National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for maos sbs s2

  1. Nucleon form factors program with SBS at JLAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-12-01

    The physics of the nucleon form factors is the basic part of the Jefferson Laboratory program. We review the achievements of the 6-GeV era and the program with the 12- GeV beam with the SBS spectrometer in Hall A, with a focus on the nucleon ground state properties.

  2. All solid-state SBS phase conjugate mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, Clifford B.; Hackel, Lloyd A.

    1999-01-01

    A stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugate laser mirror uses a solid-state nonlinear gain medium instead of the conventional liquid or high pressure gas medium. The concept has been effectively demonstrated using common optical-grade fused silica. An energy threshold of 2.5 mJ and a slope efficiency of over 90% were achieved, resulting in an overall energy reflectivity of >80% for 15 ns, 1 um laser pulses. The use of solid-state materials is enabled by a multi-pass resonant architecture which suppresses transient fluctuations that would otherwise result in damage to the SBS medium. This all solid state phase conjugator is safer, more reliable, and more easily manufactured than prior art designs. It allows nonlinear wavefront correction to be implemented in industrial and defense laser systems whose operating environments would preclude the introduction of potentially hazardous liquids or high pressure gases.

  3. All solid-state SBS phase conjugate mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.

    1999-03-09

    A stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugate laser mirror uses a solid-state nonlinear gain medium instead of the conventional liquid or high pressure gas medium. The concept has been effectively demonstrated using common optical-grade fused silica. An energy threshold of 2.5 mJ and a slope efficiency of over 90% were achieved, resulting in an overall energy reflectivity of >80% for 15 ns, 1 um laser pulses. The use of solid-state materials is enabled by a multi-pass resonant architecture which suppresses transient fluctuations that would otherwise result in damage to the SBS medium. This all solid state phase conjugator is safer, more reliable, and more easily manufactured than prior art designs. It allows nonlinear wavefront correction to be implemented in industrial and defense laser systems whose operating environments would preclude the introduction of potentially hazardous liquids or high pressure gases. 8 figs.

  4. Evidence that formulations of the selective MAO-B inhibitor, selegiline, which bypass first-pass metabolism, also inhibit MAO-A in the human brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D.; Shumay, Elena; McCall-Perez, Fred; Gilmor, Michelle; Jayne, Millard; Wang, Gene-Jack; Alexoff, David L.; Apelskog-Torres, Karen; Hubbard, Barbara; Carter, Pauline; King, Payton; Fahn, Stanley; Telang, Frank; Shea, Colleen; Xu, Youwen; Muench, Lisa

    2015-10-29

    Selegiline (L-deprenyl) is a selective, irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) at the conventional dose (10 mg/day oral) that is used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. However, controlled studies have demonstrated antidepressant activity for high doses of oral selegiline and for transdermal selegiline suggesting that when plasma levels of selegiline are elevated, brain MAO-A might also be inhibited. Zydis selegiline (Zelapar®) is an orally disintegrating formulation of selegiline, which is absorbed through the buccal mucosa producing higher plasma levels of selegiline and reduced amphetamine metabolites compared to equal doses of conventional selegiline. Although there is indirect evidence that Zydis selegiline at high doses loses its selectivity for MAO-B, there is no direct evidence that it also inhibits brain MAO-A in humans. We measured brain MAO-A in 18 healthy men after a 28-day treatment with Zydis selegiline (2.5, 5.0, or 10 mg/day) and in 3 subjects receiving the selegiline transdermal system (Emsam patch, 6 mg/day) using PET and the MAO-A radiotracer [¹¹C]clorgyline. We also measured dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in three subjects from the 10 mg group. The 10 mg Zydis selegiline dose significantly inhibited MAO-A (36.9 ± 19.7%, range 11–70%, p<0.007)) but not DAT; and while Emsam also inhibited MAO-A (33.2 ± 28.9 (range 9-68%) the difference did not reach significance (p=0.10)) presumably because of the small sample size. Our results provide the first direct evidence of brain MAO-A inhibition in humans by formulations of selegiline, which are currently postulated but not verified to target brain MAO-A in addition to MAO-B.

  5. Evidence that formulations of the selective MAO-B inhibitor, selegiline, which bypass first-pass metabolism, also inhibit MAO-A in the human brain

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D.; Shumay, Elena; McCall-Perez, Fred; Gilmor, Michelle; Jayne, Millard; Wang, Gene-Jack; Alexoff, David L.; Apelskog-Torres, Karen; et al

    2015-10-29

    Selegiline (L-deprenyl) is a selective, irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) at the conventional dose (10 mg/day oral) that is used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. However, controlled studies have demonstrated antidepressant activity for high doses of oral selegiline and for transdermal selegiline suggesting that when plasma levels of selegiline are elevated, brain MAO-A might also be inhibited. Zydis selegiline (Zelapar®) is an orally disintegrating formulation of selegiline, which is absorbed through the buccal mucosa producing higher plasma levels of selegiline and reduced amphetamine metabolites compared to equal doses of conventional selegiline. Although there is indirect evidence thatmore » Zydis selegiline at high doses loses its selectivity for MAO-B, there is no direct evidence that it also inhibits brain MAO-A in humans. We measured brain MAO-A in 18 healthy men after a 28-day treatment with Zydis selegiline (2.5, 5.0, or 10 mg/day) and in 3 subjects receiving the selegiline transdermal system (Emsam patch, 6 mg/day) using PET and the MAO-A radiotracer [¹¹C]clorgyline. We also measured dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in three subjects from the 10 mg group. The 10 mg Zydis selegiline dose significantly inhibited MAO-A (36.9 ± 19.7%, range 11–70%, p<0.007)) but not DAT; and while Emsam also inhibited MAO-A (33.2 ± 28.9 (range 9-68%) the difference did not reach significance (p=0.10)) presumably because of the small sample size. Our results provide the first direct evidence of brain MAO-A inhibition in humans by formulations of selegiline, which are currently postulated but not verified to target brain MAO-A in addition to MAO-B.« less

  6. Properties of dark solitons under SBS in focused beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bel'dyugin, Igor' M; Erokhin, A I; Efimkov, V F; Zubarev, I G; Mikhailov, S I

    2012-12-31

    Using the method of four-wave probing of the waist of the laser beam focused into the bulk of a short active medium (L || {tau}c, where L is the length of the active medium, {tau} is the pulse duration, and c is the speed of light), we have studied the dynamics of the behaviour of a dark soliton, appearing upon a jump of the input Stokes signal phase by about {pi} under SBS. The computer simulation has shown that when spontaneous noises with the gain increment {Gamma}, exceeding the self-reflection threshold by 2 - 3 times, are generated, the dark soliton propagates along the interaction region for the time t Almost-Equal-To T{sub 2}{Gamma}{sub th}/2, where T{sub 2} is the the lifetime of acoustic phonons, and {Gamma}{sub th} = 25 - 30 is the stationary threshold gain increment. (special issue devoted to the 90th anniversary of n.g. basov)

  7. LANL/Green Star Tests of the Green Star SBS-60 Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. E. Sampson; D. T. Vo; T. L. Cremers; P. A. Hypes; Y. P. Seldiakov; A. B. Dorin; M. V. Kondrashov; V. I. Timoshin

    2001-06-01

    We report on joint testing of the Russian-designed and manufactured single board spectrometer SBS-60 from Green Star Ltd. of Moscow. The SBS-60 will be used to make material control and accountability measurements on plutonium in the Russian plutonium disposition program. We compared three SBS-60 units of two different designs with three commonly used commercial US data acquisition systems by making measurements with three different HPGe detector systems. The measurements were performed to test if the gamma-ray spectral data of plutonium samples from the SBS-60 was suitable for analysis for the isotopic composition of plutonium using the Los Alamos FRAM isotopic analysis software. Each detector fed its signal to two data acquisition systems, one SBS-60 and one commercial US system. The data from the two systems were analyzed by FRAM and compared. In addition, we characterized the throughput, resolution, and stability of the SBS-60 data acquisition system in comparison with the commercial US systems. This report presents detailed results of all the tests performed.

  8. Large size GEM for Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) polarimeter for Hall A 12GeV program at JLab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Sacher, Seth; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    We report on the R&D effort in the design and construction of a large size GEM chamber for the Proton Polarimeter of the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab). The SBS Polarimeter trackers consist of two sets of four large chambers of size 200 cm x 60 cm2. Each chamber is a vertical stack of four GEM modules with an active area of 60 cm x 50 cm. We have built and tested several GEM modules and we describe in this paper the design and construction of the final GEM as well asmore » the preliminary results on performances from tests carried out in our detector lab and with test beams at (Fermilab).« less

  9. Large size GEM for Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) polarimeter for Hall A 12GeV program at JLab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Sacher, Seth; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    We report on the R&D effort in the design and construction of a large size GEM chamber for the Proton Polarimeter of the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab). The SBS Polarimeter trackers consist of two sets of four large chambers of size 200 cm x 60 cm2. Each chamber is a vertical stack of four GEM modules with an active area of 60 cm x 50 cm. We have built and tested several GEM modules and we describe in this paper the design and construction of the final GEM as well as the preliminary results on performances from tests carried out in our detector lab and with test beams at (Fermilab).

  10. RSE Table S2.1 and S2.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S2.1 and S2.2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    S2.1 and S2.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S2.1 and S2.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel

  11. An Air-Stable Na3SbS4 Superionic Conductor Prepared by a Rapid and Economic Synthetic Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Yan; Hood, Zachary; Peng, Rui; Samuthira Pandian, Amaresh; Keum, Jong Kahk; Wu, Zili; An, Ke; Liang, Chengdu

    2016-01-01

    All-solid-state sodium batteries, using abundant sodium resources and solid electrolyte, hold much promise for safe, low cost, large-scale energy storage. To realize the practical applications of all solid Na-ion batteries at ambient temperature, the solid electrolytes are required to have high ionic conductivity, chemical stability, and ideally, easy preparation. Ceramic electrolytes show higher ionic conductivity than polymers, but they often require extremely stringent synthesis conditions, either high sintering temperature above 1000 C or long-time, low-energy ball milling. Herein, we report a new synthesis route for Na3SbS4, a novel Na superionic conductor that needs much lower processing temperature below 200 C and easy operation. This new solid electrolyte exhibits a remarkable ionic conductivity of 1.05 mS cm-1 at 25 C and is chemically stable under ambient atmosphere. This synthesis process provides unique insight into the current state-of-the-art solid electrolyte preparation and opens new possibilities for the design of similar materials.

  12. An Air-Stable Na3SbS4 Superionic Conductor Prepared by a Rapid and Economic Synthetic Procedure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Yan; Hood, Zachary; Peng, Rui; Samuthira Pandian, Amaresh; Keum, Jong Kahk; Wu, Zili; An, Ke; Liang, Chengdu

    2016-01-01

    All-solid-state sodium batteries, using abundant sodium resources and solid electrolyte, hold much promise for safe, low cost, large-scale energy storage. To realize the practical applications of all solid Na-ion batteries at ambient temperature, the solid electrolytes are required to have high ionic conductivity, chemical stability, and ideally, easy preparation. Ceramic electrolytes show higher ionic conductivity than polymers, but they often require extremely stringent synthesis conditions, either high sintering temperature above 1000 C or long-time, low-energy ball milling. Herein, we report a new synthesis route for Na3SbS4, a novel Na superionic conductor that needs much lower processing temperature below 200 Cmore » and easy operation. This new solid electrolyte exhibits a remarkable ionic conductivity of 1.05 mS cm-1 at 25 C and is chemically stable under ambient atmosphere. This synthesis process provides unique insight into the current state-of-the-art solid electrolyte preparation and opens new possibilities for the design of similar materials.« less

  13. TIME DELAY AND ACCRETION DISK SIZE MEASUREMENTS IN THE LENSED QUASAR SBS 0909+532 FROM MULTIWAVELENGTH MICROLENSING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hainline, Laura J.; Morgan, Christopher W.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Landaal, Zachary D. [Department of Physics, United States Naval Academy, 572C Holloway Rd, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States); Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy [United States Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 West Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001-8521 (United States); Goicoechea, L. J.; Shalyapin, V. N. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, Avda. de Los Castros s/n, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Falco, Emilio E., E-mail: hainline@usna.edu, E-mail: cmorgan@usna.edu, E-mail: macleod@usna.edu, E-mail: m123894@usna.edu, E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: trudy@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: goicol@unican.es, E-mail: vshal@ukr.net, E-mail: falco@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    We present three complete seasons and two half-seasons of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) r-band photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasar SBS 0909+532 from the U.S. Naval Observatory, as well as two seasons each of SDSS g-band and r-band monitoring from the Liverpool Robotic Telescope. Using Monte Carlo simulations to simultaneously measure the system's time delay and model the r-band microlensing variability, we confirm and significantly refine the precision of the system's time delay to {Delta}t{sub AB} = 50{sub -4}{sup +2} days, where the stated uncertainties represent the bounds of the formal 1{sigma} confidence interval. There may be a conflict between the time delay measurement and a lens consisting of a single galaxy. While models based on the Hubble Space Telescope astrometry and a relatively compact stellar distribution can reproduce the observed delay, the models have somewhat less dark matter than we would typically expect. We also carry out a joint analysis of the microlensing variability in the r and g bands to constrain the size of the quasar's continuum source at these wavelengths, obtaining log {l_brace}(r{sub s,r}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 15.3 {+-} 0.3 and log {l_brace}(r{sub s,g}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 14.8 {+-} 0.9, respectively. Our current results do not formally constrain the temperature profile of the accretion disk but are consistent with the expectations of standard thin disk theory.

  14. Tuning the electronic structure of monolayer graphene/ Mo S 2...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tuning the electronic structure of monolayer graphene Mo S 2 van der Waals ... Title: Tuning the electronic structure of monolayer graphene Mo S 2 van der Waals ...

  15. EIS-0082-S2: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    82-S2: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0082-S2: Draft Environmental Impact Statement The Department of Energy (DOE) limits electronic access to certain NEPA documents on ...

  16. EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications EIS-0283-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0283-S2: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0283-SA-02: ...

  17. EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http://energy.gov/node/299815. Download Document EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination (781.29 KB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination

  18. EIS-0158-S2: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -S2: Record of Decision EIS-0158-S2: Record of Decision Sale of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California The Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing this...

  19. EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Disposition of Certain Plutonium Materials Stored at the Savannah River Site For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http://energy.gov/node/299815. Download Document EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination (880.28 KB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Second Amended Notice of Intent

  20. EIS-0283-S2: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Record of Decision EIS-0283-S2: Record of Decision Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement The Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration issued a Record of Decision for the 2015 Final Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0283-S2). For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http://energy.gov/node/299815. DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT EIS-0283-S2_ROD.pdf (238.95 KB) More Documents & Publications

  1. EIS-0082-S2: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Record of Decision EIS-0082-S2: Record of Decision Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives, Aiken, South Carolina The Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives ...

  2. EIS-0283-S2: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0283-S2: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Summary This Supplemental EIS (SEIS) analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated ...

  3. EIS-0283-S2: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and other domestic commercial nuclear power reactors. ... PDF icon EIS-0283-S2: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (Summary) PDF icon ...

  4. EIS-0026-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ...026-S2-FEIS-v04-1997.pdf PDF icon EIS-0026-S2-FEIS-v05-1997.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0200-SA-03: Supplement Analysis EIS-0026-SA-02: Supplement Analysis EIS-0200-SA-01

  5. EIS-0236-S2: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on: (1) wheter to proceed with a Modern Pit Facility (MPF); and (2) if so, where to locate a MPF. EIS-0236-S2-DEIS-Summary-200...

  6. EIS-0236-S2: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on: (1) whether to proceed with a Modern Pit Facility (MPF); and (2) if so, where to locate a MPF. EIS-0236-S2-DEIS-Summary-200...

  7. EIS-0236-S2: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy S2: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0236-S2: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Stockpile Stewardship and Management for a Modern Pit Facility DOE's NNSA is responsible for the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, including production readiness required to maintain that stockpile. Pursuant to National Environmental Policy Act of 199, NNSA has prepared a Supplement to the

  8. MoS2 Heterojunctions by Thickness Modulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tosun, Mahmut; Fu, Deyi; Desai, Sujay B.; Ko, Changhyun; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Lien, Der-Hsien; Najmzadeh, Mohammad; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao; Javey, Ali

    2015-06-30

    In this work, we report lateral heterojunction formation in as-exfoliated MoS2 flakes by thickness modulation. Kelvin probe force microscopy is used to map the surface potential at the monolayer-multilayer heterojunction, and consequently the conduction band offset is extracted. Scanning photocurrent microscopy is performed to investigate the spatial photocurrent response along the length of the device including the source and the drain contacts as well as the monolayer-multilayer junction. The peak photocurrent is measured at the monolayer-multilayer interface, which is attributed to the formation of a type-I heterojunction. Finally, the work presents experimental and theoretical understanding of the band alignment andmore » photoresponse of thickness modulated MoS2 junctions with important implications for exploring novel optoelectronic devices.« less

  9. Superconductivity in layered BiS2-based compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yazici, D.; Jeon, I.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-02-25

    Here, a novel family of superconductors based on BiS2-based superconducting layers were discovered in 2012. In short order, other BiS2-based superconductors with the same or related crystal structures were discovered with superconducting critical temperatures Tc of up to 10 K. Many experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out with the goal of establishing the basic properties of these new materials and understanding the underlying mechanism for superconductivity. In this selective review of the literature, we distill the central discoveries from this extensive body of work, and discuss the results from different types of experiments on these materials within themore » context of theoretical concepts and models.« less

  10. EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Use of H-Canyon/HB-Line to Prepare Feed for the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication at the Savannah River Site) During Fiscal Year 2012, DOE will initiate activities in the H-Canyon and HB-Line to support plutonium oxide production. The purpose and need for this action is to ensure sufficient early feedstock will be readily available when the MFFF begin operations. For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http://energy.gov/node/299815. Download Document EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action

  11. Perfect fluidity of a dissipative system: Analytical solution for the Boltzmann equation in AdS2S2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Noronha, Jorge; Denicol, Gabriel S.

    2015-12-30

    In this paper we obtain an analytical solution of the relativistic Boltzmann equation under the relaxation time approximation that describes the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of a radially expanding massless gas. This solution is found by mapping this expanding system in flat spacetime to a static flow in the curved spacetime AdS2S2. We further derive explicit analytic expressions for the momentum dependence of the single-particle distribution function as well as for the spatial dependence of its moments. We find that this dissipative system has the ability to flow as a perfect fluid even though its entropy density does not matchmore » the equilibrium form. The nonequilibrium contribution to the entropy density is shown to be due to higher-order scalar moments (which possess no hydrodynamical interpretation) of the Boltzmann equation that can remain out of equilibrium but do not couple to the energy-momentum tensor of the system. Furthermore, in this system the slowly moving hydrodynamic degrees of freedom can exhibit true perfect fluidity while being totally decoupled from the fast moving, nonhydrodynamical microscopic degrees of freedom that lead to entropy production.« less

  12. EIS-0283-S2: Second Amended Notice of Intent | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Second Amended Notice of Intent EIS-0283-S2: Second Amended Notice of Intent Surplus ... (SPD Supplemental EIS, DOEEIS-0283-S2) and to conduct additional public scoping. ...

  13. Superconductivity versus structural phase transition in the closely related Bi2Rh3.5S2 and Bi2Rh3S2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; Xie, Weiwei; Lin, Qisheng; Taufour, Valentin; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Miller, Gordon J.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-05-19

    Single crystals of Bi2Rh3S2 and Bi2Rh3.5S2 were synthesized by solution growth, and the crystal structures and thermodynamic and transport properties of both compounds were studied. In the case of Bi2Rh3S2, a structural first-order transition at around 165 K is identified by single-crystal diffraction experiments, with clear signatures visible in resistivity, magnetization, and specific heat data. No superconducting transition for Bi2Rh3S2 was observed down to 0.5 K. In contrast, no structural phase transition at high temperature was observed for Bi2Rh3.5S2; however, bulk superconductivity with a critical temperature, Tc ≈ 1.7 K, was observed. The Sommerfeld coefficient γ and the Debye temperaturemore » (ΘD) were found to be 9.41 mJ mol–1K–2 and 209 K, respectively, for Bi2Rh3S2, and 22 mJ mol–1K–2 and 196 K, respectively, for Bi2Rh3.5S2. As a result, the study of the specific heat in the superconducting state of Bi2Rh3.5S2 suggests that Bi2Rh3.5S2 is a weakly coupled, BCS superconductor.« less

  14. Defects Engineered Monolayer MoS2 for Improved Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ye, Gonglan; Gong, Yongji; Lin, Junhao; Li, Bo; He, Yongmin; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Zhou, Wu; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2016-01-13

    MoS2 is a promising, low-cost material for electrochemical hydrogen production due to its high activity and stability during the reaction. Our work represents an easy method to increase the hydrogen production in electrochemical reaction of MoS2 via defect engineering, and helps to understand the catalytic properties of MoS2.

  15. EIS-0283-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on this project, see the project webpage: http:energy.govnode299815. Download Document EIS-0283-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact...

  16. EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http:energy.govnode299815. Download Document EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental...

  17. EIS-0283-S2: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and other domestic commercial nuclear power reactors. ... PDF icon EIS-0283-S2: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental ...

  18. Defects Engineered Monolayer MoS2 for Improved Hydrogen Evolution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydrogen Evolution Reaction This content will become publicly available on January 13, 2017 Prev Next Title: Defects Engineered Monolayer MoS2 for Improved Hydrogen ...

  19. Raman vibrational spectra of bulk to monolayer Re S 2 with lower...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Raman vibrational spectra of bulk to monolayer Re S 2 with lower symmetry Authors: Feng, Yanqing ; Zhou, Wei ; Wang, Yaojia ; Zhou, Jian ; Liu, Erfu ; Fu, Yajun ; Ni, ...

  20. Spectroscopic signatures of AA' and AB stacking of chemical vapor deposited bilayer MoS2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xia, Ming; Li, Bo; Yin, Kuibo; Capellini, Giovanni; Niu, Gang; Gong, Yongji; Zhou, Wu; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Xie, Ya -Hong

    2015-11-04

    We discuss prominent resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopic differences between AA'and AB stacked bilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown by chemical vapor deposition are reported. Bilayer MoS2 islands consisting of the two stacking orders were obtained under identical growth conditions. Also, resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra of AA' and AB stacked bilayer MoS2 were obtained on Au nanopyramid surfaces under strong plasmon resonance. Both resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra show distinct features indicating clear differences in interlayer interaction between these two phases. The implication of these findings on device applications based on spin and valley degrees of freedom.

  1. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DOEEIS-0369) (November 2006 - 71 FR 65785) More Documents & Publications EIS-0250-S1: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional Public Meeting EIS-0250-S2 and...

  2. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http:energy.govnode299815. Download Document PDF icon EIS-0283-S2: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the...

  3. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http:energy.govnode299815. Download Document EIS-0283-S2: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of...

  4. EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Extension of Public Review and Comment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NM. For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http:energy.govnode299815. Download Document EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Extension of Public Review and Comment...

  5. EIS-0283-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http:energy.govnode299815. Download Document PDF icon EIS-0283-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft...

  6. Low-dimensional hyperthin FeS2 nanostructures for efficient and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jasion, Daniel; Qiao, Qiao; Barforoush, Joseph M.; Zhu, Yimei; Ren, Shenqiang; Leonard, Kevin C.

    2015-10-05

    We report a scalable, solution-processing method for synthesizing low-dimensional hyperthin FeS2 nanostructures, and we show that 2D FeS2 disc nanostructures are an efficient and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst. By changing the Fe:S ratio in the precursor solution, we were able to preferentially synthesize either 1D wire or 2D disc nanostructures. The 2D FeS2 disc structure has the highest electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction, comparable to platinum in neutral pH conditions. Moreover, the ability of the FeS2 nanostructures to generate hydrogen was confirmed by scanning electrochemical microscopy, and the 2D disc nanostructures were able to generate hydrogen for overmore » 125 h.« less

  7. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca...

  8. EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Preferred Alternative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Notice of Preferred Alternative EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Preferred Alternative Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) announced its Preferred Alternative for the disposition of certain quantities of surplus plutonium evaluated in the Final Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (Final SPD Supplemental EIS) (DOE/EIS-0283-S2, April 2015). Among the

  9. Constraining the range of Yukawa gravity interaction from S2 star orbits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borka, D.; Jovanovi?, V. Borka; Jovanovi?, P.; Zakharov, A.F. E-mail: pjovanovic@aob.rs E-mail: zakharov@itep.ru

    2013-11-01

    We consider possible signatures for Yukawa gravity within the Galactic Central Parsec, based on our analysis of the S2 star orbital precession around the massive compact dark object at the Galactic Centre, and on the comparisons between the simulated orbits in Yukawa gravity and two independent sets of observations. Our simulations resulted in strong constraints on the range of Yukawa interaction ? and showed that its most probable value in the case of S2 star is around 5000 - 7000 AU. At the same time, we were not able to obtain reliable constrains on the universal constant ? of Yukawa gravity, because the current observations of S2 star indicated that it may be highly correlated with parameter ? in the range (0 < ? < 1). For ? > 2 they are not correlated. However, the same universal constant which was successfully applied to clusters of galaxies and rotation curves of spiral galaxies (? = 1/3) also gives a satisfactory agreement with the observed orbital precession of the S2 star, and in that case the most probable value for the scale parameter is ? ? 30001500 AU. Also, the Yukawa gravity potential induces precession of S2 star orbit in the same direction as General Relativity for ? > 0 and for ? < ?1, and in the opposite direction for ?1 < ? < 0. The future observations with advanced facilities, such as GRAVITY or/and European Extremely Large Telescope, are needed in order to verify these claims.

  10. Controlling the metal to semiconductor transition of MoS2 and WS2 in solution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chou, Stanley Shihyao; Yi-Kai Huang; Kim, Jaemyung; Kaehr, Bryan James; Foley, Brian M.; Lu, Ping; Conner Dykstra; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Jiaxing Huang; et al

    2015-01-22

    Lithiation-exfoliation produces single to few-layered MoS2 and WS2 sheets dispersible in water. However, the process transforms them from the pristine semiconducting 2H phase to a distorted metallic phase. Recovery of the semiconducting properties typically involves heating of the chemically exfoliated sheets at elevated temperatures. Therefore, it has been largely limited to sheets deposited on solid substrates. We report the dispersion of chemically exfoliated MoS2 sheets in high boiling point organic solvents enabled by surface functionalization and the controllable recovery of their semiconducting properties directly in solution. Ultimately, this process connects the scalability of chemical exfoliation with the simplicity of solutionmore » processing, enabling a facile method for tuning the metal to semiconductor transitions of MoS2 and WS2 within a liquid medium.« less

  11. Research update: Spin transfer torques in permalloy on monolayer MoS2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Wei; Sklenar, Joseph; Hsu, Bo; Jiang, Wanjun; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Xiao, Jiao; Fradin, Frank Y.; Liu, Yaohua; Pearson, John E.; Ketterson, John B.; et al

    2016-03-03

    We observe current induced spin transfertorque resonance in permalloy (Py) grown on monolayer MoS2. By passing rf current through the Py/MoS2 bilayer, field-like and damping-like torques are induced which excite the ferromagnetic resonance of Py. The signals are detected via a homodyne voltage from anisotropic magnetoresistance of Py. In comparison to other bilayer systems with strong spin-orbit torques, the monolayer MoS2 cannot provide bulk spin Hall effects and thus indicates the purely interfacial nature of the spin transfer torques. Furthermore, our results indicate the potential of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenide for the use of interfacial spin-orbitronics applications.

  12. Gas-to-cluster effects in S 2p-excited SF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flesch, Roman; Serdaroglu, Ertugrul; Ruehl, Eckart; Brykalova, Xenia O.; Kan, Elena I.; Klyushina, Ekaterina S.; Krivosenko, Yuri S.; Pavlychev, Andrey A.

    2013-04-14

    High resolution X-ray spectroscopic studies on free SF{sub 6} molecules and SF{sub 6} clusters near the S 2p ionization thresholds are reported. Spectral changes occurring in clusters for the intense molecular-like S 2p{sub 1/2,3/2}{yields} 6a{sub 1g}-, 2t{sub 2g}-, and 4e{sub g}-resonances are examined in detail. Neither gas-to-cluster spectral shifts nor changes in peak shape are observed for the pre-edge 6a{sub 1g}-band. Significant changes in band shape and distinct gas-to-cluster shifts occur in the S 2p{sub 1/2,3/2}{yields} 2t{sub 2g}- and 4e{sub g}-transitions. These are found in the S 2p-ionization continua. The quasiatomic approach is used to assign the experimental results. It is shown that a convolution of asymmetric and symmetric contributions from Lorentzian and Gaussian line shapes allows us to model the spectral distribution of oscillator strength for the S 2p{sub 1/2,3/2}{yields} 2t{sub 2g}-, and 4e{sub g}-transitions. The asymmetry is due to trapping of the photoelectron within the finite size potential barrier. The Lorentzian contribution is found to be dominating in the line shape of the S 2p{yields} 2t{sub 2g}- and 4e{sub g}-bands. The spectroscopic parameters of the spin-orbit components of both the 2t{sub 2g}- and 4e{sub g}-bands are extracted and their gas-to-cluster changes are analyzed. The photoelectron trapping times in free and clustered SF{sub 6} molecules are determined. Specifically, it is shown that spectral changes in clusters reflected in core-to-valence-transitions are due to a superposition of the singly scattered photoelectron waves at the neighboring molecules with the primary and multiply scattered waves within the molecular cage.

  13. One-loop matching of Delta S=2 four-quark operators with improved staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becher, Thomas; Gamiz, Elvira; Melnikov, Kirill; /Hawaii U.

    2005-07-01

    We compute O(alpha{sub s}) lattice-to-continuum perturbative matching coefficients for the Delta S=2 flavor changing four-quark operators for the Asqtad improved staggered action. In conjunction with lattice simulations with three flavors of light, dynamical quarks, our results yield an unquenched determination of B{sub K}, the parameter that determines the amount of indirect CP violation in the neutral kaon system. Its value is an important input for the unitarity triangle analysis of weak decays.

  14. EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0283-S2: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Surplus Plutonium Disposition This Draft SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for disposition of 13.1 metric tons (14.4 tons) of surplus plutonium for which DOE has not made a disposition decision, including 7.1 metric tons (7.8 tons) of plutonium from pits that were declared excess to national defense needs after publication of the 2007

  15. EIS-0082-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Statement | Department of Energy Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0082-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Alternatives to the In-Tank Precipitation Process at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina The Department of Energy (DOE) intends to prepare a supplemental environmental impact statement (SEIS) on the proposed replacement of the in-tank precipitation (ITP) process at the Savannah River

  16. Exciton-dominated dielectric function of atomically thin MoS2 films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Yiling; Yu, Yifei; Cai, Yongqing; Li, Wei; Gurarslan, Alper; Peelaers, Hartwin; Aspnes, David E.; Van de Walle, Chris G.; Nguyen, Nhan V.; Zhang, Yong -Wei; et al

    2015-11-24

    We systematically measure the dielectric function of atomically thin MoS2 films with different layer numbers and demonstrate that excitonic effects play a dominant role in the dielectric function when the films are less than 5–7 layers thick. The dielectric function shows an anomalous dependence on the layer number. It decreases with the layer number increasing when the films are less than 5–7 layers thick but turns to increase with the layer number for thicker films. We show that this is because the excitonic effect is very strong in the thin MoS2 films and its contribution to the dielectric function maymore » dominate over the contribution of the band structure. We also extract the value of layer-dependent exciton binding energy and Bohr radius in the films by fitting the experimental results with an intuitive model. The dominance of excitonic effects is in stark contrast with what reported at conventional materials whose dielectric functions are usually dictated by band structures. Lastly, the knowledge of the dielectric function may enable capabilities to engineer the light-matter interactions of atomically thin MoS2 films for the development of novel photonic devices, such as metamaterials, waveguides, light absorbers, and light emitters.« less

  17. Two spatially separated phases in semiconducting Rb0.8Fe1.5S2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Meng; Tian, Wei; Valdivia, P.; Chi, Songxue; Bourret-Courchesne, E.; Dai, Pengcheng; Birgeneau, R. J.

    2014-09-26

    We report neutron scattering and transport measurements on semiconducting Rb0.8Fe1.5S2, a compound isostructural and isoelectronic to the well-studied A0.8FeySe2(A = K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K) superconducting systems. Both resistivity and DC susceptibility measurements reveal a magnetic phase transition at T = 275 K. Neutron diffraction studies show that the 275 K transition originates from a phase with rhombic iron vacancy order which exhibits an in-plane stripe antiferromagnetic ordering below 275 K. In addition, the stripe antiferromagnetic phase interdigitates mesoscopically with an ubiquitous phase with √5 x√5 iron vacancy order. This phase has a magnetic transition at TN = 425 K andmore » an iron vacancy order-disorder transition at TS = 600 K. These two different structural phases are closely similar to those observed in the isomorphous Se materials. Based on the close similarities of the in-plane antiferromagnetic structures, moments sizes, and ordering temperatures in semiconducting Rb0.8Fe1.5S2 and K0.81Fe1.58Se2, we argue that the in-plane antiferromagnetic order arises from strong coupling between local moments. Superconductivity, previously observed in the A0.8FeySe2₋ zSz system, is absent in A0.8Fe1.5S2, which has a semiconducting ground state. We discuss the implied relationship between stripe and block antiferromagnetism and superconductivity in these materials as well as a strategy for further investigation.« less

  18. DES13S2cmm: The first superluminous supernova from the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Papadopoulos, A.; Plazas, A. A.; D"Andrea, C. B.; Sullivan, M.; Nichol, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Biswas, R.; Brown, P. J.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Finley, D. A.; et al

    2015-03-23

    We present DES13S2cmm, the first spectroscopically-confirmed superluminous supernova (SLSN) from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We briefly discuss the data and search algorithm used to find this event in the first year of DES operations, and outline the spectroscopic data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope to confirm its redshift (z = 0.663 ± 0.001 based on the host-galaxy emission lines) and likely spectral type (type I). Using this redshift, we find MpeakU = –21.05+0.10–0.09 for the peak, rest-frame U-band absolute magnitude, and find DES13S2cmm to be located in a faint, low-metallicity (sub-solar), low stellar-mass hostmore » galaxy (log(M/M⊙) = 9.3 ± 0.3), consistent with what is seen for other SLSNe-I. We compare the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm to fourteen similarly well-observed SLSNe-I in the literature and find it possesses one of the slowest declining tails (beyond +30 days rest frame past peak), and is the faintest at peak. Moreover, we find the bolometric light curves of all SLSNe-I studied herein possess a dispersion of only 0.2–0.3 magnitudes between +25 and +30 days after peak (rest frame) depending on redshift range studied; this could be important for ‘standardising’ such supernovae, as is done with the more common type Ia. We fit the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm with two competing models for SLSNe-I – the radioactive decay of ⁵⁶Ni, and a magnetar – and find that while the magnetar is formally a better fit, neither model provides a compelling match to the data. Although we are unable to conclusively differentiate between these two physical models for this particular SLSN-I, further DES observations of more SLSNe-I should break this degeneracy, especially if the light curves of SLSNe-I can be observed beyond 100 days in the rest frame of the supernova.« less

  19. DES13S2cmm: The first superluminous supernova from the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papadopoulos, A.; Plazas, A. A.; D"Andrea, C. B.; Sullivan, M.; Nichol, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Biswas, R.; Brown, P. J.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Finley, D. A.; Fischer, J. A.; Foley, R. J.; Goldstein, D.; Gupta, R. R.; Kessler, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Lidman, C.; March, M.; Nugent, P. E.; Sako, M.; Smith, R. C.; Spinka, H.; Wester, W.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F.; Allam, S. S.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, J. P.; Bernstein, R. A.; Carnero, A.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Eifler, T.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J. A.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Ogando, R.; Roe, N. A.; Romer, A. K.; Rykoff, E.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Soares-Santos, M.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, L. D.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.

    2015-03-23

    We present DES13S2cmm, the first spectroscopically-confirmed superluminous supernova (SLSN) from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We briefly discuss the data and search algorithm used to find this event in the first year of DES operations, and outline the spectroscopic data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope to confirm its redshift (z = 0.663 ± 0.001 based on the host-galaxy emission lines) and likely spectral type (type I). Using this redshift, we find MpeakU = –21.05+0.10–0.09 for the peak, rest-frame U-band absolute magnitude, and find DES13S2cmm to be located in a faint, low-metallicity (sub-solar), low stellar-mass host galaxy (log(M/M⊙) = 9.3 ± 0.3), consistent with what is seen for other SLSNe-I. We compare the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm to fourteen similarly well-observed SLSNe-I in the literature and find it possesses one of the slowest declining tails (beyond +30 days rest frame past peak), and is the faintest at peak. Moreover, we find the bolometric light curves of all SLSNe-I studied herein possess a dispersion of only 0.2–0.3 magnitudes between +25 and +30 days after peak (rest frame) depending on redshift range studied; this could be important for ‘standardising’ such supernovae, as is done with the more common type Ia. We fit the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm with two competing models for SLSNe-I – the radioactive decay of ⁵⁶Ni, and a magnetar – and find that while the magnetar is formally a better fit, neither model provides a compelling match to the data. Although we are unable to conclusively differentiate between these two physical models for this particular SLSN-I, further DES observations of more SLSNe-I should break this degeneracy, especially if the light curves of SLSNe-I can be observed beyond 100 days in the rest frame of the supernova.

  20. DES13S2cmm: The first superluminous supernova from the dark energy survey

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Papadopoulos, A.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Sullivan, M.; Nichol, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Biswas, R.; Brown, P. J.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Finley, D. A.; Fischer, J. A.; et al

    2015-03-23

    We present DES13S2cmm, the first spectroscopically-confirmed superluminous supernova (SLSN) from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We briefly discuss the data and search algorithm used to find this event in the first year of DES operations, and outline the spectroscopic data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope to confirm its redshift (z = 0.663 0.001 based on the host-galaxy emission lines) and likely spectral type (type I). Using this redshift, we find MUpeak = -21.05????-0.09 for the peak, rest-frame U-band absolute magnitude, and find DES13S2cmm to be located in a faint, low metallicity (sub-solar), low stellar-massmorehost galaxy (log(M/M_sun) = 9.3 0.3); consistent with what is seen for other SLSNe-I. We compare the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm to fourteen similarly well-observed SLSNe-I in the literature and find it possesses one of the slowest declining tails (beyond +30 days rest frame past peak), and is the faintest at peak. Moreover, we find the bolometric light curves of all SLSNe-I studied herein possess a dispersion of only 0.2-0.3 magnitudes between +25 and +30 days after peak (rest frame) depending on redshift range studied; this could be important for 'standardising' such supernovae, as is done with the more common type Ia. We fit the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm with two competing models for SLSNe-I - the radioactive decay of ??Ni, and a magnetar - and find that while the magnetar is formally a better fit, neither model provides a compelling match to the data. Although we are unable to conclusively differentiate between these two physical models for this particular SLSN-I, further DES observations of more SLSNe-I should break this degeneracy, especially if the light curves of SLSNe-I can be observed beyond 100 days in the rest frame of the supernova.less

  1. EIS-0026-S-2; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Final Supplemental

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I Chapters 1-6 September 1997 Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office Carlsbad, New Mexico This Document Printed on Recycled Paper DOE/EIS-0026-S-2 This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831; prices available from (423) 576-1301. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port

  2. DES13S2cmm: The first superluminous supernova from the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papadopoulos, A.; Plazas, A. A.; D"Andrea, C. B.; Sullivan, M.; Nichol, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Biswas, R.; Brown, P. J.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Finley, D. A.; Fischer, J. A.; Foley, R. J.; Goldstein, D.; Gupta, R. R.; Kessler, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Lidman, C.; March, M.; Nugent, P. E.; Sako, M.; Smith, R. C.; Spinka, H.; Wester, W.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F.; Allam, S. S.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, J. P.; Bernstein, R. A.; Carnero, A.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Eifler, T.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J. A.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Ogando, R.; Roe, N. A.; Romer, A. K.; Rykoff, E.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Soares-Santos, M.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, L. D.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.

    2015-03-23

    We present DES13S2cmm, the first spectroscopically-confirmed superluminous supernova (SLSN) from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We briefly discuss the data and search algorithm used to find this event in the first year of DES operations, and outline the spectroscopic data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope to confirm its redshift (z = 0.663 0.001 based on the host-galaxy emission lines) and likely spectral type (type I). Using this redshift, we find MpeakU = 21.05+0.100.09 for the peak, rest-frame U-band absolute magnitude, and find DES13S2cmm to be located in a faint, low-metallicity (sub-solar), low stellar-mass host galaxy (log(M/M?) = 9.3 0.3), consistent with what is seen for other SLSNe-I. We compare the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm to fourteen similarly well-observed SLSNe-I in the literature and find it possesses one of the slowest declining tails (beyond +30 days rest frame past peak), and is the faintest at peak. Moreover, we find the bolometric light curves of all SLSNe-I studied herein possess a dispersion of only 0.20.3 magnitudes between +25 and +30 days after peak (rest frame) depending on redshift range studied; this could be important for standardising such supernovae, as is done with the more common type Ia. We fit the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm with two competing models for SLSNe-I the radioactive decay of ??Ni, and a magnetar and find that while the magnetar is formally a better fit, neither model provides a compelling match to the data. Although we are unable to conclusively differentiate between these two physical models for this particular SLSN-I, further DES observations of more SLSNe-I should break this degeneracy, especially if the light curves of SLSNe-I can be observed beyond 100 days in the rest frame of the supernova.

  3. Raman shifts in electron-irradiated monolayer MoS2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Parkin, William M.; Balan, Adrian; Liang, Liangbo; Das, Paul Masih; Lamparski, Michael; Naylor, Carl H.; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A.; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Meunier, Vincent; Drndic, Marija

    2016-03-21

    Here, we report how the presence of electron-beam-induced sulfur vacancies affects first-order Raman modes and correlate the effects with the evolution of the in situ transmission-electron microscopy (TEM) two-terminal conductivity of monolayer MoS2 under electron irradiation. We observe a redshift in the E Raman peak and a less pronounced blueshift in the A'1 peak with increasing electron dose. Using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), we show that irradiation causes partial removal of sulfur and correlate the dependence of the Raman peak shifts with S vacancy density (a few %), which is confirmed by first-principles density functional theory calculations. In situ devicemore » current measurements show exponential decrease in channel current upon irradiation. Our analysis demonstrates that the observed frequency shifts are intrinsic properties of the defective systems and that Raman spectroscopy can be used as a quantitative diagnostic tool to characterize MoS2-based transport channels.« less

  4. Catalytic activity in lithium-treated core–shell MoOx/MoS2 nanowires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cummins, Dustin R.; Martinez, Ulises; Kappera, Rajesh; Voiry, Damien; Martinez-Garcia, Alejandro; Jasinski, Jacek; Kelly, Dan; Chhowalla, Manish; Mohite, Aditya D.; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; et al

    2015-09-22

    Significant interest has grown in the development of earth-abundant and efficient catalytic materials for hydrogen generation. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides present opportunities for efficient electrocatalytic systems. Here, we report the modification of 1D MoOx/MoS2 core–shell nanostructures by lithium intercalation and the corresponding changes in morphology, structure, and mechanism of H2 evolution. The 1D nanowires exhibit significant improvement in H2 evolution properties after lithiation, reducing the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) onset potential by ~50 mV and increasing the generated current density by ~600%. The high electrochemical activity in the nanowires results from disruption of MoS2 layers in the outer shell, leadingmore » to increased activity and concentration of defect sites. This is in contrast to the typical mechanism of improved catalysis following lithium exfoliation, i.e., crystal phase transformation. As a result, these structural changes are verified by a combination of Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).« less

  5. A New Molybdenum Nitride Catalyst with Rhombohedral MoS2 Structure for Hydrogenation Applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Shanmin; Ge, Hui; Sun, Shouli; Zhang, Jianzhong; Liu, Fangming; Wen, Xiaodong; Yu, Xiaohui; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Hongwu; et al

    2015-03-23

    Nitrogen-rich transition-metal nitrides hold great promise to be the next-generation catalysts for clean and renewable energy applications. However, incorporation of nitrogen into the crystalline lattices of transition metals is thermodynamically unfavorable at atmospheric pressure; most of the known transition metal nitrides are nitrogen-deficient with molar ratios of N:metal less than a unity. In this work, we have formulated a high-pressure route for the synthesis of a nitrogen-rich molybdenum nitride through a solid-state ion-exchange reaction. The newly discovered nitride, 3R-MoN2, adopts a rhombohedral R3m structure, isotypic with MoS2. This new nitride exhibits catalytic activities that are three times more active thanmore » the traditional catalyst MoS2 for the hydrodesulfurization of dibenzothiophene and more than twice as high in the selectivity to hydrogenation. The nitride is also catalytically active in sour methanation of syngas with >80% CO and H2 conversion at 723 K. Lastly, our formulated route for the synthesis of 3R-MoN2 is at a moderate pressure of 3.5 GPa and, thus, is feasible for industrial-scale catalyst production.« less

  6. Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafarman, William N.

    2015-10-12

    This project “Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells”, completed by the Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC) at the University of Delaware in collaboration with the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Florida, developed the fundamental understanding and technology to increase module efficiency and improve the manufacturability of Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 films using the precursor reaction approach currently being developed by a number of companies. Key results included: (1) development of a three-step H2Se/Ar/H2S reaction process to control Ga distribution through the film and minimizes back contact MoSe2 formation; (2) Ag-alloying to improve precursor homogeneity by avoiding In phase agglomeration, faster reaction and improved adhesion to allow wider reaction process window; (3) addition of Sb, Bi, and Te interlayers at the Mo/precursor junction to produce more uniform precursor morphology and improve adhesion with reduced void formation in reacted films; (4) a precursor structure containing Se and a reaction process to reduce processing time to 5 minutes and eliminate H2Se usage, thereby increasing throughput and reducing costs. All these results were supported by detailed characterization of the film growth, reaction pathways, thermodynamic assessment and device behavior.

  7. Spatially Resolved Photoexcited Charge-Carrier Dynamics in Phase-Engineered Monolayer MoS2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yamaguchi, Hisato; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Kappera, Rajesh; Lei, Sidong; Najmaei, Sina; Mangum, Benjamin D.; Gupta, Gautam; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Chhowalla, Manish; et al

    2015-01-27

    A fundamental understanding of the intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is crucial for its integration into high performance semiconductor devices. We investigate the transport properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under photo-excitation using correlated scanning photocurrent microscopy and photoluminescence imaging. We examined the effect of local phase transformation underneath the metal electrodes on the generation of photocurrent across the channel length with diffraction-limited spatial resolution. While maximum photocurrent generation occurs at the Schottky contacts of semiconducting (2H-phase) MoS2, after the metallic phase transformation (1T-phase), the photocurrent peak is observed towardsmore » the center of the device channel, suggesting a strong reduction of native Schottky barriers. Analysis using the bias and position dependence of the photocurrent indicates that the Schottky barrier heights are few meV for 1T- and ~200 meV for 2H-contacted devices. We also demonstrate that a reduction of native Schottky barriers in a 1T device enhances the photo responsivity by more than one order of magnitude, a crucial parameter in achieving high performance optoelectronic devices. The obtained results pave a pathway for the fundamental understanding of intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin TMDs where Ohmic contacts are necessary for achieving high efficiency devices with low power consumption.« less

  8. Tensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yungang; Wang, Zhiguo; Yang, Ping; Zu, Xiaotao; Yang, Li; Sun, Xin; Gao, Fei

    2012-11-01

    Developing approaches to effectively induce and control the magnetic states is critical to the use of magnetic nanostructures in quantum information devices but is still challenging. Here we have demonstrated, by employing the density functional theory calculations, an existence of infinite magnetic sheets with structural integrity and magnetic homogeneity. Examination from a series of transition metal dichalcogenides shows that the biaxial tensile strained NbS2 and NbSe2 structures can be magnetized with a ferromagnetic character due to the competitive effects of through-bond interaction and through-space interaction. The estimated Curie temperatures (387 and 542 K under the 10% strain for NbS2 and NbSe2 structures, respectively) suggest that the unique ferromagnetic character can be achieved above room temperature. The self-exchange of population between 4d orbitals of Nb atom that leads to the exchange splitting is the mechanism behind the transition of the spin moment. The induced magnetic moments can be significantly enhanced by the tensile strain, even giving rise to half-metallic character with the strong spin polarization around the Fermi level. Given the recent progress that the desired strain can be achieved on two-dimensional nanostructures, such as graphene and BN layer in a controlled way, we believe that our calculated results are suitable for experimental verification and implementation opening a new path to explore the spintronics in pristine two-dimensional nanostructures.

  9. Composition and Manufacturing Effects on Electrical Conductivity of Li/FeS 2 Thermal Battery Cathodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reinholz, Emilee L.; Roberts, Scott A.; Apblett, Christopher A.; Lechman, Jeremy B.; Schunk, P. Randall

    2016-06-11

    The electrical conductivity is key to the performance of thermal battery cathodes. In this work we present the effects of manufacturing and processing conditions on the electrical conductivity of Li/FeS2 thermal battery cathodes. Finite element simulations were used to compute the conductivity of three-dimensional microcomputed tomography cathode microstructures and compare results to experimental impedance spectroscopy measurements. A regression analysis reveals a predictive relationship between composition, processing conditions, and electrical conductivity; a trend which is largely erased after thermally-induced deformation. Moreover, the trend applies to both experimental and simulation results, although is not as apparent in simulations. This research is amore » step toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of processing and composition on thermal battery component microstructure, properties, and performance.« less

  10. Low-Frequency Interlayer Raman Modes to Probe Interface of Twisted Bilayer MoS 2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Shengxi; Liang, Liangbo; Ling, Xi; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kong, Jing; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2016-02-21

    A variety of van der Waals homo- and hetero- structures assembled by stamping monolayers together present optoelectronic properties suitable for diverse applications. Understanding the details of the interlayer stacking and resulting coupling is crucial for tuning these properties. Twisted bilayer transition metal dichalcogenides offer a great platform for developing a precise understanding of the structure/property relationship. Here, we study the low-frequency interlayer shear and breathing Raman modes (<50 cm-1) in twisted bilayer MoS2 by Raman spectroscopy and first-principles modeling. Twisting introduces both rotational and translational shifts and significantly alters the interlayer stacking and coupling, leading to notable frequency and intensitymore » changes of low-frequency modes. The frequency variation can be up to 8 cm-1 and the intensity can vary by a factor of ~5 for twisting near 0 and 60 , where the stacking is a mixture of multiple high-symmetry stacking patterns and is thus especially sensitive to twisting. Moreover, for twisting angles between 20 and 40 , the interlayer coupling is nearly constant since the stacking results in mismatched lattices over the entire sample. It follows that the Raman signature is relatively uniform. Interestingly, unlike the breathing mode, the shear mode is extremely sensitive to twisting: it disappears between 20 and 40 as its frequency drops to almost zero due to the stacking-induced mismatch. Note that for some samples, multiple breathing mode peaks appear, indicating non-uniform coupling across the interface. In contrast to the low-frequency interlayer modes, high-frequency intralayer Raman modes are much less sensitive to interlayer stacking and coupling, showing negligible changes upon twisting. Our research demonstrates the effectiveness of low-frequency Raman modes for probing the interfacial coupling and environment of twisted bilayer MoS2, and potentially other two-dimensional materials and

  11. First-principles characterization of potassium intercalation in the hexagonal 2H-MoS2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, Amity; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Lilga, Michael A.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.; Mei, Donghai

    2012-01-12

    Periodic density functional theory calculations were performed to study the structural and electronic properties of potassium intercalated into hexagonal MoS{sub 2} (2H-MoS{sub 2}). Metallic potassium (K) atoms are incrementally loaded in the hexagonal sites of the interstitial spaces between MoS2 sheets of the 2H-MoS{sub 2} bulk structure generating 2H-KxMoS2 (0.125 {<=} x {<=} 1.0) structures. To accommodate the potassium atoms, the interstitial spacing c parameter in the 2H-MoS{sub 2} bulk expands from 12.816 {angstrom} in 2H-MoS{sub 2} to 16.086 {angstrom} in 2H-K{sub 0.125}MoS{sub 2}. The second lowest potassium loading concentration (K{sub 0.25}MoS{sub 2}) results in the largest interstitial spacing expansion (to c = 16.726 {angstrom}). Our calculations show that there is a small gradual contraction of the interstitial spacing as the potassium loading increases with c = 14.839 {angstrom} for KMoS{sub 2}. This interstitial contraction is correlated with an in-plane expansion of the MoS{sub 2} sheets, which is in good agreement with experimental X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The electronic analysis shows that potassium readily donates its 4s electron to the conduction band of the 2H-K{sub x}MoS{sub 2}, and is largely ionic in character. As a result of the electron donation, the 2H-K{sub x}MoS{sub 2} system changes from a semiconductor to a more metallic system with increasing potassium intercalation. For loadings 0.25 {<=} x {<=} 0.625, triangular Mo-Mo-Mo moieties are prominent and tend to form rhombitrihexagonal motifs. Intercalation of H{sub 2}O molecules that solvate the K atoms is likely to occur in catalytic conditions. The inclusion of two H{sub 2}O molecules per K atom in the K{sub 0.25}MoS{sub 2} structure shows good agreement with XRD measurements.

  12. Coupled spin and valley physics in monolayer MoS2 and group-VI dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Di; Liu, G. B.; Feng, wanxiang; Xu, Xiaodong; Yao, Wang

    2012-01-01

    We show that inversion symmetry breaking together with spin-orbit coupling leads to coupled spin and valley physics in monolayer MoS2 and group-VI dichalcogenides, making possible controls of spin and valley in these 2D materials. The spin-valley coupling at the valence band edges suppresses spin and valley relaxation, as flip of each index alone is forbidden by the 0.1 eV valley contrasting spin splitting. Valley Hall and spin Hall effects coexist in both electron-doped and hole-doped systems. Optical interband transitions have frequency-dependent polarization selection rules which allow selective photoexcitation of carriers with various combination of valley and spin indices. Photo-induced spin Hall and valley Hall effects can generate long lived spin and valley accumulations on sample boundaries. The physics discussed here provides a route towards the integration of valleytronics and spintronics in multi-valley materials with strong spin-orbit coupling and inversion symmetry breaking.

  13. PROBING THE SOLAR WIND ACCELERATION REGION WITH THE SUN-GRAZING COMET C/2002 S2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, S.; Raymond, J. C.; Lamy, P.; Uzzo, M.; Dobrzycka, D.

    2015-01-01

    Comet C/2002 S2, a member of the Kreutz family of sungrazing comets, was discovered in white-light images of the Large Angle and Spectromeric Coronagraph Experiment coronagraph on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) on 2002 September 18 and observed in H I Ly? emission by the SOHO Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) instrument at four different heights as it approached the Sun. The H I Ly? line profiles detected by UVCS are analyzed to determine the spectral parameters: line intensity, width, and Doppler shift with respect to the coronal background. Two-dimensional comet images of these parameters are reconstructed at the different heights. A novel aspect of the observations of this sungrazing comet data is that, whereas the emission from most of the tail is blueshifted, that along one edge of the tail is redshifted. We attribute these shifts to a combination of solar wind speed and interaction with the magnetic field. In order to use the comet to probe the density, temperature, and speed of the corona and solar wind through which it passes, as well as to determine the outgassing rate of the comet, we develop a Monte Carlo simulation of the H I Ly? emission of a comet moving through a coronal plasma. From the outgassing rate, we estimate a nucleus diameter of about 9 m. This rate steadily increases as the comet approaches the Sun, while the optical brightness decreases by more than a factor of 10 and suddenly recovers. This indicates that the optical brightness is determined by the lifetimes of the grains, sodium atoms, and molecules produced by the comet.

  14. Defect-mediated transport and electronic irradiation effect in individual domains of CVD-grown monolayer MoS2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Durand, Corentin; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Fowlkes, Jason; Najmaei, Sina; Lou, Jun; Li, An -Ping

    2015-01-16

    We study the electrical transport properties of atomically thin individual crystalline grains of MoS2 with four-probe scanning tunneling microscopy. The monolayer MoS2 domains are synthesized by chemical vapor deposition on SiO2/Si substrate. Temperature dependent measurements on conductance and mobility show that transport is dominated by an electron charge trapping and thermal release process with very low carrier density and mobility. The effects of electronic irradiation are examined by exposing the film to electron beam in the scanning electron microscope in an ultrahigh vacuum environment. The irradiation process is found to significantly affect the mobility and the carrier density of themore » material, with the conductance showing a peculiar time-dependent relaxation behavior. It is suggested that the presence of defects in active MoS2 layer and dielectric layer create charge trapping sites, and a multiple trapping and thermal release process dictates the transport and mobility characteristics. The electron beam irradiation promotes the formation of defects and impact the electrical properties of MoS2. Finally, our study reveals the important roles of defects and the electron beam irradiation effects in the electronic properties of atomic layers of MoS2.« less

  15. Chemical Substitution and High Pressure Effects on Superconductors in the LnOBiS$_2$ (Ln = La-Nd) System

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fang, Yuankan; Wolowiec, Christian T.; Yazici, Duygu; Maple, M. Brian

    2015-12-14

    A large number of compounds which contain BiS$_2$ layers exhibit enhanced superconductivity upon electron doping. Much interest and research effort has been focused on BiS$_2$-based compounds which provide new opportunities for exploring the nature of superconductivity. Important to the study of BiS2-based superconductors is the relation between structure and superconductivity. By modifying either the superconducting BiS$_2$ layers or the blocking layers in these layered compounds, one can effectively tune the lattice parameters, local atomic environment, electronic structure, and other physical properties of these materials. In this article, we will review some of the recent progress on research of the effectsmore » of chemical substitution in BiS$_2$-based compounds, with special attention given to the compounds in the LnOBiSS$_2$ (Ln = La-Nd) system. Strategies which are reported to be essential in optimizing superconductivity of these materials will also be discussed.« less

  16. A High-Yield Synthesis of Chalcopyrite CuInS2Nanoparticles with Exceptional Size Control

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Chivin; Gardner, Joseph S.; Shurdha, Endrit; Margulieux, Kelsey R.; Westover, Richard D.; Lau, Lisa; Long, Gary; Bajracharya, Cyril; Wang, Chongmin; Thurber, Aaron; et al

    2009-01-01

    We report high-yield and efficient size-controlled syntheses of Chalcopyrite CuInS2nanoparticles by decomposing molecular single source precursors (SSPs) via microwave irradiation in the presence of 1,2-ethanedithiol at reaction temperatures as low as 100C and times as short as 30?minutes. The nanoparticles sizes were 1.8?nm to 10.8?nm as reaction temperatures were varied from 100C to 200C with the bandgaps from 2.71?eV to 1.28?eV with good size control and high yields (64%95%). The resulting nanoparticles were analyzed by XRD, UV-Vis, ICP-OES, XPS, SEM, EDS, and HRTEM. Titration studies by1H NMR using SSP1with 1,2-ethanedithiol and benzyl mercaptan were conducted to elucidate the formation ofmoreChalcopyrite CuInS2nanoparticles.less

  17. Effects of Potassium Doping on CO Hydrogenation Over MoS2 Catalysts: A First-Principles Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, Amity; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Lilga, Michael A.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.; Mei, Donghai

    2014-07-01

    Periodic density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the effects of doping potassium (K) on the reactivity of CO hydrogenation to mixed higher alcohols over MoS2 catalysts. We found that the doped K species over the model MoS2(100) catalyst surface acts as a unique site for CO adsorption where either the K-C or the K-O bonding is allowed. The charge transfer from the K 4s electron to the conduction band of the MoS2(100) surface slightly enhances CO adsorption at the edge Mo sites. Due to the large electropositive nature, the presence of the surface K species, however, will hinder the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen. As a result, the doping K species drive CO hydrogenation selectivity toward the C2+ alcohols instead of hydrocarbons by increasing CO and decreasing hydrogen coverages on the MoS2 catalysts. To further elucidate the effect of doping K on the shifting of the selectivity toward CO hydrogenation, we calculated several key reaction steps leading to the H2CCO precursor formation, i.e., CO hydrogenation, the C-O bond scission and the C-C coupling (CH2+CO). The C-C coupling step is favorable for both the Mo and S edges. However, the undoped S edge has an overall more thermodynamically favorable reaction profile up to C-O scission compared with the Mo edge. This work was funded by a CRADA project (No. PNNL/297) with Range Fuels. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The work involving the results analysis and mansucript writing was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences.

  18. Protecting the properties of monolayer MoS2 on silicon based substrates with an atomically thin buffer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Man, Michael K. L.; Deckoff-Jones, Skylar; Winchester, Andrew; Shi, Guangsha; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D.; Kar, Swastik; Kioupakis, Emmanouil; Talapatra, Saikat; Dani, Keshav M.

    2016-02-12

    Semiconducting 2D materials, like transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have gained much attention for their potential in opto-electronic devices, valleytronic schemes, and semi-conducting to metallic phase engineering. However, like graphene and other atomically thin materials, they lose key properties when placed on a substrate like silicon, including quenching of photoluminescence, distorted crystalline structure, and rough surface morphology. The ability to protect these properties of monolayer TMDs, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), on standard Si-based substrates, will enable their use in opto-electronic devices and scientific investigations. Here we show that an atomically thin buffer layer of hexagonal-boron nitride (hBN) protects the rangemore » of key opto-electronic, structural, and morphological properties of monolayer MoS2 on Si-based substrates. The hBN buffer restores sharp diffraction patterns, improves monolayer flatness by nearly two-orders of magnitude, and causes over an order of magnitude enhancement in photoluminescence, compared to bare Si and SiO2 substrates. Lastly, our demonstration provides a way of integrating MoS2 and other 2D monolayers onto standard Si-substrates, thus furthering their technological applications and scientific investigations.« less

  19. One-loop matching of {delta}S=2 four-quark operators with improved staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becher, Thomas; Gamiz, Elvira; Melnikov, Kirill

    2005-10-01

    We compute O({alpha}{sub s}) lattice-to-continuum perturbative matching coefficients for the {delta}S=2 flavor changing four-quark operators for the Asqtad improved staggered action. In conjunction with lattice simulations with three flavors of light, dynamical quarks, our results yield an unquenched determination of B{sub K}, the parameter that determines the amount of indirect CP violation in the neutral kaon system. Its value is an important input for the unitarity triangle analysis of weak decays.

  20. MoS2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... mechanisms for its eventual aging and demise. Figure 3: Typical x-ray diffraction of the poorly crystalline MoS phase. (reference 5) Often transmission electron microscopy (TEM) ...

  1. Word Pro - S2

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  6. Word Pro - S2

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  9. Word Pro - S2

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  11. Word Pro - S2

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  12. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural Gas Renewable Energy 10.944 11.193 11.504 2014 2015 2016 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 J F M A M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 2014 2015 2016 Web Page: http:www.eia.gov...

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  16. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  17. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  18. Efficient Interlayer Relaxation and Transition of Excitons in Epitaxial and Non-epitaxial MoS2/WS2 Heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Yifei; Hu, Shi; Su, Liqin; Huang, Lujun; Liu, Yi; Jin, Zhenghe; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Kim, Ki Wook; Zhang, Yong; et al

    2014-12-03

    Semiconductor heterostructurs provide a powerful platform for the engineering of excitons. Here we report on the excitonic properties of two-dimensional (2D) heterostructures that consist of monolayer MoS2 and WS2 stacked epitaxially or non-epitaxially in the vertical direction. We find similarly efficient interlayer relaxation and transition of excitons in both the epitaxial and non-epitaxial heterostructures. This is manifested by a two orders of magnitude decrease in the photoluminescence and an extra absorption peak at low energy region of both heterostructures. The MoS2/WS2 heterostructures show weak interlayer coupling and essentially act as an atomic-scale heterojunction with the intrinsic band structures of themore » two monolayers largely preserved. They are particularly promising for the applications that request efficient dissociation of excitons and strong light absorption, including photovoltaics, solar fuels, photodetectors, and optical modulators. Our results also indicate that 2D heterostructures promise to provide capabilities to engineer excitons from the atomic level without concerns of interfacial imperfection.« less

  19. Efficient Interlayer Relaxation and Transition of Excitons in Epitaxial and Non-epitaxial MoS2/WS2 Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Yifei; Hu, Shi; Su, Liqin; Huang, Lujun; Liu, Yi; Jin, Zhenghe; Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Kim, Ki Wook; Zhang, Yong; Cao, Linyou

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor heterostructurs provide a powerful platform for the engineering of excitons. Here we report on the excitonic properties of two-dimensional (2D) heterostructures that consist of monolayer MoS2 and WS2 stacked epitaxially or non-epitaxially in the vertical direction. We find similarly efficient interlayer relaxation and transition of excitons in both the epitaxial and non-epitaxial heterostructures. This is manifested by a two orders of magnitude decrease in the photoluminescence and an extra absorption peak at low energy region of both heterostructures. The MoS2/WS2 heterostructures show weak interlayer coupling and essentially act as an atomic-scale heterojunction with the intrinsic band structures of the two monolayers largely preserved. They are particularly promising for the applications that request efficient dissociation of excitons and strong light absorption, including photovoltaics, solar fuels, photodetectors, and optical modulators. Our results also indicate that 2D heterostructures promise to provide capabilities to engineer excitons from the atomic level without concerns of interfacial imperfection.

  20. A High-Yield Synthesis of Chalcopyrite CuIn S 2 Nanoparticles with Exceptional Size Control

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Chivin; Gardner, Joseph S.; Shurdha, Endrit; Margulieux, Kelsey R.; Westover, Richard D.; Lau, Lisa; Long, Gary; Bajracharya, Cyril; Wang, Chongmin; Thurber, Aaron; et al

    2009-01-01

    We repormore » t high-yield and efficient size-controlled syntheses of Chalcopyrite CuIn S 2 nanoparticles by decomposing molecular single source precursors (SSPs) via microwave irradiation in the presence of 1,2-ethanedithiol at reaction temperatures as low as 100 ° C and times as short as 30 minutes. The nanoparticles sizes were 1.8 nm to 10.8 nm as reaction temperatures were varied from 100 ° C to 200 ° C with the bandgaps from 2.71 eV to 1.28 eV with good size control and high yields (64%–95%). The resulting nanoparticles were analyzed by XRD, UV-Vis, ICP-OES, XPS, SEM, EDS, and HRTEM. Titration studies by 1 H NMR using SSP 1 with 1,2-ethanedithiol and benzyl mercaptan were conducted to elucidate the formation of Chalcopyrite CuIn S 2 nanoparticles.« less

  1. Second-harmonic generation of TEA CO2 10. 6-micrometer laser light in AgGaS2 crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bangmin, Z.; Dinghua, W.

    1991-05-03

    Characteristics of AgGaS2 crystal for frequency doubling of TEA CO2 10.6 micrometer laser light were investigated. When the crystal was 4.3mm long, the maximum conversion frequency was 0.122 percent. In recent years, much progress was made in expanding the range of laser wavebands by utilizing the nonlinear effects. In the medium-infrared waveband, the CO2 laser is a relatively ideal light source and can output tens of laser spectral lines within the range 8.7 to 11.8 micrometers. With double frequency, tunable output can be obtained within the range 4.3 to 5.9 micrometers. Since the advent of CO2 lasers, researchers have conducted numerous research tasks in this area. However, since it is relatively difficult to obtain high-quality and large infrared nonlinear optical crystals, such work still remains at the laboratory research stage without practical applications.

  2. Large Fermi Surface of Heavy Electrons at the Border of Mott Insulating State in NiS2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Friedemann, S.; Chang, H.; Gamża, M. B.; Reiss, P.; Chen, X.; Alireza, P.; Coniglio, W. A.; Graf, D.; Tozer, S.; Grosche, F. M.

    2016-05-12

    One early triumph of quantum physics is the explanation why some materials are metallic whereas others are insulating. While a treatment based on single electron states is correct for most materials this approach can fail spectacularly, when the electrostatic repulsion between electrons causes strong correlations. Not only can these favor new and subtle forms of matter, such as magnetism or superconductivity, they can even cause the electrons in a half-filled energy band to lock into position, producing a correlated, or Mott insulator. The transition into the Mott insulating state raises important fundamental questions. Foremost among these is the fate ofmore » the electronic Fermi surface and the associated charge carrier mass, as the Mott transition is approached. We report the first direct observation of the Fermi surface on the metallic side of a Mott insulating transition by high pressure quantum oscillatory measurements in NiS2. We find our results point at a large Fermi surface consistent with Luttinger's theorem and a strongly enhanced quasiparticle effective mass. These two findings are in line with central tenets of the Brinkman-Rice picture of the correlated metal near the Mott insulating state and rule out alternative scenarios in which the carrier concentration vanishes continuously at the metal-insulator transition.« less

  3. Exciton diamagnetic shifts and valley Zeeman effects in monolayer WS2 and MoS2 to 65 Tesla

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stier, Andreas V.; McCreary, Kathleen M.; Jonker, Berend T.; Kono, Junichiro; Crooker, Scott A.

    2016-02-09

    In bulk and quantum-confined semiconductors, magneto-optical studies have historically played an essential role in determining the fundamental parameters of excitons (size, binding energy, spin, dimensionality and so on). Here we report low-temperature polarized reflection spectroscopy of atomically thin WS2 and MoS2 in high magnetic fields to 65 T. Both the A and B excitons exhibit similar Zeeman splittings of approximately –230 μeV T–1 (g-factor ≃–4), thereby quantifying the valley Zeeman effect in monolayer transition-metal disulphides. Crucially, these large fields also allow observation of the small quadratic diamagnetic shifts of both A and B excitons in monolayer WS2, from which radiimore » of ~1.53 and ~1.16 nm are calculated. Further, when analysed within a model of non-local dielectric screening, these diamagnetic shifts also constrain estimates of the A and B exciton binding energies (410 and 470 meV, respectively, using a reduced A exciton mass of 0.16 times the free electron mass). Lastly, these results highlight the utility of high magnetic fields for understanding new two-dimensional materials.« less

  4. [Cu32(H)20{S2P(O i Pr)2 }12 ]: The Largest Number of Hydrides Recorded in a Molecular Nanocluster by Neutron Diffraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dhayal, Rajendra S.; Liao, Jian-Hong; Kahlal, Samia; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Yu-Chiao; Chiang, Ming-Hsi; van Zyl, Werner E.; Saillard, Jean-Yves; Liu, C. W.

    2015-04-20

    An air- and moisture-stable nanoscale polyhydrido copper cluster [Cu32(H)20{S2P(O i Pr)2 }12 ] (1H) was synthesized and structurally characterized. The molecular structure of 1H exhibits a hexacapped pseudo-rhombohedral core of 14 Cu atoms sandwiched between two nestlike triangular cupola fragments of (2x9) Cu atoms in an elongated triangular gyrobicupola polyhedron. The discrete Cu32 cluster is stabilized by 12 dithiophosphate ligands and a record number of 20 hydride ligands, which were found by high-resolution neutron diffraction to exhibit tri-, tetra-, and pentacoordinated hydrides in capping and interstitial modes. We conclude that this result was further supported by a density functional theorymore » investigation on the simplified model [Cu32(H)20(S2PH2)12].« less

  5. Electron-hadron correlations in pp collisions at {radical}(s) = 2.76TeV with the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Oliveira Filho, Elienos P.; Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2013-03-25

    In this work we are studying the relative beauty to charm production in pp collisions at {radical}(s) = 2.76TeV, through correlations between electrons from heavy-flavour decay and charged hadrons, with the ALICE detector at the LHC. This study represents a baseline for the analysis in heavy-ion collisions where heavy flavour production is a powerful tool to study the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP).

  6. Pressure-induced phase transition in La1–xSmxO0.5F0.5BiS2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fang, Y.; Yazici, D.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-09-15

    Electrical resistivity measurements on La1–xSmxO0.5F0.5BiS2 (x = 0.1, 0.3, 0.6, 0.8) have been performed under applied pressures up to 2.6 GPa from 2 K to room temperature. The superconducting transition temperature Tc of each sample significantly increases at a Sm-concentration dependent pressure Pt, indicating a pressure-induced phase transition from a low-Tc to a high-Tc phase. At ambient pressure, Tc increases dramatically from 2.8 K at x = 0.1 to 5.4 K at x = 0.8; however, the Tc values at P > Pt decrease slightly with x and Pt shifts to higher pressures with Sm substitution. In the normal state,more » semiconducting-like behavior is suppressed and metallic conduction is induced with increasing pressure in all of the samples. Furthermore, these results suggest that the pressure dependence of Tc for the BiS2-based superconductors is related to the lattice parameters at ambient pressure and enable us to estimate the evolution of Tc for SmO0.5F0.5BiS2 under pressure.« less

  7. Optimization Method to Branch and Bound Large SBO State Spaces Under Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment via use of LENDIT Scales and S2R2 Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph W. Nielsen; Akira Tokurio; Robert Hiromoto; Jivan Khatry

    2014-06-01

    Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) methods have been developed and are quite effective in evaluating risk associated with complex systems, but lack the capability to evaluate complex dynamic systems. These time and energy scales associated with the transient may vary as a function of transition time to a different physical state. Dynamic PRA (DPRA) methods provide a more rigorous analysis of complex dynamic systems, while complete, results in issues associated with combinatorial explosion. In order to address the combinatorial complexity arising from the number of possible state configurations and discretization of transition times, a characteristic scaling metric (LENDIT length, energy, number, distribution, information and time) is proposed as a means to describe systems uniformly and thus provide means to describe relational constraints expected in the dynamics of a complex (coupled) systems. Thus when LENDIT is used to characterize four sets state, system, resource and response (S2R2) describing reactor operations (normal and off-normal), LENDIT and S2R2 in combination have the potential to branch and bound the state space investigated by DPRA. In this paper we introduce the concept of LENDIT scales and S2R2 sets applied to a branch-and-bound algorithm and apply the methods to a station black out transient (SBO).

  8. Measurement of electrons from semileptonic heavy-flavor hadron decays in pp collisions at s=2.76TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; et al

    2015-01-07

    The pT-differential production cross section of electrons from semileptonic decays of heavy-flavor hadrons has been measured at midrapidity in proton-proton collisions at √s = 2.76  TeV in the transverse momentum range 0.5 < pT < 12  GeV/c with the ALICE detector at the LHC. The analysis was performed using minimum bias events and events triggered by the electromagnetic calorimeter. Predictions from perturbative QCD calculations agree with the data within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties.

  9. Word Pro - S2.lwp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 By Selected End Use¹ By Energy Source 48 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Excludes inputs of unallocated energy sources (5,820 trillion Btu). 2 Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Excludes steam and hot water. 3 Excludes coal coke and breeze. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Natural gas liquids. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Source: Table 2.3. 3.3 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.2

  10. Word Pro - S2.lwp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2012 (Quadrillion Btu) 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial

  11. Word Pro - S2.lwp

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solarphotovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP)...

  12. ARM - Instrument - ccn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA retired SBS S2 Browse Data Browse Plots Steamboat Springs CO, Christie Peak...

  13. ARM - Instrument - aos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA retired SBS S2 Browse Data Steamboat Springs CO, Christie Peak retired TMP S1...

  14. Measurement of Υ(1S + 2S +3S) production in p + p and Au + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-02-24

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ(1S + 2S + 3S), was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au+Au and p+p collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV. The Υ(1S + 2S + 3S) → e⁺e⁻ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beedσ/dy = 108 ± 38 (stat) ± 15 (syst) ± 11 (luminosity) pb in p+p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au+Au collisions indicates a suppression of themore »total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p+p collision data. Thus, the suppression is consistent with measurements at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.« less

  15. Assessment of the LV-S2 & LV-S3 Stack Sampling Probe Locations for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Amidan, Brett G.

    2014-09-30

    This document reports on a series of tests conducted to assess the proposed air sampling locations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Group 1-2A exhaust stacks with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. The LV-C2, LV-S2, and LV-S3 exhaust stacks were tested together as a group (Test Group 1-2A). This report only covers the results of LV-S2 and LV-S3; LV-C2 will be reported on separately. Federal regulations1 require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria established by the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. 2 These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

  16. Measurement of Υ(1S + 2S +3S) production in p + p and Au + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bing, X.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J. -L.; Chen, C. -H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K. -B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; Whitaker, S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2015-02-24

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ(1S + 2S + 3S), was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au+Au and p+p collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV. The Υ(1S + 2S + 3S) → e⁺e⁻ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beedσ/dy = 108 ± 38 (stat) ± 15 (syst) ± 11 (luminosity) pb in p+p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au+Au collisions indicates a suppression of the total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p+p collision data. Thus, the suppression is consistent with measurements at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

  17. Evidence of the 2s2p({sup 1}P) doubly excited state in the harmonic generation spectrum of helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngoko Djiokap, J. M.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2011-07-15

    By solving the two-active-electron time-dependent Schroedinger equation in an intense, ultrashort laser field, we investigate evidence of electron correlations in the high-order harmonic generation spectrum of helium. As the frequency of the driving laser pulse varies from 4.6 to 6.6 eV, the 13th, 11th, and 9th harmonics sequentially become resonant with the transition between the ground state and the isolated 2s2p({sup 1}P) autoionizing state of helium, which dramatically enhances these harmonics and changes their profiles. When each of the 9th and 13th harmonics are in resonance with this autoionizing state, there is also a low-order multiphoton resonance with a Rydberg state, resulting in a particularly large enhancement of these harmonics relative to neighboring harmonics. When the 11th harmonic is in resonance with the 2s2p({sup 1}P) autoionizing state, the 13th harmonic is simultaneously in resonance with numerous higher-energy autoionizing states, resulting in a competition between these two harmonics for intensity. These results demonstrate that even electron correlations occurring over a narrow energy interval can have a significant effect on strong-field processes such as harmonic generation.

  18. Measurement of Υ(1S + 2S +3S) production in p + p and Au + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-02-24

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ(1S + 2S + 3S), was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au+Au and p+p collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV. The Υ(1S + 2S + 3S) → e⁺e⁻ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beedσ/dy = 108 ± 38 (stat) ± 15 (syst) ± 11 (luminosity) pb in p+p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au+Au collisions indicates a suppression of themore » total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p+p collision data. Thus, the suppression is consistent with measurements at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.« less

  19. Spin-Orbit Coupling Induced Anisotropy in the Magnetotransport of the Chiral Helimagnet Cr1=3NbS2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandrus, D.; Parker, David S; Ghimire, Nirmal J; Bornstein, Alexander; Chapman, Benjamin; Lee, Minyhea

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) has been crucial for controlling magnetic anisotropy in magnetic multilayer films. It has been shown that electronic structure can be altered via interface SOC by varying the superlattice structure, resulting in spontaneous magnetization perpendicular or parallel to the plane. In lieu of magnetic thin films, we study the similarly anisotropic helimagnet Cr1/3NbS2 where the spin-polarization direction, controlled by the applied magnetic field, can modify the electronic structure. As a result, the direction of spin polarization can modulate the density of states and in turn affect the in-plane electrical conductivity. In Cr1/3NbS2, we found an enhancement of in-plane conductivity when the spin polarization is out-of-plane as compared to in-plane spin polarization. This is consistent with the increase in density of states near the Fermi energy at the same spin configuration, found from first-principles calculations. We also observe unusual field dependence of the Hall signal in the same temperature range. This is unlikely to originate from the noncollinear spin texture but rather further indicates strong dependence of electronic structure on spin orientation relative to the plane.

  20. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 2.76\\,\\text {TeV}$$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-05-12

    The double-differential inclusive jet cross section is measured as a function of jet transverse momentummore » $$p_{\\mathrm {T}}$$ and absolute rapidity $|y |$ , using proton-proton collision data collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC, at a center-of-mass energy of $$\\sqrt{s} = 2.76\\,{\\mathrm{TeV}}$$ and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.43 $$\\,\\text {pb}^{-1}$$ . Jets are reconstructed within the $$p_{\\mathrm {T}}$$ range of 74 to 592 $$\\,\\text {GeV}$$ and the rapidity range $|y |<3.0$ . The reconstructed jet spectrum is corrected for detector resolution. The measurements are compared to the theoretical prediction at next-to-leading-order QCD using different sets of parton distribution functions. Furthermore, this inclusive cross section measurement explores a new kinematic region and is consistent with QCD predictions.« less

  1. Single Use Letter Report for the Verification and Validation of the RADNUC-2A and ORIGEN2 S.2 Computer Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACKER, M.J.

    2000-06-20

    This report documents the verification and validation (V&V) activities undertaken to support the use of the RADNUC2-A and ORIGEN2 S.2 computer codes for the specific application of calculating isotopic inventories and decay heat loadings for Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) activities as described herein. Two recent applications include the reports HNF-SD-SNF-TI-009, 105-K Basin Material Design Basis Feed Description for Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Facilities, Volume 1, Fuel (Praga, 1998), and HNF-3035, Rev. 0B, MCO Gas Composition for Low Reactive Surface Areas (Packer, 1998). Representative calculations documented in these two reports were repeated using RADNUC2-A, and the results were identical to the documented results. This serves as verification that version 2A of Radnuc was used for the applications noted above; the same version was tested herein, and perfect agreement was shown. Comprehensive V&V is demonstrated for RADNUC2-A in Appendix A.

  2. Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Luyi; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.; Chen, Weibing; Yuan, Jiangtan; Zhang, Jing; Lou, Jun; Crooker, Scott  A.

    2015-08-03

    The recently discovered monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) provide a fertile playground to explore new coupled spin–valley physics. Although robust spin and valley degrees of freedom are inferred from polarized photoluminescence (PL) experiments PL timescales are necessarily constrained by short-lived (3–100 ps) electron–hole recombination9, 10. Direct probes of spin/valley polarization dynamics of resident carriers in electron (or hole)-doped TMDCs, which may persist long after recombination ceases, are at an early stage. Here we directly measure the coupled spin–valley dynamics in electron-doped MoS2 and WS2 monolayers using optical Kerr spectroscopy, and reveal very long electron spin lifetimes, exceeding 3 ns atmore » 5 K (2-3 orders of magnitude longer than typical exciton recombination times). In contrast with conventional III–V or II–VI semiconductors, spin relaxation accelerates rapidly in small transverse magnetic fields. Supported by a model of coupled spin–valley dynamics, these results indicate a novel mechanism of itinerant electron spin dephasing in the rapidly fluctuating internal spin–orbit field in TMDCs, driven by fast inter-valley scattering. Additionally, a long-lived spin coherence is observed at lower energies, commensurate with localized states. These studies provide insight into the physics underpinning spin and valley dynamics of resident electrons in atomically thin TMDCs.« less

  3. Out-of-plane spin-orientation dependent magnetotransport properties in the anisotropic helimagnet CR1/3NbS2 [Spin-Orbit Coupling Induced Anisotropy in the Magnetotransport of the Chiral Helimagnet Cr1=3NbS2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bornstein, Alexander C.; Chapman, Benjamin J.; Ghimire, Nirmal J.; Mandrus, David G.; Parker, David S.; Lee, Minhyea

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the role of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) has been crucial for controlling magnetic anisotropy in magnetic multilayer films. It has been shown that electronic structure can be altered via interface SOC by varying the superlattice structure, resulting in spontaneous magnetization perpendicular or parallel to the plane. In lieu of magnetic thin films, we study the similarly anisotropic helimagnet Cr1/3NbS2 where the spin-polarization direction, controlled by the applied magnetic field, can modify the electronic structure. As a result, the direction of spin polarization can modulate the density of states and in turn affect the in-plane electrical conductivity. In Cr1/3NbS2, we foundmore » an enhancement of in-plane conductivity when the spin polarization is out-of-plane as compared to in-plane spin polarization. This is consistent with the increase in density of states near the Fermi energy at the same spin configuration, found from first-principles calculations. We also observe unusual field dependence of the Hall signal in the same temperature range. This is unlikely to originate from the noncollinear spin texture but rather further indicates strong dependence of electronic structure on spin orientation relative to the plane.« less

  4. Materials Data on RbAg2SbS4 (SG:154) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Six years' operating experience at Ardjuna field helps prove out LPG SBS system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smulders, L.H.

    1983-02-21

    The permanent yoke mooring system and the two-product flexpipe riser of the Arjuna Sakti LPG storage barge have completely lived up to their expectations. The LPG offtake system, the terminaling function of the storage unit, has also performed extremely well. Experience gained at Ardjuna provides confidence for future openocean mooring of large methanol or LNG plants. Mooring systems of these future units will likely have a different configuration, such as the single anchor leg storage (SALS) mooring. However, the basic system components have been used, both at Ardjuna and in comparable situations elsewhere in the world. Engineers who are working on floating, large scale, gas processing plants for mooring in the open ocean could profitably join their efforts in a team comprised of process specialists, naval architects, and mooring experts. Specific areas of consideration should be: length-to-beam and lengthto-depth ratios and shape of bow. This could result in a storage/process barge design with better motion characteristics and lower mooring forces than proposed at present.

  6. Characterization of fundamental catalytic properties of MoS2/WS2 nanotubes and nanoclusters for desulfurization catalysis - a surface temperature study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U. Burghaus

    2012-07-05

    The prior project consisted of two main project lines. First, characterization of novel nanomaterials for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) applications. Second, studying more traditional model systems for HDS such as vapor-deposited silica-supported Mo and MoSx clusters. In the first subproject, we studied WS2 and MoS2 fullerene-like nanoparticles as well as WS2 nanotubes. Thiophene (C4H4S) was used as the probe molecule. Interestingly, metallic and sulfur-like adsorption sites could be identified on the silica-supported fullerene-particles system. Similar structures are seen for the traditional system (vapor-deposited clusters). Thus, this may be a kinetics fingerprint feature of modern HDS model systems. In addition, kinetics data allowed characterization of the different adsorption sites for thiophene on and inside WS2 nanotube bundles. The latter is a unique feature of nanotubes that has not been reported before for any inorganic nanotube system; however, examples are known for carbon nanotubes, including prior work of the PI. Although HDS has been studied for decades, utilizing nanotubes as nanosized HDS reactors has never been tried before, as far as we know. This is of interest from a fundamental perspective. Unfortunately, the HDS activity of the nanocatalysts at ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions was close to the detection limit of our techniques. Therefore, we propose to run experiments at ambient pressure on related nanopowder samples as part of the renewal application utilizing a now-available GC (gas chromatograph) setup. In addition, Ni and Co doped nanocatalyts are proposed for study. These dopants will boost the catalytic activity. In the second subproject of the prior grant, we studied HDS-related chemistry on more traditional supported cluster catalysts. Mo clusters supported by physical vapor deposition (PVD) on silica have been characterized. Two reaction pathways are evident when adsorbing thiophene on Mo and MoSx clusters: molecular adsorption and

  7. EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) Area Expansion at the Savannah River Site)

  8. EIS-0283-S2-IAD-2009.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  9. EIS-0283-S2-IAD-2012.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  10. EIS-0283-S2-Summary-2012.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Impact Statement S-16 mining sites that are ... sources, emissions from coal-fired power plants, ... Peak construction direct employment at SRS would range from ...

  11. EIS-0082-S2-2001.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... or communities dominated by pollution-tolerant forms). ... work practices or conditions before an accident occurs. ... and burning of fossil fuels (e.g., coal and oil) to ...

  12. DOE/EIS-0283-S2

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... I-18 Table of Contents xxvii Appendix J Table J-1 Partial Mixed Oxide and Full Low-Enriched Uranium Core Inventories for the Sequoyah and Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plants ...

  13. DOE/EIS-0283-S2

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... nuclear power reactors), irradiation in fast reactors, immobilization with HLW, downblending ... If required, treatment at H-CanyonHB-Line using vacuum salt distillation and sodium ...

  14. Assessment of the Group 5-6 (LB C2, LB S2, LV S1) Stack Sampling Probe Locations for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Piepel, Gregory F.

    2011-03-11

    This document reports on a series of tests to assess the proposed air sampling locations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Group 5-6 exhaust stacks with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. The LB-C2, LV-S1, and LB S2 exhaust stacks were tested together as a group (Test Group 5-6) because the common factor in their design is that the last significant flow disturbance upstream of the air sampling probe is a reduction in duct diameter. Federal regulations( ) require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream. The testing on scale models of the stacks conducted for this project was part of the River Protection Project—Waste Treatment Plant Support Program under Contract No. DE-AC05-76RL01830 according to the statement of work issued by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI, 24590-QL-SRA-W000-00101, N13.1-1999 Stack Monitor Scale Model Testing and Qualification, Revision 1, 9/12/2007) and Work Authorization 09 of Memorandum of Agreement 24590-QL-HC9-WA49-00001. The internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) project for this task is 53024, Work for Hanford Contractors Stack Monitoring. The testing described in this document was further guided by the Test Plan Scale Model Testing the Waste Treatment Plant LB-C2, LB-S2, and LV-S1 (Test Group 5-6) Stack Air Sampling Positions (TP-RPP-WTP-594). The tests conducted by PNNL during 2009 and 2010 on the Group 5-6 scale model systems are described in this report. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross-section at the designed sampling

  15. Diselenophosphate-Induced Conversion of an Achiral [Cu 20 H 11 {S 2 P(O i Pr) 2 } 9 ] into a Chiral [Cu 20 H 11 {Se 2 P(O i Pr) 2 } 9 ] Polyhydrido Nanocluster

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dhayal, Rajendra S.; Liao, Jian-Hong; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Yu-Chiao; Chiang, Ming-His; Kahlal, Samia; Saillard, Jean-Yves; Liu, C. W.

    2015-11-09

    A polyhydrido copper nanocluster, [Cu20H11{Se2P(OiPr)2}9] (2H), which exhibits an intrinsically chiral inorganic core of C-3 symmetry, was synthesized from achiral [Cu20H11{S2P(OiPr)2}9] (1(H)) of C-3h symmetry by a ligand-exchange method. Likewise, the structure has a distorted cuboctahedral Cu-13 core, two triangular faces of which are capped along the C-3 axis, one by a Cu-6 cupola and the other by a single Cu atom. The Cu-20 framework is further stabilized by 9 diselenophosphate and 11 hydride ligands. The number of hydride, phosphorus, and selenium resonances and their splitting patterns in multinuclear NMR spectra of 2(H) indicate that the chiral Cu20H11 core retainsmore » its C-3 symmetry in solution. Moreover, the 11 hydride ligands were located by neutron diffraction experiments and shown to be capping (3)-H and interstitial (5)-H ligands (in square-pyramidal and trigonal-bipyramidal cavities), as supported by DFT calculations on [Cu20H11(Se2PH2)9] (2H') as a simplified model.« less

  16. Assessment of the Group 3-4 (HV-S1, HV-S2, IHLW-S1) Stack Sampling Probe Locations for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Antonio, Ernest J.

    2013-01-01

    This document reports on a series of tests conducted to assess the proposed air sampling locations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Group 3-4 exhaust stacks with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. The HV-S1, HV-S2, and IHLW-S1 exhaust stacks were tested together as a group (Test Group 3-4) because they share a geometric attribute: the common factor in their design is that the last significant flow disturbance upstream of the air sampling probe is a jog (i.e., two conjoined bends of equal and opposite curvature resulting in a change in elevation of the duct). Federal regulations require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to criteria established by the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

  17. New thermotropic chiral nematic copolymers using (1S,2S,3S,5R)-(+)- and (1R,2R,3R,5S)-([minus])-isopinocampheol as building blocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.H.; Tsai, M.L. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Lab. for Laser Energetics)

    1990-01-01

    Thermotropic chiral nematic side-chain copolymers were synthesized and characterized by using (1S,2S,3S,5R)-(+)- and (1R,2R,3R,5S)-([minus])-isopinocampheol as the chiral building blocks. The helical twisting power was found to correlate with the volume swept out by the chiral pendant group via rotation for a given nematogenic monomer. However, the enhanced mesomorphic order introduced in both the nematogenic and chiral monomers as a result of an increased extent of conjugation or a shortened spacer length was found to reduce the helical twisting power of the resultant copolymer. Hence, both factors have to be taken into account as the helical twisting power of a copolymer system is to be optimized for a specific application. The present work also generalized the previous observation that the inversion of chirality of the pendant group results in helical sense reversal, although the role of the absolute configuration of the chiral moiety is not yet clearly understood.

  18. Electron-impact excitation of the (2p{sup 2}) {sup 1}D and (2s2p) {sup 1}P{sup o} autoionizing states of helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sise, Omer; Dogan, Mevlut; Okur, Ibrahim; Crowe, Albert

    2011-08-15

    An experimental study of the excitation of the (2p{sup 2}) {sup 1}D and (2s2p) {sup 1}P{sup o} autoionizing states of helium by 250-eV electron impact is presented. The ejected-electron angular distributions and energy spectra are measured in coincidence with the corresponding scattered electrons for a scattering angle of -13 deg. and for a range of ejected-electron angles in both the forward and backward directions. Resonance profiles are analyzed in terms of the Shore-Balashov parametrization to obtain the resonance asymmetry A{sub {mu}} and yield B{sub {mu}} parameters and the direct ionization cross section f. The spectra and their parameters are compared to the previous measurements of Lower and Weigold [J. Phys. B. 23, 2819 (1990)] and McDonald and Crowe [J. Phys. B 26, 2887 (1993)]. Comparison is also made with the recent theoretical triply differential cross-section calculations based on the first and second Born approximations. In general, good qualitative agreement is found between the experimental results. Some differences are found at the forward and backward directions. These differences in the shape and magnitude of the cross sections are attributed to the different incoming electron energies used in the experiments. The second Born approximation with inclusion of the three-body Coulomb interaction in the final state agrees reasonably well with experiments in the binary region. However, the {sup 1}P{sup o} resonance yield parameter B{sub {mu}} is significantly overestimated at the recoil region, giving a relatively large recoil peak, in contradiction to the experiment. There is also a discrepancy between the two theories available for the {sup 1}D resonance yield parameter B{sub {mu}} in this region. Remaining discrepancies between theories and experiments are also discussed.

  19. GPU accelerated fully space and time resolved numerical simulations of self-focusing laser beams in SBS-active media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mauger, Sarah; Colin de Verdière, Guillaume; Bergé, Luc; Skupin, Stefan; Friedrich Schiller University, Institute of Condensed Matter Theory and Optics, 07743 Jena

    2013-02-15

    A computer cluster equipped with Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) is used for simulating nonlinear optical wave packets undergoing Kerr self-focusing and stimulated Brillouin scattering in fused silica. We first recall the model equations in full (3+1) dimensions. These consist of two coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations for counterpropagating optical beams closed with a source equation for light-induced acoustic waves seeded by thermal noise. Compared with simulations on a conventional cluster of Central Processing Units (CPUs), GPU-based computations allow us to use a significant (16 times) larger number of mesh points within similar computation times. Reciprocally, simulations employing the same number of mesh points are between 3 and 20 times faster on GPUs than on the same number of classical CPUs. Performance speedups close to 45 are reported for isolated functions evaluating, e.g., the optical nonlinearities. Since the field intensities may reach the ionization threshold of silica, the action of a defocusing electron plasma is also addressed.

  20. ARM - Instrument - smps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System (AOS). Locations ARM Mobile Facility MAO S1 Browse Data Manacapuru, Amazonas, Brazil; MAOS PVC S1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; MAOS retired retired ...

  1. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Plutonium Materials from the Department of Energy Standard 3013 Surveillance Program at the Savannah River Site (Amending Interim Action Determination of 12082008) DOE is ...

  2. EIS-0158-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Program Environmental Impact Report for the Sale of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 at Elk Hills, California

  3. EIS-0283-S2-Amended_IAD-2013.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy : Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary (Spanish) EIS-0281: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary (Spanish) DOE proposes to continue operating the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) located in central New Mexico. The DOE has identified and assessed three alternatives for the operation of SNL/NM: (1) No Action, (2) Expanded Operations, and (3) Reduced Operations. The Expanded Operations Alternative is the DOE's preferred alternative (exclusive

  4. EIS-0283-S2-IntActDet-2011.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  5. EIS-0283-S2-Volume2-2012.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Residues and Scrub Alloy Stored at the Rocky Flats ... Building area to 153,600 square feet (14,300 square ... when acted upon by a given physical stress or accident. ...

  6. EIS-0283-S2-Volume1-2012.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... war and nuclear weapons, mining sites that are ... sources, emissions from coal-fired power plants, ... Peak construction direct employment at SRS would range from ...

  7. EIS-0082-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from the low-activity fraction of the high-level radioactive waste salt solutions now stored in underground tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. ...

  8. EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from the DOE Standard 3013 Surveillance Program in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http:energy.govnode299815. ...

  9. EIS-0283-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Statement This Final SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for disposition of 13.1 metric tons (14.4 tons) of surplus plutonium for which a disposition...

  10. EA-1440-S2: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-1968: Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment EA-1887: Supplemental Environmental Assessment EA-1573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National ...

  11. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Certain Plutonium Materials at the K-Area Complex, Savannah River Site DOE has reviewed the environmental analysis relevant to preparation for disposition in the HB-Line and K-Area ...

  12. Energies and E1, M1, E2, and M2 transition rates for states of the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 3}, 2s2p{sup 4}, and 2p{sup 5} configurations in nitrogen-like ions between F III and Kr XXX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rynkun, P.; Jönsson, P.; Gaigalas, G.; Froese Fischer, C.

    2014-03-15

    Based on relativistic wavefunctions from multiconfiguration Dirac–Hartree–Fock and configuration interaction calculations, E1, M1, E2, and M2 transition rates, weighted oscillator strengths, and lifetimes are evaluated for the states of the (1s{sup 2})2s{sup 2}2p{sup 3},2s2p{sup 4}, and 2p{sup 5} configurations in all nitrogen-like ions between F III and Kr XXX. The wavefunction expansions include valence, core–valence, and core–core correlation effects through single–double multireference expansions to increasing sets of active orbitals. The computed energies agree very well with experimental values, with differences of only 300–600 cm{sup −1} for the majority of the levels and ions in the sequence. Computed transitions rates are in close agreement with available data from MCHF-BP calculations by Tachiev and Froese Fischer [G.I. Tachiev, C. Froese Fischer, A and A 385 (2002) 716].

  13. ARM - Instrument - tracegas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Island, Azores, Portugal ARM Mobile Facility MAO S1 Browse Data Manacapuru, Amazonas, Brazil; MAOS PVC S1 Browse Data Browse Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; MAOS retired...

  14. DOE/SC-ARM-14-016 ARM Operations and Engineering Procedure Mobile...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 1910.305, Wiring methods, components, and equipment ... Its central objective is reducing the uncertainty in the ... MAOS - Trace Gas O3 MAOS - Trace Gas SO2 MAOS - Trace Gas ...

  15. Stimulated Brillouin scattering mirror system, high power laser and laser peening method and system using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz B.

    2007-04-24

    A laser system, such as a master oscillator/power amplifier system, comprises a gain medium and a stimulated Brillouin scattering SBS mirror system. The SBS mirror system includes an in situ filtered SBS medium that comprises a compound having a small negative non-linear index of refraction, such as a perfluoro compound. An SBS relay telescope having a telescope focal point includes a baffle at the telescope focal point which blocks off angle beams. A beam splitter is placed between the SBS mirror system and the SBS relay telescope, directing a fraction of the beam to an alternate beam path for an alignment fiducial. The SBS mirror system has a collimated SBS cell and a focused SBS cell. An adjustable attenuator is placed between the collimated SBS cell and the focused SBS cell, by which pulse width of the reflected beam can be adjusted.

  16. Method for pulse control in a laser including a stimulated brillouin scattering mirror system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz B.

    2007-10-23

    A laser system, such as a master oscillator/power amplifier system, comprises a gain medium and a stimulated Brillouin scattering SBS mirror system. The SBS mirror system includes an in situ filtered SBS medium that comprises a compound having a small negative non-linear index of refraction, such as a perfluoro compound. An SBS relay telescope having a telescope focal point includes a baffle at the telescope focal point which blocks off angle beams. A beam splitter is placed between the SBS mirror system and the SBS relay telescope, directing a fraction of the beam to an alternate beam path for an alignment fiducial. The SBS mirror system has a collimated SBS cell and a focused SBS cell. An adjustable attenuator is placed between the collimated SBS cell and the focused SBS cell, by which pulse width of the reflected beam can be adjusted.

  17. Materials Data on KFeS2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on K(CoS)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on CuSbS2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on LiNdS2 (SG:141) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Ag3AuS2 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Ca(DyS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Ca(LaS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Cd(GaS2)2 (SG:82) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Li Intercalation in MoS 2 : In Situ Observation of Its Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full Text Journal Articles DOI: 10.1021acs.nanolett.5b02619

  6. Materials Data on Sr(NdS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Sr(GaS2)2 (SG:70) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Sr(GdS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Sr(ErS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Sr(SmS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Sr(InS2)2 (SG:70) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Sr(AsS2)2 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Sr(AlS2)2 (SG:70) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Sr(PrS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Sr(ScS2)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Sr(CeS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Sr(LaS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. EIS-0082-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from liquid high-level radioactive waste before vitrifying the high-activity fraction of the waste in the Defense Waste Processing Facility and disposing of the...

  19. EIS-0082-S2: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environmental Impact Statement (SPA SEIS), June 2001) for separation of the ... Now, using technologies described in the SPA SEIS, DOE has decided to change the ...

  20. Materials Data on Fe(SbS2)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Site-dependent free energy barrier for proton reduction on MoS2...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 14 SOLAR ENERGY

  2. Materials Data on IrS2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on AgAsS2 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on LiSbS2 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. EIS-0283-S2: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Supplemental EIS (SEIS) analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with changes to the surplus plutonium disposition program, including changes to the inventory of surplus plutonium and proposed new alternatives.

  6. Photo-oxidation method using MoS2 nanocluster materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcoxon, Jess P.

    2001-01-01

    A method of photo-oxidizing a hydrocarbon compound is provided by dispersing MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters in a solvent containing a hydrocarbon compound contaminant to form a stable solution mixture and irradiating the mixture to photo-oxide the hydrocarbon compound. Hydrocarbon compounds of interest include aromatic hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbons. MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters with an average diameter less than approximately 10 nanometers are shown to be effective in decomposing potentially toxic aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as phenol, pentachlorophenol, chlorinated biphenols, and chloroform, into relatively non-toxic compounds. The irradiation can occur by exposing the MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters and hydrocarbon compound mixture with visible light. The MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters can be introduced to the toxic hydrocarbons as either a MoS.sub.2 solution or deposited on a support material.

  7. Materials Data on FeS2 (SG:205) by Materials Project (Dataset...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Materials Project Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving ...

  8. Materials Data on Fe3H10S2NO14 (SG:160) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on H30S2O21 (SG:8) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Ca(SmS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Ca(GdS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Ca(NdS2)2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on SiS2 (SG:72) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS2: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jin, Wencan; Yeh, Po -Chun; Zaki, Nader; Zhang, Datong; Liou, Jonathan T.; Dadap, Jerry I.; Barinov, Alexey; Yablonskikh, Mikhail; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Sutter, Peter; et al

    2015-03-17

    We report the directly measured electronic structure of exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) using micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Measurements of both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ elucidate the effects of interaction with a substrate. Thus, a suggested relaxation of the in-plane lattice constant is found for both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ crystals. For suspended MoS₂, a careful investigation of the measured uppermost valence band gives an effective mass at Γ¯ and Κ¯ of 2.00m₀ and 0.43m₀, respectively. We also measure an increase in the band linewidth from the midpoint of Γ¯Κ¯ to the vicinity of Κ¯ and briefly discussmore » its possible origin.« less

  15. Materials Data on Ba(FeS2)2 (SG:87) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Alternative S2 Hinge Regions of the Myosin Rod Affect Myofibrillar Structure and Myosin Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Mark S.; Dambacher, Corey M.; Knowles, Aileen F.; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Swank, Douglas M.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Maughan, David W.

    2009-07-01

    The subfragment 2/light meromyosin 'hinge' region has been proposed to significantly contribute to muscle contraction force and/or speed. Transgenic replacement of the endogenous fast muscle isovariant hinge A (exon 15a) in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle with the slow muscle hinge B (exon 15b) allows examination of the structural and functional changes when only this region of the myosin molecule is different. Hinge B was previously shown to increase myosin rod length, increase A-band and sarcomere length, and decrease flight performance compared to hinge A. We applied additional measures to these transgenic lines to further evaluate the consequences of modifying this hinge region. Structurally, the longer A-band and sarcomere lengths found in the hinge B myofibrils appear to be due to the longitudinal addition of myosin heads. Functionally, hinge B, although a significant distance from the myosin catalytic domain, alters myosin kinetics in a manner consistent with this region increasing myosin rod length. These structural and functional changes combine to decrease whole fly wing-beat frequency and flight performance. Our results indicate that this hinge region plays an important role in determining myosin kinetics and in regulating thick and thin filament lengths as well as sarcomere length.

  17. Site-dependent free energy barrier for proton reduction on MoS2...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry C, vol. 117, na, October 14, 2013, pp. 21772-21777 ...

  18. Materials Data on FeS2 (SG:205) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    that would be constructed and operated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http:...

  20. Materials Data on TaS2 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Amended Notice of Intent To Expand...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada The Department of Energy (DOE or the ... a Rail Line to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DOEEIS-0369). ...

  2. Materials Data on Cu(RhS2)2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. EIS-0283-S2-InterimActionDetermation_04_25_13.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  4. Materials Data on FeS2 (SG:58) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Ca(ScS2)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Na2S2O5 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Na2S2O7 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on FeS2 (SG:58) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on TlGeS2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on DyTlS2 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Ca(ScS2)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on NaFeS2 (SG:23) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Composition and Manufacturing Effects on Electrical Properties of Li/FeS2 Thermal Battery Cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinholz, Emilee Lolita

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to better understand the relationship between processing, microstructure, and electrical conductivity of LiFeS2 thermal battery cathodes.

  14. EIS-0250-S1 and EIS-0250-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statements Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca...

  15. EIS-0250-S1 and EIS-0250-S2: DOE Notice of Availability of the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NV and Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada--Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor The...

  16. Catalytic activity in lithium-treated core-shell MoOx/MoS2 nanowires...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The high electrochemical activity in the nanowires results ... 119; Journal Issue: 40; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-7447 Publisher: American Chemical Society Research Org: Los Alamos ...

  17. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain—Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor and Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

  18. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada—Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor and Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

  19. EIS-0082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for separating the high-activity fraction from the low-activity fraction of the high-level radioactive waste salt solutions...

  20. Materials Data on K(CoS)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Second update The Gordon Bell Competetion entry gb110s2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vranas, P; Soltz, R

    2006-11-12

    Since the update to our entry of October 20th we have just made a significant improvement. We understand that this is past the deadline for updates and very close to the conference date. However, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has just updated the BG/L system software on their full 64 BG/L supercomputer to IBM-BGL Release 3. As we discussed in our update of October 20 this release includes our custom L1 and SRAM access functions that allow us to achieve higher sustained performance. Just a few hours ago we got access to the full system and obtained the fastest sustained performance point. In the full 131,072 CPU-cores system QCD sustains 70.9 Teraflops for the Dirac operator and 67.9 teraflops for the full Conjugate Gradient inverter. This is about 20% faster than our last update. We attach the corresponding speedup figure. As you can tell the speedup is perfect. This figure is the same as Figure 1 of our October 20th update except that it now includes the 131,072 CPU-cores point.

  2. Raman vibrational spectra of bulk to monolayer Re S 2 with lower...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This content will become publicly available on August 25, 2016 Prev Next Title: ... become publicly available on August 25, 2016 Publisher's Version of Record 10.1103...

  3. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nevada Rail Alignment for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

  4. Materials Data on BaHgS2 (SG:26) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on RuS2 (SG:205) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Fe(RhS2)2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-24

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Thickness-dependent charge transport in few-layer MoS 2 field...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Nanotechnology (Print) Additional Journal Information: Journal Name: Nanotechnology (Print); Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: ...

  8. Materials Data on Mg(AlS2)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Mn(NbS2)3 (SG:182) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-05-16

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. EIS-0026-S2: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SEIS-II evaluates environmental impacts resulting from the various treatment options; the transportation of TRU waste to WIPP using truck, a combination of truck and regular rail service, and a...

  11. Materials Data on RbSbS2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on OsS2 (SG:205) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Zn3S2O9 (SG:11) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Glass melter system technologies for vitrification of high-sodium-content low-level, radioactive, liquid wastes: Phase 1, SBS demonstration with simulated low-level waste. Final test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, M.J.; Scotto, M.V.; Shiao, S.Y.

    1995-12-31

    The attached vendor report was prepared for Westinghouse Hanford Company by Babcock & Wilcox as documentation of the Phase I Final Test Report, Cyclone Combustion Melter Demonstration.

  15. THIRTY NEW LOW-MASS SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Hebb, Leslie; Cameron, Andrew C.; Liu, Michael C.; Neill Reid, I. E-mail: Andrew.Cameron@st-and.ac.u E-mail: mliu@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2010-06-20

    As part of our search for young M dwarfs within 25 pc, we acquired high-resolution spectra of 185 low-mass stars compiled by the NStars project that have strong X-ray emission. By cross-correlating these spectra with radial velocity standard stars, we are sensitive to finding multi-lined spectroscopic binaries. We find a low-mass spectroscopic binary fraction of 16% consisting of 27 SB2s, 2 SB3s, and 1 SB4, increasing the number of known low-mass spectroscopic binaries (SBs) by 50% and proving that strong X-ray emission is an extremely efficient way to find M-dwarf SBs. WASP photometry of 23 of these systems revealed two low-mass eclipsing binaries (EBs), bringing the count of known M-dwarf EBs to 15. BD-22 5866, the ESB4, was fully described in 2008 by Shkolnik et al. and CCDM J04404+3127 B consists of two mid-M stars orbiting each other every 2.048 days. WASP also provided rotation periods for 12 systems, and in the cases where the synchronization time scales are short, we used P{sub rot} to determine the true orbital parameters. For those with no P{sub rot}, we used differential radial velocities to set upper limits on orbital periods and semimajor axes. More than half of our sample has near-equal-mass components (q > 0.8). This is expected since our sample is biased toward tight orbits where saturated X-ray emission is due to tidal spin-up rather than stellar youth. Increasing the samples of M-dwarf SBs and EBs is extremely valuable in setting constraints on current theories of stellar multiplicity and evolution scenarios for low-mass multiple systems.

  16. ARM - Value-Added Products (VAP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ASI, AWR, ENA, FKB, GRW, HFE, MAO, NIM, NSA, PGH, PVC, PYE, SGP, SMT, TWP 2005.03.23 ... Properties AWR, FKB, GRW, HFE, MAO, NIM, NSA, PGH, PVC, PYE, SGP 1996.07.02 2016.09.30 ...

  17. Characterization of the antiferromagnetism in Ag(pyz)2(S2O8) with a two-dimensional square lattice of Ag 2+ ions (Ag=silver, Pyz-pyrdzine, S2O8=sulfate)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, John; Mc Donald, R; Sengupta, P; Cox, S; Manson, J; Southerland, H; Warter, M; Stone, K; Stephens, P; Lancaster, T; Steele, A; Blundell, S; Baker, P; Pratt, F; Lee, C; Whangbo, M

    2009-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction and magnetic susceptibility measurements show that Ag(pyz){sub 2}(S{sub 2}O{sub 8}) consists of 2D square nets of Ag{sup 2+} ions resulting from the corner-sharing of axially elongated AgN{sub 4}O{sub 2} octahedra and exhibits characteristic 2D antiferromagnetism. Nevertheless, {mu}{sup +}Sr measurements indicate that Ag(pyz){sub 2}(S{sub 2}O{sub 8}) undergoes 3D magnetic ordering below 7.8(3) K.

  18. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; George, E.V.; Miller, J.L.; Krupke, W.F.

    1993-11-09

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  19. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, Clifford B.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; George, Edward V.; Miller, John L.; Krupke, William F.

    1993-01-01

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  20. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinsons disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variables which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.

  1. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variablesmore » which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.« less

  2. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variables which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.

  3. EIS-0250-S1 and EIS-0250-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV and Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada--Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor

  4. Controlled Nucleation and Growth Process of Li2S2/Li2S in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Zuo, Pengjian; Koech, Phillip K.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2013-09-20

    Lithium-sulfur battery is a promising next-generation energy storage system because of its potentially three to five times higher energy density than that of traditional lithium ion batteries. However, the dissolution and precipitation of soluble polysulfides during cycling initiate a series of key-chain reactions that significantly shorten battery life. Herein, we demonstrate that through a simple but effective strategy, significantly improved cycling performance is achieved for high sulfur loading electrodes through controlling the nucleation and precipitation of polysulfieds on the electrode surface. More than 400 or 760 stable cycling are successfully displayed in the cells with locked discharge capacity of 625 mAh g-1 or 500 mAh g-1, respectively. The nucleation and growth process of dissolved polysulfides has been electrochemically altered to confine the thickness of discharge products passivated on the cathode surface, increasing the utilization rate of sulfur while avoiding severe morphology changes on the electrode. More importantly, the exposure of new lithium metal surface to the S-containing electrolyte is also greatly reduced through this strategy, largely minimizing the anode corrosion caused by polysulfides. This work interlocks the electrode morphologies and its evolution with electrochemical interference to modulate cell performances by using Li-S system as a platform, providing different but critical directions for this community.

  5. Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Synthesis via Methanol and Dimethyl Ether Intermediates: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Zhu, Yunhua; Gray, Michel J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Wang, Yong; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Palo, Daniel R.

    2013-11-26

    The objective of the work was to enhance price-competitive, synthesis gas (syngas)-based production of transportation fuels that are directly compatible with the existing vehicle fleet (i.e., vehicles fueled by gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, etc.). To accomplish this, modifications to the traditional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process were investigated. In this study, we investigated direct conversion of syngas to distillates using methanol and dimethyl ether intermediates. For this application, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 (PdZnAl) catalyst previously developed for methanol steam reforming was evaluated. The PdZnAl catalyst was shown to be far superior to a conventional copper-based methanol catalyst when operated at relatively high temperatures (i.e., >300°C), which is necessary for MTG-type applications. Catalytic performance was evaluated through parametric studies. Process conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas-hour-space velocity, and syngas feed ratio (i.e., hydrogen:carbon monoxide) were investigated. PdZnAl catalyst formulation also was optimized to maximize conversion and selectivity to methanol and dimethyl ether while suppressing methane formation. Thus, a PdZn/Al2O3 catalyst optimized for methanol and dimethyl ether formation was developed through combined catalytic material and process parameter exploration. However, even after compositional optimization, a significant amount of undesirable carbon dioxide was produced (formed via the water-gas-shift reaction), and some degree of methane formation could not be completely avoided. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 used in combination with ZSM-5 was investigated for direct syngas-to-distillates conversion. High conversion was achieved as thermodynamic constraints are alleviated when methanol and dimethyl are intermediates for hydrocarbon formation. When methanol and/or dimethyl ether are products formed separately, equilibrium restrictions occur. Thermodynamic relaxation also enables the use of lower operating pressures than what would be allowed for methanol synthesis alone. Aromatic-rich hydrocarbon liquid (C5+), containing a significant amount of methylated benzenes, was produced under these conditions. However, selectivity control to liquid hydrocarbons was difficult to achieve. Carbon dioxide and methane formation was problematic. Furthermore, saturation of the olefinic intermediates formed in the zeolite, and necessary for gasoline production, occurred over PdZnAl. Thus, yield to desirable hydrocarbon liquid product was limited. Evaluation of other oxygenate-producing catalysts could possibly lead to future advances. Potential exists with discovery of other types of catalysts that suppress carbon dioxide and light hydrocarbon formation. Comparative techno-economics for a single-step syngas-to-distillates process and a more conventional MTG-type process were investigated. Results suggest operating and capital cost savings could only modestly be achieved, given future improvements to catalyst performance. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increased single-pass yield to hydrocarbon liquid is a primary need for this process to achieve cost competiveness.

  6. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: DOE Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alignment, Construction, and Operation of a Rail Line to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV

  7. EIS-0250-S2 and EIS-0369: Amended Notice of Intent To Expand the Scope of the Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alignment, Construction, and Operation of a Rail Line to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

  8. Materials Data on CrH8C4(S2N3)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on CdH8C4(S2N3)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Cs2Ti(AgS2)2 (SG:132) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on MgH8C2S2(NO2)2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. 1s-2p Excitation of Atomic Hydrogen by Electron Impact Studied Using the Angular Correlation Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yalim, H.A.; Cvejanovic, D.; Crowe, A.

    1997-10-01

    Excitation of the 2p state of atomic hydrogen by electron impact was studied using the electron-photon angular correlation technique with the aim of resolving a long-standing and serious discrepancy between theories and previous experiments at large scattering angles. At a scattering angle of 100{degree}, where the discrepancy was greatest, the present result shows excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted correlations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. EIS-0005-S2: Bonneville Power Administration Proposed FY 1979 Program Facility Planning Supplement Southwest Oregon Area Service, Supplemental

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statement, one of a series prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration on various facets of its construction and maintenance activities, addresses the potential impact of a major new facility proposed for fiscal year 1979. To allow power generated in Wyoming to be delivered to Southwest Oregon and to facilitate the exchange of electric power between the Pacific Northwest and the Middle Snake region, two basic plans of service, each with two corridor routing options, have been identified to meet system requirements. BPA proposes construction of the following two transmission facilities: (1) a 500-kV line from Idaho Power Company's Brownlee Substation in Idaho to BPA's Slatt Substation near Arlington, Oregon, and (2) a 500-kV line from Buckley (near Maupin, Oregon) to Malin, Oregon. This statement must be reviewed and used in conjunction with the overall programmatic environmental statement entitled ""The Role of the Bonneville Power Administration in the Pacific Northwest Power Supply System, Including Its Participation in the Hydro-Thermal Power Program: A Program Environmental Statement and Planning Report (The ""Role EIS""), particularly Appendix B - BPA Power Transmission.

  14. Materials Data on MgH8C2S2(NO2)2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. EIS-0158-S2: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement, the supplement to DOE/EIS-0158, to analyze the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the sale of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in Kern County, California to Occidental Petroleum Corporation.

  16. Exascale design space exploration and co-design - 1-s2.0-S0167739X13000782-main.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    u t u r e G e n e r a t i o n C o m p u t e r S y s t e m s 3 0 ( 2 0 1 4 ) 4 6 - 5 8 C o n t e n t s l i s t s a v a i l a b l e a t S c i e n c e D i r e c t F u t u r e G e n e r a t i o n C o m p u t e r S y s t e m s j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / f g c s E x a s c a l e d e s i g n s p a c e e x p l o r a t i o n a n d c o - d e s i g n S . S . D o s a n j h a , R . F . B a r r e t t b , , D . W . D o e r f l e r b , S . D . H a m m o n d b

  17. Boron uptake in tumors, cerebrum and blood from [10B]NA4B24H22S2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, Daniel N.; Micca, Peggy L.; Fairchild, Ralph G.

    1988-08-02

    A stable boronated (.sup.10 B-labeled) compound, sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate is infused in the form of the disulfide dimer, [.sup.10 B]Na.sub.4 B.sub.24 H.sub.22 S.sub.2, at a dose of about 200 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight. The infusion is performed into the blood or peritoneal cavity of the patient slowly over a period of many days, perhaps one week or more, at the rate of roughly 1 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight per hour. Use of this particular boronated dimer in the manner or similarly to the manner so described permits radiotherapeutically effective amounts of boron to accumulate in tumors to be treated by boron neutron capture radiation therapy and also permits sufficient retention of boron in tumor after the cessation of the slow infusion, so as to allow the blood concentration of .sup.10 B to drop or to be reduced artificially to a radiotherapeutically effective level, less than one-half of the concentration of .sup.10 B in the tumor.

  18. Boron uptake in tumors, cerebrum and blood from [10B]NA4B24H22S2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, Daniel N.; Micca, Peggy L.; Fairchild, Ralph G.

    1988-01-01

    A stable boronated (.sup.10 B-labeled) compound, sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate is infused in the form of the disulfide dimer, [.sup.10 B]Na.sub.4 B.sub.24 H.sub.22 S.sub.2, at a dose of about 200 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight. The infusion is performed into the blood or peritoneal cavity of the patient slowly over a period of many days, perhaps one week or more, at the rate of roughly 1 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight per hour. Use of this particular boronated dimer in the manner or similarly to the manner so described permits radiotherapeutically effective amounts of boron to accumulate in tumors to be treated by boron neutron capture radiation therapy and also permits sufficient retention of boron in tumor after the cessation of the slow infusion, so as to allow the blood concentration of .sup.10 B to drop or to be reduced artificially to a radiotherapeutically effective level, less than one-half of the concentration of .sup.10 B in the tumor.

  19. EIS-0236-S2: Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on Stockpile Stewardship and Management for a Modern Pit Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's NNSA is responsible for the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, including production readiness required to maintain that stockpile. Pursuant to National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, NNSA has prepared a Supplement to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on: (1) whether to proceed with a Modern Pit Facility (MPF); and (2) if so, where to locate a MPF.

  20. EIS-0250-S1 and EIS-0250-S2: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV and Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada--Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor

  1. Characterization of the Li(Si)/CoS(2) couple for a high-voltage, high-power thermal battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.

    2000-02-01

    In order to determined the capabilities of a thermal battery with high-voltage and high-power requirements, a detailed characterization of the candidate LiSi/LiCl-LiBr-LiF/CoS{sub 2} electrochemical couple was conducted. The rate capability of this system was investigated using 0.75 inch-dia. and 1.25 inch-dia. single and multiple cells under isothermal conditions, where the cells were regularly pulsed at increasingly higher currents. Limitations of the electronic loads and power supplies necessitated using batteries to obtain the desired maximum current densities possible for this system. Both 1.25 inch-dia. and 3 inch-dia. stacks were used with the number of cells ranging from 5 to 20. Initial tests involved 1.25 inch-dia. cells, where current densities in excess of 15 A/cm{sup 2} (>200 W/cm{sup 2}) were attained with 20-cell batteries during 1-s pulses. In subsequent follow-up tests with 3 inch-dia., 10-cell batteries, ten 400-A 1-s pulses were delivered over an operating period often minutes. These tests formed the foundation for subsequent full-sized battery tests with 125 cells with this chemistry.

  2. Materials Data on Sr3Sc2Cu2S2O5 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Gas-filled hohlraum experiments at the national ignition facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernndez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Goldman, S. R.; Grimm, B. M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Lanier, N. E.; Rose, H. A.; Schmidt, D. M.; Swift, D. C.; Workman, J. B.; Alvarez, Sharon; Bower, Dan.; Braun, Dave.; Campbell, K.; DeWald, E.; Glenzer, S.; Holder, J.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Kimbrough, Joe; Kirkwood, Robert; Landen, O. L.; Mccarville, Tom; Macgowan, B.; Mackinnon, A.; Niemann, C.; Schein, J.; Schneider, M; Watts, Phil; Young, Ben-li 194154; Young B.

    2004-01-01

    The summary of this paper is: (1) We have fielded on NIF a gas-filled hohlraum designed for future ignition experiments; (2) Wall-motion measurements are consistent with LASNEX simulations; (3) LPI back-scattering results have confounded expectations - (a) Stimulated Brillouin (SBS) dominates Raman (SRS) for any gas-fill species, (b) Measured SBS time-averaged reflectivity values are high, peak values are even higher, (c) SRS and SBS peak while laser-pulse is rising; and (4) Plasma conditions at the onset of high back-scattering yield high SBS convective linear gain - Wavelengths of the back-scattered light is predicted by linear theory.

  4. Technical Review of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... line (including Wall Penetration) and SBS Down-Comer can ... Nuclear Air Cleaning Handbook, resulting in excessive ... that called for the heat barrier to cover the entire top ...

  5. ABSTRACT

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Witterseh T. 2001. Environmental perception, SBS symptoms and performance of office work under combined exposure to temperature, noise and air pollution. PhD Thesis. International ...

  6. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optional unit may be installed in hutch upon advance request. Sample format SBS compliant crystallization trays oriented 90 degrees to gravity. Trays that limit the...

  7. Microsoft Word - M-2 WTP Contract Section C - Conformed Thru...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The primary offgas treatment system consists of a submerged bed scrubber (SBS), a wet ... After cooling, if necessary, the container shall be filled with suitable inert dry filler ...

  8. Pajarito Aerosol Couplings to Ecosystems (PACE) Field Campaign...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PACE's primary goal was to demonstrate routine Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) field operations and improve instrumental and operational performance. LANL operated the ...

  9. ARM - Instrument - csphot

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    maintenance during periods of adverse weather conditions. ... For more details, see the External Data Center web page. ... Data Shouxian, Anhui, China retired MAO M1 Browse Data ...

  10. ARM - Datastreams - met

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... field: PWS instantaneous present weather code unitless qcpwspwcodeinst ... Data Browse Plots Shouxian, Anhui, China retired MAO M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Manacapuru, Amazonas, ...

  11. ARM - Instrument - mwrp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The data are useful for input to numerical weather forecast models and others that require continuous, high ... Browse Plots Shouxian, Anhui, China retired MAO M1 Browse Data ...

  12. Atmospheric Research - Manaus Plume: GoAmazon T3 Ground Site...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Sponsoring Org: DOELANL Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Environmental Sciences(54) ARM MAOS ...

  13. Rhapsody: II. Subhalo Properties and the Impact of Tidal Stripping...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SLAC Michigan U. ; Hahn, Oliver ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC ETH, Zurich ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; Behroozi, Peter S. ; Mao, Yao-Yuan ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC Publication Date:...

  14. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the ARM Facility's Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) located southwest of Manaus, Brazil, at the T-3 site in Manacapuru where a Cimel Sunphotometer measures the optical...

  15. Effects of the Fe[superscript 3+] spin transition on the equation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Mao, Zhu ; Lin, Jung-Fu ; Yang, Jing ; Inoue, Toru ; Prakapenka, Vitali B. 1 ; UC) 2 ; CHPSTAR- China) 2 ; Ehime U) 2 + Show Author Affiliations (Texas) ( ...

  16. Structure of the oxygen-annealed chalcogenide superconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    x Authors: Hu, Hefei ; Zuo, Jian-Min ; Zheng, Mao ; Eckstein, James N. ; Park, Wan Kyu ; Greene, Laura H. ; Wen, Jinsheng ; Xu, Zhijun ; Lin, Zhiwei ; Li, Qiang ; Gu,...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The study was a collaborative effort involving scientists from DOE national laboratories, NOAA, NASA, and universities. The AAF and MAOS were deployed for two approximately ...

  18. The Dependence of Subhalo Abundance on Halo Concentration (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Dependence of Subhalo Abundance on Halo Concentration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Dependence of Subhalo Abundance on Halo Concentration Authors: Mao,...

  19. Measurement of the underlying event activity using charged-particle jets in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 2.76 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-09-21

    A measurement of the underlying event (UE) activity in proton-proton collisions is performed using events with charged-particle jets produced in the central pseudorapidity region (|η jet| < 2) and with transverse momentum 1 ≤ pT jet < 100 GeV. The analysis uses a data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The UE activity is measured as a function of pT jet in terms of the average multiplicity and scalar sum of transverse momenta (pT) of charged particles, with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV, in the azimuthal regionmore » transverse to the highest pT jet direction. By further dividing the transverse region into two regions of smaller and larger activity, various components of the UE activity are separated. As a result, the measurements are compared to previous results at 0.9 and 7 TeV, and to predictions of several Monte Carlo event generators, providing constraints on the modelling of the UE dynamics« less

  20. Incorporation of zinc into calcium silicate hydrates, Part I: formation of C-S-H(I) with C/S=2/3 and its isochemical counterpart gyrolite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stumm, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.stumm@itc-wgt.fzk.de; Garbev, Krassimir; Beuchle, Guenter; Black, Leon; Stemmermann, Peter; Nueesch, Rolf

    2005-09-01

    We have investigated the incorporation of zinc into both nanocrystalline and crystalline calcium silicate hydrates with starting C/S ratios of 2/3 (0.66). Zinc was added replacing calcium in the starting mixtures [Zn/(Zn+Ca)=0-1/4; 0-10 wt.% Zn], and the resultant phases were characterised using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), differential thermal analysis-thermogravimetry (DTA-TG) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). In both groups of samples, increasing zinc content led to gradual structural changes, until eventually a second phase was formed. Zinc was incorporated to similar limits in both sets of samples. The thermal stability of the structures increased to a certain zinc content, beyond which there was structural destabilisation. Zinc incorporation is possible up to {approx}6 wt.%. Our observations strongly indicate similar zinc incorporation mechanisms in both sample series, namely incorporation of zinc into the interlayer of C-S-H(I) and the X-sheet of gyrolite for nanocrystalline and crystalline samples, respectively.

  1. Amended Record of Decision for the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives (DOE/EIS-0082-S2) (1/24/06)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 15 / Tuesday, January 24, 2006 / Notices (f) Quality of Evaluation Plan (Total 15 Points). (g) Budget (Total 8 Points). 2. Review and Selection Process: Tiebreaker for Development Grants. In tie-breaking situations for development grants described in 34 CFR 606.23(b), the HSI Program regulations require that we award one additional point to an application from an IHE that has an endowment fund for which the market value per FTE student is less than the

  2. Measurement of the underlying event activity using charged-particle jets in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-09-21

    A measurement of the underlying event (UE) activity in proton-proton collisions is performed using events with charged-particle jets produced in the central pseudorapidity region (|η jet| < 2) and with transverse momentum 1 ≤ pT jet < 100 GeV. The analysis uses a data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The UE activity is measured as a function of pT jet in terms of the average multiplicity and scalar sum of transverse momenta (pT) of charged particles, with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV, in the azimuthal region transverse to the highest pT jet direction. By further dividing the transverse region into two regions of smaller and larger activity, various components of the UE activity are separated. As a result, the measurements are compared to previous results at 0.9 and 7 TeV, and to predictions of several Monte Carlo event generators, providing constraints on the modelling of the UE dynamics

  3. Specific heat investigation for line nodes in heavily overdoped B a 1 - x K x F e 2 A s 2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, J. S.; Stewart, G. R.; Liu, Yong; Lograsso, Thomas A.

    2015-06-10

    Previous research has found that the pairing symmetry in the iron-based superconductor Ba1-xKxFe2As2 changes from nodeless s wave near optimally doped, x≈0.4-0.55 and Tc>30K, to nodal (either d wave or s wave) at the pure end point, x=1 and Tc<4K. Intense theoretical interest has been focused on this possibility of changing pairing symmetry, where in the transition region both order parameters would be present and time-reversal symmetry would be broken. Here we report specific heat measurements in zero and applied magnetic fields down to 0.4 K of three individual single crystals, free of low-temperature magnetic anomalies, of heavily overdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2,x=0.91,more » 0.88, and 0.81. The values for Tcmid are 5.6, 7.2, and 13 K and for Hc2≈4.5, 6, and 20 T, respectively. The data can be analyzed in a two-gap scenario, Δ2/Δ1≈4, with the magnetic field dependence of γ(=C/T as T→0) showing an anisotropic “S-shaped” behavior vs H, with the suppression of the lower gap by 1 T and γ≈H1/2 overall. Although such a nonlinear γ vs H is consistent with deep minima or nodes in the gap structure, it is not clear evidence for one, or both, of the gaps being nodal in these overdoped samples. Thus, following the established theoretical analysis of the specific heat of d-wave cuprate superconductors containing line nodes, we present the specific heat normalized by H1/2 plotted vs T/H1/2 of these heavily overdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2 samples which—thanks to the absence of magnetic impurities in our sample—convincingly shows the expected scaling for line node behavior for the larger gap for all three compositions. There is, however, no clear observation of the nodal behavior C∝αT2 in zero field at low temperatures, with α≤2mJ/molK3 being consistent with the data. This, together with the scaling, leaves open the possibility of extreme anisotropy in a nodeless larger gap, Δ2, such that the scaling works for fields above 0.25–0.5 T (0.2–0.4 K in temperature units), where this is an estimate for the size of the deep minima in the Δ2~20-25K gap. Therefore, the location of the change from nodeless to nodal gaps between optimally doped and heavily overdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2 based on the present work may be closer to the KFe2As2 end point than x=0.91.« less

  4. Characterization of the LiSi/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/FeS(2) System for Potential Use as a Geothermal Borehole Power Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GUIDOTTI, RONALD A.; REINHARDT, FREDERICK W.

    1999-10-18

    We are continuing to study the suitability of modified thermal-battery technology as a potential power source for geothermal borehole applications. Previous work focused on the LiSi/FeS{sub 2} couple over a temperature range of 350 C to 400 C with the LiBr-KBr-LiF eutectic, which melts at 324.5 C. In this work, the discharge processes that take place in LiSi/CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic/FeS{sub 2} thermal cells were studied at temperatures between 250 C and 400 C using pelletized cells with immobilized electrolyte. The CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic was selected because of its lower melting point (228.5 C). Incorporation of a quasi-reference electrode allowed the determination of the relative contribution of each electrode to the overall cell polarization. The results of single-cell tests and limited battery tests are presented, along with preliminary data for battery stacks tested in a simulated geothermal borehole environment.

  5. Influence of pump wavelength and core size on stimulated Brillouin scattering spectra of acoustically antiguiding optical fibres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Likhachev, M E; Alekseev, V V; Bubnov, M M [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Yashkov, M V; Vechkanov, N N; Gur'yanov, A N [G.G.Devyatykh Institute of Chemistry of High-Purity Substances, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation); Peyhambarian, N; Temyanko, V; Nagel, J [College of Optical Sciences University of Arizona, 1630 E. University Blvd.Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-11-30

    Optical fibres having an acoustically antiguiding structure produced by alumina doping of their core have been fabricated and investigated. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) spectra of the fibres have been measured and calculated theoretically. The results demonstrate that the shape of the SBS spectrum of the acoustically antiguiding fibres strongly depends on the pump wavelength, core size and dopant profile across the fibre. A considerable broadening of the SBS gain spectrum is only possible at certain guidance parameters of the fibre and a fixed operating wavelength. (fibre and integrated-optical structures)

  6. Long-pulse-width narrow-bandwidth solid state laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd A.

    1997-01-01

    A long pulse laser system emits 500-1000 ns quasi-rectangular pulses at 527 nm with near diffraction-limited divergence and near transform-limited bandwidth. The system consists of one or more flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass zig-zag amplifiers, a very low threshold stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phase conjugator system, and a free-running single frequency Nd:YLF master oscillator. Completely passive polarization switching provides eight amplifier gain passes. Multiple frequency output can be generated by using SBS cells having different pressures of a gaseous SBS medium or different SBS materials. This long pulse, low divergence, narrow-bandwidth, multi-frequency output laser system is ideally suited for use as an illuminator for long range speckle imaging applications. Because of its high average power and high beam quality, this system has application in any process which would benefit from a long pulse format, including material processing and medical applications.

  7. ARM - Datastreams - tsiskyimage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA retired SBS M1 Browse Data Steamboat Springs CO, Valley Site; AMF2 retired TMP M1...

  8. ARM - Datastreams - skyrad20s

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retired PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA retired SBS M1 Browse Data Steamboat Springs CO, Valley Site; AMF2 retired...

  9. ARM - Instrument - mpl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Browse Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA retired SBS S1 Browse Data Steamboat Springs CO, Thunderhead Lodge TMP M1 Browse...

  10. ARM - Instrument - gndrad

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA retired SBS M1 Browse Data Steamboat Springs CO, Valley Site; AMF2 retired TMP M1...

  11. ARM - Instrument - sonde

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA retired SBS M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Steamboat Springs CO, Valley Site; AMF2...

  12. ARM - Datastreams - sondewnpn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plots Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF1 retired PYE M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Point Reyes, CA retired SBS M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Steamboat Springs CO, Valley Site; AMF2...

  13. Long-pulse-width narrow-bandwidth solid state laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.

    1997-11-18

    A long pulse laser system emits 500-1000 ns quasi-rectangular pulses at 527 nm with near diffraction-limited divergence and near transform-limited bandwidth. The system consists of one or more flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass zig-zag amplifiers, a very low threshold stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phase conjugator system, and a free-running single frequency Nd:YLF master oscillator. Completely passive polarization switching provides eight amplifier gain passes. Multiple frequency output can be generated by using SBS cells having different pressures of a gaseous SBS medium or different SBS materials. This long pulse, low divergence, narrow-bandwidth, multi-frequency output laser system is ideally suited for use as an illuminator for long range speckle imaging applications. Because of its high average power and high beam quality, this system has application in any process which would benefit from a long pulse format, including material processing and medical applications. 5 figs.

  14. Modified magnetism within the coherence volume of superconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Leiner J. ; Thampy V. ; Christianson, A. D. ; Abernathy, D. L. ; Stone, M. B. ; Lumsden, M. D. ; Sefat, A. S. ; Sales, B. C. ; Hu, Jin ; Mao, Zhiqiang ; Bao, Wei ; ...

  15. Effects of pressure and distortion on superconductivity in Tl...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2CaCusubscript 2Osubscript 8+delta Authors: Zhang, Jian-Bo ; Struzhkin, Viktor V ; Yang, Wenge ; Mao, Ho-Kwang ; Lin, Hai-Qing ; Ma, Yong-Chang ; Wang, Nan-Lin ; Chen,...

  16. ARM - AMF2 Baseline Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 MAOS Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images ... 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, ... rain gauges and present weather detectors are available to ...

  17. ARM - AMF2 Management and Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 MAOS Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images ... 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, ... on Vessel position and weather is located here. ...

  18. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mao-Hua Full Text Available November 2014, American Physical Society Connecting Thermoelectric Performance and Topological-Insulator Behavior: Bi 2 Te 3 and Bi 2 Te 2 Se from...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Filter by Author Zhang, Rui (39) Smith, Richard D. (7) Zhang Rui (7) Chen, Xiao-Jia (5) Lin, Hai-Qing (5) Zhang, Rui-Qin (5) Mao, Ho-kwang (4) Moore, Ronald J. (4) Olvera de la ...

  20. SSRL Seminar Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hiring Filamentous Bacteriophage for Targeted Cancer Treatment SSRL Seminar Tuesday, August 24, 2010 11:00 - 12:30 SSRL Conference room -137-322 Chuanbin Mao Department of...

  1. Forum Agenda: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 - 29, 2010 in Beijing, China. ... Mao Tsinghua University and Chair of the China Association for Hydrogen Energy 8:35 ...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mao, Wendy L. (2) Meng, Yue (2) Zhang, Jian-Bo (2) Abney, Carter W. (1) Barisic, Neven (1) ... Simulant Piechowicz, Marek ; Abney, Carter W. ; Zhou, Xin ; Thacker, Nathan C. ; Li, ...

  3. ARM - Instrument - sodar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KS (ABLE) retired SGP A2 Browse Data Beaumont, KS (ABLE) retired SGP A5 Browse Data Oxford, KS (ABLE) retired ARM Mobile Facility MAO S1 Browse Data Manacapuru, Amazonas,...

  4. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Yao, Meng-Yu (1) Yao, Yugui (1) Yoon, Mina (1) Zhang, Lijun (1) Save Results Excel (limit ... Dongwen ; Ming, Wenmei ; Shi, Hongliang ; Zhang, Lijun ; Du, Mao-Hua Full Text Available ...

  5. In Focus: Dented Diamonds, Carbon Cages, and Exceptional Potential...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    This work, featured in the Office of Science's In Focus, was supported by the Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments (EFree) center, an EFRC led by Ho-kwang Mao at the ...

  6. First-principles investigation on mechanical, electronic, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Mao, Pingli, E-mail: pinglimao@yahoo.com ; Yu, Bo ; Liu, Zheng ; Wang, Feng ; Ju, Yang 1 + Show Author Affiliations School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang ...

  7. Experimental observation of incoherent-coherent crossover and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Liu, Z. K. ; Yi, M. ; Zhang, Y. ; Hu, J. ; Yu, R. ; Zhu, J.-X. ; He, R.-H. ; Chen, Y. L. ; Hashimoto, M. ; Moore, R. G. ; Mo, S.-K. ; Hussain, Z. ; Si, Q. ; Mao, Z. Q. ; ...

  8. Structure of the oxygen-annealed chalcogenide superconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fe1.08Te0.55Se0.45Ox Authors: Hu, Hefei ; Zuo, Jian-Min ; Zheng, Mao ; Eckstein, James N. ; Park, Wan Kyu ; Greene, Laura H. ; Wen, Jinsheng ; Xu, Zhijun ; Lin, Zhiwei ; Li,...

  9. Vibrational and structural properties of tetramethyltin under...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    properties of tetramethyltin under pressure Authors: Qin, Zhen-Xing ; Chen, Xiao-Jia ; Zhang, Chao ; Tang, Ling-Yun ; Zhong, Guo-Hua ; Lin, Hai-Qing ; Meng, Yue ; Mao,...

  10. Superhard Monoclinic Polymorph of Carbon (Journal Article) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    graphite above 13.4 GPa. The simulated x-ray diffraction pattern and near K-edge spectroscopy are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data W.L. Mao et al., Science...

  11. ARM - Instrument - mfr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central Facility, Lamont, OK ARM Mobile Facility AWR M1 Browse Data McMurdo Station Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica; AMF2 MAO M1 Browse Data Browse Plots Manacapuru, Amazonas,...

  12. The Eating Habits of Milky Way Mass Halos: Destroyed Dwarf Satellites...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Deason, Alis J. ; Mao, Yao-Yuan ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC Publication Date: 2016-02-02 OSTI Identifier: 1237023 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-16470 ...

  13. Rhapsody: II. Subhalo Properties and the Impact of Tidal Stripping...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Wu, Hao-Yi ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC Michigan U. ; Hahn, Oliver ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC ETH, Zurich ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; Behroozi, Peter S. ; Mao, Yao-Yuan ; ...

  14. Rhapsody: I. Structural Properties and Formation History from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Wu, Hao-Yi ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC Michigan U. ; Hahn, Oliver ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; Mao, Yao-Yuan ; Behroozi, Peter S. ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC Publication Date: ...

  15. Rami Hourani | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 15296-15299 (2011). 10.1021ja2063082 Xu, Ting; Zhao, Nana; Ren, Feng; Hourani, Rami; Lee, Ming Tsang; Shu, Jessica Y; Mao, Samuel; and Helms,...

  16. Brett Helms | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 15296-15299 (2011). 10.1021ja2063082 Xu, Ting; Zhao, Nana; Ren, Feng; Hourani, Rami; Lee, Ming Tsang; Shu, Jessica Y; Mao, Samuel; and Helms,...

  17. Ting Xu | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 15296-15299 (2011). 10.1021ja2063082 Xu, Ting; Zhao, Nana; Ren, Feng; Hourani, Rami; Lee, Ming Tsang; Shu, Jessica Y; Mao, Samuel; and Helms,...

  18. Subnanometer Porous Thin Films by the Co-assembly of Nanotube...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Co-assembly of Nanotube Subunits and Block Copolymers Previous Next List Ting Xu, Nana Zhao, Feng Ren, Rami Hourani, Ming Tsang Lee, Jessica Y. Shu, Samuel Mao, and Brett A....

  19. Section 68

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARMpost97 285 Longwave Radiative Forcing in Global Climate Models (a) F. Baer, J. Mao, C. Wang and R. G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park,...

  20. A unifying phase diagram with correlation-drivensuperconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Niu, X. H. ; Chen, S. D. ; Jiang, J. ; Ye, Z. R. ; Yu, T. L. ; Xu, D. F. ; Xu, M. ; Feng, Y. ; Yan, Y. J. ; Xie, B. P. ; Zhao, J. ; Gu, D. C. ; Sun, L. L. ; Mao, Qianhui ; ...

  1. Azure B, a metabolite of methylene blue, is a high-potency, reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petzer, Anél; Harvey, Brian H.; Wegener, Gregers; Petzer, Jacobus P.

    2012-02-01

    Methylene blue (MB) has been shown to act at multiple cellular and molecular targets and as a result possesses diverse medical applications. Among these is a high potency reversible inhibition of monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) that may, at least in part, underlie its adverse effects but also its psycho- and neuromodulatory actions. MB is metabolized to yield N-demethylated products of which azure B, the monodemethyl species, is the major metabolite. Similar to MB, azure B also displays a variety of biological activities and may therefore contribute to the pharmacological profile of MB. Based on these observations, the present study examines the interactions of azure B with recombinant human MAO-A and -B. The results show that azure B is a potent MAO-A inhibitor (IC{sub 50} = 11 nM), approximately 6-fold more potent than is MB (IC{sub 50} = 70 nM) under identical conditions. Measurements of the time-dependency of inhibition suggest that the interaction of azure B with MAO-A is reversible. Azure B also reversibly inhibits the MAO-B isozyme with an IC{sub 50} value of 968 nM. These results suggest that azure B may be a hitherto under recognized contributor to the pharmacology and toxicology of MB by blocking central and peripheral MAO-A activity and as such needs to be considered during its use in humans and animals. Highlights: ► Methylene blue (MB) is a known potent MAO-A inhibitor. ► Azure B, the major metabolite of MB, is more potent as a MAO-A inhibitor. ► Azure B may be a contributor to the CNS pharmacology and toxicology of MB.

  2. Phase conjugation research: Final report, June 1, 1986--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, W.P.; Rockwell, D.A.; Turley, R.S.; Wandzura, S.M.

    1989-02-01

    The work performed on this contract has resulted in a significant improvement in the understanding of the temporal behavior of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and in the modeling of this phenomenon. In particular, we have demonstrated that: SBS generally does not have a steady-state, and therefore, that steady-state modeling is not appropriate; amplitude, phase and fidelity fluctuations of the Stokes wave are correlated; a small amount of feedback produces a steady-state for SBS in a bulk medium, but does not for SBS in a fiber or long lightguides; and 3d SBS modeling is practical. The main body of the report begins with the mathematical description of the SBS process, including the important time dependence. The fluctuation-dissipation theorem is employed to derive the strength of the noise term that drives the process. The next section discusses the algorithms employed in the calculations, and is followed by a review of the results, first in one and then in two spatial dimensions. We conclude with suggestions for further research. 21 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Analysis of stimulated Raman backscatter and stimulated Brillouin backscatter in experiments performed on SG-III prototype facility with a spectral analysis code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Liang; Zhao, Yiqing; Hu, Xiaoyan; Zou, Shiyang; Yang, Dong; Wang, Feng; Peng, Xiaoshi; Li, Zhichao; Li, Sanwei; Xu, Tao; Wei, Huiyue; Liu, Zhanjun; Zheng, Chunyang

    2014-07-15

    Experiments about the observations of stimulated Raman backscatter (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) in Hohlraum were performed on Shenguang-III (SG-III) prototype facility for the first time in 2011. In this paper, relevant experimental results are analyzed for the first time with a one-dimension spectral analysis code, which is developed to study the coexistent process of SRS and SBS in Hohlraum plasma condition. Spectral features of the backscattered light are discussed with different plasma parameters. In the case of empty Hohlraum experiments, simulation results indicate that SBS, which grows fast at the energy deposition region near the Hohlraum wall, is the dominant instability process. The time resolved spectra of SRS and SBS are numerically obtained, which agree with the experimental observations. For the gas-filled Hohlraum experiments, simulation results show that SBS grows fastest in Au plasma and amplifies convectively in C{sub 5}H{sub 12} gas, whereas SRS mainly grows in the high density region of the C{sub 5}H{sub 12} gas. Gain spectra and the spectra of backscattered light are simulated along the ray path, which clearly show the location where the intensity of scattered light with a certain wavelength increases. This work is helpful to comprehend the observed spectral features of SRS and SBS. The experiments and relevant analysis provide references for the ignition target design in future.

  4. Reye's syndrome: salicylate and mitochondrial monoamine oxidase function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faraj, B.A.; Caplan, D.; Lolies, P.

    1986-03-01

    It has been suggested that aspirin is somehow linked with the onset of Reye's syndrome (RS). A general feature of Reye's syndrome is severe impairment of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) function. The main objective of this investigation was to study the effect of salicylate on platelet mitochondrial MAO activity in three groups: group A (healthy children, n = 21) and group C (healthy adults, n = 10). Platelet MAO was measured by radio-enzymatic technique with /sup 14/C-tyramine as a substrate. The results showed that salicyclate (10 mM) had a 20 to 60 percent inhibitory effect on platelet MAO function in only 1, 3 and 2 of the subjects in group A, B and C. Furthermore, there was an association between low enzyme activity and salicylate MAO inhibitory effect in these subjects. These preliminary findings suggest that salicylate may induce deterioration in mitochondrial function in susceptible individuals and that the assessment of salicylate MAO inhibitory effect may identify those who may be at risk to develop aspirin poisoning and Reye's syndrome.

  5. Event activity dependence of Y(nS) production in $$\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$$=5.02 TeV pPb and $$\\sqrt{s}$$=2.76 TeV pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-04-15

    The production of Y(1S), Y(2S), and Y(3S) is investigated in pPb and pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV and 2.76 TeV, respectively. The datasets correspond to integrated luminosities of about 31 nb–1 (pPb) and 5.4 pb–1 (pp), collected in 2013 by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Upsilons that decay into muons are reconstructed within the rapidity interval (yCM) < 1.93 in the nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass frame. Their production is studied as a function of two measures of event activity, namely the charged-particle multiplicity measured in the pseudorapidity interval |η| < 2.4, and the sum ofmore » transverse energy deposited at forward pseudorapidity, 4.0 < |η|< 5.2. The Y cross sections normalized by their event activity integrated values, Y(nS)/, are found to rise with both measures of the event activity in pp and pPb. In both collision systems, the ratios of the excited to the ground state cross sections, Y(nS)/Y(1S), are found to decrease with the charged-particle multiplicity, while as a function of the transverse energy the variation is less pronounced. Lastly, the event activity integrated double ratios, [Y(nS)/Y(1S)]pPb / [Y(nS)/Y(1S)]pp, are also measured and found to be 0.83 +/- 0.05 (stat.) +/- 0.05 (syst.) and 0.71 +/- 0.08 (stat.) +/- 0.09 (syst.) for Y(2S) and Y(3S), respectively.« less

  6. EIS-0250-S2: Supplemental EIS for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This SEIS is to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating a railroad for shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from an existing rail line in Nevada to a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The purpose of the evaluation is to assist the Department in deciding whether to construct and operate a railroad in Nevada, and if so, in which corridor and along which specific alignment within the selected corridor.

  7. Parameters influencing the aerosol capture performance of the Submerged-Bed Scrubber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruecker, C.M.; Scott, P.A.

    1987-04-01

    The Submerged-Bed Scrubber (SBS) is a novel air cleaning device that has been investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for scrubbing off gases from liquid-fed ceramic melters used to vitrify high-level waste (HLW). The concept for the SBS was originally conceived at Hanford for emergency venting of a reactor containment building. The SBS was adapted for use as a quenching scrubber at PNL because it can cool the hot melter off gas as well as remove over 90% of the airborne particles, thus meeting the minimum particulate decontamination factor (DF) of 10 required of a primary scrubber. The experiments in this study showed that the submicron aerosol DF for the SBS can exceed 100 under certain conditions. A conventional device, the ejector-venturi scrubber (EVS), has been previously used in this application. The EVS also adequately cools the hot gases from the melter while exhibiting aerosol removal DFs in the range of 5 to 30. In addition to achieving higher DFs than the EVS, however, the SBS has the advantage of being a passive system, better suited to the remote environment of an HLW processing system. The objective of this study was to characterize the performance of the SBS and to improve the aerosol capture efficiency by modifying the operating procedure or the design. A partial factorial experimental matrix was completed to determine the main effects of aerosol solubility, inlet off-gas temperature, inlet off-gas flow rate, steam-to-air ratio, bed diameter and packing diameter on the particulate removal efficiency of the SBS. Several additional experiments were conducted to measure the influence of the inlet aerosol concentration and scrubbing-water concentration on aerosol-removal performance. 33 refs., 17 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant U. S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposition Project - 13460

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanochko, Ronald M. [Washington River Protection Solutions, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, P.O. Box 850, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Corcoran, Connie [AEM Consulting, LLC, 1201 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [AEM Consulting, LLC, 1201 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix [1]. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility [2]. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling. This study [2] concluded that SBS direct disposal is a viable option to the WTP baseline. The results show: - Off-site transportation and disposal of the SBS condensate is achievable and cost effective. - Reduction of approximately 4,325 vitrified WTP Low Activity Waste canisters could be realized. - Positive WTP operational impacts; minimal WTP construction impacts are realized. - Reduction of mass flow from the LAW Facility to the Pretreatment Facility by 66%. - Improved Double Shell Tank (DST) space management is a benefit. (authors)

  9. Combined effect of relativistic and ponderomotive filamentation on coexisting stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyas, Ashish Singh, Ram Kishor; Sharma, R. P.

    2014-11-15

    This paper presents a model to study the interplay between the stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin scattering (SBS) along with the combined effect of relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities, at relativistic laser power. As the intense non-uniform laser beam propagates through the plasma, both the non-linearities are operative and modify the plasma refractive index in such a manner that one enhances the self-focusing (of the pump beam) caused by the other non-linearity. The interplay between the scattering processes (SRS and SBS) affects the pump filamentation process because of pump depletion and at the same time these scattering processes get modified due to this filamentation process. An impact of the filamentation process and coexistence of the scattering processes (SRS and SBS) on the back-reflectivity of scattered beams (SRS and SBS) has been explored and found that the back-reflectivity gets modified significantly. Results are also compared with the three wave interaction case (isolated SRS or SBS case)

  10. Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant U. S. Department Of Energy Office Of River Protection Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposition Project - Abstract # 13460

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanochko, Ronald M; Corcoran, Connie

    2012-11-15

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling.

  11. Guided wave opto-acoustic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarecki, Jr., Robert L.; Rakich, Peter Thomas; Camacho, Ryan; Shin, Heedeuk; Cox, Jonathan Albert; Qiu, Wenjun; Wang, Zheng

    2016-02-23

    The various technologies presented herein relate to various hybrid phononic-photonic waveguide structures that can exhibit nonlinear behavior associated with traveling-wave forward stimulated Brillouin scattering (forward-SBS). The various structures can simultaneously guide photons and phonons in a suspended membrane. By utilizing a suspended membrane, a substrate pathway can be eliminated for loss of phonons that suppresses SBS in conventional silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides. Consequently, forward-SBS nonlinear susceptibilities are achievable at about 3000 times greater than achievable with a conventional waveguide system. Owing to the strong phonon-photon coupling achievable with the various embodiments, potential application for the various embodiments presented herein cover a range of radiofrequency (RF) and photonic signal processing applications. Further, the various embodiments presented herein are applicable to applications operating over a wide bandwidth, e.g. 100 MHz to 50 GHz or more.

  12. Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations, VOCS, environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, M.G.; Erdmann, C.A.

    2002-10-01

    Using the 100 office-building Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study dataset, we performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the associations between indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} (dCO{sub 2}) concentrations and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (Lresp) Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Using principal components analysis we identified a number of possible sources of 73 measured volatile organic compounds in the office buildings, and assessed the impact of these VOCs on the probability of presenting the SBS symptoms. Additionally we included analysis adjusting for the risks for predisposition of having SBS symptoms associated with the allergic, asthmatic, and environmentally sensitive subpopulations within the office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependant associations (p<0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100-ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average significantly reduce the prevalence of several SBS symptoms, up to 80%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. VOC sources were observed to play an role in direct association with mucous membrane and lower respiratory irritation, and possibly to be indirectly involved in indoor chemical reactions with ozone that produce irritating compounds associated with SBS symptoms. O-xylene, possibly emitted from furniture coatings was associated with shortness of breath (OR at the maximum concentration = 8, p < 0.05). The environmental sensitivities of a large subset of the office building population add to the overall risk of SBS symptoms (ORs

  13. Intercalation of p-methycinnamic acid anion into Zn-Al layered double hydroxide to improve UV aging resistance of asphalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Chao; Dai, Jing; Yu, Jianying; Yin, Jian

    2015-02-15

    A UV absorber, p-methycinnamic acid (PMCA), was intercalated into Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) by calcination recovery. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the PMCA anions completely replaced the CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} anions in the interlayer galleries of Zn-Al-LDH containing PMCA anions (Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH). X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that the interlayer distance increased from 0.78 nm to 1.82 nm after the substitution of PMCA anions for CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} anions. The similar diffraction angles of the CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} anion-containing Zn-Al-LDH (Zn-Al-CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}-LDH) and the Zn-Al-CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}-LDH/styrene–butadiene–styrene (SBS) modified asphalt implied that the asphalt molecules do not enter into the LDH interlayer galleries to form separated-phase structures. The different diffraction angles of Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH and Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH/SBS modified asphalt indicated that the asphalt molecules penetrated into the LDH interlayer galleries to form an expanded-phase structure. UV-Vis absorbance analyses showed that Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH was better able to block UV light due to the synergistic effects of PMCA and Zn-Al-LDH. Conventional physical tests and atomic force microscopy images of the SBS modified asphalt, Zn-Al-CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}-LDH/SBS modified asphalt and Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH/SBS modified asphalt before and after UV aging indicated that Zn-Al-PMCA-LDH improved the UV aging resistance of SBS modified asphalts.

  14. Reduction of stimulated Brillouin backscattering with plasma beam smoothing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yahia, V.; Loisel, G.; Baccou, C.; Labaune, C.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Depierreux, S.; Goyon, C.; Teychenné, D.; Borisenko, N. G.; Orekhov, A.; Rienecker, T.; Rosmej, O.

    2015-04-15

    Plasma induced incoherence (PII) can strongly modify the growth rates of stimulated scattering instabilities. A special double-target design was used to quantify the effect of PII on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). Successive shots using all or part of these targets led to the characterization of temporal and spatial incoherence of a laser pulse after propagation through a foam plasma and to the quantification of the reduction of SBS from the second target. Numerical simulations were used to identify the main physical mechanisms in play.

  15. Microsoft Word - 08071744_DocProd.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shirley Basin South, Wyoming Disposal Site January 2009 LMS/SBS/S00808 This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August 2008, Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site January 2009 RIN 08071744 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map

  16. Microsoft Word - 08101885 DVP.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site April 2009 LMS/SBS/S01008 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-October 2009, Shirley Basin, Wyoming April 2009 RIN 08101885 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ............................................2 Data Assessment

  17. Stimulated scattering in laser driven fusion and high energy density physics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, L. Albright, B. J.; Rose, H. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Finnegan, S. M.; Bergen, B.; Bowers, K. J.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Milovich, J.

    2014-09-15

    In laser driven fusion and high energy density physics experiments, one often encounters a k?{sub D} range of 0.15?SBS), LDI, and re-scatter, together with three dimensional effects, are examined. Effects of collisions are found to include de-trapping as well as cross-speckle electron temperature variation from collisional heating, the latter of which reduces gain, introduces a positive frequency shift that counters the trapping-induced negative frequency shift, and affects SRS and SBS saturation. Bowing and breakup of ion-acoustic wavefronts saturate SBS and cause a dramatic, sharp decrease in SBS reflectivity. Mitigation of SRS and SBS in the strongly nonlinear trapping regime is discussed.

  18. An experimental investigation of stimulated Brillouin scattering in laser-produced plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, K.S.

    1993-02-11

    Despite the apparent simplicity of controlled fusion, there are many phenomena which have prevented its achievement. One phenomenon is laser-plasma instabilities. An investigation of one such instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), is reported here. SBS is a parametric process whereby an electromagnetic wave (the parent wave) decays into another electromagnetic wave and an ion acoustic wave (the daughter waves). SBS impedes controlled fusion since it can scatter much or all of the incident laser light, resulting in poor drive symmetry and inefficient laser-plasma coupling. It is widely believed that SBS becomes convectively unstable--that is, it grows as it traverses the plasma. Though it has yet to be definitively tested, convective theory is often invoked to explain experimental observations, even when one or more of the theory`s assumptions are violated. In contrast, the experiments reported here not only obeyed the assumptions of the theory, but were also conducted in plasmas with peak densities well below quarter-critical density. This prevented other competing or coexisting phenomena from occurring, thereby providing clearly interpretable results. These are the first SBS experiments that were designed to be both a clear test of linear convective theory and pertinent to controlled fusion research. A crucial part of this series of experiments was the development of a new instrument, the Multiple Angle Time Resolving Spectrometer (MATRS). MATRS has the unique capability of both spectrally and temporally resolving absolute levels of scattered light at many angles simultaneously, and is the first of its kind used in laser-plasma experiments. A detailed comparison of the theoretical predictions and the experimental observations is made.

  19. Noise sources and competition between stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering: A one-dimensional steady-state approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Tao; Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 ; Li, Zhichao; Zhao, Bin; Hu, Guang-yue; Zheng, Jian

    2013-09-15

    A 1D steady-state model is developed to deal with stimulated scattering processes. The volume and boundary noise sources for scattered light are discussed in detail. Our results indicate that the boundary noise sources may play a significant role in estimating the reflectivity of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). With the capability of our model to deal with broadband scattered light, we find that pump depletion could be the main reason to the anti-correlation between SBS and SRS versus electron density observed in experiments. A simple method is proposed to phenomenologically include the effect of nonlinear saturation mechanisms in our model and reasonable results are obtained.

  20. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Seminar Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Series Dr. Sergey Pershoguba Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (NORDITA) Postdoctoral Fellow Skyrmion-induced Bound States in a Superconductor Wednesday, January 20, 2016 11:00 - Noon IMS/MPA Conference Room, TA-3, Bldg 32, Rm 134 Abstract: We consider a superconductor proximity coupled to a two-dimensional ferromagnetic film with a skyrmion texture. We predict the skyrmion bound states (SBS) that are induced in the superconductor, similar to the well-known Yu- Shiba-Rusinov (YSR) states.

  1. Fermi monitoring of radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Stalin, C. S.; Ravikumar, C. D.

    2015-02-01

    We present detailed analysis of the γ-ray flux variability and spectral properties of the five radio-loud narrow line Seyfert 1 (RL-NLSy1) galaxies, detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, namely 1H 0323+342, SBS 0846+513, PMN J0948+0022, PKS 1502+036, and PKS 2004−447. The first three sources show significant flux variations, including the rapid variability of a few hours by 1H 0323+342. The average γ-ray spectrum of 1H 0323+342 and PMN J0948+0022 shows deviation from a simple power-law (PL) behavior, whereas the PL model gives a better fit for the other three sources. The spectra of 1H 0323+342, SBS 0846+513, and PMN J0948+0022, which are in low, flaring, and moderately active states, respectively, show significant curvature. Such curvature in the γ-ray spectrum of 1H 0323+342 and PMN J0948+0022 could be due to the emission region located inside the broad line region (BLR) where the primary mechanism of the γ-ray emission is inverse-Compton (IC) scattering of BLR photons occurring in the Klein–Nishina regime. The γ-ray emission of SBS 0846+513 is explained by IC scattering of dusty torus photons, which puts the emission region outside the BLR and thus under the Thomson regime. Therefore, the observed curvature of SBS 0846+513 could be intrinsic to the particle energy distribution. The presence of curvature in the γ-ray spectrum and flux variability amplitudes of some of the RL-NLSy1 galaxies suggests that these sources could be akin to low/moderate jet power flat spectrum radio quasars.

  2. Experimental Ion Exchange Column With SuperLig 639 And Simulant Formulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morse, Megan; Nash, C.

    2013-08-26

    SuperLig639 ion exchange resin was tested as a retrieval mechanism for pertechnetate, through decontamination of a perrhenate spiked 5M Simple Average Na{sup +} Mass Based Simulant. Testing included batch contacts and a three-column ion exchange campaign. A decontamination of perrhenate exceeding 99% from the liquid feed was demonstrated. Analysis of the first formulation of a SBS/WESP simulant found unexpectedly low concentrations of soluble aluminum. Follow-on work will complete the formulation.

  3. International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum - Presentations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum - Presentations International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum - Presentations These presentations were given at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum held September 27-29, 2010 in Beijing, China. September 27, 2010 Keynote: Status and Progress in Research, Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen-Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles in China Professor Z.Q. Mao Tsinghua University and Chair of

  4. Mobile Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govSitesMobile Facility AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 MAOS AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments McMurdo Station, Antarctica, 2015-2016 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, to San Francisco, California, 2015 Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010

  5. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FacilitiesInstruments AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 MAOS AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments McMurdo Station, Antarctica, 2015-2016 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, to San Francisco, California, 2015 Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa

  6. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FacilitiesInstruments AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 MAOS AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments McMurdo Station, Antarctica, 2015-2016 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, to San Francisco, California, 2015 Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa

  7. ARM - Surface Aerosol Observing System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 MAOS AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments McMurdo Station, Antarctica, 2015-2016 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, to San Francisco, California, 2015 Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs,

  8. Status and Progress in Research, Development and Demonstration of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen-Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles in China | Department of Energy Status and Progress in Research, Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen-Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles in China Status and Progress in Research, Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen-Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles in China These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 - 29, 2010, in Beijing, China. ihfpv_mao.pdf (5.22 MB) More Documents &

  9. Vehicle Evaluation of Downsized Dow ACM DPF | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation of Downsized Dow ACM DPF Vehicle Evaluation of Downsized Dow ACM DPF Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_mao.pdf (2.08 MB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Ceramic Filter For Diesel Emission Control Experimental Diesel Particulate Filter Capabilities at PNNL fundamental Modeling and Experimental Studies of Acicular Mullite Diesel

  10. Land-Use Change Data Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review 4.1.2.40 Land-Use Change Data Analysis 03/25/2015 Analysis & Sustainability Nagendra Singh (PI) Keith Kline, Rebecca Efroymson, Raju Vatsavai, Huina Mao, Erica Pham, Budhendra Bhaduri. Oak Ridge National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Presentation name Goal Statement Project Goal Design and develop scalable tools and assessment methods to establish scientific basis for

  11. Stimulated Brillouin scattering in solid aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chitanvis, S.M.

    1988-08-01

    We estimate the differential scattering cross-section due to SBS in a glass bead which is much larger than the wavelength of a high energy laser beam which irradiates it. We consider three possible scenarios: neither the incident nor the Stokes wavelength is on a Mie resonance; only the Stokes wavelength is on resonance; and the incident wavelength and the Stokes wavelength are on a Mie resonance. For the first two cases, we find that the SBS scattering cross-section is extremely small compared to the geometric/Mie cross-section. It follows as a corollary that SBS in a glass bead will be insufficient to shatter it in these two cases. In the last case, it is quite possible that due to the buildup of high fields on-resonance within the spherical bead, the bead might be shattered. The chance of such an event occurring in a polydisperse distribution of spherical beads is generally not expected to be very high. 3 figs.

  12. Laser parametric instability experiments of a 3ω, 15 kJ, 6-ns laser pulse in gas-filled hohlraums at the Ligne d'Intégration Laser facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rousseaux, C.; Huser, G.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.; Alozy, E.; Villette, B.; Wrobel, R.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.

    2015-02-15

    Experimental investigation of stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin (SBS) scattering have been obtained at the Ligne-d'Intégration-Laser facility (LIL, CEA-Cesta, France). The parametric instabilities (LPI) are driven by firing four laser beamlets (one quad) into millimeter size, gas-filled hohlraum targets. A quad delivers energy on target of 15 kJ at 3ω in a 6-ns shaped laser pulse. The quad is focused by means of 3ω gratings and is optically smoothed with a kinoform phase plate and with smoothing by spectral dispersion-like 2 GHz and/or 14 GHz laser bandwidth. Open- and closed-geometry hohlraums have been used, all being filled with 1-atm, neo-pentane (C{sub 5}H{sub 12}) gas. For SRS and SBS studies, the light backscattered into the focusing optics is analyzed with spectral and time resolutions. Near-backscattered light at 3ω and transmitted light at 3ω are also monitored in the open geometry case. Depending on the target geometry (plasma length and hydrodynamic evolution of the plasma), it is shown that, at maximum laser intensity about 9 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}, Raman reflectivity noticeably increases up to 30% in 4-mm long plasmas while SBS stays below 10%. Consequently, laser transmission through long plasmas drops to about 10% of incident energy. Adding 14 GHz bandwidth to the laser always reduces LPI reflectivities, although this reduction is not dramatic.

  13. FAA Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) operated by Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Hartman, Roger D.

    2010-09-01

    Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) objectives are: (1) Enhance aircraft safety and reliability; (2) Aid developing advanced aircraft designs and maintenance techniques; (3) Provide our customers with comprehensive, independent, and quantitative/qualitative evaluations of new and enhanced inspection, maintenance, and repair techniques; (4) Facilitate transferring effective technologies into the aviation industry; (5) Support FAA rulemaking process by providing guidance on content & necessary tools to meet requirements or recommendations of FARs, ADs, ACs, SBs, SSIDs, CPCP, and WFD; and (6) Coordinate with and respond to Airworthiness Assurance Working Group (AAWG) in support of FAA Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC).

  14. Broken Symmetry

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    - Physics, as we know it, attempts to interpret the diverse natural phenomena as particular manifestations of general laws. This vision of a world ruled by general testable laws is relatively recent in the history of mankind. Basically it was initiated by the Galilean inertial principle. The subsequent rapid development of large-scale physics is certainly tributary to the fact that gravitational and electromagnetic forces are long-range and hence can be perceived directly without the mediation of highly sophisticated technical devices. - The discovery of subatomic structures and of the concomitant weak and strong short-range forces raised the question of how to cope with short-range forces in relativistic quantum field theory. The Fermi theory of weak interactions, formulated in terms of point-like current-current interaction, was well-defined in lowest order perturbation theory and accounted for existing experimental data.However, it was inconsistent in higher orders because of uncontrollable divergent quantum fluctuations. In technical terms, in contradistinction to quantum electrodynamics, the Fermi theorywas not ?renormalizable?. This difficulty could not be solved by smoothing the point-like interaction by a massive, and therefore short-range, charged ?vector? particle exchange: theories with massive charged vector bosons were not renormalizable either. In the early nineteen sixties, there seemed to be insuperable obstacles to formulating a consistent theory with short-range forces mediated by massive vectors. - The breakthrough came from the notion of spontaneous symmetry breaking which arose in the study of phase transitions and was introduced in field theory by Nambu in 1960. - Ferromagnets illustrate the notion in phase transitions. Although no direction is dynamically preferred, the magnetization selects a global orientation. This is a spontaneous broken symmetry(SBS)of rotational invariance. Such continuous SBS imply the existence of ?massless? modes

  15. SU-E-T-581: On the Value of LET as a Radiation Quality Descriptor for RBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pater, P; Backstrom, G; Enger, S; Seuntjens, J; Naqa, I El; Villegas, F; Ahnesjo, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for protons and light ions, and the corresponding role of LET as a descriptor of radiation quality of hadron therapy. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) proton and light ion (He, Li, C) tracks with LET < 30 eV nm{sup -1} were generated in an event-by-event mode. They were overlaid on a cell nucleus model containing 6×10{sup 9} nucleotide base pairs using an isotropic irradiation procedure that provides electronic equilibrium. Strand breaks (sbs) were scored in the DNA sugar-phosphate groups and further sub-classified into single or double sbs (ssbs or dsbs). Distributions of ssbs and dsbs for 2 Gy fractions were calculated to estimate RBE for the induction of initial dsbs with reference to {sup 60}Co. Additionally, sbs were classified based on their complexity (i.e. the number of sbs in each cluster). Results: An increase in LET for light ions of the same atomic number or a decrease in atomic number for ions of the same LET resulted in a lower kinetic energy of emitted secondary electrons. The clustering of DNA damage was more pronounced as reflected by the increase in proton RBE from ∼ 1.75 to 4 for LET values of 7 to 28 eV nm{sup -1}. A significant RBE decrease between protons, He, Li and C ions of the same LET was also noticed as function of the atomic number. Significant differences in ssbs and dsbs complexities were also seen for particles with the same LET, potentially supporting a clustering-based radiation quality descriptor. Conclusion: The LET-RBE relationships were simulated for proton and light ions and exhibited expected trends, including different RBEs for particles with the same LET but different atomic numbers. A complexity based radiation quality descriptor may allow better differentiation of RBE between radiation fields of similar LET. We would like to acknowledge support from the Fonds de recherche du Quebec Sante (FRQS), from the

  16. Forecast of contracting and subcontracting opportunities. Fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    This forecast of prime and subcontracting opportunities with the U.S. Department of Energy and its MAO contractors and environmental restoration and waste management contractors, is the Department`s best estimate of small, small disadvantaged and women-owned small business procurement opportunities for fiscal year 1996. The information contained in the forecast is published in accordance with Public Law 100-656. It is not an invitation for bids, a request for proposals, or a commitment by DOE to purchase products or services. Each procurement opportunity is based on the best information available at the time of publication and may be revised or cancelled.

  17. Boundary Layer Structure:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boundary Layer Structure: a comparison between methods and sites Thiago Biscaro Suzane de Sá Jae-In Song Shaoyue "Emily" Qiu Mentors: Virendra Ghate and Ewan O'Connor July 24 2015 1 st ever ARM Summer Training Outline * IntroducQon * Methodology * Results - SGP - MAO - Comparison between the 2 sites * Conclusions INTRODUCTION Focus: esQmates of PBL height Boundary Layer: "The boUom layer of the troposphere that is in contact with the surface of the earth." (AMS, Glossary of

  18. A 1-Joule laser for a 16-fiber injection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honig, J

    2004-04-06

    A 1-J laser was designed to launch light down 16, multi-mode fibers (400-{micro}m-core dia.). A diffractive-optic splitter was designed in collaboration with Digital Optics Corporation (DOC), and was delivered by DOC. Using this splitter, the energy injected into each fiber varied <1%. The spatial profile out of each fiber was such that there were no ''hot spots,'' a flyer could successfully be launched and a PETN pellet could be initiated. Preliminary designs of the system were driven by system efficiency where a pristine TEM{sub 00} laser beam would be required. The laser is a master oscillator, power amplifier (MOPA) consisting of a 4-mm-dia. Nd:YLF rod in the stable, q-switched oscillator and a 9.5-mm-dia. Nd:YLF rod in the double-passed amplifier. Using a TEM{sub 00} oscillator beam resulted in excellent transmission efficiencies through the fibers at lower energies but proved to be quite unreliable at higher energies, causing premature fiber damage, flyer plate rupture, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). Upon further investigation, it was found that both temporal and spatial beam formatting of the laser were required to successfully initiate the PETN. Results from the single-mode experiments, including fiber damage, SRS and SBS losses, will be presented. In addition, results showing the improvement that can be obtained by proper laser beam formatting will also be presented.

  19. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowers, M.; Hankla, A.

    1996-07-09

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90{degree} such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system. 5 figs.

  20. Indoor carbon dioxide concentrations and sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study revisited: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdmann, Christine A.; Steiner, Kate C.; Apte, Michael G.

    2002-02-01

    In previously published analyses of the 41-building 1994-1996 USEPA Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) dataset, higher workday time-averaged indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} concentrations (dCO{sub 2}) were associated with increased prevalence of certain mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, even at peak dCO{sub 2} concentrations below 1,000 ppm. For this paper, similar analyses were performed using the larger 100-building 1994-1998 BASE dataset. Multivariate logistic regression analyses quantified the associations between dCO{sub 2} and the SBS symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Adjusted dCO{sub 2} prevalence odds ratios for sore throat and wheeze were 1.17 and 1.20 per 100-ppm increase in dCO{sub 2} (p <0.05), respectively. These new analyses generally support our prior findings. Regional differences in climate, building design, and operation may account for some of the differences observed in analyses of the two datasets.

  1. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowers, Mark; Hankla, Allen

    1996-01-01

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90.degree. such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system.

  2. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  3. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.

    1993-01-01

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  4. The development of laser-plasma interaction program LAP3D on thousands of processors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Xiaoyan Hao, Liang; Liu, Zhanjun; Zheng, Chunyang; Li, Bin Guo, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Modeling laser-plasma interaction (LPI) processes in real-size experiments scale is recognized as a challenging task. For explorering the influence of various instabilities in LPI processes, a three-dimensional laser and plasma code (LAP3D) has been developed, which includes filamentation, stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBS), stimulated Raman backscattering (SRS), non-local heat transport and plasmas flow computation modules. In this program, a second-order upwind scheme is applied to solve the plasma equations which are represented by an Euler fluid model. Operator splitting method is used for solving the equations of the light wave propagation, where the Fast Fourier translation (FFT) is applied to compute the diffraction operator and the coordinate translations is used to solve the acoustic wave equation. The coupled terms of the different physics processes are computed by the second-order interpolations algorithm. In order to simulate the LPI processes in massively parallel computers well, several parallel techniques are used, such as the coupled parallel algorithm of FFT and fluid numerical computation, the load balance algorithm, and the data transfer algorithm. Now the phenomena of filamentation, SBS and SRS have been studied in low-density plasma successfully with LAP3D. Scalability of the program is demonstrated with a parallel efficiency above 50% on about ten thousand of processors.

  5. Causes of Indoor Air Quality Problems in Schools: Summary of Scientific Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayer, C.W.

    2001-02-22

    In the modern urban setting, most individuals spend about 80% of their time indoors and are therefore exposed to the indoor environment to a much greater extent than to the outdoors (Lebowitz 1992). Concomitant with this increased habitation in urban buildings, there have been numerous reports of adverse health effects related to indoor air quality (IAQ) (sick buildings). Most of these buildings were built in the last two decades and were constructed to be energy-efficient. The quality of air in the indoor environment can be altered by a number of factors: release of volatile compounds from furnishings, floor and wall coverings, and other finishing materials or machinery; inadequate ventilation; poor temperature and humidity control; re-entrainment of outdoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs); and the contamination of the indoor environment by microbes (particularly fungi). Armstrong Laboratory (1992) found that the three most frequent causes of IAQ are (1) inadequate design and/or maintenance of the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, (2) a shortage of fresh air, and (3) lack of humidity control. A similar study by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH 1989) recognized inadequate ventilation as the most frequent source of IAQ problems in the work environment (52% of the time). Poor IAQ due to microbial contamination can be the result of the complex interactions of physical, chemical, and biological factors. Harmful fungal populations, once established in the HVAC system or occupied space of a modern building, may episodically produce or intensify what is known as sick building syndrome (SBS) (Cummings and Withers 1998). Indeed, SBS caused by fungi may be more enduring and recalcitrant to treatment than SBS from multiple chemical exposures (Andrae 1988). An understanding of the microbial ecology of the indoor environment is crucial to ultimately resolving many IAQ problems. The incidence of SBS related to multiple

  6. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and supported monolayer MoS2: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy Title: Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS2: Angle-resolved ...

  7. Form Approved

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    -----.- -"..::*::.,". ' " .-:.*- *- .- --* --.V- -.,---. :.-;-:;;5: F|g;- , . , J:;.-;:;. .::;:; ;; ;as 1970 '*:>'::S2i-:: ': r- ::' * * '* * * - * ' 06 f 1...

  8. Inhibition of star formation in Sa galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pompea, S.M.; Rieke, G.H. )

    1989-07-01

    Only 4 percent of Sas in the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog with B(T) less than 12 have an infrared luminosity greater than 10 to the 10th solar. This proportion is about one-sixth of the corresponding one for Sbs and Scs. Although the infrared luminosities of most Sa galaxies are dominated by disk emission, the same trend appears in the incidence of nuclear starbursts. IRAS measurements indicate that no more than three Sas out of the entire RSA sample of 166 galaxies have nuclear starbursts that cannot be associated with interactions or active nuclei. Plots of H I fluxes do not strongly correlate with infrared fluxes. Similarly, for at least the infrared selected Sas, the trend of IR flux with CO flux is similar to that of later type spiral galaxies. This would imply that molecular cloud formation is inhibited in Sas, leading to the lack of infrared activity. 38 refs.

  9. Phasing of Stokes radiation under shock excitation of stimulated Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordeev, A A; Efimkov, V F; Zubarev, I G; Mikhailov, S I

    2011-11-30

    Interaction of counterpropagating waves in Brillouin-active media has been analysed by numerical computation. The dynamics of the development of acoustic waves is described using a secondorder equation. It is shown that in the case of counterpropagating waves with sufficiently steep leading pulse edges ({tau}{sub f} {<=} 3T{sub 2}, where T{sub 2} is the acoustic phonon lifetime), SBS begins from the level of acoustic waves induced by shock excitation in the bulk of the active medium rather than from the spontaneous noise level. This mechanism determines the phase of the output Stokes wave, which is generated in the backward direction to the wave with the highest input intensity, irrespective of the ratio of counterpropagating-wave frequencies.

  10. Microwave modeling of laser plasma interactions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    For a large laser fusion targets and nanosecond pulse lengths, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and self-focusing are expected to be significant problems. The goal of the contractual effort was to examine certain aspects of these physical phenomena in a wavelength regime (lambda approx.5 cm) more amenable to detailed diagnostics than that characteristic of laser fusion (lambda approx.1 micron). The effort was to include the design, fabrication and operation of a suitable experimental apparatus. In addition, collaboration with Dr. Neville Luhmann and his associates at UCLA and with Dr. Curt Randall of LLNL, on analysis and modelling of the UCLA experiments was continued. Design and fabrication of the TRW experiment is described under ''Experiment Design'' and ''Experimental Apparatus''. The design goals for the key elements of the experimental apparatus were met, but final integration and operation of the experiment was not accomplished. Some theoretical considerations on the interaction between Stimulated Brillouin Scattering and Self-Focusing are also presented.

  11. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION /

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    / @ St& i900.955 L' E+t Pk. S. W., Washingron. D.C. 20024-2174. Tdephonr: (202) 4884400 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA CA,OLf Mr. Andrew'Wallo. III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site c r-05 Deconnnissioning Projects f-L .0-d U.S. Department of Energy lr\/.QL Germantown, Maryland ,20,54B ., iAl*Oz I., a,:,. :.. ,.. i. ,i < Dear Mr. Wallo: 1hJ *o-o1 flA.QS ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES MA.o-05 rl D.OF The attached elimination recommendation was prepared

  12. Hohlraum Energetics and Implosion Symmetry with Elliptical Phase Plates Using a Multi-Cone Beam Geometry on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Seka, W.; Epstein, R.; Loucks, S.J.; McCrory, R.L.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Jones, O.S.; Callahan, D.A.; Amendt, P.A.; Meezan, N.B.; Suter, L.J.; Rosen, M.D.; Landen, O.L.; DeWald, E.L.; Glenzer, S.H.; Sorce, C.; Dixit, S.; Turner, R.E.; MacGowan, B.J.

    2008-07-21

    Hohlraum energetics and implosion-symmetry experiments were conducted on the OMEGA Laser System using laser beams arranged in three cones and smoothed with elliptical phase plates. The peak radiation temperature (Tr) increased by 17 eV, with phase plates for gas-filled halfraums irradiated with 20 beams using a ~7-kJ shaped laser pulse (PS26), corresponding to a 44% increase in the peak x-ray flux. The improved coupling correlates with reduced, cone-dependent losses from stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). Phase plates reduce SRS and SBS by controlling the on-target laser-intensity envelope and the speckle modal power spectrum. An implosion symmetry scan was performed by varying the length and beam pointing of vacuum and gas-filled, thin-walled (3 um) Au hohlraums irradiated with 40 beams using a ~14-kJ PS26. Gated-x-ray (hv > 3 keV) images taken along radial and axial views of the self-emission from Ar-doped, D2-filled, plastic-shell implosions quantified the indirect-drive-implosion symmetry. A shift in symmetry was observed between vacuum and gas-filled hohlraums having identical beam pointing. The ratio of x-ray drive at the poles of the capsule relative to the waist increased for the gas-filled hohlraum. Levels of hard-x-ray production (hv > 20 keV) and SRS were reduced with trace amounts of high-Z dopants (i.e., Ne, Kr) in the hohlraum plasma, while the peak Tr increased ~5 eV.

  13. Unconventional Quantum Hall Effect and Tunable Spin Hall Effect...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to an Isolated MoS2 Trilayer Title: Unconventional Quantum Hall Effect and Tunable Spin Hall Effect in Dirac Materials: Application to an Isolated MoS2 Trilayer Authors: Li, ...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... and Development (NA-22) Office of River Protection (United States) Office of the Secretary ... Chemla, D.S. (2) Dahan, M. (2) Deniz, A.A. (2) Schultz, P.G. (2) Weiss, S. (2) ...

  15. crd title p1.ai | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOEEIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir EIS-0250-S2 and ...

  16. Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 2.3 Wave Period Range(s) 2.3 Current Velocity...

  17. A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for future theory development. Top: Absorption of a photon by an He- ion in the 1s2s2p 4Po ground state boosts a 1s electron into an empty 2p orbital, forming the triply excited...

  18. Development And Initial Testing Of Off-Gas Recycle Liquid From The WTP Low Activity Waste Vitrification Process - 14333

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Adamson, Duane J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Morse, Megan M.

    2014-01-07

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flow was designed to pre-treat feed from the Hanford tank farms, separate it into a High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fraction and vitrify each fraction in separate facilities. Vitrification of the waste generates an aqueous condensate stream from the off-gas processes. This stream originates from two off-gas treatment unit operations, the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrospray Precipitator (WESP). Currently, the baseline plan for disposition of the stream from the LAW melter is to recycle it to the Pretreatment facility where it gets evaporated and processed into the LAW melter again. If the Pretreatment facility is not available, the baseline disposition pathway is not viable. Additionally, some components in the stream are volatile at melter temperatures, thereby accumulating to high concentrations in the scrubbed stream. It would be highly beneficial to divert this stream to an alternate disposition path to alleviate the close-coupled operation of the LAW vitrification and Pretreatment facilities, and to improve long-term throughput and efficiency of the WTP system. In order to determine an alternate disposition path for the LAW SBS/WESP Recycle stream, a range of options are being studied. A simulant of the LAW Off-Gas Condensate was developed, based on the projected composition of this stream, and comparison with pilot-scale testing. The primary radionuclide that vaporizes and accumulates in the stream is Tc-99, but small amounts of several other radionuclides are also projected to be present in this stream. The processes being investigated for managing this stream includes evaporation and radionuclide removal via precipitation and adsorption. During evaporation, it is of interest to investigate the formation of insoluble solids to avoid scaling and plugging of equipment. Key parameters for radionuclide removal include identifying effective precipitation or ion

  19. Development of the scintillator-based probe for fast-ion losses in the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y. P. Liu, Yi; Yuan, G. L.; Song, X. Y.; Yang, J. W.; Li, X.; Chen, W.; Li, Y.; Yan, L. W.; Song, X. M.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Luo, X. B.; Liu, Y. Q.; Hua, Y.; Isobe, M.

    2014-05-15

    A new scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) has been developed and operated in the HL-2A tokamak [L. W. Yan, X. R. Duan, X. T. Ding, J. Q. Dong, Q. W. Yang, Yi Liu, X. L. Zou, D. Q. Liu, W. M. Xuan, L. Y. Chen, J. Rao, X. M. Song, Y. Huang, W. C. Mao, Q. M. Wang, Q. Li, Z. Cao, B. Li, J. Y. Cao, G. J. Lei, J. H. Zhang, X. D. Li, W. Chen, J. Chen, C. H. Cui, Z. Y. Cui, Z. C. Deng, Y. B. Dong, B. B. Feng, Q. D. Gao, X. Y. Han, W. Y. Hong, M. Huang, X. Q. Ji, Z. H. Kang, D. F. Kong, T. Lan, G. S. Li, H. J. Li, Qing Li, W. Li, Y. G. Li, A. D. Liu, Z. T. Liu, C. W. Luo, X. H. Mao, Y. D. Pan, J. F. Peng, Z. B. Shi, S. D. Song, X. Y. Song, H. J. Sun, A. K. Wang, M. X. Wang, Y. Q. Wang, W. W. Xiao, Y. F. Xie, L. H. Yao, D. L. Yu, B. S. Yuan, K. J. Zhao, G. W. Zhong, J. Zhou, J. C. Yan, C. X. Yu, C. H. Pan, Y. Liu, and the HL-2A Team , Nucl. Fusion 51, 094016 (2011)] to measure the losses of neutral beam ions. The design of the probe is based on the concept of the ?-particle detectors on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) using scintillator plates. The probe is capable of traveling across an equatorial plane port and sweeping the aperture angle rotationally with respect to the axis of the probe shaft by two step motors, in order to optimize the radial position and the collimator angle. The energy and the pitch angle of the lost fast ions can be simultaneously measured if the two-dimensional image of scintillation light intensity due to the impact of the lost fast ions is detected. Measurements of the fast-ion losses using the probe have been performed during HL-2A neutral beam injection discharges. The clear experimental evidence of enhanced losses of beam ions during disruptions has been obtained by means of the SLIP system. A detailed description of the probe system and the first experimental results are reported.

  20. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  1. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Dane, C. Brent; Tiszauer, Detlev H.

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  2. Diffuse X-ray emission from the superbubbles N70 and N185 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes-Iturbide, J.; Rodríguez-González, A.; Velázquez, P. F.; Rosado, M.; Sánchez-Cruces, M.; Ambrocio-Cruz, P.

    2014-11-01

    We present a study of the diffuse X-ray emission from superbubbles (SBs) N70 (DEM L301) and N185 (DEM L25) located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, based on data from the XMM-Newton Satellite. We obtained spectra and images of these objects in the soft X-ray energy band. These X-ray spectra were fitted by a thermal plasma model, with temperatures of 2.6×10{sup 6} K and 2.3×10{sup 6} K, for N70 and N185, respectively. For N70, images show that X-ray emission comes from the inner regions of the SB when we compare the distribution of the X-ray and the optical emission, while for N185, the X-ray emission is partially confined by the optical shell. We suggest that the observed X-ray emission is caused by shock-heated gas, inside of the optical shells. We also obtained X-ray luminosities which exceed the values predicted by the standard analytical model. This fact shows that, in addition to the winds of the interior stars, it is necessary to consider another ingredient in the description, such as a supernova explosion, as has been proposed in previous numerical models.

  3. A STUDY OF GRAVITATIONAL LENS CHROMATICITY WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz, J. A.; Mosquera, A. M.; Mediavilla, E.; Kochanek, C. S.; Falco, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    We report Hubble Space Telescope observations of six gravitational lenses with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. We measured the flux ratios between the lensed images in seven filters from 8140 #Angstrom# to 2200 #Angstrom#. In three of the systems, HE0512-3329, B1600+434, and H1413+117, we were able to construct UV extinction curves partially overlapping the 2175 #Angstrom# feature and characterize the properties of the dust relative to the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. In HE1104-1804, we detect chromatic microlensing and use it to study the physical properties of the quasar accretion disk. For a Gaussian model of the disk exp (- r{sup 2}/2r{sup 2}{sub s}), scaling with wavelength as r{sub s} {proportional_to}{lambda}{sup p}, we estimate r{sub s} ({lambda}3363) = 4{sup +4}{sub -2} (7 {+-} 4) light days and p = 1.1 {+-} 0.6 (1.0 {+-} 0.6) for a logarithmic (linear) prior on r{sub s} . The remaining two systems, FBQ0951+2635 and SBS1520+530, yielded no useful estimates of extinction or chromatic microlensing.

  4. A NEW SUB-PERIOD-MINIMUM CATACLYSMIC VARIABLE WITH PARTIAL HYDROGEN DEPLETION AND EVIDENCE OF SPIRAL DISK STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Littlefield, C.; Garnavich, P.; Magno, K.; Applegate, A.; Pogge, R.; Irwin, J.; Marion, G. H.; Kirshner, R.; Vinko, J.

    2013-06-15

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy and photometry of CSS 120422:111127+571239 (=SBS 1108+574), a recently discovered SU UMa-type dwarf nova whose 55 minute orbital period is well below the cataclysmic variable (CV) period minimum of {approx}78 minutes. In contrast with most other known CVs, its spectrum features He I emission of comparable strength to the Balmer lines, implying a hydrogen abundance less than 0.1 of long-period CVs-but still at least 10 times higher than that in AM CVn stars. Together, the short orbital period and remarkable helium-to-hydrogen ratio suggest that mass transfer in CSS 120422 began near the end of the donor star's main-sequence lifetime, meaning that this CV is a strong candidate progenitor of an AM CVn system as described by Podsiadlowski et al. Moreover, a Doppler tomogram of the H{alpha} line reveals two distinct regions of enhanced emission. While one is the result of the stream-disk impact, the other is probably attributable to spiral disk structure generated when material in the outer disk achieves a 2:1 orbital resonance with respect to the donor.

  5. Changing ventilation rates in U.S. offices: Implications for health, work performance, energy, and associated economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Black, Douglas; Brunner, Gregory

    2011-07-01

    This paper provides quantitative estimates of benefits and costs of providing different amounts of outdoor air ventilation in U.S. offices. For four scenarios that modify ventilation rates, we estimated changes in sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, work performance, short-term absence, and building energy consumption. The estimated annual economic benefits were $13 billion from increasing minimum ventilation rates (VRs) from 8 to 10 L/s per person, $38 billion from increasing minimum VRs from 8 to 15 L/s per person, and $33 billion from increasing VRs by adding outdoor air economizers for the 50% of the office floor area that currently lacks economizers. The estimated $0.04 billion in annual energy-related benefits of decreasing minimum VRs from 8 to 6.5 L/s per person are very small compared to the projected annual costs of $12 billion. Benefits of increasing minimum VRs far exceeded energy costs while adding economizers yielded health, performance, and absence benefits with energy savings.

  6. Zonal flow dynamics in the double tearing mode with antisymmetric shear flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Aohua [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 6110011 (Japan); Li, Jiquan, E-mail: lijq@energy.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 6110011 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 6110011 (Japan); Liu, Jinyuan, E-mail: jyliu@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Kishimoto, Yasuaki [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 6110011 (Japan) [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 6110011 (Japan); Institude of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 6110011 (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    The generation dynamics and the structural characteristics of zonal flows are investigated in the double tearing mode (DTM) with antisymmetric shear flows. Two kinds of zonal flow oscillations are revealed based on reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations, which depend on the shear flow amplitudes corresponding to different DTM eigen mode states, elaborated by Mao et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20, 022114 (2013)]. For the weak shear flows below an amplitude threshold, v{sub c}, at which two DTM eigen states with antisymmetric or symmetric magnetic island structure are degenerated, the zonal flows grow oscillatorily in the Rutherford regime during the nonlinear evolution of the DTMs. It is identified that the oscillation mechanism results from the nonlinear interaction between the distorted islands and the zonal flows through the modification of shear flows. However, for the medium shear flows above v{sub c} but below the critical threshold of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, an oscillatory growing zonal flow occurs in the linear phase of the DTM evolution. It is demonstrated that the zonal flow oscillation originates from the three-wave mode coupling or a modulation instability pumped by two DTM eigen modes with the same frequency but opposite propagating direction. With the shear flows increasing, the amplitude of zonal flow oscillation increases first and then decreases, whilst the oscillation frequency as twice of the Doppler frequency shift increases. Furthermore, impacts of the oscillatory zonal flows on the nonlinear evolution of DTM islands and the global reconnection are also discussed briefly.

  7. The Behavior of Hydrogen Under Extreme Conditions on Ultrafast Timescales (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mao, Ho-kwang (Director, Center for Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments); EFree Staff

    2011-11-02

    'The Behavior of Hydrogen Under Extreme Conditions on Ultrafast Timescales ' was submitted by the Center for Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments (EFree) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. EFree is directed by Ho-kwang Mao at the Carnegie Institute of Washington and is a partnership of scientists from thirteen institutions.The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments is 'to accelerate the discovery and creation of energy-relevant materials using extreme pressures and temperatures.' Research topics are: catalysis (CO{sub 2}, water), photocatalysis, solid state lighting, optics, thermelectric, phonons, thermal conductivity, solar electrodes, fuel cells, superconductivity, extreme environment, radiation effects, defects, spin dynamics, CO{sub 2} (capture, convert, store), greenhouse gas, hydrogen (fuel, storage), ultrafast physics, novel materials synthesis, and defect tolerant materials.

  8. The Behavior of Hydrogen Under Extreme Conditions on Ultrafast Timescales (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Ho-kwang; EFree Staff

    2011-05-01

    'The Behavior of Hydrogen Under Extreme Conditions on Ultrafast Timescales ' was submitted by the Center for Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments (EFree) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. EFree is directed by Ho-kwang Mao at the Carnegie Institute of Washington and is a partnership of scientists from thirteen institutions.The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments is 'to accelerate the discovery and creation of energy-relevant materials using extreme pressures and temperatures.' Research topics are: catalysis (CO{sub 2}, water), photocatalysis, solid state lighting, optics, thermelectric, phonons, thermal conductivity, solar electrodes, fuel cells, superconductivity, extreme environment, radiation effects, defects, spin dynamics, CO{sub 2} (capture, convert, store), greenhouse gas, hydrogen (fuel, storage), ultrafast physics, novel materials synthesis, and defect tolerant materials.

  9. X chromosome aneuploidy in infertile women: Analysis by interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, M.A.; Moix, I.; Mermillod, B.

    1994-09-01

    Up to 1 in 3 couples have a problem of infertility at some time in their lives. Sex chromosome anomalies are found in 5-10% of couples, with mosaic aneuploidy being a common finding in primary infertility. Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA), in contrast, is frequently associated with autosomal structural anomalies. We hypothesized that low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy was associated with primary infertility but not with RSA. Three groups were studied: women from couples with primary infertillity (n=26); women with three or more spontaneous abortions (n=22); and age-matched normally fertile women (at least two pregnancies; n=28). Interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine X chromosome ploidy in 100 nuclei per patient, using a contig of three cosmids from MAO locus (kindly donated by W. Berger, Nijmegen). A control probe (chr. 15 centromere) was simultaneously hybridized, and only nuclei containing two control signals were scored for the X chromosome. The mean numbers of nuclei with two X chromosome signals were the same in all groups (Welch equality of means test: p>0.97). However, there is a significant difference between the variances of the primary infertile and RSA groups (Levene`s test: p=0.025 after Bonferrone correction for multiple testing). This provides preliminary support for the hypothesis of an association between primary infertility and low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy.

  10. In situ derivation of sulfur activated TiO{sub 2} nano porous layers through pulse-micro arc oxidation technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayati, M.R.; Golestani-Fard, F.; Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-195, Tehran ; Moshfegh, A.Z.; Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 14588-89694, Tehran ; Molaei, Roya

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} S-TiO{sub 2} layers were grown by MAO technique under pulse current for the first time. {yields} Effect of growth parameters on chemical composition, topography, and morphology of the layers was studied. {yields} A correlation between photocatalytic performance and growth conditions was proposed. -- Abstract: Micro arc oxidation technique, as a facile and efficient process, was employed to grow sulfur doped titania porous layers. This research sheds light on the photocatalytic performance of the micro arc oxidized S-TiO{sub 2} nano-porous layers fabricated under pulse current. Morphological and topographical studies, performed by SEM and AFM techniques, revealed that increasing the frequency and/or decreasing the duty cycle resulted in formation of finer pores and smoother surfaces. XRD and XPS results showed that the layers consisted of anatase and rutile phases whose fraction was observed to change depending on the synthesis conditions. The highest anatase relative content was obtained at the frequency of 500 Hz and the duty cycle of 5%. Furthermore, photocatalytic activity of the layers was examined by measuring the decomposition rate of methylene blue under both ultraviolet and visible photo irradiations. Maximum photodegradation reaction rate constants over the pulse-grown S-TiO{sub 2} layers were respectively measured as 0.0202 and 0.0110 min{sup -1} for ultraviolet and visible irradiations.

  11. In situ growth of ZrO{sub 2}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-crystalline ceramic coatings via micro arc oxidation of aluminum substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoaei-Rad, V.; Bayati, M.R.; Zargar, H.R.; Javadpour, J.; Golestani-Fard, F.; Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-195, Tehran

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► ZrO{sub 2}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers were fabricated by MAO process. ► A formation mechanism was also proposed. ► Effect of voltage and electrolyte composition on layers properties was studied. -- Abstract: Micro arc oxidation technique was employed to grow zirconia–alumina porous layers. Considering XPS, XRD, and EDX results, the layers mainly consisted of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, monoclinic ZrO{sub 2}, tetragonal ZrO{sub 2}. Fractions of these phases were observed to change based on the fabrication conditions. Zirconia phases formed not only on the surface, but also in the layers depth. Increasing the voltage as well as utilizing thicker electrolytes resulted in higher zirconium concentration. The average crystalline size of the ZrO{sub 2} and the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases was determined as about 57 and 75 nm. AFM studies revealed that the surface roughness increased with voltage and electrolyte concentration. Morphological evaluations, performed by SEM, showed that the microstructure of the layers strongly depended on the synthesis conditions. The layers revealed a porous structure with a pores size of 40–300 nm. Microcracks were observed to appear when the electrolyte concentration and the applied voltage increased. Finally, a formation mechanism was put forward with emphasis on the chemical and the electrochemical foundations.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of ionic liquid (EMImBF{sub 4})/Li{sup +} - chitosan membranes for ion battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasaribu, Marvin H. Arcana, I Made Wahyuningrum, Deana

    2015-09-30

    Lithium ion battery has been currently developed and produced because it has a longer life time, high energycapacity, and the efficient use of lithium ion battery that is suitable for storing electrical energy. However, this battery has some drawbacks such as use liquid electrolytes that are prone to leakage and flammability during the battery charging process in high temperature. In this study, an ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMImBF4) containing Li{sup +} ions was synthesized and combined with chitosan polymer host as a polymer electrolyte membrane for lithium-ion batteries to solve this problems. This ionic liquid was obtained from the anion metathesis reaction between EMImBr and LiBF4 salt, while EMImBr was synthesized from the reaction between 1-methylimidazole and ethyl bromide utilizing Microwave Assisted Organic Synthesis (MAOS) method. The ionic liquid obtained was characterized by microstructure analysis with using NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The polymer electrolyte membrane was characterized by analysis functional groups (FTIR), ionic conductivity (EIS), and surface morphology (SEM). The analysis results of ion conductivity by the EIS method showed the increase the ionic conductivity value of membranes from 1.30 × 10{sup −2} S cm{sup −1} for chitosan to 1.30 × 10{sup −2} S cm{sup −1} for chitosan with EMImBF4/Li{sup +}, and this result was supported by analysis the surface morphology (SEM)

  13. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monolayer Behavior Retained in Bulk Semiconducting Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Comparison of the structure of ReS2 with the conventional structure of sTMDs such as MoS2 from the side (top panels) and top (bottom panels). Scientific Achievement Users at the Molecular Foundry have discovered a new member of the transition metal dichalcogenides (sTMD) family, rhenium disulphide (ReS2), in which the bulk behaves as electronically and vibrationally decoupled monolayers. Significance and Impact

  14. WORKSHOP ?PHYSICS FOR HEALTH IN EUROPE?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    2-4 February 2010 at CERN This event will be will be available live via the Webcast Service and transmitted in parallel to:IT auditorium, Salle Anderssen 40-S2-A01(Tuesday 2nd February)BE auditorium (all day), Salle 40-S2-01 (only between 08:00- 14:00) (Wednesday 3rd February)BE auditorium, Salle Curie 40-S2-C01(Thursday 4th February)   

  15. WORKSHOP ?PHYSICS FOR HEALTH IN EUROPE?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    2-4 February 2010 at CERN This event will be will be available live via the Webcast Service and transmitted in parallel to:IT auditorium,Salle Anderssen 40-S2-A01(Tuesday 2nd February)BE auditorium (all day), Salle 40-S2-01 (only between 08:00- 14:00) (Wednesday 3rd February)BE auditorium, Salle Curie 40-S2-C01(Thursday 4th February)

  16. EA-1440: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex, DOEEA-1440-S-1 (May 2008) More Documents & Publications EA-1440-S2: Final ...

  17. Latest Documents and Notices | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 28, 2015 EA-2024: Final Environmental Assessment Gap Material Plutonium - Transport, Receipt, and Processing December 24, 2015 EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Preferred Alternative...

  18. EA-1736: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Blanton, Michael R. (2) Blomqvist, Michael (2) Bolton, Adam S. (2) Bovy, Jo (2) Brinkmann, ... ; Blanton, Michael ; Blomqvist, Michael ; Bolton, Adam S. ; Bovy, Jo ; et al December 2015 ...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... calculations (2) low-frequency raman spectroscopy (2) stacking configurations ... September 2015 , Elsevier Raman shifts in electron-irradiated monolayer MoS2 Parkin, ...

  1. EIS-0361: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0250-S1 and EIS-0250-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental...

  2. EA-1736: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

  3. Solar Energy International | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    International Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Energy International Address: 76 S. 2nd St. Carbondale, CO 81623 Place: Carbondale, Colorado Zip: 81623 Website:...

  4. Louisiana's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Louisiana's 2nd congressional district Entergy New Orleans Inc Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLouisiana%27s2ndcongressionaldistrict&oldid192538...

  5. Pennsylvania's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PECO Energy Co Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titlePennsylvania%27s2ndcongressionaldistrict&oldid198301" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs...

  6. Florida's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Tallahassee, Florida (Utility Company) Talquin Electric Coop, Inc Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFlorida%27s2ndcongressionaldistrict&oldid182772...

  7. Tennessee's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Tennessee's 2nd congressional district Knoxville Utilities Board Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTennessee%27s2ndcongressionaldistrict&oldid204320...

  8. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to Egypt (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 2,947

  9. Other Notices | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Canal Intertie Project July 19, 2010 EIS-0283-S2: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement and Conduct Additional Public...

  10. EA-1736: Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, Los Alamos, New Mexico

  11. Commercial Reference Buildings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference Building Types1 , which represent approximately 70% of the commercial buildings in the U.S. 2. Whole building energy analysis data (developed using EnergyPlus...

  12. Single line-of-sight dual energy backlighter for mix width experiments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    S. A. ; Felker, S. ; Seugling, R. ; Doane, D. ; Wallace, R. 1 ; Guymer, T. M. ; Moore, A. S. 2 ; Whiting, N. ; Sorce, C. 3 + Show Author Affiliations Lawrence Livermore ...

  13. Carmanah Technologies Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Columbia, Canada Zip: V9A 3S2 Sector: Solar Product: Canadian manufacturer of solar balance of systems (mounts, converters, inverters), battery chargers, and distributor of...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Filippone, Salvatore (2) Franko, Ken (2) Goodman, Eric (2) Hollman, David S (2) Jimenez, Edward Steven, (2) Smith, Brian (2) Xu, Xiaofeng (2) Adalsteinsson, Helgi (1) Boggs, Paul ...

  15. EIS-0200: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Waste (January 1998) More Documents & Publications EIS-0026: Record of Decision EIS-0026-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0026-SA-02: Supplement Analysis

  16. Accelerating Cleanup focus on 2006 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    focus on 2006 More Documents & Publications EIS-0026-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0200-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0026-SA-05: Supplement Analysis

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Dippo, Pat (2) Dippo, Patricia (2) Guthrey, Harvey (2) Hasoon, Falah S. (2) Kanevce, Ana ... ; Li, Jian V. ; Kanevce, Ana ; Guthrey, Harvey ; Contreras, Miguel ; Pankow, Joel ; ...

  18. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tuning the electronic structure of monolayer graphene Mo S 2 van der Waals ... Optical Third-Harmonic Generation in Graphene Hong, Sung-Young ; Dadap, Jerry I. ; ...

  19. Audit Report: OAS-L-06-03 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Audit Report: OAS-L-06-03 December 20, 2005 Defense Waste Processing Facility Operations at the Savannah River Site Audit Report: OAS-L-06-03 (172.11 KB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination EIS-0082: Record of Decision

  20. Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    109 297 498 371 231 411 2,047 839 603 2000's 2,486 2,574 3,069 3,068 3,105 1,987 2,211 4,666 2,566 3,501 2010's 2,117 2,214 953 1,400 766 - No Data Reported; -- Not Applicable;...

  1. Draft New England Clean Power Link Project Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... V-BE-AS-106(P) V-BE-AS-104(D) V-BE-AS-107(D) 2014-RTE-SL-1 State Rank: S2S3 Status: Not ... V-FH-AS-23(I) V-WH-AS-1(I) V-FH-AS-19(D) 2014-RTE-SL-11 State Rank: S2S3 Status: Not ...

  2. Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,011,361 2,088,647 2,113,912 1970's 2,233,138 2,191,458 2,140,575 2,007,141 1,829,171 1,525,678...

  3. U.S. Natural Gas Non-Salt Underground Storage Injections (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,654,035 2,371,697 2,647,124 2,532,986 2,607,787 2,337,857 2000's 2,388,369 3,123,178 2,312,532...

  4. Virginia Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 158 272 2,143 1970's 2,175 2,286 278 320 112 1,079 1980's 22 1990's 0 2,369 2,378 2000's 2,455...

  5. Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,630 2,529 2,666 1970's 2,713 2,669 2,681 2,377 889 846 831 783 861 801 1980's 737 641 431 436...

  6. Backlighter development at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Zinc to Zirconium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barrios, M. A.; Fournier, K. B.; Regan, S. P.; Landen, O.; May, M.; Opachich, Y. P.; Widmann, K.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W.

    2013-06-07

    A K-shell X-ray emission from laser-irradiated planar Zn, Ge, Br, and Zr foils was measured at the National Ignition Facility for laser irradiances in the range of 0.6–9.5 × 1015 W/cm 2. The incident laser power had a pre-pulse to enhance the laser-to-X-ray conversion efficiency (CE) of a 2–5 ns constant-intensity pulse used as the main laser drive. The measured CE into the 8–16 keV energy band ranged from 0.43% to 2%, while the measured CE into the He-like resonance 1s2–1s2p(1P) and intercombination 1s2–1s2p(3P) transitions, as well as from their 1s2(2s,2p)l–1s2p(2s,2p)l satellite transitions for l = 1, 2, 3, correspondingmore » to the Li-, Be-, and B-like resonances, respectively, ranged from 0.3% to 1.5%. Moreover, absolute and relative CE measurements are consistent with X-ray energy scaling of (hν) -3 to (hν) -5, where hν is the X-ray energy. The temporal evolution of the broadband X-ray power was similar to the main laser drive for ablation plasmas having a critical density surface.« less

  7. Process system evaluation-consolidated letters. Volume 1. Alternatives for the off-gas treatment system for the low-level waste vitrification process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peurrung, L.M.; Deforest, T.J; Richards, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    This report provides an evaluation of alternatives for treating off-gas from the low-level waste (LLW) melter. The study used expertise obtained from the commercial nonradioactive off-gas treatment industry. It was assumed that contact maintenance is possible, although the subsequent risk to maintenance personnel was qualitatively considered in selecting equipment. Some adaptations to the alternatives described may be required, depending on the extent of contact maintenance that can be achieved. This evaluation identified key issues for the off-gas system design. To provide background information, technology reviews were assembled for various classifications of off-gas treatment equipment, including off-gas cooling, particulate control, acid gas control, mist elimination, NO{sub x} reduction, and SO{sub 2} removal. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate for one of the off-gas systems considered is provided using both the off-gas characteristics associated with the Joule-heated and combustion-fired melters. The key issues identified and a description of the preferred off-gas system options are provided below. Five candidate treatment systems were evaluated. All of the systems are appropriate for the different melting/feed preparations currently being considered. The lowest technical risk is achieved using option 1, which is similar to designs for high-level waste (HLW) vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP) and the West Valley. Demonstration Project. Option 1 uses a film cooler, submerged bed scrubber (SBS), and high-efficiency mist eliminator (HEME) prior to NO{sub x} reduction and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration. However, several advantages were identified for option 2, which uses high-temperature filtration. Based on the evaluation, option 2 was identified as the preferred alternative. The characteristics of this option are described below.

  8. Gas reburn retrofit on an industrial cyclone boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farzan, H.; Latham, C.E.; Maringo, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Eastman Kodak Company`s cyclone boiler (Unit No. 43), located in Rochester, New York, is being retrofitted with the gas reburning technology developed by Babcock & Wilcox (B & W) to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in order to comply with the Title I, ozone nonattainment, of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. The required NO{sub x} reduction from baseline levels necessary to meet the presumptive limit set in New York`s regulation is about 47%. Eastman Kodak and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) are cosponsoring this project. B & W is the prime contractor and contract negotiations with Chevron as the gas supplier are presently being finalized. Equipment installation for the gas reburn system is scheduled for a September 1995 outage. No. 43 Boiler`s maximum continuous rating (MCR) is 550,000 pounds per hour of steam flow or approximately equivalent to 60 MW{sub e}. Because of the compact boiler design, there is insufficient gas residence time to use pulverized coal or oil as the reburn fuel, thus making it a prime candidate for gas reburn. Kodak currently has four cyclone boilers. Based on successful completion of this gas reburn project, modifying the other three cyclone boilers with gas reburn technology is anticipated. The paper will describe B & W`s gas reburn data from a cyclone-equipped pilot facility (B & W`s Small Boiler Simulator), gas reburn design information specific to Eastman Kodak No. 43 Boiler, and numerical modeling experiences based on the pilot-scale Small Boiler Simulator (SBS) results along with those from a full-scale commercial boiler.

  9. A HEURISTIC PREDICTION OF THE COSMIC EVOLUTION OF THE CO-LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreschkow, D.; Heywood, I.; Kloeckner, H.-R.; Rawlings, S.

    2009-09-10

    We predict the emission line luminosity functions (LFs) of the first 10 rotational transitions of {sup 12}C{sup 16}O in galaxies at redshift z = 0 to z = 10. This prediction relies on a recently presented simulation of the molecular cold gas content in {approx}3 x 10{sup 7} evolving galaxies based on the Millennium Simulation. We combine this simulation with a model for the conversion between molecular mass and CO-line intensities, which incorporates the following mechanisms: (1) molecular gas is heated by the cosmic microwave background (CMB), starbursts (SBs), and active galactic nuclei (AGNs); (2) molecular clouds in dense or inclined galaxies can overlap; (3) compact gas can attain a smooth distribution in the densest part of disks; (4) CO luminosities scale with metallicity changes between galaxies; and (5) CO luminosities are always detected against the CMB. We analyze the relative importance of these effects and predict the cosmic evolution of the CO-LFs. The most notable conclusion is that the detection of regular galaxies (i.e., no AGN, no massive SB) at high z {approx}> 7 in CO emission will be dramatically hindered by the weak contrast against the CMB, in contradiction to earlier claims that CMB heating will ease the detection of high-redshift CO. The full simulation of extragalactic CO lines and the predicted CO-LFs at any redshift can be accessed online (http://s-cubed.physics.ox.ac.uk/, go to {sup S3}-SAX) and they should be useful for the modeling of CO-line surveys with future telescopes, such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array or the Square Kilometre Array.

  10. Development of new VOC exposure metrics and their relationship to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' symptoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ten Brinke, JoAnn

    1995-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are suspected to contribute significantly to ''Sick Building Syndrome'' (SBS), a complex of subchronic symptoms that occurs during and in general decreases away from occupancy of the building in question. A new approach takes into account individual VOC potencies, as well as the highly correlated nature of the complex VOC mixtures found indoors. The new VOC metrics are statistically significant predictors of symptom outcomes from the California Healthy Buildings Study data. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the hypothesis that a summary measure of the VOC mixture, other risk factors, and covariates for each worker will lead to better prediction of symptom outcome. VOC metrics based on animal irritancy measures and principal component analysis had the most influence in the prediction of eye, dermal, and nasal symptoms. After adjustment, a water-based paints and solvents source was found to be associated with dermal and eye irritation. The more typical VOC exposure metrics used in prior analyses were not useful in symptom prediction in the adjusted model (total VOC (TVOC), or sum of individually identified VOCs ({Sigma}VOC{sub i})). Also not useful were three other VOC metrics that took into account potency, but did not adjust for the highly correlated nature of the data set, or the presence of VOCs that were not measured. High TVOC values (2--7 mg m{sup {minus}3}) due to the presence of liquid-process photocopiers observed in several study spaces significantly influenced symptoms. Analyses without the high TVOC values reduced, but did not eliminate the ability of the VOC exposure metric based on irritancy and principal component analysis to explain symptom outcome.

  11. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report: October--December 1995. Volume 6, Number 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEachern, R.L.; Carpenter, J.; Miguel, A.; Murphy, P.; Perez, J.; Schleich, D.

    1996-07-01

    This issue presents recent results from the ICF program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in areas ranging from cryogenics to plasma instabilities. The article ``Metastable Crystal Structures of Solid Hydrogen`` describes primarily Raman spectroscopy studies of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} films deposited at various rates and temperatures. All ignition target designs for ICF require a cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel layer of uniform thickness and acceptable roughness. Solid DT layers, in particular, are easier to support in the presence of gravity and self-symmetrize due to self heating from the beta decay of tritium. The roughness of these films is closely related to their crystal structure, so it is important to understand film morphology under different deposition conditions. Three articles present different approaches to the study of plasma instabilities that lead to stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). In ``Modeling of Self-Focusing Experiments by Beam Propagation Codes,`` the authors describe the use of computer codes to model nonlinear effects during the propagation of laser beams through optical elements. Such codes have played a key role in the design of high-power lasers for ICF, both historically and for the NIF. The article ``Optical Scatter--A Diagnostic Tool to Investigate Laser Damage in KDP and DKDP`` examines the important problem of characterizing single crystals of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP) and deuterated KDP. These materials are used as optical switches, for frequency conversion in the Nova laser, and will be required for the NIF. The use of soft x-rays as a plasma probe is the topic of ``Soft X-Ray Interferometry.`` Interferometry of laser-produced plasmas presents a significant challenge, especially at electron densities exceeding 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}. The authors compare x-ray and optical interferometry of plasmas and show experimental results from a soft x-ray Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

  12. TECHNETIUM RETENTION IN WTP LAW GLASS WITH RECYCLE FLOW-SHEET DM10 MELTER TESTING VSL-12R2640-1 REV 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramowitz, Howard; Brandys, Marek; Cecil, Richard; D'Angelo, Nicholas; Matlack, Keith S.; Muller, Isabelle S.; Pegg, Ian L.; Callow, Richard A.; Joseph, Innocent

    2012-12-11

    Melter tests were conducted to determine the retention of technetium and other volatiles in glass while processing simulated Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams through a DM10 melter equipped with a prototypical off-gas system that concentrates and recycles fluid effiuents back to the melter feed. To support these tests, an existing DM10 system installed at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was modified to add the required recycle loop. Based on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) LAW off-gas system design, suitably scaled versions of the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS), Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP), and TLP vacuum evaporator were designed, built, and installed into the DM10 system. Process modeling was used to support this design effort and to ensure that issues associated with the short half life of the {sup 99m}Tc radioisotope that was used in this work were properly addressed and that the system would be capable of meeting the test objectives. In particular, this required that the overall time constant for the system was sufficiently short that a reasonable approach to steady state could be achieved before the {sup 99m}Tc activity dropped below the analytical limits of detection. The conceptual design, detailed design, flow sheet development, process model development, Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (P&ID) development, control system design, software design and development, system fabrication, installation, procedure development, operator training, and Test Plan development for the new system were all conducted during this project. The new system was commissioned and subjected to a series of shake-down tests before embarking on the planned test program. Various system performance issues that arose during testing were addressed through a series of modifications in order to improve the performance and reliability of the system. The resulting system provided a robust and reliable platform to address the test objectives.

  13. The microwave assisted synthesis of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide as potential corrosion inhibitor toward carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution saturated with carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasasa, Norman Vincent A. Bundjali, Bunbun; Wahyuningrum, Deana

    2015-09-30

    Injection of corrosion inhibitor into the fluid current of oil and gas pipelines is an effective way to mitigate corrosion rate on the inner-surface parts of pipelines, especially carbon steel pipelines. In this research, two alkylimidazolium ionic liquids, 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (IL1) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (IL2) have been synthesized and studied as a potential corrosion inhibitor towards carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution saturated with carbon dioxide. IL1 and IL2 were synthesized using microwave assisted organic synthesis (MAOS) method. Mass Spectrometry analysis of IL1 and IL2 showed molecular mass [M-H+] peak at 223.2166 and 251.2484, respectively. The FTIR,{sup 1}H-NMR and {sup 13}C-NMR spectra confirmed that IL1 and IL2 were successfully synthesized. Corrosion inhibition activity of IL1 and IL2 were determined using weight loss method. The results showed that IL1 and IL2 have the potential as good corrosion inhibitors with corrosion inhibition efficiency of IL1 and IL2 are 96.00% at 100 ppm (343 K) and 95.60% at 50 ppm (343 K), respectively. The increase in the concentration of IL1 and IL2 tends to improve their corrosion inhibition activities. Analysis of the data obtained from the weight loss method shows that the adsorption of IL1 and IL2 on carbon steel is classified into chemisorption which obeys Langmuir’s adsorption isotherm.

  14. Hybrid quantum dot-tin disulfide field-effect transistors with improved photocurrent and spectral responsivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cotlet, Mircea; Huang, Yuan Zang; Chen, Jia -Shiang; Huidong Zang; Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.; Nam, Chang -Yong

    2016-03-24

    We report an improved photosensitivity in few-layer tin disulfide (SnS2) field-effect transistors(FETs) following doping with CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots(QDs). The hybrid QD-SnS2 FET devices achieve more than 500% increase in the photocurrent response compared with the starting SnS2-only FET device and a spectral responsivity reaching over 650 A/W at 400 nm wavelength. The negligible electrical conductance in a control QD-only FET device suggests that the energy transfer between QDs and SnS2 is the main mechanism responsible for the sensitization effect, which is consistent with the strong spectral overlap between QDphotoluminescence and SnS2 optical absorption as well as the large nominalmore » donor-acceptor interspacing between QD core and SnS2. Furthermore, we also find enhanced charge carrier mobility in hybrid QD-SnS2 FETs which we attribute to a reduced contact Schottky barrier width due to an elevated background charge carrier density.« less

  15. Arkansas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels) Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Arkansas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1 1980's 1 1 3 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1990's 2 2 2 2 3 3 2 4 2 2 2000's 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2010's 2 2 2 1 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release

  16. Kansas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels) Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Kansas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 2 1990's 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 8 3 3 2000's 3 2 2 3 4 6 5 4 6 5 2010's 7 7 7 18 37 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release

  17. Texas--RRC District 7B Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Million Barrels) Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 7B Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 3 3 6 4 3 3 3 2 3 2 1990's 2 1 1 6 1 1 1 2 3 2 2000's 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 5 5 2010's 4 5 4 3 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,049,536 2,228,414 2,264,158 2000's 2,434,770 2,400,993 2,218,923 2,218,715 2,353,823 2,196,741 2,248,988 2,327,205 2,330,514 2,256,380 2010's 2,196,086 2,096,279 2,337,017 2,352,421 2,265,431 2,257,216

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Hawaii (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,894 2,654 3,115 2000's 2,841 2,818 2,734 2,732 2,772 2,793 2,782 2,848 2,700 2,605 2010's 2,625 2,616 2,687 2,853 2,927 2,929

  20. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to India (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 2010's 2,873 12,542 3,004

  1. Earth abundant nanocrystals for solar and thermoelectric applications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on a couple classes of nanomaterials containing antimony, including chalcostibite (CuSbS2CuSbSe2) and stibnite (Sb2Se3). While not extensively explored, these materials have...

  2. Georgia's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Companies in Georgia's 2nd congressional district First United Ethanol LLC Habitat for Humanity Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeorgia%27s2ndc...

  3. Three dimensional time-gated tracking of non-blinking quantum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: DeVore, Matthew S. 1 ; Werner, James H. 1 ; Goodwin, Peter M. 1 ; Keller, Aaron M. 1 ; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A. 1 ; Wilson, Bridget S. 2 ; Cleyrat, Cedric ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... Bhushan, Abhinav (2) Davids, Paul S. (2) Dharmasena, H.P. (2) Galambos, Paul C. (2) ... Observation of the Integer Quantum Hall Effect in Record High-Mobility Uniform Wafer-Scale ...

  5. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,772 2,689 2,877 1990's 2,889 2,840 2,859 2,912 2,853 2,845 2,843 2,531 3,295 3,040 2000's 2,821 3,403 3,438 3,367 3,283 2,855 2,811 2,822 2,920 2,618 2010's 2,731 2,733 2,872 2,958 3,063 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  6. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,237,877 2,271,801 2,291,242 1990's 2,311,795 2,333,377 2,363,575 2,386,249 2,393,053 2,413,715 2,431,909 2,452,524 2,493,639 2,486,704 2000's 2,519,794 2,542,724 2,559,024 2,572,584 2,591,458 2,600,574 2,605,782 2,620,755 2,631,340 2,635,886 2010's 2,646,211 2,667,392 2,678,547

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Hogg, D.W. (2) Ichikawa, S.-I. (2) Inada, Naohisa (2) Ivezic, Z. (2) Kayo, Issha (2) Kent, S. (2) Knapp, G.R. (2) Morokuma, Tomoki (2) Save Results Save this search to My...

  8. EA-1566: Notice of Comment Period Extension | Department of Energy

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    EA-1566: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Assessment EIS-0250-S1 and EIS-0250-S2: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental...

  9. EIS-0471: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact Statement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EIS-0440: EPA Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0250-S1 and EIS-0250-S2: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental...

  10. Albany Center map_rev36-10

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    Bro adw ay Stre et Lib ert y Str ee t Queen Avenue N S1 S2 S3 Locked Gate Locked Gate Locked Gate Locked Gate Locked Gate Locked Gate Walk Gate (locked) Walk Gate (locked) Walk...

  11. Patterning Smaller Junctions for Ultrathin Devices | U.S. DOE...

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    Chemical mapping with Raman spectroscopy (bottom) validates the controlled conversion of MoSe2 to MoS2 in the exposed regions. The Science Making faster, more powerful electronics ...

  12. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

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    Mary S. (2) Paa-Toli, Ljiljana (2) Wu, Si (2) Zhao, Rui (2) Baker, Scott E. (1) Brown, Roslyn N. (1) Deng, Shuang (1) Feng, Ju (1) Hu, Jian Zhi (1) Jiang, Yuxuan (1) Meng,...

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    ... Queiroz, Farinaldo S. (2) Sinha, Kuver (2) Smith, J. Allyn (2) Steffen, Jason H. (2) ... for the Dark Energy Survey Fix, Mees B. ; Smith, J. Allyn ; Tucker, Douglas ; Wester, ...

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    ... Filter by Author Wester, William (11) Fix, Mees B. (2) Queiroz, Farinaldo S. (2) Sinha, Kuver (2) Smith, J. Allyn (2) Steffen, Jason H. (2) Wester, William Carl, III (2) Annis, ...

  15. Rapid first-cycle lithiation strategy for enhanced performance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    performance of Li-MoS2 batteries as identified by in situ studies. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rapid first-cycle lithiation strategy for enhanced performance of ...

  16. DOE/RL-2000-27

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... plutonium-production reactors that were shut down ... reactor known as the Fast Flux Test Facility. * The ... wells, was injected with sodium dithionate (Na 2 O 6 S 2 ...

  17. Run

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    Maintenance AP Spear Down University Holidays Sep Oct S 1 1 Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug 442013 SPEAR OPERATING SCHEDULE 2012-2013 2012 2013 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb S 2 1 1 M 3 1 2 ...

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    ... Bligaard, Thomas (2) Garcia-Mota, Monica (2) Garca-Melchor, Max (2) Hummelshj, Jens S. (2) Man, Isabela C. (2) Rossmeisl, Jan (2) Save Results Save this search to My Library ...

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    Lamarque, J F (3) Szopa, S (3) Wild, O (3) Atherton, C (2) Bergmann, D. (2) Cameron-Smith, P (2) Cameron-Smith, Philip (2) Cuvelier, C (2) Dalsoren, S. (2) Save Results Save this ...

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    O'Shea, Brian W. (2) Oishi, Jeffrey S. (2) Smith, Britton D. (2) Bordner, James (1) Bryan, ... Skillman, Samuel W. ; O'Shea, Brian W. ; Smith, Britton D., E-mail: stephen.skory@colorad...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Zeng, G. (4) Nagashima, T. (3) Strode, S. (3) Sudo, K. (3) Bergmann, D (2) Cameron-Smith, P (2) Cameron-Smith, P. (2) Cameron-Smith, Philip (2) Dalsoren, S. (2) Dentener, F (2) ...

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    Dentener, F (3) Doherty, R (3) Ghan, Steven J. (3) Bergmann, D. (2) Bey, I (2) Cameron-Smith, P (2) Cameron-Smith, Philip (2) Collins, W. J. (2) Cuvelier, C (2) Dalsoren, S. (2) ...

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    ... (1) environment (1) head (1) image processing (1) images (1) limiting values (1) lungs (1) medical records (1) Filter by Author Chen, S (2) Mutaf, Y (2) Antolak, J. A. (1) ...

  4. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to Japan (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 2,822 2,741 5,037...

  5. Appendix H biomonitoring data table H-1.xls

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    This page intentionally left blank Table H-1: Biomonitoring Sediment and Surface Water ... Surface Water P-S1 P-S2 P-S3 Table H-1: Biomonitoring Sediment and Surface Water Data a ...

  6. Statement of Work for RFP RCE-6-62377

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power ramp rate 0-100% <1s <.2s Communications interface to system power transfer <.5s <.1s System operation Automatic - No driver intervention necessary On-vehicle system...

  7. Virginia's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Virginia. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleVirginia%27s2ndcongressiona...

  8. Eastern States Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Eastern States Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 2 -...

  9. Kentucky Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 2 5 2010's 4 4...

  10. Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2,265 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0...

  11. Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production (Million Barrels) Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,125 1980's 2,081 2,285 2,393 2,650 2,660 2,610 2,671 2,509 2,339 2,270 1990's 2,305 2,237 2,162 2,211 2,151 2,269 2,337 2,376 2,262 2,257 2000's 2,479 2,318 2,368 2,192 2,466 2,723 2,913 3,158 3,148 3,432 2010's 3,983

  12. Bacterial Sulfur Storage Globules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Prominent among these are the sulfide-oxidizing bacteria that oxidize sulfide (S2-) to sulfate (SO42-). Many of these organisms can store elemental sulfur (S0) in "globules" for...

  13. untitled

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Supplementary Fig. S2d vs. Fig. 3f). We thus conclude that Fermi pockets in (Sr1 ... be due to the possibility that the two materials have different properties, with Sr2IrO4 ...

  14. Universality of the Volume Bound in Slow-Roll Eternal Inflation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    It has recently been shown that in single field slow-roll inflation the total volume cannot grow by a factor larger than esup Ssub dS2 without becoming infinite. The bound is ...

  15. Pressure-enhanced superconductivity in Eu 3 Bi 2 S 4 F 4 (Journal...

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    The pressure effect on the newly discovered charge-transferred BiS2-based superconductor, Eu3Bi2S4F4, with a Tc of 1.5 K at ambient pressure, is investigated by transport and ...

  16. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Truck to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 0 0 2010's 0 0 2 71 99 41

  17. Michigan Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 7,642 2,330 1,719 1970's 378 788 63 176 327 981 1,401 2,169 1980's 2,375 2,390 2,400 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,606 2,340 2,768 1990's 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2000's 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2010's 2,340 2,340 0

  18. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,585 2,670 2,638 1990's 2,574 2,486 2,515 2,477 2,592 2,531 2,564 2,233 2,188 2,267 2000's 2,025 1,996 2,029 2,074 2,040 1,432 1,257 1,146 1,131 2,039 2010's 2,106 1,770 1,793 1,870 1,878 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  19. Measurement of the optical dielectric function of monolayertransition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurement of the optical dielectric function of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides:MoS2,MoSe2,WS2, andWSe2 This content will become publicly available on November 17,...

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    ... Wang, Xiaohan (3) Yakobson, Boris I. (3) Bharathi, M. S. (2) Chen Hua (2) Chen, Wei (2) Chou, Harry (2) Cui, Ping (2) Save Results Save this search to My Library Excel (limit 2000) ...

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    Pando, K. (4) Ross, D.K. (4) Le, L. (3) Righter, Kevin (3) Agee, C. (2) Agresti, David G. (2) Bell, Aaron S. (2) Burger, Paul V. (2) Danielson, Lisa R. (2) Jones, John (2) Le, Loan ...

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Albrecht_ARM_2009 Poster.ppt

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    Studies V e r t c r ARM Boundary Layer s 2.5 surface saturation mixing ratio as a ces. Regression line e temperature and with RH constant. Diurnal cycle of the hourly- used to ...

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    Jackson, Scott I. (2) Kober, Edward M. (2) Morris, John S. (2) Patterson, Brian M. (2) Perry, William L. (2) Ramos, Kyle J. (2) Sheffield, Stephen A (2) Sheffield, Stephen A. (2) ...

  4. TABLE49.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 0 0 0 10 Ecuador ... 249 0 0 0 -14 22 0 (s) -2 6 256 Egypt ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (s) 0 (s) (s) France...

  5. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOEEIS-0250F-S2 and Final En Final Supplemental ...

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    ... Clem, Paul G. (3) campione, s (3) Bender, Daniel A. (2) Campione, Salvatore (2) Capolino, F. (2) Ihlefeld, Jon (2) Krishna, Sanjay (2) Luk, Ting S. (2) Wendt, Joel R. (2) Save ...

  7. TID-4500, UC-4 Chemistry Lawpenoe R

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... was also investigated. in the standard copper cylinder a r e p r e - sented in Fig. 5 . ... wave l e n s 2 Comp B Cylinder: OFHC Copper, ASTM-B-187, density 8.93 gcc, i .d. ...

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/13-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    15.3(d)). Note: Under the Beach Dune Rules Sec. 15.3(s)(2)(a) the exploration for and production of oil and gas is exempted from the Dune Protection permit requirement. If the...

  9. Spectroscopic signatures of AA' and AB stacking of chemical vapor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Also, resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra of AA' and AB stacked bilayer MoS2 were obtained on Au nanopyramid surfaces under strong plasmon resonance. Both resonance Raman ...

  10. West Virginia's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in West Virginia. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWestVirginia%27s2nd...

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    ... Elliptic flow in s 200 GeV Au + Au collisions and s 2.76 TeV Pb + Pb collisions: Insights from viscous hydrodynamics + hadron cascade hybrid model Song, Huichao ; Bass, Steffen ...

  12. Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production (Million Barrels) Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,125 1980's 2,081 2,285 2,393 2,650 2,660 2,610 2,671 2,509 2,339 2,270 1990's 2,305 2,237 2,162 2,211 2,151 2,269 2,337 2,376 2,262 2,257 2000's 2,479 2,318 2,368 2,192 2,466 2,723 2,913 3,158 3,148 3,432 2010's 3,983 4,541 4,727 5,653

  13. Integrated digital inverters based on two-dimensional anisotropic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... reported and has attracted considerable attention16. In contrast, semiconducting 2D TMDs ... In this study, we focus on monolayer and few-layer ReS2, with thicknesses ranging from 0.8 ...

  14. TABLE08.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    - 0 (s) - 0 (s) 2 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ... 15 69 31 - 69 37 - 5 3 140 EthaneEthylene ... 1 (s) 0 - 0 0 - 0 0 1 PropanePropylene...

  15. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B from ENSDF (unpublished, January 2016) E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 or Γ Decay g.s. (2 - ) n

  16. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 H from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (MeV) Decay g.s. (2 - ); 2 1.6 ± 0.4

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Energy Transfer from Quantum Dots to Graphene and MoS 2 : The Role of Absorption and Screening in Two-Dimensional Materials Raja, Archana ; Montoya-Castillo, Andrs ; Zultak, ...

  18. Copper Antimony Chalcogenide Thin Film PV Device Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, Adam W.; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; de Souza Lucas, Francisco Willian; Toberer, Eric S.; Wolden, Colin A.; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2015-06-14

    Emerging ternary chalcogenide thin film solar cell technologies, such as CuSbS2 and CuSbSe2, have recently attracted attention as simpler alternatives to quaternary Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS). Despite suitable photovoltaic properties, the initial energy conversion efficiency of CuSbS2 is rather low (0.3%). Here, we report on our progress towards improving the efficiency of CuSbS2 solar cells using a high throughput approach. The combinatorial methodology quickly results in baseline solar cell prototypes with 0.6% efficiency, and then modification of the back contact architecture leads to 1% PV devices. We then translate the optimal CuSbS2 synthesis parameters to CuSbSe2 devices, which show 3% efficiencies.

  19. Center for Inverse Design Highlight: Iron Chalcogenide PV Absorbers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and experimental study of FeS 2 reveals that coexistence of off-stoichiometric secondary phases is an important factor limiting performance as a thin-film solar absorber. ...

  20. New Mexico--East Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico--East Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 0 1 ...