. The measured CE into the 8–16 keV energy band ranged from 0.43% to 2%, while the measured CE into the He-like resonance 1s2–1s2p(1P) and intercombination 1s2–1s2p(3P) transitions, as well as from their 1s2(2s,2p)l–1s2p(2s,2p)l satellite transitions for l = 1, 2, 3, correspondingmore » to the Li-, Be-, and B-like resonances, respectively, ranged from 0.3% to 1.5%. Moreover, absolute and relative CE measurements are consistent with X-ray energy scaling of (hν) -3 to (hν) -5, where hν is the X-ray energy. The temporal evolution of the broadband X-ray power was similar to the main laser drive for ablation plasmas having a critical density surface.« less

  9. Audit Report: OAS-L-06-03 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 Audit Report: OAS-L-06-03 December 20, 2005 Defense Waste Processing Facility Operations at the Savannah River Site PDF icon Audit Report: OAS-L-06-03 More Documents & Publications EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination EIS-0082: Record of Decision

  10. A HEURISTIC PREDICTION OF THE COSMIC EVOLUTION OF THE CO-LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreschkow, D.; Heywood, I.; Kloeckner, H.-R.; Rawlings, S.

    2009-09-10

    We predict the emission line luminosity functions (LFs) of the first 10 rotational transitions of {sup 12}C{sup 16}O in galaxies at redshift z = 0 to z = 10. This prediction relies on a recently presented simulation of the molecular cold gas content in {approx}3 x 10{sup 7} evolving galaxies based on the Millennium Simulation. We combine this simulation with a model for the conversion between molecular mass and CO-line intensities, which incorporates the following mechanisms: (1) molecular gas is heated by the cosmic microwave background (CMB), starbursts (SBs), and active galactic nuclei (AGNs); (2) molecular clouds in dense or inclined galaxies can overlap; (3) compact gas can attain a smooth distribution in the densest part of disks; (4) CO luminosities scale with metallicity changes between galaxies; and (5) CO luminosities are always detected against the CMB. We analyze the relative importance of these effects and predict the cosmic evolution of the CO-LFs. The most notable conclusion is that the detection of regular galaxies (i.e., no AGN, no massive SB) at high z {approx}> 7 in CO emission will be dramatically hindered by the weak contrast against the CMB, in contradiction to earlier claims that CMB heating will ease the detection of high-redshift CO. The full simulation of extragalactic CO lines and the predicted CO-LFs at any redshift can be accessed online (http://s-cubed.physics.ox.ac.uk/, go to {sup S3}-SAX) and they should be useful for the modeling of CO-line surveys with future telescopes, such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array or the Square Kilometre Array.

  11. Gas reburn retrofit on an industrial cyclone boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farzan, H.; Latham, C.E.; Maringo, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Eastman Kodak Company`s cyclone boiler (Unit No. 43), located in Rochester, New York, is being retrofitted with the gas reburning technology developed by Babcock & Wilcox (B & W) to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in order to comply with the Title I, ozone nonattainment, of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. The required NO{sub x} reduction from baseline levels necessary to meet the presumptive limit set in New York`s regulation is about 47%. Eastman Kodak and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) are cosponsoring this project. B & W is the prime contractor and contract negotiations with Chevron as the gas supplier are presently being finalized. Equipment installation for the gas reburn system is scheduled for a September 1995 outage. No. 43 Boiler`s maximum continuous rating (MCR) is 550,000 pounds per hour of steam flow or approximately equivalent to 60 MW{sub e}. Because of the compact boiler design, there is insufficient gas residence time to use pulverized coal or oil as the reburn fuel, thus making it a prime candidate for gas reburn. Kodak currently has four cyclone boilers. Based on successful completion of this gas reburn project, modifying the other three cyclone boilers with gas reburn technology is anticipated. The paper will describe B & W`s gas reburn data from a cyclone-equipped pilot facility (B & W`s Small Boiler Simulator), gas reburn design information specific to Eastman Kodak No. 43 Boiler, and numerical modeling experiences based on the pilot-scale Small Boiler Simulator (SBS) results along with those from a full-scale commercial boiler.

  12. Development of new VOC exposure metrics and their relationship to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' symptoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ten Brinke, JoAnn

    1995-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are suspected to contribute significantly to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' (SBS), a complex of subchronic symptoms that occurs during and in general decreases away from occupancy of the building in question. A new approach takes into account individual VOC potencies, as well as the highly correlated nature of the complex VOC mixtures found indoors. The new VOC metrics are statistically significant predictors of symptom outcomes from the California Healthy Buildings Study data. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the hypothesis that a summary measure of the VOC mixture, other risk factors, and covariates for each worker will lead to better prediction of symptom outcome. VOC metrics based on animal irritancy measures and principal component analysis had the most influence in the prediction of eye, dermal, and nasal symptoms. After adjustment, a water-based paints and solvents source was found to be associated with dermal and eye irritation. The more typical VOC exposure metrics used in prior analyses were not useful in symptom prediction in the adjusted model (total VOC (TVOC), or sum of individually identified VOCs ({Sigma}VOC{sub i})). Also not useful were three other VOC metrics that took into account potency, but did not adjust for the highly correlated nature of the data set, or the presence of VOCs that were not measured. High TVOC values (2--7 mg m{sup {minus}3}) due to the presence of liquid-process photocopiers observed in several study spaces significantly influenced symptoms. Analyses without the high TVOC values reduced, but did not eliminate the ability of the VOC exposure metric based on irritancy and principal component analysis to explain symptom outcome.

  13. TECHNETIUM RETENTION IN WTP LAW GLASS WITH RECYCLE FLOW-SHEET DM10 MELTER TESTING VSL-12R2640-1 REV 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramowitz, Howard; Brandys, Marek; Cecil, Richard; D'Angelo, Nicholas; Matlack, Keith S.; Muller, Isabelle S.; Pegg, Ian L.; Callow, Richard A.; Joseph, Innocent

    2012-12-11

    Melter tests were conducted to determine the retention of technetium and other volatiles in glass while processing simulated Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams through a DM10 melter equipped with a prototypical off-gas system that concentrates and recycles fluid effiuents back to the melter feed. To support these tests, an existing DM10 system installed at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was modified to add the required recycle loop. Based on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) LAW off-gas system design, suitably scaled versions of the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS), Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP), and TLP vacuum evaporator were designed, built, and installed into the DM10 system. Process modeling was used to support this design effort and to ensure that issues associated with the short half life of the {sup 99m}Tc radioisotope that was used in this work were properly addressed and that the system would be capable of meeting the test objectives. In particular, this required that the overall time constant for the system was sufficiently short that a reasonable approach to steady state could be achieved before the {sup 99m}Tc activity dropped below the analytical limits of detection. The conceptual design, detailed design, flow sheet development, process model development, Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (P&ID) development, control system design, software design and development, system fabrication, installation, procedure development, operator training, and Test Plan development for the new system were all conducted during this project. The new system was commissioned and subjected to a series of shake-down tests before embarking on the planned test program. Various system performance issues that arose during testing were addressed through a series of modifications in order to improve the performance and reliability of the system. The resulting system provided a robust and reliable platform to address the test objectives.

  14. Process system evaluation-consolidated letters. Volume 1. Alternatives for the off-gas treatment system for the low-level waste vitrification process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peurrung, L.M.; Deforest, T.J; Richards, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    This report provides an evaluation of alternatives for treating off-gas from the low-level waste (LLW) melter. The study used expertise obtained from the commercial nonradioactive off-gas treatment industry. It was assumed that contact maintenance is possible, although the subsequent risk to maintenance personnel was qualitatively considered in selecting equipment. Some adaptations to the alternatives described may be required, depending on the extent of contact maintenance that can be achieved. This evaluation identified key issues for the off-gas system design. To provide background information, technology reviews were assembled for various classifications of off-gas treatment equipment, including off-gas cooling, particulate control, acid gas control, mist elimination, NO{sub x} reduction, and SO{sub 2} removal. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate for one of the off-gas systems considered is provided using both the off-gas characteristics associated with the Joule-heated and combustion-fired melters. The key issues identified and a description of the preferred off-gas system options are provided below. Five candidate treatment systems were evaluated. All of the systems are appropriate for the different melting/feed preparations currently being considered. The lowest technical risk is achieved using option 1, which is similar to designs for high-level waste (HLW) vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP) and the West Valley. Demonstration Project. Option 1 uses a film cooler, submerged bed scrubber (SBS), and high-efficiency mist eliminator (HEME) prior to NO{sub x} reduction and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration. However, several advantages were identified for option 2, which uses high-temperature filtration. Based on the evaluation, option 2 was identified as the preferred alternative. The characteristics of this option are described below.

  15. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report: October--December 1995. Volume 6, Number 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEachern, R.L.; Carpenter, J.; Miguel, A.; Murphy, P.; Perez, J.; Schleich, D.

    1996-07-01

    This issue presents recent results from the ICF program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in areas ranging from cryogenics to plasma instabilities. The article ``Metastable Crystal Structures of Solid Hydrogen`` describes primarily Raman spectroscopy studies of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} films deposited at various rates and temperatures. All ignition target designs for ICF require a cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel layer of uniform thickness and acceptable roughness. Solid DT layers, in particular, are easier to support in the presence of gravity and self-symmetrize due to self heating from the beta decay of tritium. The roughness of these films is closely related to their crystal structure, so it is important to understand film morphology under different deposition conditions. Three articles present different approaches to the study of plasma instabilities that lead to stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). In ``Modeling of Self-Focusing Experiments by Beam Propagation Codes,`` the authors describe the use of computer codes to model nonlinear effects during the propagation of laser beams through optical elements. Such codes have played a key role in the design of high-power lasers for ICF, both historically and for the NIF. The article ``Optical Scatter--A Diagnostic Tool to Investigate Laser Damage in KDP and DKDP`` examines the important problem of characterizing single crystals of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP) and deuterated KDP. These materials are used as optical switches, for frequency conversion in the Nova laser, and will be required for the NIF. The use of soft x-rays as a plasma probe is the topic of ``Soft X-Ray Interferometry.`` Interferometry of laser-produced plasmas presents a significant challenge, especially at electron densities exceeding 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}. The authors compare x-ray and optical interferometry of plasmas and show experimental results from a soft x-ray Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

  16. New Mexico--West Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production (Million Barrels) Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) New Mexico--West Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3 1980's 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 1990's 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 2000's 2 2 2 2 2 2 5 5 1 1 2010's 1 1 2 2 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  17. Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in

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    monolayer MoS2 and WS2 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August 3, 2016 Title: Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2 The recently discovered monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) provide a fertile playground to explore new coupled spin-valley

  18. Measurement of the dependence of transverse energy production at large

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    pseudorapidity on the hard-scattering kinematics of proton-proton collisions at s=2.76 TeV with ATLAS (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect dependence of transverse energy production at large pseudorapidity on the hard-scattering kinematics of proton-proton collisions at s=2.76 TeV with ATLAS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of the dependence of transverse energy production at large pseudorapidity on the hard-scattering kinematics of proton-proton collisions at s = 2.76

  19. Measurement of the dependence of transverse energy production at large

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    pseudorapidity on the hard-scattering kinematics of proton-proton collisions at s=2.76 TeV with ATLAS (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES dependence of transverse energy production at large pseudorapidity on the hard-scattering kinematics of proton-proton collisions at s=2.76 TeV with ATLAS Title: Measurement of the dependence of transverse energy production at large pseudorapidity on the hard-scattering kinematics of proton-proton collisions at s=2.76 TeV with ATLAS Publication Date: 2016-05-01

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,049,536 2,228,414 2,264,158 2000's 2,434,770 2,400,993 2,218,923 2,218,715 2,353,823 2,196,741 2,248,988 2,327,205 2,330,514 2,256,380 2010's 2,196,086 2,096,279 2,337,017 2,352,421 2,265,431 2,257,216

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Hawaii (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,894 2,654 3,115 2000's 2,841 2,818 2,734 2,732 2,772 2,793 2,782 2,848 2,700 2,605 2010's 2,625 2,616 2,687 2,853 2,927 2,929

  2. Texas--RRC District 7B Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Million Barrels) Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 7B Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 3 3 6 4 3 3 3 2 3 2 1990's 2 1 1 6 1 1 1 2 3 2 2000's 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 5 5 2010's 4 5 4 3 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  3. Spin-Orbit Coupling Induced Anisotropy in the Magnetotransport of the

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    Chiral Helimagnet Cr1=3NbS2 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Spin-Orbit Coupling Induced Anisotropy in the Magnetotransport of the Chiral Helimagnet Cr1=3NbS2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spin-Orbit Coupling Induced Anisotropy in the Magnetotransport of the Chiral Helimagnet Cr1=3NbS2 Understanding the role of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) has been crucial for controlling magnetic anisotropy in magnetic multilayer films. It has been shown that electronic structure can be altered

  4. Profile for Aditya Mohite

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    Dynamics in Phase-Engineered Monolayer MoS2" equal contributions *corresponding author ACS Nano 9, 840 (2015). DOI: 10.1021nn506469v Sibel Ebru Yalcin*, Charudatta Galande,...

  5. Conergy Canada | Open Energy Information

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    Canada Jump to: navigation, search Name: Conergy Canada Place: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Zip: T5S 2X3 Sector: Solar Product: Canada-based manufacturer of solar products....

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    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Canadian Solar Inc (CSI) Place: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada Zip: N2K 3S2 Sector: Solar Product: Canada-incorporated, China-based manufacturer of...

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    ... Bolton, Adam S. (2) Burles, Scott M. (2) Cameron, Scott A. (2) Coil, Alison L. (2) Cool, ... Janet E. ; Bernstein, Rebecca A. ; Cameron, Scott A. ; McWilliam, Andrew, E-mail: ...

  8. Spin wave eigenmodes in single and coupled sub-150 nm rectangular...

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    ...anni.carlotti@fisica.unipg.it ; Madami, M. 1 ; Tacchi, S. 2 ; Gubbiotti, G. ; Dey, H. ; Csaba, G. ; Porod, W. 3 + Show Author Affiliations Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, ...

  9. Michigan Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 7,642 2,330 1,719 1970's 378 788 63 176 327 981 1,401 2,169 1980's 2,375 2,390 2,400 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,606 2,340 2,768 1990's 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2000's 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2010's 2,340 2,340 0

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    Identifying different stacking sequences in few-layer CVD-grown Mo S 2 by low-energy atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy Yan, Aiming ; Chen, Wei ; Ophus, ...

  11. Georgia's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

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    Energy Companies in Georgia's 2nd congressional district First United Ethanol LLC Habitat for Humanity Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeorgia%27s2ndc...

  12. Virginia's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

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    You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Virginia. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleVirginia%27s2ndcongressiona...

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    Mary S. (2) Paa-Toli, Ljiljana (2) Wu, Si (2) Zhao, Rui (2) Baker, Scott E. (1) Brown, Roslyn N. (1) Deng, Shuang (1) Feng, Ju (1) Hu, Jian Zhi (1) Jiang, Yuxuan (1) Meng,...

  14. CX-007381: Categorical Exclusion Determination

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    Enabling EarthAbundant Pyrite (FeS2) Semiconductor Nanostructures for High Performance Photovoltaic Devices CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/26/2011 Location(s): Wisconsin Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  15. CeCap LLP | Open Energy Information

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    Name: CeCap LLP Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: W1S 2LQ Product: London-based investment boutique which provides investment advice to, and invests in, small to mediun size...

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    ... Here we directly measure the coupled spin-valley dynamics in electron-doped MoS2 and WS2 ... optical transitions between conduction and valence subband Landau levels in ...

  17. Statement of Work for RFP RCE-6-62377

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    Power ramp rate 0-100% <1s <.2s Communications interface to system power transfer <.5s <.1s System operation Automatic - No driver intervention necessary On-vehicle system...

  18. Section 113

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    (TAO) buoys on the 165E line. The radiometers will be installed on the buoys at 8S, 5S, 2S, 0, 2N, 5N, and 8N during 1997. The data will provide incoming solar radiation data...

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    Hogg, D.W. (2) Ichikawa, S.-I. (2) Inada, Naohisa (2) Ivezic, Z. (2) Kayo, Issha (2) Kent, S. (2) Knapp, G.R. (2) Morokuma, Tomoki (2) Save Results Save this search to My...

  20. What are the Rare Earths? | The Ames Laboratory

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    cars components. The Elements Scandium Sc symbol Scandium Atomic Weight: 44.955 gmol Density: 2.958 gcm3 Electron Configuration: Ar 3d14s2 Melting Point: 1814 K, 1541 C,...

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    Grant, C D (4) Crowhurst, J (3) Glascoe, E A (3) Jeanloz, R (3) Aberg, D (2) Aracne-Ruddle, C (2) Brown, J M (2) Esposito, A (2) Goldman, N (2) Lee, G S (2) Save Results Save this ...

  2. The unseen iceberg: Plant roots in arctic tundra (Journal Article...

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    ecosystems in the Arctic. Authors: Iversen, Colleen M 1 ; Sloan, Victoria L 1 ; Sullivan, Patrick F. 2 ; Euskirchen, Eugenie S 2 ; McGuire, A. David 2 ; Norby, Richard...

  3. TABLE49.CHP:Corel VENTURA

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    0 0 0 0 10 Ecuador ... 249 0 0 0 -14 22 0 (s) -2 6 256 Egypt ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (s) 0 (s) (s) France...

  4. EA-1566: Notice of Comment Period Extension | Department of Energy

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    EA-1566: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Assessment EIS-0250-S1 and EIS-0250-S2: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental...

  5. EIS-0471: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact Statement...

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    EIS-0440: EPA Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0250-S1 and EIS-0250-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental...

  6. Albany Center map_rev36-10

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    Bro adw ay Stre et Lib ert y Str ee t Queen Avenue N S1 S2 S3 Locked Gate Locked Gate Locked Gate Locked Gate Locked Gate Locked Gate Walk Gate (locked) Walk Gate (locked) Walk...

  7. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to India (Million Cubic...

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    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 2010's 2,873 12,542 3,004

  8. Run

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    Maintenance AP Spear Down University Holidays Sep Oct S 1 1 Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug 442013 SPEAR OPERATING SCHEDULE 2012-2013 2012 2013 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb S 2 1 1 M 3 1 2...

  9. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Truck to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

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    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 0 0 2010's 0 0 2 99 41

  10. Energy Levels

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    B from ENSDF (unpublished, January 2016) E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 or Γ Decay g.s. (2 - ) n

  11. Energy Levels

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    6 H from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (MeV) Decay g.s. (2 - ); 2 1.6 ± 0.4

  12. Michigan Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 7,642 2,330 1,719 1970's 378 788 63 176 327 981 1,401 2,169 1980's 2,375 2,390 2,400 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,606 2,340 2,768 1990's 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2000's 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2010's 2,340 2,340 0

  13. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,585 2,670 2,638 1990's 2,574 2,486 2,515 2,477 2,592 2,531 2,564 2,233 2,188 2,267 2000's 2,025 1,996 2,029 2,074 2,040 1,432 1,257 1,146 1,131 2,039 2010's 2,106 1,770 1,793 1,870 1,878 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  14. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,772 2,689 2,877 1990's 2,889 2,840 2,859 2,912 2,853 2,845 2,843 2,531 3,295 3,040 2000's 2,821 3,403 3,438 3,367 3,283 2,855 2,811 2,822 2,920 2,618 2010's 2,731 2,733 2,872 2,958 3,063 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  15. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,237,877 2,271,801 2,291,242 1990's 2,311,795 2,333,377 2,363,575 2,386,249 2,393,053 2,413,715 2,431,909 2,452,524 2,493,639 2,486,704 2000's 2,519,794 2,542,724 2,559,024 2,572,584 2,591,458 2,600,574 2,605,782 2,620,755 2,631,340 2,635,886 2010's 2,646,211 2,667,392 2,678,547

  16. Measurement of the optical dielectric function of monolayertransition...

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    Measurement of the optical dielectric function of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides:MoS2,MoSe2,WS2, andWSe2 This content will become publicly available on November 17,...

  17. West Virginia's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources...

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    You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in West Virginia. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWestVirginia%27s2nd...

  18. Price of Massena, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's -- 2.96 -- --

  19. Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,865 2,742 1,850 2,222 1,303 2,477 1,695 1,228 2,053 3,757 1990's 2,377 1,923 3,065 2,931 2,879 3,035 3,985 2,416 3,562 3,005 2000's 2,664 2,273 2,234 2,960 1,564 1,487 1,121 3,864 3,509 2,748 2010's 2,738 1,499 2,963 3,505 7,759 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  20. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,206 2,151 2,555 1990's 2,361 2,369 2,425 2,512 2,440 2,393 2,306 2,382 5,149 2,159 2000's 2,386 2,704 2,657 2,755 2,738 2,498 2,545 2,656 2,650 2,717 2010's 2,702 2,729 2,679 2,581 2,595 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  1. U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,637 1980's 2,648 3,080 3,520 3,071 2,778 3,053 1,855 1,556 1,979 2,313 1990's 2,492 1,655 1,773 1,930 3,606 2,518 3,209 2,455 2,240 2,265 2000's 2,463 2,898 1,752 1,653 1,244 1,243 1,197 1,244 1,678 2,656 2010's

  2. U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,373 1980's 2,279 2,809 3,155 2,745 2,482 2,712 1,666 1,401 1,640 2,139 1990's 2,242 1,321 1,481 1,767 3,404 1,884 2,871 2,268 2,022 1,841 2000's 2,211 2,420 1,421 1,529 1,147 1,164

  3. Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Barrels) Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,125 1980's 2,081 2,285 2,393 2,650 2,660 2,610 2,671 2,509 2,339 2,270 1990's 2,305 2,237 2,162 2,211 2,151 2,269 2,337 2,376 2,262 2,257 2000's 2,479 2,318 2,368 2,192 2,466 2,723 2,913 3,158 3,148 3,432 2010's 3,983

  4. New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,634 1980's 2,266 2,377 2,331 2,214 2,117 2,001 1,750 1,901 2,030 2,131 1990's 2,290 2,073 1,948 1,860 1,791 1,648 1,612 1,694 1,694 1,880 2000's 2,526 2,571 2,632

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - FY2016 Senior Professional Performance...

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    ... Reviews AU, CF, CI, EA, GC, HC, HG, SC, OE, OSDBU Panel 3 Reviews EIA, EM, PMAs, LP, MA, PM Panel 4 Reviews S1 & S2, AR, ED, EE, EP, FE, IA, IN, LM, NE, & IM 32 Rewarding ...

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - FY2016 SES Performance Management Training...

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    ... Reviews AU, CF, CI, GC, HC, HG, SC, OE, OSBDU Panel 3 Reviews EIA, EM, PMAs, LP, MA, PM Panel 4 Reviews S1 & S2, AR, ED, EE, EP, FE, IA, IN, LM, NE, IM 33 Rewarding Performance ...

  7. TABLE08.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    - 0 (s) - 0 (s) 2 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ... 15 69 31 - 69 37 - 5 3 140 EthaneEthylene ... 1 (s) 0 - 0 0 - 0 0 1 PropanePropylene...

  8. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,896 2,852 2,842 1990's 2,837 2,786 2,793 3,222 2,805 2,825 2,823 2,783 2,761 2,763 2000's 2,768 2,777 2,781 2,804 2,578 2,572 2,548 2,547 2,540 2,535 2010's 2,551 2,560 2,545 2,627 2,789 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  9. U.S. Price of Natural Gas Imports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History U.S. 2.66 2.74 2.75 3.23 2.40 2.28 1989-2015

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/13-TX-a | Open Energy Information

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    15.3(d)). Note: Under the Beach Dune Rules Sec. 15.3(s)(2)(a) the exploration for and production of oil and gas is exempted from the Dune Protection permit requirement. If the...

  11. The MAJORANA Project (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Leviner, L. 7 ; Luke, P. 4 ; MacMullin, S. 3 ; Marino, Michael G. 5 ; McDonald, Art B. 19 ; Mei, Dong-Ming 17 ; Miley, Harry S. 2 ; Myers, A. W. 5 ; Nomachi,...

  12. Earth abundant nanocrystals for solar and thermoelectric applications...

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    on a couple classes of nanomaterials containing antimony, including chalcostibite (CuSbS2CuSbSe2) and stibnite (Sb2Se3). While not extensively explored, these materials have...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Tamarit, Carlos (4) Franco, Sebastian (3) Behbahani, Siavosh R. (2) Cohen, Timothy (2) Harrison, Sarah (2) Matsuura, Shunji (2) Raghu, S. (2) Schafer-Nameki, Sakura (2) Bai, Yang ...

  14. Audit Report: IG-0522 | Department of Energy

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    Both operations are to take place at the Savannah River Site (Site). PDF icon Audit Report: IG-0522 More Documents & Publications Audit Report: ER-L-02-01 EIS-0283-S2: Final ...

  15. Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons...

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    Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on ...

  16. davis-99.PDF

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    Gaussian solution has 2 and variance 2 L 2 , so its probability density function (PDF) is dP 2 (s)ds (12 L 12 ) x exp-(s2 L ) 2 . (4a) Another solution is the...

  17. ENERGY USE AND DOMESTIC HOT WATER CONSUMPTION Final Report

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    ... Weekdays have a minimal overnight usage, then a s-2 morning peak, followed by lower ... The existence of, in some cases, more than zero to minimal consumption in the overnight ...

  18. Rapid first-cycle lithiation strategy for enhanced performance...

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    Rapid first-cycle lithiation strategy for enhanced performance of Li-MoS2 batteries as identified by in situ studies. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rapid first-cycle...

  19. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to Japan (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 2,822 2,741 5,037...

  20. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

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    5 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Table S2. Uranium feed deliveries, enrichment services, and uranium loaded by owners ...

  1. Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2,265 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0...

  2. EIS-0283: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

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    EIS-0283-AmROD-2003a.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision (April 2002) EIS-0283: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0283-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

  3. Promising technique improves hydrogen production of affordable alternative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to platinum | Argonne National Laboratory A schematic illustration highlighting the synthesis of nanostructured MoS2 catalyst from microwave reaction (click image to enlarge) A schematic illustration highlighting the synthesis of nanostructured MoS2 catalyst from microwave reaction (click image to enlarge) A molybdenum disulfide chip (Materialscientist, Wikipedia) (click image to enlarge) A molybdenum disulfide chip (Materialscientist, Wikipedia) (click image to enlarge) Promising technique

  4. Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 873 431 139 27 4 3 3 3 1980's 2 3 9 10 10 12 2 1,306 1990's 2,080 1,123 721 508 711 470 417 398 429 471 2000's 368 305 300 443 331 233 611 654 523 711 2010's 183 168 117 72 106

  5. Florida Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,511 1980's 2,173 1,094 1990's 115 - 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 17,909 17,718 20,890

  6. Florida Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,511 1980's 2,173 1,094 1990's 115 - 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 17,909 17,718 20,890

  7. Vermont Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,334 2,105 2,901 2000's 3,949 2,597 3,085 2,479 2,784 2,628 2,762 2,987 3,000 2,890 2010's 2,909 2,812 2,711 1,303 1,858 NA

  8. Industrial Carbon Management Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Carbon Management Initiative Fact Sheets Research Team Members Key Contacts Industrial Carbon Management Initiative (ICMI) Background The ICMI project is part of a larger program called Carbon Capture Simulation and Storage Initiative (C2S2I). The C2S2I has a goal of expanding the DOE's focus on Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS) for advanced coal power systems and other applications, including the use of petroleum coke as a feedstock for the industrial sector. The American

  9. Savannah River Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Site | Department of Energy Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River Site Savannah River Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River Site Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download PDF icon Savannah River Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River Site PDF icon Summary - Plutonium Preparation Project at the Savannah River Site More Documents & Publications EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2:

  10. Other Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents Other Documents December 16, 2015 EA-2005: Floodplain Statement of Findings Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure and Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM June 24, 2014 EIS-0501: FERC Project Update Golden Pass LNG Export and Pipeline Project, Texas and Louisiana October 30, 2013 EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination Disposition of Certain Plutonium Materials at the K-Area Complex, Savannah River Site April 25, 2013 EIS-0283-S2:

  11. crd title p1.ai | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE/EIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye

  12. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 5 5 3 3 2,790 4,080 4,600 3,800 4,000 2,500 1990's 2,815 2,741 2,580 4,003 4,200 2,520...

  13. EIS-0082-S1: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    S1: Record of Decision EIS-0082-S1: Record of Decision Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina For more information, see the project page: http://energy.gov/node/1191601. PDF icon EIS-0082-S1-ROD-1995.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0082: Record of Decision EIS-0082-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0082-S2: Record of Decision

  14. Collaborative research. Study of aerosol sources and processing at the GVAX Pantnagar Supersite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worsnop, Doug; Volkamer, Rainer

    2012-08-13

    The Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) investigated uncertainties in the aerosol direct effect in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes. The University of Colorado 2D-MAX-DOAS and LED-CE-DOAS instruments were collocated with DOE’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) and Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) during the TCAP-1 campaign at Cape Cod, MA (1 July to 13 August 2012). We have performed atmospheric radiation closure studies to evaluate the use of a novel parameter, i.e., the Raman Scattering Probability (RSP). We have performed first measurements of RSP almucantar scans, and measure RSP in spectra of scattered solar photons at 350nm and 430nm. Radiative Transfer Modelling of RSP demonstrate that the RSP measurement is maximally sensitive to infer even extremely low aerosol optical depth (AOD < 0.01) reliably by DOAS at low solar relative azimuth angles. We further assess the role of elevated aerosol layers on near surface observations of oxygen collision complexes, O 2-O2. Elevated aerosol layers modify the near surface absorption of O2-O2 and RSP. The combination of RSP and O2-O2 holds largely unexplored potential to better constrain elevated aerosol layers and measure column aerosol optical properties such as aerosol effective radius, extinction, aerosol phase functions and refractive indices. The TCAP deployment also provides a time series of reactive trace gas vertical profiles, i.e., nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and glyoxal (C2H2O2), which are measured simultaneously with the aerosol optical properties by DOAS. NO2 is an important precursor for ozone (O3) that modifies oxidative capacity. Glyoxal modifies oxidative capacity and is a source for brown carbon by forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via multiphase reactions in aerosol and cloud water. We have performed field measurements of these gases during TCAP, and conducted laboratory experiments to quantify for the first time the Setschenow salting constant, KS, of glyoxal in sulfate aerosols. Knowledge about KS is prerequisite to predict how increasing sulfate concentrations since pre-industrial times have modified the formation of SOA from biogenic gases in atmospheric models.

  15. FINAL REPORT REGULATORY OFF GAS EMISSIONS TESTING ON THE DM1200 MELTER SYSTEM USING HLW AND LAW SIMULANTS VSL-05R5830-1 REV 0 10/31/05

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    The operational requirements for the River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) and High Level Waste (HLW) melter systems, together with the feed constituents, impose a number of challenges to the off-gas treatment system. The system must be robust from the standpoints of operational reliability and minimization of maintenance. The system must effectively control and remove a wide range of solid particulate matter, acid mists and gases, and organic constituents (including those arising from products of incomplete combustion of sugar and organics in the feed) to concentration levels below those imposed by regulatory requirements. The baseline design for the RPP-WTP LAW primary off-gas system includes a submerged bed scrubber (SBS), a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP), and a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The secondary off-gas system includes a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed (AC-S), a thermal catalytic oxidizer (TCO), a single-stage selective catalytic reduction NOx treatment system (SCR), and a packed-bed caustic scrubber (PBS). The baseline design for the RPP-WTP HLW primary off-gas system includes an SBS, a WESP, a high efficiency mist eliminator (HEME), and a HEPA filter. The HLW secondary off-gas system includes a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed, a silver mordenite bed, a TCO, and a single-stage SCR. The one-third scale HLW DM1200 Pilot Melter installed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was equipped with a prototypical off-gas train to meet the needs for testing and confirmation of the performance of the baseline off-gas system design. Various modifications have been made to the DM1200 system as the details of the WTP design have evolved, including the installation of a silver mordenite column and an AC-S column for testing on a slipstream of the off-gas flow; the installation of a full-flow AC-S bed for the present tests was completed prior to initiation of testing. The DM1200 system was reconfigured to enable testing of the baseline HLW or LAW off-gas trains to perform off-gas emissions testing with both LAW and HLW simulants in the present work. During 2002 and 2003, many of these off-gas components were tested individually and in an integrated manner with the DM1200 Pilot Melter. Data from these tests are being used to support engineering design confirmation and to provide data to support air permitting activities. In fiscal year 2004, the WTP Project was directed by the Office of River Protection (ORP) to comply with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements for organics. This requires that the combined melter and off-gas system have destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of >99.99% for principal organic dangerous constituents (PODCs). In order to provide confidence that the melter and off-gas system are able to achieve the required DRE, testing has been directed with both LAW and HLW feeds. The tests included both 'normal' and 'challenge' WTP melter conditions in order to obtain data for the potential range of operating conditions for the WTP melters and off-gas components. The WTP Project, Washington State Department of Ecology, and ORP have agreed that naphthalene will be used for testing to represent semi-volatile organics and allyl alcohol will be used to represent volatile organics. Testing was also performed to determine emissions of halides, metals, products of incomplete combustion (PICs), dioxins, furans, coplanar PCBs, total hydrocarbons, and COX and NOX, as well as the particle size distribution (PSD) of particulate matter discharged at the end of the off-gas train. A description of the melter test requirements and analytical methods used is provided in the Test Plan for this work. Test Exceptions were subsequently issued which changed the TCO catalyst, added total organic emissions (TOE) to exhaust sampling schedule, and allowing modification of the test conditions in response to attainable plenum temperatures as well as temperature increases in the sulfur impregnated activated carbon (AC-S) column. Data are provided in this final report for all the required emission samples as well as melter and off-gas conditions during all the sampling periods. Appended to this report are previously issued VSL Letter Reports on method development for monitoring allyl alcohol in melter exhaust streams, on the results of characterization of the selected AC-S carbon media (Donnau BAT37), and on DM1200 off-line tests on the AC-S bed; also appended are reports from Air Tech on emissions sampling, and reports from Keika Ventures on validation of analytical data provided by Severn Trent Laboratories of Knoxville, Tennessee.

  16. Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,000 2,906 2,802 1970's 2,852 2,926 5,506 7,664 5,259 1,806 1,048 691 469 560 1980's 2,439 2,740 3,682 1,572 1,766 1,161 1990's 1,338 1,625 1,284 2,153 3,363 35,069 27,277 16,790 19,365 13,835 2000's 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 595 585 1,005 1,285 1,398 2010's 2,080 1,755 0

  17. Minnesota Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Minnesota Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.49 2.52 2.65 2.72 2.59 2.44 2.52 2000's 2.60 2.62 2.77 2.72 2.73 2.66 2.68 2.73 2.85 2.79 2010's 2.57 2.66 2.63 2.86 2.88 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016

  18. Missouri Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Missouri Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.71 2.53 2.58 2.62 2.56 2.45 2.37 2000's 2.31 2.44 2.34 2.26 2.25 2.21 2.18 2.15 2.33 2.22 2010's 2.25 2.18 2.00 2.17 2.27 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016

  19. Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.14 2.05 2.15 2.12 2.32 2.45 2.37 2000's 2.33 2.59 2.64 2.45 2.48 2.57 2.73 2.77 2.74 2.70 2010's 2.74 2.76 2.79 2.76 2.60 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016

  20. Georgia Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Georgia Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.33 2.18 2.36 2.42 2.30 2.38 2.09 2000's 2.82 2.51 2.59 2.56 2.60 2.58 2.52 2.37 2.44 2.48 2010's 2.90 2.40 2.35 2.48 2.64 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016

  1. Kansas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Barrels) Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Kansas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 2 1990's 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 8 3 3 2000's 3 2 2 3 4 6 5 4 6 5 2010's 7 7 7 18 37 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring

  2. Louisiana - North Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - North Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,104 1980's 2,244 2,318 2,156 2,233 1,856 2,018 2,000 1,862 2,193 2,468 1990's 2,399 2,243 2,203 2,256 2,465 2,730 2,934 2,869 2,760 2,867 2000's 3,158 3,759 4,124

  3. Massachusetts Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Massachusetts Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.45 2.47 2.18 2.18 2.25 2.26 2.24 2000's 2.28 2.24 2.24 2.48 2.32 2.46 2.38 2.44 2.71 2.78 2010's 2.63 2.74 2.78 2.39 2.49 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016

  4. Arkansas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Barrels) Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Arkansas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1 1980's 1 1 3 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1990's 2 2 2 2 3 3 2 4 2 2 2000's 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2010's 2 2 2 1 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring

  5. California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,961 1980's 3,345 2,660 2,663 2,546 2,507 1990's 2,400 2,213 2,093 1,982 1,698 1,619 1,583 1,820 1,879 2,150 2000's 2,198 1,922 1,900 1,810 2,006 2,585 2,155 2,193

  6. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2 2,313 2,293 2,380 1990's 2,431 2,523 2,509 2,458 2,477 2,491 2,512 2,496 2,464 2,620 2000's 2,792 2,781 2,730 2,743 2,799 2,787 2,735 2,704 2,757 3,057 2010's 3,039 2,988 3,045 3,143 3,244 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  7. Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Industrial Deliveries (Percent)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Deliveries (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Industrial Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.28 2.23 2.38 2.27 2.36 2.39 2.53 2000's 2.46 2.11 2.13 2.22 2.25 2.29 2.30 2.26 2.13 2.13 2010's 2.12 2.19 2.38 2.42 2.46 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Vermont (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 828 831 853 856 1,467 1,575 1,688 1,833 1,941 2,081 1990's 2,049 2,058 2,319 2,382 2,669 2,672 2,825 3,051 2,979 2,309 2000's 2,595 2,473 2,470 2,757 2,724 2,610 2,374 2,631 2,495 2,483 2010's 2,384 2,479 2,314 4,748 4,830 NA

  9. California Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,146,211 2,309,883 2,339,521 2000's 2,508,797 2,464,565 2,273,193 2,269,405 2,406,889 2,248,256 2,315,721 2,395,674 2,405,266 2,328,504 2010's 2,273,128 2,153,186 2,403,494 2,415,571 2,344,977 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  10. California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,565 2,780 3,074 1970's 2,499 575 1,999 1,560 1,537 1,288 1,038 960 1,253 1980's 1,386 1,907 1,907 1,135 2,116 2,200 2,750 2,734 2,733 2,731 1990's 1,244 1,429 751 580 830 1,250 1,268 1,590 1,952 1,367 2000's 2,210 1,717 2,690 3,940 3,215 2,120 1,562 1,879 2,127 2,501 2010's 2,790 2,424 0

  11. Hawaii Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Hawaii Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,894 2,654 3,115 2000's 2,841 2,818 2,734 2,732 2,774 2,795 2,783 2,850 2,702 2,607 2010's 2,627 2,619 2,689 2,855 2,928 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  12. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,452,554 2,491,149 2,531,304 1990's 2,573,570 2,609,561 2,640,579 2,677,085 2,717,683 2,767,190 2,812,876 2,859,483 2,903,698 2,949,628 2000's 2,999,737 3,011,205 3,110,743 3,140,021 3,161,370 3,187,583 3,193,920 3,188,152 3,172,623 3,169,026 2010's 3,152,468 3,153,895 3,161,033 3,180,349

  13. U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field Discoveries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,279 1980's 2,629 3,870 2,785 1,628 2,584 1,040 1,122 1,128 1,677 1,488 1990's 2,041 871 668 927 1,941 1,709 1,491 2,747 1,116 1,622 2000's 2,055 3,668 1,374 1,252 790 973 425 814 1,229 1,423 2010's 895 987 780 263 671 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  14. Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,000 2,906 2,802 1970's 2,852 2,926 5,506 7,664 5,259 1,806 1,048 691 469 560 1980's 2,439 2,740 3,682 1,572 1,766 1,161 1990's 1,338 1,625 1,284 2,153 3,363 35,069 27,277 16,790 19,365 13,835 2000's 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 595 585 1,005 1,285 1,398 2010's 2,080 1,755 0

  15. Wisconsin Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Wisconsin Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.63 2.64 2.80 2.82 2.73 2.57 2.70 2000's 2.70 2.63 2.81 2.80 2.78 2.72 2.76 2.78 2.87 2.79 2010's 2.58 2.75 2.71 2.92 2.96 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016

  16. Oregon Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2.00 1980's 2.40 2.60 3.33 3.33 2.78 2.40 2.00 1.45 1.60 1.40 1990's 1.39 1.42 1.29 1.70 2.06 0.93 2.26 2.19 2.38 2.52 2000's 2.69 3.66 3.97 4.48 3.89 4.25 NA 5.27 5.33 4.00 2010's 4.92 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  17. U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Injections (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,654,035 2,371,697 2,647,124 2,532,986 2,607,787 2,337,857 2000's 2,388,369 3,123,178 2,312,532 2,934,751 2,809,465 2,623,097 2,553,493 2,732,676 2,900,103 2,855,667 2010's 2,780,703 2,888,920 2,360,422 2,663,518 3,204,781 3,031,794

  18. California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,565 2,780 3,074 1970's 2,499 575 1,999 1,560 1,537 1,288 1,038 960 1,253 1980's 1,386 1,907 1,907 1,135 2,116 2,200 2,750 2,734 2,733 2,731 1990's 1,244 1,429 751 580 830 1,250 1,268 1,590 1,952 1,367 2000's 2,210 1,717 2,690 3,940 3,215 2,120 1,562 1,879 2,127 2,501 2010's 2,790 2,424 0

  19. Hawaii Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Hawaii Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,190 2,993 2,899 2,775 2,449 2,655 2,630 2,461 2,801 2,844 1990's 2,817 2,725 2,711 2,705 2,831 2,793 2,761 2,617 2,715 2,752 2000's 2,769 2,689 2,602 2,602 2,626 2,606 2,613 2,683 2,559 2,447 2010's 2,472 2,467 2,510 2,658 2,743 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  20. West Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,593 1980's 2,437 1,881 2,169 2,238 2,173 2,104 2,207 2,210 2,299 2,244 1990's 2,243 2,513 2,293 2,408 2,569 2,514 2,722 2,887 2,925 2,952 2000's 2,929 2,777 3,477 3,376 3,489 4,553

  1. West Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,052 2,276 0 1970's 2,551 3,043 3,808 2,160 1,909 1,791 1,490 1,527 1,233 1,218 1980's 2,482 2,515 6,426 5,826 7,232 7,190 6,658 8,835 8,343 7,882 1990's 9,631 7,744 8,097 7,065 8,087 8,045 6,554 7,210 6,893 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  2. Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Barrels) Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 3 21 2 1 2 2 3 3 1990's 2 3 6 6 7 7 7 9 8 8 2000's 7 6 8 8 8 9 11 14 14 0 2010's 9 10 12 32 350 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015

  3. Oregon Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 5 5 3 3 2,790 4,080 4,600 3,800 4,000 2,500 1990's 2,815 2,741 2,580 4,003 3,221 1,923 1,439 1,173 1,067 1,291 2000's 1,214 1,110 837 731 467 454 621 409 778 821 2010's 1,407 1,344 770 770 950

  4. Louisiana - South Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) South Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,304 1980's 2,134 1,871 1,789 1,582 1,488 1,792 1,573 1,380 1,338 1,273 1990's 1,106 995 853 649 678 720 627 599 630 599

  5. Michigan Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Barrels) Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Michigan Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1990's 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 2000's 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 2010's 1 1 1 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  6. Calif--Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production (Million Barrels) Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Calif--Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1990's 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2000's 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2010's 1 1 1 1 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  7. California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reserves (Million Barrels) Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2,095 2010's 2,037 1,950 1,893 1,813 1,838 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date:

  8. California Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) California Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2,835 2010's 2,939 3,009 2,976 2,878 2,874 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved

  9. California State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Barrels) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) California State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 1 2 6 2 2 2 3 1990's 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date:

  10. California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production (Million Barrels) Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 1 2 6 5 2 2 2 3 1990's 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  11. Texas--RRC District 10 Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production (Million Barrels) Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 10 Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1990's 2 2 1 2 3 1 1 1 1 1 2000's 1 1 1 2 2 3 5 5 8 8 2010's 11 15 18 20 14 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  12. Texas--RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3 1980's 2 3 4 5 4 5 4 4 4 3 1990's 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 4 2 2000's 2 3 2 2 3 3 4 3 3 3 2010's 5 18 33 49 66 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  13. Texas--RRC District 7C Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production (Million Barrels) Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 7C Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1990's 4 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 2000's 1 3 2 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 2010's 4 3 2 2 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  14. Texas--RRC District 8 Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production (Million Barrels) Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 8 Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 7 1980's 6 5 4 3 3 2 3 2 2 2 1990's 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 2000's 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 3 2010's 38 5 5 7 9 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  15. The Creation of the Universe

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Gravity and quantum theory cause the Universe to be spontaneously created out of nothing. Most of these universes are quite unlike our own but we select out a subset that are compatible with what we observe. Please note that Professor Hawking's talk will be broadcasted in the following rooms : TH auditorium (4-3-006) TE auditorium (30-7-018) 40-S2-A01 40-S2-C01 BE Meyrin (6-2-024) BE Prévessin (864-1-D02)

  16. Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,630 2,529 2,666 1970's 2,713 2,669 2,681 2,377 889 846 831 783 861 801 1980's 737 641 431 436 467 514 450 458 578 509 1990's 557 628 642 670 715 723 716 680 605 555 2000's 527 481 456 420 398 378 365 363 373 353 2010's 323 307 0

  17. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.97 2.36 2.17 2.47 2000's 2.91 3.92 NA 5.06 6.83 7.92 7.36 7.77 7.48 4.85 2010's 4.87 4.48 3.18 3.98 5.45 3.55

  18. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 5 5 3 3 2,790 4,080 4,600 3,800 4,000 2,500 1990's 2,815 2,741 2,580 4,003 4,200 2,520 1,743 1,382 1,263 1,555 2000's 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 454 621 409 778 821 2010's 1,407 1,344 770 770 950

  19. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Idaho Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.0 2.5 2.7 2000's 2.7 2.2 2.0 2.1 2.4 2.3 2.1 2.0 1.9 1.7 2010's 1.8 2.0 1.9 2.5 2.8 NA

  20. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Wyoming Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.5 2.0 2.9 2000's 2.6 2.5 2.9 1.8 2.1 3.7 3.5 3.0 3.2 3.1 2010's 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.2 1.3