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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Table 40. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code 0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 40. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 NAICS Code June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 311 Food Manufacturing 875 926 1,015 -13.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 26 17 19 35.8 313 Textile Mills 22 22 25 -13.9 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w w 322 Paper Manufacturing 570 583

2

Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 2,256 2,561 1,864 4,817 4,343 10.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 38 50 48 88 95 -7.7 313 Textile Mills 31 29 21 60 59 2.2 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w

3

Table 28. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 28. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 2,214 2,356 1,994 4,570 4,353 5.0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 48 37 53 85 90 -5.6 313 Textile Mills 31 29 22 59 63 -6.1 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w w w w 322 Paper Manufacturing

4

Delineation of Coal Tar Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid and Groundwater Plumes at a Former Manufactured Gas Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a field investigation at a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site in the Midwest. The focus of the investigation was delineating the distribution of coal tar (a dense nonaqueous phase liquid) and the associated dissolved-phase constituents in groundwater using a combination of analysis methodologies. The results will be used to determine remediation needs at the site.

1998-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Table 29. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 29. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 51.17 49.59 50.96 50.35 50.94 -1.2 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 111.56 115.95 113.47 113.49 117.55 -3.5 313 Textile Mills 115.95 118.96 127.41 117.40 128.07 -8.3 315 Apparel Manufacturing

6

Proceedings: EPRI Manufactured Gas Plants 2003 Forum  

SciTech Connect

The EPRI Manufactured Gas Plants 2003 Forum covered a range of topics related to remediation and management of former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites, with emphasis on technological advances and current issues associated with site cleanup. In specific, the forum covered MGP coal-tar delineation, soil and groundwater remediation technologies, improvements in air monitoring, and ecological risk characterization/risk management tools.

None

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Plants on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants on Delicious Rank Advanced...

8

The First Coal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Plants Coal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 329-A January 25, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE FIRST COAL PLANTS Coal has been called "the mainspring" of our civilization. You are probably familiar, in a general way, with the story of how it originated ages ago from beds of peat which were very slowly changed to coal; and how it became lignite or brown coal, sub-bituminous, bituminous, or anthracite coal, depending on bacterial and chemical changes in the peat, how much it was compressed under terrific pressure, and the amount of heat involved in the process. You also know that peat is formed by decaying vegetation in shallow clear fresh-water swamps or bogs, but it is difficult to find a simple description of the kinds of plants that, living and dying during different periods of the earth's history, created beds of peat which eventually became coal.

9

NETL: Coal-Fired Power Plants (CFPPs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Sources Coal-Fired Power Plants (CFPPs) Where is the coal in the United States? Coal Across the U.S. The U.S. contains coal resources in various places. The coal occurs...

10

Plants of the Coal Age  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Age Nature Bulletin No. 330-A February 1, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PLANTS OF THE COAL...

11

Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of TMDLs on Impacts of TMDLs on Coal-Fired Power Plants April 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1408 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The

12

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), and up to 5500 psi with emphasis upon 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally-acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national perspective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

14

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Upgrading coal plant damper drives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The replacement of damper drives on two coal-fired units at the James H. Miller Jr. electric generating plant by Intelligent Contrac electric rotary actuators is discussed. 2 figs.

Hood, N.R.; Simmons, K. [Alamaba Power (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Form EIA-3 Users Manual Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report, Manufacturing and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Users Manual Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report, Manufacturing and Transformation/Processing Coal Plants and Commercial and Institutional Coal Users Document Number: 001 Version: 2.0 June 2011 1 June 2011 Document History Number Date Section Description 1 2 May 2011 June 2011 Document initiation. Revised screen shots and remove external user references. Primary POC: Tejasvi Raghuveer Phone: (202) 586-8926 Email: Tejasvi.Raghuveer@eia.gov Document Changes/Maintenance POC: Primary POC: Tejasvi Raghuveer Phone: (202) 586-8926 Email: Tejasvi.Raghuveer@eia.gov Project References: Coal Internet Data Collection (CIDC) User's Manual, September 2007

18

Power Quality Investigation of a Manufacturing Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study summarizes the findings and results of a power quality (PQ) audit performed at a manufacturing plant to harden the plant processes to external PQ disturbances. Recommendations were made by EPRI and implemented by the manufacturer. The result was a significant improvement in immunity of the plant processes to voltage sags.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Solvent Extraction for Remediation of Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has assessed the feasibility of using a solvent extraction process to remove coal tar from the subsurface or to treat contaminated soil excavated from manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. The assessment indicates that in situ solvent extraction may recover a significant amount of tar from the subsurface within a reasonable timeframe, provided subsurface conditions are conducive to process implementation. This work will help utilities searching for cost-effective technologies to remediate MGP sites.

1993-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

20

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit states that an income taxpayer that makes a qualified investment in a new integrated coal gasification power plant or in the expansion of an existing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Steam Plant Conversion Eliminating Campus Coal Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam Plant Conversion Eliminating Campus Coal Use at the Steam Plant #12;· Flagship campus region produce 14% of US coal (TN only 0.2%) Knoxville and the TN Valley #12;· UT is one of about 70 U.S. colleges and universities w/ steam plant that burns coal · Constructed in 1964, provides steam for

Dai, Pengcheng

22

Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Coal-Fired Power Plants New Coal-Fired Power Plants (data update 1/13/2012) January 13, 2012 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Strategic Energy Analysis & Planning Erik Shuster 2 Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants This report is intended to provide an overview of proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under development. This report may not represent all possible plants under consideration but is intended to illustrate the potential that exists for installation of new coal-fired power plants. Additional perspective has been added for non-coal-fired generation additions in the U.S. and coal-fired power plant activity in China. Experience has shown that public announcements of power plant developments do not provide an accurate representation of eventually

23

Holdup measurement for nuclear fuel manufacturing plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assay of nuclear material holdup in fuel manufacturing plants is a laborious but often necessary part of completing the material balance. A range of instruments, standards, and a methodology for assaying holdup has been developed. The objectives of holdup measurement are ascertaining the amount, distribution, and how firmly fixed the SNM is. The purposes are reconciliation of material unbalance during or after a manufacturing campaign or plant decommissioning, to decide security requirements, or whether further recovery efforts are justified.

Zucker, M.S.; Degen, M.; Cohen, I.; Gody, A.; Summers, R.; Bisset, P.; Shaub, E.; Holody, D.

1981-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

24

DOE Offers Support for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will Produce High Quality Solar Silicon at Low Cost DOE Offers Support for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will Produce High Quality...

25

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Better Buildings, Better Plants Program Partners are demonstrating their commitment to energy savings by signing a voluntary pledge to reduce energy intensity by 25% over ten...

26

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants provides an overview of state-of-the art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal-fired generating units along with lessons learned for current plants worldwide. The Guideline aims to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation generating units that incorporate: Higher steam conditions for higher efficiency and reduced generation of pollutants Advanced environmental controls for reduced emissions and environmental im...

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

Coal Power Plant Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Plant Database Power Plant Database Jump to: navigation, search Name Coal Power Plant Database Data Format Excel Spreadsheet, Excel Pivot Table, Access Database Geographic Scope United States TODO: Import actual dataset contents into OpenEI The Coal Power Plant Database (CPPDB) is a dataset which "consolidates large quantities of information on coal-fired power plants in a single location."[1] It is produced by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). External links 2007 Edition Excel Spreadsheet Excel Pivot Table Access Database User's Manual (PDF) References ↑ "User's Manual: Coal Power Plant Database" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Coal_Power_Plant_Database&oldid=273301" Categories: Datasets Articles with outstanding TODO tasks

28

Pages that link to "Coal Power Plant Database" | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coal Power Plant Database" Coal Power Plant Database Jump to: navigation, search What...

29

Changes related to "Coal Power Plant Database" | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coal Power Plant Database" Coal Power Plant Database Jump to: navigation, search This is...

30

Signature Metabolites at Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of research to demonstrate the biodegradation component of natural attenuation at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. Researchers developed a target compound list of signature metabolites, biochemical intermediates of mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (MAH and PAH) biodegradation. They identified and tested appropriate methods of chemical analysis for these metabolites in MGP groundwater and sediments. Emphasis was placed on identifying natural microbiological ...

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

31

Designing and upgrading plants to blend coal  

SciTech Connect

Fuel flexibility isn't free. Whether you are equipping a new power plant to burn more than one type of coal or retrofitting an existing plant to handle coal blends, you will have to spend time and money to ensure that all three functions performed by its coal-handling system, unloading, stockout, and reclaim, are up to the task. The first half of this article lays out the available options for configuring each subsystem to support blending. The second half describes, in words and pictures, how 12 power plants in the USA, both new and old, address the issue. 9 figs., 1 tab.

McCartney, R.H. [Roberts and Schaefer Co. (United States)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Flat Glass Manufacturing Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flat Glass Manufacturing Plant EPI Flat Glass Manufacturing Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

33

Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Existing Coal-fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Vulnerabilities for Existing Coal-fired Power Plants August 2010 DOENETL-20101429 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the...

35

Decommissioning Handbook for Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook lays out the steps necessary to fully decommission a coal-fired power plant. The handbook includes ways to handle permitting, environmental cleanup, site dismantlement, and site remediation, and discusses overall decommissioning costs. It is based on three actual case studies of coal plants recently decommissioned: the Arkwright coal-fired plant of Georgia Power, the Watts Bar coal-fired plant of TVA, and the Port Washington coal-fired plant of Wisconsin Electric Power.

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

36

NETL: News Release - Advanced Coal Dryer Boosts Power Plant Performanc...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Release Date: May 24, 2006 Advanced Coal Dryer Boosts Power Plant Performance Latest Project in President's Clean Coal Power Initiative Begins Operations in North Dakota...

37

Steam Plant Replaces Outdated Coal-Fired System | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam Plant Replaces Outdated Coal-Fired System Steam Plant Replaces Outdated Coal-Fired System September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A new natural gas-fired steam plant will replace...

38

A Coal-Fired Power Plant with Zero Atmospheric Emissions  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the thermodynamic analysis of a coal-based zero-atmospheric emissions electric power plant. The approach involves an oxygen-blown coal gasification unit. The resulting synthetic gas (syngas) is combusted with oxygen in a gas generator to produce the working fluid for the turbines. The combustion produces a gas mixture composed almost entirely of steam and carbon dioxide. These gases drive multiple turbines to produce electricity. The turbine discharge gases pass to a condenser where water is captured. A stream of carbon dioxide then results that can be used for enhanced oil recovery, or for sequestration. This analysis is based on a 400 MW electric power generating plant that uses turbines that are currently under development by a U.S. turbine manufacturer. The power plant has a net thermal efficiency of 42.6%. This efficiency is based on the lower heating value of the coal, and includes the energy necessary for coal gasification, air separation and for carbon dioxide separation and sequestration. The paper also presents an analysis of the cost of electricity (COE) and the cost of conditioning carbon dioxide for sequestration for the 400 MW power plant. Electricity cost is compared for three different gasification processes (Texaco, Shell, and Koppers-Totzek) and two types of coals (Illinois No.6 and Wyodak). Cost of electricity ranges from 5.16 {cents}/kWhr to 5.42 {cents}/kWhr, indicating that the cost of electricity varies by 5% for the three gasification processes considered and the two coal types used.

Martinez-Frias, J; Aceves, S M; Smith, J R; Brandt, H

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

39

Byproducts can make coal plants green  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Co-locating ethanol plants at coal-burning sites, along with the use of biomass gasification to boost coal-fired plant output, can have positive economic and environmental benefits. Adding a biomass gasifier to an older coal-fired plant would inject gas with up to 10% of the fuel value in the coal and increase steam generation by the same amount. Sawdust can be injected as a reburn fuel without the need for gasification. A pre-scrubber would be added before the existing SO{sub 2} scrubber and waste heat from the boiler in the form of low-pressure steam would be sent to a co-located ethanol plant. This would lead to a decrease in emissions of NOx, mercury and SO{sub 2}, less mercury in the gypsum, a large greenhouse gas reduction, reduced net fuel cost, and revenue from hydrochloric acid by- product and from selling low-pressure steam to the ethanol plant. The Blue Flint Ethanol facility uses waste heat from Grand River Energy's 1,100 MW Coal Creek Station in South Jordan, Utah. The new generation of US ethanol plants is likely to use switchgrass and other cellulosic materials as feedstock. Straw and other forms of biomass have high chlorine content. PVC waste can be added to optimise the chlorine content of the scrubber. A chlorine pre-scrubber before the SO{sub 2} scrubber would capture HCl. 1 fig., 1 photo.

McIlvaine, B. [McIlvaine Co. (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Vibration mills in the manufacturing technology of slurry fuel from unbeneficiated coal sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-water slurry fuel (CWSF) is economically viable provided that its ash content does not exceed 30% and the amount water in the fuel is at most 45%. Two impoundments were revealed that have considerable reserves of waste coal useful for commercial manufacture of CWSF without the beneficiation step. One of the CWSF manufacture steps is the comminution of coal sludge to have a particle size required by the combustion conditions. Vibration mills, which are more compact and energy-intensive that drum mills, can be used in the CWSG manufacture process. The rheological characteristics of CWSF obtained from unbeneficiated waste coal were determined.

E.G. Gorlov; A.I. Seregin; G.S. Khodakov [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russia)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

"Modern" Coal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Modern" Coal Plants "Modern" Coal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 331-A February 7, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation "MODERN" COAL PLANTS The Age of Cycads, when those strange tree-like plants predominated, began during the Triassic Period of the earth's geological history, reached its peak during the 60 million years of the Jurassic Period which followed, and ended during the first part of the Cretaceous Period that began about 95 million years ago. During the Jurassic, in addition to Cycades, there were also many species of ginkgos, and conifers which were the ancestors of our modern sequoias and pines. The ginkgo or "Maidenhair Tree", which we have imported from China and Japan, is the only one remaining of that tribe -- "a living fossil".

42

Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have undertaken a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than the current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) steam conditions. Ultrasupercritical (USC...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

43

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report also facilitates the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate: Higher steam conditions for improved efficiency and reduced pollutants and CO2 Advanced environmental controls for reduced emissions and environmental impacts Techniques for CO2 capture, or for future retrofit of CO2 capt...

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report is designed to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate higher steam conditions that improve efficiency and thereby decrease fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, and other environmental impacts; advanced environmental controls that reduce emissions and discharges of solid ...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC-) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report is designed to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate higher steam conditions that improve efficiency and thereby decrease fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, and other environmental impacts; advanced environmental controls that reduce emissions and discharges of solid...

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Aerosol nucleation in coal-fired power-plant plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New-particle nucleation within coal-fired power-plant plumes can have large effects on particle number concentrations

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Value Operating Flexibility in Advanced Coal Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a preliminary study of the potential value of the operating flexibility available from advanced coal plant designs and carbon capture and storage (CCS) systems. Assessing value requires new analytical approaches capable of examining plant outputs (e.g., syngas, air products, electricity, emissions) in the context of varying power market conditions and significant climate policy and fuel price uncertainties. Accounting for flexibility options in capacity planning may create opportuni...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

48

NREL: Technology Transfer - First Hybrid CSP-Coal Power Plant ...  

First Hybrid CSP-Coal Power Plant is Fired Up in Colorado July 23, 2010. On June 30, Xcel Energy began operating an experimental power plant near ...

49

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants Program Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

has been recognized by the American Chemistry Council. Eaton Corporation NAICS 335, Electrical Equipment, Appliance, and Component Manufacturing Eck Industries NAICS 331, Primary...

50

DOE Offers Support for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will Produce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Support for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will Support for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will Produce High Quality Solar Silicon at Low Cost DOE Offers Support for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will Produce High Quality Solar Silicon at Low Cost June 16, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the offer of a conditional commitment for a $275 million loan guarantee to Calisolar Inc. to commercialize its innovative solar silicon manufacturing process. Calisolar's innovative process should produce silicon for use in solar cells at less than half the cost of traditional polysilicon purification processes, which will reduce the overall cost of solar modules and panels. At full production, the manufacturing plant is expected to produce 16,000 metric tons (MT) of solar silicon annually, equivalent to

51

Vermont Manufacturing Plant Opens with Support from the Recovery Act |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vermont Manufacturing Plant Opens with Support from the Recovery Vermont Manufacturing Plant Opens with Support from the Recovery Act Vermont Manufacturing Plant Opens with Support from the Recovery Act December 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu issued a statement highlighting today's ribbon cutting event at SBE, Inc.'s new production plant in Barre, Vermont .The plant will manufacture electric vehicle direct current bus capacitors, components for next generation advanced vehicles. The facility was funded in part by a $8.5 million grant through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also known as the stimulus bill "Today's ribbon cutting puts Barre at the forefront of green innovation in America's automotive industry," said Secretary Chu. "This is another

52

Vermont Manufacturing Plant Opens with Support from the Recovery Act |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vermont Manufacturing Plant Opens with Support from the Recovery Vermont Manufacturing Plant Opens with Support from the Recovery Act Vermont Manufacturing Plant Opens with Support from the Recovery Act December 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu issued a statement highlighting today's ribbon cutting event at SBE, Inc.'s new production plant in Barre, Vermont .The plant will manufacture electric vehicle direct current bus capacitors, components for next generation advanced vehicles. The facility was funded in part by a $8.5 million grant through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also known as the stimulus bill "Today's ribbon cutting puts Barre at the forefront of green innovation in America's automotive industry," said Secretary Chu. "This is another

53

Third International Conference on Improved Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This international conference reviewed advances in materials, components, and designs for coal-fired power plants. Also showcased were results from the EPRI improved power plant project, similar collaborative European projects, and new power plants in Japan. The proceedings' 54 papers contribute to an improved international understanding of advanced coal-fired power plant technology.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

NETL: Coal-Fired Power Plants (CFPPs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOx Sources NOx Sources Coal-Fired Power Plants (CFPPs) Causes of greenhouse gases, Including NOx What is NOx? Environmental Impacts NOx Sources Reduction Efforts Several greenhouse gases, including NOx, are increasing due to human activities in the following areas: Burning of fossil fuel (for example, coal-fired power plants), Logging (mainly contributes to carbon monoxide), Agriculture processes, Use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) in holon fire suppression and refrigeration The chart below shows the three major gases contributing to greenhouse gas emissions along with their source by sector. Annual Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Sector Note: This figure was created and copyrighted by Robert A. Rohde from published data and is part of the Global Warming Art project. This image is an original work created for Global Warming Art Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this image under either:

55

Coal gasification power plant and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an integrated coal gasification power plant, a humidifier is provided for transferring as vapor, from the aqueous blowdown liquid into relatively dry air, both (I) at least a portion of the water contained in the aqueous liquid and (II) at least a portion of the volatile hydrocarbons therein. The resulting humidified air is advantageously employed as at least a portion of the hot air and water vapor included in the blast gas supplied via a boost compressor to the gasifier.

Woodmansee, Donald E. (Schenectady, NY)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Integrating Coal Gasification into a Rotary Kiln Electric Furnace Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal gasification is a potential alternative to conventional coal or natural gas- fired power plants ... Fundamentals of Spark-Plasma Sintering: Net-Shaping and Size Effects ... Investigation on a Microwave High-Temperature Air Heat Exchanger.

57

Coal stockpiles at electric power plants were above average ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Increased competition between fuels as well as a warm winter 2011-12 led to lower consumption of coal and, thus, higher coal stockpiles at electric power plants in ...

58

Coal stocks at power plants are likely sufficient despite river ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

As of March 31, 2011, EIA estimates that coal-fired power plants in States identified in the map had an average of a two-to-three month supply of coal on hand.

59

Brighter Future for Kentucky Manufacturing Plants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brighter Future for Kentucky Manufacturing Plants Brighter Future for Kentucky Manufacturing Plants Brighter Future for Kentucky Manufacturing Plants May 28, 2010 - 3:04pm Addthis Montaplast North America, Inc. is replacing almost 1,200 halide lights with high-efficiency fluorescent fixtures at its Frankfort, KY, facility. | Photo Courtesy of Montaplast | Montaplast North America, Inc. is replacing almost 1,200 halide lights with high-efficiency fluorescent fixtures at its Frankfort, KY, facility. | Photo Courtesy of Montaplast | Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Consider This: Saving $90,000 a year by curbing energy use is about equal to the salaries of three operators at a typical manufacturing plant in the Bluegrass State, according to wages listed from the U.S. Bureau of Labor

60

Manufacturing Plants Incorporate Energy Efficiency into Business Model |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Plants Incorporate Energy Efficiency into Business Manufacturing Plants Incorporate Energy Efficiency into Business Model Manufacturing Plants Incorporate Energy Efficiency into Business Model April 27, 2011 - 12:15pm Addthis Participants of the Superior Energy Performance certification program | Photo Courtesy of Texas Industries of the Future/Dave Bray Participants of the Superior Energy Performance certification program | Photo Courtesy of Texas Industries of the Future/Dave Bray Lowell Sachs Lead Technology Partnership Specialist, Industrial Technologies Program Four Texas-based manufacturing plants are adopting robust energy efficiency standards as part of an energy management certification program led by the Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies Program. The certification program, called Superior Energy Performance, provides a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Manufacturing Plants Incorporate Energy Efficiency into Business Model |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Plants Incorporate Energy Efficiency into Business Manufacturing Plants Incorporate Energy Efficiency into Business Model Manufacturing Plants Incorporate Energy Efficiency into Business Model April 27, 2011 - 12:15pm Addthis Participants of the Superior Energy Performance certification program | Photo Courtesy of Texas Industries of the Future/Dave Bray Participants of the Superior Energy Performance certification program | Photo Courtesy of Texas Industries of the Future/Dave Bray Lowell Sachs Lead Technology Partnership Specialist, Industrial Technologies Program Four Texas-based manufacturing plants are adopting robust energy efficiency standards as part of an energy management certification program led by the Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies Program. The certification program, called Superior Energy Performance, provides a

62

DOE Offers Support for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will Produce High Quality Solar Silicon at Low Cost June 16, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu...

63

Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants Speaker(s): Alexander M. Zhivov Date: April 3, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Dr. Alexander Zhivov is currently the...

64

Energy Efficiency in BP's PTA Manufacturing Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BP is a leading producer of purified terephthalic acid, or PTA, a commodity chemical used in the production of polyester. Through both self-help initiatives and innovations in our state-of-art process technology, the energy efficiency of our PTA manufacturing process has significantly improved over the past several years, which has translated into substantial decreases in greenhouse gas emissions across our global sites. The talk will provide a general overview of the PTA business and manufacturing process, as well as selected examples of enabling technology evolutions leading to this improved performance.

Clark, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant August 26, 2010 - 4:45pm Addthis Chemetall extracts lithium carbonate, a powder, from brine, a salty solution from within the earth. | Photo courtesy Chemetall Chemetall extracts lithium carbonate, a powder, from brine, a salty solution from within the earth. | Photo courtesy Chemetall Joshua DeLung Chemetall supplies materials for lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles $28.4 million in Recovery Act funding going toward geothermal plant Plant expected to produce 4 MW of electrical power, employ 25 full-time workers Chemetall produces lithium carbonate to customers in a wide range of industries, including for batteries used in electric vehicles, and now the

66

Exergy efficiency of small coal-fired power plants as a criterion of their wide applicability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The applicability of small coal-fired power plants as an independent and reliable power supply source was considered. The advantages of using small thermal power plants were given, and the classification characteristics of small coal-fired power plants were put forward. The exergy method was chosen as a versatility indicator for the operating efficiency of a flowsheet in question. The exergy efficiency factor of the flowsheet was 32%. With the manufacture of by-products, such as activated carbons, the exergy efficiency of the flowsheet increased to 35%. The studies undertaken substantiated the wide applicability of small coal-fired power plants for the development of decentralized power supply. 7 refs., 2 tabs.

O.V. Afanas'eva; G.R. Mingaleeva [Russian Academy of Sciences, Tatarstan (Russian Federation). Research Center of Power Engineering Problems

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Bull Run Fossil Plant Online Coal Flow Adjustable Riffler Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler optimization at fossil-fired power plants would be enhanced if the flow of coal and air in individual pulverizer fuel delivery lines could be balanced. The static splitter devices currently in service do not adequately maintain coal balance, especially when plant conditions change. This report summarizes the results of a test program to demonstrate the feasibility of using a novel riffler to make online adjustments to a stream of pneumatically conveyed pulverized coal at a working plant. The demon...

2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

68

Flexible Coal: Evolution from Baseload to Peaking Plant (Brochure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the transformation of power systems Flexible Coal Evolution from Baseload to Peaking Plant The experience cited in this paper is from a generating station with multiple units...

69

Optical Gas Sensors for Advanced Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Optical Gas Sensors for Advanced Coal-Fired Power Plants. Author(s), Paul Ohodnicki, Congjun Wang, Douglas Kauffman, Kristi Kauffman,...

70

Manage energy use in manufacturing | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improve building and plant performance Improve building and plant performance » Manage energy use in manufacturing Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Build an energy program Improve building and plant performance Improve energy use in commercial buildings Find guidance for energy-efficient design projects Manage energy use in manufacturing

71

Performance and risks of advanced pulverized-coal plants  

SciTech Connect

This article is based on an in-depth report of the same title published by the IEA Clean Coal Centre, CCC/135 (see Coal Abstracts entry Sep 2008 00535). It discusses the commercial, developmental and future status of pulverized fuel power plants including subcritical supercritical and ultra supercritical systems of pulverized coal combustion, the most widely used technology in coal-fired power generation. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Nalbandian, H. [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Table 38. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 38. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Census Division June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 Middle Atlantic w w w w East North Central 1,313 1,177 1,326 -1.0 South Atlantic w w w w East South Central w w w w U.S. Total 2,500 2,207 2,295 8.9 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants.'

73

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of October 1 to December 30, 2003.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

74

Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of October 1 to December 30, 2005.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2004.

R. Viswanathan; J. Sarver; M. Borden; K. Coleman; J. Blough; S. Goodstine; R.W. Swindeman; W. Mohn; I. Perrin

2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2004.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2004.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of October 1 to December 30, 2003.

K. Coleman; R. Viswanathan; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2004-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

79

Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of January 1 to March 31, 2006.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

80

Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of April 1 to June 30, 2006.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2006-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Boiler Materials For Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2006.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Coal Tar and Bedrock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characterization of bedrock groundwater and coal tar impacts is one of the most complicated tasks associated with managing manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. This report provides an overview of the fate and transport of coal tar in bedrock and the methods available to investigate coal tar at particular sites and discusses how to develop a decision-making framework for coal tar investigations.

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

83

Direct coal-fired gas turbines for combined cycle plants  

SciTech Connect

The combustion/emissions control island of the CFTCC plant produces cleaned coal combustion gases for expansion in the gas turbine. The gases are cleaned to protect the turbine from flow-path degeneration due to coal contaminants and to reduce environmental emissions to comparable or lower levels than alternate clean coal power plant tedmologies. An advantage of the CFTCC system over other clean coal technologies using gas turbines results from the CFTCC system having been designed as an adaptation to coal of a natural gas-fired combined cycle plant. Gas turbines are built for compactness and simplicity. The RQL combustor is designed using gas turbine combustion technology rather than process plant reactor technology used in other pressurized coal systems. The result is simpler and more compact combustion equipment than for alternate technologies. The natural effect is lower cost and improved reliability. In addition to new power generation plants, CFTCC technology will provide relatively compact and gas turbine compatible coal combustion/emissions control islands that can adapt existing natural gas-fired combined cycle plants to coal when gas prices rise to the point where conversion is economically attractive. Because of the simplicity, compactness, and compatibility of the RQL combustion/emission control island compared to other coal technologies, it could be a primary candidate for such conversions.

Rothrock, J.; Wenglarz, R.; Hart, P.; Mongia, H.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Integrated Paper and Paperboard Manufacturing Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Paper and Paperboard Manufacturing Plant EPI Integrated Paper and Paperboard Manufacturing Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

85

Cost and carbon emissions of coal and combined cycle power plants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and carbon emissions of coal and combined cycle power plants in India: international implications Title Cost and carbon emissions of coal and combined cycle power plants in...

86

Certifying U.S. Manufacturing Plants for Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. industry has the capacity to significantly improve its overall energy performance and help meet both private-sector and national goals for energy and the environment. The U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) is partnering with industry to drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity over a 10 year periodand also contribute to an 18% reduction in carbon intensity economy-wide by 2012. To expedite progress in achieving these targets, the Superior Energy Performance partnership1 , a collaboration involving ITP, many industrial companies, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), non-profits, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the U.S. Department of Commerces National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), is facilitating the development of energy management and certification standards for manufacturing plants. To become certified, a plant would need to adopt energy management practices meeting the ANSI standards and demonstrate continual improvement in energy intensity. Certification of plants would provide strong incentive and recognition for effective plant energy management and would lay the groundwork for energy efficiency and carbon reduction that would favorably position the plant in achieving greater market value. The paper will describe the overall strategy of certifying manufacturing plants and how plant certification fits into the DOE Industrial Technologies Program overall strategy to partner with industrial companies and entire manufacturing supply chains to improve energy intensity by 25% in 10 years.

Scheihing, P.; Schultz, S.; Almaguer, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through {minus}200 mesh size. These samples' combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace will be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. This report covers the first quarter's progress. Major activities during this period were focused on finding the plants where a demo MTU column will be installed to prepare the samples needed to characterize the combustion behavior of slurry effluents. Also, a meeting was held at Penn State University to discuss the availability of the laboratory furnace for testing the plant coal/recovered coal fines blends.

Singh, Shyam.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Optimum Design of Coal Gasification Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with the optimum design of heat recovery systems using the Texaco Coal Gasification Process (TCGP). TCGP uses an entrained type gasifier and produces hot gases at approximately 2500oF with high heat flux. This heat is removed by using a combination of radiant/convective waste heat boiler or by direct water quench before processing of the raw gas. The selection of an optimum heat recovery system is a function of the product slate, overall economics, and the technical risks associated with the heat recovery equipment. An extensive use of heat recovery equipment is not necessarily more economical than a simpler system with modest thermal efficiency. A full heat recovery mode consisting of radiant and convective boilers along with economizers is recommended for Coal Gasification Combined Cycle to maximize energy efficiency. A water quench mode is suggested for hydrogen production because of the need to adjust the H2O/CO ratio for shift conversion. A partial heat-recovery mode is recommended for power/methanol co-production plant. These heat recovery systems are discussed in detail along with the economics associated with each system.

Pohani, B. P.; Ray, H. P.; Wen, H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Corrosion protection pays off for coal-fired power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zinc has long been used to hot-dip galvanise steel to deliver protection in harsh environments. Powder River Basin or eastern coal-fired plants benefit from using galvanized steel for conveyors, vibratory feeders, coal hoppers, chutes, etc. because maintenance costs are essentially eliminated. When life cycle costs for this process are compared to an alternative three-coal paint system for corrosion protection, the latter costs 5-10 times more than hot-dip galvanizing. An AEP Power Plant in San Juan, Puerto Rico and the McDuffie Coal Terminal in Mobile, AL, USA have both used hot-dip galvanized steel. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Hansen, T.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Comparative Assessment of Coal-and Natural Gas-fired Power Plants under a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparative Assessment of Coal- and Natural Gas-fired Power Plants under a CO2 Emission Performance standard (EPS) for pulverized coal (PC) and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants; · Evaluate · Coal-fired Power Plant: Supercritical pulverized coal (SC PC) Illinois #6 Coal Capacity Factor 75

91

Effects of Coal Quality on Power Plant Performance and Costs, Volume 4: Review of Coal Science Fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs of generating electricity in a coal-fired power plant depend not only on the delivered cost of coal but on how coal quality affects plant performance. Utilities need to account for both these factors to decide which coals provide the most power at the lowest cost.

1986-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

92

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the ninth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, comparative analyses were performed for lignite and PRB coals to determine how unit performance varies with coal product moisture. Results are given showing how the coal product moisture level and coal rank affect parameters such as boiler efficiency, station service power needed for fans and pulverizers and net unit heat rate. Results are also given for the effects of coal drying on cooling tower makeup water and comparisons are made between makeup water savings for various times of the year.

Edward Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Wei Zhang

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Tracking new coal-fired power plants: coal's resurgence in electric power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This information package is intended to provide an overview of 'Coal's resurgence in electric power generation' by examining proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under consideration in the USA. The results contained in this package are derived from information that is available from various tracking organizations and news groups. Although comprehensive, this information is not intended to represent every possible plant under consideration but is intended to illustrate the large potential that exists for new coal-fired power plants. It should be noted that many of the proposed plants are likely not to be built. For example, out of a total portfolio (gas, coal, etc.) of 500 GW of newly planned power plant capacity announced in 2001, 91 GW have been already been scrapped or delayed. 25 refs.

NONE

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Chemical Manufacturing - Plant  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Plant Assessments Plant Assessments Plant-Wide Assessments Plant-wide assessments are one way to work with the DOE Industrial Technologies Program—most companies realize a minimum of $1 million in annual energy savings after just one assessment. Plants are selected through a competitive solicitation process, and agree to a minimum 50% cost-share for implementing the assessment. An industry-defined team conducts an on-site analysis of total energy use and identifies opportunities to save energy in your overall operations and in motor, steam, compressed air, and process heating systems. The recommendations could include implementing emerging technologies that would be particularly effective in your operation. These emerging technologies, although on the forefront of industrial manufacturing, are successful and commercially

95

Reclaiming lost capability in power plant coal conversions: an innovative, low-cost approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of the capability lost during coal conversion can be recovered for midrange/peaking power generation through low cost, turbine cycle and economizer modifications. The additional output can be realized by shutting off adjacent high pressure feedwater heaters (as specified by turbogenerator manufacturers) and simultaneously increasing heat input to the economizer. The supplemental economizer heat input makes up for heat lost to the feedwater when extraction steam is shut off. Several options for applying this novel approach to capability recovery are described. The reclaimed capability is realized at somewhat lower efficiency but at low cost, compared to the overall cost of a coal conversion. Rather than return converted units to up to 100% oil or gas firing during periods of high system demand, the proposed method allows the continued comsumption of coal for the base-load portion of the plant's output. The development of the low NO/sub x/ Slagging Combustor will allow even the added economizer heat input to be supplied by relatively low cost coal. Following a brief review of factors affecting boiler capability in coal conversions and current approaches to coal conversion in this country and overseas, the results of a preliminary study that apply the proposed novel concept to a West Coast power plant are described.

Miliaras, E.S.; Kelleher, P.J.; Fujimura, K.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Mercury Removal Characteristics of Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The standard Ontario Hydro Method (OHM) was used into the flue gas mercury sampling before and after fabric filter (FF)/ electrostatic precipitator (ESP) locations in coal-fired power stations in China, and then various mercury speciation, Hg0, Hg2+ ... Keywords: coal-fired power plant, mercury, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator

Yang Liguo, Fan Xiaoxu, Duanyu Feng, Wang Yunjun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Low-Rank Coal Grinding Performance Versus Power Plant Performance  

SciTech Connect

The intent of this project was to demonstrate that Alaskan low-rank coal, which is high in volatile content, need not be ground as fine as bituminous coal (typically low in volatile content) for optimum combustion in power plants. The grind or particle size distribution (PSD), which is quantified by percentage of pulverized coal passing 74 microns (200 mesh), affects the pulverizer throughput in power plants. The finer the grind, the lower the throughput. For a power plant to maintain combustion levels, throughput needs to be high. The problem of particle size is compounded for Alaskan coal since it has a low Hardgrove grindability index (HGI); that is, it is difficult to grind. If the thesis of this project is demonstrated, then Alaskan coal need not be ground to the industry standard, thereby alleviating somewhat the low HGI issue (and, hopefully, furthering the salability of Alaskan coal). This project studied the relationship between PSD and power plant efficiency, emissions, and mill power consumption for low-rank high-volatile-content Alaskan coal. The emissions studied were CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and Hg (only two tests). The tested PSD range was 42 to 81 percent passing 76 microns. Within the tested range, there was very little correlation between PSD and power plant efficiency, CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2}. Hg emissions were very low and, therefore, did not allow comparison between grind sizes. Mill power consumption was lower for coarser grinds.

Rajive Ganguli; Sukumar Bandopadhyay

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Trace metal particulates in coal-fired power plant emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Since coal-fired power plants produce approximately 50% of U.S. energy, the toxic and environmental damaging effects of this energy source are important. Trace metals are (more)

Marett, Lanette Simone

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

NETL: News Release - Making Tomorrow's Coal-Fired Power Plants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 4, 2001 Making Tomorrow's Coal-Fired Power Plants Cleaner and More Efficient August 21, 2001 DOE Selects 5 New Research Projects to Improve Combustors, Reduce Pollutants, and...

100

Nitrogen oxide emissions from coal fired MHD plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this topical report, the nitrogen oxide emission issues from a coal fired MHD steam combined cycle power plant are summarized, both from an experimental and theoretical/calculational viewpoint. The concept of staging the coal combustion to minimize NO{sub x} is described. The impact of NO{sub x} control design choices on electrical conductivity and overall plant efficiency are described. The results of the NO{sub x} measurements in over 3,000 hours of coal fired testing are summarized. A chemical kinetics model that was used to model the nooks decomposition is described. Finally, optimum design choices for a low nooks plant are discussed and it is shown that the MHD Steam Coal Fired Combined Cycle Power Plant can be designed to operate with nooks emissions less than 0.05 lbm/MMBTU.

Chapman, J.N. [ed.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001...

102

Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants Speaker(s): Alexander M. Zhivov Date: April 3, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Dr. Alexander Zhivov is currently the chairman of the International Task Force "Autovent International" focusing on environmental problems within the Automotive Industry. This Task Force was formed in 1997 to develop the "Ventilation Guide for Automotive Industry". The guide was to be seen as a building block within the EU sponsored "Industrial Ventilation Design Guide Book" project, covering both theory and applications. In his presentation, Dr. Zhivov will talk about his work with the automotive industry, describe major highlights from the "Ventilation Guide for Automotive Industry" and talk about building, process and HVAC

103

Sediment Capping Resource Guide for Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes tools and techniques applicable to design and implementation of sediment capping remedies at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. It includes a number of practical case studies describing cap designs and cap construction experience. The report is intended as a sediment capping resource guide to be used with EPRI's 2007 Handbook of Remedial Alternatives for MGP Sites with Contaminated Sediments (EPRI report 1012592).

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

104

Groundwater Closure Strategy for Former Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities responsible for Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) remediation must navigate numerous challenges in order to attain regulatory closure. Typically, the first strategic focus is on source remediation: to locate, treat or remove MGP residuals that constitute ongoing sources of impacts to receptors (e.g., direct contact, soil vapor, or groundwater). Often the last compliance piece that must fall into place is compliance with regulatory criteria for groundwater. The state-specific regulatory closure ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

105

How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gasification » How Coal Gasification » How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work How Coal Gasification Power Plants Work The heart of a gasification-based system is the gasifier. A gasifier converts hydrocarbon feedstock into gaseous components by applying heat under pressure in the presence of steam. A gasifier differs from a combustor in that the amount of air or oxygen available inside the gasifier is carefully controlled so that only a relatively small portion of the fuel burns completely. This "partial oxidation" process provides the heat. Rather than burning, most of the carbon-containing feedstock is chemically broken apart by the gasifier's heat and pressure, setting into motion chemical reactions that produce "syngas." Syngas is primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide, but can include

106

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Commercial plant feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

In order to determine the viability of any Liquids from Coal (LFC) commercial venture, TEK-KOL and its partner, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI), have put together a technical and economic feasibility study for a commercial-size LFC Plant located at Zeigler Coal Holding Company`s North Rochelle Mine site. This resulting document, the ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Plant: Commercial Plant Feasibility Study, includes basic plant design, capital estimates, market assessment for coproducts, operating cost assessments, and overall financial evaluation for a generic Powder River Basin based plant. This document and format closely resembles a typical Phase II study as assembled by the TEK-KOL Partnership to evaluate potential sites for LFC commercial facilities around the world.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

NETL: News Release - Projects Selected to Study Coal Plant Particulate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2004 5, 2004 Projects Selected to Study Coal Plant Particulate Matter, Human Health PITTSBURGH, PA - The Department of Energy has selected three projects to help determine whether fine particulates emitted from coal-fired power plants affect human health, and which components of the particulates may be most problematic. Past studies have established that particulate matter smaller than 2.5 microns in diameter from all sources does affect human health, but there is scant information to provide a link between PM2.5 emitted specifically from coal plants and cardiac or respiratory health problems in humans. PM2.5 refers to particles-invisible to the eye-no more than 1/30th of the width of a human hair Coal plants emit only small quantities of "primary" PM2.5 (e.g., fly ash) because all plants have high-efficiency particulate-collection devices. However, coal plants are responsible for a great deal of "secondary" PM2.5, which forms in the atmosphere from emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Data collected in the new studies will be used to help design standards reviews and to devise strategies for controlling power plant emissions of PM2.5, SO2, and NOx.

108

Accelerating the deployment of cleaner coal plants  

SciTech Connect

The dearth of commercial operating experience for advanced coal-fired facilities is forcing their early adopters and builders to use long development cycles and pay high costs for unique engineering design studies. A broad-based industry collaborative effort fostered by EPRI to address this issue (CoalFleet for Tomorrow) is beginning to show results. 3 figs.

Parkes, J.; Holt, N.; Phillips, J.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Capture-ready coal plants--Options, technologies and Mark C. Bohm a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capture-ready coal plants--Options, technologies and economics Mark C. Bohm a , Howard J. Herzog a. Introduction Interest in the construction of coal-fired power generation has increased significantly in recent the construction of coal-fired plants. Worldwide, the installed capacity of coal-fired plants is expected

110

An efficient process for recovery of fine coal from tailings of coal washing plants  

SciTech Connect

Gravity concentration of hard lignites using conventional jigs and heavy media separation equipment is prone to produce coal-rich fine tailings. This study aims to establish a fine coal recovery process of very high efficiency at reasonable capital investment and operational costs. The technical feasibility to upgrade the properties of the predeslimed fine refuse of a lignite washing plant with 35.9% ash content was investigated by employing gravity separation methods. The laboratory tests carried out with the combination of shaking table and Mozley multi-gravity separator (MGS) revealed that the clean coal with 18% ash content on dry basis could be obtained with 58.9% clean coal recovery by the shaking table stage and 4.1% clean coal recovery by MGS stage, totaling to the sum of 63.0% clean coal recovery from a predeslimed feed. The combustible recovery and the organic efficiency of the shaking table + MGS combination were 79.5% and 95.5%, respectively. Based on the results of the study, a flow sheet of a high-efficiency fine coal recovery process was proposed, which is also applicable to the coal refuse pond slurry of a lignite washing plant.

Cicek, T.; Cocen, I.; Engin, V.T.; Cengizler, H. [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. for Mining Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal-fired Plants .capture technologies to coal-fired plants is also likely togroups. Conventional Coal-fired Plants Sulfur During

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Table 33. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 33. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic w w w w w w East North Central 3,051 2,997 3,092 6,048 6,156 -1.8 South Atlantic w w w w w w East South Central w w w w w w U.S. Total 5,471 5,280 5,296 10,751 10,579 1.6 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants

113

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Low rank fuels such as subbituminous coals and lignites contain significant amounts of moisture compared to higher rank coals. Typically, the moisture content of subbituminous coals ranges from 15 to 30 percent, while that for lignites is between 25 and 40 percent, where both are expressed on a wet coal basis. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit. High fuel moisture results in fuel handling problems, and it affects heat rate, mass rate (tonnage) of emissions, and the consumption of water needed for evaporative cooling. This project deals with lignite and subbituminous coal-fired pulverized coal power plants, which are cooled by evaporative cooling towers. In particular, the project involves use of power plant waste heat to partially dry the coal before it is fed to the pulverizers. Done in a proper way, coal drying will reduce cooling tower makeup water requirements and also provide heat rate and emissions benefits. The technology addressed in this project makes use of the hot circulating cooling water leaving the condenser to heat the air used for drying the coal (Figure 1). The temperature of the circulating water leaving the condenser is usually about 49 C (120 F), and this can be used to produce an air stream at approximately 43 C (110 F). Figure 2 shows a variation of this approach, in which coal drying would be accomplished by both warm air, passing through the dryer, and a flow of hot circulating cooling water, passing through a heat exchanger located in the dryer. Higher temperature drying can be accomplished if hot flue gas from the boiler or extracted steam from the turbine cycle is used to supplement the thermal energy obtained from the circulating cooling water. Various options such as these are being examined in this investigation. This is the eleventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report.

Edward Levy

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Nomogram calculates power plant coal use  

SciTech Connect

The number of tons of coal burned annually by a generating unit can be calculated by the following formula: Q = 43.8 (MW) (HR) (CF/HV)/10/sup 6/ where: Q = Annual usage, million tons MW = Unit capacity, MW HR = Unit heat rate, Btu/kWh CF = Annual unit capacity factor, % HV = Heating value of coal, Btu/lb The nomogram solves this equation and permits annual coal usage to be estimated quickly for various combinations of the other variables. The nomogram also can be used in reverse to determine such things as the annual capacity factor that a certain coal usage could sustain. Example: An 840-MW unit has an average heat rate of 10,000 Btu/kWh and burns coal with a heating value of 8600 Btu/lb. The annual capacity factor is 60%. Calculate the annual coal usage. Solution: (A) Align 840 on MW scale with 8600 on HV scale and mark intersection with CF scale; (B) align this marked point with 10,000 on HR scale and mark intersection with Reference Line; (C) align this point with 60 on CF scale and extend to Q scale. Read answer as approximately 2.6 million tons/year.

McAlister, J.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Blacksville No. 2 Coal Preparation Plant final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses an investigation of the effects of washing on the concentrations of selected metals and non-metals in coal. The investigation concerned the Blacksville No. 2 coal preparation plant of CONSOL Inc. Samples of four solids and three water streams were collected at the plant with the assistance of CONSOL. The solids were the raw coal, the product coal, and both coarse and fine grades of refuse. The water streams analyzed were input water (a mixture of makeup water and recycled thickener overflow), output water (thickener overflow), and water from the thickener underflow. The contaminants determined in these materials were 16 trace metals, 5 major metals, and four non-metals.

NONE

1995-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

116

Sustainable development with clean coal  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the opportunities available with clean coal technologies. Applications include new power plants, retrofitting and repowering of existing power plants, steelmaking, cement making, paper manufacturing, cogeneration facilities, and district heating plants. An appendix describes the clean coal technologies. These include coal preparation (physical cleaning, low-rank upgrading, bituminous coal preparation); combustion technologies (fluidized-bed combustion and NOx control); post-combustion cleaning (particulate control, sulfur dioxide control, nitrogen oxide control); and conversion with the integrated gasification combined cycle.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Coal switch helps New York plants stay competitive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NRG Energy bought the Dunlook and Huntley Generating Stations in 1999 from Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. and has since then invested millions of dollars in converting them from bituminous coal to low sulphur Powder River Basin coal, combustion tuning and routine maintenance to help provide reliable stable-priced electricity to New York. The plants have reduced NOx, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions. 1 photo.

Blankinship, S.

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Steam Turbine Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lack of materials with the necessary fabricability and resistance to creep, oxidation, corrosion, and fatigue at the higher steam temperatures and pressures currently limits adoption of advanced ultra supercritical (USC) steam conditions in pulverized coal-fired plants. A major five-year national effort sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) to develop materials for USC boilers for operation at 760C (1400F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) has been in progress and is be...

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

119

Design Considerations for Coal Plant CO2 Capture Flexibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the input from various Electric Power Research Institute- (EPRI-) sponsored research and other respected industry sources, this report aims to initially present the implications for the case when existing pulverized coal (PC) plants are required to operate under frequently changing load conditions. Design improvements to enable more flexible operation of the current and next generation coal fleet are also presented. Finally, the report discusses the implications for operation flexibility of ...

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

120

About Manufacturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... reflects the changes in prices that manufacturers ... Petroleum Electricity Natural Gas Coal Emissions ... Position Abroad on a Historical Cost Basis ...

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the twelfth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report and results are shown for a drying system utilizing a combination of waste heat from the condenser and thermal energy extracted from boiler flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Ursla Levy; John Sale; Nenad Sarunac

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Combinatorial Optimization of Pulverizers for Blended-Coal-Fired Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal blending has become an important way to ease the tension of coal purchase for many Chinese power plants. Mixed by pulverizers which has been widely used, is considered the most reasonable and convenient approach of coal blending. The implementation ... Keywords: power plant, coal blending, combinatorial optimization, pulverizer, NSGA-II

Xia Ji; Peng Peng; Hua Zhigang; Lu Pan; Chen Gang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Coal-fired power plants the next generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal is today a very important source of energy and the resources are sufficient for a long period. To keep power generation with coal up-to-date in view of minimizing the pollution (especially the CO{sub 2}) and of better economy, we will have introduce new plant technologies. After a general overview three of these are presented and compared with the state-of-the-art PCF technology, in respect to plant efficiency, environmental impact, investment cost, cost of electricity, and unit size.

Schemenau, W.; Schoedel, J. (ABB Kraftwerke AG, Mannheim (DE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant system verification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following tasks are included in this project: Commercialization; Power plant development; Manufacturing facilities development; Test facility development; Stack research; and Advanced research and technology development. This report briefly describes the subtasks still to be completed: Power plant system test with reformed natural gas; Upgrading of existing, US government-owned, test facilities; and Advanced MCFC component research.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant system verification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical progress report summarizes the objectives and progress on the following tasks associated with the project: Commercialization; Power plant development; Manufacturing facilities development; Testing facility development; Stack research; and Advanced research and technology development. The project will demonstrate a 250 kW molten carbonate fuel cell power plant based on the IMHEX stack design concept.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Using auxiliary gas power for CCS energy needs in retrofitted coal power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Post-combustion capture retrofits are expected to a near-term option for mitigating CO 2 emissions from existing coal-fired power plants. Much of the literature proposes using power from the existing coal plant and thermal ...

Bashadi, Sarah (Sarah Omer)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

EA-1870: Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant, Kanab, Kane...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant, Kanab, Kane County, Utah EA-1870: Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant, Kanab, Kane County, Utah Summary This EA evaluates the...

128

Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant Demonstrating Innovative DOE-Funded Technology Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant...

129

Flexible Coal: Evolution from Baseload to Peaking Plant (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twenty-first century power systems, with higher penetration levels of low-carbon energy, smart grids, and other emerging technologies, will favor resources that have low marginal costs and provide system flexibility (e.g., the ability to cycle on and off to follow changes in variable renewable energy plant output). Questions remain about both the fate of coal plants in this scenario and whether they can cost-effectively continue to operate if they cycle routinely. The experience from the CGS plant demonstrates that coal plants can become flexible resources. This flexibility - namely the ability to cycle on and off and run at lower output (below 40% of capacity) - requires limited hardware modifications but extensive modifications to operational practice. Cycling does damage the plant and impact its life expectancy compared to baseload operations. Nevertheless, strategic modifications, proactive inspections and training programs, among other operational changes to accommodate cycling, can minimize the extent of damage and optimize the cost of maintenance. CGS's cycling, but not necessarily the associated price tag, is replicable. Context - namely, power market opportunities and composition of the generation fleet - will help determine for other coal plants the optimal balance between the level of cycling-related forced outages and the level of capital investment required to minimize those outages. Replicating CGS's experience elsewhere will likely require a higher acceptance of forced outages than regulators and plant operators are accustomed to; however, an increase in strategic maintenance can minimize the impact on outage rates.

Cochran, J.; Lew, D.; Kumar, N.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through -200 mesh size. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace will be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc.

Singh, S. [SS Energy Environmental International, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States); Scaroni, A.; Miller, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Circular Economy Assessment for Coal-fired Power Plants Based on Supper-Efficiency DEA Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants are the main pollution source in most areas of China. The implementation of circular economy in coal-fired power plants is necessary for environmental protection and also an effective way of energy saving and emission reduction. ... Keywords: circular economy assessment, circular economy improvement, coal-fired power plant, super-efficiency data envelopment analysis

Shao-lun Zeng; Hong Hu; Wei Wang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

COMBINATION OF MSWC AND COAL FIRED POWER PLANT Jiirgen Vehlow, Hans Hunsinger, Siegfried Kreisz, Helmut Seifert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMBINATION OF MSWC AND COAL FIRED POWER PLANT Jiirgen Vehlow, Hans Hunsinger, Siegfried Kreisz for the combination of a municipal solid waste combustion plant and a coal fired power plant in such a way that the dedusted and pre cleaned offgas of the waste combustion serves as carrier gas for the pulverized coal

Columbia University

133

Table 23. Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 23. Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic w w w w w w East North Central 3,189 2,679 3,225 5,867 5,993 -2.1 South Atlantic w w w w w w East South Central w w w w w w U.S. Total 5,770 4,962 5,370 10,732 10,440 2.8 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants

134

Evaluation of Stringent Emission Control Options for Pulverized Coal Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the results from one of a series of studies sponsored by the Canadian Clean Power Coalition (CCPC), EPRI, and the International Energy Agency (IEA). The CCPC established a goal to develop projects to demonstrate technology at a commercial utility scale for retrofit to existing plants, or for use in new coal-fired power plants, that would allow all emissions, including CO2, to be controlled to meet foreseeable new regulatory requirements. The purpose of this study conducted by Neill &...

2004-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

135

Alaska coal gasification feasibility studies - Healy coal-to-liquids plant  

SciTech Connect

The Alaska Coal Gasification Feasibility Study entailed a two-phase analysis of the prospects for greater use of Alaska's abundant coal resources in industrial applications. Phase 1, Beluga Coal Gasification Feasibility Study (Report DOE/NETL 2006/1248) assessed the feasibility of using gasification technology to convert the Agrium fertilizer plant in Nikiski, Alaska, from natural gas to coal feedstock. The Phase 1 analysis evaluated coals from the Beluga field near Anchorage and from the Usibelli Coal Mine near Healy, both of which are low in sulfur and high in moisture. This study expands the results of Phase 1 by evaluating a similar sized gasification facility at the Usibelli Coal mine to supply Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquids to central Alaska. The plant considered in this study is small (14,640 barrels per day, bbl/d) compared to the recommended commercial size of 50,000 bbl/d for coal-to-liquid plants. The coal supply requirements for the Phase 1 analysis, four million tons per year, were assumed for the Phase 2 analysis to match the probable capacity of the Usibelli mining operations. Alaska refineries are of sufficient size to use all of the product, eliminating the need for F-T exports out of the state. The plant could produce marketable by-products such as sulfur as well as electric power. Slag would be used as backfill at the mine site and CO{sub 2} could be vented, captured or used for enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The unexpected curtailment of oil production from Prudhoe Bay in August 2006 highlighted the dependency of Alaskan refineries (with the exception of the Tesoro facility in Nikiski) on Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude. If the flow of oil from the North Slope declines, these refineries may not be able to meet the in-state needs for diesel, gasoline, and jet fuel. Additional reliable sources of essential fuel products would be beneficial. 36 refs., 14 figs., 29 tabs., 3 apps.

Lawrence Van Bibber; Charles Thomas; Robert Chaney [Research & Development Solutions, LLC (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Steam Turbine Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lack of materials that can be readily fabricated and that are resistant to creep, oxidation, corrosion, and fatigue at higher steam temperatures and pressures limits adoption of advanced ultrasupercritical (USC) steam conditions in pulverized coal-fired plants. An ongoing major five-year national effort8212sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO)8212to develop materials for USC boilers for operation at 760C (1400F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) is being carried ou...

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

137

Cornell's conversion of a coal fired heating plant to natural Gas -BACKGROUND: In December 2009, the Combined Heat and Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cornell's conversion of a coal fired heating plant to natural Gas University began operating with natural gas, instead of the coal-fired generators of the coal that had been stockpiled, the Plant is running completely on natural gas

Keinan, Alon

138

Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant public design report. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

This Public Design Report provides, in a single document, available nonproprietary design information for the Great Plains Gasification Project, the first commercial coal gasification facility in the United States. In addition to the design aspects, the history of the project, the organization of the plant owners, and the role of the Department of Energy are briefly discussed. Plant capital and operating costs are also presented. An overview of the mine and plant operations is presented and is followed by detailed nonproprietary descriptions of the individual process units, plant systems, and products. Narrative process descriptions, simplified process flow diagrams, input/output stream data, operating conditions, catalyst and chemical requirements, and utility requirements are given for each unit. The process units are described as they were planned by July 1984. Any modification or alteration that occurred after that date will be the subject of a followup work. Plant startup provisions, environmental considerations and control, monitoring and safety considerations are also addressed for each operating unit. The report is published in two volumes. Volume I contains: (1) introduction; (2) overview of project (plant and mine, plant facilities, Basin Electric Antelope Valley Station); and (3) plant process data (coal, oxygen and steam, gasification and gas processing). 53 refs., 80 figs., 36 tabs.

Miller, W.R.; Belt, R.J.; Honea, F.I.; Ness, H.M.; Lang, R.A.; Berty, T.E.; Delany, R.C.; Mako, P.F.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Power plants with topping gas turbines and coal gasification planning of new plants and upgrading of existing plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on existing and new power plants improved environmentally and economically by integrating gas turbines in the plant process. The rate of additional firing has an influence on the overall plant efficiency. The influence of the additional firing of natural gas-fired power plants is compared to that of power plants with integrated coal gasification. The differences are explained. The result of the examination lead to recommendations for the design of new plants and for upgrading of existing plants. The advantages of topping gas turbines are shown by examples of new power plants and upgraded plants.

Schoedel, J.; Mertens, K. (ABB Kraftwerke AG, Mannheim (DE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Techno-economic evaluation of coal-to-liquids (CTL) plants with carbon capture and sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Techno-economic evaluation of coal-to-liquids (CTL) plants with carbon capture and sequestration online 5 March 2011 Keywords: Coal-to-liquids Co-production Carbon capture and storage a b s t r a c t Coal-to-liquids (CTL) processes that generate synthetic liquid fuels from coal are of increasing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Proceedings: Effects of Coal Quality on Power Plants: Fifth International Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal quality has wide-ranging effects on handling, capacity, heat rate, availability, and maintenance of power plant equipment. EPRI's fifth international conference on coal quality featured discussions on corrosion, air toxics, heat rate, and a special session on software tools to support coal quality investigations. Such information can help utilities select coals that will enhance operations and overall generation costs.

1997-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

142

MANUFACTURING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Energy Efficiency in Buildings: Solid State Climate Control ... TE materials is green job creation, as Table ... can provide 21,454 US jobs in manufacturing ...

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Manufacturing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy funds the research, development, and demonstration of highly efficient and innovative manufacturing technologies. The Energy Department has supported the development...

144

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through {minus}200 mesh size. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace will be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. This report covers the first quarter`s progress. Major activities during this period were focused on finding the plants where a demo MTU column will be installed to prepare the samples needed to characterize the combustion behavior of slurry effluents. Also, a meeting was held at Penn State University to discuss the availability of the laboratory furnace for testing the plant coal/recovered coal fines blends.

Singh, Shyam

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Mercury emission control for coal fired power plants using coal and biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury is a leading concern among the air toxic metals addressed in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) because of its volatility, persistence, and bioaccumulation as methylmercury in the environment and its neurological health impacts. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports for 2001 shows that total mercury emissions from all sources in USA is about 145 tons per annum, of which coal fired power plants contribute around 33% of it, about 48 tons per annum. Unlike other trace metals that are emitted in particulate form, mercury is released in vapor phase in elemental (Hg0) or oxidized (Hg2+, mainly HgCl2) form. To date, there is no post combustion treatment which can effectively capture elemental mercury vapor, but the oxidized form of mercury can be captured in traditional emission control devices such as wet flue gas defulrization (WFGD) units, since oxidized mercury (HgCl2) is soluble in water. The chlorine concentration present during coal combustion plays a major role in mercury oxidation, which is evident from the fact that plants burning coal having high chlorine content have less elemental mercury emissions. A novel method of co-firing blends of low chlorine content coal with high chlorine content cattle manure/biomass was used in order to study its effect on mercury oxidation. For Texas Lignite and Wyoming coal the concentrations of chlorine are 139 ppm and 309 ppm on dry ash free basis, while for Low Ash Partially Composted Dairy Biomass it is 2,691 ppm. Co-firing experiments were performed in a 100,000 BTU/hr (29.3 kWt) Boiler Burner facility located in the Coal and Biomass Energy laboratory (CBEL); coal and biomass blends in proportions of 80:20, 90:10, 95:5 and 100:0 were investigated as fuels. The percentage reduction of Hg with 95:5, 90:10 and 80:20 blends were measured to be 28- 50%, 42-62% and 71-75% respectively. Though cattle biomass serves as an additive to coal, to increase the chlorine concentration, it leads to higher ash loading. Low Ash and High Ash Partially Composted Dairy Biomass have 164% and 962% more ash than Wyoming coal respectively. As the fraction of cattle biomass in blend increases in proportion, ash loading problems increase simultaneously. An optimum blend ratio is arrived and suggested as 90:10 blend with good reduction in mercury emissions without any compromise on ash loading.

Arcot Vijayasarathy, Udayasarathy

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Does proximity to coal-fired power plants influence fish tissue mercury?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does proximity to coal-fired power plants influence fish tissue mercury? Dana K. Sackett · D. Derek+Business Media, LLC 2010 Abstract Much of the mercury contamination in aquatic biota originates from coal of contaminated fish. In this study, we quantified the relative importance of proximity to coal-fired power plants

147

Financing Capture Ready Coal-Fired Power Plants in China by Issuing Capture Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Financing Capture Ready Coal-Fired Power Plants in China by Issuing Capture Options Xi Liang, Jia Li, Jon Gibbons and David Reiner December 2007 EPRG 0728 & CWPE 0761 #12;FINANCING CAPTURE READY COAL supercritical pulverized coal power plant in China, using a cash flow model with Monte-Carlo simulations

Aickelin, Uwe

148

Quantification of Variability and Uncertainty in Hourly NOx Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Quantification of Variability and Uncertainty in Hourly NOx Emissions from Coal-Fired Power to quantify variability and uncertainty for NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants. Data for hourly NOx Uncertainty, Variability, Emission Factors, Coal-Fired Power Plants, NOx emissions, Regression Models

Frey, H. Christopher

149

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis Ram Chandra Sekar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis by Ram Chandra Sekar;2 #12;3 Carbon Dioxide Capture in Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis by Ram Chandra Sekar and Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering ABSTRACT Investments in three coal-fired power generation

150

Assessing the environmental pollutant vector of combustion gases emission from coal-fired power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the present industrial metabolism, electric and thermal energy production is one of the main consumers of fossil fuels. Coal is a natural resource and fossil fuel used in the coal-fired power plants in Romania. Unfortunately, beyond the environmental ... Keywords: coal-fired power plant, combustion gases, environmental impact, pollutant vector

Cornelia A. Bulucea; Andreea Jeles; Nikos E. Mastorakis; Carmen A. Bulucea; Constantin Brindusa

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Award Recipient of ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry JM Eagle Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant JM Eagle 10807 U.S. 59 Road Wharton, TX 77488 The Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant, located on an old cattle field, opened in 1985 by first manufacturing PVC pipe. The manufacturing of injection molding was added in 1988, corrugated pipe was added in 2009, and corrugated fittings were added in 2011. There are expectations for the plant to expand into manufacturing PE pipe fittings in the future. The Wharton plant achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in June 2010. The plant achieved a 15.5% reduction in energy intensity in the first year following its baseline. The success of achieving the Challenge for Industry came principally from an energy conservation program that focused on not operating equipment other than that needed for current production,

152

Advanced Coal Power Plant Model (ACCPM) Version 1.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the purchase of a license for the appropriate SimTech IPSEpro modules and library, users can quickly generate performance and capital cost estimates of new, advanced coal power plants. The application allows users to screen integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies prior to engaging in more extensive studies of their preferred choice. Such screening activities generally require sophisticated software and qualified staff to run the models, which takes time and significant investment....

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

153

NETL: News Release - New Mexico Coal-Fired Power Plant to Demonstrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 14, 2004 New Mexico Coal-Fired Power Plant to Demonstrate Multi-Pollutant Controls Project Will Help Meet President's Commitment to Clean Coal and Address National Energy...

154

EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY...

155

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants: Version 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report is designed to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate higher steam conditions that improve efficiency and thereby decrease fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, and other environmental impacts; advanced environmental controls that reduce emissions and discharges of solid ...

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants: Version 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report is designed to facilitate timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate higher steam conditions that improve efficiency and, thereby, decrease fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, and other environmental impacts; advanced environmental controls that reduce emissions and discharges of solid an...

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

157

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants: Verison 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal (PC) fired generating units along with lessons learned from current plants worldwide. The report is designed to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation units that incorporate higher steam conditions that improve efficiency and thereby decrease fuel consumption, CO2 emissions, and other environmental impacts; advanced environmental controls that reduce emissions and discharges of solid ...

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Manufacturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manufacturing Manufacturing DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Manufacturing of Products Containing Depleted Uranium Discussion of risks and possible impacts associated with fabrication of representative products containing depleted uranium. Beneficial Uses Risk Evaluation The Department has initiated the Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Program to explore the potential beneficial uses of the depleted uranium (DU), fluorine, and empty carbon steel DUF6 storage cylinders for effective use of resources and to achieve cost savings to the government. A number of tasks have been initiated related to uses of DU as a shielding material, catalyst, and as a semi-conductor material in electronic devices. An evaluation of the risks associated with the release

159

Plasma-enhanced gasification of low-grade coals for compact power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high temperature of a steam torch ensures an efficient gasification of low-grade coals, which is comparable to that of high-grade coals. Therefore, the coal gasification system energized by microwaves can serve as a moderately sized power plant due to its compact and lightweight design. This plasma power plant of low-grade coals would be useful in rural or sparsely populated areas without access to a national power grid.

Uhm, Han S. [Department of Electrophysics, Kwangwoon University, 447-1 Wolgye-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yong C.; Shin, Dong H.; Lee, Bong J. [Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Combined compressed air storage-low BTU coal gasification power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical generating power plant includes a Compressed Air Energy Storage System (CAES) fueled with low BTU coal gas generated in a continuously operating high pressure coal gasifier system. This system is used in coordination with a continuously operating main power generating plant to store excess power generated during off-peak hours from the power generating plant, and to return the stored energy as peak power to the power generating plant when needed. The excess coal gas which is produced by the coal gasifier during off-peak hours is stored in a coal gas reservoir. During peak hours the stored coal gas is combined with the output of the coal gasifier to fuel the gas turbines and ultimately supply electrical power to the base power plant.

Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL); Sather, Norman F. (Naperville, IL)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Clean coal reference plants: Atmospheric CFB. Topical report, Task 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program is a government and industry cofunded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes in a series of full-scale facilities. The goal of the program is to provide the US energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient and environmentally responsive coal-using technologies. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has the responsibility for monitoring the CCT Projects within certain technology categories, which correspond to the center`s areas of technology development, including atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, pressurized fluidized bed combustion, integrated gasification combined cycle, mild gasification, and industrial applications. A measure of success in the CCT program will be the commercial acceptance of the new technologies being demonstrated. The dissemination of project information to potential users is being accomplished by producing a series of reference plant designs which will provide the users a basis for the selection of technologies applicable to their future energy requirements. As a part of DOE`s monitoring and evaluation of the CCT Projects, Gilbert/Commonwealth (G/C) has been contracted to assist in this effort by producing the design of a commercial size Reference Plant, utilizing technologies developed in the CCT Program. This report, the first in a series, describes the design of a 400 MW electric power plant, utilizing an atmospheric pressure, circulating fluidized bed combustor (ACFB) similar to the one which was demonstrated at Colorado-Ute`s Nucla station, funded in Round 1 of the CCT Program. The intent of the reference plant design effort was to portray a commercial power plant with attributes considered important to the utility industry. The logical choice for the ACFB combustor was Pyropower since they supplied the ACFB for the Nucla Project.

Rubow, L.N.; Harvey, L.E.; Buchanan, T.L.; Carpenter, R.G.; Hyre, M.R.; Zaharchuk, R.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Water vulnerabilities for existing coal-fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the Existing Plants Research Program's overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. Water consumption by all users in the United States over the 2005-2030 time period is projected to increase by about 7% (from about 108 billion gallons per day [bgd] to about 115 bgd) (Elcock 2010). By contrast, water consumption by coal-fired power plants over this period is projected to increase by about 21% (from about 2.4 to about 2.9 bgd) (NETL 2009b). The high projected demand for water by power plants, which is expected to increase even further as carbon-capture equipment is installed, combined with decreasing freshwater supplies in many areas, suggests that certain coal-fired plants may be particularly vulnerable to potential water demand-supply conflicts. If not addressed, these conflicts could limit power generation and lead to power disruptions or increased consumer costs. The identification of existing coal-fired plants that are vulnerable to water demand and supply concerns, along with an analysis of information about their cooling systems and related characteristics, provides information to help focus future research and development (R&D) efforts to help ensure that coal-fired generation demands are met in a cost-effective manner that supports sustainable water use. This study identified coal-fired power plants that are considered vulnerable to water demand and supply issues by using a geographical information system (GIS) that facilitated the analysis of plant-specific data for more than 500 plants in the NETL's Coal Power Plant Database (CPPDB) (NETL 2007a) simultaneously with 18 indicators of water demand and supply. Two types of demand indicators were evaluated. The first type consisted of geographical areas where specific conditions can generate demand vulnerabilities. These conditions include high projected future water consumption by thermoelectric power plants, high projected future water consumption by all users, high rates of water withdrawal per square mile (mi{sup 2}), high projected population increases, and areas projected to be in a water crisis or conflict by 2025. The second type of demand indicator was plant specific. These indicators were developed for each plant and include annual water consumption and withdrawal rates and intensities, net annual power generation, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. The supply indictors, which are also area based, include areas with low precipitation, high temperatures, low streamflow, and drought. The indicator data, which were in various formats (e.g., maps, tables, raw numbers) were converted to a GIS format and stored, along with the individual plant data from the CPPDB, in a single GIS database. The GIS database allowed the indicator data and plant data to be analyzed and visualized in any combination. To determine the extent to which a plant would be considered 'vulnerable' to a given demand or supply concern (i.e., that the plant's operations could be affected by water shortages represented by a potential demand or supply indicator), criteria were developed to categorize vulnerability according to one of three types: major, moderate, or not vulnerable. Plants with at least two major demand indicator values and/or at least four moderate demand indicator values were considered vulnerable to demand concerns. By using this approach, 144 plants were identified as being subject to demand concerns only. Plants with at least one major supply indicator value and/or at least two moderate supply indicator values were considered vulnerable to supply concerns. By using this approach, 64 plants were identified as being subject to supply concerns only. In addition, 139 plants were identified as subject to both demand and supply concerns. Therefore, a total of 347 plants were considere

Elcock, D.; Kuiper, J.; Environmental Science Division

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

Controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasingly stringent US federal and state limits on mercury emissions form coal-fired power plants demand optimal mercury control technologies. This article summarises the successful removal of mercury emissions achieved with activated carbon injection and boiler bromide addition, technologies nearing commercial readiness, as well as several novel control concepts currently under development. It also discusses some of the issues standing in the way of confident performance and cost predictions. In testing conducted on western coal-fired units with fabric filters or TOXECON to date, ACI has generally achieved mercury removal rates > 90%. At units with ESPs, similar performance requires brominated ACI. Alternatively, units firing western coals can use boiler bromide addition to increase flue gas mercury oxidation and downstream capture in a wet scrubber, or to enhance mercury removal by ACI. At eastern bituminous fired units with ESPs, ACI is not as effective, largely due to SO{sub 3} resulting from the high sulfur content of the coal or the use of SO{sub 3} flue gas conditioning to improve ESP performance. 7 refs., 3 figs.

Chang, R. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Characterization of the Toxicity of Coal-Fired Power Plant Effluents to Freshwater Mussels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plant effluents contain trace metals, dissolved salts, and nutrients that may harm aquatic life, including fish, invertebrates, and freshwater mussels, living in receiving streams adjacent to the plants. This interim report discusses the results of effluent toxicity and water quality tests performed over the past year for three coal-fired power plantsMitchell Plant and Mountaineer Plant, both in West Virginia, and Marshall Plant in North Carolina.

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

165

Conceptual flow sheets development for coal conversion plant coal handling-preparation and ash/slag removal operations  

SciTech Connect

This report presents 14 conceptual flow sheets and major equipment lists for coal handling and preparation operations that could be required for future, commercial coal conversion plants. These flow sheets are based on converting 50,000 tons per day of clean coal representative of the Pittsburgh and Kentucky No. 9 coal seams. Flow sheets were used by Union Carbide Corporation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in a survey of coal handling/preparation equipment requirements for future coal conversion plants. Operations covered in this report include run-of-mine coal breaking, coarse coal cleaning, fine coal cleaning, live storage and blending, fine crushing (crushing to top sizes ranging from 1/4-inch to 20 mesh), drying, and grinding (70 percent minus 200 mesh). Two conceptual flow sheets and major equipment lists are also presented for handling ash or granulated slag and other solid wastes produced by nine leading coal conversion processes. These flow sheets provide for solid wastes transport to an environmentally acceptable disposal site as either dry solids or as a water slurry.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A Case Study on the Use of Innovative Methods for Comprehensive Site Characterization at Former Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a case study on using innovative technologies for investigating former manufactured gas plant sites.

2002-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

167

Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant Public Design Report. Volume II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Public Design Report provides, in a single document, available nonproprietary design information for the Great Plains Gasification Project, the first commercial coal gasification facility in the United States. In addition to the design aspects, the history of the project, the organization of the plant owners, and the role of the Department of Energy are briefly discussed. Plant capital and operating costs are also presented. An overview of the mine and plant operations is presented and is followed by detailed nonproprietary descriptions of the individual process units, plant systems, and products. Narrative process descriptions, simplified process flow diagrams, input/output stream data, operating conditions, catalyst and chemical requirements, and utility requirements are given for each unit. The process units are described as they were planned by July 1984. Any modification or alteration that occurred after that date will be the subject of a followup work. Plant startup provisions, environmental considerations and control, monitoring and safety considerations are also addressed for each operating unit. The report is published in two volumes. Volume II contains: (1) plant process data (sulfur recovery, main flare - area 8300, liquid processing, ash handling and solids disposal, other systems); (2) plant startup procedure and schedule; (3) plant and employee safety; (4) GPGP cost data; and (5) references. 53 refs., 46 figs., 38 tabs.

Miller, W.R.; Belt, R.J.; Honea, F.I.; Ness, H.M.; Lang, R.A.; Berty, T.E.; Delany, R.C.; Mako, P.F.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Evaluating the environmental impact of coal-fired power plants through wastewater pollutant vector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable and safe operation of a coal-fired power plant is strongly linked to freshwater resources, and environmental problems related to water source and wastewater discharging are challenging the power plant operation. This study deals with an evaluation ... Keywords: coal-fired power plant, environmental impact, pollutant vector, wastewater

Nikos E. Mastorakis; Andreea Jeles; Cornelia A. Bulucea; Carmen A. Bulucea; Constantin Brindusa

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and 642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY SUMMARY This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE's proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

170

Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant Demonstrating Innovative DOE-Funded Technology Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant Demonstrating Innovative DOE-Funded Technology December 16, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative project demonstrating DryFining™ technology, a more cost-effective way to control coal-based power plant emissions while improving fuel quality, has been named the 2010 Coal-Fired Project of the Year by the editors of Power Engineering magazine. The project, managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, was developed with funding from the Department of Energy's Clean Coal Power Initiative and was originally implemented at Great River Energy's Coal Creek Station in Underwood, ND, in 2009. The

171

Impacts of TMDLs on coal-fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Water Act (CWA) includes as one of its goals restoration and maintenance of the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Nation's waters. The CWA established various programs to accomplish that goal. Among the programs is a requirement for states to establish water quality standards that will allow protection of the designated uses assigned to each water body. Once those standards are set, state agencies must sample the water bodies to determine if water quality requirements are being met. For those water bodies that are not achieving the desired water quality, the state agencies are expected to develop total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) that outline the maximum amount of each pollutant that can be discharged to the water body and still maintain acceptable water quality. The total load is then allocated to the existing point and nonpoint sources, with some allocation held in reserve as a margin of safety. Many states have already developed and implemented TMDLs for individual water bodies or regional areas. New and revised TMDLs are anticipated, however, as federal and state regulators continue their examination of water quality across the United States and the need for new or revised standards. This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements its overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. One of the program missions of the DOE's NETL is to develop innovative environmental control technologies that will enable full use of the Nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. Some of the parameters for which TMDLs are being developed are components in discharges from coal-fired power plants. If a state establishes a new or revised TMDL for one of these pollutants in a water body where a power plant is located, the next renewal of the power plant's National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit is likely to include more restrictive limits. Power generators may need to modify existing operational and wastewater treatment technologies or employ new ones as TMDLs are revised or new ones are established. The extent to which coal-fired power plants may be impacted by revised and new TMDL development has not been well established. NETL asked Argonne to evaluate how current and potential future TMDLs might influence coal-fired power plant operations and discharges. This information can be used to inform future technology research funded by NETL. The scope of investigation was limited to several eastern U.S. river basins rather than providing a detailed national perspective.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

Coal-fired open cycle magnetohydrodynamic power plant emissions and energy efficiences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study is a review of projected emissions and energy efficiencies of coal-fired open cycle MHD power plants. Ideally one

Gruhl, Jim

173

Coal plants without scrubbers account for a majority of U.S. SO 2 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal-fired electric power plants make up the largest source of national sulfur dioxide (SO 2) emissions. The Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR) ...

174

Cost of transporting coal to power plants rose almost 50% in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The average cost of shipping coal by railroad to power plants increased almost 50% in the United States from 2001 to 2010.

175

Cost of transporting coal to power plants rose almost 50% in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, ... The average cost of shipping coal by railroad to power plants increased almost 50% in the United ... National numbers can be ...

176

U.S. coal stockpile levels at electric power plants approach five ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total coal stockpile levels at U.S. electric power plants were 139 million tons in August 2011the lowest total level for August since 2006.

177

A baseline assessment of local mercury deposition from coal-fired power plants in Central Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal-fired power plants represent the largest source of anthropogenic mercury in the world. The Central Texas region as represented by the Heart of Texas Council (more)

Furl, Chad Van.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Mercury concentrations in wetlands associated with coal-fired power plants in Illinois.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Burning of fossil fuels by coal-fired power plants (CFPPs) is one of the largest sources of environmental mercury in the United States and there have (more)

Weir, Scott

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Innovative coal gas cleaning at Sparrows Point Coal Chemical Plant, Maryland for Bethlehem Steel Corporation  

SciTech Connect

In response to the Clean Coal II solicitation, Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC) submitted a proposal to the DOE in May 1988. The proposal submitted by BSC describes a Unique integration of commercial technologies developed by Davy/Still Otto to clean coke oven gas being produced at its Sparrows Point, Maryland steel plant. This innovative coke oven gas cleaning system combines secondary gas cooling with hydrogen sulfide and ammonia removal, hydrogen sulfide and ammonia recovery, ammonia destruction and sulfur recovery to produce a cleaner fuel gas for plant use. The primary environmental benefit associated with employing this innovative coke oven gas cleaning system is realized when the fuel gas is burned within the steel plant. Emissions of sulfur dioxide are reduced by more than 60 percent. The removal, recovery and destruction of ammonia eliminates the disposal problems associated with an unmarketable ammonium sulfate by-product. Significant reduction in benzene and hydrogen cyanide emissions are also obtained.

Antrobus, K.; Platts, M. (Davy/Still Otto, Pittsburgh, PA (US)); Harbold, L. (Bethlehem Steel Corp., PA (USA)); Kornosky, R. (Office of Clean Coal Technology, US DOE, Pittsburgh, PA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Efficiency and Environmental Impacts of Electricity Restructuring on Coal-fired Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and states in the Northeast was high electricity prices, reflecting high historical average costs from efficiency, cost of coal purchases, and utilization among coal-fired power plants using a panel data set from recent years allows us to examine longer term impacts of restructuring; (2) the focus on coal-fired power

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181

Capture-Ready Coal Plants -Options, Technologies and Economics Mark C. Bohm1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Capture-Ready Coal Plants - Options, Technologies and Economics Mark C. Bohm1 , Howard J. Herzog1 be employed during the initial design and construction of a both pulverized coal and integrated gasification the Internet in the summer of 2006 [7]. Introduction Interest in the construction of coal-fired power

182

Using Auxiliary Gas Power for CCS Energy Needs in Retrofitted Coal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Using Auxiliary Gas Power for CCS Energy Needs in Retrofitted Coal Power Plants by Sarah Bashadi and Policy Program #12;2 #12;3 Using Auxiliary Gas Power for CCS Energy Needs in Retrofitted Coal Power-combustion capture retrofits are expected to a near-term option for mitigating CO2 emissions from existing coal

183

EPRI Central Plant Equipment Manufacturers Roundtable, Meeting Summary, October 26-27, 1999, Houston, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI and Reliant Energy co-sponsored the Central Plant Equipment Manufacturers Roundtable on October 26-27, 1999. The meeting gave EPRI members, commercial building owners, and central plant equipment manufacturers an opportunity to enhance their relationships as the electric industry faces deregulation. Representatives from major building owner and facility manager organizations attended the meeting, as did representatives from major equipment suppliers. The roundtable forum provided for extensive and l...

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

184

Development of an Ultra-fine Coal Dewatering Technology and an Integrated Flotation-Dewatering System for Coal Preparation Plants  

SciTech Connect

The project proposal was approved for only the phase I period. The goal for this Phase I project was to develop an industrial model that can perform continuous and efficient dewatering of fine coal slurries of the previous flotation process to fine coal cake of {approx}15% water content from 50-70%. The feasibility of this model should be demonstrated experimentally using a lab scale setup. The Phase I project was originally for one year, from May 2005 to May 2006. With DOE approval, the project was extended to Dec. 2006 without additional cost from DOE to accomplish the work. Water has been used in mining for a number of purposes such as a carrier, washing liquid, dust-catching media, fire-retardation media, temperature-control media, and solvent. When coal is cleaned in wet-processing circuits, waste streams containing water, fine coal, and noncombustible particles (ash-forming minerals) are produced. In many coal preparation plants, the fine waste stream is fed into a series of selection processes where fine coal particles are recovered from the mixture to form diluted coal fine slurries. A dewatering process is then needed to reduce the water content to about 15%-20% so that the product is marketable. However, in the dewatering process currently used in coal preparation plants, coal fines smaller than 45 micrometers are lost, and in many other plants, coal fines up to 100 micrometers are also wasted. These not-recovered coal fines are mixed with water and mineral particles of the similar particle size range and discharged to impoundment. The wasted water from coal preparation plants containing unrecoverable coal fine and mineral particles are called tailings. With time the amount of wastewater accumulates occupying vast land space while it appears as threat to the environment. This project developed a special extruder and demonstrated its application in solid-liquid separation of coal slurry, tailings containing coal fines mostly less than 50 micron. The extruder is special because all of its auger surface and the internal barrier surface are covered with the membranes allowing water to drain and solid particles retained. It is believed that there are four mechanisms working together in the dewatering process. They are hydrophilic diffusion flow, pressure flow, agitation and air purging. Hydrophilic diffusion flow is effective with hydrophilic membrane. Pressure flow is due to the difference of hydraulic pressure between the two sides of the membrane. Agitation is provided by the rotation of the auger. Purging is achieved with the air blow from the near bottom of the extruder, which is in vertical direction.

Wu Zhang; David Yang; Amar Amarnath; Iftikhar Huq; Scott O'Brien; Jim Williams

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

185

Industrial/manufacturing resources | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial/manufacturing resources Industrial/manufacturing resources Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

186

CoalFleet RD&D Augmentation Plan for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced, clean coal technologies such as integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) offer societies around the world the promise of efficient, affordable power generation at markedly reduced levels of emissions8212including "greenhouse gases" linked to global climate change8212relative to today's current fleet of coal-fired power plants. To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of IGCC and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiati...

2007-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

187

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Health Effects of Coal Plant Emissions Map Click on a Project Name to Get More Information Click to read a DOE TechLine [PDF-22KB] describing three new projects that will improve our current understanding of the link between power plant emissions, PM2.5, and human health. The Health Effects component of NETL's Air Quality Research Program is designed to enhance the body of scientific evidence relating stack emissions from coal plants to adverse health effects resulting from human exposures to air pollution. Despite the fact that coal plants emit significant amounts of PM2.5 and mercury to the atmosphere, there is currently a great deal of uncertainty regarding the actual amount of health damage resulting from these emissions. In order to devise cost-effective

188

Color Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Color Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power color from pulp mill effluent using coal ash. Prevent coal ash adsorbent from leaching arsenic, chromium, lead, and zinc. Define a treatment procedure using coal ash that will result in the maximum

Hutcheon, James M.

189

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. Coal drying experiments were performed with a Powder River Basin coal to measure the effects of fluidization velocity and drying temperature on rate of drying in a batch drying process. Comparisons to computational results using the batch bed drying model show good agreement. Comparisons to drying results with North Dakota lignite at the same process conditions confirm the lignite dries slightly more rapidly than the PRB. Experiments were also carried out to determine the effects of inlet air humidity on drying rate. The specific humidity ranged from a value typical for air at temperatures near freezing to a value for 30 C air at 90 percent relative humidity. The experimental results show drying rate is strongly affected by inlet air humidity, with the rate decreasing with more humid inlet air. The temperature of the drying process also plays a strong role, with the negative impacts of high inlet moisture being less of a factor in a higher temperature drying process. Concepts for coal drying systems integrated into a power plant were developed. These make use of hot circulating cooling water from the condenser, steam extraction from the turbine cycle and thermal energy extracted from hot flue gas, in various combinations. Analyses are under way to calculate the effects of drying system design and process conditions on unit performance, emissions, and cooling tower makeup water.

Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Wei Zhang

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Testing of a coal-fired diesel power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The POC coal-fired power plant consists of a Cooper-Bessemer LSC-6 engine (15.5 inch bore, 22 inch stroke) rated at 400 rev/min and 208 psi bmep producing approximately 1.8 MW of power. The power plant is fueled with 'engine grade' coal slurry which has been physically cleaned to an ash level of approximately 1.5 to 2% (dry basis) and has a mean particle size of approximately 12 micron. CWS is injected directly into the combustion chamber through a fuel injector (one per cylinder) which was designed and developed to be compatible with the fuel. Each injector is fitted with a 19 orifice nozzle tip made with sapphire inserts in each orifice. The combustion chambers are fitted with twin diesel pilot injectors which provide a positive ignition source and substantially shorten the ignition delay period of the CWS fuel. Durable coatings (typically tungsten carbide) are used for the piston rings and cylinder liners to reduce wear rates. The emission control system consists of SCR for NO[sub x] control, sodium sorbent injection for SO[sub x] control, and a cyclone plus baghouse for particulate capture. The cyclone is installed upstream of the engine turbocharger which helps protect the turbine blades.

Wilson, R.P.; Balles, E.N.; Benedek, K.R.; Benson, C.E. (Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Rao, K.; Schaub, F. (Cooper-Bessemer, Mount Vernon, OH (United States)); Kimberley, J. (AMBAC, West Springfield, MA (United States)); Itse, D. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Testing of a coal-fired diesel power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The POC coal-fired power plant consists of a Cooper-Bessemer LSC-6 engine (15.5 inch bore, 22 inch stroke) rated at 400 rev/min and 208 psi bmep producing approximately 1.8 MW of power. The power plant is fueled with `engine grade` coal slurry which has been physically cleaned to an ash level of approximately 1.5 to 2% (dry basis) and has a mean particle size of approximately 12 micron. CWS is injected directly into the combustion chamber through a fuel injector (one per cylinder) which was designed and developed to be compatible with the fuel. Each injector is fitted with a 19 orifice nozzle tip made with sapphire inserts in each orifice. The combustion chambers are fitted with twin diesel pilot injectors which provide a positive ignition source and substantially shorten the ignition delay period of the CWS fuel. Durable coatings (typically tungsten carbide) are used for the piston rings and cylinder liners to reduce wear rates. The emission control system consists of SCR for NO{sub x} control, sodium sorbent injection for SO{sub x} control, and a cyclone plus baghouse for particulate capture. The cyclone is installed upstream of the engine turbocharger which helps protect the turbine blades.

Wilson, R.P.; Balles, E.N.; Benedek, K.R.; Benson, C.E. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Rao, K.; Schaub, F. [Cooper-Bessemer, Mount Vernon, OH (United States); Kimberley, J. [AMBAC, West Springfield, MA (United States); Itse, D. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Planning for coal power plant transition : lessons learned from communities in Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As coal-fired power plants across the U.S. are retiring in increasing numbers - a trend likely to continue in the years ahead - the communities that host these plants will play a critical role in balancing local concerns ...

Nochur, Aditya Kumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Use of the GranuFlow Process in Coal Preparation Plants to Improve Energy Recovery and Reduce Coal Processing Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the increasing use of screen-bowl centrifuges in today's fine coal cleaning circuits, a significant amount of low-ash, high-Btu coal can be lost during the dewatering step due to the difficulty in capturing coal of this size consist (< 100 mesh or 0.15mm). The GranuFlow{trademark} technology, developed and patented by an in-house research group at DOE-NETL, involves the addition of an emulsified mixture of high-molecular-weight hydrocarbons to a slurry of finesized coal before cleaning and/or mechanical dewatering. The binder selectively agglomerates the coal, but not the clays or other mineral matter. In practice, the binder is applied so as to contact the finest possible size fraction first (for example, froth flotation product) as agglomeration of this fraction produces the best result for a given concentration of binder. Increasing the size consist of the fine-sized coal stream reduces the loss of coal solids to the waste effluent streams from the screen bowl centrifuge circuit. In addition, the agglomerated coal dewaters better and is less dusty. The binder can also serve as a flotation conditioner and may provide freeze protection. The overall objective of the project is to generate all necessary information and data required to commercialize the GranuFlow{trademark} Technology. The technology was evaluated under full-scale operating conditions at three commercial coal preparation plants to determine operating performance and economics. The handling, storage, and combustion properties of the coal produced by this process were compared to untreated coal during a power plant combustion test.

Glenn A. Shirey; David J. Akers

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Characterizing Coal-Fired Power Plant Mercury Emissions Variability at Low Concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update presents a further evaluation of the variability of mercury emission from coal-fired power plants, based on additional measurements by continuous mercury monitors (CMMs) at two coal-fired power plants with low-level mercury emissions. Emissions variability is important for control technology selection as well as regulatory considerations.

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

195

Evaluation of 450-MWe BGL GCC Power Plants Fueled With Pittsburgh No. 8 Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed design and cost estimates have been developed for conventionally and highly integrated 450-MWe, British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plants employing two General Electric (GE) MS-7001F gas turbines and fueled with Pittsburgh No. 8 coal. The plants have attractive heat rates and capital costs that are competitive with conventional coal-based power technology.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Evaluation of a 510-MWe Destec GCC Power Plant Fueled with Illinois No. 6 Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed design and cost estimate has been developed for a 510-MWe, conventionally integrated, Destec gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plant employing two General Electric (GE) MS-7001F gas turbines and fueled with Illinois no. 6 coal. The plant has an attractive heat rate and a capital cost that is competitive with conventional coal-based power technology.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

197

Evaluation of a Dow-Based Gasification-Combined-Cycle Plant Using Low-Rank Coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This feasibility study developed performance and cost data for two different Dow-based gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plants, designed to fire either Texas lignite or Wyoming subbituminous coals at a Gulf Coast location. It demonstrated the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of these plants for generating power from low-rank coals.

1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

198

Research on Resource Value Flow Accounting Based on Circular Economy for Coal-fired Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the methodology of resource value flow accounting developed for a study which combined material flow analysis?MFA? for the coal-fired power generation plant, in order to shed light on concepts such as resource productivity ... Keywords: Circular economy, Coal-fired power plant, Material flow analysis, Resource value flow accounting

Xie Zhiming; Yi Xuan

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

How clean is coal : coal power plant ash pond regulations compared to nuclear reactor decommissioning standards.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal power is the prominent source of energy in the United States (U.S.) and around the world. The byproducts of coal power contain many of (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Water Extraction from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to develop a liquid disiccant-based flue gas dehydration process technology to reduce water consumption in coal-fired power plants. The specific objective of the program was to generate sufficient subscale test data and conceptual commercial power plant evaluations to assess process feasibility and merits for commercialization. Currently, coal-fired power plants require access to water sources outside the power plant for several aspects of their operation in addition to steam cycle condensation and process cooling needs. At the present time, there is no practiced method of extracting the usually abundant water found in the power plant stack gas. This project demonstrated the feasibility and merits of a liquid desiccant-based process that can efficiently and economically remove water vapor from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants to be recycled for in-plant use or exported for clean water conservation. After an extensive literature review, a survey of the available physical and chemical property information on desiccants in conjunction with a weighting scheme developed for this application, three desiccants were selected and tested in a bench-scale system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). System performance at the bench scale aided in determining which desiccant was best suited for further evaluation. The results of the bench-scale tests along with further review of the available property data for each of the desiccants resulted in the selection of calcium chloride as the desiccant for testing at the pilot-scale level. Two weeks of testing utilizing natural gas in Test Series I and coal in Test Series II for production of flue gas was conducted with the liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) designed and built for this study. In general, it was found that the LDDS operated well and could be placed in an automode in which the process would operate with no operator intervention or adjustment. Water produced from this process should require little processing for use, depending on the end application. Test Series II water quality was not as good as that obtained in Test Series I; however, this was believed to be due to a system upset that contaminated the product water system during Test Series II. The amount of water that can be recovered from flue gas with the LDDS is a function of several variables, including desiccant temperature, L/G in the absorber, flash drum pressure, liquid-gas contact method, and desiccant concentration. Corrosion will be an issue with the use of calcium chloride as expected but can be largely mitigated through proper material selection. Integration of the LDDS with either low-grade waste heat and or ground-source heating and cooling can affect the parasitic power draw the LDDS will have on a power plant. Depending on the amount of water to be removed from the flue gas, the system can be designed with no parasitic power draw on the power plant other than pumping loads. This can be accomplished in one scenario by taking advantage of the heat of absorption and the heat of vaporization to provide the necessary temperature changes in the desiccant with the flue gas and precipitates that may form and how to handle them. These questions must be addressed in subsequent testing before scale-up of the process can be confidently completed.

Bruce C. Folkedahl; Greg F. Weber; Michael E. Collings

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant January 19, 2012 - 5:00pm Addthis Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon dioxide produced are among the technologies being used in the Texas Clean Energy Project. | Photo courtesy of llnlphotos. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon

202

Workers Demolish Coal-fired Steam Plant at EM's Portsmouth Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Demolish Coal-fired Steam Plant at EM's Portsmouth Site Workers Demolish Coal-fired Steam Plant at EM's Portsmouth Site Workers Demolish Coal-fired Steam Plant at EM's Portsmouth Site September 18, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A high-pressure water cannon is used to control dust for the demolition of the X-600 Steam Plant. A high-pressure water cannon is used to control dust for the demolition of the X-600 Steam Plant. One of three large smoke stacks comes down during the demolition. One of three large smoke stacks comes down during the demolition. A high-pressure water cannon is used to control dust for the demolition of the X-600 Steam Plant. One of three large smoke stacks comes down during the demolition. PIKETON, Ohio - Towering above most nearby buildings, the X-600 Coal-fired Steam Plant had been part of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion

203

Workers Demolish Coal-fired Steam Plant at EM's Portsmouth Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Demolish Coal-fired Steam Plant at EM's Portsmouth Site Workers Demolish Coal-fired Steam Plant at EM's Portsmouth Site Workers Demolish Coal-fired Steam Plant at EM's Portsmouth Site September 18, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A high-pressure water cannon is used to control dust for the demolition of the X-600 Steam Plant. A high-pressure water cannon is used to control dust for the demolition of the X-600 Steam Plant. One of three large smoke stacks comes down during the demolition. One of three large smoke stacks comes down during the demolition. A high-pressure water cannon is used to control dust for the demolition of the X-600 Steam Plant. One of three large smoke stacks comes down during the demolition. PIKETON, Ohio - Towering above most nearby buildings, the X-600 Coal-fired Steam Plant had been part of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion

204

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated April 28, 2004) Spot coal prices in the East rose steadily since Labor Day 2003, with rapid escalations ...

205

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 26) The average spot prices for reported coal purchases rose once again ...

206

for Coal-Fired Power Plants, 1970-2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper relies on interviews and documentary evidence to describe federal RD&D policy for SO2 and NOx emissions controls for coal-fired power plants from 1970 to 2000 and to assess its impact on technology development. The narrative begins by describing the RD&D program of the EPA in the 1970s, which many observers deem to have been successful, but which was largely dismantled after the election of Ronald Reagan to the presidency in 1980. We then turn to the contributions of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which has been the main federal agency operating in this area since 1980, and particularly to DOEs Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), which began in 1985. The narrative as a whole suggests a mixed verdict on the effectiveness of past federal emissions control RD&D. In the papers conclusion, we mine this narrative history for insights that may be useful to current policy-makers. We argue first that regulatory pull is a necessary component for an effective greenhouse gas reduction policy, while technology push is not. However, a welldesigned technology push may enhance the impact of regulation and lower the cost of compliance. Second, we should not expect that these two components will be well-aligned, due

David M. Hart; Kadri Kallas; David M. Hart; Kadri Kallas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Capturing Carbon from Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CEP April 2009 www.aiche.org/cep 33 CEP April 2009 www.aiche.org/cep 33 DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory is spearheading R&D on a variety of post-combustion and oxy-combustion technologies to cost-effectively achieve 90% CO 2 capture. Jared P. Ciferno Timothy E. Fout U.S. Dept. of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Andrew P. Jones James T. Murphy Science Applications International Corp. C oal-fi red power plants generate about half of the electricity in the United States today, and will con- tinue to be a major source of energy for the fore- seeable future. The U.S. Dept. of Energy's (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that the nation's 300+ gigawatts (GW) of coal-fi red electricity-generating capacity currently in operation will increase to more than

208

Valuing the Flexibility of Providing System Services for Coal Plants with Carbon Capture Capability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes a preliminary study of the potential value associated with using the operating flexibility available from advanced coal plant designs with carbon capture and storage (CCS) systems, as well as from existing coal plants with CCS retrofits, to participate in ancillary service markets. New analytical approaches are introduced that offer the ability to examine plant outputs and operating modes in the context of varying power market conditions151for real power and for reserve a...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated August 12) According to Platts Coal Outlooks Weekly Price Survey (August 11), the ...

210

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 2) The average spot prices for coal traded last week were relatively ...

211

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for cement manufacturing plants.  

SciTech Connect

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing the plant performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing plants can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the cement manufacturing industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for assembly plants that produce a variety of products, including Portland cement and other specialty cement products, in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for cement manufacturing plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G.; Decision and Information Sciences

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

212

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for cement manufacturing plants.  

SciTech Connect

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing the plant performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing plants can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the cement manufacturing industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for assembly plants that produce a variety of products, including Portland cement and other specialty cement products, in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for cement manufacturing plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G.; Decision and Information Sciences

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

213

Report on Geothermal Power Plant Cost and Comparative Cost of Geothermal and Coal Fired Steam Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is to be used by Utah Power and Light Company (UP and L) in making studies of geothermal power plants. The dollars per kilowatt comparison between a geothermal plant and a UP and L coal-fired plant is to be developed. Geothermal gathering system costs and return to owner are to be developed for information.

None

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program was to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples were prepared as 100% plant coal, 90% plant coal/10% fines, 85% plant coal/15% fines, and 80% plant coal /20% fines with a particle size distribution of 70% passing through {minus}200 mesh size. The plant coal and recovered coal fines were obtained from the Randolph Preparation Plant of Peabody Coal Co., Marissa, IL. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace was used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace was used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. The burning profile of the plant coal and the three blends was determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer. Results indicated slower burning of the blends due to low volatile matter and oxidized coal particles. Combustion emissions of these samples were determined in the down-fired combustor, while relative ignition temperatures were determined in the drop tube furnace. Chemical composition of ashes were analyzed to establish a correlation with their respective ash fusion temperatures. Overall study of these samples suggested that the blended samples had combustion properties similar to the original plant coal. In other words, flames were stable under identical firing rates of approximately 200,000 Btu`s/hr and 25% excess air. CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub x}, were similar to each other and within the experimental error. Combustion efficiency of 99{sup +}% was achievable. Ash chemical analysis of each sample revealed that slagging and fouling should not be different from each other.

Singh, S. [SS Energy Environmental International, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States); Scaroni, A.; Miller, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Geochemistry, Fate, and Three-Dimensional Transport Modeling of Subsurface Cyanide Contamination at a Manufactured Gas Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the geochemistry, fate, and three-dimensional transport modeling of subsurface cyanide contamination at a manufactured gas plant.

2001-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

Testing Kentucky Coal to Set Design Criteria for a Lurgi Gasification Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tri-State Synfuels Company, in cooperation with the Commonwealth of Kentucky, undertook a comprehensive coal testing program to support the development of an indirect coal liquefaction project. One of the major elements of the program was a commercial scale gasification test with Kentucky 9 coal in a Lurgi Mark IV dry-bottom gasifier at the Sasol One Plant in Sasolburg, Republic of South Africa, in 1981. The test was conducted to confirm the operability of the Lurgi process on Western Kentucky coal, and to establish the design bases for the TriState Synfuels Project. Other elements of the overall program with Kentucky 9 coal included coal selection, coal characterization, stockpile weatherability, corrosion testing, by-product characterization, and wastewater treatability. The results from this testing program formed the basis for recommendations concerning technical and environmental design criteria and permit applications.

Roeger, A., III; Jones, J. E., Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Potential of hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plants in Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of Burbank and the Ralph M. Parsons Company studies showed several advantages for hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plants, as follows: (1) the estimated cost of producing electricity in hybrid plant is about 18.3 mills/kWh, compared to 19.3 mills/kWh in an all-coal fired power plant; (2) the coal requirements for a given plant can be reduced about 12 to 17%; and (3) the geothermal brines can be used for power plant cooling water, and in some cases, as boiler feedwater. The pertinent results of the City of Burbank studies are summarized and applied to the geothermal and coal resources of Arizona for possible future utilization.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

U.S. Program on Materials Technology for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of coal for electrical generation is essential for maintaining adequate energy supplies in the United States in the 21st Century, but traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO2 at high levels relative to other generation options. To address these problems, a government/industry consortium is undertaking a five-year effort to evaluate and develop advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, termed "Ultrasuperc...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

219

Demonstration Development Project: Assessment of Pressurized Oxy-Coal Technology for Steam-Electric Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of pressurized oxy-combustion technology to support steamelectric power production has been proposed by several organizations as a potential low-cost way to enable a dramatic reduction in CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The pressurized oxy-coal technology realizes most of the benefits of atmospheric pressure oxy-coal technology and offers the prospect of additional efficiency and cost benefits. The technology is, however, in the early stages of development.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

220

Demonstration of On-Line Elemental Coal Analyzer at TVA's Cumberland Fossil Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Pulsed-Fast-Thermal-Neutron Analysis (PFTNA) on-line elemental coal analyzer, developed by Western Kentucky University's Applied Physics Institute, was installed at TVA's Cumberland Fossil Plant. The analyzer is designed to continuously determine the incoming coal's quality properties. The overall effort was coordinated by EPRI's Instrumentation and Control Center. The demonstration and evaluation of the coal analyzer at Cumberland identified and quantified the elements of ash formation along with mois...

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Computer integrated manufacturing implementation at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant: The sixth year of a ten-year plan  

SciTech Connect

The strategic and operational plans for the computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) program in the Y-12 Plant are providing for the evolution of the plant's CIM infrastructure from today's environment to the integrated, highly flexible, and more responsive manufacturing systems planned for the 1990s. The program is committed to meeting the CIM directives established by the US Department of Energy and providing the means by which operations can improve the manufacturing performance of the Y-12 Plant. The plant's CIM program charter is a commitment to coordinating efforts to implement and integrate CIM technologies to improve manufacturing performance and thus significantly enhance the plant's ability to meet current and future manufacturing objectives. To achieve these objectives, CIM technologies are being applied to automate manufacturing processes and information systems. 1 ref., 1 fig.

Bowers, G.L.; Harper, H.E.

1987-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

222

Computer integrated manufacturing implementation at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant: The sixth year of a ten-year plan  

SciTech Connect

The strategic and operational plans for the computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) program in the Y-12 Plant are providing for the evolution of the plant's CIM infrastructure from today's environment to the integrated, highly flexible, and more responsive manufacturing systems planned for the 1990s. The program is committed to meeting the CIM directives established by the US Department of Energy and providing the means by which operations can improve the manufacturing performance of the Y-12 Plant. The plant's CIM program charter is a commitment to coordinating efforts to implement and integrate CIM technologies to improve manufacturing performance and thus significantly enhance the plant's ability to meet current and future manufacturing objectives. To achieve these objectives, CIM technologies are being applied to automate manufacturing processes and informations systems.

Davenport, C.M.; Bowers, G.L.

1987-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant system verification. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the main project is to identify the current developmental status of MCFC systems and address those technical issues that need to be resolved to move the technology from its current status to the demonstration stage in the shortest possible time. The specific objectives are separated into five major tasks as follows: Stack research; Power plant development; Test facilities development; Manufacturing facilities development; and Commercialization. This Final Report discusses the M-C power Corporation effort which is part of a general program for the development of commercial MCFC systems. This final report covers the entire subject of the Unocal 250-cell stack. Certain project activities have been funded by organizations other than DOE and are included in this report to provide a comprehensive overview of the work accomplished.

NONE

1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Steam Turbine Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The Ultrasupercritical (USC) Steam Turbine Materials Development Program is sponsored and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Ohio Coal Development Office, through grants to Energy Industries of Ohio (EIO), a non-profit organization contracted to manage and direct the project. The program is co-funded by the General Electric Company, Alstom Power, Siemens Power Generation (formerly Siemens Westinghouse), and the Electric Power Research Institute, each organization having subcontracted with EIO and contributing teams of personnel to perform the requisite research. The program is focused on identifying, evaluating, and qualifying advanced alloys for utilization in coal-fired power plants that need to withstand steam turbine operating conditions up to 760°C (1400°F) and 35 MPa (5000 psi). For these conditions, components exposed to the highest temperatures and stresses will need to be constructed from nickel-based alloys with higher elevated temperature strength than the highchromium ferritic steels currently used in today??s high-temperature steam turbines. In addition to the strength requirements, these alloys must also be weldable and resistant to environmental effects such as steam oxidation and solid particle erosion. In the present project, candidate materials with the required creep strength at desired temperatures have been identified. Coatings that can resist oxidation and solid particle erosion have also been identified. The ability to perform dissimilar welds between nickel base alloys and ferritic steels have been demonstrated, and the properties of the welds have been evaluated. Results of this three-year study that was completed in 2009 are described in this final report. Additional work is being planned and will commence in 2009. The specific objectives of the future studies will include conducting more detailed evaluations of the weld-ability, mechanical properties and repair-ability of the selected candidate alloys for rotors, casings and valves, and to perform scale-up studies to establish a design basis for commercial scale components. A supplemental program funded by the Ohio Coal Development Office will undertake supporting tasks such as testing and trials using existing atmospheric, vacuum and developmental pressure furnaces to define specific metal casting techniques needed for producing commercial scale components.

Viswanathan, R.; Hawk, J.; Schwant, R.; Saha, D.; Totemeier, T.; Goodstine, S.; McNally, M.; Allen, D. B.; Purgert, Robert

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Low Temperature Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer Balance-of-Plant Manufacturing Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop: Manufacturing Progress and Barriers Low Temperature Fuel Cell and Electrolyser Balance-of-Plant Manufacturing Needs Agenda 2 1. Market and development overview 2. DOE manufacturing overview 3. Current mfg status (automation, volume, etc.) 4. Barriers to achieving high volume production 5. Manufacturing R&D needs Near Term Market Trends  I will focus on the green highlighted areas below as they are the near term applications:  Electrolyser  Industrial Applications  Fuel Cell Refuelling Applications  Energy Storage Applications  Fuel Cells  Automotive  Stationary Long Life  Stationary Intermittent / Short Life / Back-Up Power  Material Handling  APUs (cars/trucks/planes/boats/etc.)  Portable Applications Summary of Hydrogenics' Fuel Cell

226

Problems and Solutions for Multi-coals Blending in Thermal Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-coals blending is an applicable method for energy-saving and pollutant reduction in thermal plants. However, the utilizations have been hampered by problems such as complexities of practical implements, risks against safety during operation, difficulties ... Keywords: multi-coals blending, whole process, global optimization, expert system

Peng Peng; Xia Ji; Yang Tao

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

What does computer integrated manufacturing mean in a continuous process plant?  

SciTech Connect

Increasingly stringent regulations and the burgeoning liabilities associates with noncompliance are among the prime concerns today of companies in the chemical process industries (CPI). A key challenge will be meeting these regulations without drastically sacrificing profitability, already under pressure at many firms from weak markets. Computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) can play a critical role in maximizing profits at continuous process plants. The paper describes the CIM solution in process manufacturing; the concept of simultaneous engineering; elimination of the CIM gap; mirror-like capability (i.e., a model that mirrors plant operations); diverse applications of the mirror-like model; the essential elements of the mirror-like modeling system; CIM and process control; and changes mandated by CIM from common CPI practices in process design, planning, cost management, operations, maintenance, and control systems. A properly implemented CIM system empowers people in a process manufacturing organization with information required to make good and timely decisions.

Nair, P.K. [Profit Technologies Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Canfield, F.B. [ChemShare Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Accumulation of trace elements and growth responses in Corbicula fluminea downstream of a coal-fired power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accumulation of trace elements and growth responses in Corbicula fluminea downstream of a coal 2009 Keywords: Corbicula fluminea Coal-fired power plant Selenium Mercury Glutathione Condition index Bioaccumulation a b s t r a c t Lentic organisms exposed to coal-fired power plant (CFPP) discharges can have

Hopkins, William A.

230

Nitrogen Isotopic Composition of Coal-Fired Power Plant NOx: Influence of Emission Controls and Implications for Global Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen Isotopic Composition of Coal-Fired Power Plant NOx: Influence of Emission Controls from coal-fired power plants in the U.S. at typical operating conditions with and without the presence this, a novel method for collection and isotopic analysis of coal-fired stack NOx emission samples

Elliott, Emily M.

231

Field Test of Manufactured Gas Plant Remediation Technologies: Material Removal and Handling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Common manufactured gas plant (MGP) site structures are often sources of contamination and present a number of unique material removal and handling challenges. This report provides results from a field-scale study involving the excavation of the contents of a subgrade gas holder tank. Specifically discussed are the material handling activities needed to prepare MGP impacted soils and debris for remediation processes.

1996-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

232

Application of Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Containment Barriers at Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the status and use of containment technologies at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites and provides a framework for a rigorous evaluation of containment technologies and applicability. It identifies the performance parameters that, through additional bench- or field-scale research, would promote increased understanding of the use and limitations of containment technologies at MGP sites.

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

233

Remediation Strategies for Source Materials and Contaminated Media at Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information on remediation technologies that can be used to manage source material and contaminated media at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. It describes each technology, discusses its advantages and limitations, and defines the key factors that should be taken into account before selecting the technology for use at a given site.

1995-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

234

Prediction of power output of a coal-fired power plant by artificial neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate modeling of thermal power plant is very useful as well as difficult. Conventional simulation programs based on heat and mass balances represent plant processes with mathematical equations. These are good for understanding the processes but usually ... Keywords: ANN model, Coal-fired boiler, Extrapolation, Interpolation, Real plant data, Steam turbine

J. Smrekar; D. Pandit; M. Fast; M. Assadi; Sudipta De

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Review of Alternatives for Co-firing Biomass in Coal-Based Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update presents information gathered during visits to three European coal-based plants co-fired with biomass. In addition to process details of the plants visited, the report draws together the insight gained of the political and technical approaches that Member States of the European Union (EU) are following to reduce fossil-derived carbon dioxide emissions from their power plants.

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Characterizing Variation in Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the variability of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants, using EPRI's continuous mercury monitor (CMM) dataset. Emission variability is important for control technology selection as well as regulatory considerations.

2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

237

Carbon Management for a Coal/Biomass to Liquids Plant in Northeast...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon ManageMent for a CoalbioMass to liquids Plant in northeast ohio Background This project involves the development of a carbon management plan for a proposed coal and biomass...

238

Future Carbon Regulations and Current Investments in Alternative Coal-Fired Power Plant Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper assesses the role of uncertainty over future U.S. carbon regulations in shaping the current choice of which type of power plant to build. The pulverized coal technology (PC) still offer the lowest cost power ...

Sekar, Ram C.

239

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species Yungang Wang 1 , Jiaoyan Huang 2,a , Philip K. Hopke 3,* , Oliver V. Rattigan 4 , David C....

240

SO2 impacts on forage and soil sulfur concentrations near coal-fired power plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The goal of this research was to determine if S02 emissions from coal-fired power plants could be contributing to the copper deficiency in cattle. Copper (more)

Beene, Jack Stephen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EIA Energy Kids - Coal  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sometimes, coal-fired electric power plants are built near coal mines to lower ... industries and businesses with their own power plants use coal to generate ...

242

Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Design Considerations for Coal Plant Load Following Flexibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is currently examining the feasibility of large scale 90 CO2 post combustion capture (PCC) on pulverized Coal (PC) power plants for both new build and retrofit scenarios. The CoalFleet program has undertaken extensive engineering and economic assessments of state-of-the-art ultra-supercritical (USC) PC with capture, alongside plants retrofitted with highly integrated PCC systems. Based on extensive knowledge accrued to date, this report aims to illustrate the ...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Slipstream Testing of a Membrane CO2 Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing of a Membrane CO Testing of a Membrane CO 2 Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of

244

Estimation Methodology for Total and Elemental Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a tool for estimating total and speciated mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. The mercury emissions methodology is based on EPRI's analyses of the results from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Mercury Information Collection Request (ICR). The Mercury ICR required owner/operators of coal-fired electric utility steam generating units to report for calendar year 1999 the quantity of fuel consumed and the mercury content of that fuel. In addition, 84 power plant...

2001-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

245

Options for Removing Multiple Pollutants Including CO2 at Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a technical review of the fuel changes and technology options for existing coal-fired power plants in response to potential new requirements for increasingly stringent multi-pollutant air emissions reductions, possibly including carbon dioxide (CO2). Preliminary costing of the major options is included. A database of the U.S. coal-fired power plants has been developed for further, more specific analyses.

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

246

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated July 7, 2004) In the trading week ended July 2, the average spot coal prices tracked by EIA were mixed.

247

NETL: Coal Utilization By-Products (CUB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Coal Utilization Byproducts Innovations for Existing Plants Solid Waste (Coal Utilization...

248

Membrane filtration waste treatment technology comes of age in battery manufacturing plants  

SciTech Connect

A new waste treatment system from MEMTEK Corporation incorporates membrane filtration, and makes possible the effective treatment of waste streams containing a number of toxic heavy metals. Using this membrane technology, MEMTEK is capable of treating the wastewater in battery manufacturing plants to meet even the strictest limits imposed by local regulatory agencies and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Lead and zinc in the treated effluent are typically below 0.1 ppm. The typical battery manufacturing processes introduce metals, primarily lead, into plant effluents, especially from formation, battery wash, and laundry operation. Due to the high usage of acid in the plant, the wastewater is also usually of a low pH, typically 2 or less. The dissolved and particulate contaminants in this effluent must be removed to very low levels before the water can be released to the sewer or the environment. The waste treatment process is described.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Superheater Corrosion in Plants Burning High-Chlorine Coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion caused by molten alkali sulfates can cause premature failure in superheaters and reheaters of coal-fired boilers. Coals with a high chlorine content are more likely to cause molten sulfate corrosion than those with a low chlorine content. Tests in a boiler burning coal with 0.37% chlorine and 1.3% sulfur show that stainless steels with at least 35% chromium are very corrosion resistant, while steels containing less than 20% chromium have high corrosion rates.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Evaluation of Suitability of Selected Set of Coal Plant Sites for Repowering with Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the approach that ORNL developed for screening a sample set of small coal stations for possible repowering with SMRs; the methodology employed, including spatial modeling; and initial results for these sample plants. The objective in conducting this type of siting evaluation is to demonstrate the capability to characterize specific sample coal plant sites to identify any particular issues associated with repowering existing coal stations with SMRs using OR-SAGE; it is not intended to be a definitive assessment per se as to the absolute suitability of any particular site.

Belles, Randy [ORNL; Copinger, Donald A [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P [ORNL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Projected retirements of coal-fired power plants - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Current trends in the electric power market put many coal-fired generators in the United States at risk for retirement. In the Annual Energy Outlook ...

252

DURABILITY EVALUATION AND PRODUCTION OF MANUFACTURED AGGREGATES FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect

Under the cooperative agreement with DOE, the Research and Development Department of CONSOL Energy (CONSOL R&D), teamed with Universal Aggregates, LLC, to conduct a systematic study of the durability of aggregates manufactured using a variety of flue gas desulfurization (FGD), fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) and fly ash specimens with different chemical and physical properties and under different freeze/thaw, wet/dry and long-term natural weathering conditions. The objectives of the study are to establish the relationships among the durability and characteristics of FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash, and to identify the causes of durability problems, and, ultimately, to increase the utilization of FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash as a construction material. Manufactured aggregates made from FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash, and products made from those manufactured aggregates were used in the study. The project is divided into the following activities: sample collection and characterization; characterization and preparation of manufactured aggregates; determination of durability characteristics of manufactured aggregates; preparation and determination of durability characteristics of manufactured aggregate products; and data evaluation and reporting.

M. M. Wu

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review (Revised 5/6/2002) 1 by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration 1 This article has been revised, deleting 17.6 millions short tons of coal consumed by the manufacturers of synthetic coal from the consumption of coal by "other industrial plants." This change was made because the synthetic coal those plants produced was primarily consumed in the electric sector and reported as coal, resulting in an overstating of total coal consumption. Overview With the dawning of a new century came the beginning of a new era in the coal industry. Instead of the traditional prac- tice of only buying and selling produced coal in the United

254

DOE Awards $235 Million to Southern Company to Build Clean Coal Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

235 Million to Southern Company to Build Clean Coal 235 Million to Southern Company to Build Clean Coal Plant DOE Awards $235 Million to Southern Company to Build Clean Coal Plant February 22, 2006 - 12:13pm Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - The U.S. Department of Energy awarded $235 million to Southern Company, in partnership with the Orlando Utilities Commission and Kellogg, Brown and Root, to develop one of the cleanest coal-fired power plants in the world. Representatives of the Energy Department and Southern Company signed a cooperative agreement that launches the design, construction, and demonstration of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation system at the Orlando Utilities Commission's Stanton Energy Center. The system will produce 285 megawatts of electricity for the Orlando area - which will power approximately 285,000 households - and is

255

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from combustion and gasification of coal an equilibriumHolysh, M. 2005. Coke Gasification: Advanced technology forfrom a Coal-Fired Gasification Plant. Final Report, December

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. One plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through -200 mesh size. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace win be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. The burning profile of the plant coal and the three blends was determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer. Results indicated slower burning of the blends due to low volatile matter and oxidized coal particles. Ash fusing temperatures of the samples were determined using ASTM procedure. Preliminary combustion evaluation of the samples (100% plant coal, 80% plant coal/20% recovered coal fines) indicated that the flame was stable at 100,000-200,000 Btu/hr firing rate. Carbon conversion efficiency of 85 to 90% was recorded using the Ash Tracer technique. Tests are continuing to determine the operating boundaries for these blends while measuring the emissions of SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, CO and O{sub 2}, maintaining a stable flame.

Singh, S. [SS Energy Environmental International, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States); Scaroni, A.; Miller, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

NUCLEAR-CONVENTIONAL POWER PLANT COST STUDY CONVENTIONAL COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS, 25,000 KW TO 325,000 KW, FOR ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY, LEMONT, ILLINOIS  

SciTech Connect

In order to establish a basis for comparing the estimated cost of nuclear power plant designs, a set of general and detailed design considerations for conventional coal-fired power plants was established. Five preliminary designs of conventional coal-fired power plants ranging in size from 25to 325 mw were selected, and cost estimates were prepared. ( A.C.)

Chittenden, W.A.

1959-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Application of Multi-objects Fuzzy Comprehension Evaluation in Selecting Location of Coal-Fired Plant Construction Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper introduces the method of multi-objects fuzzy comprehension evaluation briefly, and applies it to select location of coal-fired plants construction project. Multi-objective fuzzy comprehensive evaluation in plant site application has strong ... Keywords: Fuzzy comprehension evaluation, Multi-objects decision, Selecting location of coal-fired plant

Li Wei; Zhang Zhen-gang; Wen Xinpu

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Evaluation of Technical Impracticability Determinations and Their Applicability to Former Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigation and remediation of former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites often present many challenges due to the presence of dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), the age of releases, complex geology, persistent compounds, and site ownership by third parties. As a result, it is often difficult or impossible to remediate former MGP sites to pre-release conditions or regulatory-established default soil and groundwater quality criteria. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and many states ...

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Evaluation of Biosparging for Management of Groundwater at the Manufactured Gas Plant in Baraboo, Wisconsin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of field and modeling studies of the fate and transport of a plume of organic constituents in an aquifer underlying a manufactured gas plant (MGP) site and documents the effectiveness of biosparging technology for remediation of groundwater. Because a significant fraction of naphthalene and other contaminants are only slowly released to the aqueous phase, processes such as biodegradation or pump-and-treat that address constituents in the aqueous phase require exceedingly ...

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Evaluation of In-Situ Solidification/Stabilization For Redevelopment of Manufactured Gas Plant Impacted Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Process byproducts produced at manufactured gas plants (MGP) pose concerns from an environmental standpoint. One treatment for the management of a broad range of contaminated media and wastes is solidification/stabilization (S/S). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) considers S/S an established treatment technology and it continues as a cornerstone treatment technology for the management of site remediation. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been sponsoring research on the ...

2013-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

262

State of the Science Review of Cyanide and Its Compounds at Former Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One area of environmental concern associated with former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites involves the presence of cyanide-containing compounds at many of these sites. This report compiles information on this subject. Experts in the areas of regulatory requirements, cyanide speciation and analysis, site characterization, transport and fate, and human health risk issues have contributed chapters, and a research agenda is also suggested. The report is a result of a tailored collaboration effort between E...

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Solid-Phase Biotreatment Technology Studies Using Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry has been conducting site investigations to assess the presence of tar residuals at manufactured gas plant sites and to determine appropriate remediation actions. Tars typically contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. This report evaluates the feasibility of remediating such tarry materials using a patented solid-phase bioremediation technology to target PAH degradation. Bench- and pilot scale treatability trials det...

2000-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

264

Advanced Oxidation Techniques for Soils Containing Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) Hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a bench-scale experimental study using a combination of chemical oxidation and electrotreatment of PAH contaminated soils from former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites. Electroosmotic movement of water and movement of charged surfactant micelles due to the electro-gradient were used to introduce persulfate oxidant into the contaminated soil matrix. Results showed that greater than 80% removal of the PAHs were obtained in 20 days of treatment time. Experiments with aqu...

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Field Studies of Soil Vapor Intrusion at a Vacant Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) Site in Wisconsin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive two-phase field-based research program was completed at a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site located in Wisconsin during the summer of 2008. The purpose of this ongoing research study is to develop improved approaches and methodologies for characterizing the potential for vapor intrusion (VI) at MGP sites. This report describes the methods, results, and limited data interpretation of Phase I (Passive Soil Gas Survey) and Phase II (Soil, Groundwater, and Soil Gas Sampling) at the vac...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Survey of Physical and Chemical Properties of Soils Collected From Former Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents technical information and data from a study of the physical and chemical nature of soils at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. Included in the report is a comparison of chemical analysis methods for determination of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). One of the specific objectives of the research was determining relationships between total soil and leachate concentrations of analytes of int...

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Material Consolidation, Rendering, and Disposal Studies of Gas Holders at Former Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of full-scale field implementation studies conducted in conjunction with an evaluation of EPRI-sponsored bench-scale mixing tests. The study was designed to complement bench-scale mixing studies that correlated those results to full-scale remedial actions at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. The field implementation study included a review of potentially applicable remedial approaches, site characterization, bench-scale treatability tests, and results of site remedia...

2001-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

268

DNAPL Site Characterization for Waste Management at Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining the optimal waste management strategy at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites requires adequate site characterization to provide data for remediation decisions, a task that is particularly challenging when dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are present. This report discusses development of an appropriate characterization strategy, including parameters that should be characterized, tools for characterization and the relation between characterization goals, a developing site conceptual model...

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

269

New Environmental Friendly Evaluation Criterion for Coal-Fired Power Plant Comprehensive Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new environmental friendly evaluation criterion to assess the comprehensive performance of coal-fired power plant. The new evaluation criterion, which is called the comprehensive Index of Energy, Resources and Environment (IERE), ... Keywords: power plant, evaluation criterion, environmental friendly, comperhensive performance

Gang Xu; Shiyuan Lu; Yongping Yang; Liqiang Duan; Ji Li; Le Li; Xiaona Song

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the seventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. Coal drying experiments were performed with lignite and Powder River Basin coals to determine the effects of inlet air moisture level on the equilibrium relationship between coal moisture and exit air relative humidity and temperature. The results show that, for lignite, there is a slight dependence of equilibrium moisture on inlet humidity level. However, the equilibrium relationship for PRB coal appears to be independent of inlet air humidity level. The specific equilibrium model used for computing lignite coal dryer performance has a significant effect on the prediction accuracy for exit air relative humidity; but its effects on predicted coal product moisture, exit air temperature and specific humidity are minimal. Analyses were performed to determine the effect of lignite product moisture on unit performance for a high temperature drying system. With this process design, energy for drying is obtained from the hot flue gas entering the air preheater and the hot circulating cooling water leaving the steam condenser. Comparisons were made to the same boiler operating with lignite which had been dried off-site.

Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Wei Zhang

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Investigating the effects of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments on inputs to coal-fired power plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation examines the effects of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) on inputs to coal-fired power plants. The 1990 CAAA established a system (more)

Lange, Ian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Repowering a small coal-fired power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arkansas River Power Authority (ARPA) Lamar Repowering Project is moving forward. The new generator, capable of producing 18 MW of electricity, is scheduled to be online in June 2008 bringing the total generation to 43 MW. New coal handling equipment, with infrared fire detectors, is almost complete. The new 18 MW steam turbine will be cooled by an air-cooled condenser. Coal will be delivered in a railroad spur to an unloading site then be unloaded onto a conveyor under the tracks and conveyed to two storage domes each holding 6000 tons of coal. It will be drawn out of these through an underground conveyor system, brought into a crusher, conveyed through overhead conveyors and fed into the new coal- fired fluidized bed boilers. 1 photo.

Miell, R.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Mercury Reduction in Coal-Fired Power Plants: DOE's R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduction in Coal-Fired Power Reduction in Coal-Fired Power Plants: DOE's R&D Program ARIPPA Technical Symposium August 21, 2002 State College, PA Thomas J. Feeley, III, Product Manager Innovations for Existing Plants ARIPPA_TJF082102 Presentation Outline * About NETL * IEP Program * Hg Background * Hg Control R&D * Q&As ARIPPA_TJF082102 About NETL ARIPPA_TJF082102 * One of DOE's 17 national labs * Government owned / operated * Sites in: - Pennsylvania - West Virginia - Oklahoma - Alaska * More than 1,100 federal and support contractor employees National Energy Technology Laboratory ARIPPA_TJF082102 Electric Power Using Coal Clean Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Production Environmental Control V21 Next Generation Carbon Sequestration Exploration & Production Refining & Delivery Alternative Fuels Exploration &

274

Options for reducing a coal-fired plant's carbon footprint, Part II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part 1 of this article detailed and quantified the impacts of postcoming CO{sub 2} capture on a coal plant's net output and efficiency. Part II deals with four other CO{sub 2} reduction techniques: oxy-fuel combustion, using higher-temperature and higher-pressure boilers, cofiring biomass, and replacing some coal-fired capacity with renewable capacity. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Zachary, J. [Bechtel Power Corp. (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Flexible Operation of Current and Next-Generation Coal Plants, With and Without Carbon Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on input from research sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and other respected industry sources, this report aims to initially highlight the implications for existing pulverized coal (PC) plants when they are required to operate frequently under changing load conditions. The report presents design improvements to enable more flexible operation of the current and next generation coal fleet. It also discusses the implications on operation flexibility of both new and ...

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

An Assessment of Mercury Emissions from U.S. Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In parallel with a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) study of mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utility steam generating units, EPRI has reviewed the available data and re-estimated mercury emissions. This document provides an estimate of the mercury levels entering every U.S. coal-fired power plant in 1999, the total and speciated mercury emissions during the same period, and initial projections of the effect of operational and design changes on mercury levels in 2010.

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

Guidance for Comanagement of Mill Rejects at Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, utilities have comanaged some or all of their low-volume wastes with their high-volume combustion by-products in disposal facilities. This report presents guidance on comanagement of coal combustion by-products and mill rejects containing pyrites at coal-fired power plants. The report specifically addresses the issue of environmental protection from leachates due to oxidation of pyrites under certain conditions. Included is a discussion of acid-base accounting and neutralization capacity o...

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

278

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

279

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

280

Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 2: Coal to Synthetic Natural Gas and Ammonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 2: Coal to Synthetic Natural Gas and Ammonia July 5, 2011 DOE/NETL- 2010/1402 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

System design verification of a hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This hybrid plant utilizes geothermal fluid for feedwater heating. With respect to the extraction of available work from the geothermal fluids, this cycle is approximately two times as efficient as the all geothermal plant. The System Design Verification Study presented verifies the technical and economic feasibility of the hybrid plant. This report is comprised of a conceptual design, cost estimate, and economic analysis of a one-unit 715 MW hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plant. In addition to the use of geothermal fluid for feedwater heating, its use is also investigated for additional power generation, condensate and cooling tower makeup water, coal beneficiation, air preheating, flue gas reheating and plant space heating requirements. An engineering and construction schedule for the hybrid plant is also included.

Not Available

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Atmospheric Deposition of Mercury, Trace Elements, and Major Ions Around a Coal-fired Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a multiyear study to measure mercury (Hg), trace elements, and major ions in precipitation around Plant Crist, a four-unit coal-fired power plant in Pensacola, Florida. The main purpose of the study was to see if Hg emissions from Plant Crist could be detected and quantified in local wet deposition. Specifically, the study evaluated whether the significant reduction in Hg emissions that accompanied the installation of a wet flue gas desulfurization scrubber ...

2013-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

283

Desulfurization of Fisher-Tropsch synthesis gas in coal-to-gasoline pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, a coal-to-gasoline pilot plant was installed and operated successfully in China, and a dry desulfurization process was used in this plant. This paper presents an overview of the dry desulfurization process. It includes design and operation of the process, and a description of ST801, T305 adsorbents and TGH COS hydrolysis catalyst. In addition, the desulfurization process used in a planned demonstration plant scheduled for completion in 1991 is presented.

Shishao, T.; Ju, S.; Shenzhao, L.; Maoqian, M.; Hanxian, G. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan Univ. of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi (CN))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Characterization of Toxicity of Coal-Fired Power Plant Effluents to Freshwater Mussels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plant wastewater effluents contain metals and other materials that may harm aquatic life living in receiving streams adjacent to power plants. Characterization of the hazard associated with these wastewater effluents will inform plant operators such that they may alter processes in order to promote cleaner wastewater discharges. This interim report discusses efforts to culture healthy aquatic organisms to be used in toxicity bioassays. Culture and bioassay methods are refined and ready f...

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

285

Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective ASME - IGCC ASME - IGCC Turbo Turbo Expo Expo June 2001 June 2001 GE Power Systems g Klaus Brun, Ph.D. - Manager Process Power Plant Product & Market Development Robert M. Jones - Project Development Manager Process Power Plants Power Systems Power Systems General Electric Company General Electric Company ABSTRACT GE Power Systems g Economic Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective High natural gas fuel gas prices combined with new technology developments have made IGCC a competitive option when compared to conventional combined cycle or coal steam turbine cycles. Although the initial investment costs for an IGCC plant are still comparatively high, the low

286

1 2Using Auxiliary Gas Power for CCS Energy Needs in Retrofitted Coal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Post-combustion capture retrofits are expected to a near-term option for mitigating CO2 emissions from existing coal-fired power plants. Much of the literature proposes using power from the existing coal plant and thermal integration of its supercritical steam cycle with the stripper reboiler to supply the energy needed for solvent regeneration and CO2 compression. This study finds that using an auxiliary natural gas turbine plant to meet the energetic demands of carbon capture and compression may make retrofits more attractive compared to using thermal integration in some circumstances. Natural gas auxiliary plants increase the power output of the base plant and reduce technological risk associated with CCS, but require favorable natural gas prices and regional electricity demand for excess electricity to make using an auxiliary plant more desirable. Three different auxiliary plant technologies were compared to integration for 90 % capture from an existing, 500 MW supercritical coal plant. CO2 capture and compression is simulated using Aspen Plus and a monoethylamine (MEA) absorption process. Thermoflow software is used to simulate three gas plant technologies. The three technologies assessed are the

Sarah Bashadi; Howard Herzog; Dava J. Newman; Sarah Bashadi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Dal-Tile: Optimized Compressed Air System Improves Performance and Saves Energy at a Tile Manufacturing Plant  

SciTech Connect

This DOE Industrial Technologies Program case study describes the significant energy and costs savings resulting from compressed air system improvements at Dal-Tile, a Texas tile manufacturing plant.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Dispersion modeling of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants at Coshocton and Manchester, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants are estimated to contribute to approximately 46% of the total US anthropogenic mercury emissions and required to be regulated by maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards. Dispersion modeling of mercury emissions using the AERMOD model and the industrial source complex short term (ISCST3) model was conducted for two representative coal-fired power plants at Coshocton and Manchester, Ohio. Atmospheric mercury concentrations, dry mercury deposition rates, and wet mercury deposition rates were predicted in a 5 x 5 km area surrounding the Coonesville and JM Stuart coal-fired power plants. In addition, the analysis results of meteorological parameters showed that wet mercury deposition is dependent on precipitation, but dry mercury deposition is influenced by various meteorological factors. 8 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Lee, S.; Keener, T.C. [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Multi-Pathway Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for a Model Coal-Fired Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a multimedia human health and ecosystem risk study of a model coal-fired power plant in a model setting, using data on an actual power plant transposed to a lakeside setting in the same state.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

CoalFleet RD&D augmentation plan for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants  

SciTech Connect

To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiative, which facilitates collaborative research by more than 50 organizations from around the world representing power generators, equipment suppliers and engineering design and construction firms, the U.S. Department of Energy, and others. This group advised EPRI as it evaluated more than 120 coal-gasification-related research projects worldwide to identify gaps or critical-path activities where additional resources and expertise could hasten the market introduction of IGCC advances. The resulting 'IGCC RD&D Augmentation Plan' describes such opportunities and how they could be addressed, for both IGCC plants to be built in the near term (by 2012-15) and over the longer term (2015-25), when demand for new electric generating capacity is expected to soar. For the near term, EPRI recommends 19 projects that could reduce the levelized cost-of-electricity for IGCC to the level of today's conventional pulverized-coal power plants with supercritical steam conditions and state-of-the-art environmental controls. For the long term, EPRI's recommended projects could reduce the levelized cost of an IGCC plant capturing 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from the carbon in coal (for safe storage away from the atmosphere) to the level of today's IGCC plants without CO{sub 2} capture. EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow program is also preparing a companion RD&D augmentation plan for advanced-combustion-based (i.e., non-gasification) clean coal technologies (Report 1013221). 7 refs., 30 figs., 29 tabs., 4 apps.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

NETL: News Release - Coal Gasification Plant Returns $79 Million to DOE in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2006 2, 2006 Coal Gasification Plant Returns $79 Million to DOE in Revenue-Sharing Gas Sales Plant Currently Supplies Carbon Dioxide for DOE Sequestration Project Washington, DC -A coal gasification plant purchased from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1988 recently paid millions of dollars to DOE as part of a revenue sharing agreement and continues to be an integral part of a Department project to sequester millions of tons of carbon dioxide while doubling an oil field's recovery rate. MORE INFO Learn more about the Great Plains Synfuels Plant The Dakota Gasification Company (DGC), which purchased the Great Plains Synfuels Plant near Beulah, N.D., recently announced the payment of more than $79 million to DOE as part of a revenue-sharing agreement signed in

292

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2012 Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 25. Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Company Name Plant Location Top Ten Manufacturers American Crystal Sugar Co MN, ND Archer Daniels Midland IA, IL, MN, ND, NE Carmeuse Lime Stone Inc AL, IL, IN, KY, MI, OH, PA, TN, VA, WI Cemex Inc AL, CA, CO, FL, GA, KY, OH, TN, TX Dakota Gasification Company ND Eastman Chemical Company TN Georgia-Pacific LLC AL, GA, OK, VA, WI Holcim (US) Inc AL, CO, MD, MO, MT, OK, SC, TX, UT NewPage Corporation MD, MI, WI U S Steel Corporation AL, IN, MI, MN Other Major Manufacturers Ash Grove Cement Co

293

Digital Gas Joins Asian Waste-to-Energy Consortium: To Eliminate Coal as a Power Plant Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Digital Gas Joins Asian Waste-to-Energy Consortium: To Eliminate Coal as a Power Plant Fuel Digital upside in view of the power generation growth potential in Asia and the environmental friendly, cost's energy and farming centers in North America as an alternative to coal-fired power plants and a solution

Columbia University

294

Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant systems verification. Technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following tasks are included in this project: Commercialization; Power plant development; Manufacturing facilities development; Test facility development; Stack research; and Advanced research and technology development. This report briefly describes the subtasks still to be completed: Power plant system test with reformed natural gas; Upgrading of existing, US government-owned, test facilities; and Advanced MCFC component research.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Coal-fired power-plant-capital-cost estimates. Final report. [Mid-1978 price level; 13 different sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conceptual designs and order-of-magnitude capital cost estimates have been prepared for typical 1000-MW coal-fired power plants. These subcritical plants will provide high efficiency in base load operation without excessive efficiency loss in cycling operation. In addition, an alternative supercritical design and a cost estimate were developed for each of the plants for maximum efficiency at 80 to 100% of design capacity. The power plants will be located in 13 representative regions of the United States and will be fueled by coal typically available in each region. In two locations, alternate coals are available and plants have been designed and estimated for both coals resulting in a total of 15 power plants. The capital cost estimates are at mid-1978 price level with no escalation and are based on the contractor's current construction projects. Conservative estimating parameters have been used to ensure their suitability as planning tools for utility companies. A flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system has been included for each plant to reflect the requirements of the promulgated New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) emissions. The estimated costs of the FGD facilities range from 74 to 169 $/kW depending on the coal characteristics and the location of the plant. The estimated total capital requirements for twin 500-MW units vary from 8088 $/kW for a southeastern plant burning bituminous Kentucky coal to 990 $/kW for a remote western plant burning subbituminous Wyoming coal.

Holstein, R.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the third Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. A description is given of the equipment, instrumentation and procedures being used for the fluidized bed drying experiments. Laboratory data are presented on the effects of bed depth on drying rate. These show that drying rate decreased strongly with an increase in bed depth as the settled bed depth varied from 0.25 to 0.65 m. These tests were performed with North Dakota lignite having a 6.35 mm (1/4 inch) top size, constant inlet air and heater surface temperatures, constant rate of heat addition per unit initial mass of wet coal and constant superficial air velocity. A theoretical model of the batch dryer is described. This model uses the equations for conservation of mass and energy and empirical data on the relationship between relative humidity of the air and coal moisture content at equilibrium. Outputs of the model are coal moisture content, bed temperature, and specific humidity of the outlet air as functions of time. Preliminary comparisons of the model to laboratory drying data show very good agreement.

Edward K. Levy; Hugo Caram; Zheng Yao; Gu Feng

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Evaluation of In Situ Thermal Stabilization at a Former Manufactured Gas Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Situ Thermal Stabilization (ISTS) is an emerging technology that has been proposed for the remediation of residual organic contamination at a former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) site in the southeastern United States. As described in this report, a test program was designed to verify the effectiveness of ISTS to treat the contaminants of concern, as well as to identify any adverse impacts (e.g., ground settling) to operations on an adjacent set of railroad tracks. A further goal of the testing was to ...

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

298

NETL: News Release - Clean Coal Plant to Anchor West Virginia "Eco-Park"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2004 7, 2004 Clean Coal Plant to Anchor West Virginia "Eco-Park" $215 Million Co-Production Demonstration Plant to Create 6,000 New Jobs LEWISBURG, WV - Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham today commissioned a new $215 million West Virginia clean coal project based on new technology that over the next 60 months will deliver environmental improvements, economic benefits and thousands of new jobs. The project is part of President Bush's Clean Coal Power Initiative, a key component of the National Energy Policy that competitively selects commercial-scale technology demonstrations to continue and expand the use of coal as a fuel source. Development of the new technology, termed atmospheric-pressure circulating fluidized-bed combustion, is a joint-venture between the Department of Energy (DOE) and Western Greenbrier Co-Generation LLC. It will use nearby waste-coal to generate electric power with ultra-low emissions of pollutants while concurrently producing combustion ash byproducts and heat to support industrial activities. The power plant will serve as the anchor tenant for a new "Eco-Park" site in Rainelle, W. Va.

299

Economic analysis of coal-fired cogeneration plants for Air Force bases  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Appropriations Act of 1986 requires the Department of Defense to use an additional 1,600,000 tons/year of coal at their US facilities by 1995 and also states that the most economical fuel should be used at each facility. In a previous study of Air Force heating plants burning gas or oil, Oak Ridge National Laboratory found that only a small fraction of this target 1,600,000 tons/year could be achieved by converting the plants where coal is economically viable. To identify projects that would use greater amounts of coal, the economic benefits of installing coal-fired cogeneration plants at 7 candidate Air Force bases were examined in this study. A life-cycle cost analysis was performed that included two types of financing (Air Force and private) and three levels of energy escalation for a total of six economic scenarios. Hill, McGuire, and Plattsburgh Air Force Bases were identified as the facilities with the best potential for coal-fired cogeneration, but the actual cost savings will depend strongly on how the projects are financed and to a lesser extent on future energy escalation rates. 10 refs., 11 figs., 27 tabs.

Holcomb, R.S.; Griffin, F.P.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Theoretical investigation of selected trace elements in coal gasification plants. Final report Mar 78-Nov 79  

SciTech Connect

The report gives results of a theoretical investigation of the disposition of five volatile trace elements (arsenic, boron, lead, selenium, and mercury) in SNG-producing coal gasification plants. Three coal gasification processes (dry-bottom Lurgi, Koppers-Totzek, and HYGAS) were investigated to examine the possible effects of gasifier operation conditions on the speciation of the volatile trace elements. Results of this investigation suggest that none of the trace elements considered in this study will be present in the product SNG from a coal gasification plant, but will be removed from the fuel gas by various unit operations. Results also suggest that speciation of these volatile trace elements is not significantly affected by gasifier conditions.

Hill, A.H.; Anderson, G.L.; Fleming, D.K.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Emissions, Monitoring, and Control of Mercury from Subbituminous Coal-Fired Power Plants - Phase II  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI), in conjunction with Western Farmers Electric Cooperative (WFEC), has teamed with Clean Air Engineering of Pittsburgh PA to conduct a mercury monitoring program at the WEFC Hugo plant in Oklahoma. Sponsored by US Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-26-98FT40323, the program included the following members of the Subbituminous Energy Coalition (SEC) as co-sponsors: Missouri Basin Power Project; DTE Energy; Entergy; Grand River Dam Authority; and Nebraska Public Power District. This research effort had five objectives: (1) determine the mass balance of mercury for subbituminous coal-fired power plant; (2) assess the distribution of mercury species in the flue gas (3) perform a comparison of three different Hg test methods; (4) investigate the long-term (six months) mercury variability at a subbituminous coal-fired power plant; and (5) assess operation and maintenance of the Method 324 and Horiba CEMS utilizing plant personnel.

Alan Bland; Jesse Newcomer; Allen Kephart; Volker Schmidt; Gerald Butcher

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

Cloud-Active Nuclei from Coal-Fired Electric Power Plants and Their Interactions with Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the plumes from coal-fired electric power plants are generally about 2 to 5 times greater than in the ambient air unaffected by the plumes. However, if the ambient air is very clean, the ...

Peter V. Hobbs; Jeffrey L. Stith; Lawrence F. Radke

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Program on Technology Innovation: Modified Brayton Cycle for Use in Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modified closed Brayton cycle using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO2) as the working fluid is being proposed for a number of power generation applications. The technology offers the prospect of increased plant efficiency and reduced plant cost. This report compares candidate closed Brayton cycle performance with advanced ultra-supercritical steam-Rankine cycle performance.BackgroundIncreasing the efficiency of coal-fired steam-electric power ...

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Technical and Economic Potential for Electricity Energy Efficiency in a Semiconductor Manufacturing Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, there has been renewed interest in energy efficiency in the semiconductor industry. The declining prices for semiconductor products has prompted semiconductor manufacturing plants to control costs so as to maintain profitability. This paper presents the potential for energy efficiency improvements at a semiconductor manufacturing plant from various energy efficiency measures such as high efficiency motors, adjustable speed drive motors, high efficiency HVAC, and high efficiency lighting. The effort was part of a utility-sponsored technical potential study. Although this paper describes energy efficiency options in a specific facility, the recommended actions have broad application. In this study, the results show that none of the group replacement with high efficiency motors, adjustable speed drive motors, and high efficiency lighting would yield paybacks of less than 3 years. However, the end-of-useful life replacement with high efficiency motors for abatement of exhaust and deionizing of water as well as high efficiency lighting would yield paybacks of less than 3 years. The installation of adjustable speed drive motors at the end of useful life would not yield average paybacks of less than 3 years. Although specific implementation plans to achieve the energy savings are not outlined in this paper, it is hoped that the results of this analysis will identify areas which merit further engineering and economic analyses.

Lee, A. H. W.; Golden, J. W.; Zarnikau, J. W.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Coal stockpiles at electric power plants were above average ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alternative Fuels. Includes ... decline during summer and winter as power plants burn through stocks to meet peak electricity demand for heating and cooling, ...

306

Coal stockpiles at electric power plants were above average ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... decline during summer and winter as power plants burn through stocks to meet peak electricity demand for heating and cooling, ... overall heating load in ...

307

Great plains coal gasification plant: Technical lessons learned report  

SciTech Connect

In a first of a kind, grass roots plant of the complexity of the Great Plains Gasification Plant the lessons learned are numerous and encompass a wide range of items. This report documents the lessons learned from all phases of the project from preliminary design through the most recent operation of the plant. Based on these lessons learned, suggestions are made for changes and/or process improvements to future synfuel plants. In addition, recommendations are made for research and development in selected areas. 46 refs., 31 figs., 33 tabs.

Delaney, R.C.; Mako, P.F.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Capturing Carbon from Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scrubbing technology (7, 8). The modifi cations are focused primarily on extensive thermal integration of the CO 2 -capture system with the power plant and develop- ment of...

309

Form EIA-5 Users Manual Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality - Coke Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Users Manual Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality - Coke Plants Document Number: 001 Version: 2.0 June 2011 i June 2011 Document History Number Date Section Description 1 2 June 2011 June 2011 Document initiation Revised screen shots and remove external user references. Primary POC: Tejasvi Raghuveer Phone: (202) 586-8926 Email: Tejasvi.Raghuveer@eia.gov Document Changes/Maintenance POC: Primary POC: Tejasvi Raghuveer Phone: (202) 586-8926 Email: Tejasvi.Raghuveer@eia.gov Project References: Coal Internet Data Collection (CIDC) User's Manual, September 2007 ii June 2011 Content 1. General System Overview ................................................................................. 1

310

From plant to dealer : improving route optimization for outbound vehicle distribution at an automobile manufacturer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With rising fuel costs and increasing rates among specialized shipping carriers, cost mitigation in outbound distribution is increasingly important for automobile manufacturers. Many manufacturers have turned to specialized, ...

Katcoff, Elizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Thermal energy storage for an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of molten nitrate salt thermal energy storage in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant allowing the facility to economically provide peak- and intermediate-load electric power. The results of the study show that an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant with thermal energy storage can reduce the cost of coal-fired peak- or intermediate-load electric power by between 5% and 20% depending on the plants operating schedule. The use of direct-contact salt heating can further improve the economic attractiveness of the concept. 11 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Thermal energy storage for an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of molten nitrate salt thermal energy storage in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant allowing the facility to economically provide peak- and intermediate-load electric power. The results of the study show that an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant with thermal energy storage can reduce the cost of coal-fired peak- or intermediate-load electric power by between 5% and 20% depending on the plants operating schedule. The use of direct-contact salt heating can further improve the economic attractiveness of the concept. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Drost, K.; Antoniak, Z.; Brown, D.; Somasundaram, S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Computer Integrated Manufacturing Strategic Plan (FY 1986-1992): a working document  

SciTech Connect

The Y-12 Computer-Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) Program is managing the migration of the plant's CIM infrastructure from today's environment to an integrated, highly flexible, and more responsive manufacturing architecture planned for the 1990s. The program is committed to: (1) meeting DOE CIM directives, and (2) improving the manufacturing performance of the Y-12 Plant. The CIM Program charter in Y-12 is to improve manufacturing performance through integrated computer and communication technologies such that the plant's ability to meet its current and future manufacturing objectives is significantly enhanced. To achieve this goal, CIM technologies are being applied in two primary areas: (1) automation of manufacturing processes, and (2) automation of information of information systems. The objectives of the CIM Program are as follows: Meet DOE CIM directives; Reduce product cost; Meet production schedules with minimum contingency costs; Improve product quality via quality assurance at the point of origin; Minimize in-process inventory and improve inventory control; Reduce product lead time; Improve production flexibility.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Managing Your Energy: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Identifying Energy Savings in Manufacturing Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the United States, industry spends over $100 billion annually to power its manufacturing plants. Companies also spend on maintenance, capital outlay, and energy services. Improving energy efficiency is vital to reduce these costs and increase earnings. Many cost-effective opportunities to reduce energy consumption are available, and this Energy Guide discusses energy-efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be applied over a broad spectrum of companies. Strategies in the guide address hot water and steam, compressed air, pumps, motors, fans, lighting, refrigeration, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. This guide includes descriptions of expected energy and cost savings, based on real-world applications, typical payback periods, and references to more detailed information. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers achieve cost-effective energy reductions while maintaining product quality. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Worrell, Ernst; Angelini, Tana; Masanet, Eric

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

316

CO2 Mitigation Economics for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering & Economic Consultants Engineering & Economic Consultants Website: www.sfapacific.com 444 Castro Street, Suite 720 Mountain View, California 94041 Telephone: (650) 969-8876 Fax: (650) 969-1317 Email: Simbeck@sfapacific.com CO 2 MITIGATION ECONOMICS FOR EXISTING COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS Presented at the U.S. Dept. of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 Washington, DC by Dale R. Simbeck Vice President Technology SFA Pacific, Inc. Mountain View, CA ABSTRACT Electric power generation represents one of the largest sources of CO 2 emissions in North America. A major issue in the analysis of CO 2 mitigation options is the fact that over 45% of total electric power generation in North America is from coal. These existing coal-based power

317

Clean coal reference plants: Pulverized encoal PDF fired boiler. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT) is a government and industry cofunded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes in a series of full-scale facilities. The goal of the program is to provide the U.S. energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsive coal-using technologies. To achieve this goal, a multiphased effort consisting of five separate solicitations has been completed. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has the responsibility for monitoring the CCT Projects within certain technology categories, which, in general, correspond to the center`s areas of technology development. Primarily the categories of METC CCT projects are: atmospheric fluid bed combustion, pressurized fluidized bed combustion, integrated gasification combined cycle, mild gasification, and industrial applications. This report describes the plant design.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Managing Your Energy: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Identifying Energy Savngs in Manufacturing Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL-3714E LBNL-3714E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Managing Your Energy An ENERGY STAR ® Guide for Identifying Energy Savings in Manufacturing Plants Ernst Worrell Tana Angelini Eric Masanet Environmental Energy Technologies Division Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency June 2010 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

319

Emissions, Monitoring and Control of Mercury from Subbituminous Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subbituminous Energy Coalition (SEC) identified a need to re-test stack gas emissions from power plants that burn subbituminous coal relative to compliance with the EPA mercury control regulations for coal-fired plants. In addition, the SEC has also identified the specialized monitoring needs associated with mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEM). The overall objectives of the program were to develop and demonstrate solutions for the unique emission characteristics found when burning subbituminous coals. The program was executed in two phases; Phase I of the project covered mercury emission testing programs at ten subbituminous coal-fired plants. Phase II compared the performance of continuous emission monitors for mercury at subbituminous coal-fired power plants and is reported separately. Western Research Institute and a number of SEC members have partnered with Eta Energy and Air Pollution Testing to assess the Phase I objective. Results of the mercury (Hg) source sampling at ten power plants burning subbituminous coal concluded Hg emissions measurements from Powder River Basin (PBR) coal-fired units showed large variations during both ICR and SEC testing. Mercury captures across the Air Pollution Control Devices (APCDs) present much more reliable numbers (i.e., the mercury captures across the APCDs are positive numbers as one would expect compared to negative removal across the APCDs for the ICR data). Three of the seven units tested in the SEC study had previously shown negative removals in the ICR testing. The average emission rate is 6.08 lb/TBtu for seven ICR units compared to 5.18 lb/TBtu for ten units in the SEC testing. Out of the ten (10) SEC units, Nelson Dewey Unit 1, burned a subbituminous coal and petcoke blend thus lowering the total emission rate by generating less elemental mercury. The major difference between the ICR and SEC data is in the APCD performance and the mercury closure around the APCD. The average mercury removal values across the APCDs are 2.1% and 39.4% with standard deviations (STDs) of 1990 and 75%, respectively for the ICR and SEC tests. This clearly demonstrates that variability is an issue irrespective of using 'similar' fuels at the plants and the same source sampling team measuring the species. The study also concluded that elemental mercury is the main Hg specie that needs to be controlled. 2004 technologies such as activated carbon injection (ACI) may capture up to 60% with double digit lb/MMacf addition of sorbent. PRB coal-fired units have an Hg input of 7-15 lb/TBtu; hence, these units must operate at over 60% mercury efficiency in order to bring the emission level below 5.8 lb/TBtu. This was non-achievable with the best technology available as of 2004. Other key findings include: (1) Conventional particulate collectors, such as Cold-side Electro-Static Precipitators (CESPs), Hot-side Electro-Static Precipitator (HESP), and Fabric Filter (FF) remove nearly all of the particulate bound mercury; (2) CESPs perform better highlighting the flue gas temperature effect on the mercury removal. Impact of speciation with flue gas cooling is apparent; (3) SDA's do not help in enhancing adsorption of mercury vapor species; and (4) Due to consistently low chlorine values in fuels, it was not possible to analyze the impact of chlorine. In summary, it is difficult to predict the speciation at two plants that burn the same fuel. Non-fuel issues, such as flue gas cooling, impact the speciation and consequently mercury capture potential.

Alan Bland; Kumar Sellakumar; Craig Cormylo

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

ECONOMICS AND FEASIBILITY OF RANKINE CYCLE IMPROVEMENTS FOR COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), American Electric Company (AEP) and Parsons Energy and Chemical Group to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating coal fired steam power plants, known as Rankine Cycles, equipped with three different combustion systems: Pulverized Coal (PC), Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB), and Circulating Moving Bed (CMB{trademark}). Five steam cycles utilizing a wide range of steam conditions were used with these combustion systems. The motivation for this study was to establish through engineering analysis, the most cost-effective performance potential available through improvement in the Rankine Cycle steam conditions and combustion systems while at the same time ensuring that the most stringent emission performance based on CURC (Coal Utilization Research Council) 2010 targets are met: > 98% sulfur removal; < 0.05 lbm/MM-Btu NO{sub x}; < 0.01 lbm/MM-Btu Particulate Matter; and > 90% Hg removal. The final report discusses the results of a coal fired steam power plant project, which is comprised of two parts. The main part of the study is the analysis of ten (10) Greenfield steam power plants employing three different coal combustion technologies: Pulverized Coal (PC), Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB), and Circulating Moving Bed (CMB{trademark}) integrated with five different steam cycles. The study explores the technical feasibility, thermal performance, environmental performance, and economic viability of ten power plants that could be deployed currently, in the near, intermediate, and long-term time frame. For the five steam cycles, main steam temperatures vary from 1,000 F to 1,292 F and pressures from 2,400 psi to 5,075 psi. Reheat steam temperatures vary from 1,000 F to 1,328 F. The number of feedwater heaters varies from 7 to 9 and the associated feedwater temperature varies from 500 F to 626 F. The main part of the study therefore determines the steam cycle parameters and combustion technology that would yield the lowest cost of electricity (COE) for the next generation of coal-fired steam power plants. The second part of the study (Repowering) explores the means of upgrading the efficiency and output of an older existing coal fired steam power plant. There are currently more than 1,400 coal-fired units in operation in the United States generating about 54 percent of the electricity consumed. Many of these are modern units are clean and efficient. Additionally, there are many older units in excellent condition and still in service that could benefit from this repowering technology. The study evaluates the technical feasibility, thermal performance, and economic viability of this repowering concept.

Richard E. Waryasz; Gregory N. Liljedahl

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ECONOMICS AND FEASIBILITY OF RANKINE CYCLE IMPROVEMENTS FOR COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), American Electric Company (AEP) and Parsons Energy and Chemical Group to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating coal fired steam power plants, known as Rankine Cycles, equipped with three different combustion systems: Pulverized Coal (PC), Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB), and Circulating Moving Bed (CMB{trademark}). Five steam cycles utilizing a wide range of steam conditions were used with these combustion systems. The motivation for this study was to establish through engineering analysis, the most cost-effective performance potential available through improvement in the Rankine Cycle steam conditions and combustion systems while at the same time ensuring that the most stringent emission performance based on CURC (Coal Utilization Research Council) 2010 targets are met: > 98% sulfur removal; < 0.05 lbm/MM-Btu NO{sub x}; < 0.01 lbm/MM-Btu Particulate Matter; and > 90% Hg removal. The final report discusses the results of a coal fired steam power plant project, which is comprised of two parts. The main part of the study is the analysis of ten (10) Greenfield steam power plants employing three different coal combustion technologies: Pulverized Coal (PC), Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB), and Circulating Moving Bed (CMB{trademark}) integrated with five different steam cycles. The study explores the technical feasibility, thermal performance, environmental performance, and economic viability of ten power plants that could be deployed currently, in the near, intermediate, and long-term time frame. For the five steam cycles, main steam temperatures vary from 1,000 F to 1,292 F and pressures from 2,400 psi to 5,075 psi. Reheat steam temperatures vary from 1,000 F to 1,328 F. The number of feedwater heaters varies from 7 to 9 and the associated feedwater temperature varies from 500 F to 626 F. The main part of the study therefore determines the steam cycle parameters and combustion technology that would yield the lowest cost of electricity (COE) for the next generation of coal-fired steam power plants. The second part of the study (Repowering) explores the means of upgrading the efficiency and output of an older existing coal fired steam power plant. There are currently more than 1,400 coal-fired units in operation in the United States generating about 54 percent of the electricity consumed. Many of these are modern units are clean and efficient. Additionally, there are many older units in excellent condition and still in service that could benefit from this repowering technology. The study evaluates the technical feasibility, thermal performance, and economic viability of this repowering concept.

Richard E. Waryasz; Gregory N. Liljedahl

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

322

Performance Analysis of Existing 600MW Coal-Fired Power Plant with Ammonia-Based CO2 Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the techno-economic performance of 600 MW coal-fired power plant with and without ammonia-based CO2 capture process, based on the operating data of an existing power plant. The simulation and analysis, with fully consideration of ... Keywords: CO2 capture, aqueous ammonia, existing power plant, techno-economic performance

Gang Xu; Liqiang Duan; Mingde Zhao; Yongping Yang; Ji Li; Le Li; Haizhan Chen

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Feasibility Study for Bioethanol Co-Location with a Coal Fired Power Plant: 29 November 2001--28 July 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study looks at the feasibility of co-locating 30, 50, and 70 million gallon per year bioethanol facilities with coal fired power plants in Indiana and Nebraska. Corn stover is the feedstock for ethanol production in both cases.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

COAL DERIVED MATRIX PITCHES FOR CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE MANUFACTURE/PRODUCTION OF FIBERS AND COMPOSITES FROM COAL-BASED PRECURSORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Consortium for premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory continue with the development of innovative technologies that will allow coal or coal-derived feedstocks to be used in the production of value-added carbon materials. In addition to supporting eleven independent projects during budget period 3, three meetings were held at two separate locations for the membership. The first was held at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort on May 15-16, 2000. This was followed by two meetings at Penn State, a tutorial on August 11, 2000 and a technical progress meeting on October 26-27.

Peter G. Stansberry; John W. Zondlo

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Development of a Low NOx Burner System for Coal Fired Power Plants Using Coal and Biomass Blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The low NOx burner (LNB) is the most cost effective technology used in coal-fired power plants to reduce NOx. Conventional (unstaged) burners use primary air for transporting particles and swirling secondary air to create recirculation of hot gases. LNB uses staged air (dividing total air into primary, secondary and tertiary air) to control fuel bound nitrogen from mixing early and oxidizing to NOx; it can also limit thermal NOx by reducing peak flame temperatures. Previous research at Texas A&M University (TAMU) demonstrated that cofiring coal with feedlot biomass (FB) in conventional burners produced lower or similar levels of NOx but increased CO. The present research deals with i) construction of a small scale 29.31 kW (100,000 BTU/hr) LNB facility, ii) evaluation of firing Wyoming (WYO) coal as the base case coal and cofiring WYO and dairy biomass (DB) blends, and iii) evaluating the effects of staging on NOx and CO. Ultimate and Proximate analysis revealed that WYO and low ash, partially composted, dairy biomass (LA-PC-DB-SepS) had the following heat values and empirical formulas: CH0.6992N0.0122O0.1822S0.00217 and CH_1.2554N_0.0470O_0.3965S_0.00457. The WYO contained 3.10 kg of Ash/GJ, 15.66 kg of VM/GJ, 0.36 kg of N/GJ, and 6.21 kg of O/GJ while LA-PC-DB-SepS contained 11.57 kg of Ash/GJ, 36.50 kg of VM/GJ, 1.50 kg of N/GJ, and 14.48 kg of O/GJ. The construction of a LNB nozzle capable of providing primary, swirled secondary and swirled tertiary air for staging was completed. The reactor provides a maximum residence time of 1.8 seconds under hot flow conditions. WYO and DB were blended on a mass basis for the following blends: 95:5, 90:10, 85:15, and 80:20. Results from firing pure WYO showed that air staging caused a slight decrease of NOx in lean regions (equivalence ratio, greater than or equal to 1.0) but an increase of CO in rich regions (=1.2). For unstaged combustion, cofiring resulted in most fuel blends showing similar NOx emissions to WYO. Staged cofiring resulted in a 12% NOx increase in rich regions while producing similar to slightly lower amounts of NOx in lean regions. One conclusion is that there exists a strong inverse relationship between NOx and CO emissions.

Gomez, Patsky O.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of 1300F Series Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plants: Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strategy for lowering the cost of CO2 capture from coal-based power plants includes raising generating efficiency. For pulverized coal (PC) plants this means progressing to ultra-supercritical (USC) steam conditions, arbitrarily defined as having temperatures above 593C (1100F). Currently, USC steam temperatures are limited to approximately 627C (1160F) by the use of ferritic steels, the most advanced commercially available steels. To go to higher temperatures, high-nickel alloys must be used, and th...

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

Program on Technology Innovation: Nanoparticles at Coal and Gas Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoparticlesparticles with diameters less than 100 nanometerscan occur from the combustion of fossil fuel, such as coal and natural gas. Recently, nanoparticles have gained the industrys attention because they may be associated with adverse health effects. Despite potential health hazards, little published data exist concerning the types and concentrations of nanoparticles in work environments. This report is the first published study on concentration and composition of nanoparticles in power plant w...

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

328

Assessing Cancer Risk of Coal-Fired Power Plant Workers Exposed to PAHs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To study the relationship between the concentration of urinary 1-OH-Py, 3-OH-BaP and the degree as well as the pathways of human exposure to PAHs, we collected 24-hour air, dietary and urine samples of 60 oven workers in a coal-fired power plant of Central ... Keywords: biomarkers, medium-air and food, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), exposure assessment, cancer risk

Bin Li; Zhaolong Zhang; Haitao Fan; Cheng Zeng

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Multimedia Mercury Fate at Coal-Fired Power Plants Equipped With SCR and Wet FGD Controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the current regulatory climate in the United States, a number of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems will be installed at new and existing coal-fired power plants to remove nitrogen oxide (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and mercury. The multimedia fate of trace metal species, especially mercury, in SCR/wet FGD systems is not well understood. Understanding and quantifying the amount of mercury removed from the flue gas and distributed to the solid and aqueous ...

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

330

Characterization of Toxicity of Coal-Fired Power Plant Effluents to Freshwater Mussels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has voiced concerns about fluidized gas desulfuration (FGD-) influenced waste streams regarding compliance with water quality standards. The effects of these effluents on aquatic organisms need to be quantified to better characterize the risk to aquatic ecosystems. This interim report discusses results of effluent toxicity tests performed over the past year. Four separate shipments of effluents were received from three different coal-fired power plants. Resultin...

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

331

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species Title Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6097E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Wang, Yungang, Jiaoyan Huang, Philip K. Hopke, Oliver V. Rattigan, David C. Chalupa, Mark J. Utell, and Thomas M. Holsen Journal Chemosphere Volume 92 Issue 4 Pagination 360-367 Date Published 07/2013 Abstract In the spring of 2008, a 260MWe coal-fired power plant (CFPP) located in Rochester, New York was closed over a 4 month period. Using a 2-years data record, the impacts of the shutdown of the CFPP on nearby ambient concentrations of three Hg species were quantified. The arithmetic average ambient concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), and particulate mercury (PBM) during December 2007-November 2009 were 1.6ng/m3, 5.1pg/m3, and 8.9pg/m3, respectively. The median concentrations of GEM, GOM, and PBM significantly decreased by 12%, 73%, and 50% after the CFPP closed (Mann-Whitney test, p<0.001). Positive Matrix Factorization (EPA PMF v4.1) identified six factors including O3-rich, traffic, gas phase oxidation, wood combustion, nucleation, and CFPP. When the CFPP was closed, median concentrations of GEM, GOM, and PBM apportioned to the CFPP factor significantly decreased by 25%, 74%, and 67%, respectively, compared to those measured when the CFPP was still in operation (Mann-Whitney test, p<0.001). Conditional probability function (CPF) analysis showed the greatest reduction in all three Hg species was associated with northwesterly winds pointing toward the CFPP. These changes were clearly attributable to the closure of the CFPP.

332

Management of Process Wastewater at Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A confluence of drivers is causing utilities to consider closing ash ponds and converting to dry ash handling. These drivers include wastewater discharge regulations on salinity, chlorides, nutrients, and metals, as well as solid waste regulations resulting from concerns with pond safety. Because ash ponds at many sites receive a variety of wastewaters, even if a plant converts to dry ash handling and thereby reduces or eliminates ash sluice water, other wastewater streams will still require treatment. E...

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

POLLUTION-CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS AND THEIR IMPACT ON AEROSOL NUCLEATION AND GROWTH IN EMISSIONS PLUMES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nucleation and growth of particles in coal-fired power-plant plumes can greatly contribute to particle concentrations near source regions. Pollution-control technologies have been added to coal-fired (more)

Lonsdale, Chantelle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Summary of Test Results from Babcock & Wilcox's 30 MWth Oxy-Coal Pilot Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If CO2 capture and storage (CCS) is to be implemented and play a role in keeping electricity prices affordable under proposed emission restrictions, its rate of progress must be accelerated. Demonstration plants need to be deployed in the short-term to allow the technology to evolve and become more efficient and cost effective. One way to reduce the costs of CCS from coal-fired power plants is by adopting oxy-combustion. With this technology, instead of using air, oxygen is mixed with recycled flue gas. ...

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Prospects of Oxy-Coal Steam-Electric Power Plants Achieving "Minor Source" Status for Air Emissions Permitting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxy-coal power plants have been proposed for capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal combustion in a relatively concentrated form for storage in geological formations. The particular processes employed for oxy-combustion have the positive side effect of reducing emissions to very low levels. This report assesses the extent to which oxy-coal power plants might meet near-zero emissions proposed by several organizations and qualify as a minor source for the purposes of air emissions permitting. The rep...

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

337

Controlling Energy Costs with Coal Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Even with a decade of substantial energy reduction in America's manufacturing plants and a temporary 'oil glut', energy often represents the largest plant expense, higher than labor or raw materials. Energy is not only a major plant expense; it is usually regarded as the most controllable. Fluidized bed combustion technology allows industrial steam users to use low-grade coals that are outside of mainstream coal markets, are abundant, and are very inexpensive, being one-quarter to one-third the price of oil or gas. This paper discusses the economics of low-grade coal, what is fluidized bed technology and its comparison to conventional coal and gas/oil fired systems, and one coal-fired FBC installation in Texas.

Sadowski, R. S.; von Hippel, C. S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Survey and conceptual flow sheets for coal conversion plant handling-preparation and ash/slag removal operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was undertaken at the request of the Fossil Fuel Processing Division of the Department of Energy. The report includes a compilation of conceptual flow sheets, including major equipment lists, and the results of an availability survey of potential suppliers of equipment associated with the coal and ash/slag operations that will be required by future large coal conversion plant complexes. Conversion plant flow sheet operations and related equipment requirements were based on two representative bituminous coals - Pittsburgh and Kentucky No. 9 - and on nine coal conversion processes. It appears that almost all coal handling and preparation and ash/slag removal equipment covered by this survey, with the exception of some coal comminution equipment, either is on hand or can readily be fabricated to meet coal conversion plant capacity requirements of up to 50,000 short tons per day. Equipment capable of handling even larger capacities can be developed. This approach appears to be unjustified, however, because in many cases a reasonable or optimum number of trains of equipment must be considered when designing a conversion plant complex. The actual number of trains of equipment selected will be influenced by the total requied capacity of the complex, the minimum on-line capacity that can be tolerated in case of equipment failure, reliability of specific equipment types, and the number of reactors and related feed injection stations needed for the specific conversion process.

Zapp, F.C.; Thomas, O.W.; Silverman, M.D.; Dyslin, D.A.; Holmes, J.M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluation of an oxyfuel power plant using mixed conductingA Vision for Thermal Power-Plant Technology Development inon an Existing US Coal-Fired Power Plant . First National

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

2011 Next Generation Manufacturing Study 2011 Next ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... well: 28% of manufacturers reported they were ... The NGM Study manufacturers report annual revenues ... 0.7% 0.5% Petroleum and Coal Products Mfg ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Simulated coal-gas fueled carbonate fuel cell power plant system verification. Final report, September 1990--June 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed under U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) Contract DE-AC-90MC27168 for September 1990 through March 1995. Energy Research Corporation (ERC), with support from DOE, EPRI, and utilities, has been developing a carbonate fuel cell technology. ERC`s design is a unique direct fuel cell (DFC) which does not need an external fuel reformer. An alliance was formed with a representative group of utilities and, with their input, a commercial entry product was chosen. The first 2 MW demonstration unit was planned and construction begun at Santa Clara, CA. A conceptual design of a 10OMW-Class dual fuel power plant was developed; economics of natural gas versus coal gas use were analyzed. A facility was set up to manufacture 2 MW/yr of carbonate fuel cell stacks. A 100kW-Class subscale power plant was built and several stacks were tested. This power plant has achieved an efficiency of {approximately}50% (LHV) from pipeline natural gas to direct current electricity conversion. Over 6,000 hours of operation including 5,000 cumulative hours of stack operation were demonstrated. One stack was operated on natural gas at 130 kW, which is the highest carbonate fuel cell power produced to date, at 74% fuel utilization, with excellent performance distribution across the stack. In parallel, carbonate fuel cell performance has been improved, component materials have been proven stable with lifetimes projected to 40,000 hours. Matrix strength, electrolyte distribution, and cell decay rate have been improved. Major progress has been achieved in lowering stack cost.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Analysis and prevention of metallurgical failures at a major direct coal liquefaction pilot plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The H-Coal Pilot Plant in Catlettsburg, KY was the largest-capacity direct coal liquefaction project operating in the United States. Since the start of operations, performance of its components was carefully monitored and occasional failures were examined and documented. The results of the examinations were used to develop remedial steps and improve the design of scale-up units. In this paper, the metallurgical aspects of the following incidents will be described: 1) stress corrosion cracking of martensitic stainless steel bolting on the waterside of a heat exchanger; 2) stress corrosion cracking of a superalloy seal ring; 3) brittle failure of a low alloy nut in a block valve body; 4) corrosion damage in the fractionator and side stripper; 5) erosion/corrosion of a coal liquid transfer line in the atmospheric fractionation area; 6) pitting corrosion in a deaerator carbon steel inlet pipe; 7) brittle failure of a martensitic stainless steel ball in a block valve handling coal liquids; and 8) cracking of cobalt-base alloy seat rings in block valve applications. In addition, remedial steps and preventive measures leading to successful performance after repair are briefly described.

Sagues, A.A.; Ganesan, P.; Ragle, H.V.; Searles, R.C.; Sethi, V.K.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

POTENTIAL HEALTH RISK REDUCTION ARISING FROM REDUCED MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced plans to regulate mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants. EPA has not prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. To address this issue, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with support from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in human health risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. The primary pathway for Hg exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to Hg exposure is the fetus. Therefore the risk assessment focused on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Dose response factors were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions. Three scenarios for reducing Hg emissions from coal plants were considered: (1) A base case using current conditions; (2) A 50% reduction; and, (3) A 90% reduction. These reductions in emissions were assumed to translate linearly into a reduction in fish Hg levels of 8.6% and 15.5%, respectively. Population risk estimates were also calculated for two subsistence fisher populations. These groups of people consume substantially more fish than the general public and, depending on location, the fish may contain higher Hg levels than average. Risk estimates for these groups were calculated for the three Hg levels used for the general population analyses. Analysis shows that the general population risks for exposure of the fetus to Hg are small. Estimated risks under current conditions (i.e., no specific Hg controls) ranged from 5.7 x 10{sup -6} in the Midwest to 2 x 10{sup -5} in the Southeast. Reducing emissions from coal plants by 90% reduced the estimated range in risk to 5 x 10{sup -6} in the Midwest and 1.5 x 10{sup -5} in Southeast, respectively. The population risk for the subsistence fisher using the Southeast regional fish Hg levels was 3.8 x 10{sup -3}, a factor of 200 greater than the general population risk. For the subsistence fishers and the Savannah River Hg levels, the population risk was 4.3 x 10{sup -5}, a factor of 2 greater than for the general population. The estimated risk reductions from a 90% reduction in coal plant Hg emissions ranged from 25%-68%, which is greater than the assumed reduction in Hg levels in fish, (15.5%). To place this risk in perspective, there are approximately 4 x 10{sup 6} births/year in the U.S (National Vital Statistics Report, 2000). Assuming that the Southeast risk level (the highest of the regions) is appropriate for the entire U.S., an estimate of 80 newborn children per year have a 5% chance of realizing any of the 16 adverse effects used to generate the DRF. If Hg emissions from power plants are reduced 90%, the number of children at risk is reduced to 60.

SULLIVAN,T.M.LIPFERT,F.W.MORRIS,S.C.MOSKOWITZ,P.D.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Global coal gap between Permian-Triassic extinction and Middle Triassic recovery of peat-forming plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early Triassic coals are unknown, and Middle Triassic coals are rare and thin. The Early Triassic coal gap began with extinction of peat-forming plants at the end of the Permian (ca. 250 Ma), with no coal known anywhere until Middle Triassic (243 Ma). Permian levels of plant diversity and peat thickness were not recovered until Late Triassic (230 Ma). Tectonic and climatic explanations for the coal gap fail because deposits of fluctuating sea levels and sedimentary facies and paleosols commonly found in coal-bearing sequences are present also in Early Triassic rocks. Nor do we favor explanations involving evolutionary advances in the effectiveness of fungal decomposers, insects or tetrapod herbivores, which became cosmopolitan and much reduced in diversity across the Permian-Triassic boundary. Instead, we favor explanations involving extinction of peat-forming plants at the Permian-Triassic boundary, followed by a hiatus of some 10 m.y. until newly evolved peat-forming plants developed tolerance to the acidic dysaerobic conditions of wetlands. This view is compatible not only with the paleobotanical record of extinction of swamp plants, but also with indications of a terminal Permian productivity crash from {delta}{sup 13}C{sub org} and total organic carbon of both nonmarine and shallow marine shales. 205 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Retallack, G.J. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)] [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Veevers, J.J.; Morante, R. [Macquarie Univ., New South Wales (Australia)] [Macquarie Univ., New South Wales (Australia)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Potential nanotechnology applications for reducing freshwater consumption at coal fired power plants : an early view.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the overall research effort of the Existing Plants Research Program by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. A growing challenge to the economic production of electricity from coal-fired power plants is the demand for freshwater, particularly in light of the projected trends for increasing demands and decreasing supplies of freshwater. Nanotechnology uses the unique chemical, physical, and biological properties that are associated with materials at the nanoscale to create and use materials, devices, and systems with new functions and properties. It is possible that nanotechnology may open the door to a variety of potentially interesting ways to reduce freshwater consumption at power plants. This report provides an overview of how applications of nanotechnology could potentially help reduce freshwater use at coal-fired power plants. It was developed by (1) identifying areas within a coal-fired power plant's operations where freshwater use occurs and could possibly be reduced, (2) conducting a literature review to identify potential applications of nanotechnology for facilitating such reductions, and (3) collecting additional information on potential applications from researchers and companies to clarify or expand on information obtained from the literature. Opportunities, areas, and processes for reducing freshwater use in coal-fired power plants considered in this report include the use of nontraditional waters in process and cooling water systems, carbon capture alternatives, more efficient processes for removing sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, coolants that have higher thermal conductivities than water alone, energy storage options, and a variety of plant inefficiencies, which, if improved, would reduce energy use and concomitant water consumption. These inefficiencies include air heater inefficiencies, boiler corrosion, low operating temperatures, fuel inefficiencies, and older components that are subject to strain and failure. A variety of nanotechnology applications that could potentially be used to reduce the amount of freshwater consumed - either directly or indirectly - by these areas and activities was identified. These applications include membranes that use nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials for improved water purification and carbon capture; nano-based coatings and lubricants to insulate and reduce heat loss, inhibit corrosion, and improve fuel efficiency; nano-based catalysts and enzymes that improve fuel efficiency and improve sulfur removal efficiency; nanomaterials that can withstand high temperatures; nanofluids that have better heat transfer characteristics than water; nanosensors that can help identify strain and impact damage, detect and monitor water quality parameters, and measure mercury in flue gas; and batteries and capacitors that use nanotechnology to enable utility-scale storage. Most of these potential applications are in the research stage, and few have been deployed at coal-fired power plants. Moving from research to deployment in today's economic environment will be facilitated with federal support. Additional support for research development and deployment (RD&D) for some subset of these applications could lead to reductions in water consumption and could provide lessons learned that could be applied to future efforts. To take advantage of this situation, it is recommended that NETL pursue funding for further research, development, or deployment for one or more of the potential applications identified in this report.

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

346

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal- electric power plant Coal blending Nitrogen controlblending chemical methods resource requirements cost STEAM-ELECTRIC COAL- FIRED POWER PLANT

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to design, construct, and operate an ash beneficiation facility that will generate several products from coal combustion ash stored in a utility ash pond. The site selected is LG&E's Ghent Station located in Carroll County, Kentucky. The specific site under consideration is the lower ash pond at Ghent, a closed landfill encompassing over 100 acres. Coring activities revealed that the pond contains over 7 million tons of ash, including over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. These potential products are primarily concentrated in the lower end of the pond adjacent to the outlet. A representative bulk sample was excavated for conducting laboratory-scale process testing while a composite 150 ton sample was also excavated for demonstration-scale testing at the Ghent site. A mobile demonstration plant with a design feed rate of 2.5 tph was constructed and hauled to the Ghent site to evaluate unit processes (i.e. primary classification, froth flotation, spiral concentration, secondary classification, etc.) on a continuous basis to determine appropriate scale-up data. Unit processes were configured into four different flowsheets and operated at a feed rate of 2.5 tph to verify continuous operating performance and generate bulk (1 to 2 tons) products for product testing. Cementitious products were evaluated for performance in mortar and concrete as well as cement manufacture process addition. All relevant data from the four flowsheets was compiled to compare product yields and quality while preliminary flowsheet designs were generated to determine throughputs, equipment size specifications and capital cost summaries. A detailed market study was completed to evaluate the potential markets for cementitious products. Results of the study revealed that the Ghent local fly ash market is currently oversupplied by more than 500,000 tpy and distant markets (i.e. Florida) are oversupplied as well. While the total US demand for ultrafine pozzolan is currently equal to demand, there is no reason to expect a significant increase in demand. Despite the technical merits identified in the pilot plant work with regard to beneficiating the entire pond ash stream, market developments in the Ohio River Valley area during 2006-2007 were not conducive to demonstrating the project at the scale proposed in the Cooperative Agreement. As a result, Cemex withdrew from the project in 2006 citing unfavorable local market conditions in the foreseeable future at the demonstration site. During the Budget Period 1 extensions provided by the DOE, CAER has contacted several other companies, including cement producers and ash marketing concerns for private cost share. Based on the prevailing demand-supply situation, these companies had expressed interest only in limited product lines, rather than the entire ash beneficiation product stream. Although CAER had generated interest in the technology, a financial commitment to proceed to Budget Period 2 could not be obtained from private companies. Furthermore, the prospects of any decisions being reached within a reasonable time frame were dim. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007. The activities presented in this report were carried out during the Cooperative Agreement period 08 November 2004 through 31 March 2007.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant start-up and modification report. [Lurgi Process  

SciTech Connect

This report will help in designing future coal conversion plants by documenting the areas which need additional research to obtain more reliable process data, more careful planning and equipment selection. The scope of this report is to: describe the problem with the particular process or item of equipment; identify the modification that was implemented to correct the problem; evaluate the impacts of the modification; and document the cost of the modification. Contents include the following: (1) process modifications (coal, oxygen and steam, gasification and gas processing, sulfur recovery, flare system, liquid processing, ash handling and solids disposal, other systems); (2) start-up schedule; (3) SNG production; (4) environmental data; and (5) cost data.

Miller, W.R.; Honea, F.I.; Lang, R.A.; Berty, T.E.; Delaney, R.C.; Hospodarec, R.W.; Mako, P.F.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

ASSESSMENT OF LOW COST NOVEL SORBENTS FOR COAL-FIRED POWER PLANT MERCURY CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a Technical Report under a program funded by the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to obtain the necessary information to assess the viability of lower cost alternatives to commercially available activated carbon for mercury control in coal-fired utilities. During this reporting period, several sorbent samples have been tested by URS in their laboratory fixed-bed system. The sorbents were evaluated under conditions simulating flue gas from power plants burning Powder River Basin (PRB) and low sulfur eastern bituminous coals. The equilibrium adsorption capacities of the sorbents for both elemental and oxidized mercury are presented. A team meeting discussing the overall program and meetings with Midwest Generation and Wisconsin Electric Power Company (WEPCO) concerning field testing occurred during this reporting period.

Sharon Sjostrom

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

350

Analysis of pipe failure for the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rupture of a carbon steel elbow in the methanation area of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant resulted in a fire and plant shutdown. The failure was investigated by personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ANG Associates, the plant operators. These studies consisted of an on-site inspection and extensive laboratory examination that included optical metallography, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray diffraction, chemical analyses, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). It was concluded that operation of a heat exchanger under off-specification conditions contributed to higher than design temperatures, lower than design pressures, and higher than design concentrations of carbon dioxide and water in the exit line from a condensate separator. Together, these conditions produced high levels of carbonic acid and higher than design velocities resulting in severe corrosion of the carbon steel. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Keiser, J.R.; Mayotte, J.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Dias, O.C. (Amoco Research Center, Naperville, IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Evaluation of Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid Sorbents as a Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO 2 Capture from Coal-fired Power Plants Background Retrofitting the current fleet of pulverized coal (PC)-fired power plants for the separation and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is one of the most significant challenges for effective, long-term carbon management. Post-combustion CO 2 capture using solid-sorbent based technologies is a potential resolution to this challenge that could be appropriate for both new and existing PC-fired power plant

352

A Low Cost and High Efficient Facility for Removal of $\\SO_{2}$ and $\\NO_{x}$ in the Flue Gas from Coal Fire Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Low Cost and High Efficient Facility for Removal of $\\SO_{2}$ and $\\NO_{x}$ in the Flue Gas from Coal Fire Power Plant

Pei, Y J; Dong, X; Feng, G Y; Fu, S; Gao, H; Hong, Y; Li, G; Li, Y X; Shang, L; Sheng, L S; Tian, Y C; Wang, X Q; Wang, Y; Wei, W; Zhang, Y W; Zhou, H J

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Plant growth response in experimental soilless mixes prepared from coal combustion products and organic waste materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large quantities of organic materials such as animal manures, yard trimmings, and biosolids are produced each year. Beneficial use options for them are often limited, and composting has been proposed as a way to better manage these organic materials. Similarly, burning of coal created 125 million tons of coal combustion products (CCP) in the United States in 2006. An estimated 53 million tons of CCP were reused, whereas the remainder was deposited in landfills. By combining CCP and composted organic materials (COM), we were able to create soilless plant growth mixes with physicochemical conditions that can support excellent plant growth. An additional benefit is the conservation of natural raw materials, such as peat, which is generally used for making soilless mixes. Experimental mixes were formulated by combining CCP and COM at ratios ranging from 2:8 to 8:2 (vol/vol), respectively. Water content at saturation for the created mixes was 63% to 72%, whereas for the commercial control, it was 77%. pH values for the best performing mixes ranged between 5.9 and 6.8. Electrical conductivity and concentrations of required plant nutrient were also within plant growth recommendations for container media. Significantly (P < 0.0001) higher plant biomass growth (7%-130%) was observed in the experimental mixes compared with a commercial mix. No additional fertilizers were provided during the experiment, and reduced fertilization costs can thus accrue as an added benefit to the grower. In summary, combining CCP and COM, derived from source materials often viewed as wastes, can create highly productive plant growth mixes.

Bardhan, S.; Watson, M.; Dick, W.A. [Ohio State University, Wooster, OH (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX Website: www.netl.doe.gov Customer Service: 1-800-553-7681 Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants Background The Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) University Coal Research (UCR) Program seeks to further develop the understanding of coal utilization. Since the program's inception in 1979, its primary objectives have been to improve our understanding of the chemical and physical processes involved in the conversion and utilization of coal in an environmentally acceptable manner; maintain and upgrade the coal research capabilities and facilities of U.S. colleges and

355

Bench Scale Study of Integrated Chemical Oxidation and Enhanced Bio-Stabilization of Manufactured Gas Plant SoilsBench Scale Study of Integrated Chemical Oxidation and Enhanced Bio-Stabilization of Manufactured Gas Plant Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bench-scale study was conducted to investigate a new remedial approach to treat constituents of concern (COC) that were present in soil from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. The approach combines in situ chemical oxidation, in situ stabilization, and enhanced biodegradation to provide overall degradation/stabilization of COCs that would not be possible using any of the three technologies alone. Sodium persulfate was chosen as the oxidant because it can be activated by ...

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

356

Mass balance of major and trace elements in a coal-fired power plant  

SciTech Connect

A total of 48 samples, feed coals (FCs), fly ashes (FAs) and bottom ashes (BAs), which were systematically collected once a week over an eight-week period from boiler units, B1-4 with 660 MW and B5-6 with 330 MW capacity from Soma power plant, have been evaluated for major and trace elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ti, S, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Cs, Ga, Ge, Hf, Hg, Li, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sn, Sr, Ta, Th, Tl, U, V, Y, Zn, Zr, and REEs) to get information on behavior during coal combustion. This study indicates that some elements such as Hg, Bi, Cd, As, Pb, Ge, Tl, Sn, Zn, Sb, B show enrichments in FAs relative to the BAs in both group boiler units. In addition to these, Cs, Lu, Tm, and Ga in Units B1-4 and S in Units B5-6 also have enrichments in FAs. Elements showing enrichments in BAs in both group boiler units are Ta, Mn, Nb. In addition to these, Se, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe in Units B1-4 and Cu in Units B5-6 also have enrichments in BAs. The remaining elements investigated in this study have no clear segregation between FAs and BAs. Mass balance calculations with the two methods show that some elements, S, Ta, Hg, Se, Zn, Na, Ca in Units B1-4, and Hg, S, Ta, Se, P in Units B5-6, have volatile behavior during coal combustion in the Soma power plant. This study also implies that some elements, Sb and Tb in Units B1-4 and Sb in Units B5-6, have relatively high retention effects in the combustion residues from the Soma power plant.

Karayigit, A.I.; Bulut, Y.; Karayigit, G.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Vassilev, S.; Vassileva, C. [Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS LOCAL IMPACTS ON HUMAN HEALTH RISK.  

SciTech Connect

A thorough quantitative understanding of the processes of mercury emissions, deposition, and translocation through the food chain is currently not available. Complex atmospheric chemistry and dispersion models are required to predict concentration and deposition contributions, and aquatic process models are required to predict effects on fish. However, there are uncertainties in all of these predictions. Therefore, the most reliable method of understanding impacts of coal-fired power plants on Hg deposition is from empirical data. A review of the literature on mercury deposition around sources including coal-fired power plants found studies covering local mercury concentrations in soil, vegetation, and animals (fish and cows). There is strong evidence of enhanced local deposition within 3 km of the chlor-alkali plants, with elevated soil concentrations and estimated deposition rates of 10 times background. For coal-fired power plants, the data show that atmospheric deposition of Hg may be slightly enhanced. On the scale of a few km, modeling suggests that wet deposition may be increased by a factor of two or three over background. The measured data suggest lower increases of 15% or less. The effects of coal-fired plants seem to be less than 10% of total deposition on a national scale, based on emissions and global modeling. The following summarizes our findings from published reports on the impacts of local deposition. In terms of excesses over background the following increments have been observed within a few km of the plant: (1) local soil concentration Hg increments of 30%-60%, (2) sediment increments of 18-30%, (3) wet deposition increments of 11-12%, and (4) fish Hg increments of about 5-6%, based on an empirical finding that fish concentrations are proportional to the square root of deposition. Important uncertainties include possible reductions of RGM to Hg{sub 0} in power plant plumes and the role of water chemistry in the relationship between Hg deposition and fish content. Soil and vegetation sampling programs were performed around two mid-size coal fired power plants. The objectives were to determine if local mercury hot-spots exist, to determine if they could be attributed to deposition of coal-fired power plant emissions, and to determine if they correlated with model predictions. These programs found the following: (1) At both sites, there was no correlation between modeled mercury deposition and either soil concentrations or vegetation concentrations. At the Kincaid plant, there was excess soil Hg along heavily traveled roads. The spatial pattern of soil mercury concentrations did not match the pattern of vegetation Hg concentrations at either plant. (2) At both sites, the subsurface (5-10 cm) samples the Hg concentration correlated strongly with the surface samples (0-5 cm). Average subsurface sample concentrations were slightly less than the surface samples; however, the difference was not statistically significant. (3) An unequivocal definition of background Hg was not possible at either site. Using various assumed background soil mercury concentrations, the percentage of mercury deposited within 10 km of the plant ranged between 1.4 and 8.5% of the RGM emissions. Based on computer modeling, Hg deposition was primarily RGM with much lower deposition from elemental mercury. Estimates of the percentage of total Hg deposition ranged between 0.3 and 1.7%. These small percentages of deposition are consistent with the empirical findings of only minor perturbations in environmental levels, as opposed to ''hot spots'', near the plants. The major objective of this study was to determine if there was evidence for ''hot-spots'' of mercury deposition around coal-fired power plants. Although the term has been used extensively, it has never been defined. From a public health perspective, such a ''hot spot'' must be large enough to insure that it did not occur by chance, and it must affect water bodies large enough to support a population of subsistence fishers. The results of this study support the hypothesis that n

SULLIVAN, T.M.; BOWERMAN, B.; ADAMS, J.; LIPFERT, F.; MORRIS, S.M.; BANDO, A.; PENA, R.; BLAKE, R.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

New 90,000 PPH Coal Fired Boiler Plant at Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company, Durham North Carolina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company in Durham, North Carolina is installing a future cogeneration, coal fired boiler system designed and built by Energy Systems (ESI) of Chattanooga, Tennessee. The complete boiler plant is comprised of a 90,000 pph Dorr-Oliver/E.Keeler, 750 psig design boiler for future cogeneration with a Detroit chain grate stoker and all necessary coal conveying equipment, silos, side stream bag house, buildings and also, all necessary auxiliary equipment to make for a complete operating system.

Kaskey, G. T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

A study of the computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

SciTech Connect

CIM is a dominant force at the Y-12 Plant, winner of the 1986 CASA/SME Industry LEAD Award, as this manufacturing facility migrates to a factory-of-the-future environment. Top Management commitment to CIM was demonstrated by establishing long-term strategic business goals. CIM focus is on four technology zones: information systems, computer network systems, computer-aided design, and computer-aided manufacturing. CIM is both an integrating technology and a management philosophy at Y-12, and plant business systems are being developed to integrate the total business environment. Top-down CIM strategic planning, combined with strong user input, directs the selection of investments. Benefit management techniques are used, and budgets are reduced based on CIM savings. The dynamic nature of CIM is recognized, and program direction is periodically adjusted based on lessons learned.

Murphy, S.M. Jr.

1987-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

360

Planning the transition to the CIM (computer-integrated manufacturing) environment at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

SciTech Connect

Formalized efforts have been ongoing within the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant since 1982 to plan and implement a computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) environment. This presentation addresses activities past and present that are enabling the Y-12 facility to make the transition into the CIM environment. Specific issues addressed are: (1) present and future modeling for manufacturing process, business model, data architecture, and information systems architecture; (2) establishing a formal CIM organization to be responsible for CIM planning and implementation; (3) establishing specific Plant performance goals relating to CIM objectives; (4) conducting CIM needs analysis with the production organizations to foster a basic understanding of the CIM concept and to identify CIM opportunities; and (5) CIM Program status.

Bowers, G.L.; Murphy, S.M. Jr.

1987-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

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361

CO sub 2 emissions from coal-fired and solar electric power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of the lifetime carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired, photovoltaic, and solar thermal electric power plants in the United States. These CO{sub 2} estimates are based on a net energy analysis derived from both operational systems and detailed design studies. It appears that energy conservation measures and shifting from fossil to renewable energy sources have significant long-term potential to reduce carbon dioxide production caused by energy generation and thus mitigate global warming. The implications of these results for a national energy policy are discussed. 40 refs., 8 figs., 23 tabs.

Keith, F.; Norton, P.; Brown, D.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Estimates of the value of carbon dioxide from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops a framework and methodology for estimating the value of carbon dioxide produced by the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant. The petroleum industry could use this CO/sub 2/ as a solvent for enhanced oil recovery. The value of CO/sub 2/ is found to be a function of the geological characteristics of the petroleum reservoirs being flooded, the cost of transporting the CO/sub 2/, and the presence or absence of competitors selling CO/sub 2/. Carbon dioxide demand curves for oil fields in Montana and North Dakota are developed for various economic conditions, and sensitivity analyses are performed. 22 refs., 4 figs., 21 tabs.

Wolsky, A.M.; Nelson, S.H.; Jankowski, D.J.

1985-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

363

Review of CO2 Capture Development Activities for Coal-Fired Power Generation Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If CO2 capture and storage (CCS) is to be implemented and play a role in keeping electricity prices affordable under proposed emission restrictions, its rate of progress needs to be accelerated. Demonstration plants need to be deployed in the short-term to allow the technology to evolve and become more efficient and costeffective. Achieving this objective is the primary objective of EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow Program. This report provides an up-to-date review of the progress being made in pilot and d...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

PSNH's Northern Wood power project repowers coal-fired plant with new fluidized-bed combustor  

SciTech Connect

The Northern Wood Power project permanently replaced a 50-MW coal-burning boiler (Unit 5) at Public Service of New Hampshire's Schiller station with a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed wood-burning boiler of the same capacity. The project, completed in December 2006, reduced emissions and expanded the local market for low-grade wood. For planning and executing the multiyear, $75 million project at no cost to its ratepayers, PSNH wins Power's 2007 Marmaduke Award for excellence in O & M. The award is named for Marmaduke Surfaceblow, the fictional marine engineer/plant troubleshoot par excellence. 7 figs., 1 tab.

Peltier, R.

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Optimization under Uncertainty for Water Consumption in a Pulverized Coal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

Pulverized coal (PC) power plants are widely recognized as major water consumers whose operability has started to be affected by drought conditions across some regions of the country. Water availability will further restrict the retrofitting of existing PC plants with water-expensive carbon capture technologies. Therefore, national efforts to reduce water withdrawal and consumption have been intensified. Water consumption in PC plants is strongly associated to losses from the cooling water cycle, particularly water evaporation from cooling towers. Accurate estimation of these water losses requires realistic cooling tower models, as well as the inclusion of uncertainties arising from atmospheric conditions. In this work, the cooling tower for a supercritical PC power plant was modeled as a humidification operation and used for optimization under uncertainty. Characterization of the uncertainty (air temperature and humidity) was based on available weather data. Process characteristics including boiler conditions, reactant ratios, and pressure ratios in turbines were calculated to obtain the minimum water consumption under the above mentioned uncertainties. In this study, the calculated conditions predicted up to 12% in reduction in the average water consumption for a 548 MW supercritical PC power plant simulated using Aspen Plus. Optimization under uncertainty for these large-scale PC plants cannot be solved with conventional stochastic programming algorithms because of the computational expenses involved. In this work, we discuss the use of a novel better optimization of nonlinear uncertain systems (BONUS) algorithm which dramatically decreases the computational requirements of the stochastic optimization.

Juan M. Salazar; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila Diwekar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Optimization Under Uncertainty for Water Consumption in a Pulverized Coal Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulverized coal (PC) power plants are widely recognized as major water consumers whose operability has started to be affected by drought conditions across some regions of the country. Water availability will further restrict the retrofitting of existing PC plants with water-expensive carbon capture technologies. Therefore, national efforts to reduce water withdrawal and consumption have been intensified. Water consumption in PC plants is strongly associated to losses from the cooling water cycle, particularly water evaporation from cooling towers. Accurate estimation of these water losses requires realistic cooling tower models, as well as the inclusion of uncertainties arising from atmospheric conditions. In this work, the cooling tower for a supercritical PC power plant was modeled as a humidification operation and used for optimization under uncertainty. Characterization of the uncertainty (air temperature and humidity) was based on available weather data. Process characteristics including boiler conditions, reactant ratios, and pressure ratios in turbines were calculated to obtain the minimum water consumption under the above mentioned uncertainties. In this study, the calculated conditions predicted up to 12% in reduction in the average water consumption for a 548 MW supercritical PC power plant simulated using Aspen Plus. Optimization under uncertainty for these large-scale PC plants cannot be solved with conventional stochastic programming algorithms because of the computational expenses involved. In this work, we discuss the use of a novel better optimization of nonlinear uncertain systems (BONUS) algorithm which dramatically decreases the computational requirements of the stochastic optimization.

Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Cost and Performance Comparison Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants, Volume 3 Executive Summary: Low Rank Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baseline Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 3 Executive Summary: Low Rank Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity September 2011 DOE/NETL-2010/1399 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring

368

Program on Technology Innovation - Use of Natural Peat to Remediate Contaminated Water at Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the use of natural peat to remediate contaminated groundwater, including its potential use in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. Readers will find descriptions of peat's properties and the mechanisms by which it removes contaminants from water, results of laboratory and field studies using natural peat to remove specific environmental contaminants, and recommendations for modifications that can enhance peat's removal efficiency.

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

369

Innovative Sediment Remediation Using a Risk-based Mixed Remedy at the Laconia Manufactured Gas Plant Site: Data and Lessons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a case study of the sediment remediation project at the Messer Street manufactured gas plant in Laconia, New Hampshire. The report describes a strategy developed to achieve the goal of a remedial action satisfactory to stakeholder goals and interests and which met the utility's business objectives of cost control, schedule, and positive community relations. Key elements in the strategy included a focused site characterization resulting in a remedial action plan prescribed to definite...

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

370

Technical Protocols for Assessing Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Mobility in the Subsurface at Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) research that has been conducted on dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) mobility at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites and presents technical protocols for conducting DNAPL mobility assessments at MGP sites using currently available methodologies and/or technologies. The technical protocols address each of the primary zones of the subsurface environment: vadose zone, saturated zone, and bedrock (both competent and fractured). The report a...

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

371

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of In-Situ Solidification/Stabilization at the Georgia Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-situ solidification/stabilization (S/S), an approach to remediating manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites, is often considered but seldom selected because of a lack of documented performance data. Data assuring long-term protection to human health and the environment are important because many MGP contaminants are suspected carcinogens. This study evaluates the long-term effectiveness of the past use of S/S at a former MGP site.

2003-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

372

Mercury Speciation in Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas-Experimental Studies and Model Development  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of the project was to obtain a fundamental understanding of the catalytic reactions that are promoted by solid surfaces present in coal combustion systems and develop a mathematical model that described key phenomena responsible for the fate of mercury in coal-combustion systems. This objective was achieved by carefully combining laboratory studies under realistic process conditions using simulated flue gas with mathematical modeling efforts. Laboratory-scale studies were performed to understand the fundamental aspects of chemical reactions between flue gas constituents and solid surfaces present in the fly ash and their impact on mercury speciation. Process models were developed to account for heterogeneous reactions because of the presence of fly ash as well as the deliberate addition of particles to promote Hg oxidation and adsorption. Quantum modeling was used to obtain estimates of the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions. Based on the initial findings of this study, additional work was performed to ascertain the potential of using inexpensive inorganic sorbents to control mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants without adverse impact on the salability fly ash, which is one of the major drawbacks of current control technologies based on activated carbon.

Radisav Vidic; Joseph Flora; Eric Borguet

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Nitrogen oxides emission control through reburning with biomass in coal-fired power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxides of nitrogen from coal-fired power stations are considered to be major pollutants, and there is increasing concern for regulating air quality and offsetting the emissions generated from the use of energy. Reburning is an in-furnace, combustion control technology for NOx reduction. Another environmental issue that needs to be addressed is the rapidly growing feedlot industry in the United States. The production of biomass from one or more animal species is in excess of what can safely be applied to farmland in accordance with nutrient management plans and stockpiled waste poses economic and environmental liabilities. In the present study, the feasibility of using biomass as a reburn fuel in existing coal-fired power plants is considered. It is expected to utilize biomass as a low-cost, substitute fuel and an agent to control emission. The successful development of this technology will create environment-friendly, low cost fuel source for the power industry, provide means for an alternate method of disposal of biomass, and generate a possible revenue source for feedlot operators. In the present study, the effect of coal, cattle manure or feedlot biomass, and blends of biomass with coal on the ability to reduce NOx were investigated in the Texas A&M University 29.31 kW (100,000 Btu/h) reburning facility. The facility used a mixture of propane and ammonia to generate the 600 ppm NOx in the primary zone. The reburn fuel was injected using air. The stoichiometry tested were 1.00 to 1.20 in the reburn zone. Two types of injectors, circular jet and fan spray injectors, which produce different types of mixing within the reburn zone, were studied to find their effect on NOx emissions reduction. The flat spray injector performed better in all cases. With the injection of biomass as reburn fuel with circular jet injector the maximum NOx reduction was 29.9 % and with flat spray injector was 62.2 %. The mixing time was estimated in model set up as 936 and 407 ms. The maximum NOx reduction observed with coal was 14.4 % and with biomass it was 62.2 % and the reduction with blends lay between that of coal and biomass.

Arumugam, Senthilvasan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Flue Gas Cleanup at Temperatures about 1400 C for a Coal Fired Combined Cycle Power Plant: State and Perspectives in the Pressurized Pulverized Coal Combustion (PPCC) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PPCC technology, a combined cycle, requires comprehensive cleaning of the flue gases because coal contains a large variety of minerals and other substances. This would lead to fast destruction of the gas turbine blades due to erosion and corrosion. The present specifications of the turbine manufacturers for the required flue gas quality are at a maximum particulate content of 5 mg/m3 s.t.p., diameter of Kraftwerke GmbH, SaarEnergie GmbH, Siemens AG, and Steag AG.

Foerster, M.E.C.; Oeking, K.; Hannes, K.

2002-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

375

CO2 Capture Options for an Existing Coal Fired Power Plant: O2/CO2 Recycle Combustion vs. Amine Scrubbing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OPTIONS FOR AN EXISTING COAL FIRED POWER PLANT: OPTIONS FOR AN EXISTING COAL FIRED POWER PLANT: O 2 /CO 2 RECYCLE COMBUSTION vs. AMINE SCRUBBING D. J. Singh (djsingh@uwaterloo.ca; +001-519-496-2064) E. Croiset 1 (ecroiset@uwaterloo.ca;+001-519-888-4567x6472) P.L. Douglas (pdouglas@uwaterloo.ca; +001-519-888-4567x2913) Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3G1 M.A. Douglas (madougla@nrcan.gc.ca; +001-613 996-2761) CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources Canada, 1 Haanel Dr., Nepean, Ontario, Canada, K1A 1M1 Abstract The existing fleet of modern pulverized coal fired power plants represents an opportunity to achieve significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the coming years providing efficient and economical CO 2 capture technologies are available for retrofit.

376

Coal industry annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Coal Industry Annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Analysis of pipe failure at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

SciTech Connect

The rupture of a carbon steel elbow in the methanation area of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant resulted in a fire and plant shutdown. Failure studies consisted of an on-site inspection and an extensive laboratory examination that included light metallography, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, chemical analyses, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. It was concluded that operation of a heat exchanger under off-specification conditions contributed to higher than design temperatures, lower than design pressures, and higher than design concentrations of carbon dioxide and water in the exit line from a condensate separator. Together, these conditions produced high levels of carbonic acid and higher than design velocities resulting in severe corrosion of the carbon steel.

Keiser, J.R.; Mayotte, J.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Dias, O.C. (Amoco Oil Co., Texas City, TX (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a new and unique pilot plant test facility. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it is the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco and Inland steel companies and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of both the Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for blast furnace injection. The main feature of the current work is the testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s (Canadian Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology) pilot plant coal combustion facility. This facility simulates blowpipe-tuyere conditions in an operating blast furnace, including blast temperature (900 C), flow pattern (hot velocity 200 m/s), geometry, gas composition, coal injection velocity (34 m/s) and residence time (20 ms). The facility is fully instrumented to measure air flow rate, air temperature, temperature in the reactor, wall temperature, preheater coil temperature and flue gas analysis. During this quarter a sample of the Herrin No. 6 coal (IBCSP 112) was delivered to the CANMET facility and testing is scheduled for the week of 11 December 1994. Also at this time, all of the IBCSP samples are being evaluated for blast furnace injection using the CANMET computer model.

Crelling, J.C. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Geology

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Should a coal-fired power plant be replaced or retrofitted?  

SciTech Connect

In a cap-and-trade system, a power plant operator can choose to operate while paying for the necessary emissions allowances, retrofit emissions controls to the plant, or replace the unit with a new plant. Allowance prices are uncertain, as are the timing and stringency of requirements for control of mercury and carbon emissions. We model the evolution of allowance prices for SO{sub 2}, NOx, Hg, and CO{sub 2} using geometric Brownian motion with drift, volatility, and jumps, and use an options-based analysis to find the value of the alternatives. In the absence of a carbon price, only if the owners have a planning horizon longer than 30 years would they replace a conventional coal-fired plant with a high-performance unit such as a supercritical plant; otherwise, they would install SO{sub 2} and NOx controls on the existing unit. An expectation that the CO{sub 2} price will reach $50/t in 2020 makes the installation of an IGCC with carbon capture and sequestration attractive today, even for planning horizons as short as 20 years. A carbon price below $40/t is unlikely to produce investments in carbon capture for electric power. 1 ref., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Dalia Patino-Echeverri; Benoit Morel; Jay Apt; Chao Chen [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DOE Announces Restructured FutureGen Approach to Demonstrate CCS Technology at Multiple Clean Coal Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Affirms Commitment to Clean Coal Technology Investments; Requests $648 Million for Coal Research, Development and Deployment for FY09 Budget - Largest Coal Budget Request in more than 25 years...

382

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Oxy-Fired 1100F (593C) Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant with CO2 Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxy-combustion of coal has been proposed as a way to reduce the costs of capturing CO2 from coal-fired steam-electric power plants at a purity adequate for geological storage. Various efforts are underway worldwide to develop oxy-combustion technology for deployment at full scale (600-800 MWe). This report describes the design of a 700-MWe (gross) oxy-pulverized coal power plant for comparison with a more familiar conventional air-coal power plant with the same steam cycle.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

Engineering and Economic Analysis of an Oxy-Fired 1100ºF (593ºC) Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant with CO2Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxy-combustion of coal has been proposed as a way to reduce the costs of capturing CO2 from coal-fired steam-electric power plants at a purity adequate for geological storage. Various efforts are underway worldwide to develop oxy-combustion technology for deployment at full scale (600800 MWe). This report describes the design of a 700-MWe (gross) oxy-pulverized coal power plant along with a more familiar conventional air-coal power plant with the same steam cycle.

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.502753725,1.549729719,1.64272351,1.727259934,1.784039735,1.822135762,1.923203642,2.00781457,2.134768212,2.217425497,2.303725166,2.407715232,2.46134106,2.637086093,2.775389073,2.902293046,3.120364238,3.298013245 "AEO 1995",,1.4212343,1.462640338,1.488780998,1.545300242,1.585877053,1.619428341,1.668671498,1.7584219,1.803937198,1.890547504,1.968695652,2.048913043,2.134750403,2.205281804,2.281690821,2.375434783,2.504830918 "AEO 1996",,,1.346101641,1.350594221,1.369020126,1.391737646,1.421340737,1.458772082,1.496497523,1.561369914,1.619940033,1.674758358,1.749420803,1.800709877,1.871110564,1.924495246,2.006850327,2.048938234,2.156821499

385

Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.47 1.48 1.53 1.57 1.58 1.57 1.61 1.63 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.72 1.70 1.76 1.79 1.81 1.88 1.92 AEO 1995 1993 1.39 1.39 1.38 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.42 1.41 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.46 1.46 1.47 1.50 AEO 1996 1994 1.32 1.29 1.28 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.27 1.27 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.26 1.28

386

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a review of the available data on mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts from small, laboratory-scale experiments, pilot-scale slipstream reactors and full-scale power plants was carried out. Data from small-scale reactors obtained with both simulated flue gas and actual coal combustion flue gas demonstrated the importance of temperature, ammonia, space velocity and chlorine on mercury oxidation across SCR catalyst. SCR catalysts are, under certain circumstances, capable of driving mercury speciation toward the gas-phase equilibrium values at SCR temperatures. Evidence suggests that mercury does not always reach equilibrium at the outlet. There may be other factors that become apparent as more data become available.

Constance Senior

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Zero-order trace element distribution model for the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant: Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the US DOE is developing a series for models of environmental systems. Both zero-order and detailed models are being developed. Detailed models are based on fundamental engineering principles and the use of detailed physical and chemical property data; reliance on empirical relationships and correlations is minimized. The key advantage of detailed models is their predictive capabilities and utility in performing valid comparative analyses. An important prerequisite to the development of detailed models in the availability of representative, long-term process and environmental data. These data are needed both to develop the models as well as to validate them. Zero-order models are less rigorous and have less predictive capability than detailed models since they are based on empirical estimates and simple correlations. However, they can be developed relatively quickly and are significantly less expensive to develop and use compared to detailed models. Zero-order models are useful in identifying potential environmental or control technology problems. As such, they can help direct future research and development efforts. They can provide useful information when comprehensive data are unavailable for detailed modeling, and can be used as a screening tool to identify process alternatives which appear to warrant more detailed modeling. This report describes a zero-order trace element distribution model for the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant located near Beulah, North Dakota. The model estimates how trace elements entering the plant in the feed coal are distributed to the plant's process and waste streams. Elements that may be introduced to the plant's waste streams from sorbents and/or catalysts (e.g., Vanadium in makeup Stretford solution) are not considered in the model. 13 refs.

Thomas, W.C.; Page, G.C.; Magee, R.A.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and related Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) power plantspower plants, petroleum refining, chemical processing industries, and natural gasnatural gas. If CO 2 capture and geologic sequestration from coal-fired power plants

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

DOE/EA-1498: Advanced Coal Utilization Byproduct Beneficiation Processing Plant Ghent Power Station, Carroll County, Kentucky (01/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1498 EA-1498 Advanced Coal Utilization Byproduct Beneficiation Processing Plant Ghent Power Station, Carroll County, Kentucky Final Environmental Assessment January 2005 Note: No comments were received during the public comment period from September 25 to October 25, 2004. Therefore, no changes to the Draft Environmental Assessment were necessary. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The proposed Federal action is to provide funding, through a cooperative agreement with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation (UKRF), Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), for the design, construction, and operation of an advanced coal ash beneficiation processing plant at Kentucky Utilities (KU) Ghent Power Station in Carroll County, Kentucky.

390

Economic assessment of coal-burning locomotives: Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The General Electric Company embarked upon a study to evaluate various alternatives for the design and manufacture a coal fired locomotive considering various prime movers, but retaining the electric drive transmission. The initial study was supported by the Burlington-Northern and Norfolk-Southern railroads, and included the following alternatives: coal fired diesel locomotive; direct fired gas turbine locomotives; direct fired gas turbine locomotive with steam injection; raw coal gasifier gas turbine locomotive; and raw coal fluid bed steam turbine locomotive. All alternatives use the electric drive transmission and were selected for final evaluation. The first three would use a coal water slurry as a fuel, which must be produced by new processing plants. Therefore, use of a slurry would require a significant plant capital investment. The last two would use classified run-of-the-mine (ROM) coal with much less capital expenditure. Coal fueling stations would be required but are significantly lower in capital cost than a coal slurry plant. For any coal fired locomotive to be commercially viable, it must pass the following criteria: be technically feasible and environmentally acceptable; meet railroads' financial expectations; and offer an attractive return to the locomotive manufacturer. These three criteria are reviewed in the report.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Sustainability Assessment of Coal-Fired Power Plants with Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has the ability to dramatically reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from power production. Most studies find the potential for 70 to 80 percent reductions in CO2 emissions on a life-cycle basis, depending on the technology. Because of this potential, utilities and policymakers are considering the wide-spread implementation of CCS technology on new and existing coal plants to dramatically curb greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the power generation sector. However, the implementation of CCS systems will have many other social, economic, and environmental impacts beyond curbing GHG emissions that must be considered to achieve sustainable energy generation. For example, emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur oxides (SOx), and particulate matter (PM) are also important environmental concerns for coal-fired power plants. For example, several studies have shown that eutrophication is expected to double and acidification would increase due to increases in NOx emissions for a coal plant with CCS provided by monoethanolamine (MEA) scrubbing. Potential for human health risks is also expected to increase due to increased heavy metals in water from increased coal mining and MEA hazardous waste, although there is currently not enough information to relate this potential to actual realized health impacts. In addition to environmental and human health impacts, supply chain impacts and other social, economic, or strategic impacts will be important to consider. A thorough review of the literature for life-cycle analyses of power generation processes using CCS technology via the MEA absorption process, and other energy generation technologies as applicable, yielded large variability in methods and core metrics. Nonetheless, a few key areas of impact for CCS were developed from the studies that we reviewed. These are: the impact of MEA generation on increased eutrophication and acidification from ammonia emissions and increased toxicity from MEA production and the impact of increased coal use including the increased generation of NOx from combustion and transportation, impacts of increased mining of coal and limestone, and the disposal of toxic fly ash and boiler ash waste streams. Overall, the implementing CCS technology could contribute to a dramatic decrease in global GHG emissions, while most other environmental and human health impact categories increase only slightly on a global scale. However, the impacts on human toxicity and ecotoxicity have not been studied as extensively and could have more severe impacts on a regional or local scale. More research is needed to draw strong conclusions with respect to the specific relative impact of different CCS technologies. Specifically, a more robust data set that disaggregates data in terms of component processes and treats a more comprehensive set of environmental impacts categories from a life-cycle perspective is needed. In addition, the current LCA framework lacks the required temporal and spatial scales to determine the risk of environmental impact from carbon sequestration. Appropriate factors to use when assessing the risk of water acidification (groundwater/oceans/aquifers depending on sequestration site), risk of increased human toxicity impact from large accidental releases from pipeline or wells, and the legal and public policy risk associated with licensing CO2 sequestration sites are also not currently addressed. In addition to identifying potential environmental, social, or risk-related issues that could impede the large-scale deployment of CCS, performing LCA-based studies on energy generation technologies can suggest places to focus our efforts to achieve technically feasible, economically viable, and environmentally conscious energy generation technologies for maximum impact.

Widder, Sarah H.; Butner, R. Scott; Elliott, Michael L.; Freeman, Charles J.

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

Conceptual design of a coal-fired MHD retrofit plant. Topical report, Seed Regeneration System Study 2  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Advanced Energy Systems (WAES), through Contract No. DE-AC22-87PC79668 funded by US DOE/PETC, is conducting a conceptual design study to evaluate a coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) retrofit of a utility plant of sufficient size to demonstrate the technical and future economic viability of an MHD system operating within an electric utility environment. The objective of this topical report is to document continuing seed regeneration system application studies and the definition of will system integration requirements for the Scholz MHD retrofit plant design. MHD power plants require the addition of a seeding material in the form of potassium to enhance the ionization of the high temperature combustion gas in the MHD channel. This process has an added environmental advantage compared to other types of coal-fired power plants in that the potassium combines with the naturally occurring sulfur in the coal to form a potassium sulfate flyash (K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) which can be removed from the process by appropriate particulate control equipment. Up to 100% of the Sulfur in the coal can be removed by this process thereby providing environmentally clean power plant operation that is better than required by present and anticipated future New Source Performance Standards (NSPS).

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Evaluation of the Implementation of Contained Recovery of Oily Waste (CROW(TM)) Enhanced Recovery at a Manufactured Gas Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the implementation of an enhanced tar recovery remediation system at a former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) site. The project included investigations, treatability and testing, cost analysis, system design, construction, and operations.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

394

Membrane Process to Capture CO{sub 2} from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

This final report describes work conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) on development of an efficient membrane process to capture carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from power plant flue gas (award number DE-NT0005312). The primary goal of this research program was to demonstrate, in a field test, the ability of a membrane process to capture up to 90% of CO{sub 2} in coal-fired flue gas, and to evaluate the potential of a full-scale version of the process to perform this separation with less than a 35% increase in the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) conducted this project in collaboration with Arizona Public Services (APS), who hosted a membrane field test at their Cholla coal-fired power plant, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and WorleyParsons (WP), who performed a comparative cost analysis of the proposed membrane CO{sub 2} capture process. The work conducted for this project included membrane and module development, slipstream testing of commercial-sized modules with natural gas and coal-fired flue gas, process design optimization, and a detailed systems and cost analysis of a membrane retrofit to a commercial power plant. The Polaris membrane developed over a number of years by MTR represents a step-change improvement in CO{sub 2} permeance compared to previous commercial CO{sub 2}-selective membranes. During this project, membrane optimization work resulted in a further doubling of the CO{sub 2} permeance of Polaris membrane while maintaining the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity. This is an important accomplishment because increased CO{sub 2} permeance directly impacts the membrane skid cost and footprint: a doubling of CO{sub 2} permeance halves the skid cost and footprint. In addition to providing high CO{sub 2} permeance, flue gas CO{sub 2} capture membranes must be stable in the presence of contaminants including SO{sub 2}. Laboratory tests showed no degradation in Polaris membrane performance during two months of continuous operation in a simulated flue gas environment containing up to 1,000 ppm SO{sub 2}. A successful slipstream field test at the APS Cholla power plant was conducted with commercialsize Polaris modules during this project. This field test is the first demonstration of stable performance by commercial-sized membrane modules treating actual coal-fired power plant flue gas. Process design studies show that selective recycle of CO{sub 2} using a countercurrent membrane module with air as a sweep stream can double the concentration of CO{sub 2} in coal flue gas with little energy input. This pre-concentration of CO{sub 2} by the sweep membrane reduces the minimum energy of CO{sub 2} separation in the capture unit by up to 40% for coal flue gas. Variations of this design may be even more promising for CO{sub 2} capture from NGCC flue gas, in which the CO{sub 2} concentration can be increased from 4% to 20% by selective sweep recycle. EPRI and WP conducted a systems and cost analysis of a base case MTR membrane CO{sub 2} capture system retrofitted to the AEP Conesville Unit 5 boiler. Some of the key findings from this study and a sensitivity analysis performed by MTR include: The MTR membrane process can capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} in coal flue gas and produce high-purity CO{sub 2} (>99%) ready for sequestration. CO{sub 2} recycle to the boiler appears feasible with minimal impact on boiler performance; however, further study by a boiler OEM is recommended. For a membrane process built today using a combination of slight feed compression, permeate vacuum, and current compression equipment costs, the membrane capture process can be competitive with the base case MEA process at 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a coal-fired power plant. The incremental LCOE for the base case membrane process is about equal to that of a base case MEA process, within the uncertainty in the analysis. With advanced membranes (5,000 gpu for CO{sub 2} and 50 for CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}), operating with no feed compression and

Merkel, Tim; Wei, Xiaotong; Firat, Bilgen; He, Jenny; Amo, Karl; Pande, Saurabh; Baker, Richard; Wijmans, Hans; Bhown, Abhoyjit

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

DOE-NETL's Mercury Control Technology R&D Program for Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Emissions from Coal Mercury Emissions from Coal 1 st International Experts' Workshop May 12-13, 2004 Glasgow, Scotland Thomas J. Feeley, III thomas.feeley@netl.doe.gov National Energy Technology Laboratory TJ Feeley _Scotland_ 2004 Presentation Outline * Who is NETL * Why mercury control? * NETL mercury control R&D * NETL coal utilization by-products R&D TJ Feeley _Glasgow_May 2004 * One of DOE's 17 national labs * Government owned / operated * Sites in: - Pennsylvania - West Virginia - Oklahoma - Alaska * More than 1,100 federal and support contractor employees National Energy Technology Laboratory TJ Feeley Feb. 2004 * R&D Activities - Mercury control - NO x control - Particulate matter control - Air quality research - Coal utilization by-products - Water management Innovations for Existing Plants

396

Developing Engineered Fuel (Briquettes) Using Fly Ash from the Aquila Coal-Fired Power Plant in Canon City and Locally Available Biomass Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to explore the feasibility of producing engineered fuels from a combination of renewable and non renewable energy sources. The components are flyash (containing coal fines) and locally available biomass waste. The constraints were such that no other binder additives were to be added. Listed below are the main accomplishments of the project: (1) Determination of the carbon content of the flyash sample from the Aquila plant. It was found to be around 43%. (2) Experiments were carried out using a model which simulates the press process of a wood pellet machine, i.e. a bench press machine with a close chamber, to find out the ideal ratio of wood and fly ash to be mixed to get the desired briquette. The ideal ratio was found to have 60% wood and 40% flyash. (3) The moisture content required to produce the briquettes was found to be anything below 5.8%. (4) The most suitable pressure required to extract the lignin form the wood and cause the binding of the mixture was determined to be 3000psi. At this pressure, the briquettes withstood an average of 150psi on its lateral side. (5) An energy content analysis was performed and the BTU content was determined to be approximately 8912 BTU/lb. (6) The environmental analysis was carried out and no abnormalities were noted. (7) Industrial visits were made to pellet manufacturing plants to investigate the most suitable manufacturing process for the briquettes. (8) A simulation model of extrusion process was developed to explore the possibility of using a cattle feed plant operating on extrusion process to produce briquettes. (9) Attempt to produce 2 tons of briquettes was not successful. The research team conducted a trial production run at a Feed Mill in La Junta, CO to produce two (2) tons of briquettes using the extrusion process in place. The goal was to, immediately after producing the briquettes; send them through Aquila's current system to test the ability of the briquettes to flow through the system without requiring any equipment or process changes. (10) Although the above attempt failed, the plant is still interested in producing briquettes. (11) An economic analysis of investing in a production facility manufacturing such briquettes was conducted to determine the economic viability of the project. Such a project is estimated to have an internal rate of return of 14% and net present value of about $400,000. (12) An engineering independent study class (4 students) is now working on selecting a site near the power plant and determining the layout of the future plant that will produce briquettes.

H. Carrasco; H. Sarper

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

ADVANCED MULTI-PRODUCT COAL UTILIZATION BY-PRODUCT PROCESSING PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. The ash produced by the plant was found to be highly variable as the plant consumes high and low sulfur bituminous coal, in Units 1 and 2 and a mixture of subbituminous and bituminous coal in Units 3 and 4. The ash produced reflected this consisting of an iron-rich ({approx}24%, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), aluminum rich ({approx}29% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and high calcium (6%-7%, CaO) ash, respectively. The LOI of the ash typically was in the range of 5.5% to 6.5%, but individual samples ranged from 1% to almost 9%. The lower pond at Ghent is a substantial body, covering more than 100 acres, with a volume that exceeds 200 million cubic feet. The sedimentation, stratigraphy and resource assessment of the in place ash was investigated with vibracoring and three-dimensional, computer-modeling techniques. Thirteen cores to depths reaching nearly 40 feet, were retrieved, logged in the field and transported to the lab for a series of analyses for particle size, loss on ignition, petrography, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence. Collected data were processed using ArcViewGIS, Rockware, and Microsoft Excel to create three-dimensional, layered iso-grade maps, as well as stratigraphic columns and profiles, and reserve estimations. The ash in the pond was projected to exceed 7 million tons and contain over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon, and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. The size, quality and consistency of the ponded material suggests that it is the better feedstock for the beneficiation plant.

Robert Jewell; Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Investigation of coal tar mobility at a former MGP site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of coal tar in the subsurface of former manufactured gas plant sites poses an environmental hazard and a potential threat to public health. Coal tar can release various chemical compounds that are transported into the groundwater. Before any efforts can be made to remove coal tar from contaminated subsurface soils, it is recommended to characterize coal tar properties and composition and to delineate the residual saturation point between mobile and immobile coal tar. This paper presents a new innovative field device, the Res-SAT field tool, and laboratory procedures that can be used to determine the saturation-capillary pressure relationship for a soil-water coal-tar system and the critical pressure for coal tar mobility.

Moo-Young, H.K.; Mo, X.H.; Waterman, R.; Coleman, A.; Saroff, S. [California State University Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Improving Energy Efficiency and Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions in BPs PTA Manufacturing Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BP is the worlds leading producer of purified terephthalic acid, or PTA, a commodity chemical used in the production of polyester. Through both self-help initiatives and innovations in our state-of-art process technology, the energy efficiency of our PTA manufacturing process has significantly improved over the past several years, which has translated into substantial decreases in greenhouse gas emissions across our global sites. The talk will provide a general overview of the PTA business and manufacturing process, as well as the enabling technology evolutions leading to this improved performance.

Clark, F.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Reclaiming Fibrous Material in Manufacturing Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, In the manufacture of faced fiberglass insulation, defects may ... There are approximately 29 fiberglass insulation manufacturing plants across...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

The ADESORB Process for Economical Production of Sorbents for Mercury Removal from Coal Fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) currently manages the largest research program in the country for controlling coal-based mercury emissions. NETL has shown through various field test programs that the determination of cost-effective mercury control strategies is complex and highly coal- and plant-specific. However, one particular technology has the potential for widespread application: the injection of activated carbon upstream of either an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) or a fabric filter baghouse. This technology has potential application to the control of mercury emissions on all coal-fired power plants, even those with wet and dry scrubbers. This is a low capital cost technology in which the largest cost element is the cost of sorbents. Therefore, the obvious solutions for reducing the costs of mercury control must focus on either reducing the amount of sorbent needed or decreasing the cost of sorbent production. NETL has researched the economics and performance of novel sorbents and determined that there are alternatives to the commercial standard (NORIT DARCO{reg_sign} Hg) and that this is an area where significant technical improvements can still be made. In addition, a key barrier to the application of sorbent injection technology to the power industry is the availability of activated carbon production. Currently, about 450 million pounds ($250 million per year) of activated carbon is produced and used in the U.S. each year - primarily for purification of drinking water, food, and beverages. If activated carbon technology were to be applied to all 1,100 power plants, EPA and DOE estimate that it would require an additional $1-$2 billion per year, which would require increasing current capacity by a factor of two to eight. A new facility to produce activated carbon would cost approximately $250 million, would increase current U.S. production by nearly 25%, and could take four to five years to build. This means that there could be significant shortages in supply if response to new demand is not well-timed.

Robin Stewart

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

402

Capturing and Sequestering CO2 from a Coal-Fired Power Plant - Assessing the Net Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capturing and Sequestering CO Capturing and Sequestering CO 2 from a Coal-fired Power Plant - Assessing the Net Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Pamela L. Spath (pamela_spath @nrel.gov; (303) 275-4460) Margaret K. Mann (margaret_mann @nrel.gov; (303) 275-2921) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 INTRODUCTION It is technically feasible to capture CO 2 from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant and various researchers are working to understand the fate of sequestered CO 2 and its long term environmental effects. Sequestering CO 2 significantly reduces the CO 2 emissions from the power plant itself, but this is not the total picture. CO 2 capture and sequestration consumes additional energy, thus lowering the plant's fuel to electricity efficiency. To compensate for this, more fossil fuel must be

403

Air pollution: Coal based power plants major culprit : HindustanTimes.com http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/5922_1646830,001500250000000... 1 of 2 3/10/2006 7:45 AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air pollution: Coal based power plants major culprit : HindustanTimes.com http 1 Front » Story Air pollution: Coal based power plants major culprit HT Correspondent Kanpur, March that coal based thermal power plants are the main source for air pollution. The fact came to the fore during

Singh, Ramesh P.

404

Coal industry annual 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit for Pulverized Coal-Fired...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit for Pulverized Coal-Fired Power Plants with In-Situ CO 2 Capture Background Pulverized coal (PC)-fired power plants provide nearly 50% of...

406

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

Several technology advances since the early coal-fueled turbine programs that address technical issues of coal as a turbine fuel have been developed in the early 1980s: Coal-water suspensions as fuel form, improved methods for removing ash and contaminants from coal, staged combustion for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from fuel-bound nitrogen, and greater understanding of deposition/erosion/corrosion and their control. Several Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems programs were awarded to gas turbine manufacturers for for components development and proof of concept tests; one of these was Allison. Tests were conducted in a subscale coal combustion facility and a full-scale facility operating a coal combustor sized to the Allison Model 501-K industrial turbine. A rich-quench-lean (RQL), low nitrogen oxide combustor design incorporating hot gas cleanup was developed for coal fuels; this should also be applicable to biomass, etc. The combustor tests showed NO{sub x} and CO emissions {le} levels for turbines operating with natural gas. Water washing of vanes from the turbine removed the deposits. Systems and economic evaluations identified two possible applications for RQL turbines: Cogeneration plants based on Allison 501-K turbine (output 3.7 MW(e), 23,000 lbs/hr steam) and combined cycle power plants based on 50 MW or larger gas turbines. Coal-fueled cogeneration plant configurations were defined and evaluated for site specific factors. A coal-fueled turbine combined cycle plant design was identified which is simple, compact, and results in lower capital cost, with comparable efficiency and low emissions relative to other coal technologies (gasification, advanced PFBC).

Wenglarz, R.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Particle Formation and Growth in Power Plant Plumes, Volume 1: Field Observations and Theoretical Studies of the Evolution of Partic les in the Plumes from Coal-Fired Electric Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 1 of this report describes parallel field and theoretical studies of particle-size distributions in the plumes of coal-fired power plants.Volume 2 presents measurements of concentration of particulate sulfur, sulfate, nitrate, total particulate volume.Aitken nuclei, and various trace gases in the plumes of six coal-fired power plants.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

CFCC Development Program. Commercial plant reliability and maintainability evaluation (Task 1. 4). [Coal-fired  

SciTech Connect

The Coal Fired Combined Cycle (CFCC) is the unique powerplant concept developed under the leadership of the General Electric Company to provide a direct coal-burning gas turbine and steam turbine combined cycle powerplant. The advantages of the combined cycle for higher efficiency and the potential of the pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) combustor for improvements in emissions could offer a new and attractive option to the electric utility industry, after its successful development. The CFCC approach provides cooling of the fluid bed combustor through the use of steam tubes in the bed, which supply a steam turbine-generator. The partially cooled combustion gases exiting from the combustor drive a gas turbine-generator after passing through a hot-gas cleanup train. On the basis of previous studies and confirming work under this contract, General Electric continues to believe that the CFCC approach offers important advantages over alternate approaches: higher powerplant efficiency in the combustor temperature range of interest; reduced combustor/steam generator corrosion potential, due to low fluid-bed tube temperature (as contrasted to the air in tube cycle); reduced hot-gas cleanup flow rate (as contrasted with the uncooled combustor cycle); and increased gas turbine bucket life from improved material protection systems. The present report involves mainly a failure mode analysis for components of the plant.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Thermal Integration of CO{sub 2} Compression Processes with Coal-Fired Power Plants Equipped with Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired power plants, equipped either with oxycombustion or post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture, will require a CO{sub 2} compression system to increase the pressure of the CO{sub 2} to the level needed for sequestration. Most analyses show that CO{sub 2} compression will have a significant effect on parasitic load, will be a major capital cost, and will contribute significantly to reduced unit efficiency. This project used first principle engineering analyses and computer simulations to determine the effects of utilizing compressor waste heat to improve power plant efficiency and increase net power output of coal-fired power plants with carbon capture. This was done for units with post combustion solvent-based CO{sub 2} capture systems and for oxyfired power plants, firing bituminous, PRB and lignite coals. The thermal integration opportunities analyzed for oxycombustion capture are use of compressor waste heat to reheat recirculated flue gas, preheat boiler feedwater and predry high-moisture coals prior to pulverizing the coal. Among the thermal integration opportunities analyzed for post combustion capture systems are use of compressor waste heat and heat recovered from the stripper condenser to regenerate post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture solvent, preheat boiler feedwater and predry high-moisture coals. The overall conclusion from the oxyfuel simulations is that thermal integration of compressor heat has the potential to improve net unit heat rate by up to 8.4 percent, but the actual magnitude of the improvement will depend on the type of heat sink used and to a lesser extent, compressor design and coal rank. The simulations of a unit with a MEA post combustion capture system showed that thermal integration of either compressor heat or stripper condenser heat to preheat boiler feedwater would result in heat rate improvements from 1.20 percent to 4.19 percent. The MEA capture simulations further showed that partial drying of low rank coals, done in combination with feedwater heating, would result in heat rate reductions of 7.43 percent for PRB coal and 10.45 percent for lignite.

Edward Levy

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

410

Minimization of investment costs and the effect on economy and availability of coal-fired power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low manufacturing costs and short construction periods are two factors with a major influence on the economy of power plants. This paper identifies, on the basis of a power plant design concept actually developed, potential plant cost savings at the concept design and component design levels and the sometimes contradictory implications to be considered and attempts to assess the impact of these savings on plant economy and availability. By comparison with a conventionally constructed plant, the cost savings that can be achieved over the entire plant, including erection costs, total just on 15 percent. The construction period can be reduced by about 20%. The simplifications implemented in this design concept with a view to minimizing plant costs are expected to entail only a negligible reduction in plant availability, so that this type of power plant retains its overall economic lead.

Hebel, G.; Hauenschild, R. (ABB Kraftwerke AG, Mannheim (DE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Elemental Modes of Occurrence in an Illinois #6 Coal and Fractions Prepared by Physical Separation Techniques at a Coal Preparation Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to gain better insight into elemental partitioning between clean coal and tailings, modes of occurrence have been determined for a number of major and trace elements (S, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn, As, Se, Pb) in an Illinois No.6 coal and fractions prepared by physical separation methods at a commercial coal preparation plant. Elemental modes of occurrence were largely determined directly by XAFS or Moessbauer spectroscopic methods because the concentrations of major minerals and wt.% ash were found to be highly correlated for this coal and derived fractions, rendering correlations between individual elements and minerals ambiguous for inferring elemental modes of occurrence. Of the major elements investigated, iron and potassium are shown to be entirely inorganic in occurrence. Most (90%) of the iron is present as pyrite, with minor fractions in the form of clays and sulfates. All potassium is present in illitic clays. Calcium in the original coal is 80-90% inorganic and is divided between calcite, gypsum, and illite, with the remainder of the calcium present as carboxyl-bound calcium. In the clean coal fraction, organically associated Ca exceeds 50% of the total calcium. This organically-associated form of Ca explains the poorer separation of Ca relative to both K and ash. Among the trace elements, V and Cr are predominantly inorganically associated with illite, but minor amounts (5-15% Cr, 20-30% V) of these elements are also organically associated. Estimates of the V and Cr contents of illite are 420 ppm and 630 ppm, respectively, whereas these elements average 20 and 8 ppm in the macerals. Arsenic in the coal is almost entirely associated with pyrite, with an average As content of about 150 ppm, but some As ({approx} 10%) is present as arsenate due to minor oxidation of the pyrite. The mode of occurrence of Zn, although entirely inorganic, is more complex than normally noted for Illinois basin coals; about 2/3 is present in sphalerite, with lesser amounts associated with illite and a third form yet to be conclusively identified. The non-sulfide zinc forms are removed predominantly by the first stage of separation (rotary breaker), whereas the sphalerite is removed by the second stage (heavy media). Germanium is the only trace element determined to have a predominantly organic association.

Huggins, F.; Seidu, L; Shah, N; Huffman, G; Honaker, R; Kyger, J; Higgins, B; Robertson, J; Pal, S; Seehra, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Evaluation of Site Investigation/Closure Requirements and Their Applicability to Residuals from Former Manufactured Gas Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Free product is defined as the concentration of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) that is present in concentrations greater than the residual saturation point of the site media at a contaminated location. Identifying free product is important for the management of former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites because the free product is mobile and has the potential to migrate off site. The report provides a review of the regulatory programs for six states in the mid-west and northeast with regard to closure re...

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

NETL: News Release - DOE-Funded Innovation Promotes Reduced Coal Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

21, 2007 21, 2007 DOE-Funded Innovation Promotes Reduced Coal Plant Emissions Novel Catalyst System Bolsters NOx Control Washington, DC - A catalyst-activity testing tool developed with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy is now commercially available and offers a major breakthrough in managing the selective catalytic reduction systems that are used in power plants to control nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions. The much-needed innovation will promote both cleaner air and cost savings for electric customers by helping plant operators to more cost-effectively comply with NOx emissions regulations, including the new Clean Air Interstate Rule. Most of America's energy systems rely on combustion processes. A drawback of combustion is the formation of NOx - a group of highly reactive gases that form when fuel is burned at high temperatures and which contribute to smog, acid rain, and global warming. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems control NOx emissions by injecting ammonia or urea into flue gas in the presence of a catalyst, converting NOx into nitrogen and water.

414

An assessment of mercury emissions and health risks from a coal-fired power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) mandated that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluate the need to regulate mercury emissions from electric utilities. In support of this forthcoming regulatory analysis the U.S. DOE, sponsored a risk assessment project at Brookhaven (BNL) to evaluate methylmercury (MeHg) hazards independently. In the US MeHg is the predominant way of exposure to mercury originated in the atmosphere. In the BNL study, health risks to adults resulting from Hg emissions from a hypothetical 1,000 MW coal-fired power plant were estimated using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. This study showed that the effects of emissions of a single power plant may double the background exposures to MeHg resulting from consuming fish obtained from a localized area near the power plant. Even at these more elevated exposure levels, the attributable incidence in mild neurological symptoms was estimated to be quite small, especially when compared with the estimated background incidence in the population. The current paper summarizes the basic conclusions of this assessment and highlights issues dealing with emissions control and environmental transport.

Fthenakis, V.M.; Lipfert, F.; Moskowitz, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Analytical Sciences Div.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Atmospheric Aerosol Source-Receptor Relationships: The Role of Coal-Fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as the final report for the project Atmospheric Aerosol Source-Receptor Relationships: The Role of Coal-Fired Power Plants supported by the US Department of Energy. The project involved measurement of the ambient fine particle concentrations in the Pittsburgh metropolitan area, development of source profiles for important source classes in the Pittsburgh region, source apportionment using statistical and deterministic air quality models, and investigation of the response in ambient fine particle concentrations to changes in emissions. The project was led by Carnegie Mellon University in collaboration with universities, companies, national laboratories, and regional, state and local air quality agencies. This report describes the overall approach of the project and its major findings.

Robinson, Allen; Pandis, Spyros; Davidson, Cliff

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the available data from laboratory, pilot and full-scale SCR units was reviewed, leading to hypotheses about the mechanism for mercury oxidation by SCR catalysts.

Constance Senior

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to conventional'' technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to ``conventional`` technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Managing Your Energy: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Identifying Energy Savings in Manufacturing Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.5). Industrial refrigeration systems are another importantindustrial electricity consumer and are used in many plant systems, such as HVAC, compressed air, refrigeration

Worrell, Ernst

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this program were to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel and to develop a greater understanding of mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts in the form of a simple model. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH provided co-funding for this program. REI used a multicatalyst slipstream reactor to determine oxidation of mercury across five commercial SCR catalysts at a power plant that burned a blend of 87% subbituminous coal and 13% bituminous coal. The chlorine content of the blend was 100 to 240 {micro}g/g on a dry basis. Mercury measurements were carried out when the catalysts were relatively new, corresponding to about 300 hours of operation and again after 2,200 hours of operation. NO{sub x}, O{sub 2} and gaseous mercury speciation at the inlet and at the outlet of each catalyst chamber were measured. In general, the catalysts all appeared capable of achieving about 90% NO{sub x} reduction at a space velocity of 3,000 hr{sup -1} when new, which is typical of full-scale installations; after 2,200 hours exposure to flue gas, some of the catalysts appeared to lose NO{sub x} activity. For the fresh commercial catalysts, oxidation of mercury was in the range of 25% to 65% at typical full-scale space velocities. A blank monolith showed no oxidation of mercury under any conditions. All catalysts showed higher mercury oxidation without ammonia, consistent with full-scale measurements. After exposure to flue gas for 2,200 hours, some of the catalysts showed reduced levels of mercury oxidation relative to the initial levels of oxidation. A model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "manufacturing plants coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Unneeded electric plant's cost draws manufacturer shutdown threat  

SciTech Connect

If the Big Rivers Electric Corp. succeeds in raising its rates to cover the cost of surplus capacity resulting from new constrcution, an aluminum smelter threatens to stop manufacturing, which would raise rates even higher for the remaining consumers. Efforts to sell power out of state and to generate financial assistance from the Rural Electrification Administration are underway. The comment period for rate intervenors ends in mid November.

Efron, S.

1984-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

422

7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during a one-day period and the rate of air flowing through the furnace are to be determined.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7-11 7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during The heating value of the coal is given to be 28,000 kJ/kg. Analysis (a) The rate and the amount of heat inputs'tQQ The amount and rate of coal consumed during this period are kg/s48.33 s360024 kg10893.2 MJ/kg28 MJ101.8 6

Bahrami, Majid

423

Coal industry annual 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

Not Available

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

424

Carbon dioxide capture from coal-fired power plants : a real potions analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investments in three coal-fired power generation technologies are valued using the "real options" valuation methodology in an uncertain carbon dioxide (CO2) price environment. The technologies evaluated are pulverized coal ...

Sekar, Ram Chandra

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Mercury Reduction in Coal-Fired Power Plants: DOE's R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Coal Production Environmental Control V21 Next Generation Carbon Sequestration Exploration & Production Refining & Delivery Alternative Fuels Exploration & Production...

426

Assessment of instrumentation needs for advanced coal power plant applications: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to identify contaminants, identify instrumentation needs, assess available instrumentation and identify instruments that should be developed for controlling and monitoring gas streams encountered in the following power plants: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion, and Gasification Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell. Emphasis was placed on hot gas cleanup system gas stream analysis, and included process control, research and environmental monitoring needs. Commercial process analyzers, typical of those currently used for process control purposes, were reviewed for the purpose of indicating commercial status. No instrument selection guidelines were found which were capable of replacing user interaction with the process analyzer vendors. This study leads to the following conclusions: available process analyzers for coal-derived gas cleanup applications satisfy current power system process control and regulatory requirements, but they are troublesome to maintain; commercial gas conditioning systems and in situ analyzers continue to be unavailable for hot gas cleanup applications; many research-oriented gas stream characterization and toxicity assessment needs can not be met by commercially available process analyzers; and greater emphasis should be placed on instrumentation and control system planning for future power plant applications. Analyzers for specific compounds are not recommended other than those needed for current process control purposes. Instead, some generally useful on-line laser-based and inductively coupled plasma methods are recommended for further development because of their potential for use in present hot gas cleanup research and future optimization, component protection and regulation compliance activities. 48 refs., 21 figs., 26 tabs.

Nelson, E.T.; Fischer, W.H.; Lipka, J.V.; Rutkowski, M.D.; Zaharchuk, R.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Managing Your Energy: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Identifying Energy Savings in Manufacturing Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a significant source of wasted energy. A typical plant thatused to burn fuel, energy is wasted, because excessive heatenergy savings in compressed air systems. By properly sizing regulators, compressed air that is otherwise wasted

Worrell, Ernst

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Improving Energy Efficiency at U.S. Plastics Manufacturing Plants: Summary Report and Case Studies  

SciTech Connect

Industrial Technologies Programs BestPractices report based on a comprehensive plant assessment project with ITP's Industrial Assessment Center, The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc., and several of its member companies.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power generation in the Illinois Basin is expected to increase by as much as 30% by the year 2030, and this would increase the cooling water consumption in the region by approximately 40%. This project investigated the potential use of produced water from CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (CO{sub 2}-EOR) operations; coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery; and active and abandoned underground coal mines for power plant cooling in the Illinois Basin. Specific objectives of this project were: (1) to characterize the quantity, quality, and geographic distribution of produced water in the Illinois Basin; (2) to evaluate treatment options so that produced water may be used beneficially at power plants; and (3) to perform a techno-economic analysis of the treatment and transportation of produced water to thermoelectric power plants in the Illinois Basin. Current produced water availability within the basin is not large, but potential flow rates up to 257 million liters per day (68 million gallons per day (MGD)) are possible if CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery and coal bed methane recovery are implemented on a large scale. Produced water samples taken during the project tend to have dissolved solids concentrations between 10 and 100 g/L, and water from coal beds tends to have lower TDS values than water from oil fields. Current pretreatment and desalination technologies including filtration, adsorption, reverse osmosis (RO), and distillation can be used to treat produced water to a high quality level, with estimated costs ranging from $2.6 to $10.5 per cubic meter ($10 to $40 per 1000 gallons). Because of the distances between produced water sources and power plants, transportation costs tend to be greater than treatment costs. An optimization algorithm was developed to determine the lowest cost pipe network connecting sources and sinks. Total water costs increased with flow rate up to 26 million liters per day (7 MGD), and the range was from $4 to $16 per cubic meter ($15 to $60 per 1000 gallons), with treatment costs accounting for 13 ?? 23% of the overall cost. Results from this project suggest that produced water is a potential large source of cooling water, but treatment and transportation costs for this water are large.

Chad Knutson; Seyed Dastgheib; Yaning Yang; Ali Ashraf; Cole Duckworth; Priscilla Sinata; Ivan Sugiyono; Mark Shannon; Charles Werth

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

CoalFleet User Design Basis Specification for Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Duke Edwardsport integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant started up in 2012, and Mississippi Powers Kemper County IGCC plant is in construction. The capital cost of these initial commercial scale IGCC plants is high. The industry needs specifications that encourage greater standardization in IGCC design in order to bring down the investment cost for the next generation of plants. Standardization also supports repeatable, reliable performance and reduces the time and cost ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

431

URBAN WOOD/COAL CO-FIRING IN THE NIOSH BOILER PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase I of this project began by obtaining R&D variances for permits at the NIOSH boilerplant (NBP), Emery Tree Service (ETS) and the J. A. Rutter Company (JARC) for their portions of the project. Wood for the test burn was obtained from the JARC inventory (pallets), Thompson Properties and Seven D Corporation (construction wood), and the Arlington Heights Housing Project (demolition wood). The wood was ground at ETS and JARC, delivered to the Three Rivers Terminal and blended with coal. Three one-day tests using wood/coal blends of 33% wood by volume (both construction wood and demolition wood) were conducted at the NBP. Blends using hammermilled wood were operationally successful. Emissions of SO{sub 2} and NOx decreased and that of CO increased when compared with combusting coal alone. Mercury emissions were measured and evaluated. During the first year of Phase II the principal work focused upon searching for a replacement boilerplant and developing a commercial supply of demolition wood. The NBP withdrew from the project and a search began for another stoker boilerplant in Pennsylvania to replace it on the project. Three potential commercial demolition wood providers were contacted. Two were not be able to supply wood. At the end of the first year of Phase II, discussions were continuing with the third one, a commercial demolition wood provider from northern New Jersey. During the two-and-a-third years of the contract extension it was determined that the demolition wood from northern New Jersey was impractical for use in Pittsburgh, in another power plant in central New Jersey, and in a new wood gasifier being planned in Philadelphia. However, the project team did identify sufficient wood from other sources for the gasifier project. The Principal Investigator of this project assisted a feasibility study of wood gasification in Clarion County, Pennsylvania. As a result of the study, an independent power producer in the county has initiated a small wood gasification project at its site. Throughout much of this total project the Principal Investigator has counseled two small businesses in developing a waxed cardboard pellet business. A recent test burn of this biofuel appears successful and a purchase contract is anticipated soon. During the past two months a major tree-trimming firm has shown an active interest in entering the wood-chip fuel market in the Pittsburgh area and has contacted the NBP, among others, as potential customers. The NBP superintendent is currently in discussion with the facilities management of the Bruceton Research Center about resuming their interest in cofiring this renewable fuel to the stoker there.

James T. Cobb Jr.

2005-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

432

Near-term implications of a ban on new coal-fired power plants in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large numbers of proposed new coal power generators in the United States have been cancelled, and some states have prohibited new coal power generators. We examine the effects on the U.S. electric power system of banning the construction of coal-fired electricity generators, which has been proposed as a means to reduce U.S. CO{sub 2} emissions. The model simulates load growth, resource planning, and economic dispatch of the Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator (ISO), Inc., Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and PJM under a ban on new coal generation and uses an economic dispatch model to calculate the resulting changes in dispatch order, CO{sub 2} emissions, and fuel use under three near-term (until 2030) future electric power sector scenarios. A national ban on new coal-fired power plants does not lead to CO{sub 2} reductions of the scale required under proposed federal legislation such as Lieberman-Warner but would greatly increase the fraction of time when natural gas sets the price of electricity, even with aggressive wind and demand response policies. 50 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Adam Newcomer; Jay Apt [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Table 12. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2.03 2.17 2.33 2.52 2.73 2.99 AEO 1983 1.99 2.10 2.24 2.39 2.57 2.76 4.29 AEO 1984 1.90 2.01 2.13 2.28 2.44 2.61 3.79 AEO 1985 1.68 1.76 1.86 1.95 2.05 2.19 2.32 2.49 2.66 2.83 3.03 AEO 1986 1.61 1.68 1.75 1.83 1.93 2.05 2.19 2.35 2.54 2.73 2.92 3.10 3.31 3.49 3.68 AEO 1987 1.52 1.55 1.65 1.75 1.84 1.96 2.11 2.27 2.44 3.55 AEO 1989* 1.50 1.51 1.68 1.77 1.88 2.00 2.13 2.26 2.40 2.55 2.70 2.86 3.00 AEO 1990 1.46 1.53 2.07 2.76 3.7 AEO 1991 1.51 1.58 1.66 1.77 1.88 1.96 2.06 2.16 2.28 2.41 2.57 2.70 2.85 3.04 3.26 3.46 3.65 3.87 4.08 4.33 AEO 1992 1.54 1.61 1.66 1.75 1.85 1.97 2.03 2.14 2.26 2.44 2.55 2.69 2.83 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.58 3.78 4.01 AEO 1993 1.92 1.54 1.61 1.70

434

A COMPARISON OF THE NUCLEAR DEFENSE CAPABILITIES ON NUCLEAR AND COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS. FUEL COST STUDY VARIOUS REACTORS AT 100 AND 300 Mwe  

SciTech Connect

Appendices C and D may further be identified as SL1925 and CF-61-12- 20(Rev.), respectively. A comparative report is presented in which the economics and feasibility of plant protection from nuclear attack by plant hardening, remote siting, and utilization of optional fueling concepts for the coal-fired plant are evaluated. (J.R.D.)

Gift, E.H.

1962-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

435

Significant Improvement in Energy Efficiency in Manufacturing at Rohm and Haas Kankakee, Illinois, Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Significant improvement in energy efficiency was achieved at Rohm and Haas Kankakee, Illinois facility last year through the combined efforts of all plant personnel. In total, a 24% reduction in energy requirements per pound of product produced was reached compared to 2004. That amounts to $270,000 in savings in 2005 with 1000 fewer tons of CO2 emitted to the environment.

Brinkley, T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Oxy-fuel Combustion and Integrated Pollutant Removal as Retrofit Technologies for Removing CO2 from Coal Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One third of the US installed capacity is coal-fired, producing 49.7% of net electric generation in 20051. Any approach to curbing CO2 production must consider the installed capacity and provide a mechanism for preserving this resource while meeting CO2 reduction goals. One promising approach to both new generation and retrofit is oxy-fuel combustion. Using oxygen instead of air as the oxidizer in a boiler provides a concentrated CO2 combustion product for processing into a sequestration-ready fluid.... Post-combustion carbon capture and oxy-fuel combustion paired with a compression capture technology such as IPR are both candidates for retrofitting pc combustion plants to meet carbon emission limits. This paper will focus on oxy-fuel combustion as applied to existing coal power plants.

Ochs, T.L.; Oryshchyn, D.B.; Summers, C.A.; Gerdemann, S.J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Selenium Removal by Iron Cementation from a Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater in a Continuous Flow System-- a Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes work funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and performed by MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) at a coal-fired power plant burning Powder River Basin (PRB) coal (identified in this report as Plant E). This work was based on encouraging results obtained during previous EPRI-funded work on flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater treatability testing by MSE, which focused on selenium removal from a variety of FGD wastewater sources. The results from th...

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z