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1

AVTA: 2012 Toyota Prius PHEV Downloadable Dynamometer Database...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Toyota Prius PHEV Downloadable Dynamometer Database Reports AVTA: 2012 Toyota Prius PHEV Downloadable Dynamometer Database Reports The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced...

2

Toyota Gen III Prius Hybrid Electric Vehicle Accelerated Testing...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HEV Accelerated Testing - September 2011 Two model year 2010 Toyota Generation III Prius hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July 2009 in a fleet in...

3

AVTA: Toyota Prius PHEV 2013 Testing Results  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a Toyota Prius PHEV 2013. Baseline and battery testing data collected at Argonne National Laboratory is available in summary and CSV form on the Argonne Downloadable Dynometer Database site (http://www.transportation.anl.gov/D3/2013_toyota_prius_phev.html). The reports for download here are based on research done at Idaho National Laboratory. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing.

4

HEV Fleet Testing - Summary Fact Sheet 2010 Toyota Prius  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Toyota Prius VIN JTDKN3DU2A5010462 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.8 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 885 lbs Features:...

5

2010 Toyota Prius VIN 0462 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 2010 Toyota Prius VIN 0462 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results Tyler Gray Matthew Shirk January 2013 The Idaho National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy...

6

2010 Toyota Prius VIN 6063 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 2010 Toyota Prius VIN 6063 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results Tyler Gray Matthew Shirk January 2013 The Idaho National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy...

7

Evaluation of 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electric Drive System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2004 Toyota Prius is a hybrid automobile equipped with a gasoline engine and a battery- and generator-powered electric motor. Both of these motive-power sources are capable of providing mechanical-drive power for the vehicle. The engine can deliver a peak-power output of 57 kilowatts (kW) at 5000 revolutions per minute (rpm) while the motor can deliver a peak-power output of 50 kW over the speed range of 1200-1540 rpm. Together, this engine-motor combination has a specified peak-power output of 82 kW at a vehicle speed of 85 kilometers per hour (km/h). In operation, the 2004 Prius exhibits superior fuel economy compared to conventionally powered automobiles. To acquire knowledge and thereby improve understanding of the propulsion technology used in the 2004 Prius, a full range of design characterization studies were conducted to evaluate the electrical and mechanical characteristics of the 2004 Prius and its hybrid electric drive system. These characterization studies included (1) a design review, (2) a packaging and fabrication assessment, (3) bench-top electrical tests, (4) back-electromotive force (emf) and locked rotor tests, (5) loss tests, (6) thermal tests at elevated temperatures, and most recently (7) full-design-range performance testing in a controlled laboratory environment. This final test effectively mapped the electrical and thermal results for motor/inverter operation over the full range of speeds and shaft loads that these assemblies are designed for in the Prius vehicle operations. This testing was undertaken by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) program through its vehicle systems technologies subprogram. The thermal tests at elevated temperatures were conducted late in 2004, and this report does not discuss this testing in detail. The thermal tests explored the derating of the Prius motor design if operated at temperatures as high as is normally encountered in a vehicle engine. The continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures are projected from test data at 900 rpm. A separate, comprehensive report on this thermal control study is available [1].

Staunton, Robert H [ORNL; Ayers, Curtis William [ORNL; Chiasson, J. N. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burress, Timothy A [ORNL; Marlino, Laura D [ORNL

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Evaluation of 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electric Drive System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2004 Toyota Prius is a hybrid automobile equipped with a gasoline engine and a battery- and generator-powered electric motor. Both of these motive-power sources are capable of providing mechanical-drive power for the vehicle. The engine can deliver a peak-power output of 57 kilowatts (kW) at 5000 revolutions per minute (rpm) while the motor can deliver a peak-power output of 50 kW over the speed range of 1200-1540 rpm. Together, this engine-motor combination has a specified peak-power output of 82 kW at a vehicle speed of 85 kilometers per hour (km/h). In operation, the 2004 Prius exhibits superior fuel economy compared to conventionally powered automobiles. To acquire knowledge and thereby improve understanding of the propulsion technology used in the 2004 Prius, a full range of design characterization studies were conducted to evaluate the electrical and mechanical characteristics of the 2004 Prius and its hybrid electric drive system. These characterization studies included (1) a design review, (2) a packaging and fabrication assessment, (3) bench-top electrical tests, (4) back-electromotive force (emf) and locked rotor tests, (5) loss tests, (6) thermal tests at elevated temperatures, and most recently (7) full-design-range performance testing in a controlled laboratory environment. This final test effectively mapped the electrical and thermal results for motor/inverter operation over the full range of speeds and shaft loads that these assemblies are designed for in the Prius vehicle operations. This testing was undertaken by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) program through its vehicle systems technologies subprogram. The thermal tests at elevated temperatures were conducted late in 2004, and this report does not discuss this testing in detail. The thermal tests explored the derating of the Prius motor design if operated at temperatures as high as is normally encountered in a vehicle engine. The continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures are projected from test data at 900 rpm. A separate, comprehensive report on this thermal control study is available [1].

Staunton, R.H.; Ayers, C.W.; Chiasson, J.N. (U Tennessee-Knoxville); Burress, B.A. (ORISE); Marlino, L.D.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Microsoft Word - TM-2010-253 - 2010 Prius Report - 26 - Tim ...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

11 EVALUATION OF THE 2010 TOYOTA PRIUS HYBRID SYNERGY DRIVE SYSTEM Prepared by: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Mitch Olszewski, Program Manager Submitted to: Energy Efficiency and...

10

AVTA: Toyota Prius Gen III HEV 2010 Testing Results  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Toyota Prius III hybrid-electric vehicle. Baseline data, which provides a point of comparison for the other test results, was collected at two different research laboratories. Baseline and other data collected at Idaho National Laboratory is in the attached documents. Baseline and battery testing data collected at Argonne National Laboratory is available in summary and CSV form on the Argonne Downloadable Dynometer Database site (http://www.transportation.anl.gov/D3/2010_toyota_prius.html). Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing.

11

AVTA: 2012 Toyota Prius PHEV Downloadable Dynamometer Database Reports |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601Department of Energy Toyota Prius PHEV

12

Fuel Cell Transit Buses: ThunderPower Bus Evaluation at SunLine...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cell Transit Buses: ThunderPower Bus Evaluation at SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Buses: ThunderPower Bus Evaluation at SunLine Transit Agency Report details the...

13

BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIMENTAL STUDY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SEISMIC ENERGY of Explosive Engineers, 2-5 Feb 97, Las Vegas, NV #12;BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL and David Gross Thunder Basin Coal Company Post Office Box 406 Wright, Wyoming 82732 D. Craig Pearson

14

Fuel Cell Transit Buses: ThunderPower Bus Evaluation at SunLine...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ThunderPower Bus Evaluation at SunLine Transit Agency Transit Buses Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Fuel Cell A Strong Energy Portfolio for a Strong...

15

Report on Toyota/Prius Motor Torque-Capability, Torque-Property, No-Load Back EMF, and Mechanical Losses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In today's hybrid vehicle market, the Toyota Prius drive system is currently considered the leader in electrical, mechanical, and manufacturing innovations. It is significant that in today's marketplace, Toyota is able to manufacture and sell the vehicle for a profit. This project's objective is to test the torque capability of the 2004 Prius motor and to analyze the torque properties relating to the rotor structure. The tested values of no-load back electromotive force (emf) and mechanical losses are also presented.

Hsu, J.S.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

Field Operations Program, Toyota PRIUS Hybrid Electric Vehicle Performance Characterization Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys Field Operations Program evaluates advanced technology vehicles in real-world applications and environments. Advanced technology vehicles include pure electric, hybrid electric, hydrogen, and other vehicles that use emerging technologies such as fuel cells. Information generated by the Program is targeted to fleet managers and others considering the deployment of advanced technology vehicles. As part of the above activities, the Field Operations Program has initiated the testing of the Toyota Prius hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), a technology increasingly being considered for use in fleet applications. This report describes the Pomona Loop testing of the Prius, providing not only initial operational and performance information, but also a better understanding of HEV testing issues. The Pomona Loop testing includes both Urban and Freeway drive cycles, each conducted at four operating scenarios that mix minimum and maximum payloads with different auxiliary (e.g., lights, air conditioning) load levels.

Francfort, James Edward; Nguyen, N.; Phung, J.; Smith, J.; Wehrey, M.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Evaluation of 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electric Drive System Interim Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the electrical and mechanical performance of the 2004 Toyota Prius and its hybrid electric drive system. As a hybrid vehicle, the 2004 Prius uses both a gasoline-powered internal combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor as motive power sources. Innovative algorithms for combining these two power sources results in improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions compared to traditional automobiles. Initial objectives of the laboratory tests were to measure motor and generator back-electromotive force (emf) voltages and determine gearbox-related power losses over a specified range of shaft speeds and lubricating oil temperatures. Follow-on work will involve additional performance testing of the motor, generator, and inverter. Information contained in this interim report summarizes the test results obtained to date, describes preliminary conclusions and findings, and identifies additional areas for further study.

Ayers, C.W.

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

18

Model year 2010 (Gen 3) Toyota Prius level 1 testing report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Toyota Prius (Generation 3) was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of 'Level 1' testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network connection, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were conducted. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D{sup 3}). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from the exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and minimal CAN bus data such as engine speed and pedal position. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Prius over standard regulatory cycles.

Rask, E.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Bocci, D.; Energy Systems

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

19

2010 Toyota Prius VIN 6063 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Toyota Prius HEV (VIN JTDKN3DU5A0006063). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

2010 Toyota Prius VIN 0462 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Toyota Prius HEV (VIN: JTDKN3DU2A5010462). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manzanita prius thunder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hybrid Electric Vehicle End-Of-Life Testing On Honda Insights, Gen I Civics And Toyota Gen I Priuses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical report details the end-of-life fuel efficiency and battery testing on two model year 2001 Honda Insight hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), two model year 2003 Honda Civic HEVs, and two model year 2002 Toyota Prius HEVs. The end-of-life testing was conducted after each vehicle has been operated for approximately 160,000 miles. This testing was conducted by the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). The AVTA is part of DOEs FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. SAE J1634 fuel efficiency testing was performed on the six HEVs with the air conditioning (AC) on and off. The AC on and off test results are compared to new vehicle AC on and off fuel efficiencies for each HEV model. The six HEVs were all end-of-life tested using new-vehicle coast down coefficients. In addition, one of each HEV model was also subjected to fuel efficiency testing using coast down coefficients obtained when the vehicles completed 160,000 miles of fleet testing. Traction battery pack capacity and power tests were also performed on all six HEVs during the end-of-life testing in accordance with the FreedomCAR Battery Test Manual For Power-Assist Hybrid Electric Vehicles procedures. When using the new-vehicle coast down coefficients (Phase I testing), 11 of 12 HEV tests (each HEV was tested once with the AC on and once with the AC off) had increases in fuel efficiencies compared to the new vehicle test results. The end-of-life fuel efficiency tests using the end-of-life coast down coefficients (Phase II testing) show decreases in fuel economies in five of six tests (three with the AC on and three with it off). All six HEVs experienced decreases in battery capacities, with the two Insights having the highest remaining capacities and the two Priuses having the lowest remaining capacities. The AVTAs end-of-life testing activities discussed in this report were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory; the AVTA testing partner Electric Transportation Applications, and by Exponent Failure Analysis Associates.

James Francfort; Donald Karner; Ryan Harkins; Joseph Tardiolo

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Rolling Thunder -- Integration of the Solo 161 Stirling engine with the CPG-460 solar concentrator at Ft. Huachuca  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Rolling Thunder is a dish/Stirling demonstration project at Ft. Huachuca, a US Army fort in southeastern Arizona (Huachuca means rolling thunder in Apache). It has been supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a cooperative program between the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy (DOE). As part of a 1992 SERDP project, Cummins Power Generation, Inc. (CPG) installed a CPG 7 kW(c) dish/Stirling system at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC) in Ft. Huachuca, Arizona. The primary objective of the SERDP Dish/Stirling for DoD Applications project was to demonstrate a CPG 7-kW(c) dish/Stirling system at a military facility. Unfortunately, Cummins Engine Company decided to divest its solar operations. As a direct result of Ft. Huachuca`s interest in the Cummins dish/Stirling technology, Sandia explored the possibility of installing a SOLO 161 Stirling power conversion unit (PCU) on the Ft. Huachuca CPG-460. In January 1997, a decision was made to retrofit a SOLO 161 Stirling engine on the CPG-460 at Ft. Huachuca. Project Rolling Thunder. The SOLO 161 Demonstration at Ft. Huachuca has been a challenge. Although, the SOLO 161 PCU has operated nearly flawlessly and the CPG-460 has been, for the most part, a solid and reliable component, integration of the SOLO PCU with the CPG-460 has required significant attention. In this paper, the integration issues and technical approaches of project Rolling Thunder are presented. Lessons of the project are also discussed.

Diver, R.B.; Moss, T.A.; Goldberg, V.; Thomas, G.; Beaudet, A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Toyota Prius Plug-In HEV: A Plug-In Hybrid Electric Car in NREL's Advanced Technology Vehicle Fleet (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet highlights the Toyota Prius plug-in HEV, a plug-in hybrid electric car in the advanced technology vehicle fleet at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). In partnership with the University of Colorado, NREL uses the vehicle for grid-integration studies and for testing new hardware and charge-management algorithms. NREL's advanced technology vehicle fleet features promising technologies to increase efficiency and reduce emissions without sacrificing safety or comfort. The fleet serves as a technology showcase, helping visitors learn about innovative vehicles that are available today or are in development. Vehicles in the fleet are representative of current, advanced, prototype, and emerging technologies.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Black Thunder Coal Mine and Los Alamos National Laboratory experimental study of seismic energy generated by large scale mine blasting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an attempt to better understand the impact that large mining shots will have on verifying compliance with the international, worldwide, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT, no nuclear explosion tests), a series of seismic and videographic experiments has been conducted during the past two years at the Black Thunder Coal Mine. Personnel from the mine and Los Alamos National Laboratory have cooperated closely to design and perform experiments to produce results with mutual benefit to both organizations. This paper summarizes the activities, highlighting the unique results of each. Topics which were covered in these experiments include: (1) synthesis of seismic, videographic, acoustic, and computer modeling data to improve understanding of shot performance and phenomenology; (2) development of computer generated visualizations of observed blasting techniques; (3) documentation of azimuthal variations in radiation of seismic energy from overburden casting shots; (4) identification of, as yet unexplained, out of sequence, simultaneous detonation in some shots using seismic and videographic techniques; (5) comparison of local (0.1 to 15 kilometer range) and regional (100 to 2,000 kilometer range) seismic measurements leading to determine of the relationship between local and regional seismic amplitude to explosive yield for overburden cast, coal bulking and single fired explosions; and (6) determination of the types of mining shots triggering the prototype International Monitoring System for the CTBT.

Martin, R.L.; Gross, D. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States); Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Anderson, D.P. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

MANZANITA Fall 2009 Getting the Dirt on Roots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;2 nitrogen and phosphorous, and water from the soil to support their photosynthetic activities. Fungi lack

Bruns, Tom

26

Manzanita Estates District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellis a town in CarrollManteca,Change | OpenMany

27

HEV Fleet Testing - Summary Fact Sheet for 2010 Toyota Prius  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

courts, law offices, and medical facilities on city streets and urban freeways. Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.8 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt...

28

Maintenance Records for 2010 Toyota Prius vin#0462  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DU2A5010462 Date Mileage Description Cost 11232009 5,935 Changed oil and filter, rotated tires, and inspected brakes 31.75 12182009 13,330 Changed oil and filter and inspected...

29

Honey, Did You Plug in the Prius? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,Fermi National AcceleratorMemoranda and Action

30

AVTA: 2013 Toyota Prius PHEV Testing Results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601Department of Energy Toyota

31

AVTA: 2010 Toyota Prius Gen III HEV Testing Results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601 High26-OPAM63-OPAMGuidanceAVTASmart Fortwo

32

Microsoft Word - TM-2010-253 - 2010 Prius Report - 26 - Tim - edited 2-16-2011  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite--FORRemarksHEATINGI5613, Rev.QA:4135-Rev. 111

33

Energy, Appliances and Utilities Energy&Environment * EnergySTAR * Toyota PRIUS Myths, Facts, and Hype ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

below) Typical furnace: 1 therm/hr = 100000 BTU/hr = 29.3 kW(h) heating power Typical A/C unit: 3.5 ton therm = 100000 BTU = 29.307 kWhr 1 tonR = 12000 BTU/hr = 3.516 kW(c) cooling rate 1 SEER = (1 BTU)/Whr(e) = 1000 BTU/kWhr = 0.293 kWhr(c)/kWhr(e), i.e., (cooling)/(electrical) ratio What is SEER? How does

Kostic, Milivoje M.

34

1 Year Postdoctoral Visitor in Policy, Sustainability & Education, York University, Toronto and Lakehead University, Thunder Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Year Postdoctoral Visitor in Policy, Sustainability & Education, York University, Toronto available in the Institute for Research and Innovation in Sustainability at York University and the Centre for Place and Sustainability Studies at Lakehead University. The post-doctorate appointment will be joining

35

Supplementary Protocol Here we provide details on the implementation of five analyses in Thunder, explaining  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, explaining for each the goal of the analysis, how it can be run from the Python shell (e.g. in iPython

Cai, Long

36

Fuel Cell Transit Buses: ThunderPower Bus Evaluation at SunLine Transit  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergy Frozen TelescopeRenewable 0Agency |

37

NOT EVERY HYBRID BECOMES ANOT EVERY HYBRID BECOMES A PRIUS: THE CASE AGAINST THEPRIUS: THE CASE AGAINST THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the expansion of nuclear energyof nuclear energy Waste ManagementWaste Management Fuel Resource Management ITS HYBRID CAR CALLED THE NUCLEON WITH NUCLEAR DRIVECALLED THE NUCLEON WITH NUCLEAR DRIVE #12;Past''s potential fors potential for nuclear applicationsnuclear applications The hybrid blanket must also breed

38

ATOC 3500/CHEM 3151 Spring 2014 Which is more fuel efficient, a Mercedes E250 or a Prius?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. However, there is still a catch...most regular gasoline contains 10% ethanol in order to further reduce pollutants like carbon monoxide. We really need to account for the even lighter weight of 90%/10% gasoline/ethanol done with such a blend). But it's easiest to just do the last calculation. A 90/10 mixture of gasoline/ethanol

Toohey, Darin W.

39

Les ombres noires de Saint Domingue: The Impact of Black Women on Gender and Racial Boundaries in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thunder, directed by Ben Stiller, Paramount Pictures andThunder, directed by Ben Stiller, Paramount Pictures and

Mitchell, Robin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

AVTA: Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 Ford Fusion Energi2013 Ford C-Max Energi Fleet2013 Ford C-Max Energi2012 Chevrolet Volt2012 Toyota Prius2013 Toyota Prius2013 Chevrolet Volt2011 Chrysler Town & Country2010 Quantum...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manzanita prius thunder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced hybrid imaging Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prius Used ... Source: North Carolina State University, North Carolina Solar Center Collection: Renewable Energy ; Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 2...

42

Bing Concert Hall, Under Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stadium Main Quad Escondido VillageManzanita Park Knight Management Center Escondido South Skilling HEPL Meyer Library Fire Truck Hse. Clock Tower Owen Bolivar House Haas Center Galvez Modular Bookstore

Straight, Aaron

43

Bing Concert Hall, Under Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Main Quad Escondido VillageManzanita Park Knight Management Center Escondido South (see INSET 2 Meyer Library School of Education Fire Truck Hse. Clock Tower Owen Bolivar House Haas Center Galvez

Prinz, Friedrich B.

44

MARGUERITE SHUTTLE SYSTEM MAP BioE/ChemE Bioengineering/Chemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Main Quad Escondido VillageManzanita Park Graduate School of Business; Knight Management Center of Education Fire Truck Hse. Clock Tower Owen Bolivar House Haas Center Galvez Modular Sweet Hall Bookstore Law

Bogyo, Matthew

45

Education and Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Main Quad Escondido VillageManzanita Park Graduate School of Business; Knight Management Center Meyer Library School of Education Fire Truck Hse. Clock Tower Owen Bolivar House Haas Center Galvez

Bogyo, Matthew

46

Arrillaga Sports Center Addition,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stadium Main Quad Escondido VillageManzanita Park Graduate School of Business; Knight Management Center 530 Peterson (550) 610 570 560 CERAS Meyer Library School of Education Fire Truck Hse. Clock Tower

Bogyo, Matthew

47

Bing Concert Hall, Under Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manzanita Park Knight Management Center Escondido South Skilling HEPL South Green Earth Sciences Mitchell Earth of Education Fire Truck Hse. Clock Tower Owen Bolivar House Haas Center Galvez Modular Sweet Hall Bookstore Law

Prinz, Friedrich B.

48

Education and Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manzanita Park Graduate School of Business; Knight Management Center Escondido South Galvez Lot Skilling HEPL 520540 530 Peterson (550) 610 570 560 CERAS Meyer Library School of Education Fire Truck Hse. Clock Tower

Bogyo, Matthew

49

Construction New Stanford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stadium Main Quad Escondido VillageManzanita Park Graduate School of Business; Knight Management Center Peterson (550) d.school 610 570 560 CERAS Fire Truck Hse. Clock Tower Owen Bolivar House Haas Center Galvez

Schnitzer, Mark

50

Bing Concert Hall, Under Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manzanita Park Knight Management Center Skilling HEPL South Green Earth Sciences Mitchell Earth Sciences 360 520540 530550 610 570 560 CERAS Meyer Library School of Education Fire Truck Hse. Clock Tower Owen

Prinz, Friedrich B.

51

Bing Concert Hall, Under Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Main Quad Escondido VillageManzanita Park Knight Management Center Escondido South Arrillaga Family 520540 530550 610 570 560 CERAS Meyer Library School of Education Fire Truck Hse. Clock Tower Owen

Prinz, Friedrich B.

52

Bioengineering/Chemical Engineering Building,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Main Quad Escondido VillageManzanita Park Graduate School of Business; Knight Management Center Truck Hse. Clock Tower Owen Bolivar House Haas Center Galvez Modular Sweet Hall Bookstore Law School

Straight, Aaron

53

Bing Concert Hall, Under Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Main Quad Escondido VillageManzanita Park Knight Management Center Escondido South Skilling HEPL South 570 560 CERAS Meyer Library School of Education Fire Truck Hse. Clock Tower Owen Bolivar House Haas

Prinz, Friedrich B.

54

Florence Moore Wilbur Hall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Main Quad Escondido VillageManzanita Park Graduate School of Business; Knight Management Center Truck Hse. Clock Tower Owen Bolivar House Haas Center Galvez Modular Sweet Hall Bookstore Law School

Bogyo, Matthew

55

Education and Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manzanita Park Graduate School of Business; Knight Management Center Escondido South Galvez Lot Skilling HEPL Peterson (550) 610 570 560 CERAS Meyer Library School of Education Fire Truck Hse. Clock Tower Owen Bolivar

Bogyo, Matthew

56

Water-wise bee garden plants for the Sacramento region Christine Casey, UC Davis Hagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water-wise bee garden plants for the Sacramento region Christine Casey, UC Davis Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven This is a suggested list of water Purple Manzanita Arctostaphylos spp. Heather (Ericaceae) December to April; varies

Ferrara, Katherine W.

57

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as the Toyota Prius, plug-in hybrid cars run on electric power with a gasoline (or biofuel) engine backup

58

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - Vehicle Testing and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- cont'd * University of California Davis, with 13 Hymotion Prius being used by 70 public drives * Oregon State Government fleets, 3 Hymotion PHEVs * National Rural Electric...

59

Secretary Chu's Remarks at the California Institute of Technology...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

computer tools with embedded energy analysis. It was the system integration of the automobile engine, transmission, brakes and battery that enabled Toyota to create the Prius....

60

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

1. Comparison of operating and incremental costs of battery electric vehicles and conventional gasoline vehicles Characteristics Hybrid electric vehicle (Prius) Plug-in hybrid...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manzanita prius thunder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CX-002030: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Snohomish County, Washington proposes to use 278,880.00 of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funds to support their solar carports and Prius conversion project, DOE...

62

Advanced Technology Vehicle Benchmark and Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to PHEV operation. Allows for flexible engine starting with acceptable emissions Prius Cold Engine Starting Strategy Fusion EV Envelope and Urban Operating Points 9...

63

Learning from Consumers: Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) Demonstration and Consumer Education, Outreach, and Market Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production of further hybrid cars. Similarly, Larry Rhodesbuying Priuses as commute carshybrids were fairly popularhybrid vehicles are being made available to (predominately new-car

Kurani, Kenneth S; Axsen, Jonn; Caperello, Nicolette; Davies, Jamie; Stillwater, Tai

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Symbolism and the Adoption of Fuel-Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

owner, who traded in his BMW for a Toyota Prius, struggledthan he used to drive his BMW during his first few months

Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Turrentine, Tom

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) ? PHEV Evaluations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

kWh MPG per FWHET Test Cumulative MPG Cumulative AC kWh 15 FY07 EnergyCS Prius - Fuel Costs EnergyCS PHEV Prius UDDS & HWFET Fuel Cost per Mile 0.000 0.005 0.010 0.015...

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity plug-in hybrid Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Electric Vehicles 109 Chapter 5: The Impact of Distributed Summary: of a PHEV. Tesla Roadster Nissan Leaf GM Chevy Volt Toyota Plug-in Prius Type Battery Battery Plug-in...

67

A study in hybrid vehicle architectures : comparing efficiency and performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a comparison of performance and efficiencies for four vehicle power architectures; the internal combustion engine (ICE), the parallel hybrid (i.e. Toyota Prius), the serial hybrid (i.e. Chevrolet Volt), ...

Cotter, Gavin M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Advanced Vehicle Benchmarking of HEVs and PHEVs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

rd Qtr 2008 - 2010 Honda Insight: 3 rd Qtr 2009 - 2010 Toyota Prius: 4 th Qtr 2009 - 2010 Fusion Hybrid: 4 th Qtr 2009 - 2010 Saturn Vue Hybrid: 4 th Qtr 2009 PHEV Benchmarking -...

69

Essays in Behavioral Economics and Environmental Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flex-fuel fleet), and hybrid cars (like the Prius, the HondaStates; 48% of the 290,271 hybrid cars sold in the U.S. indescribed by Khan, with hybrid cars enjoying greater market

Sexton, Steven E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Plug-In Demo Charges up Clean Cities Coalitions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Clean Cities Coordinators across the country highlight the benefits of plug-in hybrids and help collect valuable usage data as part of a demonstration project for the upcoming plug-in hybrid model of the Toyota Prius.

71

In the Viewpoints section, academics, practitioners and experts share their perspectives on policy questions relevant to sustainable development. In this issue, experts address the question  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" house, buying lots of environmentally sustainable products, driving his/her Prius 20,000 miles a year, cultural and ecological criteria, and how "business-as-usual" development and more sustainable alternatives

Vermont, University of

72

AVTA HEV, NEV, BEV and HICEV Demonstrations and Testing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Testing * 18 HEV models and 47 HEVs tested to date: Year Model Vehicles Testing Status 2001 Honda Insight 6 Completed 2002 Gen I Toyota Prius 6 Completed 2003 Gen I Honda...

73

Fact #762: January 14, 2013 Sales from Introduction: Hybrid Vehicles...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

14, 2013 Sales from Introduction: Hybrid Vehicles vs. Plug-in Vehicles The Toyota Prius hybrid-electric vehicle (HEV) was first released in the U.S. market in January 2000 and...

74

o Fences roun Fi JAMES L. MURPHY AND HARRY E. SCHIMKE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clover (Chamaebatia foliosa), and manzanita brush r..Q.t9J~...tgRholus viscida). There were twoo Fences roun Fi JAMES L. MURPHY AND HARRY E. SCHIMKE ABSTRACT: Five meshes (1/8 to 1 inch) of 16-breaks - -retard them until fir e crews a r r i v ed, costs of installing and maintaining fences might be justified

Standiford, Richard B.

75

San Nicolas Marine Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the asphaltum min- ing days to a viable and self-sustaining habitat. Manzanita Village Restoration Project College of Creative Studies 555 465 Housing & Residential Services 411 429LOT 3 LOT 9 LOT 7 LOT 23 LOT 27 Lehmann Concert Hall Multi- Cultural Theater Corwin Pavillion University House Centennial House Marine

California at Santa Barbara, University of

76

EA-1603: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

03: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1603: Final Environmental Assessment Expansion of Permitted Land and Operations at the 9940 Complex and Thunder Range at Sandia National...

77

abscess formation accompanied: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

multiple neutrons which appear with long delays in neutron monitors nearby the EAS core ('neutron thunder') are mostly not the neutrons of the shower, but have a secondary...

78

accompanies pro-thymocyte proliferation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

extensive air shower hadrons. However, multiple neutrons which appear with long delays in neutron monitors nearby the EAS core ('neutron thunder') are mostly not the neutrons of...

79

EA-1603: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the 9940 Complex and Thunder Range at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico The EA analyzes the potential effects of a proposal to increase testing and training...

80

L  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TRIBAL L EADER F ORUM TRIBAL E NERGY S YSTEMS: CLIMATE P REPAREDNESS A ND R ESILIENCY MARCH 4 , 2 015 THUNDER V ALLEY R ESORT, L INCOLN Cynthia G omez Governor's T ribal A dvisor...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manzanita prius thunder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Mapping The Midwest Future Improving Transportation Competitiveness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regina Williston Thunder Bay Thompson 356 mi 438 mi Note: Distances are in road miles The Centre of Development Shipping to Williston from Winnipeg is 20 to 50 per cent cheaper than shipping from other regional

Levinson, David M.

82

Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

Bakeman, M.S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Weingartner, R.; Gruner, F.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Influence of Rotor Structure and Number of Phases on Torque and Flux Weakening Characteristics of V-shape Interior PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, phase back-EMF, constant power operating capability. Keywords: V-shape magnet machine, straight number on the machine characteristics, PRIUS structure is transformed into 5-phase machine of the same type and dimensions. As well, an optimization procedure is carried out to determine the optimal open

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

84

Save-the Date: September 17th and 18th Charge Across Town's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and showing its Prius Plug-in; PG&E will show an extended range electric (eREV) pickup truck from VIA Motors and City Car Share electric vehicles; and finally the luxury cars Fisker Karma and the Tesla Model S! Learn

Mullins, Dyche

85

A CorridorCentric Approach to Planning Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and around the world ­ Plugin EV sales are expected o account for 0.3 percent of all cars sales by 2015. (Ohnishi, 2008) #12;Introduction · Why electric vehicles? ­ EV are energy efficient: with a welltowheel efficiency around 1.15 km/mJ, Evs are almost as twice as efficient as Toyota Prius (Romm, 2006). ­ Electric

Nagurney, Anna

86

LowCostGHG ReductionCARB 3/03 Low-Cost and Near-Term Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manufacturers to focus on high fuel-economy cars. And Toyota Prius and Honda Civic Hybrid are wonderful, or oil resources. Nor would the anticipated 40 mpg Ford Escape hybrid in the "small SUV" class Cycle (UDC) for representative cars and light trucks.1 The horizontal axis shows measured emissions

Edwards, Paul N.

87

| | English | | | RSS | www.sciencenet.cn 2007-9-11 23:28:9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] "Do you go to office by bike or bus, or by hybrid car?" the reporter from SCIENCENET was the first and his wife Susan drive their hybrid car Prius when really needed. The so-called hybrid car means the car worldwide hybrid car produced by Toyota in Japan. Indeed, Prof. Zare has a high expectation on hybrid cars

Zare, Richard N.

88

Market Implications of Synergism Between Low Drag Area and Electric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compared, Drag Area per unit vehicle mass dropped consistently from the EPRI 2001 base case vs. 3 HEVs the UDDS, Highway, and US06 Cycles. The 2001 EPRI Base Case Had a High Drag Area. Prius/Volt-like Drag Areas (EPRI Low Load & MIT) Improved 48 MPH "per Mile" Results Significantly 7 #12;Absolute Savings per

89

The inverter in a hybrid or fully  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The inverter in a hybrid or fully electric vehicle, such as the Toyota Prius, supplies power from the batteries to the motor. Inverters used in this application are currently limited by their power new material devices under real operating conditions. A project with TRW and others is investigating

Davies, Christopher

90

Author's personal copy Neural Networks 21 (2008) 458465  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vehicle (HEV) are more complex than those of the internal combustion engine-only vehicle because they have the appropriate power split between the electric motor and the engine to minimize fuel consumption and emissions of CI techniques. The Prius powertrain uses a planetary gear mechanism to connect an internal combustion

Prokhorov, Danil

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Building Information Modeling (BIM), Utilized During the Design and Construction Phase of a Project Has the Potential to Create a Valuable Asset in Its Own Right ('BIMASSET') at Handover that in Turn Enhances the Value of the Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be drawn from the manufacturing industry. A similarity to the BIM collaboration process can be found in the Toyota Production System. A vehicle development system called the ?Obeya? system was developed for the Prius, which is now the new standard... for Toyota. The system serves two main purposes, which is information management and on the spot decision making. It enabled project participants to keep track of the project development schedule through the CAD terminals, schedules with checkpoints...

Patrick, R.; Munir, M.; Jeffrey, H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

UCDavis University of California A California Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-in Prius Battery kWh: Charge Time: Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 All Electric Range: Price: 3hrs/110v (15A) 1 in single family House · 96% own their house ­ 1% rent in SD ­ 5% rent in other areas · 38-42% have solar panels ­ 18% consider installation ­ 40% have no plan to install · Average Household size 2.7 · 83% have

California at Davis, University of

93

Technology and Cost of the Model Year (MY) 2007 Toyota Camry HEV Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides research and development (R&D) support to the Department of Energy on issues related to the cost and performance of hybrid vehicles. ORNL frequently benchmarks its own research against commercially available hybrid components currently used in the market. In 2005 we completed a detailed review of the cost of the second generation Prius hybrid. This study examines the new 2007 Camry hybrid model for changes in technology and cost relative to the Prius. The work effort involved a detailed review of the Camry hybrid and the system control strategy to identify the hybrid components used in the drive train. Section 2 provides this review while Section 3 presents our detailed evaluation of the specific drive train components and their cost estimates. Section 3 also provides a summary of the total electrical drive train cost for the Camry hybrid vehicle and contrasts these estimates to the costs for the second generation Prius that we estimated in 2005. Most of the information on cost and performance were derived from meetings with the technical staff of Toyota, Nissan, and some key Tier I suppliers like Hitachi and Panasonic Electric Vehicle Energy (PEVE) and we thank these companies for their kind cooperation.

None

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Technology and Cost of the MY 2007 toyota Camry HEV -- A Subcontract Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides research and development (R&D) support to the Department of Energy on issues related to the cost and performance of hybrid vehicles. ORNL frequently benchmarks its own research against commercially available hybrid components currently used in the market. In 2005 we completed a detailed review of the cost of the second generation Prius hybrid. This study examines the new 2007 Camry hybrid model for changes in technology and cost relative to the Prius. The work effort involved a detailed review of the Camry hybrid and the system control strategy to identify the hybrid components used in the drive train. Section 2 provides this review while Section 3 presents our detailed evaluation of the specific drive train components and their cost estimates. Section 3 also provides a summary of the total electrical drive train cost for the Camry hybrid vehicle and contrasts these estimates to the costs for the second generation Prius that we estimated in 2005. Most of the information on cost and performance were derived from meetings with the technical staff of Toyota, Nissan, and some key Tier I suppliers like Hitachi and Panasonic Electric Vehicle Energy (PEVE) and we thank these companies for their kind cooperation.

Marlino, Laura D [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Detail of Telemaco Signorini's masterpiece "The Riverbank" ("L'alzaia"), painted in 1864. It shows the hard work of five men pulling a heavy barge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;#12;#12;Prudhoe Bay 1977 Internal Estimate : 12.5-15 Gb Reported : 9 Gb Technology added nothing 1977 1989 #12 10, 04 #12;#12;The energy cost for getting oil is increasing greatly.... #12;Thunder horse platform: Wealth comes from Capital (In the 1970s Solow dropped even labor) #12;#12;As natural scientists we

Hall, Charles A.S.

96

THE CHARACTERIZATION OF SEISMIC AND INFRASOUND SIGNALS FROM MINING EXPLOSIONS a) Explosion Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MORENCIDATA TXARDATA Natural Gas Explosion and Burn in New Mexico 19 August 2000 180 km NE of site No Seismic at TXAR T. Wallace Natural Gas Explosion and Burn in New Mexico T. Wallace Ft. Hancock Infrasound ~ 180 km are illustrated below. Type 1 - Coal overburden casting (Black Thunder) where explosions are designed to expose

Stump, Brian W.

97

MET Stations and Web Cams in the Great Lakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Alpena, MI, Muskegon, MI, South Haven, MI, Michigan City, IN, Chicago, IL, and Toldeo, OH also include: Alpena, MI Chicago, IL Muskegon, MI Michigan City, IN South Haven, MI Toledo, OH Met Data Stations: Alpena, MI Chicago, IL Michigan City, IN Milwaukee, WI Muskegon, MI South Haven, MI Thunder Bay

98

134 MAY/JUNE 2006 THE SOCIAL STUDIES uch of Mesoamerica's rich cul-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dis- solves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) to study acid rain at Mexico's archaeological sites. One product, called Acid Thunder: Saving El Tajín from Acid Rain. The supplement is in the form of a Webquest

Kahl, Jonathan D. W.

99

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Volume 2, appendices. Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquefaction experiments were undertaken using subbituminous Black Thunder mine coal to observe the effects of aqueous SO{sub 2} coal beneficiation and the introduction of various coal swelling solvents and catalyst precursors. Aqueous SO{sub 2} beneficiation of Black Thunder coal removed alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, increased the sulfur content and increased the catalytic liquefaction conversion to THF solubles compared to untreated Black Thunder coal. The liquefaction solvent had varying effects on coal conversion, depending upon the type of solvent added. The hydrogen donor solvent, dihydroanthracene, was most effective, while a coal-derived Wilsonville solvent promoted more coal conversion than did relatively inert 1-methylnaphthalene. Swelling of coal with hydrogen bonding solvents tetrahydrofuran (THF), isopropanol, and methanol, prior to reaction resulted in increased noncatalytic conversion of both untreated and SO{sub 2} treated Black Thunder coals, while dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), which was absorbed more into the coal than any other swelling solvent, was detrimental to coal conversion. Swelling of SO{sub 2} treated coal before liquefaction resulted in the highest coal conversions; however, the untreated coal showed the most improvements in catalytic reactions when swelled in either THF, isopropanol, or methanol prior to liquefaction. The aprotic solvent DMSO was detrimental to coal conversion.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., College Park, PA (United States); Gutterman, C.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Victorville San Bernardino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Farm Thunder Hill SolFocus Solar Hesperia Valley-Co.River Ivanpah SunrisePowerLink Midway Reservoir Camanche Reservoir Pardee Reservoir Folsom Lake Palen Solar Power Project Genesis Solar Project Blythe Solar Project Ivanpah SEGS Abengoa Mojave Solar Beacon Solar Energy Project Edwards AFB Carrizo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manzanita prius thunder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

AVTA: 2013 BRP Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Testing Results | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601Department of Energy Toyota Prius PHEVof

102

AVTA: 2013 Chevrolet Malibu HEV Testing Results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601Department of Energy Toyota Prius PHEVofMalibu HEV

103

AVTA: 2013 Chevrolet Volt Testing Results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601Department of Energy Toyota Prius PHEVofMalibu

104

AVTA: 2013 Ford C-MAX HEV Testing Results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601Department of Energy Toyota Prius PHEVofMalibuMAX

105

AVTA: 2013 Ford C-Max Energi Fleet PHEV Testing Results | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601Department of Energy Toyota Prius

106

AVTA: 2013 Ford C-Max Energi PHEV Testing Results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601Department of Energy Toyota PriusMax Energi PHEV

107

AVTA: 2013 Ford Focus All-Electric Vehicle Testing Reports | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601Department of Energy Toyota PriusMax Energi

108

AVTA: 2013 Ford Fusion Energi PHEV Testing Results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601Department of Energy Toyota PriusMax EnergiFord

109

AVTA: 2013 Honda Civic HEV Testing Results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601Department of Energy Toyota PriusMax

110

AVTA: 2013 Nissan Leaf All-Electric Vehicle Testing Reports | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601Department of Energy Toyota PriusMaxEnergy

111

A self-inflicted wound: the Confederacy's guerrilla campaign in Arkansas, 1862-1865  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Press, 1994), 109, 111, 124-25, 132. 6. William L. Shea, "1862: A Continual Thunder, " in Mark E. Christ, ed. , Ru ed and Sublime The Civil 'n Arkansas (Fayetteville, Ark. : University of 25 Arkansas Press, 1995), 39, 58; Daniel E. Sutherland...A SELF-INFLICTED WOUND: THE CONFEDERACY'S GUERRILLA CAMPAIGN IN ARKANSAS, 1862-1865 A Thesis by ROBERT RUSSELL MACKEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Mackey, Robert Russell

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Wireless Power Transfer Development for Sustainable Campus Initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wireless power transfer (WPT) is a convenient, safe, and autonomous means for electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging that has seen rapid growth in recent years for stationary applications. WPT does not require bulky contacts, plugs, and wires, is not affected by dirt or weather conditions, and is as efficient as conventional charging systems. This study summarizes some of the recent Sustainable Campus Initiative activities of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in WPT charging of an on-campus vehicle (a Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid electric vehicle). Laboratory development of the WPT coils, high-frequency power inverter, and overall systems integration are discussed. Results cover the coil performance testing at different operating frequencies, airgaps, and misalignments. Some of the experimental results of insertion loss due to roadway surfacing materials in the air-gap are presented. Experimental lessons learned are also covered in this study.

Onar, Omer C [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Campbell, Steven L [ORNL] [ORNL; Coomer, Chester [ORNL] [ORNL; White, Cliff P [ORNL] [ORNL; Seiber, Larry Eugene [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Hybrid options for light-duty vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) offer great promise in improving fuel economy. In this paper, we analyze why, how, and by how much vehicle hybridization can reduce energy consumption and improve fuel economy. Our analysis focuses on efficiency gains associated solely with vehicle hybridization. We do not consider such other measures as vehicle weight reduction or air- and tire-resistance reduction, because such measures would also benefit conventional technology vehicles. The analysis starts with understanding the energy inefficiencies of light-duty vehicles associated with different operation modes in US and Japanese urban and highway driving cycles, with the corresponding energy-saving potentials. The potential for fuel economy gains due to vehicle hybridization can be estimated almost exclusively on the basis of three elements: the reducibility of engine idling operation, the recoverability of braking energy losses, and the capability of improving engine load profiles to gain efficiency associated with specific HEV configurations and control strategies. Specifically, we evaluate the energy efficiencies and fuel economies of a baseline MY97 Corolla-like conventional vehicle (CV), a hypothetical Corolla-based minimal hybrid vehicle (MHV), and a MY98 Prius-like full hybrid vehicle (FHV). We then estimate energy benefits of both MHVs and FHVs over CVs on a performance-equivalent basis. We conclude that the energy benefits of hybridization vary not only with test cycles, but also with performance requirements. The hybrid benefits are greater for ''Corolla (high) performance-equivalent'' vehicles than for ''Prius (low) performance-equivalent'' vehicles. An increasing acceleration requirement would result in larger fuel economy benefits from vehicle hybridization.

An, F., Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

114

The importance of vehicle costs, fuel prices, and fuel efficiency to HEV market success.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Toyota's introduction of a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) named ''Prius'' in Japan and Honda's proposed introduction of an HEV in the United States have generated considerable interest in the long-term viability of such fuel-efficient vehicles. A performance and cost projection model developed entirely at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is used here to estimate costs. ANL staff developed fuel economy estimates by extending conventional vehicle (CV) modeling done primarily under the National Cooperative Highway Research Program. Together, these estimates are employed to analyze dollar costs vs. benefits of two of many possible HEV technologies. We project incremental costs and fuel savings for a Prius-type low-performance hybrid (14.3 seconds zero to 60 mph acceleration, 260 time) and a higher-performance ''mild'' hybrid vehicle, or MHV (11 seconds 260 time). Each HEV is compared to a U.S. Toyota Corolla with automatic transmission (11 seconds 260 time). The base incremental retail price range, projected a decade hence, is $3,200-$3,750, before considering battery replacement cost. Historical data are analyzed to evaluate the effect of fuel price on consumer preferences for vehicle fuel economy, performance, and size. The relationship between fuel price, the level of change in fuel price, and consumer attitude toward higher fuel efficiency is also evaluated. A recent survey on the value of higher fuel efficiency is presented and U.S. commercial viability of the hybrids is evaluated using discount rates of 2090 and 870. Our analysis, with our current HEV cost estimates and current fuel savings estimates, implies that the U.S. market for such HEVS would be quite limited.

Santini, D. J.; Patterson, P. D.; Vyas, A. D.

1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

115

Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

116

Alternative Perspectives on the Battle of Wolf Creek of 1938  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

all relative 3 4 Mary Jane Warde newcomers to the region and had yet to establish firm claims and boundaries. The Comanches arrived first, by the early 1700s, according to contemporary French reports. Mounted on horses acquired from the Spanish... know about this time and what followed has come to us through George Bent, the son of trader William Bent and Owl Woman, the Indigenous Nations Studies Journal, Vol. 2, No. 2, Fall 2001 5 daughter of White Thunder, Keeper of the Medicine Arrows.3...

Warde, Mary Jane

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

USDOE/EPRI BIOMASS COFIRING COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the period of April 1, 2000 through June 30, 2000, alternatives for relocating the Seward Generating Station cofiring project were investigated. A test was conducted at Bailly Generating Station of Northern Indiana Public Service Co., firing a blend of Black Thunder (Powder River Basin) coal and Illinois basin coal, in cyclone boiler designed for Illinois basin coal. This test at Bailly was designed to determine the technical feasibility of cofiring at that station using PRB coals. This report summarizes the activities during the second calendar quarter in 2000 of the USDOE/EPRI Biomass Cofiring Cooperative Agreement. It focuses upon reporting the results of construction and testing activities at these generating stations.

E. Hughes; D. Tillman

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Closed Solicitations | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe HouseStudents2.2 Documentation and ApprovalThe4, 2015 Thunder Valley Office

119

A CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF COAL LIQUEFACTION PROCESS STREAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first Annual Technical Report of activities under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC93054. Activities from the first three quarters of the fiscal 1998 year were reported previously as Quarterly Technical Progress Reports (DOE/PC93054-57, DOE/PC93054-61, and DOE/PC93054-66). Activities for the period July 1 through September 30, 1998, are reported here. This report describes CONSOL's characterization of process-derived samples obtained from HTI Run PB-08. These samples were derived from operations with Black Thunder Mine Wyoming subbituminous coal, simulated mixed waste plastics, and pyrolysis oils derived from waste plastics and waste tires. Comparison of characteristics among the PB-08 samples was made to ascertain the effects of feed composition changes. A comparison also was made to samples from a previous test (Run PB-06) made in the same processing unit, with Black Thunder Mine coal, and in one run condition with co-fed mixed plastics.

G.A. Robbins; R.A. Winschel; S.D. Brandes

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We characterized the gas- and speciated aerosol-phase emissions from the open combustion of 33 different plant species during a series of 255 controlled laboratory burns during the Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiments (FLAME). The plant species we tested were chosen to improve the existing database for U.S. domestic fuels: laboratory-based emission factors have not previously been reported for many commonly-burned species that are frequently consumed by fires near populated regions and protected scenic areas. The plants we tested included the chaparral species chamise, manzanita, and ceanothus, and species common to the southeastern US (common reed, hickory, kudzu, needlegrass rush, rhododendron, cord grass, sawgrass, titi, and wax myrtle). Fire-integrated emission factors for gas-phase CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2-4} hydrocarbons, NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3} and particle-phase organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +} generally varied with both fuel type and with the fire-integrated modified combustion efficiency (MCE), a measure of the relative importance of flaming- and smoldering-phase combustion to the total emissions during the burn. Chaparral fuels tended to emit less particulate OC per unit mass of dry fuel than did other fuel types, whereas southeastern species had some of the largest observed EF for total fine particulate matter. Our measurements often spanned a larger range of MCE than prior studies, and thus help to improve estimates for individual fuels of the variation of emissions with combustion conditions.

McMeeking, Gavin R.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Baker, Stephen; Carrico, Christian M.; Chow, Judith C.; Collett, Jr., Jeffrey L.; Hao, Wei Min; Holden, Amanda S.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Malm, William C.; Moosmuller, Hans; Sullivan, Amy P.; Wold, Cyle E.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manzanita prius thunder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Self limiting features of accidental criticality in a solution system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experience with the SHEBA solution critical assembly during validation testing of accidental criticality alarm detectors provided several insights into the character of potential accidental excursions. Two observations were of particular interest. First, it is nearly impossible to maintain a solution system, particularly one employing low-enrichment material, in a constant state. If super-critical, the system will heat up, expand (or form bubbles), return to a sub-critical state, and shut down of its own accord without going into short period oscillations. Second, a very slow change in the system could produce a long ''pulse'' resulting in lengthy exposures, a high dose, but a low dose rate. The experiments dramatically contradicted the popular contention that accidental criticality is characterized by a blue flash, a clap of thunder, and violet expulsion of material. 5 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Malenfant, R.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Beam transport and monitoring for laser plasma accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The controlled transport and imaging of relativistic electron beams from laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) are critical for their diagnostics and applications. Here we present the design and progress in the implementation of the transport and monitoring system for an undulator based electron beam diagnostic. Miniature permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQs) are employed to realize controlled transport of the LPA electron beams, and cavity based electron beam position monitors for non-invasive beam position detection. Also presented is PMQ calibration by using LPA electron beams with broadband energy spectrum. The results show promising performance for both transporting and monitoring. With the proper transport system, XUV-photon spectra from THUNDER will provide the momentum distribution of the electron beam with the resolution above what can be achieved by the magnetic spectrometer currently used in the LOASIS facility.

Nakamura, K.; Sokollik, T.; Tilborg, J. van; Gonsalves, A. J.; Shaw, B.; Shiraishi, S.; Mittal, R.; De Santis, S.; Byrd, J. M.; Leemans, W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States) and University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

123

UNDULATOR-BASED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

to couple the THUNDER undulator to the LOASIS Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). Currently the LWFA has achieved quasi-monoenergetic electron beams with energies up to 1 GeV. These ultra-short, high-peak-current, electron beams are ideal for driving a compact XUV free electron laser (FEL). Understanding the electron beam properties such as the energy spread and emittance is critical for achieving high quality light sources with high brightness. By using an insertion device such as an undulator and observing changes in the spontaneous emission spectrum, the electron beam energy spread and emittance can be measured with high precision. The initial experiments will use spontaneous emission from 1.5 m of undulator. Later experiments will use up to 5 m of undulator with a goal of a high gain, XUV FEL.

Bakeman, M.S.; Fawley, W.M.; Leemans, W. P.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, C.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

124

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Fleet and Baseline Performance Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts baseline performance and fleet testing of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). To date, the AVTA has completed baseline performance testing on seven HEV models and accumulated 1.4 million fleet testing miles on 26 HEVs. The HEV models tested or in testing include: Toyota Gen I and Gen II Prius, and Highlander; Honda Insight, Civic and Accord; Chevrolet Silverado; Ford Escape; and Lexus RX 400h. The baseline performance testing includes dynamometer and closed track testing to document the HEVs fuel economy (SAE J1634) and performance in a controlled environment. During fleet testing, two of each HEV model are driven to 160,000 miles per vehicle within 36 months, during which maintenance and repair events, and fuel use is recorded and used to compile life-cycle costs. At the conclusion of the 160,000 miles of fleet testing, the SAE J1634 tests are rerun and each HEV battery pack is tested. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory, Electric Transportation Applications, and Exponent Failure Analysis Associates. This paper discusses the testing methods and results.

J. Francfort; D. Karner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A wide bandgap silicon carbide (SiC) gate driver for high-temperature and high-voltage applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limitations of silicon (Si) based power electronic devices can be overcome with Silicon Carbide (SiC) because of its remarkable material properties. SiC is a wide bandgap semiconductor material with larger bandgap, lower leakage currents, higher breakdown electric field, and higher thermal conductivity, which promotes higher switching frequencies for high power applications, higher temperature operation, and results in higher power density devices relative to Si [1]. The proposed work is focused on design of a SiC gate driver to drive a SiC power MOSFET, on a Cree SiC process, with rise/fall times (less than 100 ns) suitable for 500 kHz to 1 MHz switching frequency applications. A process optimized gate driver topology design which is significantly different from generic Si circuit design is proposed. The ultimate goal of the project is to integrate this gate driver into a Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) charger module. The application of this high frequency charger will result in lighter, smaller, cheaper, and a more efficient power electronics system.

Lamichhane, Ranjan [University of Arkansas; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL; Frank, Steven Shane [ORNL; BRITTONJr., CHARLES L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Marlino, Laura D [ORNL; Mantooth, Alan [University of Arkansas; Francis, Matt [APEI, Inc.; Shepherd, Dr. Paul [University of Arkansas; Glover, Dr. Michael [University of Arkansas; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Perez, M [University of Arkansas; Mcnutt, Tyler [APEI, Inc.; Whitaker, Mr. Bret [APEI, Inc.; Cole, Mr. Zach [APEI, Inc.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Barriers to the Application of High-Temperature Coolants in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify practical approaches, technical barriers, and cost impacts to achieving high-temperature coolant operation for certain traction drive subassemblies and components of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). HEVs are unique in their need for the cooling of certain dedicated-traction drive subassemblies/components that include the electric motor(s), generators(s), inverter, dc converter (where applicable), and dc-link capacitors. The new coolant system under study would abandon the dedicated 65 C coolant loop, such as used in the Prius, and instead rely on the 105 C engine cooling loop. This assessment is important because automotive manufacturers are interested in utilizing the existing water/glycol engine cooling loop to cool the HEV subassemblies in order to eliminate an additional coolant loop with its associated reliability, space, and cost requirements. In addition, the cooling of power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology (FCVT) goals for power rating, volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost. All of these have been addressed in this study. Because there is high interest by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in reducing manufacturing cost to enhance their competitive standing, the approach taken in this analysis was designed to be a positive 'can-do' approach that would be most successful in demonstrating the potential or opportunity of relying entirely on a high-temperature coolant system. Nevertheless, it proved to be clearly evident that a few formidable technical and cost barriers exist and no effective approach for mitigating the barriers was evident in the near term. Based on comprehensive thermal tests of the Prius reported by ORNL in 2005 [1], the continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures were projected from test data at 900 rpm. They are approximately 15 kW with 103 C coolant and 20 kW with 50 C coolant. To avoid this 25% drop1 in continuous power, design changes for improved heat dissipation and carefully managed changes in allowable thermal limits would be required in the hybrid subsystems. This study is designed to identify the technical barriers that potentially exist in moving to a high-temperature cooling loop prior to addressing the actual detailed design. For operation at a significantly higher coolant temperature, there were component-level issues that had to be addressed in this study. These issues generally pertained to the cost and reliability of existing or near term components that would be suitable for use with the 105 C coolant. The assessed components include power electronic devices/modules such as diodes and insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs), inverter-grade high-temperature capacitors, permanent magnets (PM), and motor-grade wire insulation. The need for potentially modifying/resizing subassemblies such as inverters, motors, and heat exchangers was also addressed in the study. In order to obtain pertinent information to assist ORNL researchers address the thermal issues at the component, module, subassembly, and system levels, pre-existing laboratory test data conducted at varying temperatures was analyzed in conjunction with information obtained from technical literature searches and industry sources.

Hsu, J.S.; Staunton, M.R.; Starke, M.R.

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

Barriers to the Application of High-Temperature Coolants in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify practical approaches, technical barriers, and cost impacts to achieving high-temperature coolant operation for certain traction drive subassemblies and components of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). HEVs are unique in their need for the cooling of certain dedicated-traction drive subassemblies/components that include the electric motor(s), generators(s), inverter, dc converter (where applicable), and dc-link capacitors. The new coolant system under study would abandon the dedicated 65 C coolant loop, such as used in the Prius, and instead rely on the 105 C engine cooling loop. This assessment is important because automotive manufacturers are interested in utilizing the existing water/glycol engine cooling loop to cool the HEV subassemblies in order to eliminate an additional coolant loop with its associated reliability, space, and cost requirements. In addition, the cooling of power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology (FCVT) goals for power rating, volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost. All of these have been addressed in this study. Because there is high interest by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in reducing manufacturing cost to enhance their competitive standing, the approach taken in this analysis was designed to be a positive 'can-do' approach that would be most successful in demonstrating the potential or opportunity of relying entirely on a high-temperature coolant system. Nevertheless, it proved to be clearly evident that a few formidable technical and cost barriers exist and no effective approach for mitigating the barriers was evident in the near term. Based on comprehensive thermal tests of the Prius reported by ORNL in 2005 [1], the continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures were projected from test data at 900 rpm. They are approximately 15 kW with 103 C coolant and 20 kW with 50 C coolant. To avoid this 25% drop1 in continuous power, design changes for improved heat dissipation and carefully managed changes in allowable thermal limits would be required in the hybrid subsystems. This study is designed to identify the technical barriers that potentially exist in moving to a high-temperature cooling loop prior to addressing the actual detailed design. For operation at a significantly higher coolant temperature, there were component-level issues that had to be addressed in this study. These issues generally pertained to the cost and reliability of existing or near-term components that would be suitable for use with the 105 C coolant. The assessed components include power electronic devices/modules such as diodes and insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs), inverter-grade high-temperature capacitors, permanent magnets (PM), and motor-grade wire insulation. The need for potentially modifying/resizing subassemblies such as inverters, motors, and heat exchangers was also addressed in the study. In order to obtain pertinent information to assist ORNL researchers address the thermal issues at the component, module, subassembly, and system levels, pre-existing laboratory test data conducted at varying temperatures was analyzed in conjunction with information obtained from technical literature searches and industry sources.

Staunton, Robert H [ORNL; Hsu, John S [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Lower-Energy Energy Storage System (LEESS) Evaluation in a Full-Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) (e.g., Toyota Prius or Ford Fusion Hybrid) remains several thousand dollars higher than the cost of comparable conventional vehicles, which has limited HEV market penetration. The battery energy storage device is typically the component with the greatest contribution toward this cost increment, so significant cost reductions/performance improvements to the energy storage system (ESS) can improve the vehicle-level cost-benefit relationship, which would in turn lead to larger HEV market penetration and greater aggregate fuel savings. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collaborated with a United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) Workgroup to analyze trade-offs between vehicle fuel economy and reducing the minimum energy requirement for power-assist HEVs. NREL's analysis showed that significant fuel savings could still be delivered from an ESS with much lower energy storage than previous targets, which prompted the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) to issue a new set of lower-energy ESS (LEESS) targets that could be satisfied by a variety of technologies, including high-power batteries or ultracapacitors. NREL has developed an HEV test platform for in-vehicle performance and fuel economy validation testing of the hybrid system using such LEESS devices. This presentation describes development of the vehicle test platform and in-vehicle evaluation results using a lithium-ion capacitor ESS-an asymmetric electrochemical energy storage device possessing one electrode with battery-type characteristics (lithiated graphite) and one with ultracapacitor-type characteristics (carbon). Further efforts include testing other ultracapacitor technologies in the HEV test platform.

Cosgrove, J.; Gonder, J.; Pesaran, A.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROOF OF CONCEPT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eighth bench scale test of POC program, Run PB-08, was successfully completed from August 8 to August 26, 1997. A total of five operating conditions were tested aiming at evaluating the reactivity of different pyrolysis oils in liquefaction of a Wyoming sub-bituminous coal (Black Thunder coal). For the first time, water soluble promoters were incorporated into the iron-based GelCat to improve the dispersion of the promoter metals in the feed blend. The concentration of the active metals, Mo and Fe, was 100 and 1000 ppm of moisture-free coal, respectively. Black Thunder coal used in this run was the same batch as tested in HTI?s Run POC-02. Similar to Runs PB-01 through 7, this run employed two back mixed slurry reactors, an interstage gas/slurry separator and a direct-coupled hydrotreater. In addition to the hot vapor from the second stage separator, the first stage separator overhead liquid was also fed to the hydrotreater, which was packed with Criterion C-411 hydrotreating catalyst. Pyrolysis oil was produced off-line from a pyrolysis unit acquired from University of Wyoming. Solids rejection was achieved by purging out pressure filter solid. The recycle solvents consisted of O-6 separator bottoms and pressure filter liquid (PFL). The Run PB-08 proceeded very smoothly without any interruptions. Coal conversion consistently above 90W% was achieved. High resid conversion and distillate yield have been obtained from co-processing of coal and 343C+ (650F+) pyrolysis oil. Light gas (C1-C3 ) yield was minimized and hydrogen consumption was reduced due to the introduction of pyrolysis oil, compared with conventional coal-derived solvent. Catalytic activity was improved by incorporating a promoter metal into the iron-based GelCat. It seemed that lowering the first stage temperature to 435C might increase the hydrogenation function of the promoter metal. In comparison with previous coal-waste coprocessing run (PB-06), significant improvements in the process performance were achieved due to catalyst modification and integration of pyrolysis technique into liquefaction.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF COAL LIQUEFACTION PROCESS STREAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the Technical Progress Report for the fifteenth quarter of activities under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC93054. It covers the period January 1 through March 31, 1998. Described in this report are the following activities: (1) CONSOL characterized 41 process stream samples obtained from HTI Run PB-01 (227-90), in which Black Thunder Mine coal, Hondo VTB resid, municipal solid waste (MSW) plastics, and virgin plastics were co-liquefaction feedstocks with all-dispersed Fe and Mo catalysts. (2) A request was made for samples from the Nippon Coal Oil NEDOL pilot plant in Kashima, Japan. (3) Phenols were extracted from two samples of separator overhead oil from HTI Run PB-03 Periods 10A and 10B. The phenols were converted to ethylphenyl ethers, and the ethers were distilled to produce a sample within the diesel fuel boiling range. The ethers were mixed with diesel fuel to make 1%, 5%, 10%, and 20% solutions. The four mixtures and a control sample (0% ether) were tested for diesel fuel properties by Intertek Testing Services, Caleb Brett. (4) Computational studies related to the University of Delaware's resid conversion model were continued on the Hewlett Packard Apollo HP-735 RISC workstation at CONSOL R and D. The Structure Optimization Program and the Structure Once-Through Program were used to generate physicochemical properties and structure models for the 15 coal resid samples which have been under study.

G.A. Robbins; S.D. Brandes; D.J. Pazuchanics; D.G. Nichols; R.A. Winschel

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Viatec Recovery System, Inc.: A case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I will tell you how we transferred a technology from the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory to the private sector. I`ll begin by telling about the technology and what it does. Then I`ll tell you how we found a commercial partner to market the technology. And I`ll end by telling you some of the lessons we learned and what our customer thinks about the partnership. This is a success for two reasons. First, the people who developed the technology had faith in its potential. And second, they took an active part in the transfer; they didn`t sit back and wait for someone else to do it. That reminds me of Joe. Night after night, Joe prayed for help in winning the lottery, but his prayers went unanswered. Finally he cried out in desperation: ``Lord, give me a break! Please let me win the lottery!`` Suddenly, lightning flashed across the sky and thunder crashed around him. Then, he heard a voice from above: ``Joe! You give ME a break! BUY A TICKET!`` To succeed in tech transfer, you`ve got to have more than faith. You`ve got to buy a ticket. You`ve got to invest time, energy, imagination, and effort. And that`s just what the developers of the waste acid detoxification and reclamation process did.

Williams, L.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kensington, K. [Viatec, Inc., Whitefish, MT (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Volume 1, Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrated coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. Heterofunctional solvents were the most effective in swelling coals. Also solvent blends such as isopropanol/water were more effective than pure solvents alone. Impregnating slurry catalysts simultaneously during coal swelling showed that better uptake was achieved with nonswelling solvent and higher impregnation temperature. Some enhancement in initial coal conversion was seen liquefying SO{sub 2}-treated Black Thunder coal with slurry catalysts, and also when hydrogen donor liquefaction solvents were used. Noncatalytic reactions showed no benefit from SO{sub 2} treatment. Coupling coal swelling and SO{sub 2} treatment with slurry catalysts was also not beneficial, although high conversion was seen with continuous operation and long residence time, however, similar high conversion was observed with untreated coal. SO{sub 2} treatment is not economically attractive unless it provides about 17% increase in coal reactivity. In most cases, the best results were obtained when the coal was untreated and the slurry catalyst was added directly into the reactor. Foster Wheeler`s ASCOT process had better average liquid yields than either Wilsonville`s vacuum tower/ROSE combination or delayed coking process. This liquid product also had good quality.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Close Look at Hybrid Vehicle Loyalty and Ownership  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a news release dated April 9, 2012, Polk stated that only 35% of hybrid owners bought a hybrid again when they returned to market in 2011. These findings were based on an internal study conducted by Polk. The study also indicated that if repurchase behavior among the high volume audience of Toyota Prius owners wasn t factored in; hybrid loyalty would drop to under 25%. This news release has generated a lot of interest and concern by the automobile industry as well as consumers, since it was published, and caused many to think about the idea of hybrid loyalty as well as factors that influence consumers. Most reactions to the 35% hybrid loyalty dealt with concerns of the viability of hybrid technology as part of the solution to address transportation energy challenges. This paper attempts to shed more light on Polk s hybrid loyalty study as well as explore several information sources concerning hybrid loyalty status. Specifically, major factors that might impact the selection and acquisition of hybrid vehicles are addressed. This includes investigating the associations between hybrid market shares and influencing factors like fuel price and hybrid incentives, as well as the availability of hybrid models and other highly fuel efficient vehicle options. This effort is not in-depth study, but rather a short study to see if Polk s claim could be validated. This study reveals that Polk s claim was rather misleading because its definition of loyalty was very narrow. This paper also suggests that Polk s analysis failed to account for some very important factors, raising the question of whether it is fair to compare a vehicle drive train option (which hybrids are) with a vehicle brand in terms of loyalty and also raises the question of whether hybrid loyalty is even a valid point to consider. This report maintains that Polk s study does not prove that hybrid owners were dissatisfied with their vehicles, which was a common theme among reporting news agencies when Polk initially released their findings. In this brief review, the team has looked at factors that might contribute to a consumer choosing to not purchase a hybrid; including the increase in manufacture s overall vehicle mpg and the percentage of the vehicle market owned by hybrids.

Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL] [ORNL; Wilson, Daniel W [ORNL] [ORNL; Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes [ORNL] [ORNL; Taylor, Rob D [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Integration of waste pyrolysis with coal/oil coprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HTI has developed a novel process, HTI CoPro Plus{trademark}, to produce alternative fuels and chemicals from the combined liquefaction of waste materials, coal, and heavy petroleum residues. Promising results have been obtained from a series of bench tests (PB-01 through PB-06) under the DOE Proof of Concept Program. Recently, HTI acquired a proven technology for the mild co-pyrolysis of used rubber tires and waste refinery or lube oils, developed by the University of Wyoming and Amoco. The feasibility of integration of pyrolysis with coal-oil coprocessing was studied in the eighth bench run (PB-08) of the program. The objective of Run PB-08 was to study the coprocessing of coal with oils derived from mild pyrolysis of scrap tires, waste plastics, and waste lube oils to obtain data required for economic comparisons with the DOE data base. A specific objective was also to study the performance of HTI`s newly improved GelCat{trademark} catalyst in coal-waste coprocessing under low-high (Reactor 1-Reactor 2 temperatures) operating mode. This paper presents the results obtained from Run PB-08, a 17-day continuous operation conducted in August 1997. A total of 5 conditions were tested, including a baseline coal-only condition. During the coprocessing conditions, 343{degrees}C+ pyrolysis oils derived from co-pyrolysis of rubber tires or a mixture of rubber tires and plastics with waste lube oil, were coprocessed with Black Thunder coal using HTI GelCat{trademark} catalyst. In the last condition, rubber tires were pyrolyzed with 524{degrees}C- coal liquid to study the possible elimination of lube oil used as pyrolysis processing oil. Overall coal conversion above 90 W% was achieved.

Hu, J.; Zhou, P.; Lee, T.L.K.; Comolli, A. [Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc., Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Close-coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies. Final report, [October 1, 1988--July 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a four year and ten month contract starting on October 1, 1988 to July 31, 1993 with the US Department of Energy to study and improve Close-Coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Direct Liquefaction of coal by producing high yields of distillate with improved quality at lower capital and production costs in comparison to existing technologies. Laboratory, Bench and PDU scale studies on sub-bituminous and bituminous coals are summarized and referenced in this volume. Details are presented in the three topical reports of this contract; CTSL Process Bench Studies and PDU Scale-Up with Sub-Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-1, CTSL Process Bench Studies with Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-2, and CTSL Process Laboratory Scale Studies, Modelling and Technical Assessment-DE-88818-TOP-3. Results are summarized on experiments and studies covering several process configurations, cleaned coals, solid separation methods, additives and catalysts both dispersed and supported. Laboratory microautoclave scale experiments, economic analysis and modelling studies are also included along with the PDU-Scale-Up of the CTSL processing of sub-bituminous Black Thunder Mine Wyoming coal. During this DOE/HRI effort, high distillate yields were maintained at higher throughput rates while quality was markedly improved using on-line hydrotreating and cleaned coals. Solid separations options of filtration and delayed coking were evaluated on a Bench-Scale with filtration successfully scaled to a PDU demonstration. Directions for future direct coal liquefaction related work are outlined herein based on the results from this and previous programs.

Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Popper, G.A.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

High-Temperature High-Power Packaging Techniques for HEV Traction Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key issue associated with the wider adoption of hybrid-electric vehicles (HEV) and plug in hybrid-electric vehicles (PHEV) is the implementation of the power electronic systems that are required in these products. One of the primary industry goals is the reduction in the price of these vehicles relative to the cost of traditional gasoline powered vehicles. Today these systems, such as the Prius, utilize one coolant loop for the engine at approximately 100 C coolant temperatures, and a second coolant loop for the inverter at 65 C. One way in which significant cost reduction of these systems could be achieved is through the use of a single coolant loop for both the power electronics as well as the internal combustion engine (ICE). This change in coolant temperature significantly increases the junction temperatures of the devices and creates a number of challenges for both device fabrication and the assembly of these devices into inverters and converters for HEV and PHEV applications. Traditional power modules and the state-of-the-art inverters in the current HEV products, are based on chip and wire assembly and direct bond copper (DBC) on ceramic substrates. While a shift to silicon carbide (SiC) devices from silicon (Si) devices would allow the higher operating temperatures required for a single coolant loop, it also creates a number of challenges for the assembly of these devices into power inverters. While this traditional packaging technology can be extended to higher temperatures, the key issues are the substrate material and conductor stability, die bonding material, wire bonds, and bond metallurgy reliability as well as encapsulation materials that are stable at high operating temperatures. The larger temperature differential during power cycling, which would be created by higher coolant temperatures, places tremendous stress on traditional aluminum wire bonds that are used to interconnect power devices. Selection of the bond metallurgy and wire bond geometry can play a key role in mitigating this stress. An alternative solution would be to eliminate the wire bonds completely through a fundamentally different method of forming a reliable top side interconnect. Similarly, the solders used in most power modules exhibit too low of a liquidus to be viable solutions for maximum junction temperatures of 200 C. Commonly used encapsulation materials, such as silicone gels, also suffer from an inability to operate at 200 C for extended periods of time. Possible solutions to these problems exist in most cases but require changes to the traditional manufacturing process used in these modules. In addition, a number of emerging technologies such as Si nitride, flip-chip assembly methods, and the elimination of base-plates would allow reliable module development for operation of HEV and PHEV inverters at elevated junction temperatures.

Elshabini, Aicha [University of Idaho; Barlow, Fred D. [University of Idaho

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Power Modulation Investigation for High Temperature (175-200 degrees Celcius) Automotive Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid electric vehicles were re-introduced in the late 1990s after a century dominated by purely internal combustion powered engines[1]. Automotive players, such as GM, Ford, DaimlerChrysler, Honda, and Toyota, together with major energy producers, such as BPAmoco, were the major force in the development of hybrid electric vehicles. Most notable was the development by Toyota of its Prius, which was launched in Japan in 1997 and worldwide in 2001. The shift to hybrids was driven by the fact that the sheer volume of vehicles on the road had begun to tax the ability of the environment to withstand the pollution of the internal combustion engine and the ability of the fossil fuel industry to produce a sufficient amount of refined gasoline. In addition, the number of vehicles was anticipated to rise exponentially with the increasing affluence of China and India. Over the last fifteen years, major advances have been made in all the technologies essential to hybrid vehicle success, including batteries, motors, power control and conditioning electronics, regenerative braking, and power sources, including fuel cells. Current hybrid electric vehicles are gasoline internal combustion--electric motor hybrids. These hybrid electric vehicles range from micro-hybrids, where a stop/start system cuts the engine while the vehicle is stopped, and mild hybrids where the stop/start system is supplemented by regenerative braking and power assist, to full hybrids where the combustion motor is optimized for electric power production, and there is full electric drive and full regenerative braking. PSA Peugeot Citroen estimates the increased energy efficiency will range from 3-6% for the micro-hybrids to 15-25% for the full hybrids.[2] Gasoline-electric hybrids are preferred in US because they permit long distance travel with low emissions and high gasoline mileage, while still using the existing refueling infrastructure. One of the most critical areas in which technology has been advancing has been the development of electronics that can operate in the high temperature environments present in hybrid vehicles. The temperatures under the hood for a gasoline-electric hybrid vehicle are comparable to those for traditional internal combustion engines. This is known to be a difficult environment with respect to commercial-grade electronics, as there are surface and ambient temperatures ranging from 125 C to 175 C. In addition, some hybrid drive electronics are placed in even harsher environments, such as on or near the brakes, where temperatures can reach 250 C. Furthermore, number of temperature cycles experienced by electronics in a hybrid vehicle is different from that experienced in a traditional vehicle. A traditional internal combustion vehicle will have the engine running for longer periods, whereas a mild or micro-hybrid engine will experience many more starts and stops.[3] This means that hybrid automotive electronics will undergo more cycles of a potential wider temperature cycle than standard automotive electronics, which in turn see temperature cycles of 2 to 3 times the magnitude of the {Delta}T = 50 C-75 C experienced by commercial-grade electronics. This study will discuss the effects of these harsh environments on the failure mechanisms and ultimate reliability of electronic systems developed for gasoline-electric hybrid vehicles. In addition, it will suggest technologies and components that can reasonably be expected to perform well in these environments. Finally, it will suggest areas where further research is needed or desirable. Areas for further research will be highlighted in bold, italic type. It should be noted that the first area where further research is desirable is in developing a clearer understanding of the actual hybrid automotive electronics environment and how to simulate it through accelerated testing, thus: Developing specific mission profiles and accelerated testing protocols for the underhood environment for hybrid cars, as has previously been done for gasoline-powered vehicles, is an important area for further st

McCluskey, F. P.

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

The California greenhouse gas initiative and its implications to the automotive industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CAR undertook this investigation to better understand the costs and challenges of a local (state) regulation necessitating the implementation of alternative or advanced powertrain technology. CAR will attempt to add insight into the challenges that local regulations present to the automotive industry, and to contribute further to the discussion of how advanced powertrain technology may be used to meet such regulation. Any local law that (directly or indirectly) affects light duty motor vehicle fuel economy creates what in effect is a specialty market for powertrain technology. As such these small markets present significant challenges for automotive manufacturers. First, a small market with unique standards presents significant challenges to an industry that has sustained growth by relying on large volumes to achieve scale economies and deliver products at a cost acceptable to the consumer. Further, the challenges of the additional technology make it likely that any powertrain capable of meeting the stringent emissions standards will include costly additional components, and thus will be more costly to manufacture. It is likely that manufacturers would consider the following actions as steps to deliver products to meet the pending California regulatory requirements anticipated as a result of prior California legislation: (1) Substituting more fuel efficient vehicles: Bring in more efficient vehicles from global operations, while likely dropping existing domestic products. (2) Substituting powertrains: Add existing downsized engines (i.e. turbocharged versions, etc.) into California market-bound vehicles. (3) Powertrain enhancements: Add technology to current engine and transmission offerings to improve efficiency and reduce emissions. (4) Incorporating alternative powertrains into existing vehicle platforms: Develop a hybrid or other type of powertrain for an existing vehicle. (5) New powertrains and new platforms: Develop vehicles specifically intended to incorporate new powertrain technologies, materials and/or design (e.g. the General Motors EV1 or the Toyota Prius). These five actions represent the gamut from the least complicated solution to the most complex. They also generally represent the least expensive response to the most expensive. It is possible that the least expensive responses may be least likely to meet market demands while achieving required GHG emission limits. At the same time, the most expensive option may produce a vehicle that satisfies the GHG reduction requirements and meets some consumer requirements, but is far too costly to manufacture and sell profitably. The response of a manufacturer would certainly have to take market size, consumer acceptance, technology implication and cost, as well as internal capacities and constraints, into consideration. It is important to understand that individual companies may respond differently in the short term. However, it is probable that there would be a more consistent industry-wide response in the longer term. Options 1 and 2 present the simplest responses. A company may reach into its global portfolio to deliver vehicles that are more fuel-efficient. These vehicles are usually much smaller and significantly less powerful than current U.S. offerings. Industry respondents indicated that such a strategy may be possible but would likely be met with less than positive reaction from the buying public. A general estimate for the cost to homologize a vehicle--that is, to prepare an existing vehicle for entry into the United States provided all business conditions were met (reasonable product, capacity availability, etc.), would be approximately $50 million. Assuming an estimated cost for homologation to meet U.S. standards of $50 million and a 20,000 vehicle per year sales volume in California, the company would then incur a $2,500 per-vehicle cost to bring them into the market. A manufacturer may also choose to incorporate a more efficient powertrain into a vehicle already sold in the market. The costs associated with such a strategy would include reengineering

Smith, B. C.; Miller, R. T.; Center for Automotive Research

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

2012 SARA Students Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Service Academy Research Associates (SARA) program provides an opportunity for Midshipmen and Cadets from US Service Academies to participate in research at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratory for several weeks during the summer as part of their summer training assignments. During the summer of 2012, three Midshipmen were assigned to work with the XCP Division at LANL for approximately 5-6 weeks. As one of the nation's top national security science laboratories, LANL stretches across 36 square miles, has over 2,100 facilities, and employs over 9,000 individuals including a significant number of students and postdocs. LANL's mission is to 'apply science and technology to: ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent, reduce global threats, and solve other emerging national security challenges.' While LANL officially operates under the US Department of Energy (DoE), fulfilling this mission requires mutual cooperation with the US Department of Defense (DoD) as well. LANL's high concentration of knowledge and experience provides interns a chance to perform research in many disciplines, and its connection with the DoD in both operation and personnel gives SARA students insight to career possibilities both during and after military service. SARA students have plenty of opportunity to enjoy hiking, camping, the Los Alamos YMCA, and many other outdoor activities in New Mexico while staying at the Buffalo Thunder Resort, located 20 miles east of the lab. XCP Division is the Computational Physics division of LANL's Weapons Department. Working with XCP Division requires individuals to be Q cleared by the DoE. This means it is significantly more convenient for SARA students to be assigned to XCP Division than their civilian counterparts as the DoD CNWDI clearance held by SARA students is easily transferred to the lab prior to the students arriving at the start of the summer. SARA students working with XCP Division were given a comprehensive introduction into nuclear engineering and physics, nuclear weapons, and radiation transport and detection via texts and lectures at various classification levels. Students also attended tours of several prominent facilities at LANL including TA-41 Ice House, TA-55 PF-4 plutonium facility, the Nicholas C. Metropolis Center for Modeling and Simulation, also known as the Secure Computing Center (SCC), and the Dual-Axis Radiological Hydro Test (DARHT) facility; in addition, SARA students accompanied by LANL staff traveled to Minot AFB in North Dakota for tours of the 5th Bomb Wing and 91st Missile Wing facilities. Students participated in a week long class on the Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) code to supplement their understanding of radiation transport simulations. SARA students were then tasked with using this knowledge to model radiation detectors and use MCNP to compare their models to experimental data and previously accepted models.

Briccetti, Angelo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lorei, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yonkings, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lorio, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sood, Avneet [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z